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  1. Autogenous regulation of Escherichia coli polynucleotide phosphorylase expression revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carzaniga, Thomas; Briani, Federica; Zangrossi, Sandro; Merlino, Giuseppe; Marchi, Paolo; Dehò, Gianni

    2009-03-01

    The Escherichia coli polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase; encoded by pnp), a phosphorolytic exoribonuclease, posttranscriptionally regulates its own expression at the level of mRNA stability and translation. Its primary transcript is very efficiently processed by RNase III, an endonuclease that makes a staggered double-strand cleavage about in the middle of a long stem-loop in the 5'-untranslated region. The processed pnp mRNA is then rapidly degraded in a PNPase-dependent manner. Two non-mutually exclusive models have been proposed to explain PNPase autogenous regulation. The earlier one suggested that PNPase impedes translation of the RNase III-processed pnp mRNA, thus exposing the transcript to degradative pathways. More recently, this has been replaced by the current model, which maintains that PNPase would simply degrade the promoter proximal small RNA generated by the RNase III endonucleolytic cleavage, thus destroying the double-stranded structure at the 5' end that otherwise stabilizes the pnp mRNA. In our opinion, however, the first model was not completely ruled out. Moreover, the RNA decay pathway acting upon the pnp mRNA after disruption of the 5' double-stranded structure remained to be determined. Here we provide additional support to the current model and show that the RNase III-processed pnp mRNA devoid of the double-stranded structure at its 5' end is not translatable and is degraded by RNase E in a PNPase-independent manner. Thus, the role of PNPase in autoregulation is simply to remove, in concert with RNase III, the 5' fragment of the cleaved structure that both allows translation and prevents the RNase E-mediated PNPase-independent degradation of the pnp transcript.

  2. Autogenous Regulation of Escherichia coli Polynucleotide Phosphorylase Expression Revisited▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carzaniga, Thomas; Briani, Federica; Zangrossi, Sandro; Merlino, Giuseppe; Marchi, Paolo; Dehò, Gianni

    2009-01-01

    The Escherichia coli polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase; encoded by pnp), a phosphorolytic exoribonuclease, posttranscriptionally regulates its own expression at the level of mRNA stability and translation. Its primary transcript is very efficiently processed by RNase III, an endonuclease that makes a staggered double-strand cleavage about in the middle of a long stem-loop in the 5′-untranslated region. The processed pnp mRNA is then rapidly degraded in a PNPase-dependent manner. Two non-mutually exclusive models have been proposed to explain PNPase autogenous regulation. The earlier one suggested that PNPase impedes translation of the RNase III-processed pnp mRNA, thus exposing the transcript to degradative pathways. More recently, this has been replaced by the current model, which maintains that PNPase would simply degrade the promoter proximal small RNA generated by the RNase III endonucleolytic cleavage, thus destroying the double-stranded structure at the 5′ end that otherwise stabilizes the pnp mRNA. In our opinion, however, the first model was not completely ruled out. Moreover, the RNA decay pathway acting upon the pnp mRNA after disruption of the 5′ double-stranded structure remained to be determined. Here we provide additional support to the current model and show that the RNase III-processed pnp mRNA devoid of the double-stranded structure at its 5′ end is not translatable and is degraded by RNase E in a PNPase-independent manner. Thus, the role of PNPase in autoregulation is simply to remove, in concert with RNase III, the 5′ fragment of the cleaved structure that both allows translation and prevents the RNase E-mediated PNPase-independent degradation of the pnp transcript. PMID:19136586

  3. Catabolite and Oxygen Regulation of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Virulence

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    Kimberly M. Carlson-Banning

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The biogeography of the gut is diverse in its longitudinal axis, as well as within specific microenvironments. Differential oxygenation and nutrient composition drive the membership of microbial communities in these habitats. Moreover, enteric pathogens can orchestrate further modifications to gain a competitive advantage toward host colonization. These pathogens are versatile and adept when exploiting the human colon. They expertly navigate complex environmental cues and interkingdom signaling to colonize and infect their hosts. Here we demonstrate how enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC uses three sugar-sensing transcription factors, Cra, KdpE, and FusR, to exquisitely regulate the expression of virulence factors associated with its type III secretion system (T3SS when exposed to various oxygen concentrations. We also explored the effect of mucin-derived nonpreferred carbon sources on EHEC growth and expression of virulence genes. Taken together, the results show that EHEC represses the expression of its T3SS when oxygen is absent, mimicking the largely anaerobic lumen, and activates its T3SS when oxygen is available through Cra. In addition, when EHEC senses mucin-derived sugars heavily present in the O-linked and N-linked glycans of the large intestine, virulence gene expression is initiated. Sugars derived from pectin, a complex plant polysaccharide digested in the large intestine, also increased virulence gene expression. Not only does EHEC sense host- and microbiota-derived interkingdom signals, it also uses oxygen availability and mucin-derived sugars liberated by the microbiota to stimulate expression of the T3SS. This precision in gene regulation allows EHEC to be an efficient pathogen with an extremely low infectious dose.

  4. The Plasmid-Encoded Regulator Activates Factors Conferring Lysozyme Resistance on Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinger, Nina; Kokona, Bashkim; Fairman, Robert; Okeke, Iruka N.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that enhanced lysozyme resistance of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli requires the plasmid-encoded regulator, Per, and is mediated by factors outside the locus for enterocyte effacement. EspC, a Per-activated serine protease autotransporter protein, conferred enhanced resistance on nonpathogenic E. coli, and a second Per-regulated, espC-independent lysozyme resistance mechanism was identified. PMID:18997020

  5. The plasmid-encoded regulator activates factors conferring lysozyme resistance on enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinger, Nina; Kokona, Bashkim; Fairman, Robert; Okeke, Iruka N

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that enhanced lysozyme resistance of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli requires the plasmid-encoded regulator, Per, and is mediated by factors outside the locus for enterocyte effacement. EspC, a Per-activated serine protease autotransporter protein, conferred enhanced resistance on nonpathogenic E. coli, and a second Per-regulated, espC-independent lysozyme resistance mechanism was identified.

  6. Distinction and Relationship of BSSS and Reid in American Maize Germplasm%美国玉米种质中BSSS与Reid的区别与联系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴权明

    2014-01-01

    玉米杂交种的培育过程是杂种优势模式的发展过程,也是杂种优势群的变化过程,杂种优势群和杂种优势模式并不是一成不变的.从美国杂种优势群的发展与演变出发,分析瑞德黄马牙(Reid Yellow Dent)和衣阿华坚秆综合种(BSSS)的起源和历史地位以及衣阿华瑞德黄马牙(Iodent Reid)在美国玉米育种中的历史变迁,认为衣阿华坚秆综合种属瑞德黄马牙种质,衣阿华瑞德黄马牙虽在起源和遗传构成上也均属于瑞德黄马牙,但其杂种优势群已经属于Non-BSSS,与衣阿华坚秆综合种(BSSS)形成两个相对应的杂种优势群,成功培育出一系列商业杂交种.因此应将美国玉米种质中的BSSS与Reid加以区分.

  7. Regulation of ribosomal rna synthesis in escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Oostra, Bernard Anne

    1981-01-01

    Bacterien kunnen met verschillende snelheden groeien. De groeisnelheid hangt af van het milieu waarin de bakterien zich bevinden. De expressie van genen wordt aangepast aan de groeiomstandigheden. Omdat op een bepaald moment slechts een beperkt deel van de genen tot expressie komt, moet er sprake zijn van regulering. Daarbij is het ook van belang te weten dat prokaryoten één enzym hebben, het RNA polymerase, dat zorgt voor de transcriptie van alle genen. ... Samenvatting

  8. Ranges of control in the transcriptional regulation of Escherichia coli

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    Stoyan Helga

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The positioning of genes in the genome is an important evolutionary degree of freedom for organizing gene regulation. Statistical properties of these distributions have been studied particularly in relation to the transcriptional regulatory network. The systematics of gene-gene distances then become important sources of information on the control, which different biological mechanisms exert on gene expression. Results Here we study a set of categories, which has to our knowledge not been analyzed before. We distinguish between genes that do not participate in the transcriptional regulatory network (i.e. that are according to current knowledge not producing transcription factors and do not possess binding sites for transcription factors in their regulatory region, and genes that via transcription factors either are regulated by or regulate other genes. We find that the two types of genes ("isolated" and "regulatory" genes show a clear statistical repulsion and have different ranges of correlations. In particular we find that isolated genes have a preference for shorter intergenic distances. Conclusions These findings support previous evidence from gene expression patterns for two distinct logical types of control, namely digital control (i.e. network-based control mediated by dedicated transcription factors and analog control (i.e. control based on genome structure and mediated by neighborhood on the genome.

  9. RNase III-Independent Autogenous Regulation of Escherichia coli Polynucleotide Phosphorylase via Translational Repression

    OpenAIRE

    Carzaniga, T.; Dehò, G; Briani, F.

    2015-01-01

    The complex posttranscriptional regulation mechanism of the Escherichia coli pnp gene, which encodes the phosphorolytic exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), involves two endoribonucleases, namely, RNase III and RNase E, and PNPase itself, which thus autoregulates its own expression. The models proposed for pnp autoregulation posit that the target of PNPase is a mature pnp mRNA previously processed at its 5′ end by RNase III, rather than the primary pnp transcript (RNase I...

  10. Post-Transcriptional Regulation by the Csr Global Regulatory System in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kazushi; 鈴木, 一史

    2007-01-01

    In many species of bacteria, the Csr (carbon storage regulator) global regulatory system coordinates the expression of various genes. In Escherichia coli, the central component of this system, CsrA, is a RNA-binding protein. The CsrA is a homodimer and binds to leader segments of target mRNAs, affecting their translation and stability. CsrA activity is regulated by two small non-coding RNAs, CsrB and CsrC. These RNAs contain multiple CsrA-binding sequences and act by sequestering CsrA. In thi...

  11. Organization and transcriptional regulation of the Escherichia coli K-12 D-serine tolerance locus.

    OpenAIRE

    Nørregaard-Madsen, M; McFall, E; Valentin-Hansen, P

    1995-01-01

    We have reinvestigated the genetic organization and the transcription regulation of the dsd operon of Escherichia coli. By combining genetic and biochemical studies, it is demonstrated that the regulatory region of the operon and the gene encoding the specific regulator of D-serine tolerance (dsdC) had been misplaced in previous work on the dsd system. Also, the previous erroneous DNA sequence of the dsdC gene has been corrected. It turned out that an additional gene (dsdX) is present immedia...

  12. The Escherichia coli Hfq protein: an unattended DNA-transactions regulator

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    Grzegorz M Cech

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Hfq protein was discovered in Escherichia coli as a host factor for bacteriophage Qβ RNA replication. Subsequent studies indicated that Hfq is a pleiotropic regulator of bacterial gene expression. The regulatory role of Hfq is ascribed mainly to its function as an RNA-chaperone, facilitating interactions between bacterial noncoding RNA and its mRNA target. Thus, it modulates mRNA translation and stability. Nevertheless, Hfq is able to interact with DNA as well. Its role in the regulation of DNA-related processes has been demonstrated. In this mini-review, it is discussed how Hfq interacts with DNA and what is the role of this protein in regulation of DNA transactions. Particularly, Hfq has been demonstrated to be involved in the control of ColE1 plasmid DNA replication, transposition, and possibly also transcription. Possible mechanisms of these Hfq-mediated regulations are described and discussed.

  13. sRNA-Mediated Regulation of P-Fimbriae Phase Variation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandige, Surabhi; Kronborg, Tina; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2015-01-01

    to changing environmental cues. This study aimed to uncover sRNA-mediated gene regulation in the UPEC strain UTI89, during infection of bladder epithelial cells. Hfq is an RNA chaperone known to facilitate and stabilize sRNA and target mRNA interactions with bacterial cells. The co......Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are capable of occupying physiologically distinct intracellular and extracellular niches within the urinary tract. This feat requires the timely regulation of gene expression and small RNAs (sRNAs) are known to mediate such rapid adjustments in response...... to the discovery of a novel virulence-associated trans-acting sRNA-PapR. Deletion of papR was found to enhance adhesion of UTI89 to both bladder and kidney cell lines in a manner independent of type-1 fimbriae. We demonstrate PapR mediated posttranscriptional repression of the P-fimbriae phase regulator gene pap...

  14. A universally conserved ATPase regulates the oxidative stress response in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenk, Meike; Ba, Qiaorui; Erichsen, Veronika; MacInnes, Katherine; Wiese, Heike; Warscheid, Bettina; Koch, Hans-Georg

    2012-12-21

    YchF is an evolutionarily conserved ATPase of unknown function. In humans, the YchF homologue hOla1 appears to influence cell proliferation and was found to be up-regulated in many tumors. A possible involvement in regulating the oxidative stress response was also suggested, but details on the underlying mechanism are lacking. For gaining insight into YchF function, we used Escherichia coli as a model organism and found that YchF overexpression resulted in H(2)O(2) hypersensitivity. This was not caused by transcriptional or translational down-regulation of H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzymes. Instead, we observed YchF-dependent inhibition of catalase activity and a direct interaction with the major E. coli catalase KatG. KatG inhibition was dependent on the ATPase activity of YchF and was regulated by post-translational modifications, most likely including an H(2)O(2)-dependent dephosphorylation. We furthermore showed that YchF expression is repressed by the transcription factor OxyR and further post-translationally modified in response to H(2)O(2). In summary, our data show that YchF functions as a novel negative regulator of the oxidative stress response in E. coli. Considering the available data on hOla1, YchF/Ola1 most likely execute similar functions in bacteria and humans, and their up-regulation inhibits the ability of the cells to scavenge damaging reactive oxygen species.

  15. CRP-dependent positive autoregulation and proteolytic degradation regulate competence activator Sxy of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskólska, Milena; Gerdes, Kenn

    2015-03-01

    Natural competence, the ability of bacteria to take up exogenous DNA and incorporate it into their chromosomes, is in most bacteria a transient phenomenon under complex genetic and environmental control. In the Gram-negative bacteria Haemophilus influenzae and Vibrio cholerae, the master regulator Sxy/TfoX controls competence development. Although not known to be naturally competent, Escherichia coli possesses a Sxy homologue and a competence regulon containing the genes required for DNA uptake. Here, we show that in contrast to other characterised Gamma-proteobacteria, E. coli Sxy is positively autoregulated at the level of transcription by a mechanism that requires cAMP receptor protein (CRP), cyclic AMP (cAMP) and a CRP-S site in the sxy promoter. Similarly, we found no evidence that Sxy expression in E. coli was regulated at the translational level. However, our analysis revealed that Sxy is an unstable protein and that its cellular level is negatively regulated at the post-translational level via degradation by Lon protease. Interestingly, in the Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis, the competence master regulator ComK is also positively autoregulated at the level of transcription and negatively regulated by proteolysis. Together, these findings reveal striking similarities between the competence regulons of a Gram-positive and a Gram-negative bacterium.

  16. The oxygen-responsive transcriptional regulator FNR of Escherichia coli: the search for signals and reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unden, G; Schirawski, J

    1997-07-01

    The FNR (fumarate and nitrate reductase regulation) protein of Escherichia coli is an oxygen-responsive transcriptional regulator required for the switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism. In the absence of oxygen, FNR changes from the inactive to the active state. The sensory and the regulatory functions reside in separate domains of FNR. The sensory domain contains a Fe-S cluster, which is of the [4Fe-4S]2+ type under anaerobic conditions. It is suggested that oxygen is supplied to the cytoplasmic FNR by diffusion and inactivates FNR by direct interaction. Reactivation under anoxic conditions requires cellular reductants. In vitro, the Fe-S cluster is converted to a [3Fe-4S]+ or a [2Fe-2S]2+ cluster by oxygen, resulting in FNR inactivation. After prolonged incubation with oxygen, the Fe-S cluster is destroyed. Reassembly of the [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster might require cellular proteins, such as the NifS-like protein of E. coli. In this review, the rationale for regulation of alternative metabolic pathways by FNR and other oxygen-dependent regulators is discussed. Only the terminal reductases of respiration, and not the dehydrogenases, are regulated in such a way as to achieve maximal H+/e- ratios and ATP yields.

  17. RNase III-Independent Autogenous Regulation of Escherichia coli Polynucleotide Phosphorylase via Translational Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carzaniga, Thomas; Dehò, Gianni; Briani, Federica

    2015-06-01

    The complex posttranscriptional regulation mechanism of the Escherichia coli pnp gene, which encodes the phosphorolytic exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), involves two endoribonucleases, namely, RNase III and RNase E, and PNPase itself, which thus autoregulates its own expression. The models proposed for pnp autoregulation posit that the target of PNPase is a mature pnp mRNA previously processed at its 5' end by RNase III, rather than the primary pnp transcript (RNase III-dependent models), and that PNPase activity eventually leads to pnp mRNA degradation by RNase E. However, some published data suggest that pnp expression may also be regulated through a PNPase-dependent, RNase III-independent mechanism. To address this issue, we constructed isogenic Δpnp rnc(+) and Δpnp Δrnc strains with a chromosomal pnp-lacZ translational fusion and measured β-galactosidase activity in the absence and presence of PNPase expressed by a plasmid. Our results show that PNPase also regulates its own expression via a reversible RNase III-independent pathway acting upstream from the RNase III-dependent branch. This pathway requires the PNPase RNA binding domains KH and S1 but not its phosphorolytic activity. We suggest that the RNase III-independent autoregulation of PNPase occurs at the level of translational repression, possibly by competition for pnp primary transcript between PNPase and the ribosomal protein S1. In Escherichia coli, polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase, encoded by pnp) posttranscriptionally regulates its own expression. The two models proposed so far posit a two-step mechanism in which RNase III, by cutting the leader region of the pnp primary transcript, creates the substrate for PNPase regulatory activity, eventually leading to pnp mRNA degradation by RNase E. In this work, we provide evidence supporting an additional pathway for PNPase autogenous regulation in which PNPase acts as a translational repressor independently of RNase III

  18. Novel biosensors based on flavonoid-responsive transcriptional regulators introduced into Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siedler, Solvej; Stahlhut, Steen Gustav; Malla, Sailesh

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the construction of two flavonoid biosensors, which can be applied for metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli strains. The biosensors are based on transcriptional regulators combined with autofluorescent proteins. The transcriptional activator FdeR from Herbaspirillum...... seropedicae SmR1 responds to naringenin, while the repressor QdoR from Bacillus subtilis is inactivated by quercetin and kaempferol. Both biosensors showed over a 7-fold increase of the fluorescent signal after addition of their specific effectors, and a linear correlation between the fluorescence intensity...... and externally added flavonoid concentration. The QdoR-biosensor was successfully applied for detection of kaempferol production in vivo at the single cell level by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Furthermore, the amount of kaempferol produced highly correlated with the specific fluorescence of E. coli...

  19. sRNA-Mediated Regulation of P-Fimbriae Phase Variation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surabhi Khandige

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC are capable of occupying physiologically distinct intracellular and extracellular niches within the urinary tract. This feat requires the timely regulation of gene expression and small RNAs (sRNAs are known to mediate such rapid adjustments in response to changing environmental cues. This study aimed to uncover sRNA-mediated gene regulation in the UPEC strain UTI89, during infection of bladder epithelial cells. Hfq is an RNA chaperone known to facilitate and stabilize sRNA and target mRNA interactions with bacterial cells. The co-immunoprecipitation and high throughput RNA sequencing of Hfq bound sRNAs performed in this study, revealed distinct sRNA profiles in UPEC in the extracellular and intracellular environments. Our findings emphasize the importance of studying regulatory sRNAs in a biologically relevant niche. This strategy also led to the discovery of a novel virulence-associated trans-acting sRNA-PapR. Deletion of papR was found to enhance adhesion of UTI89 to both bladder and kidney cell lines in a manner independent of type-1 fimbriae. We demonstrate PapR mediated posttranscriptional repression of the P-fimbriae phase regulator gene papI and postulate a role for such regulation in fimbrial cross-talk at the population level in UPEC. Our results further implicate the Leucine responsive protein (LRP as a transcriptional activator regulating PapR expression. Our study reports, for the first time, a role for sRNAs in regulation of P-fimbriae phase variation and emphasizes the importance of studying pathogenesis-specific sRNAs within a relevant biological niche.

  20. Three fim genes required for the regulation of length and mediation of adhesion of Escherichia coli type 1 fimbriae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, P; Christiansen, Gunna

    1987-01-01

    Three novel fim genes of Escherichia coli, fimF, fimG and fimH, were characterized. These genes were not necessary for the production of fimbriae but were shown to be involved in the adhesive property and longitudinal regulation of these structures. Complementation experiments indicated that both...

  1. Simulating Results of Experiments on Gene Regulation of the Lactose Operon in Escherichia coli; a Problem-Solving Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchen, Trevor; Metcalfe, Judith

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simulation of the results of real experiments which use different strains of Escherichia coli. Provides an inexpensive practical problem-solving exercise to aid the teaching and understanding of the Jacob and Monod model of gene regulation. (Author/CW)

  2. Small noncoding RNA GcvB is a novel regulator of acid resistance in Escherichia coli

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    Jin Ye

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The low pH environment of the human stomach is lethal for most microorganisms; but not Escherichia coli, which can tolerate extreme acid stress. Acid resistance in E. coli is hierarchically controlled by numerous regulators among which are small noncoding RNAs (sncRNA. Results In this study, we individually deleted seventy-nine sncRNA genes from the E. coli K12-MG1655 chromosome, and established a single-sncRNA gene knockout library. By systematically screening the sncRNA mutant library, we show that the sncRNA GcvB is a novel regulator of acid resistance in E. coli. We demonstrate that GcvB enhances the ability of E. coli to survive low pH by upregulating the levels of the alternate sigma factor RpoS. Conclusion GcvB positively regulates acid resistance by affecting RpoS expression. These data advance our understanding of the sncRNA regulatory network involved in modulating acid resistance in E. coli.

  3. The highly conserved MraZ protein is a transcriptional regulator in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eraso, Jesus M.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Orr, Galya; Margolin, William

    2014-05-05

    The mraZ and mraW genes are highly conserved in bacteria, both in sequence and location at the head of the division and cell wall (dcw) gene cluster. Although MraZ has structural similarity to the AbrB transition state regulator and the MazE antitoxin, and MraW is known to methylate ribosomal RNA, mraZ and mraW null mutants have no detectable growth phenotype in any species tested to date, hampering progress in understanding their physiological role. Here we show that overproduction of Escherichia coli MraZ perturbs cell division and the cell envelope, is more lethal at high levels or in minimal growth medium, and that MraW antagonizes these effects. MraZGFP localizes to the nucleoid, suggesting that it binds DNA. Indeed, purified MraZ directly binds a region upstream from its own promoter containing three direct repeats to regulate its own expression and that of downstream cell division and cell wall genes. MraZ-LacZ fusions are repressed by excess MraZ but not when DNA binding by MraZ is inhibited. RNAseq analysis indicates that MraZ is a global transcriptional regulator with numerous targets in addition to dcw genes. One of these targets, mioC, is directly bound by MraZ in a region with three direct repeats.

  4. Organization and transcriptional regulation of the Escherichia coli K-12 D-serine tolerance locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørregaard-Madsen, M; McFall, E; Valentin-Hansen, P

    1995-11-01

    We have reinvestigated the genetic organization and the transcription regulation of the dsd operon of Escherichia coli. By combining genetic and biochemical studies, it is demonstrated that the regulatory region of the operon and the gene encoding the specific regulator of D-serine tolerance (dsdC) had been misplaced in previous work on the dsd system. Also, the previous erroneous DNA sequence of the dsdC gene has been corrected. It turned out that an additional gene (dsdX) is present immediately upstream of dsdA (encoding D-serine deaminase) and that dsdC is located adjacent to dsdX. The dsdXA genes are cotranscribed from a common promoter region present in the dsdX-dsdC intercistronic region. The DsdC activator belongs to the LysR-type of transcriptional regulators and is absolutely required for dsdA expression. Additionally, the activity of the dsdXA promoter depends on the cyclic AMP receptor protein, and the two activators act in concert to synergistically activate transcription.

  5. The Protein Acetyltransferase PatZ from Escherichia coli Is Regulated by Autoacetylation-induced Oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego Puente, Teresa; Gallego-Jara, Julia; Castaño-Cerezo, Sara; Bernal Sánchez, Vicente; Fernández Espín, Vanesa; García de la Torre, José; Manjón Rubio, Arturo; Cánovas Díaz, Manuel

    2015-09-18

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in the metabolic regulation of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In Escherichia coli, PatZ (formerly YfiQ) is the only known acetyltransferase protein and is responsible for acetyl-CoA synthetase acetylation. In this study, we demonstrated PatZ-positive cooperativity in response to acetyl-CoA and the regulation of acetyl-CoA synthetase activity by the acetylation level. Furthermore, functional analysis of an E809A mutant showed that the conserved glutamate residue is not relevant for the PatZ catalytic mechanism. Biophysical studies demonstrated that PatZ is a stable tetramer in solution and is transformed to its octameric form by autoacetylation. Moreover, this modification is reversed by the sirtuin CobB. Finally, an in silico PatZ tetramerization model based on hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions is proposed and validated by three-dimensional hydrodynamic analysis. These data reveal, for the first time, the structural regulation of an acetyltransferase by autoacetylation in a prokaryotic organism.

  6. Regulation of transcription of cell division genes in the Escherichia coli dcw cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, M; Gomez, M J; Ayala, J A

    1998-04-01

    The Escherichia coli dcw cluster contains cell division genes, such as the phylogenetically ubiquitous ftsZ, and genes involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. Transcription in the cluster proceeds in the same direction as the progress of the replication fork along the chromosome. Regulation is exerted at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The absence of transcriptional termination signals may, in principle, allow extension of the transcripts initiated at the up-stream promoter (mraZ1p) even to the furthest down-stream gene (envA). Complementation tests suggest that they extend into ftsW in the central part of the cluster. In addition, the cluster contains other promoters individually regulated by cis- and trans-acting signals. Dissociation of the expression of the ftsZ gene, located after ftsQ and A near the 3' end of the cluster, from its natural regulatory signals leads to an alteration in the physiology of cell division. The complexities observed in the regulation of gene expression in the cluster may then have an important biological role. Among them, LexA-binding SOS boxes have been found at the 5' end of the cluster, preceding promoters which direct the expression of ftsI (coding for PBP3, the penicillin-binding protein involved in septum formation). A gearbox promoter, ftsQ1p, forms part of the signals regulating the transcription of ftsQ, A and Z. It is an inversely growth-dependent mechanism driven by RNA polymerase containing sigma s, the factor involved in the expression of stationary phase-specific genes. Although the dcw cluster is conserved to a different extent in a variety of bacteria, the regulation of gene expression, the presence or absence of individual genes, and even the essentiality of some of them, show variations in the phylogenetic scale which may reflect adaptation to specific life cycles.

  7. Regulation of type 1 fimbriae synthesis and biofilm formation by the transcriptional regulator LrhA of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Caroline; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Lehnen, Daniela; Heintz, Margit; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Nagy, Gábor; Michaelis, Kai; Emödy, Levente; Polen, Tino; Rachel, Reinhard; Wendisch, Volker F; Unden, Gottfried

    2005-10-01

    Type 1 fimbriae of Escherichia coli facilitate attachment to the host mucosa and promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The transcriptional regulator LrhA, which is known as a repressor of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes, regulates biofilm formation and expression of type 1 fimbriae. Whole-genome expression profiling revealed that inactivation of lrhA results in an increased expression of structural components of type 1 fimbriae. In vitro, LrhA bound to the promoter regions of the two fim recombinases (FimB and FimE) that catalyse the inversion of the fimA promoter, and to the invertible element itself. Translational lacZ fusions with these genes and quantification of fimE transcript levels by real-time PCR showed that LrhA influences type 1 fimbrial phase variation, primarily via activation of FimE, which is required for the ON-to-OFF transition of the fim switch. Enhanced type 1 fimbrial expression as a result of lrhA disruption was confirmed by mannose-sensitive agglutination of yeast cells. Biofilm formation was stimulated by lrhA inactivation and completely suppressed upon LrhA overproduction. The effects of LrhA on biofilm formation were exerted via the changed levels of surface molecules, most probably both flagella and type 1 fimbriae. Together, the data show a role for LrhA as a repressor of type 1 fimbrial expression, and thus as a regulator of the initial stages of biofilm development and, presumably, bacterial adherence to epithelial host cells also.

  8. The highly conserved Escherichia coli transcription factor YhaJ regulates aromatic compound degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Palevsky

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aromatic compound 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT, a common impurity in 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT production, has been suggested as a tracer for the presence of TNT-based landmines due to its stability and high volatility. We have previously described an Escherichia coli bioreporter capable of detecting the presence of DNT vapors, harboring a fusion of the yqjF gene promoter, to a reporter element. However, the DNT metabolite, which is the direct inducer of yqjF, has not yet been identified, nor has the regulatory mechanism of the induction been clarified. We demonstrate here that the YhaJ protein, a member of the LysR type family, acts as a transcriptional regulator of yqjF activation, as well as of a panel of additional E. coli genes. This group of genes share a common sequence motif in their promoters, which is suggested here as a putative YhaJ-box. In addition, we have linked YhaJ to the regulation of quinol-like compound degradation in the cell, and identified yhaK as playing a role in the degradation of DNT.

  9. Regulation of gene expression: cryptic β-glucoside (bgl) operon of Escherichia coli as a paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwani, Dharmesh

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved various mechanisms to extract utilizable substrates from available resources and consequently acquire fitness advantage over competitors. One of the strategies is the exploitation of cryptic cellular functions encoded by genetic systems that are silent under laboratory conditions, such as the bgl (β-glucoside) operon of E. coli. The bgl operon of Escherichia coli, involved in the uptake and utilization of aromatic β-glucosides salicin and arbutin, is maintained in a silent state in the wild type organism by the presence of structural elements in the regulatory region. This operon can be activated by mutations that disrupt these negative elements. The fact that the silent bgl operon is retained without accumulating deleterious mutations seems paradoxical from an evolutionary view point. Although this operon appears to be silent, specific physiological conditions might be able to regulate its expression and/or the operon might be carrying out function(s) apart from the utilization of aromatic β-glucosides. This is consistent with the observations that the activated operon confers a Growth Advantage in Stationary Phase (GASP) phenotype to Bgl(+) cells and exerts its regulation on at least twelve downstream target genes.

  10. Regulation of gene expression: Cryptic β-glucoside (bgl operon of Escherichia coli as a paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmesh Harwani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria have evolved various mechanisms to extract utilizable substrates from available resources and consequently acquire fitness advantage over competitors. One of the strategies is the exploitation of cryptic cellular functions encoded by genetic systems that are silent under laboratory conditions, such as the bgl (β-glucoside operon of E. coli. The bgl operon of Escherichia coli, involved in the uptake and utilization of aromatic β-glucosides salicin and arbutin, is maintained in a silent state in the wild type organism by the presence of structural elements in the regulatory region. This operon can be activated by mutations that disrupt these negative elements. The fact that the silent bgl operon is retained without accumulating deleterious mutations seems paradoxical from an evolutionary view point. Although this operon appears to be silent, specific physiological conditions might be able to regulate its expression and/or the operon might be carrying out function(s apart from the utilization of aromatic β-glucosides. This is consistent with the observations that the activated operon confers a Growth Advantage in Stationary Phase (GASP phenotype to Bgl+ cells and exerts its regulation on at least twelve downstream target genes.

  11. The Truncated Gene cfaD′ Positively Regulates CFA/Ⅰ Expression of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐小保; 徐建国

    2004-01-01

    The gene cluster cfaABCED′ of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, encoding the fimbriae which is called colonization factor antigen Ⅰ (CFA/Ⅰ), located on a plasmid. It is positively regulated by cfaR, a member of the AraC family, and the cfaD′ gene region, which is located downstream of cfaE and is homologous to cfaR, had been described as a truncated cryptic gene. In the present study we observed that the CFA/Ⅰ fimbriae subunit, cfaB, was expressed in lower amount by the cfoABCED′ clone pNTP513 in host E. coli HB101. The expression of CFA/Ⅰ diminished by deletion of cfaD′ gene region from pNTP513, and was restored by acquisition of cfaD′ in trans. Furthermore, CFA/Ⅰ expression by cfaD′ deletion mutant, the cfaABCE clone, was remarkably increased by the presence of CFA/Ⅰ in trans in a topoisomerase A deficient strain of E. coli DM800. These data suggest that cfaD′ region is a functional region of gene, that regulates the CFA/Ⅰ expression with cfaR by unknown mechanism.

  12. Differential regulation by ppGpp versus pppGpp in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechold, Undine; Potrykus, Katarzyna; Murphy, Helen; Murakami, Katsuhiko S; Cashel, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Both ppGpp and pppGpp are thought to function collectively as second messengers for many complex cellular responses to nutritional stress throughout biology. There are few indications that their regulatory effects might be different; however, this question has been largely unexplored for lack of an ability to experimentally manipulate the relative abundance of ppGpp and pppGpp. Here, we achieve preferential accumulation of either ppGpp or pppGpp with Escherichia coli strains through induction of different Streptococcal (p)ppGpp synthetase fragments. In addition, expression of E. coli GppA, a pppGpp 5'-gamma phosphate hydrolase that converts pppGpp to ppGpp, is manipulated to fine tune differential accumulation of ppGpp and pppGpp. In vivo and in vitro experiments show that pppGpp is less potent than ppGpp with respect to regulation of growth rate, RNA/DNA ratios, ribosomal RNA P1 promoter transcription inhibition, threonine operon promoter activation and RpoS induction. To provide further insights into regulation by (p)ppGpp, we have also determined crystal structures of E. coli RNA polymerase-σ(70) holoenzyme with ppGpp and pppGpp. We find that both nucleotides bind to a site at the interface between β' and ω subunits.

  13. Negative auto-regulation increases the input dynamic-range of the arabinose system of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bren Anat

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene regulation networks are made of recurring regulatory patterns, called network motifs. One of the most common network motifs is negative auto-regulation, in which a transcription factor represses its own production. Negative auto-regulation has several potential functions: it can shorten the response time (time to reach halfway to steady-state, stabilize expression against noise, and linearize the gene's input-output response curve. This latter function of negative auto-regulation, which increases the range of input signals over which downstream genes respond, has been studied by theory and synthetic gene circuits. Here we ask whether negative auto-regulation preserves this function also in the context of a natural system, where it is embedded within many additional interactions. To address this, we studied the negative auto-regulation motif in the arabinose utilization system of Escherichia coli, in which negative auto-regulation is part of a complex regulatory network. Results We find that when negative auto-regulation is disrupted by placing the regulator araC under constitutive expression, the input dynamic range of the arabinose system is reduced by 10-fold. The apparent Hill coefficient of the induction curve changes from about n = 1 with negative auto-regulation, to about n = 2 when it is disrupted. We present a mathematical model that describes how negative auto-regulation can increase input dynamic-range, by coupling the transcription factor protein level to the input signal. Conclusions Here we demonstrate that the negative auto-regulation motif in the native arabinose system of Escherichia coli increases the range of arabinose signals over which the system can respond. In this way, negative auto-regulation may help to increase the input dynamic-range while maintaining the specificity of cooperative regulatory systems. This function may contribute to explaining the common occurrence of negative auto-regulation

  14. Negative auto-regulation increases the input dynamic-range of the arabinose system of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madar, Daniel; Dekel, Erez; Bren, Anat; Alon, Uri

    2011-07-12

    Gene regulation networks are made of recurring regulatory patterns, called network motifs. One of the most common network motifs is negative auto-regulation, in which a transcription factor represses its own production. Negative auto-regulation has several potential functions: it can shorten the response time (time to reach halfway to steady-state), stabilize expression against noise, and linearize the gene's input-output response curve. This latter function of negative auto-regulation, which increases the range of input signals over which downstream genes respond, has been studied by theory and synthetic gene circuits. Here we ask whether negative auto-regulation preserves this function also in the context of a natural system, where it is embedded within many additional interactions. To address this, we studied the negative auto-regulation motif in the arabinose utilization system of Escherichia coli, in which negative auto-regulation is part of a complex regulatory network. We find that when negative auto-regulation is disrupted by placing the regulator araC under constitutive expression, the input dynamic range of the arabinose system is reduced by 10-fold. The apparent Hill coefficient of the induction curve changes from about n = 1 with negative auto-regulation, to about n = 2 when it is disrupted. We present a mathematical model that describes how negative auto-regulation can increase input dynamic-range, by coupling the transcription factor protein level to the input signal. Here we demonstrate that the negative auto-regulation motif in the native arabinose system of Escherichia coli increases the range of arabinose signals over which the system can respond. In this way, negative auto-regulation may help to increase the input dynamic-range while maintaining the specificity of cooperative regulatory systems. This function may contribute to explaining the common occurrence of negative auto-regulation in biological systems.

  15. Chlorine disinfection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, total coliforms, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis: revisiting reclaimed water regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel-Olivares, Claudia; Reyes-Gómez, Lidia María; Hernández-Muñoz, Aurelio; Martínez-Falcón, Ana Paola; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Gabriela A; Iturbe, Ulises

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic organisms can be transmitted orally through drinking water or through skin and mucosae by both direct and indirect contact, and their presence in water thus has a negative impact on public health. In wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), water is disinfected to inactivate pathogens. The quantification of several microbial indicators in aquatic systems is required to estimate the biological quality of such systems. So far, coliform bacteria have been used as traditional indicators world-wide. This study has assessed the resistance of total coliforms, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis to three dosages of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) at two exposure times. The bacteria were isolated from secondary effluents of a WWTP located in Hidalgo, Mexico. The results show that the number of colony-forming units of all studied bacterial types decreased when both the NaClO concentration and exposure times increased. However, they were not eliminated. The inclusion of the species Pseudomonas aeruginosa in regulations for treated wastewater quality as a new indicator is highly recommended due to its importance as an opportunistic pathogen. The detection of this species along with the traditional organisms could be particulary significant for reclaimed water to be used with direct human contact.

  16. [Catabolism of methylphosphonic acid and its physiological regulation in Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, S V; Laurinavichius, K S; Nesmeianova, M A

    1996-01-01

    It was found that methyl phosphonic acid (Pn) was degraded by different Escherichia coli strains, which utilized it as the sole phosphorus source with resulting methane formation. This ability was influenced by mutations in the regulatory genes of the pho regulon. Thus, Pn was not degraded by an E. coli mutant defective in the regulatory phoB gene, responsible for the induction of pho-regulon proteins during phosphorus starvation. The intensity of Pn degradation depended on the age and concentration of the inoculum. Preincubation of bacteria in the presence of Pn accelerated subsequent degradation of both methyl phosphonic acid and its esters. Cultures developing from a small amount of inoculum degraded Pn more efficiently than heavily inoculated cultures that underwent only one cell division. However, cultures heavily inoculated with adapted cells degraded Pn as efficiently as cultures developing from a small amount of inoculum. Aeration was an important factor regulating Pn degradation: Pn was degraded more efficiently under anaerobic conditions regardless of the amount of inoculum.

  17. [Host factors in the regulation of the Vibrio fischeri lux operon in Escherichia coli cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukhov, I V; Kotova, V Iu; Zavil'gel'skiĭ, G B

    2006-01-01

    It has been shown that the chaperonin GroEL, together with GroES co-chaperonin and Lon ATP-dependent protease are involved in the regulation of expression of the Vibrio fischeri lux operon in Escherichia coli cells. The cells of E. coli groE (pF1)- bearing a plasmid with the complete V. fischeri lux regulon were weakly luminescent. The cells of E. coli lonA (pF1) displayed intense bioluminescence. The same effects also occurred in mutant E. coli strains bearing a hybrid plasmid pVFR1, where the luxR gene and the regulatory region of the V. fischeri lux operon were inserted before the Photorhabdus luminescens luxCDABE cassette. The V. fischeri luxR gene was cloned in the pGEX-KG vector with the formation of a hybrid gene gst-luxR. It was shown that affinity chromatography of the product of expression, the chimeric protein GST-LuxR, on a column with glutathione-agarose resulted in its copurification with the proteins GroEL and Lon. Consequently, LuxR, the transcription activator of the lux operon, forms complexes with these proteins. It is supposed that GroEL/GroES is responsible for the folding of the LuxR protein, and Lon protease degrades the LuxR protein either before its folding into an active globule or at denaturing.

  18. Abiotic surface sensing and biofilm-dependent regulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Vidal, O; Dorel, C; Lejeune, P

    1999-10-01

    To get further information on bacterial surface sensing and biofilm-dependent regulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli K-12, random insertion mutagenesis with Mu dX, a mini-Mu carrying the promoterless lacZ gene, was performed with an ompR234 adherent strain, and a simple screen was developed to assess changes in gene expression in biofilm cells versus planktonic cells. This screen revealed that major changes in the pattern of gene expression occur during biofilm development: the transcription of 38% of the genes was affected within biofilms. Different cell functions were more expressed in sessile bacteria: the OmpC porin, the high-affinity transport system of glycine betaine (encoded by the proU operon), the colanic acid exopolysaccharide (wca locus, formerly called cps), tripeptidase T (pepT), and the nickel high-affinity transport system (nikA). On the other hand, the syntheses of flagellin (fliC) and of a putative protein of 92 amino acids (f92) were both reduced in biofilms. Such a genetic reprogramming of gene expression in biofilms seems to result from changes in multiple environmental physicochemical conditions. In this work, we show that bacteria within biofilms encounter higher-osmolarity conditions, greater oxygen limitation, and higher cell density than in the liquid phase.

  19. Compensatory evolution of gene regulation in response to stress by Escherichia coli lacking RpoS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Stoebel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The RpoS sigma factor protein of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase is the master transcriptional regulator of physiological responses to a variety of stresses. This stress response comes at the expense of scavenging for scarce resources, causing a trade-off between stress tolerance and nutrient acquisition. This trade-off favors non-functional rpoS alleles in nutrient-poor environments. We used experimental evolution to explore how natural selection modifies the regulatory network of strains lacking RpoS when they evolve in an osmotically stressful environment. We found that strains lacking RpoS adapt less variably, in terms of both fitness increase and changes in patterns of transcription, than strains with functional RpoS. This phenotypic uniformity was caused by the same adaptive mutation in every independent population: the insertion of IS10 into the promoter of the otsBA operon. OtsA and OtsB are required to synthesize the osmoprotectant trehalose, and transcription of otsBA requires RpoS in the wild-type genetic background. The evolved IS10 insertion rewires expression of otsBA from RpoS-dependent to RpoS-independent, allowing for partial restoration of wild-type response to osmotic stress. Our results show that the regulatory networks of bacteria can evolve new structures in ways that are both rapid and repeatable.

  20. Transcriptional repressor HipB regulates the multiple promoters in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Yi; Awano, Naoki; Masuda, Hisako; Park, Jung-Ho; Inouye, Masayori

    2013-01-01

    HipB is a DNA-binding protein in Escherichia coli and negatively regulates its own promoter by binding to the palindromic sequences [TATCCN8GGATA (N represents any nucleotides)] on the hipBA promoter. For such sequences, bioinformatic analysis revealed that there are a total of 39 palindromic sequences (TATCCN(x)GGATA: N is any nucleotides and x is the number of nucleotides from 1 to 30) in the promoter regions of 33 genes on the E. coli genome. Notably, eutH and fadH have two and three TATCCN(x)GGATA palindromic sequences located in their promoters, respectively. Another significant finding was that a palindromic sequence was also identified in the promoter region of hipAB locus, known to be involved in the RelA-dependent persister cell formation in bacteria. Here, we demonstrated that HipB binds to the palindromic structures in the eutH, fadH, as well as the relA promoter regions and represses their expressions. We further demonstrated that HipA enhances the repression of the relA promoter activity by HipB. This effect was not observed with D291A HipA mutant which was previously shown to lack an ability to interact with HipB, indicating that HipA enhances the HipB's repressor activity through direct interaction with HipB.

  1. Endogenous occurrence of protein S-guanylation in Escherichia coli: Target identification and genetic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Jung, Minkyung; Zhang, Tianli; Ono, Katsuhiko; Ida, Tomoaki; Kunieda, Kohei; Ihara, Hideshi; Akaike, Takaaki; Sawa, Tomohiro

    2016-09-09

    8-Nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP) is a nitrated cGMP derivative formed in response to nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). It can cause a post-translational modification (PTM) of protein thiols through cGMP adduction (protein S-guanylation). Accumulating evidence has suggested that, in mammals, S-guanylation of redox-sensor proteins may implicate in regulation of adaptive responses against ROS-associated oxidative stress. Occurrence as well as protein targets of S-guanylation in bacteria remained unknown, however. Here we demonstrated, for the first time, the endogenous occurrence of protein S-guanylation in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Western blotting using anti-S-guanylation antibody clearly showed that multiple proteins were S-guanylated in E. coli. Interestingly, some of those proteins were more intensely S-guanylated when bacteria were cultured under static culture condition than shaking culture condition. It has been known that E. coli is deficient of guanylate cyclase, an enzyme indispensable for 8-nitro-cGMP formation in mammals. We found that adenylate cyclase from E. coli potentially catalyzed 8-nitro-cGMP formation from its precursor 8-nitroguanosine 5'-triphosphate. More importantly, E. coli lacking adenylate cyclase showed significantly reduced formation of S-guanylated proteins. Our S-guanylation proteomics successfully identified S-guanylation protein targets in E. coli, including chaperons, ribosomal proteins, and enzymes which associate with protein synthesis, redox regulation and metabolism. Understanding of functional impacts for protein S-guanylation in bacterial signal transduction is necessary basis for development of potential chemotherapy and new diagnostic strategy for control of pathogenic bacterial infections.

  2. Efficient L-Alanine Production by a Thermo-Regulated Switch in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Deng, Can; Cui, Wen-Jing; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Zhou, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    L-Alanine has important applications in food, pharmaceutical and veterinary and is used as a substrate for production of engineered thermoplastics. Microbial fermentation could reduce the production cost and promote the application of L-alanine. However, the presence of L-alanine significantly inhibit cell growth rate and cause a decrease in the ultimate L-alanine productivity. For efficient L-alanine production, a thermo-regulated genetic switch was designed to dynamically control the expression of L-alanine dehydrogenase (alaD) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the Escherichia coli B0016-060BC chromosome. The optimal cultivation conditions for the genetically switched alanine production using B0016-060BC were the following: an aerobic growth phase at 33 °C with a 1-h thermo-induction at 42 °C followed by an oxygen-limited phase at 42 °C. In a bioreactor experiment using the scaled-up conditions optimized in a shake flask, B0016-060BC accumulated 50.3 g biomass/100 g glucose during the aerobic growth phase and 96 g alanine/100 g glucose during the oxygen-limited phase, respectively. The L-alanine titer reached 120.8 g/l with higher overall and oxygen-limited volumetric productivities of 3.09 and 4.18 g/l h, respectively, using glucose as the sole carbon source. Efficient cell growth and L-alanine production were reached separately, by switching cultivation temperature. The results revealed the application of a thermo-regulated strategy for heterologous metabolic production and pointed to strategies for improving L-alanine production.

  3. Regulation of acid resistance by connectors of two-component signal transduction systems in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Yoko; Ishii, Eiji; Hata, Kensuke; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2011-03-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs), utilized extensively by bacteria and archaea, are involved in the rapid adaptation of the organisms to fluctuating environments. A typical TCS transduces the signal by a phosphorelay between the sensor histidine kinase and its cognate response regulator. Recently, small-sized proteins that link TCSs have been reported and are called "connectors." Their physiological roles, however, have remained elusive. SafA (sensor associating factor A) (formerly B1500), a small (65-amino-acid [65-aa]) membrane protein, is among such connectors and links Escherichia coli TCSs EvgS/EvgA and PhoQ/PhoP. Since the activation of the EvgS/EvgA system induces acid resistance, we examined whether the SafA-activated PhoQ/PhoP system is also involved in the acid resistance induced by EvgS/EvgA. Using a constitutively active evgS1 mutant for the activation of EvgS/EvgA, we found that SafA, PhoQ, and PhoP all contributed to the acid resistance phenotype. Moreover, EvgS/EvgA activation resulted in the accumulation of cellular RpoS in the exponential-phase cells in a SafA-, PhoQ-, and PhoP-dependent manner. This RpoS accumulation was caused by another connector, IraM, expression of which was induced by the activation of the PhoQ/PhoP system, thus preventing RpoS degradation by trapping response regulator RssB. Acid resistance assays demonstrated that IraM also participated in the EvgS/EvgA-induced acid resistance. Therefore, we propose a model of a signal transduction cascade proceeding from EvgS/EvgA to PhoQ/PhoP and then to RssB (connected by SafA and IraM) and discuss its contribution to the acid resistance phenotype.

  4. Role of ppGpp in rpoS stationary-phase regulation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Matthew; Elliott, Thomas

    2002-09-01

    The bacterial sigma factor RpoS is strongly induced under a variety of stress conditions and during growth into stationary phase. Here, we used rpoS-lac fusions in Escherichia coli to investigate control acting at the level of RpoS synthesis, which is especially evident when cells approach stationary phase in rich medium. Previous work has shown that the small molecule ppGpp is required for normal levels of RpoS in stationary phase. Despite the attraction of a model in which the ppGpp level controls stationary-phase induction of RpoS, careful measurement of rpoS-lac expression in a mutant lacking ppGpp showed similar effects during both exponential growth and stationary phase; the main effect of ppGpp was on basal expression. In addition, a modest regulatory defect was associated with the mutant lacking ppGpp, delaying the time at which full expression was achieved by 2 to 3 h. Deletion analysis showed that the defect in basal expression was distributed over several sequence elements, while the regulatory defect mapped to the region upstream of the rpoS ribosome-binding site (RBS) that contains a cis-acting antisense element. A number of other genes that have been suggested as regulators of rpoS were tested, including dksA, dsrA, barA, ppkx, and hfq. With the exception of the dksA mutant, which had a modest defect in Luria-Bertani medium, none of these mutants was defective for rpoS stationary-phase induction. Even a short rpoS segment starting at 24 nucleotides upstream of the AUG initiation codon was sufficient to confer substantial stationary-phase regulation, which was mainly posttranscriptional. The effect of RBS-proximal sequence was independent of all known trans-acting factors, including ppGpp.

  5. Structural and Functional Analysis of BipA, a Regulator of Virulence in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Haitian; Hahm, Joseph; Diggs, Stephen; Perry, J Jefferson P; Blaha, Gregor

    2015-08-21

    The translational GTPase BipA regulates the expression of virulence and pathogenicity factors in several eubacteria. BipA-dependent expression of virulence factors occurs under starvation conditions, such as encountered during infection of a host. Under these conditions, BipA associates with the small ribosomal subunit. BipA also has a second function to promote the efficiency of late steps in biogenesis of large ribosomal subunits at low temperatures, presumably while bound to the ribosome. During starvation, the cellular concentration of stress alarmone guanosine-3', 5'-bis pyrophosphate (ppGpp) is increased. This increase allows ppGpp to bind to BipA and switch its binding specificity from ribosomes to small ribosomal subunits. A conformational change of BipA upon ppGpp binding could explain the ppGpp regulation of the binding specificity of BipA. Here, we present the structures of the full-length BipA from Escherichia coli in apo, GDP-, and ppGpp-bound forms. The crystal structure and small-angle x-ray scattering data of the protein with bound nucleotides, together with a thermodynamic analysis of the binding of GDP and of ppGpp to BipA, indicate that the ppGpp-bound form of BipA adopts the structure of the GDP form. This suggests furthermore, that the switch in binding preference only occurs when both ppGpp and the small ribosomal subunit are present. This molecular mechanism would allow BipA to interact with both the ribosome and the small ribosomal subunit during stress response.

  6. Nitric oxide, nitrite, and Fnr regulation of hmp (flavohemoglobin) gene expression in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, R K; Anjum, M F; Membrillo-Hernández, J; Kim, S O; Hughes, M N; Stewart, V

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli possesses a soluble flavohemoglobin, with an unknown function, encoded by the hmp gene. A monolysogen containing an hmp-lacZ operon fusion was constructed to determine how the hmp promoter is regulated in response to heme ligands (O2, NO) or the presence of anaerobically utilized electron acceptors (nitrate, nitrite). Expression of the phi (hmp-lacZ)1 fusion was similar during aerobic growth in minimal medium containing glucose, glycerol, maltose, or sorbitol as a carbon source. Mutations in cya (encoding adenylate cyclase) or changes in medium pH between 5 and 9 were without effect on aerobic expression. Levels of aerobic and anaerobic expression in glucose-containing minimal media were similar; both were unaffected by an arcA mutation. Anaerobic, but not aerobic, expression of phi (hmp-lacZ)1 was stimulated three- to four-fold by an fnr mutation; an apparent Fnr-binding site is present in the hmp promoter. Iron depletion of rich broth medium by the chelator 2'2'-dipyridyl (0.1 mM) enhanced hmp expression 40-fold under anaerobic conditions, tentatively attributed to effects on Fnr. At a higher chelator concentration (0.4 mM), hmp expression was also stimulated aerobically. Anaerobic expression was stimulated 6-fold by the presence of nitrate and 25-fold by the presence of nitrite. Induction by nitrate or nitrite was unaffected by narL and/or narP mutations, demonstrating regulation of hmp by these ions via mechanisms alternative to those implicated in the regulation of other respiratory genes. Nitric oxide (10 to 20 microM) stimulated aerobic phi (hmp-lacZ)1 activity by up to 19-fold; soxS and soxR mutations only slightly reduced the NO effect. We conclude that hmp expression is negatively regulated by Fnr under anaerobic conditions and that additional regulatory mechanisms are involved in the responses to oxygen, nitrogen compounds, and iron availability. Hmp is implicated in reactions with small nitrogen compounds. PMID:8808940

  7. Reverse Genetics of Escherichia coli Glycerol Kinase Allosteric Regulation and Glucose Control of Glycerol Utilization In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Holtman, C. Kay; Pawlyk, Aaron C.; Meadow, Norman D.; Pettigrew, Donald W.

    2001-01-01

    Reverse genetics is used to evaluate the roles in vivo of allosteric regulation of Escherichia coli glycerol kinase by the glucose-specific phosphocarrier of the phosphoenolpyruvate:glycose phosphotransferase system, IIAGlc (formerly known as IIIglc), and by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. Roles have been postulated for these allosteric effectors in glucose control of both glycerol utilization and expression of the glpK gene. Genetics methods based on homologous recombination are used to place glp...

  8. Characterization of the gcd gene from Escherichia coli K-12 W3110 and regulation of its expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, M; Asaoka, S; Saier, M H; Yamada, Y

    1993-01-01

    DNA sequence and expressional analyses of the gcd gene of Escherichia coli K-12 W3110 revealed that two promoters that were detected were regulated negatively by cyclic AMP and positively by oxygen. Sequence conservation of the gcd gene between E. coli K-12 W3110 and PPA42 suggests that glucose dehydrogenase is required for the E. coli cells, even though it ordinarily exists as an apoprotein.

  9. Induction of YdeO, a regulator for acid resistance genes, by ultraviolet irradiation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yuki; Ishihama, Akira; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi

    2012-01-01

    YdeO, an AraC-type transcription factor, is an important regulator in the induction of acid-resistance genes in Escherichia coli. In this study, we found that ydeO expression was induced 20 min after exposure to UV irradiation. This required the evgA and gadE genes in vivo. YdeO, induced by UV, controls the expression of a total of 21 genes. This accompanies SOS response in E. coli.

  10. Regulation of expression from the glnA promoter of Escherichia coli in the absence of glutamine synthetase.

    OpenAIRE

    Rothstein, D M; Pahel, G; Tyler, B.; Magasanik, B

    1980-01-01

    One of the suspected regulators of glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2] in enteric bacteria is glutamine synthetase itself. We isolated Escherichia coli strains carrying fusions of the beta-galactosidase structural gene to the promoter of the glutamine synthetase gene, with the aid of the Casadaban Mud1 (ApR, lac, cts62) phage. Some aspects of regulation were retained in haploid fusion strains despite the absence of glutamine synthetase, whereas other as...

  11. Quorum sensing transcriptional regulator QseA is essential for the expression of multiple virulence regulons of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction and Objectives: QseA is one of several transcriptional regulators that regulates the virulence gene expression in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 through quorum sensing. QseA has been shown to regulate the expression of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), non-LEE...

  12. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 requires quorum sensing transcriptional regulators QseA and SdiA for colonization and persistence in the bovine intestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    QseA and SdiA are two of several transcriptional regulators that regulate virulence gene expression of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 via quorum sensing (QS). QseA regulates the expression of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). LEE encodes for a type III secretion (T3S) sys...

  13. Role of glycolytic intermediate in regulation: Improving lycopene production in Escherichia coli by engineering metabolic control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, W.R.; Liao, J.C.

    2001-06-01

    Metabolic engineering in the postgenomic era is expected to benefit from a full understanding of the biosynthetic capability of microorganisms as a result of the progress being made in bioinformatics and functional genomics. The immediate advantage of such information is to allow the rational design of novel pathways and the elimination of native reactions that are detrimental or unnecessary for the desired purpose. However, with the ability to manipulate metabolic pathways becoming more effective, metabolic engineering will need to face a new challenge: the reengineering of the regulatory hierarchy that controls gene expression in those pathways. In addition to constructing the genetic composition of a metabolic pathway, they propose that it will become just as important to consider the dynamics of pathways gene expression. It has been widely observed that high-level induction of a recombinant protein or pathway leads to growth retardation and reduced metabolic activity. These phenotypic characteristics result from the fact that the constant demands of production placed upon the cell interfere with its changing requirements for growth. They believe that this common situation in metabolic engineering can be alleviated by designing a dynamic controller that is able to sense the metabolic state of the cell and regulate the expression of the recombinant pathway accordingly. This approach, which is termed metabolic control engineering, involves redesigning the native regulatory circuits and applying them to the recombinant pathway. The general goal of such an effort will be to control the flux to the recombinant pathway adaptively according to the cell's metabolic state. The dynamically controlled recombinant pathway can potentially lead to enhanced production, minimized growth retardation, and reduced toxic by-product formation. The regulation of gene expression in response to the physiological state is also essential to the success of gene therapy. Here they

  14. Strength and Regulation of Seven rRNA Promoters in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Michihisa; Shimada, Tomohiro; Ishihama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The model prokaryote Escherichia coli contains seven copies of the rRNA operon in the genome. The presence of multiple rRNA operons is an advantage for increasing the level of ribosome, the key apparatus of translation, in response to environmental conditions. The complete sequence of E. coli genome, however, indicated the micro heterogeneity between seven rRNA operons, raising the possibility in functional heterogeneity and/or differential mode of expression. The aim of this research is to determine the strength and regulation of the promoter of each rRNA operon in E. coli. For this purpose, we used the double-fluorescent protein reporter pBRP system that was developed for accurate and precise determination of the promoter strength of protein-coding genes. For application of this promoter assay vector for measurement of the rRNA operon promoters devoid of the signal for translation, a synthetic SD sequence was added at the initiation codon of the reporter GFP gene, and then approximately 500 bp-sequence upstream each 16S rRNA was inserted in front of this SD sequence. Using this modified pGRS system, the promoter activity of each rrn operon was determined by measuring the rrn promoter-directed GFP and the reference promoter-directed RFP fluorescence, both encoded by a single and the same vector. Results indicated that: the promoter activity was the highest for the rrnE promoter under all growth conditions analyzed, including different growth phases of wild-type E. coli grown in various media; but the promoter strength of other six rrn promoters was various depending on the culture conditions. These findings altogether indicate that seven rRNA operons are different with respect to the regulation mode of expression, conferring an advantage to E. coli through a more fine-tuned control of ribosome formation in a wide range of environmental situations. Possible difference in the functional role of each rRNA operon is also discussed.

  15. Genetic regulation of spy gene expression in Escherichia coli in the presence of protein unfolding agent ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Lambadi, Paramesh Ramulu; Ghosh, Tamoghna; Pathania, Ranjana; Navani, Naveen Kumar

    2014-09-10

    In a living cell, folding of proteins is assisted by molecular chaperones and other folding helpers. In Escherichia coli (E. coli), recently an ATP independent chaperon 'Spy' was discovered which is highly up-regulated in the presence of protein unfolding agents like ethanol, butanol and tannic acid. Two response regulators; BaeR and CpxR have been recognized as transcriptional regulators of spy gene. However, the mechanism of genetic regulation of spy under protein denaturants like ethanol has not been studied in detail so far. Based on a combination of genetic, molecular biology and biochemical experimental data, we propose that BaeR protein is the primary regulator of spy gene in response to ethanol stress in E. coli. In addition, we expanded the experimental spectrum and validated that regulation of spy gene in the presence of zinc and copper metal stress is primarily via BaeR and CpxR regulators respectively. We also performed in-silico analysis to identify the homologs of Spy protein and their cognate regulatory elements in bacterial species belonging to enterobacteriaceae family. Based on the unique ATP-independent chaperone nature and genetic regulation of spy we also propose its importance in biosensor development and facilitated production of properly folded recombinant proteins.

  16. Production and regulation of functional amyloid curli fimbriae by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Functional amyloid, in the form of adhesive fimbrial proteins termed curli, was first described in Salmonella and Escherichia coli. Curli fibers adhere to various host cells and structural proteins, interact with components of the host immune system, and participate in biofilm formation. Shiga toxin...

  17. Distinct transcriptional regulation of the two Escherichia coli transhydrogenases PntAB and UdhA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkorn van Rijsewijk, Bart R B; Kochanowski, Karl; Heinemann, Matthias; Sauer, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Transhydrogenases catalyse interconversion of the redox cofactors NADH and NADPH, thereby conveying metabolic flexibility to balance catabolic NADPH formation with anabolic or stress-based consumption of NADPH. As one of very few microbes, Escherichia coli possesses two isoforms, the membrane-bound,

  18. Easy regulation of metabolic flux in Escherichia coli using an endogenous type I-E CRISPR-Cas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yizhao; Su, Tianyuan; Qi, Qingsheng; Liang, Quanfeng

    2016-11-15

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference (CRISPRi) is a recently developed powerful tool for gene regulation. In Escherichia coli, the type I CRISPR system expressed endogenously shall be easy for internal regulation without causing metabolic burden in compared with the widely used type II system, which expressed dCas9 as an additional plasmid. By knocking out cas3 and activating the expression of CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense (Cascade), we constructed a native CRISPRi system in E. coli. Downregulation of the target gene from 6 to 82% was demonstrated using green fluorescent protein. Regulation of the citrate synthase gene (gltA) in the TCA cycle affected host metabolism. The effect of metabolic flux regulation was demonstrated by the poly-3-hydroxbutyrate (PHB) accumulation in vivo. By regulating native gltA in E. coli using an engineered endogenous type I-E CRISPR system, we redirected metabolic flux from the central metabolic pathway to the PHB synthesis pathway. This study demonstrated that the endogenous type I-E CRISPR-Cas system is an easy and effective method for regulating internal metabolic pathways, which is useful for product synthesis.

  19. Global transcriptional regulation by H-NS and its biological influence on the virulence of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Baoshan; Zhang, Qiufen; Tao, Jing; Zhou, Aiping; Yao, Yu-Feng; Ni, Jinjing

    2016-08-22

    As a global transcriptional regulator, H-NS, the histone-like nucleoid-associated DNA-binding and bridging protein, plays a wide range of biological roles in bacteria. In order to determine the role of H-NS in regulating gene transcription and further find out the biological significance of this protein in Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), we conducted transcriptome analysis of hns mutant by RNA sequencing. A total of 983 genes were identified to be regulated by H-NS in EHEC. 213 and 770 genes were down-regulated and up-regulated in the deletion mutant of hns, respectively. Interestingly, 34 of 97 genes on virulence plasmid pO157 were down-regulated by H-NS. Although the deletion mutant of hns showed a decreased survival rate in macrophage compared with the wild type strain, it exhibited the higher ability to colonize mice gut and became more virulent to BALB/c mice. The BALB/c mice infected with the deletion mutant of hns showed a lower survival rate, and a higher bacterial burden in the gut, compared with those infected with wild type strain, especially when the gut microbiota was not disturbed by antibiotic administration. These findings suggest that H-NS plays an important role in virulence of EHEC by interacting with host gut microbiota.

  20. The Catabolite Repressor Protein-Cyclic AMP Complex Regulates csgD and Biofilm Formation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, David A; Evans, Margery L; Greene, Sarah E; Pinkner, Jerome S; Hultgren, Scott J; Chapman, Matthew R

    2016-12-15

    The extracellular matrix protects Escherichia coli from immune cells, oxidative stress, predation, and other environmental stresses. Production of the E. coli extracellular matrix is regulated by transcription factors that are tuned to environmental conditions. The biofilm master regulator protein CsgD upregulates curli and cellulose, the two major polymers in the extracellular matrix of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) biofilms. We found that cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates curli, cellulose, and UPEC biofilms through csgD The alarmone cAMP is produced by adenylate cyclase (CyaA), and deletion of cyaA resulted in reduced extracellular matrix production and biofilm formation. The catabolite repressor protein (CRP) positively regulated csgD transcription, leading to curli and cellulose production in the UPEC isolate, UTI89. Glucose, a known inhibitor of CyaA activity, blocked extracellular matrix formation when added to the growth medium. The mutant strains ΔcyaA and Δcrp did not produce rugose biofilms, pellicles, curli, cellulose, or CsgD. Three putative CRP binding sites were identified within the csgD-csgB intergenic region, and purified CRP could gel shift the csgD-csgB intergenic region. Additionally, we found that CRP binded upstream of kpsMT, which encodes machinery for K1 capsule production. Together our work shows that cAMP and CRP influence E. coli biofilms through transcriptional regulation of csgD IMPORTANCE The catabolite repressor protein (CRP)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) complex influences the transcription of ∼7% of genes on the Escherichia coli chromosome (D. Zheng, C. Constantinidou, J. L. Hobman, and S. D. Minchin, Nucleic Acids Res 32:5874-5893, 2004, https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkh908). Glucose inhibits E. coli biofilm formation, and ΔcyaA and Δcrp mutants show impaired biofilm formation (D. W. Jackson, J.W. Simecka, and T. Romeo, J Bacteriol 184:3406-3410, 2002, https://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.184.12.3406-3410.2002). We determined that the c

  1. Translational Regulation of Gene Expression by an Anaerobically Induced Small Non-coding RNA in Escherichia coli*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Anders; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Kallipolitis, Birgitte; Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Overgaard, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNA) have emerged as important elements of gene regulatory circuits. In enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella many of these sRNAs interact with the Hfq protein, an RNA chaperone similar to mammalian Sm-like proteins and act in the post-transcriptional regulation of many genes. A number of these highly conserved ribo-regulators are stringently regulated at the level of transcription and are part of major regulons that deal with the immediate response to various stress conditions, indicating that every major transcription factor may control the expression of at least one sRNA regulator. Here, we extend this view by the identification and characterization of a highly conserved, anaerobically induced small sRNA in E. coli, whose expression is strictly dependent on the anaerobic transcriptional fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator (FNR). The sRNA, named FnrS, possesses signatures of base-pairing RNAs, and we show by employing global proteomic and transcriptomic profiling that the expression of multiple genes is negatively regulated by the sRNA. Intriguingly, many of these genes encode enzymes with “aerobic” functions or enzymes linked to oxidative stress. Furthermore, in previous work most of the potential target genes have been shown to be repressed by FNR through an undetermined mechanism. Collectively, our results provide insight into the mechanism by which FNR negatively regulates genes such as sodA, sodB, cydDC, and metE, thereby demonstrating that adaptation to anaerobic growth involves the action of a small regulatory RNA. PMID:20075074

  2. Translational regulation of gene expression by an anaerobically induced small non-coding RNA in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Anders; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Kallipolitis, Birgitte; Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Overgaard, Martin

    2010-04-02

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNA) have emerged as important elements of gene regulatory circuits. In enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella many of these sRNAs interact with the Hfq protein, an RNA chaperone similar to mammalian Sm-like proteins and act in the post-transcriptional regulation of many genes. A number of these highly conserved ribo-regulators are stringently regulated at the level of transcription and are part of major regulons that deal with the immediate response to various stress conditions, indicating that every major transcription factor may control the expression of at least one sRNA regulator. Here, we extend this view by the identification and characterization of a highly conserved, anaerobically induced small sRNA in E. coli, whose expression is strictly dependent on the anaerobic transcriptional fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator (FNR). The sRNA, named FnrS, possesses signatures of base-pairing RNAs, and we show by employing global proteomic and transcriptomic profiling that the expression of multiple genes is negatively regulated by the sRNA. Intriguingly, many of these genes encode enzymes with "aerobic" functions or enzymes linked to oxidative stress. Furthermore, in previous work most of the potential target genes have been shown to be repressed by FNR through an undetermined mechanism. Collectively, our results provide insight into the mechanism by which FNR negatively regulates genes such as sodA, sodB, cydDC, and metE, thereby demonstrating that adaptation to anaerobic growth involves the action of a small regulatory RNA.

  3. Metabolic regulation is sufficient for global and robust coordination of glucose uptake, catabolism, energy production and growth in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Millard

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolism of microorganisms is regulated through two main mechanisms: changes of enzyme capacities as a consequence of gene expression modulation ("hierarchical control" and changes of enzyme activities through metabolite-enzyme interactions. An increasing body of evidence indicates that hierarchical control is insufficient to explain metabolic behaviors, but the system-wide impact of metabolic regulation remains largely uncharacterized. To clarify its role, we developed and validated a detailed kinetic model of Escherichia coli central metabolism that links growth to environment. Metabolic control analyses confirm that the control is widely distributed across the network and highlight strong interconnections between all the pathways. Exploration of the model solution space reveals that several robust properties emerge from metabolic regulation, from the molecular level (e.g. homeostasis of total metabolite pool to the overall cellular physiology (e.g. coordination of carbon uptake, catabolism, energy and redox production, and growth, while allowing a large degree of flexibility at most individual metabolic steps. These properties have important physiological implications for E. coli and significantly expand the self-regulating capacities of its metabolism.

  4. Signal transduction and adaptive regulation through bacterial two-component systems: the Escherichia coli AtoSC paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakidis, Dimitrios A; Tiligada, Ekaterini

    2009-09-01

    Adaptive signal transduction within microbial cells involves a multi-faceted regulated phosphotransfer mechanism that comprises structural rearrangements of sensor histidine kinases upon ligand-binding and phosphorylation-induced conformational changes in response regulators of versatile two-component systems (TCS), arisen early in bacterial evolution. In Escherichia coli, cross-talk between the AtoS histidine kinase and the AtoC response regulator, forming the AtoSC TCS, through His --> Asp phosphotransfer, activates AtoC directly to induce atoDAEB operon expression, thus modulating diverse fundamental cellular processes such as short-chain fatty acid catabolism, poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate biosynthesis and chemotaxis. Among the inducers hitherto identified, acetoacetate is the classical activator. The AtoSC TCS functional modulation by polyamines, histamine and Ca(2+), as well as the role of AtoC as transcriptional regulator, add new promising perspectives in the physiological significance and potential pharmacological exploitation of this TCS in cell proliferation, bacteria-host interactions, chemotaxis, and adaptation.

  5. A response regulator from a soil metagenome enhances resistance to the β-lactam antibiotic carbenicillin in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather K Allen

    Full Text Available Functional metagenomic analysis of soil metagenomes is a method for uncovering as-yet unidentified mechanisms for antibiotic resistance. Here we report an unconventional mode by which a response regulator derived from a soil metagenome confers resistance to the β-lactam antibiotic carbenicillin in Escherichia coli. A recombinant clone (βlr16 harboring a 5,169 bp DNA insert was selected from a metagenomic library previously constructed from a remote Alaskan soil. The βlr16 clone conferred specific resistance to carbenicillin, with limited increases in resistance to other tested antibiotics, including other β-lactams (penicillins and cephalosporins, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, fusidic acid, and gentamicin. Resistance was more pronounced at 24°C than at 37°C. Zone-of-inhibition assays suggested that the mechanism of carbenicillin resistance was not due to antibiotic inactivation. The DNA insert did not encode any genes known to confer antibiotic resistance, but did have two putative open reading frames (ORFs that were annotated as a metallopeptidase and a two-component response regulator. Transposon mutagenesis and subcloning of the two ORFs followed by phenotypic assays showed that the response regulator gene was necessary and sufficient to confer the resistance phenotype. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that the response regulator suppressed expression of the ompF porin gene, independently of the small RNA regulator micF, and enhanced expression of the acrD, mdtA, and mdtB efflux pump genes. This work demonstrates that antibiotic resistance can be achieved by the modulation of gene regulation by heterologous DNA. Functional analyses such as these can be important for making discoveries in antibiotic resistance gene biology and ecology.

  6. More than just a metabolic regulator - elucidation and validation of new targets of PdhR in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göhler Anna-Katharina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pyruvate dehydrogenase regulator protein (PdhR of Escherichia coli acts as a transcriptional regulator in a pyruvate dependent manner to control central metabolic fluxes. However, the complete PdhR regulon has not yet been uncovered. To achieve an extended understanding of its gene regulatory network, we combined large-scale network inference and experimental verification of results obtained by a systems biology approach. Results 22 new genes contained in two operons controlled by PdhR (previously only 20 regulatory targets in eight operons were known were identified by analysing a large-scale dataset of E. coli from the Many Microbes Microarray Database and novel expression data from a pdhR knockout strain, as well as a PdhR overproducing strain. We identified a regulation of the glycolate utilization operon glcDEFGBA using chromatin immunoprecipitation and gel shift assays. We show that this regulation could be part of a cross-induction between genes necessary for acetate and pyruvate utilisation controlled through PdhR. Moreover, a link of PdhR regulation to the replication machinery of the cell via control of the transcription of the dcw-cluster was verified in experiments. This augments our knowledge of the functions of the PdhR-regulon and demonstrates its central importance for further cellular processes in E. coli. Conclusions We extended the PdhR regulon by 22 new genes contained in two operons and validated the regulation of the glcDEFGBA operon for glycolate utilisation and the dcw-cluster for cell division proteins experimentally. Our results provide, for the first time, a plausible regulatory link between the nutritional status of the cell and cell replication mediated by PdhR.

  7. Complex regulatory network controls initial adhesion and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli via regulation of the csgD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Brombacher, E; Vidal, O; Ambert, A; Lejeune, P; Landini, P; Dorel, C

    2001-12-01

    The Escherichia coli OmpR/EnvZ two-component regulatory system, which senses environmental osmolarity, also regulates biofilm formation. Up mutations in the ompR gene, such as the ompR234 mutation, stimulate laboratory strains of E. coli to grow as a biofilm community rather than in a planktonic state. In this report, we show that the OmpR234 protein promotes biofilm formation by binding the csgD promoter region and stimulating its transcription. The csgD gene encodes the transcription regulator CsgD, which in turn activates transcription of the csgBA operon encoding curli, extracellular structures involved in bacterial adhesion. Consistent with the role of the ompR gene as part of an osmolarity-sensing regulatory system, we also show that the formation of biofilm by E. coli is inhibited by increasing osmolarity in the growth medium. The ompR234 mutation counteracts adhesion inhibition by high medium osmolarity; we provide evidence that the ompR234 mutation promotes biofilm formation by strongly increasing the initial adhesion of bacteria to an abiotic surface. This increase in initial adhesion is stationary phase dependent, but it is negatively regulated by the stationary-phase-specific sigma factor RpoS. We propose that this negative regulation takes place via rpoS-dependent transcription of the transcription regulator cpxR; cpxR-mediated repression of csgB and csgD promoters is also triggered by osmolarity and by curli overproduction, in a feedback regulation loop.

  8. Regulation of adhE (Encoding Ethanol Oxidoreductase) by the Fis Protein in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Membrillo-Hernández, Jorge; Kwon, Ohsuk; De Wulf, Peter; Finkel, Steven E.; Lin, E. C. C.

    1999-01-01

    The adhE gene of Escherichia coli encodes a multifunctional ethanol oxidoreductase whose expression is 10-fold higher under anaerobic than aerobic conditions. Transcription of the gene is under the negative control of the Cra (catabolite repressor-activator) protein, whereas translation of the adhE mRNA requires processing by RNase III. In this report, we show that the expression of adhE also depends on the Fis (factor for inversion stimulation) protein. A strain bearing a fis::kan null allele failed to grow anaerobically on glucose solely because of inadequate adhE transcription. However, fis expression itself is not under redox control. Sequence inspection of the adhE promoter revealed three potential Fis binding sites. Electrophoretic mobility shift analysis, using purified Fis protein and adhE promoter DNA, showed three different complexes. PMID:10572146

  9. Adaptive responses to cefotaxime treatment in ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and the possible use of significantly regulated pathways as novel secondary targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea S. B.; Rau, Martin Holm; Bonde, Charlotte S;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine how ESBL-producing Escherichia coli change the expression of metabolic and biosynthesis genes when adapting to inhibitory concentrations of cefotaxime. Secondly, it was investigated whether significantly regulated pathways constitute putative secondary target...

  10. Mechanism for regulation of the putrescine utilization pathway by the transcription factor PuuR in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Naoki; Kurihara, Shin; Kitahara, Yuzuru; Asada, Kei; Kato, Kenji; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2012-07-01

    In Escherichia coli, putrescine is metabolized to succinate for use as a carbon and nitrogen source by the putrescine utilization pathway (Puu pathway). One gene in the puu gene cluster encodes a transcription factor, PuuR, which has a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. DNA microarray analysis of an E. coli puuR mutant, in which three amino acid residues in the helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif of PuuR were mutated to alanine to eliminate DNA binding of PuuR, suggested that PuuR is a negative regulator of puu genes. Results of gel shift and DNase I footprint analyses suggested that PuuR binds to the promoter regions of puuA and puuD. The binding of wild-type PuuR to a DNA probe containing PuuR recognition sites was diminished with increasing putrescine concentrations in vitro. These results suggest that PuuR regulates the intracellular putrescine concentration by the transcriptional regulation of genes in the Puu pathway, including puuR itself. The puu gene cluster is found in E. coli and closely related enterobacteria, but this gene cluster is uncommon in other bacterial groups. E. coli and related enterobacteria may have gained the Puu pathway as an adaptation for survival in the mammalian intestine, an environment in which polyamines exist at relatively high concentrations.

  11. Investigation on the Metabolic Regulation of pgi gene knockout Escherichia coli by Enzyme Activities and Intracellular Metabolite Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor ‘Aini, A. R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An integrated analysis of the cell growth characteristics, enzyme activities, intracellular metabolite concentrations was made to investigate the metabolic regulation of pgi gene knockout Escherichia coli based on batch culture and continuous culture which was performed at the dilution rate of 0.2h-1. The enzymatic study identified that pathways of pentose phosphate, ED pathway and glyoxylate shunt were all active in pgi mutant. The glycolysis enzymes i.e glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose diphosphatase, pyruvate kinase, triose phosphate isomerase were down regulated implying that the inactivation of pgi gene reduced the carbon flux through glycolytic pathway. Meanwhile, the pentose phosphate pathway was active as a major route for intermediary carbohydrate metabolism instead of glycolysis. The pentose phosphate pathway generates most of the major reducing co-factor NADPH as shown by the increased of NADPH/NADP+ ratio in the mutant when compared with the parent strain. The fermentative enzymes such as acetate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase were down regulated in the mutant. Knockout of pgi gene results in the significant increase in the intracellular concentration of glucose-6-phosphate and decrease in the concentration of oxaloacetate. The slow growth rate of the mutant was assumed to be affected by the accumulation of glucose-6-phosphate and imbalance of NADPH reoxidation.

  12. MarA, SoxS and Rob of Escherichia coli - Global regulators of multidrug resistance, virulence and stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Valérie; Lister, Ida M

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria have a great capacity for adjusting their metabolism in response to environmental changes by linking extracellular stimuli to the regulation of genes by transcription factors. By working in a co-operative manner, transcription factors provide a rapid response to external threats, allowing the bacteria to survive. This review will focus on transcription factors MarA, SoxS and Rob in Escherichia coli, three members of the AraC family of proteins. These homologous proteins exemplify the ability to respond to multiple threats such as oxidative stress, drugs and toxic compounds, acidic pH, and host antimicrobial peptides. MarA, SoxS and Rob recognize similar DNA sequences in the promoter region of more than 40 regulatory target genes. As their regulons overlap, a finely tuned adaptive response allows E. coli to survive in the presence of different assaults in a co-ordinated manner. These regulators are well conserved amongst Enterobacteriaceae and due to their broad involvement in bacterial adaptation in the host, have recently been explored as targets to develop new anti-virulence agents. The regulators are also being examined for their roles in novel technologies such as biofuel production.

  13. Crosstalk of Escherichia coli FadR with global regulators in expression of fatty acid transport genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youjun Feng

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli FadR plays two regulatory roles in fatty acid metabolism. FadR represses the fatty acid degradation (fad system and activates the unsaturated fatty acid synthetic pathway. Cross-talk between E. coli FadR and the ArcA-ArcB oxygen-responsive two-component system was observed that resulted in diverse regulation of certain fad regulon β-oxidation genes. We have extended such analyses to the fadL and fadD genes, the protein products of which are required for long chain fatty acid transport and have also studied the role of a third global regulator, the CRP-cAMP complex. The promoters of both the fadL and fadD genes contain two experimentally validated FadR-binding sites plus binding sites for ArcA and CRP-cAMP. Despite the presence of dual binding sites FadR only modestly regulates expression of these genes, indicating that the number of binding sites does not determine regulatory strength. We report complementary in vitro and in vivo studies indicating that the CRP-cAMP complex directly activates expression of fadL and fadD as well as the β-oxidation gene, fadH. The physiological relevance of the fadL and fadD transcription data was validated by direct assays of long chain fatty acid transport.

  14. A Study On The Psychometric Features Of The Turkish Version Of The Brief Sensation Seeking Scale (Bsss-8 For Young Adults And The Relation Between Sensation Seeking And Life Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyup Celik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to adapt the sensation seeking scale for young adults into Turkish and to investigate if the life satisfaction of university students differ significantly in terms of sensation seeking. In addition, it was investigated whether the life satisfaction levels of university students differ significantly in terms of gender. The data for this research was collected from 570 university students. The original form of BSSS-8 consist of 8 items and 4 factors. The scale was subjected to CFA in order to determine the structural validity of its Turkish version and it was found that this version had a single factor structure. The results of the CFA suggested acceptable levels of fit indices (χ2/df = 4.46, RMSEA = .07, GFI =96, CFI = .94, IFI = .94, NFI = .93, AGFI = .93, and NNFI = .91. The reliability coefficient of the scale was found at a level of .79. Furthermore, corrected item total correlation were found to be in a range between .22 and .59. The results suggest that the single factor structure of the scale produces valid and reliable results. In addition, it was found that the life satisfaction levels of university students differ significantly in terms of sensation seeking level, but life satisfaction levels of university students do not differ significantly in terms of gender. The results showed that the life satisfaction levels of students with lower sensation seeking are higher than of students with higher sensation seeking

  15. Expanded roles of leucine-responsive regulatory protein in transcription regulation of the Escherichia coli genome: Genomic SELEX screening of the regulation targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Natsumi; Maeda, Michihisa; Tanaka, Kan; Ishihama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is a transcriptional regulator for the genes involved in transport, biosynthesis and catabolism of amino acids in Escherichia coli. In order to identify the whole set of genes under the direct control of Lrp, we performed Genomic SELEX screening and identified a total of 314 Lrp-binding sites on the E. coli genome. As a result, the regulation target of Lrp was predicted to expand from the hitherto identified genes for amino acid metabolism to a set of novel target genes for utilization of amino acids for protein synthesis, including tRNAs, aminoacyl-tRNA synthases and rRNAs. Northern blot analysis indicated alteration of mRNA levels for at least some novel targets, including the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes. Phenotype MicroArray of the lrp mutant indicated significant alteration in utilization of amino acids and peptides, whilst metabolome analysis showed variations in the concentration of amino acids in the lrp mutant. From these two datasets we realized a reverse correlation between amino acid levels and cell growth rate: fast-growing cells contain low-level amino acids, whilst a high level of amino acids exists in slow-growing cells. Taken together, we propose that Lrp is a global regulator of transcription of a large number of the genes involved in not only amino acid transport and metabolism, but also amino acid utilization. PMID:28348809

  16. Novel Functions and Regulation of Cryptic Cellobiose Operons in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinuselvi Parisutham

    Full Text Available Presence of cellobiose as a sole carbon source induces mutations in the chb and asc operons of Escherichia coli and allows it to grow on cellobiose. We previously engineered these two operons with synthetic constitutive promoters and achieved efficient cellobiose metabolism through adaptive evolution. In this study, we characterized two mutations observed in the efficient cellobiose metabolizing strain: duplication of RBS of ascB gene, (β-glucosidase of asc operon and nonsense mutation in yebK, (an uncharacterized transcription factor. Mutations in yebK play a dominant role by modulating the length of lag phase, relative to the growth rate of the strain when transferred from a rich medium to minimal cellobiose medium. Mutations in ascB, on the other hand, are specific for cellobiose and help in enhancing the specific growth rate. Taken together, our results show that ascB of the asc operon is controlled by an internal putative promoter in addition to the native cryptic promoter, and the transcription factor yebK helps to remodel the host physiology for cellobiose metabolism. While previous studies characterized the stress-induced mutations that allowed growth on cellobiose, here, we characterize the adaptation-induced mutations that help in enhancing cellobiose metabolic ability. This study will shed new light on the regulatory changes and factors that are needed for the functional coupling of the host physiology to the activated cryptic cellobiose metabolism.

  17. Escherichia coli response to uranyl exposure at low pH and associated protein regulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbia Khemiri

    Full Text Available Better understanding of uranyl toxicity in bacteria is necessary to optimize strains for bioremediation purposes or for using bacteria as biodetectors for bioavailable uranyl. In this study, after different steps of optimization, Escherichia coli cells were exposed to uranyl at low pH to minimize uranyl precipitation and to increase its bioavailability. Bacteria were adapted to mid acidic pH before exposure to 50 or 80 µM uranyl acetate for two hours at pH≈3. To evaluate the impact of uranium, growth in these conditions were compared and the same rates of cells survival were observed in control and uranyl exposed cultures. Additionally, this impact was analyzed by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis proteomics to discover protein actors specifically present or accumulated in contact with uranium.Exposure to uranium resulted in differential accumulation of proteins associated with oxidative stress and in the accumulation of the NADH/quinone oxidoreductase WrbA. This FMN dependent protein performs obligate two-electron reduction of quinones, and may be involved in cells response to oxidative stress. Interestingly, this WrbA protein presents similarities with the chromate reductase from E. coli, which was shown to reduce uranyl in vitro.

  18. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli OmpT regulates outer membrane vesicle biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premjani, Veena; Tilley, Derek; Gruenheid, Samantha; Le Moual, Hervé; Samis, John A

    2014-06-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infection from food or water often results in severe diarrheal disease and is a leading cause of death globally. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) secreted from E. coli induce lethality in mice. The omptin outer membrane protease OmpT from E. coli inactivates antimicrobial peptides and may enhance colonization of the uroepithelium, but its precise function remains unclear. Given OmpT is an outer membrane protease, we hypothesized it may have a role in OMV biogenesis. To further characterize the effect of OmpT on OMV production, a genetic approach using wild type, an ompT deletion mutant and an ompT overexpressing construct in EHEC were employed. ompT gene deletion markedly decreased OMV production and stainable lipid but increased vesicle diameter. Conversely, ompT overexpression profoundly increased OMV biogenesis but decreased stainable lipid, protein content, and vesicle diameter. Alterations in EHEC ompT gene expression have an impact on the biogenesis, composition, and size of OMVs. Changes in ompT gene expression may dynamically alter OMV formation, composition, and diameter in response to different host environments and contribute to cell-free intercellular communication to enhance bacterial growth and survival. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Patterns of subnet usage reveal distinct scales of regulation in the transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli.

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    Carsten Marr

    Full Text Available The set of regulatory interactions between genes, mediated by transcription factors, forms a species' transcriptional regulatory network (TRN. By comparing this network with measured gene expression data, one can identify functional properties of the TRN and gain general insight into transcriptional control. We define the subnet of a node as the subgraph consisting of all nodes topologically downstream of the node, including itself. Using a large set of microarray expression data of the bacterium Escherichia coli, we find that the gene expression in different subnets exhibits a structured pattern in response to environmental changes and genotypic mutation. Subnets with fewer changes in their expression pattern have a higher fraction of feed-forward loop motifs and a lower fraction of small RNA targets within them. Our study implies that the TRN consists of several scales of regulatory organization: (1 subnets with more varying gene expression controlled by both transcription factors and post-transcriptional RNA regulation and (2 subnets with less varying gene expression having more feed-forward loops and less post-transcriptional RNA regulation.

  20. Resistance to topoisomerase cleavage complex induced lethality in Escherichia coli via titration of transcription regulators PurR and FNR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu I-Fen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulation of gyrase cleavage complex in Escherichia coli from the action of quinolone antibiotics induces an oxidative damage cell death pathway. The oxidative cell death pathway has also been shown to be involved in the lethality following accumulation of cleavage complex formed by bacterial topoisomerase I with mutations that result in defective DNA religation. Methods A high copy number plasmid clone spanning the upp-purMN region was isolated from screening of an E. coli genomic library and analyzed for conferring increased survival rates following accumulation of mutant topoisomerase I proteins as well as treatment with the gyrase inhibitor norfloxacin. Results Analysis of the intergenic region upstream of purM demonstrated a novel mechanism of resistance to the covalent protein-DNA cleavage complex through titration of the cellular transcription regulators FNR and PurR responsible for oxygen sensing and repression of purine nucleotide synthesis respectively. Addition of adenine to defined growth medium had similar protective effect for survival following accumulation of topoisomerase cleavage complex, suggesting that increase in purine level can protect against cell death. Conclusions Perturbation of the global regulator FNR and PurR functions as well as increase in purine nucleotide availability could affect the oxidative damage cell death pathway initiated by topoisomerase cleavage complex.

  1. Involvement of the ribose operon repressor RbsR in regulation of purine nucleotide synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Tomohiro; Kori, Ayako; Ishihama, Akira

    2013-07-01

    Escherichia coli is able to utilize d-ribose as its sole carbon source. The genes for the transport and initial-step metabolism of d-ribose form a single rbsDACBK operon. RbsABC forms the ABC-type high-affinity d-ribose transporter, while RbsD and RbsK are involved in the conversion of d-ribose into d-ribose 5-phosphate. In the absence of inducer d-ribose, the ribose operon is repressed by a LacI-type transcription factor RbsR, which is encoded by a gene located downstream of this ribose operon. At present, the rbs operon is believed to be the only target of regulation by RbsR. After Genomic SELEX screening, however, we have identified that RbsR binds not only to the rbs promoter but also to the promoters of a set of genes involved in purine nucleotide metabolism. Northern blotting analysis indicated that RbsR represses the purHD operon for de novo synthesis of purine nucleotide but activates the add and udk genes involved in the salvage pathway of purine nucleotide synthesis. Taken together, we propose that RbsR is a global regulator for switch control between the de novo synthesis of purine nucleotides and its salvage pathway.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of drug efflux genes by EvgAS, a two-component system in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Yoko; Oshima, Taku; Mori, Hirotada; Aono, Rikizo; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2003-10-01

    A constitutively active mutant of histidine kinase sensor EvgS was found to confer multi-drug resistance (MDR) to an acrA-deficient Escherichia coli, indicating the relationship between the two-component system EvgAS and the expression of the MDR system. The observed MDR also depended on an outer-membrane channel, TolC. Microarray and S1 mapping assays indicated that, in the presence of this constitutive mutant EvgS, the level of transcription increased for some MDR genes, including the drug efflux genes emrKY, yhiUV, acrAB, mdfA and tolC. Transcription in vitro of emrK increased by the addition of phosphorylated EvgA. Transcription activation of tolC by the activated EvgS was, however, dependent on both EvgAS and PhoPQ (Mg(2+)-responsive two-component system), in agreement with the presence of the binding site (PhoP box) for the regulator PhoP in the tolC promoter region. Transcription in vitro of yhiUV also appears to require an as-yet-unidentified additional transcriptional factor besides EvgA. Taken together we propose that the expression of the MDR system is under a complex regulatory network, including the phosphorylated EvgA serving as the master regulator.

  3. A combination of lactic acid bacteria regulates Escherichia coli infection and inflammation of the bovine endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genís, Sandra; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Bach, Àlex; Fàbregas, Francesc; Arís, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Uterine function in cattle is compromised by bacterial contamination and inflammation after calving. The objective of this study was to select a combination of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to decrease endometrium inflammation and Escherichia coli infection. Primary endometrial epithelial cells were cultured in vitro to select the most favorable LAB combination modulating basal tissue inflammation and E. coli infection. Supernatants were obtained to determine expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and E. coli infection was evaluated after harvesting the tissue and plate counting. The selected LAB combination was tested in uterus explants to assess its capacity to modulate basal and acute inflammation (associated with E. coli infection). The combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Pediococcus acidilactici, and Lactobacillus reuteri at a ratio of 25:25:2, respectively, reduced E. coli infection in vitro with (89.77%) or without basal tissue inflammation (95.10%) compared with single LAB strains. Lactic acid bacteria treatment reduced CXCL8 and IL1B expression 4.7- and 2.2-fold, respectively, under acute inflammation. Ex vivo, the tested LAB combination reduced acute inflammation under E. coli infection, decreasing IL-8, IL-1β, and IL-6 up to 2.2-, 2.5-, and 2.2-fold, respectively. In the total inflammation model, the LAB combination decreased IL-8 1.6-fold and IL-6 1.2-fold. Ultrastructural evaluation of the tissue suggested no direct interaction between the LAB and E. coli, although pathological effects of E. coli in endometrial cells were greatly diminished or even reversed by the LAB combination. This study shows the promising potential of LAB probiotics for therapeutic use against endometrial inflammation and infection. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. PafR, a Novel Transcription Regulator, Is Important for Pathogenesis in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Mordechai; Watad, Mobarak; Smith, Sara N.; Alteri, Christopher J.; Gordon, Noa; Rosenshine, Ilan; Mobley, Harry L.

    2014-01-01

    The metV genomic island in the chromosome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) encodes a putative transcription factor and a sugar permease of the phosphotransferase system (PTS), which are predicted to compose a Bgl-like sensory system. The presence of these two genes, hereby termed pafR and pafP, respectively, has been previously shown to correlate with isolates causing clinical syndromes. We show here that deletion of both genes impairs the ability of the resulting mutant to infect the CBA/J mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection compared to that of the parent strain, CFT073. Expressing the two genes in trans in the two-gene knockout mutant complemented full virulence. Deletion of either gene individually generated the same phenotype as the double knockout, indicating that both pafR and pafP are important to pathogenesis. We screened numerous environmental conditions but failed to detect expression from the promoter that precedes the paf genes in vitro, suggesting that they are in vivo induced (ivi). Although PafR is shown here to be capable of functioning as a transcriptional antiterminator, its targets in the UPEC genome are not known. Using microarray analysis, we have shown that expression of PafR from a heterologous promoter in CFT073 affects expression of genes related to bacterial virulence, biofilm formation, and metabolism. Expression of PafR also inhibits biofilm formation and motility. Taken together, our results suggest that the paf genes are implicated in pathogenesis and that PafR controls virulence genes, in particular biofilm formation genes. PMID:25069986

  5. Uncoupling of allosteric and oligomeric regulation in a functional hybrid enzyme constructed from Escherichia coli and human ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuan; Long, Marcus J C; Rigney, Mike; Parvez, Saba; Blessing, William A; Aye, Yimon

    2013-10-08

    An N-terminal-domain (NTD) and adjacent catalytic body (CB) make up subunit-α of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the rate-limiting enzyme for de novo dNTP biosynthesis. A strong linkage exists between ligand binding at the NTD and oligomerization-coupled RNR inhibition, inducible by both dATP and nucleotide chemotherapeutics. These observations have distinguished the NTD as an oligomeric regulation domain dictating the assembly of inactive RNR oligomers. Inactive states of RNR differ between eukaryotes and prokaryotes (α6 in human versus α4β4 in Escherichia coli , wherein β is RNR's other subunit); however, the NTD structurally interconnects individual α2 or α2 and β2 dimeric motifs within the respective α6 or α4β4 complexes. To elucidate the influence of NTD ligand binding on RNR allosteric and oligomeric regulation, we engineered a human- E. coli hybrid enzyme (HE) where human-NTD is fused to E. coli -CB. Both the NTD and the CB of the HE bind dATP. The HE specifically partners with E. coli -β to form an active holocomplex. However, although the NTD is the sole physical tether to support α2 and/or β2 associations in the dATP-bound α6 or α4β4 fully inhibited RNR complexes, the binding of dATP to the HE NTD only partially suppresses HE activity and fully precludes formation of higher-order HE oligomers. We postulate that oligomeric regulation is the ultimate mechanism for potent RNR inhibition, requiring species-specific NTD-CB interactions. Such interdomain cooperativity in RNR oligomerization is unexpected from structural studies alone or biochemical studies of point mutants.

  6. RpoS regulation of gene expression during exponential growth of Escherichia coli K12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tao; Kirchhof, Mark G; Schellhorn, Herb E

    2008-03-01

    RpoS is a major regulator of genes required for adaptation to stationary phase in E. coli. However, the exponential phase expression of some genes is affected by rpoS mutation, suggesting RpoS may also have an important physiological role in growing cells. To test this hypothesis, we examined the regulatory role of RpoS in exponential phase using both genomic and biochemical approaches. Microarray expression data revealed that, in the rpoS mutant, the expression of 268 genes was attenuated while the expression of 24 genes was enhanced. Genes responsible for carbon source transport (the mal operon for maltose), protein folding (dnaK and mopAB), and iron acquisition (fepBD, entCBA, fecI, and exbBD) were positively controlled by RpoS. The importance of RpoS-mediated control of iron acquisition was confirmed by cellular metal analysis which revealed that the intracellular iron content of wild type cells was two-fold higher than in rpoS mutant cells. Surprisingly, many previously identified RpoS stationary-phase dependent genes were not controlled by RpoS in exponential phase and several genes were RpoS-regulated only in exponential phase, suggesting the involvement of other regulators. The expression of RpoS-dependent genes osmY, tnaA and malK was controlled by Crl, a transcriptional regulator that modulates RpoS activity. In summary, the identification of a group of exponential phase genes controlled by RpoS reveals a novel aspect of RpoS function.

  7. Overlapping Repressor Binding Sites Result in Additive Regulation of Escherichia coli FadH by FadR and ArcA▿

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli fadH encodes a 2,4-dienoyl reductase that plays an auxiliary role in β-oxidation of certain unsaturated fatty acids. In the 2 decades since its discovery, FadH biochemistry has been studied extensively. However, the genetic regulation of FadH has been explored only partially. Here we report mapping of the fadH promoter and document its complex regulation by three independent regulators, the fatty acid degradation FadR repressor, the oxygen-responsive ArcA-ArcB two-component s...

  8. Expression of the alaE gene is positively regulated by the global regulator Lrp in response to intracellular accumulation of l-alanine in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Kohei; Sato, Kazuki; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Makino, Yumiko; Shigenobu, Shuji; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    The alaE gene in Escherichia coli encodes an l-alanine exporter that catalyzes the active export of l-alanine using proton electrochemical potential. In our previous study, alaE expression was shown to increase in the presence of l-alanyl-l-alanine (Ala-Ala). In this study, the global regulator leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) was identified as an activator of the alaE gene. A promoter less β-galactosidase gene was fused to an alaE upstream region (240 nucleotides). Cells that were lacZ-deficient and harbored this reporter plasmid showed significant induction of β-galactosidase activity (approximately 17-fold) in the presence of 6 mM l-alanine, l-leucine, and Ala-Ala. However, a reporter plasmid possessing a smaller alaE upstream region (180 nucleotides) yielded transformants with strikingly low enzyme activity under the same conditions. In contrast, lrp-deficient cells showed almost no β-galactosidase induction, indicating that Lrp positively regulates alaE expression. We next performed an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and a DNase I footprinting assay using purified hexahistidine-tagged Lrp (Lrp-His). Consequently, we found that Lrp-His binds to the alaE upstream region spanning nucleotide -161 to -83 with a physiologically relevant affinity (apparent KD, 288.7 ± 83.8 nM). Furthermore, the binding affinity of Lrp-His toward its cis-element was increased by l-alanine and l-leucine, but not by Ala-Ala and d-alanine. Based on these results, we concluded that the gene expression of the alaE is regulated by Lrp in response to intracellular levels of l-alanine, which eventually leads to intracellular homeostasis of l-alanine concentrations.

  9. Role of the multidrug resistance regulator MarA in global regulation of the hdeAB acid resistance operon in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Cristian; McMurry, Laura M; Levy, Stuart B

    2008-02-01

    MarA, a transcriptional regulator in Escherichia coli, affects functions such as multiple-antibiotic resistance (Mar) and virulence. Usually an activator, MarA is a repressor of hdeAB and other acid resistance genes. We found that, in wild-type cells grown in LB medium at pH 7.0 or pH 5.5, repression of hdeAB by MarA occurred only in stationary phase and was reduced in the absence of H-NS and GadE, the main regulators of hdeAB. Moreover, repression of hdeAB by MarA was greater in the absence of GadX or Lrp in exponential phase at pH 7.0 and in the absence of GadW or RpoS in stationary phase at pH 5.5. In turn, MarA enhanced repression of hdeAB by H-NS and hindered activation by GadE in stationary phase and also reduced the activity of GadX, GadW, RpoS, and Lrp on hdeAB under some conditions. As a result of its direct and indirect effects, overexpression of MarA prevented most of the induction of hdeAB expression as cells entered stationary phase and made the cells sevenfold more sensitive to acid challenge at pH 2.5. These findings show that repression of hdeAB by MarA depends on pH, growth phase, and other regulators of hdeAB and is associated with reduced resistance to acid conditions.

  10. Manipulation of the carbon storage regulator system for metabolite remodeling and biofuel production in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Microbial engineering strategies that elicit global metabolic perturbations have the capacity to increase organism robustness for targeted metabolite production. In particular, perturbations to regulators of cellular systems that impact glycolysis and amino acid production while simultaneously decreasing fermentation by-products such as acetate and CO2 make ideal targets. Intriguingly, perturbation of the Carbon Storage Regulator (Csr) system has been previously implicated in large changes in central carbon metabolism in E. coli. Therefore, we hypothesized that perturbation of the Csr system through the CsrA-CsrB ribonucleoprotein complex might increase production of biofuels and their intermediates from heterologous pathways. Results We engaged the CsrA-CsrB ribonucleoprotein complex of E. coli via overexpression of CsrB. CsrB is a 350-nucleotide non-coding RNA that antagonizes CsrA, an RNA-binding protein that regulates translation of specific mRNA targets. By using shotgun proteomics and targeted metabolomics we established that elevation of CsrB levels leads to alterations in metabolite and protein levels in glycolysis, the TCA cycle and amino acid levels. Consequently, we show that such changes can be suitably applied to improve the production of desired compounds through the native fatty acid and heterologous n-butanol and isoprenoid pathways by up to two-fold. We also observed concomitant decreases in undesirable fermentation by-products such as acetate and CO2. Conclusions We have demonstrated that simple engineering of the RNA-based Csr global regulatory system constitutes a novel approach to obtaining pathway-independent improvements within engineered hosts. Additionally, since Csr is conserved across most prokaryotic species, this approach may also be amenable to a wide variety of production hosts. PMID:22694848

  11. A novel mechanism controls anaerobic and catabolite regulation of the Escherichia coli tdc operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawers, G

    2001-03-01

    The tdc operon is subject to CRP-controlled catabolite repression. Expression of the operon is also induced anaerobically, although this regulation does not rely on direct control by either FNR or ArcA. Recently, the anaerobic expression of the tdc operon was found to be fortuitously induced in the presence of glucose by a heterologous gene isolated from the Gram-positive anaerobe Clostridium butyricum. The gene, termed tcbC, encoded a histone-like protein of 14.5 kDa. Using tdc-lacZ fusions, it was shown that TcbC did not activate tdc expression by functionally replacing any of the operon regulators. In vitro transcription analyses with RNA polymerase and CRP revealed that faithful CRP-dependent transcription initiation occurred only on supercoiled templates. No specific, CRP-dependent transcription initiation was observed on relaxed or linear DNA templates. Surprisingly, purified His-tagged TcbC activated transcription from a relaxed, circular template, but not from supercoiled or linear templates. Examination of the CRP binding site of the tdc promoter revealed that it was located 43.5 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site. Repositioning of the CRP site at -41.5 bp abolished activation by the TcbC protein and allowed CRP-dependent transcription to occur on linear, relaxed and supercoiled templates. TcbC bound DNA non-specifically; however, in topoisomerase I relaxation assays, it was demonstrated that TcbC imposed torsional constraints on negatively supercoiled DNA, which influenced the ability of the enzyme to relax the topoisomers. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that TcbC activates transcription of tdc by altering the local topological status of the tdc promoter and that, in the wild-type tdc promoter, the CRP binding site is misaligned to allow transcription to occur only under optimal conditions. Indeed, in vivo transcription analyses revealed that repositioning of the CRP binding site to -41.5 bp resulted in high-level, CRP

  12. GPA-9 is a novel regulator of innate immunity against Escherichia coli foods in adult Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Sunhee; Paik, Young-Ki

    2011-04-01

    Innate immune responses to pathogens are governed by the nervous system. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying innate immunity in Caenorhabditis elegans against Escherichia coli OP50, a standard laboratory C. elegans food. Longevity was compared in worms fed live or UV-killed OP50 at low or high density food condition (HDF). Expression of the antimicrobial gene lys-8 was approximately 5-fold higher in worms fed live OP50, suggesting activation of innate immunity upon recognition of OP50 metabolites. Lifespan was extended and SOD-3 mRNA levels were increased in gpa-9-overexpressing gpa-9XS worms under HDF in association with robust induction of insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS). Expression of ins-7 and daf-28 that control lys-8 expression was reduced in gpa-9XS, indicating that GPA-9-mediated immunity is due in part to ins-7 and daf-28 downregulation. Our results suggest that OP50 metabolites in amphid neurons elicit innate immunity through the IIS pathway, and identify GPA-9 as a novel regulator of both the immune system and aging in C. elegans. © 2011 The Authors. Aging Cell © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. System-level analysis of tryptophan regulation in Escherichia coli--performance under starved and well-fed conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, N; Bhartiya, S; Venkatesh, K V

    2007-05-01

    Biological systems respond appropriately to a variety of environments thus representing complex systems with rich physiological behaviour. Quantitative models can be used to identify the design components that result in the system complexity. In this work, the tryptophan system of Escherichia coli that synthesises tryptophan internally when faced with starvation in a rapid manner and shuts off the synthesis sluggishly when the cells are exposed to a medium replete with tryptophan has been discussed. The evolved regulatory design is capable of providing such an asymmetric response that represents an appropriate behaviour to ensure survival. The tryptophan system uses three distinct regulatory mechanisms namely genetic regulation, transcriptional attenuation and enzyme inhibition to achieve its goals. It has been shown that genetic repression and attenuation are the only active regulatory mechanisms during moderate and severe starvation. However, as the degree of starvation increases, repression is relieved prior to attenuation. The analysis also shows that enzyme inhibition does not play a role under severe starvation and plays a marginal role in increasing the rate of repression when the cells are exposed to well-fed conditions. Finally, we use tools from linear systems theory to rationalise the above observations based on the poles and zeros of an approximated linear system.

  14. Exonuclease III and the catalase hydroperoxidase II in Escherichia coli are both regulated by the katF gene product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sak, B.D.; Eisenstark, A.; Touati, D.

    1989-05-01

    The levels of both exonuclease III (exo III, product of xthA) and hydroperoxidase II (HP-II, product of katE) activity in Escherichia coli were influenced by a functional katF gene. The katF gene product is also necessary for synthesis of HP-II. Mutations in either katF or xthA, but not katE, result in sensitivity to H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and near-UV (300-400 nm) radiation. Exo III, encoded by the xthA locus, recognizes and removes nucleoside 5'-monophosphates near apurinic and apyrimidinic sites in damaged DNA. Extracts of katF mutant strains had little detectable exo III activity. When a katF+ plasmid was introduced into the katF mutant, exo III activity exceeded wild-type levels. We propose that the katF gene is a trans-acting positive regulator of exo III and HP-II enzymes, both of which are involved in cellular recovery from oxidative damage.

  15. Cloning, expression, purification and refolding of microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Farha; Asad, Mohd; Malhotra, Pawan; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2014-03-01

    Microtubule-associated protein/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 (MARK4) is a member of the family Ser/Thr kinase and involved in numerous biological functions including microtubule bundle formation, nervous system development, positive regulation of programmed cell death, cell cycle control, cell polarity determination, cell shape alterations, cell division etc. For various biophysical and structural studies, we need this protein in adequate quantity. In this paper, we report a novel cloning strategy for MARK4. We have cloned MARK4 catalytic domain including 59 N-terminal extra residues with unknown function and catalytic domain alone in PQE30 vector. The recombinant MARK4 was expressed in the inclusion bodies in M15 cells. The inclusion bodies were solubilized effectively with 1.5% N-lauroylsarcosine in alkaline buffer and subsequently purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography in a single step with high purity and good concentration. Purity of protein was checked on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified by using mass spectrometry immunoblotting. Refolding of the recombinant protein was validated by ATPase assay. Our purification procedure is quick, simple and produces adequate quantity of proteins with high purity in a limited step.

  16. A simple strategy guides the complex metabolic regulation in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchetti, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    A way to decipher the complexity of the cellular metabolism is to study the effect of different external perturbations. Through an analysis over a sufficiently large set of gene knockouts and growing conditions, one aims to find a unifying principle that governs the metabolic regulation. For instance, it is known that the cessation of the microorganism proliferation after a gene deletion is only transient. However, we do not know the guiding principle that determines the partial or complete recovery of the growth rate, the corresponding redistribution of the metabolic fluxes and the possible different phenotypes. In spite of this large variety in the observed metabolic adjustments, we show that responses of E. coli to several different perturbations can always be derived from a sequence of greedy and myopic resilencings. This simple mechanism provides a detailed explanation for the experimental dynamics both at cellular (proliferation rate) and molecular level (13C-determined fluxes), also in case of appearance of multiple phenotypes. As additional support, we identified an example of a simple network motif that is capable of implementing this myopic greediness in the regulation of the metabolism.

  17. The microbiota regulates neutrophil homeostasis and host resistance to Escherichia coli K1 sepsis in neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Hitesh S; Liu, Yuhong; Menkiti, Ogechukwu R; Mei, Junjie; Dai, Ning; O'Leary, Claire E; Oliver, Paula M; Kolls, Jay K; Weiser, Jeffrey N; Worthen, G Scott

    2014-05-01

    Neonatal colonization by microbes, which begins immediately after birth, is influenced by gestational age and the mother's microbiota and is modified by exposure to antibiotics. In neonates, prolonged duration of antibiotic therapy is associated with increased risk of late-onset sepsis (LOS), a disorder controlled by neutrophils. A role for the microbiota in regulating neutrophil development and susceptibility to sepsis in the neonate remains unclear. We exposed pregnant mouse dams to antibiotics in drinking water to limit transfer of maternal microbes to the neonates. Antibiotic exposure of dams decreased the total number and composition of microbes in the intestine of the neonates. This was associated with decreased numbers of circulating and bone marrow neutrophils and granulocyte/macrophage-restricted progenitor cells in the bone marrow of antibiotic-treated and germ-free neonates. Antibiotic exposure of dams reduced the number of interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing cells in the intestine and production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Granulocytopenia was associated with impaired host defense and increased susceptibility to Escherichia coli K1 and Klebsiella pneumoniae sepsis in antibiotic-treated neonates, which could be partially reversed by administration of G-CSF. Transfer of a normal microbiota into antibiotic-treated neonates induced IL-17 production by group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in the intestine, increasing plasma G-CSF levels and neutrophil numbers in a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)- and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-dependent manner and restored IL-17-dependent resistance to sepsis. Specific depletion of ILCs prevented IL-17- and G-CSF-dependent granulocytosis and resistance to sepsis. These data support a role for the intestinal microbiota in regulation of granulocytosis, neutrophil homeostasis and host resistance to sepsis in neonates.

  18. Up-regulation of intestinal vascular endothelial growth factor by Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Cane

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Angiogenesis has been recently described as a novel component of inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis. The level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has been found increased in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis mucosa. To question whether a pro-inflammatory Escherichia coli could regulate the expression of VEGF in human intestinal epithelial cells, we examine the response of cultured human colonic T84 cells to infection by E. coli strain C1845 that belongs to the typical Afa/Dr diffusely adhering E. coli family (Afa/Dr DAEC. METHODOLOGY: VEGF mRNA expression was examined by Northern blotting and q-PCR. VEGF protein levels were assayed by ELISA and its bioactivity was analysed in endothelial cells. The bacterial factor involved in VEGF induction was identified using recombinant E. coli expressing Dr adhesin, purified Dr adhesin and lipopolysaccharide. The signaling pathway activated for the up-regulation of VEGF was identified using a blocking monoclonal anti-DAF antibody, Western blot analysis and specific pharmacological inhibitors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: C1845 bacteria induce the production of VEGF protein which is bioactive. VEGF is induced by adhering C1845 in both a time- and bacteria concentration-dependent manner. This phenomenon is not cell line dependent since we reproduced this observation in intestinal LS174, Caco2/TC7 and INT407 cells. Up-regulation of VEGF production requires: (1 the interaction of the bacterial F1845 adhesin with the brush border-associated decay accelerating factor (DAF, CD55 acting as a bacterial receptor, and (2 the activation of a Src protein kinase upstream of the activation of the Erk and Akt signaling pathways. CONCLUSIONS: Results demonstrate that a Afa/Dr DAEC strain induces an adhesin-dependent activation of DAF signaling that leads to the up-regulation of bioactive VEGF in cultured human intestinal cells. Thus, these results suggest a link between an entero-adherent, pro

  19. The solution structure of ChaB, a putative membrane ion antiporter regulator from Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iannuzzi Pietro

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ChaB is a putative regulator of ChaA, a Na+/H+ antiporter that also has Ca+/H+ activity in E. coli. ChaB contains a conserved 60-residue region of unknown function found in other bacteria, archaeabacteria and a series of baculoviral proteins. As part of a structural genomics project, the structure of ChaB was elucidated by NMR spectroscopy. Results The structure of ChaB is composed of 3 α-helices and a small sheet that pack tightly to form a fold that is found in the cyclin-box family of proteins. Conclusion ChaB is distinguished from its putative DNA binding sequence homologues by a highly charged flexible loop region that has weak affinity to Mg2+ and Ca2+ divalent metal ions.

  20. Interspecies Transfer and Regulation of Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 Nitrogen Fixation Island in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yunlei; Lu, Na; Chen, Qinghua; Zhan, Yuhua; Liu, Wei; Lu, Wei; Zhu, Baoli; Lin, Min; Yang, Zhirong; Yan, Yongliang

    2015-08-01

    Until now, considerable effort has been made to engineer novel nitrogen-fixing organisms through the transfer of nif genes from various diazotrophs to non-nitrogen fixers; however, regulatory coupling of the heterologous nif genes with the regulatory system of the new host is still not well understood. In this work, a 49 kb nitrogen fixation island from P. stutzeri A1501 was transferred into E. coli using a novel and efficient transformation strategy, and a series of recombinant nitrogen-fixing E. coli strains were obtained. We found that the nitrogenase activity of the recombinant E. coli strain EN-01, similar to the parent strain P. stutzeri A1501, was dependent on external ammonia concentration, oxygen tension, and temperature. We further found that there existed a regulatory coupling between the E. coli general nitrogen regulatory system and the heterologous P. stutzeri nif island in the recombinant E. coli strain. We also provided evidence that the E. coli general nitrogen regulator GlnG protein was involved in the activation of the nif-specific regulator NifA via a direct interaction with the NifA promoter. To the best of our knowledge, this work plays a groundbreaking role in increasing understanding of the regulatory coupling of the heterologous nitrogen fixation system with the regulatory system of the recipient host. Furthermore, it will shed light on the structure and functional integrity of the nif island and will be useful for the construction of novel and more robust nitrogen-fixing organisms through biosynthetic engineering.

  1. GlgS, described previously as a glycogen synthesis control protein, negatively regulates motility and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Mehdi; Montero, Manuel; Almagro, Goizeder; Viale, Alejandro M; Sevilla, Ángel; Cánovas, Manuel; Muñoz, Francisco J; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Eydallin, Gustavo; Dose, Hitomi; Takeuchi, Rikiya; Mori, Hirotada; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2013-06-15

    Escherichia coli glycogen metabolism involves the regulation of glgBXCAP operon expression and allosteric control of the GlgC [ADPG (ADP-glucose) pyrophosphorylase]-mediated catalysis of ATP and G1P (glucose-1-phosphate) to ADPG linked to glycogen biosynthesis. E. coli glycogen metabolism is also affected by glgS. Though the precise function of the protein it encodes is unknown, its deficiency causes both reduced glycogen content and enhanced levels of the GlgC-negative allosteric regulator AMP. The transcriptomic analyses carried out in the present study revealed that, compared with their isogenic BW25113 wild-type strain, glgS-null (ΔglgS) mutants have increased expression of the operons involved in the synthesis of type 1 fimbriae adhesins, flagella and nucleotides. In agreement, ΔglgS cells were hyperflagellated and hyperfimbriated, and displayed elevated swarming motility; these phenotypes all reverted to the wild-type by ectopic glgS expression. Also, ΔglgS cells accumulated high colanic acid content and displayed increased ability to form biofilms on polystyrene surfaces. F-driven conjugation based on large-scale interaction studies of glgS with all the non-essential genes of E. coli showed that deletion of purine biosynthesis genes complement the glycogen-deficient, high motility and high biofilm content phenotypes of ΔglgS cells. Overall the results of the present study indicate that glycogen deficiency in ΔglgS cells can be ascribed to high flagellar propulsion and high exopolysaccharide and purine nucleotides biosynthetic activities competing with GlgC for the same ATP and G1P pools. Supporting this proposal, glycogen-less ΔglgC cells displayed an elevated swarming motility, and accumulated high levels of colanic acid and biofilm. Furthermore, glgC overexpression reverted the glycogen-deficient, high swarming motility, high colanic acid and high biofilm content phenotypes of ΔglgS cells to the wild-type. As on the basis of the present study Glg

  2. An O island 172 encoded RNA helicase regulates the motility of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmei Xu

    Full Text Available Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7 is a major cause of zoonotic food- and water-borne intestinal infections worldwide with clinical consequences ranging from mild diarrhoea to hemolytic uraemic syndrome. The genome of EHEC O157:H7 contains many regions of unique DNA that are referred to as O islands including the Shiga toxin prophages and pathogenicity islands encoding key virulence factors. However many of these O islands are of unknown function. In this study, genetic analysis was conducted on OI-172 which is a 44,434 bp genomic island with 27 open reading frames. Comparative genome analysis showed that O1-72 is a composite island with progressive gain of genes since O157:H7 evolved from its ancestral O55:H7. A partial OI-172 island was also found in 2 unrelated E. coli strains and 2 Salmonella strains. OI-172 encodes several putative helicases, one of which (Z5898 is a putative DEAH box RNA helicase. To investigate the function of Z5898, a deletion mutant (EDL933ΔZ5898 was constructed in the O157:H7 strain EDL933. Comparative proteomic analysis of the mutant with the wild-type EDL933 found that flagellin was down-regulated in the Z5898 mutant. Motility assay showed that EDL933ΔZ5898 migrated slower than the wild-type EDL933 and electron microscopy found no surface flagella. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR revealed that the fliC expression of EDL933ΔZ5898 was significantly lower while the expression of its upstream regulator gene, fliA, was not affected. Using a fliA and a fliC promoter - green fluorescent protein fusion contruct, Z5898 was found to affect only the fliC promoter activity. Therefore, Z5898 regulates the flagella based motility by exerting its effect on fliC. We conclude that OI-172 is a motility associated O island and hereby name it the MAO island.

  3. RegulonDB version 7.0: transcriptional regulation of Escherichia coli K-12 integrated within genetic sensory response units (Gensor Units)

    OpenAIRE

    Gama-Castro, Socorro; Salgado, Heladia; Peralta-Gil, Martin; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Muñiz-Rascado, Luis; Solano-Lira, Hilda; Jimenez-Jacinto, Verónica; Weiss, Verena; García-Sotelo, Jair S.; López-Fuentes, Alejandra; Porrón-Sotelo, Liliana; Alquicira-Hernández, Shirley; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Martínez-Flores, Irma; Alquicira-Hernández, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx/) is the primary reference database of the best-known regulatory network of any free-living organism, that of Escherichia coli K-12. The major conceptual change since 3 years ago is an expanded biological context so that transcriptional regulation is now part of a unit that initiates with the signal and continues with the signal transduction to the core of regulation, modifying expression of the affected target genes responsible for the response. We cal...

  4. Escherichia coli UMP-kinase, a member of the aspartokinase family, is a hexamer regulated by guanine nucleotides and UTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serina, L; Blondin, C; Krin, E; Sismeiro, O; Danchin, A; Sakamoto, H; Gilles, A M; Bârzu, O

    1995-04-18

    The pyrH gene, encoding UMP-kinase from Escherichia coli, was cloned using as a genetic probe the property of the carAB operon to be controlled for its expression by the concentration of cytoplasmic UTP. The open reading frame of the pyrH gene of 723 bp was found to be identical to that of the smbA gene [Yamanaka, K., et al. (1992) J. Bacteriol. 174, 7517-7526], previously described as being involved in chromosome partitioning in E. coli. The bacterial UMP-kinase did not display significant sequence similarity to known nucleoside monophosphate kinases. On the contrary, it exhibited similarity with three families of enzymes including aspartokinases, glutamate kinases, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa carbamate kinase. UMP-kinase overproduced in E. coli was purified to homogeneity and analyzed for its structural and catalytic properties. The protein consists of six identical subunits, each of 240 amino acid residues (the N-terminal methionine residue is missing in the expressed protein). Upon excitation at 295 nm, the bacterial enzyme exhibits a fluorescence emission spectrum with maximum at 332 nm which indicates that the single tryptophan residue of the protein (Trp119) is located in a hydrophobic environment. Like other enzymes involved in the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides, UMP-kinase of E. coli is subject to regulation by nucleotides: GTP is an allosteric activator, whereas UTP serves as an allosteric inhibitor. UTP and UDP, but none of the other nucleotides tested such as GTP, ATP, and UMP, enhanced the fluorescence of the protein. The sigmoidal shape of the dose-response curve indicated cooperativity in binding of UTP and UDP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Ribonucleotide reductase NrdR as a novel regulator for motility and chemotaxis during adherent-invasive Escherichia coli infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreux, Nicolas; del Mar Cendra, Maria; Massier, Sébastien; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Barnich, Nicolas; Torrents, Eduard

    2015-04-01

    A critical step in the life cycle of all organisms is the duplication of the genetic material during cell division. Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are essential enzymes for this step because they control the de novo production of the deoxyribonucleotides required for DNA synthesis and repair. Enterobacteriaceae have three functional classes of RNRs (Ia, Ib, and III), which are transcribed from separate operons and encoded by the genes nrdAB, nrdHIEF, and nrdDG, respectively. Here, we investigated the role of RNRs in the virulence of adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) isolated from Crohn's disease (CD) patients. Interestingly, the LF82 strain of AIEC harbors four different RNRs (two class Ia, one class Ib, and one class III). Although the E. coli RNR enzymes have been extensively characterized both biochemically and enzymatically, little is known about their roles during bacterial infection. We found that RNR expression was modified in AIEC LF82 bacteria during cell infection, suggesting that RNRs play an important role in AIEC virulence. Knockout of the nrdR and nrdD genes, which encode a transcriptional regulator of RNRs and class III anaerobic RNR, respectively, decreased AIEC LF82's ability to colonize the gut mucosa of transgenic mice that express human CEACAM6 (carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6). Microarray experiments demonstrated that NrdR plays an indirect role in AIEC virulence by interfering with bacterial motility and chemotaxis. Thus, the development of drugs targeting RNR classes, in particular NrdR and NrdD, could be a promising new strategy to control gut colonization by AIEC bacteria in CD patients.

  6. From ingestion to colonization: the influence of the host environment on regulation of the LEE encoded type III secretion system in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P R Connolly

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC binds to host tissue and intimately attaches to intestinal cells using a dedicated type III secretion system (T3SS. This complex multi-protein organelle is encoded within a large pathogenicity island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE, which is subject to extensive regulatory control. Over the past 15 years we have gained a wealth of knowledge concerning how the LEE is regulated transcriptionally by specific, global and phage encoded regulators, but more recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of how specific signals, including host or microbiota derived metabolic products and various nutrient sources, can affect how the LEE encoded T3SS is regulated. In this review we discuss transcriptional regulation of the LEE in EHEC, focusing on how these physiologically relevant signals are sensed and how they affect the expression of this major virulence factor. The implications for understanding the disease process by specific regulatory mechanisms are also discussed.

  7. From ingestion to colonization: the influence of the host environment on regulation of the LEE encoded type III secretion system in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, James P R; Finlay, B Brett; Roe, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) binds to host tissue and intimately attaches to intestinal cells using a dedicated type III secretion system (T3SS). This complex multi-protein organelle is encoded within a large pathogenicity island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), which is subject to extensive regulatory control. Over the past 15 years we have gained a wealth of knowledge concerning how the LEE is regulated transcriptionally by specific, global and phage encoded regulators. More recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of how specific signals, including host or microbiota derived metabolic products and various nutrient sources, can affect how the LEE-encoded T3SS is regulated. In this review we discuss regulation of the LEE, focusing on how these physiologically relevant signals are sensed and how they affect the expression of this major virulence factor. The implications for understanding the disease process by specific regulatory mechanisms are also discussed.

  8. Regulation of Expression of the adhE Gene, Encoding Ethanol Oxidoreductase in Escherichia coli: Transcription from a Downstream Promoter and Regulation by Fnr and RpoS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Membrillo-Hernández, Jorge; Lin, E. C. C.

    1999-01-01

    The adhE gene of Escherichia coli, located at min 27 on the chromosome, encodes the bifunctional NAD-linked oxidoreductase responsible for the conversion of acetyl-coenzyme A to ethanol during fermentative growth. The expression of adhE is dependent on both transcriptional and posttranscriptional controls and is about 10-fold higher during anaerobic than during aerobic growth. Two putative transcriptional start sites have been reported: one at position −292 and the other at −188 from the translational start codon ATG. In this study we show, by using several different transcriptional and translational fusions to the lacZ gene, that both putative transcriptional start sites can be functional and each site can be redox regulated. Although both start sites are NarL repressible in the presence of nitrate, Fnr activates only the −188 start site and Fis is required for the transcription of only the −292 start site. In addition, it was discovered that RpoS activates adhE transcription at both start sites. Under all experimental conditions tested, however, only the upstream start site is active. Available evidence indicates that under those conditions, the upstream promoter region acts as a silencer of the downstream transcriptional start site. Translation of the mRNA starting at −292, but not the one starting at −188, requires RNase III. The results support the previously postulated ribosomal binding site (RBS) occlusion model, according to which RNase III cleavage is required to release the RBS from a stem-loop structure in the long transcript. PMID:10601216

  9. pH regulates genes for flagellar motility, catabolism, and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Lisa M; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Bondurant, Sandra S; Radmacher, Michael; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2005-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of Escherichia coli K-12 W3110 were compared as a function of steady-state external pH. Cultures were grown to an optical density at 600 nm of 0.3 in potassium-modified Luria-Bertani medium buffered at pH 5.0, 7.0, and 8.7. For each of the three pH conditions, cDNA from RNA of five independent cultures was hybridized to Affymetrix E. coli arrays. Analysis of variance with an alpha level of 0.001 resulted in 98% power to detect genes showing a twofold difference in expression. Normalized expression indices were calculated for each gene and intergenic region (IG). Differential expression among the three pH classes was observed for 763 genes and 353 IGs. Hierarchical clustering yielded six well-defined clusters of pH profiles, designated Acid High (highest expression at pH 5.0), Acid Low (lowest expression at pH 5.0), Base High (highest at pH 8.7), Base Low (lowest at pH 8.7), Neutral High (highest at pH 7.0, lower in acid or base), and Neutral Low (lowest at pH 7.0, higher at both pH extremes). Flagellar and chemotaxis genes were repressed at pH 8.7 (Base Low cluster), where the cell's transmembrane proton potential is diminished by the maintenance of an inverted pH gradient. High pH also repressed the proton pumps cytochrome o (cyo) and NADH dehydrogenases I and II. By contrast, the proton-importing ATP synthase F1Fo and the microaerophilic cytochrome d (cyd), which minimizes proton export, were induced at pH 8.7. These observations are consistent with a model in which high pH represses synthesis of flagella, which expend proton motive force, while stepping up electron transport and ATPase components that keep protons inside the cell. Acid-induced genes, on the other hand, were coinduced by conditions associated with increased metabolic rate, such as oxidative stress. All six pH-dependent clusters included envelope and periplasmic proteins, which directly experience external pH. Overall, this study showed that (i) low pH accelerates acid

  10. Demand theory of gene regulation. II. Quantitative application to the lactose and maltose operons of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savageau, M A

    1998-08-01

    Induction of gene expression can be accomplished either by removing a restraining element (negative mode of control) or by providing a stimulatory element (positive mode of control). According to the demand theory of gene regulation, which was first presented in qualitative form in the 1970s, the negative mode will be selected for the control of a gene whose function is in low demand in the organism's natural environment, whereas the positive mode will be selected for the control of a gene whose function is in high demand. This theory has now been further developed in a quantitative form that reveals the importance of two key parameters: cycle time C, which is the average time for a gene to complete an ON/OFF cycle, and demand D, which is the fraction of the cycle time that the gene is ON. Here we estimate nominal values for the relevant mutation rates and growth rates and apply the quantitative demand theory to the lactose and maltose operons of Escherichia coli. The results define regions of the C vs. D plot within which selection for the wild-type regulatory mechanisms is realizable, and these in turn provide the first estimates for the minimum and maximum values of demand that are required for selection of the positive and negative modes of gene control found in these systems. The ratio of mutation rate to selection coefficient is the most relevant determinant of the realizable region for selection, and the most influential parameter is the selection coefficient that reflects the reduction in growth rate when there is superfluous expression of a gene. The quantitative theory predicts the rate and extent of selection for each mode of control. It also predicts three critical values for the cycle time. The predicted maximum value for the cycle time C is consistent with the lifetime of the host. The predicted minimum value for C is consistent with the time for transit through the intestinal tract without colonization. Finally, the theory predicts an optimum value

  11. Hyper-regulation of pyr-gene expression in Escherichia coli cells with slow ribosomes. Evidence for RNA polymerase pausing in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1988-01-01

    transcription should terminate or continue into the structural genes. This paper described a study of pyrBI and pyrE gene regulation in cells where the ribosomes move slowly as a result of mutation in rpsL. It appears that expression of the two genes is hyper-regulated by the UTP pool in this type of cells......UTP-modulated attenuation of transcription is involved in regulating the synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides in Escherichia coli. Thus, expression of two genes, pyrBI and pyrE, was shown to be under this type of control. The genes encode the two subunits of aspartate transcarbamylase and orotate....... Mechanistically this will couple the ribosomes translating a leader peptide gene more tightly to the elongating RNA polymerase. The ribosomes will then be more prone to prevent the folding of the mRNA chains into terminating hairpin structures when RNA polymerase is at the attenuator and has to decide whether...

  12. Hha controls Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilm formation by differential regulation of global transcriptional regulators FlhDC and CsgD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a zoonotic pathogen that produces a broad-spectrum of diarrheal illnesses in infected humans. Although molecular mechanisms enabling EHEC O157:H7 to produce characteristic adherence on epithelial cells are well characterized, regulatory mechanisms...

  13. Escherichia fergusonii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaastra, W; Kusters, J G; van Duijkeren, E; Lipman, L J A

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia fergusonii was introduced in the genus Escherichia almost 65 years later than Escherichia coli after which the genus was named. From then (1985) onwards mainly case reports on E. fergusonii associated with disease in individuals of veterinary or human origin have been reported and only v

  14. Constitutive expression of RyhB regulates the heme biosynthesis pathway and increases the 5-aminolevulinic acid accumulation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangfang; Wang, Yang; Gong, Kai; Wang, Qian; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, the small RNA ryhB, which regulates the metabolism of iron in Escherichia coli, was constitutively expressed in engineered E. coli DALA. The resulting strain E. coli DALRA produced 16% more 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) than the parent strain E. coli DALA in batch fermentation. Meanwhile, we found that addition of iron in the medium increased heme formation and reduced ALA yield, whereas the presence of iron chelator in the medium decreased heme concentration and increased the ALA production efficiency (ALA yield per OD600). The qRT-PCR analysis showed that the mRNA levels of hemB and hemH were also decreased as well as the known RyhB target genes of acnAB, sdhAB, fumA, and cydAB in E. coli DALRA. These results indicated that small RNA can be used as a tool for regulating ALA accumulation in E. coli.

  15. rpoS regulation of acid, heat, and salt tolerance in Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheville, A M; Arnold, K W; Buchrieser, C; Cheng, C M; Kaspar, C W

    1996-01-01

    An rpoS mutant (rpoS::pRR10) of Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43895 was generated. Stationary-phase acid, heat, and salt tolerance was significantly reduced, and starvation-induced acid tolerance did not develop in the mutant. RpoS was also important for survival of E. coli O157:H7 in dry, fermented sausage. PMID:8633882

  16. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Esquerré; Marie Bouvier; Catherine Turlan; Carpousis, Agamemnon J.; Laurence Girbal; Muriel Cocaign-Bousquet

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype...

  17. Bacterial-Chromatin Structural Proteins Regulate the Bimodal Expression of the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement (LEE Pathogenicity Island in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Leh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE encodes a type 3 secretion system (T3SS essential for pathogenesis. This pathogenicity island comprises five major operons (LEE1 to LEE5, with the LEE5 operon encoding T3SS effectors involved in the intimate adherence of bacteria to enterocytes. The first operon, LEE1, encodes Ler (LEE-encoded regulator, an H-NS (nucleoid structuring protein paralog that alleviates the LEE H-NS silencing. We observed that the LEE5 and LEE1 promoters present a bimodal expression pattern, depending on environmental stimuli. One key regulator of bimodal LEE1 and LEE5 expression is ler expression, which fluctuates in response to different growth conditions. Under conditions in vitro considered to be equivalent to nonoptimal conditions for virulence, the opposing regulatory effects of H-NS and Ler can lead to the emergence of two bacterial subpopulations. H-NS and Ler share nucleation binding sites in the LEE5 promoter region, but H-NS binding results in local DNA structural modifications distinct from those generated through Ler binding, at least in vitro. Thus, we show how two nucleoid-binding proteins can contribute to the epigenetic regulation of bacterial virulence and lead to opposing bacterial fates. This finding implicates for the first time bacterial-chromatin structural proteins in the bimodal regulation of gene expression.

  18. Factors associated with regulatory action involving investigation of illnesses associated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in products regulated by the Food Safety and Inspection Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alice L; Seys, Scott; Douris, Aphrodite; Levine, Jeoff; Robertson, Kis

    2014-07-01

    We described characteristics of the Escherichia coli O157 and Escherichia coli non-O157 illness investigations conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) during the 5-year period from 2006 through 2010. We created a multivariable logistic regression model to determine characteristics of these investigations that were associated with FSIS regulatory action, which was defined as having occurred if a product recall occurred or if FSIS personnel performed an environmental health assessment (Food Safety Assessment) at the implicated establishment. During this period, FSIS took regulatory action in 38 of 88 (43%) investigations. Illness investigations in which FoodNet states were involved were more likely to result in regulatory action. Illness investigations in which state and local traceback, or FSIS traceback occurred were more likely to result in regulatory action. Reasons for lack of action included evidence of cross-contamination after the product left a regulated establishment, delayed notification, lack of epidemiological information, and insufficient product information.

  19. Short communication: The role of autoinducer 2 (AI-2) on antibiotic resistance regulation in an Escherichia coli strain isolated from a dairy cow with mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ting; Yu, Lumin; Shang, Fei; Li, Wenchang; Zhang, Ming; Ni, Jingtian; Chen, Xiaolin

    2016-06-01

    Extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Escherichia coli is a major etiological organism responsible for bovine mastitis. The autoinducer 2 (AI-2) quorum sensing system is widely present in many species of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria and has been proposed to be involved in interspecies communication. In E. coli model strains, the functional mechanisms of AI-2 have been well studied; however, in clinical antibiotic-resistant E. coli strains, whether AI-2 affects the expression of antibiotic resistance genes has not been reported. In this study, we report that exogenous AI-2 increased the antibiotic resistance of a clinical E. coli strain isolated from a dairy cow with mastitis by upregulating the expression of TEM-type enzyme in an LsrR (LuxS regulated repressor)-dependent manner.

  20. Functional expression of the Acanthamoeba castellanii alternative oxidase in Escherichia coli; regulation of the activity and evidence for Acaox gene function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antos-Krzeminska, Nina; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-06-01

    To evidence Acanthamoeba castellanii alternative oxidase (AcAOX) gene product function, we studied alterations in the levels of mRNA and protein and AcAOX activity during growth in amoeba batch culture. Moreover, heterologous expression of AcAOX in AOX-deficient Escherichia coli confirmed by the protein immunodetection and functional studies was performed. Despite the presence of native bo and bd quinol oxidases in E. coli membrane, from which the latter is known to be cyanide-resistant, functional expression of AcAOX in E. coli conferred cyanide-resistant benzohydroxamate-sensitive respiration on the bacteria. Moreover, AcAOX activity in transformed bacteria was stimulated by GMP and inhibited by ATP, indicating that AcAOX is regulated by mutual exclusion of purine nucleotides, which was previously demonstrated in the mitochondria of A. castellanii.

  1. The ribB FMN riboswitch from Escherichia coli operates at the transcriptional and translational level and regulates riboflavin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrolli, Danielle; Langer, Simone; Hobl, Birgit; Schwarz, Julia; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Mack, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    FMN riboswitches are genetic elements that, in many bacteria, control genes responsible for biosynthesis and/or transport of riboflavin (vitamin B2 ). We report that the Escherichia coli ribB FMN riboswitch controls expression of the essential gene ribB coding for the riboflavin biosynthetic enzyme 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (RibB; EC 4.1.99.12). Our data show that the E. coli ribB FMN riboswitch is unusual because it operates at the transcriptional and also at the translational level. Expression of ribB is negatively affected by FMN and by the FMN analog roseoflavin mononucleotide, which is synthesized enzymatically from roseoflavin and ATP. Consequently, in addition to flavoenzymes, the E. coli ribB FMN riboswitch constitutes a target for the antibiotic roseoflavin produced by Streptomyces davawensis.

  2. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-04-26

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation.

  3. Evaluation of the impact of quorum sensing transcriptional regulator SdiA on long-term persistence and fecal shedding of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in weaned calves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quorum sensing transcriptional regulator SdiA has been shown to enhance the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157) in the acidic compartment of bovine rumen in response to N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) produced by the rumen bacteria. Bacteria that survive the rumen environment subsequentl...

  4. The NAG Sensor NagC Regulates LEE Gene Expression and Contributes to Gut Colonization by Escherichia coli O157:H7

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    Josée Harel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7 are human pathogens responsible for bloody diarrhea and renal failures. EHEC employ a type 3 secretion system to attach directly to the human colonic epithelium. This structure is encoded by the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE whose expression is regulated in response to specific nutrients. In this study, we show that the mucin-derived sugars N-acetylglucosamine (NAG and N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA inhibit EHEC adhesion to epithelial cells through down-regulation of LEE expression. The effect of NAG and NANA is dependent on NagC, a transcriptional repressor of the NAG catabolism in E. coli. We show that NagC is an activator of the LEE1 operon and a critical regulator for the colonization of mice intestine by EHEC. Finally, we demonstrate that NAG and NANA as well as the metabolic activity of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron affect the in vivo fitness of EHEC in a NagC-dependent manner. This study highlights the role of NagC in coordinating metabolism and LEE expression in EHEC and in promoting EHEC colonization in vivo.

  5. Regulation of the rplY gene encoding 5S rRNA binding protein L25 in Escherichia coli and related bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseev, Leonid V; Bylinkina, Natalia S; Boni, Irina V

    2015-05-01

    Ribosomal protein (r-protein) L25 is one of the three r-proteins (L25, L5, L18) that interact with 5S rRNA in eubacteria. Specific binding of L25 with a certain domain of 5S r-RNA, a so-called loop E, has been studied in detail, but information about regulation of L25 synthesis has remained totally lacking. In contrast to the rplE (L5) and rplR (L18) genes that belong to the polycistronic spc-operon and are regulated at the translation level by r-protein S8, the rplY (L25) gene forms an independent transcription unit. The main goal of this work was to study the regulation of the rplY expression in vivo. We show that the rplY promoter is down-regulated by ppGpp and its cofactor DksA in response to amino acid starvation. At the level of translation, the rplY expression is subjected to the negative feedback control. The 5'-untranslated region of the rplY mRNA comprises specific sequence/structure features, including an atypical SD-like sequence, which are highly conserved in a subset of gamma-proteobacterial families. Despite the lack of a canonical SD element, the rplY'-'lacZ single-copy reporter showed unusually high translation efficiency. Expression of the rplY gene in trans decreased the translation yield, indicating the mechanism of autogenous repression. Site-directed mutagenesis of the rplY 5' UTR revealed an important role of the conserved elements in the translation control. Thus, the rplY expression regulation represents one more example of regulatory pathways that control ribosome biogenesis in Escherichia coli and related bacteria. © 2015 Aseev et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  6. A Mathematical Model of Metabolism and Regulation Provides a Systems-Level View of How Escherichia coli Responds to Oxygen

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    Michael eEderer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficient redesign of bacteria for biotechnological purposes, such as biofuel production, waste disposal or specific biocatalytic functions, requires a quantitative systems-level understanding of energy supply, carbon and redox metabolism. The measurement of transcript levels, metabolite concentrations and metabolic fluxes per se gives an incomplete picture. An appreciation of the interdependencies between the different measurement values is essential for systems-level understanding. Mathematical modeling has the potential to provide a coherent and quantitative description of the interplay between gene expression, metabolite concentrations and metabolic fluxes. Escherichia coli undergoes major adaptations in central metabolism when the availability of oxygen changes. Thus, an integrated description of the oxygen response provides a benchmark of our understanding of carbon, energy and redox metabolism. We present the first comprehensive model of the central metabolism of E. coli that describes steady-state metabolism at different levels of oxygen availability. Variables of the model are metabolite concentrations, gene expression levels, transcription factor activities, metabolic fluxes and biomass concentration. We analyze the model with respect to the production capabilities of central metabolism of E. coli. In particular, we predict how precursor and biomass concentration are affected by product formation.

  7. The Escherichia coli transcriptional regulator MarA directly represses transcription of purA and hdeA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Thamarai; Barbosa, Teresa M; McMurry, Laura M; Levy, Stuart B

    2004-03-05

    The Escherichia coli MarA protein mediates a response to multiple environmental stresses through the activation or repression in vivo of a large number of chromosomal genes. Transcriptional activation for a number of these genes has been shown to occur via direct interaction of MarA with a 20-bp degenerate asymmetric "marbox" sequence. It was not known whether repression by MarA was also direct. We found that purified MarA was sufficient in vitro to repress transcription of both purA and hdeA. Transcription and electrophoretic mobility shift experiments in vitro using mutant promoters suggested that the marbox involved in the repression overlapped the -35 promoter motif and was in the "backward" orientation. This organization contrasts with that of the class II promoters activated by MarA, in which the marbox also overlaps the -35 motif but is in the "forward" orientation. We conclude that MarA, a member of the AraC/XylS family, can act directly as a repressor or an activator, depending on the position and orientation of the marbox within a promoter.

  8. HlyF Produced by Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Is a Virulence Factor That Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kazunori; Martin, Patricia; Porcheron, Gaëlle; Houle, Sébastien; Helloin, Emmanuelle; Pénary, Marie; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Dozois, Charles M; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Oswald, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Escherichia coli can cause extraintestinal infections in humans and animals. The hlyF gene is epidemiologically associated with virulent strains of avian pathogenic E. coli and human neonatal meningitis-associated E. coli. We demonstrated that culture supernatants of E. coli expressing HlyF induced autophagy in eukaryotic cells. This phenotype coincided with an enhanced production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) by bacteria expressing HlyF. The HlyF protein displays a predicted catalytic domain of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. This conserved domain was involved the ability of HlyF to promote the production of OMVs. The increased production of OMVs was associated with the release of toxins. hlyF was shown to be expressed during extraintestinal infection and to play a role in the virulence of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli in a chicken model of colibacillosis. This is the first evidence that pathogenic bacteria produce a virulence factor directly involved in the production of OMVs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Campylobacter jejuni CsrA complements an Escherichia coli csrA mutation for the regulation of biofilm formation, motility and cellular morphology but not glycogen accumulation

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    Fields Joshua A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Campylobacter jejuni is consistently ranked as one of the leading causes of bacterial diarrhea worldwide, the mechanisms by which C. jejuni causes disease and how they are regulated have yet to be clearly defined. The global regulator, CsrA, has been well characterized in several bacterial genera and is known to regulate a number of independent pathways via a post transcriptional mechanism, but remains relatively uncharacterized in the genus Campylobacter. Previously, we reported data illustrating the requirement for CsrA in several virulence related phenotypes of C. jejuni strain 81–176, indicating that the Csr pathway is important for Campylobacter pathogenesis. Results We compared the Escherichia coli and C. jejuni orthologs of CsrA and characterized the ability of the C. jejuni CsrA protein to functionally complement an E. coli csrA mutant. Phylogenetic comparison of E. coli CsrA to orthologs from several pathogenic bacteria demonstrated variability in C. jejuni CsrA relative to the known RNA binding domains of E. coli CsrA and in several amino acids reported to be involved in E. coli CsrA-mediated gene regulation. When expressed in an E. coli csrA mutant, C. jejuni CsrA succeeded in recovering defects in motility, biofilm formation, and cellular morphology; however, it failed to return excess glycogen accumulation to wild type levels. Conclusions These findings suggest that C. jejuni CsrA is capable of efficiently binding some E. coli CsrA binding sites, but not others, and provide insight into the biochemistry of C. jejuni CsrA.

  10. Significant rewiring of the transcriptome and proteome of an Escherichia coli strain harboring a tailored exogenous global regulator IrrE.

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    Tingjian Chen

    Full Text Available Cell reprogramming for microorganisms via engineered or artificial transcription factors and RNA polymerase mutants has presented a powerful tool for eliciting complex traits that are practically useful particularly for industrial strains, and for understanding at the global level the regulatory network of gene transcription. We previously further showed that an exogenous global regulator IrrE (derived from the extreme radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans can be tailored to confer Escherichia coli (E. coli with significantly enhanced tolerances to different stresses. In this work, based on comparative transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the representative strains E1 and E0, harboring the ethanol-tolerant IrrE mutant E1 and the ethanol-intolerant wild type IrrE, respectively, we found that the transcriptome and proteome of E. coli were extensively rewired by the tailored IrrE protein. Overall, 1196 genes (or approximately 27% of E. coli genes were significantly altered at the transcriptomic level, including notably genes in the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide (NO pathway, and genes for non-coding RNAs. The proteomic profile revealed significant up- or downregulation of several proteins associated with syntheses of the cell membrane and cell wall. Analyses of the intracellular NO level and cell growth under reduced temperature supported a close correlation between NO and ethanol tolerance, and also suggests a role for membrane fluidity. The significantly different omic profiles of strain E1 indicate that IrrE functions as a global regulator in E. coli, and that IrrE may be evolved for other cellular tolerances. In this sense, it will provide synthetic biology with a practical and evolvable regulatory "part" that operates at a higher level of complexity than local regulators. This work also suggests a possibility of introducing and engineering other exogenous global regulators to rewire the genomes of microorganism cells.

  11. Transcription factor CecR (YbiH) regulates a set of genes affecting the sensitivity of Escherichia coli against cefoperazone and chloramphenicol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yuki; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Genomic SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) screening was performed for identification of the binding site of YbiH, an as yet uncharacterized TetR-family transcription factor, on the Escherichia coli genome. YbiH was found to be a unique single-target regulator that binds in vitro within the intergenic spacer located between the divergently transcribed ybiH-ybhGFSR and rhlE operons. YbhG is an inner membrane protein and YbhFSR forms a membrane-associated ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter while RhlE is a ribosome-associated RNA helicase. Gel shift assay and DNase footprinting analyses indicated one clear binding site of YbiH, including a complete palindromic sequence of AATTAGTT-AACTAATT. An in vivo reporter assay indicated repression of the ybiH operon and activation of the rhlE operon by YbiH. After phenotype microarray screening, YbiH was indicated to confer resistance to chloramphenicol and cefazoline (a first-generation cephalosporin). A systematic survey of the participation of each of the predicted YbiH-regulated genes in the antibiotic sensitivity indicated involvement of the YbhFSR ABC-type transporter in the sensitivity to cefoperazone (a third-generation cephalosporin) and of the membrane protein YbhG in the control of sensitivity to chloramphenicol. Taken together with the growth test in the presence of these two antibiotics and in vitro transcription assay, it was concluded that the hitherto uncharacterized YbiH regulates transcription of both the bidirectional transcription units, the ybiH-ybhGFSR operon and the rhlE gene, which altogether are involved in the control of sensitivity to cefoperazone and chloramphenicol. We thus propose to rename YbiH as CecR (regulator of cefoperazone and chloramphenicol sensitivity).

  12. Rapid generation of CRISPR/dCas9-regulated, orthogonally repressible hybrid T7-lac promoters for modular, tuneable control of metabolic pathway fluxes in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Brady F; Jones, J Andrew; Kim, Daniel C; Leitz, Quentin D; Englaender, Jacob A; Collins, Shannon M; Linhardt, Robert J; Koffas, Mattheos A G

    2016-05-19

    Robust gene circuit construction requires use of promoters exhibiting low crosstalk. Orthogonal promoters have been engineered utilizing an assortment of natural and synthetic transcription factors, but design of large orthogonal promoter-repressor sets is complicated, labor-intensive, and often results in unanticipated crosstalk. The specificity and ease of targeting the RNA-guided DNA-binding protein dCas9 to any 20 bp user-defined DNA sequence makes it a promising candidate for orthogonal promoter regulation. Here, we rapidly construct orthogonal variants of the classic T7-lac promoter using site-directed mutagenesis, generating a panel of inducible hybrid promoters regulated by both LacI and dCas9. Remarkably, orthogonality is mediated by only two to three nucleotide mismatches in a narrow window of the RNA:DNA hybrid, neighboring the protospacer adjacent motif. We demonstrate that, contrary to many reports, one PAM-proximal mismatch is insufficient to abolish dCas9-mediated repression, and we show for the first time that mismatch tolerance is a function of target copy number. Finally, these promoters were incorporated into the branched violacein biosynthetic pathway as dCas9-dependent switches capable of throttling and selectively redirecting carbon flux in Escherichia coli We anticipate this strategy is relevant for any promoter and will be adopted for many applications at the interface of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering.

  13. In vivo effects of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide on regulation of immune response and protein expression in striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Bui Thi Bich; Milla, Sylvain; Gillardin, Virginie; Phuong, Nguyen Thanh; Kestemont, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Lipolysaccharide (LPS), a component of outer membrane protein of gram-negative bacteria, reportedly stimulates fish immune system. However, mechanisms driving this immunomodulatory effect are yet unknown. To determine effects of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide on regulation of immune response and protein expression of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus), juvenile fish (20-25 g) were injected with 3, 15 or 45 mg E.coli LPS/kg and challenged with Edwardsiella ictaluri. Plasma cortisol and glucose were rather low and did not differ (p<0.05) among treatments. All LPS treatments differed regarding blood cell count and immune variables such as plasma and spleen lysozyme, complement activity and antibody titer, 3mg LPS/kg yielding best results; red blood cell count was not affected by LPS treatment. Accumulated mortalities after bacterial challenge were 23.4, 32.8, 37.7 and 52.5% for treatment 3, 15, 45 mg LPS/kg fish and control respectively. Proteomic analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) confirmed that LPS induced differentially over-expressed immune proteins such as complement component C3 and lysozyme C2 precursor. Regulation of other proteins such as Wap65, alpha-2 macroglobulin-3 and transferrin precursor was also demonstrated. Striped catfish injected with E.coli LPS enhanced innate immune responses.

  14. Identification of a target gene and activating stimulus for the YpdA/YpdB histidine kinase/response regulator system in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Luitpold; Behr, Stefan; Jung, Kirsten

    2013-02-01

    Escherichia coli contains 30 two-component systems (TCSs), each consisting of a histidine kinase and a response regulator. Whereas most TCSs are well characterized in this model organism, little is known about the YpdA/YpdB system. To identify YpdB-regulated genes, we compared the transcriptomes of E. coli cells overproducing either YpdB or a control protein. Expression levels of 15 genes differed by more than 1.9-fold between the two strains. A comprehensive evaluation of these genes identified yhjX as the sole target of YpdB. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified YpdB confirmed its interaction with the yhjX promoter. Specifically, YpdB binds to two direct repeats of the motif GGCATTTCAT separated by an 11-bp spacer in the yhjX promoter. yhjX encodes a cytoplasmic membrane protein of unknown function that belongs to the major facilitator superfamily of transporters. Finally, we characterized the pattern of yhjX expression and identified extracellular pyruvate as a stimulus for the YpdA/YpdB system. It is suggested that YpdA/YpdB contributes to nutrient scavenging before entry into stationary phase.

  15. CRP-dependent positive autoregulation and proteolytic degradation regulate competence activator Sxy of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaskólska, Milena; Gerdes, Kenn

    2015-01-01

    Natural competence, the ability of bacteria to take up exogenous DNA and incorporate it into their chromosomes, is in most bacteria a transient phenomenon under complex genetic and environmental control. In the Gram-negative bacteria Haemophilus influenzae and Vibrio cholerae, the master regulator...... is positively autoregulated at the level of transcription by a mechanism that requires cAMP receptor protein (CRP), cyclic AMP (cAMP) and a CRP-S site in the sxy promoter. Similarly, we found no evidence that Sxy expression in E. coli was regulated at the translational level. However, our analysis revealed...... of transcription and negatively regulated by proteolysis. Together, these findings reveal striking similarities between the competence regulons of a Gram-positive and a Gram-negative bacterium....

  16. Amount of colicin release in Escherichia coli is regulated by lysis gene expression of the colicin E2 operon.

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    Andreas Mader

    Full Text Available The production of bacteriocins in response to worsening environmental conditions is one means of bacteria to outcompete other microorganisms. Colicins, one class of bacteriocins in Escherichia coli, are effective against closely related Enterobacteriaceae. Current research focuses on production, release and uptake of these toxins by bacteria. However, little is known about the quantitative aspects of these dynamic processes. Here, we quantitatively study expression dynamics of the Colicin E2 operon in E. coli on a single cell level using fluorescence time-lapse microscopy. DNA damage, triggering SOS response leads to the heterogeneous expression of this operon including the cea gene encoding the toxin, Colicin E2, and the cel gene coding for the induction of cell lysis and subsequent colicin release. Advancing previous whole population investigations, our time-lapse experiments reveal that at low exogenous stress levels all cells eventually respond after a given time (heterogeneous timing. This heterogeneous timing is lost at high stress levels, at which a synchronized stress response of all cells 60 min after induction via stress can be observed. We further demonstrate, that the amount of colicin released is dependent on cel (lysis gene expression, independent of the applied exogenous stress level. A heterogeneous response in combination with heterogeneous timing can be biologically significant. It might enable a bacterial population to endure low stress levels, while at high stress levels an immediate and synchronized population wide response can give single surviving cells of the own species the chance to take over the bacterial community after the stress has ceased.

  17. Histone Deacetylase 6 Regulates Bladder Architecture and Host Susceptibility to Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

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    Adam J. Lewis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6 is a non-canonical, mostly cytosolic histone deacetylase that has a variety of interacting partners and substrates. Previous work using cell-culture based assays coupled with pharmacological inhibitors and gene-silencing approaches indicated that HDAC6 promotes the actin- and microtubule-dependent invasion of host cells by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC. These facultative intracellular pathogens are the major cause of urinary tract infections. Here, we examined the involvement of HDAC6 in bladder colonization by UPEC using HDAC6 knockout mice. Though UPEC was unable to invade HDAC6−/− cells in culture, the bacteria had an enhanced ability to colonize the bladders of mice that lacked HDAC6. This effect was transient, and by six hours post-inoculation bacterial titers in the HDAC6−/− mice were reduced to levels seen in wild type control animals. Subsequent analyses revealed that the mutant mice had greater bladder volume capacity and fluid retention, along with much higher levels of acetylated a-tubulin. In addition, infiltrating neutrophils recovered from the HDAC6−/− bladder harbored significantly more viable bacteria than their wild type counterparts. Cumulatively, these changes may negate any inhibitory effects that the lack of HDAC6 has on UPEC entry into individual host cells, and suggest roles for HDAC6 in other urological disorders such as urinary retention.

  18. MinD and MinE interact with anionic phospholipids and regulate division plane formation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Lars D; Weibel, Douglas B

    2012-11-09

    The Min proteins (MinC, MinD, and MinE) form a pole-to-pole oscillator that controls the spatial assembly of the division machinery in Escherichia coli cells. Previous studies identified that interactions of MinD with phospholipids positioned the Min machinery at the membrane. We extend these studies by measuring the affinity, kinetics, and ATPase activity of E. coli MinD, MinE, and MinDE binding to supported lipid bilayers containing varying compositions of anionic phospholipids. Using quartz crystal microbalance measurements, we found that the binding affinity (K(d)) for the interaction of recombinant E. coli MinD and MinE with lipid bilayers increased with increasing concentration of the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin. The K(d) for MinD (1.8 μM) in the presence of ATP was smaller than for MinE (12.1 μM) binding to membranes consisting of 95:5 phosphatidylcholine/cardiolipin. The simultaneous binding of MinD and MinE to membranes revealed that increasing the concentration of anionic phospholipid stimulates the initial rate of adsorption (k(on)). The ATPase activity of MinD decreased in the presence of anionic phospholipids. These results indicate that anionic lipids, which are concentrated at the poles, increase the retention of MinD and MinE and explain its dwell time at this region of bacterial cells. These studies provide insight into interactions between MinD and MinE and between these proteins and membranes that are relevant to understanding the process of bacterial cell division, in which the interaction of proteins and membranes is essential.

  19. Translational regulation of gene expression by an anaerobically induced small non-coding RNA in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Anders; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Kallipolitis, Birgitte H.

    2010-01-01

    . Furthermore, in previous work most of the potential target genes have been shown to be repressed by FNR through an undetermined mechanism. Collectively, our results provide insight into the mechanism by which FNR negatively regulates genes such as sodA, sodB, cydDC, and metE, thereby demonstrating...

  20. Paraquat regulation of hmp (flavohemoglobin) gene expression in Escherichia coli K-12 is SoxRS independent but modulated by sigma S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Membrillo-Hernández, J; Kim, S O; Cook, G M; Poole, R K

    1997-01-01

    We report the first example of a gene, hmp, encoding a soluble flavohemoglobin in Escherichia coli K-12, which is up-regulated by paraquat in a SoxRS-independent manner. Unlike what is found for other paraquat-inducible genes, high concentrations of paraquat (200 microM) were required to increase the level of hmp expression, and maximal induction was observed only after 20 min of exposure to paraquat. Neither a mutation in soxS nor one in soxR prevented the paraquat-dependent increase in phi(hmp-lacZ) expression, but either mutant allele delayed full expression of phi(hmp-lacZ) activity after paraquat addition. Induction of hmp by paraquat was demonstrated in aerobically grown cultures during exponential growth and the stationary phase, thus revealing two Sox-independent regulatory mechanisms. Induction of hmp by paraquat in the stationary phase was dependent on the global regulator of stationary-phase gene expression, RpoS (sigma S). However, a mutation in rpoS did not prevent an increase in hmp expression by paraquat in exponentially growing cells. Induction of sigma S in the exponential phase by heat shock also induced phi(hmp-lacZ) expression in the presence of paraquat, supporting the role of sigma S in one of the regulatory mechanisms. Mutations in oxyR or rob, known regulators of several stress promoters in E. coli, had no effect on the induction of hmp by paraquat. Other known superoxide-generating agents (plumbagin, menadione, and phenazine methosulfate) were not effective in inducing hmp expression. PMID:9150210

  1. [Nitrogen oxide is involved in the regulation of the Fe-S cluster assembly in proteins and the formation of biofilms by Escherichia coli cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, S V; Streltsova, D A; Starostina, I A; Sanina, N A

    2013-01-01

    The functions of nitrogen oxide (NO) in the regulation of the reversible processes of Fe-S cluster assembly in proteins and the formation of Escherichia coli biofilms have been investigated. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and crystalline nitrosyl complexes of iron with sulfur-containing aliphatic ligands cisaconite (CisA) and penaconite have been used as NO donors for the first time. Wild-type E. coli cells of the strain MC4100, mutants deltaiscA and deltasufA, and the double paralog mutant deltaiscA/sufA with deletions in the alternative pathways of Fe2+ supply for cluster assembly (all derived from the above-named strain) were used in this study. Plankton growth of bacterial cultures, the mass of mature biofilms, and the expression of the SoxRS[2Fe-2S] regulon have been investigated and shown to depend on strain genotype, the process of Fe-S cluster assembly in iron-sulfur proteins, NO donor structure, and the presence of Fe2+ chelator ferene in the incubation medium. The antibiotic ciprofloxacine (CF) was used as an inhibitor of E. coli biofilm formation in the positive control. NO donors regulating Fe-S cluster assembly in E. coli have been shown to control plankton growth of the cultures and the process of mature biofilm formation; toxic doses of NO caused a dramatic (3- to 4-fold) stimulation of cell entry into biofilms as a response to nitrosative stress; NO donors CisA and GSNO in physiological concentrations suppressed the formation of mature biofilms, and the activity of these compounds was comparable to that of CE Regulation of both Fe-S cluster assembly in iron-sulfur proteins and biofilm formation by NO is indicative of the connection between these processes in E. coli.

  2. The curli biosynthesis regulator CsgD co-ordinates the expression of both positive and negative determinants for biofilm formation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombacher, Eva; Dorel, Corinne; Zehnder, Alexander J B; Landini, Paolo

    2003-10-01

    Production of curli, extracellular structures important for biofilm formation, is positively regulated by OmpR, which constitutes with the EnvZ protein an osmolarity-sensing two-component regulatory system. The expression of curli is cryptic in most Escherichia coli laboratory strains such as MG1655, due to the lack of csgD expression. The csgD gene encodes a transcription activator of the curli-subunit-encoding csgBA operon. The ompR234 up-mutation can restore csgD expression, resulting in curli production and increased biofilm formation. In this report, it is shown that ompR234-dependent csgD expression, in addition to csgBA activation during stationary phase of growth, stimulates expression of the yaiC gene and negatively regulates at least two other genes, pepD and yagS. The promoter regions of these four genes share a conserved 11 bp sequence (CGGGKGAKNKA), necessary for csgBA and yaiC regulation by CsgD. While at both the csgBA and yaiC promoters the sequence is located upstream of the promoter elements, in both yagS and pepD it overlaps either the putative -10 sequence or the transcription start point, suggesting that CsgD can function as both an activator and a repressor. Adhesion experiments show that csgD-independent expression of both yagS and pepD from a multicopy plasmid negatively affects biofilm formation, which, in contrast, is stimulated by yaiC expression. Thus it is proposed that CsgD stimulates biofilm formation in E. coli by contemporary activation of adhesion positive determinants (the curli-encoding csg operons and the product of the yaiC gene) and repression of negative effectors such as yagS and pepD.

  3. Improving ethanol tolerance of Escherichia coli by rewiring its global regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqing Chong

    Full Text Available A major challenge in bioethanol fermentation is the low tolerance of the microbial host towards the end product bioethanol. Here we report to improve the ethanol tolerance of E. coli from the transcriptional level by engineering its global transcription factor cAMP receptor protein (CRP, which is known to regulate over 400 genes in E. coli. Three ethanol tolerant CRP mutants (E1- E3 were identified from error-prone PCR libraries. The best ethanol-tolerant strain E2 (M59T had the growth rate of 0.08 h(-1 in 62 g/L ethanol, higher than that of the control at 0.06 h(-1. The M59T mutation was then integrated into the genome to create variant iE2. When exposed to 150 g/l ethanol, the survival of iE2 after 15 min was about 12%, while that of BW25113 was <0.01%. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR analysis (RT-PCR on 444 CRP-regulated genes using OpenArray® technology revealed that 203 genes were differentially expressed in iE2 in the absence of ethanol, whereas 92 displayed differential expression when facing ethanol stress. These genes belong to various functional groups, including central intermediary metabolism (aceE, acnA, sdhD, sucA, iron ion transport (entH, entD, fecA, fecB, and general stress response (osmY, rpoS. Six up-regulated and twelve down-regulated common genes were found in both iE2 and E2 under ethanol stress, whereas over one hundred common genes showed differential expression in the absence of ethanol. Based on the RT-PCR results, entA, marA or bhsA was knocked out in iE2 and the resulting strains became more sensitive towards ethanol.

  4. Inhibition of expression in Escherichia coli of a virulence regulator MglB of Francisella tularensis using external guide sequence technology.

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    Gaoping Xiao

    Full Text Available External guide sequences (EGSs have successfully been used to inhibit expression of target genes at the post-transcriptional level in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We previously reported that EGS accessible and cleavable sites in the target RNAs can rapidly be identified by screening random EGS (rEGS libraries. Here the method of screening rEGS libraries and a partial RNase T1 digestion assay were used to identify sites accessible to EGSs in the mRNA of a global virulence regulator MglB from Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium. Specific EGSs were subsequently designed and their activities in terms of the cleavage of mglB mRNA by RNase P were tested in vitro and in vivo. EGS73, EGS148, and EGS155 in both stem and M1 EGS constructs induced mglB mRNA cleavage in vitro. Expression of stem EGS73 and EGS155 in Escherichia coli resulted in significant reduction of the mglB mRNA level coded for the F. tularensis mglB gene inserted in those cells.

  5. Catabolite regulation analysis of Escherichia coli for acetate overflow mechanism and co-consumption of multiple sugars based on systems biology approach using computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yu; Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2013-10-20

    It is quite important to understand the basic principle embedded in the main metabolism for the interpretation of the fermentation data. For this, it may be useful to understand the regulation mechanism based on systems biology approach. In the present study, we considered the perturbation analysis together with computer simulation based on the models which include the effects of global regulators on the pathway activation for the main metabolism of Escherichia coli. Main focus is the acetate overflow metabolism and the co-fermentation of multiple carbon sources. The perturbation analysis was first made to understand the nature of the feed-forward loop formed by the activation of Pyk by FDP (F1,6BP), and the feed-back loop formed by the inhibition of Pfk by PEP in the glycolysis. Those together with the effect of transcription factor Cra caused by FDP level affected the glycolysis activity. The PTS (phosphotransferase system) acts as the feed-back system by repressing the glucose uptake rate for the increase in the glucose uptake rate. It was also shown that the increased PTS flux (or glucose consumption rate) causes PEP/PYR ratio to be decreased, and EIIA-P, Cya, cAMP-Crp decreased, where cAMP-Crp in turn repressed TCA cycle and more acetate is formed. This was further verified by the detailed computer simulation. In the case of multiple carbon sources such as glucose and xylose, it was shown that the sequential utilization of carbon sources was observed for wild type, while the co-consumption of multiple carbon sources with slow consumption rates were observed for the ptsG mutant by computer simulation, and this was verified by experiments. Moreover, the effect of a specific gene knockout such as Δpyk on the metabolic characteristics was also investigated based on the computer simulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural basis for phosphorylated autoinducer-2 modulation of the oligomerization state of the global transcription regulator LsrR from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minhao; Tao, Yue; Liu, Xiaotian; Zang, Jianye

    2013-05-31

    Quorum-sensing systems are widely used by bacteria to control behavior in response to fluctuations in cell density. Several small diffusible molecules called autoinducers act as signaling molecules in quorum-sensing processes through interplay with sensors. Autoinducers modulate vital physiological functions such as nutrient acquisition, gene transcription, and virulence factor production. In Escherichia coli, LsrR serves as a global transcription regulator that responds to autoinducer-2 to regulate the expression of a variety of genes, including the lsr operon and the lsrR gene. Here, we report the crystal structure of full-length LsrR from E. coli, which has an N-terminal DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal ligand-binding domain connected by a β-strand. Although only two molecules are found in one asymmetric unit, two neighboring dimers pack to form a tetramer that is consistent with the oligomerization state of LsrR in solution. Mutagenesis experiments and gel shift assays indicated that Gln-33 and Tyr-26 might be involved in interactions between LsrR and DNA. The LsrR-binding site for phosphorylated autoinducer-2 was predicted by structural comparisons of LsrR with CggR and SorC. Cross-linking, size exclusion chromatography, and gel shift assays determined that phosphorylated autoinducer-2 triggered the disassembly of the LsrR tetramer into dimers and reduced the DNA binding ability of LsrR. Our findings reveal a mechanism for the change in the oligomerization state of LsrR in the presence of phosphorylated autoinducer-2. Based on these observations, we propose that phosphorylated autoinducer-2 triggers the disassembly of the LsrR tetramer to activate the transcription of its target genes.

  7. Refining the Binding of the Escherichia coli Flagellar Master Regulator, FlhD4C2, on a Base-Specific Level ▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Ying; Barker, Clive S.; Matsumura, Philip; Belas, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The Escherichia coli flagellar master regulator, FlhD4C2, binds to the promoter regions of flagellar class II genes, yet, despite extensive analysis of the FlhD4C2-regulated promoter region, a detailed consensus sequence has not emerged. We used in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches to determine the nucleotides in the class II promoter, fliAp, required for the binding and function of FlhD4C2. FlhD4C2 protects 48 bp (positions −76 to −29 relative to the σ70-dependent transcriptional start site) in the fliA promoter. We divided the 48-bp footprint region into 5 sections to determine the requirement of each DNA segment for the binding and function of FlhD4C2. Results from an in vitro binding competition assay between the wild-type FlhD4C2-protected fragment and DNA fragments possessing mutations in one section of the 48-bp protected region showed that only one-third of the 48 bp protected by FlhD4C2 is required for FlhD4C2 binding and fliA promoter activity. This in vitro binding result was also seen in vivo with fliA promoter-lacZ fusions carrying the same mutations. Only seven bases (A12, A15, T34, A36, T37, A44, and T45) are absolutely required for the promoter activity. Moreover, A12, A15, T34, T37, and T45 within the 7 bases are highly specific to fliA promoter activity, and those bases form an asymmetric recognition site for FlhD4C2. The implications of the asymmetry of the FlhD4C2 binding site and its potential impact on FlhD4C2 are discussed. PMID:21685294

  8. Structure of WbdD: a bifunctional kinase and methyltransferase that regulates the chain length of the O antigen in Escherichia coli O9a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelueken, Gregor; Huang, Hexian; Clarke, Bradley R; Lebl, Tomas; Whitfield, Chris; Naismith, James H

    2012-11-01

    The Escherichia coli serotype O9a O-antigen polysaccharide (O-PS) is a model for glycan biosynthesis and export by the ATP-binding cassette transporter-dependent pathway. The polymannose O9a O-PS is synthesized as a polyprenol-linked glycan by mannosyltransferase enzymes located at the cytoplasmic membrane. The chain length of the O9a O-PS is tightly regulated by the WbdD enzyme. WbdD first phosphorylates the terminal non-reducing mannose of the O-PS and then methylates the phosphate, stopping polymerization. The 2.2 Å resolution structure of WbdD reveals a bacterial methyltransferase domain joined to a eukaryotic kinase domain. The kinase domain is again fused to an extended C-terminal coiled-coil domain reminiscent of eukaryotic DMPK (Myotonic Dystrophy Protein Kinase) family kinases such as Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK). WbdD phosphorylates 2-α-d-mannosyl-d-mannose (2α-MB), a short mimic of the O9a polymer. Mutagenesis identifies those residues important in catalysis and substrate recognition and the in vivo phenotypes of these mutants are used to dissect the termination reaction. We have determined the structures of co-complexes of WbdD with two known eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Although these are potent inhibitors in vitro, they do not show any in vivo activity. The structures reveal new insight into O-PS chain-length regulation in this important model system.

  9. Structure of WbdD: a bifunctional kinase and methyltransferase that regulates the chain length of the O antigen in Escherichia coli O9a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelueken, Gregor; Huang, Hexian; Clarke, Bradley R; Lebl, Tomas; Whitfield, Chris; Naismith, James H

    2012-01-01

    Summary The Escherichia coli serotype O9a O-antigen polysaccharide (O-PS) is a model for glycan biosynthesis and export by the ATP-binding cassette transporter-dependent pathway. The polymannose O9a O-PS is synthesized as a polyprenol-linked glycan by mannosyltransferase enzymes located at the cytoplasmic membrane. The chain length of the O9a O-PS is tightly regulated by the WbdD enzyme. WbdD first phosphorylates the terminal non-reducing mannose of the O-PS and then methylates the phosphate, stopping polymerization. The 2.2 Å resolution structure of WbdD reveals a bacterial methyltransferase domain joined to a eukaryotic kinase domain. The kinase domain is again fused to an extended C-terminal coiled-coil domain reminiscent of eukaryotic DMPK (Myotonic Dystrophy Protein Kinase) family kinases such as Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK). WbdD phosphorylates 2-α-d-mannosyl-d-mannose (2α-MB), a short mimic of the O9a polymer. Mutagenesis identifies those residues important in catalysis and substrate recognition and the in vivo phenotypes of these mutants are used to dissect the termination reaction. We have determined the structures of co-complexes of WbdD with two known eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Although these are potent inhibitors in vitro, they do not show any in vivo activity. The structures reveal new insight into O-PS chain-length regulation in this important model system. PMID:22970759

  10. Study and reengineering of the binding sites and allosteric regulation of biosynthetic threonine deaminase by isoleucine and valine in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Chen, Zhen; Zheng, Ping; Sun, Jibin; Zeng, An-Ping

    2013-04-01

    Biosynthetic threonine deaminase (TD) is a key enzyme for the synthesis of isoleucine which is allosterically inhibited and activated by Ile and Val, respectively. The binding sites of Ile and Val and the mechanism of their regulations in TD are not clear, but essential for a rational design of efficient productive strain(s) for Ile and related amino acids. In this study, structure-based computational approach and site-directed mutagenesis were combined to identify the potential binding sites of Ile and Val in Escherichia coli TD. Our results demonstrated that each regulatory domain of the TD monomer possesses two nonequivalent effector-binding sites. The residues R362, E442, G445, A446, Y369, I460, and S461 only interact with Ile while E347, G350, and F352 are involved not only in the Ile binding but also in the Val binding. By further considering enzyme kinetic data, we propose a concentration-dependent mechanism of the allosteric regulation of TD by Ile and Val. For the construction of Ile overproducing strain, a novel TD mutant with double mutation of F352A/R362F was also created, which showed both higher activity and much stronger resistance to Ile inhibition comparing to those of wild-type enzyme. Overexpression of this mutant TD in E. coli JW3591 significantly increased the production of ketobutyrate and Ile in comparison to the reference strains overexpressing wild-type TD or the catabolic threonine deaminase (TdcB). This work builds a solid basis for the reengineering of TD and related microorganisms for Ile production.

  11. The two-component system CpxRA negatively regulates the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli involving sigma 32 and Lon protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIGUEL A. eDE LA CRUZ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC is a significant cause of serious human gastrointestinal disease worldwide. EHEC strains contain a pathogenicity island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE, which encodes virulence factors responsible for damaging the gut mucosa. The Cpx envelope stress response of E. coli is controlled by a two-component system consisting of a sensor histidine kinase (CpxA and a cytoplasmic response regulator (CpxR. In this study, we investigated the role of CpxRA in the expression of LEE-encoded virulence factors of EHEC. We found that a mutation in cpxA significantly affected adherence of EHEC to human epithelial cells. Analysis of this mutant revealed the presence of high levels of CpxR which repressed transcription of grlA and ler, the main positive virulence regulators of the LEE, and influenced negatively the production of the type 3 secretion system–associated EspABD translocator proteins. It is known that CpxR activates rpoH (Sigma factor 32, which in turns activates transcription of the lon protease gene. We found that transcription levels of ler and grlA were significantly increased in the lon and cpxA lon mutants suggesting that lon is involved in down-regulating LEE genes. In addition, the Galleria mellonella model of infection was used to analyze the effect of the loss of the cpx and lon genes in EHEC’s ability to kill the larvae. We found that the cpxA mutant was significantly deficient at killing the larvae however, the cpxA lon mutant which overexpresses LEE genes in vitro, was unable to kill the larvae, suggesting that virulence in the G. mellonella model is T3SS independent and that CpxA modulates virulence through a yet unknown EHEC-specific factor. Our data provides new insights and broadens our scope into the complex regulatory network of the LEE in which the CpxA sensor kinase plays an important role in a cascade involving both global and virulence regulators.

  12. The Two-Component System CpxRA Negatively Regulates the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Involving σ32 and Lon protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Cruz, Miguel A.; Morgan, Jason K.; Ares, Miguel A.; Yáñez-Santos, Jorge A.; Riordan, James T.; Girón, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a significant cause of serious human gastrointestinal disease worldwide. EHEC strains contain a pathogenicity island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), which encodes virulence factors responsible for damaging the gut mucosa. The Cpx envelope stress response of E. coli is controlled by a two-component system (TCS) consisting of a sensor histidine kinase (CpxA) and a cytoplasmic response regulator (CpxR). In this study, we investigated the role of CpxRA in the expression of LEE-encoded virulence factors of EHEC. We found that a mutation in cpxA significantly affected adherence of EHEC to human epithelial cells. Analysis of this mutant revealed the presence of high levels of CpxR which repressed transcription of grlA and ler, the main positive virulence regulators of the LEE, and influenced negatively the production of the type 3 secretion system–associated EspABD translocator proteins. It is known that CpxR activates rpoH (Sigma factor 32), which in turns activates transcription of the lon protease gene. We found that transcription levels of ler and grlA were significantly increased in the lon and cpxA lon mutants suggesting that lon is involved in down-regulating LEE genes. In addition, the Galleria mellonella model of infection was used to analyze the effect of the loss of the cpx and lon genes in EHEC's ability to kill the larvae. We found that the cpxA mutant was significantly deficient at killing the larvae however, the cpxA lon mutant which overexpresses LEE genes in vitro, was unable to kill the larvae, suggesting that virulence in the G. mellonella model is T3SS independent and that CpxA modulates virulence through a yet unknown EHEC-specific factor. Our data provides new insights and broadens our scope into the complex regulatory network of the LEE in which the CpxA sensor kinase plays an important role in a cascade involving both global and virulence regulators. PMID:26904510

  13. Effect of Aqueous Extract of Aegle marmelos Fruit on Adherence and β-Lactam Resistance of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli by Down Regulating Outer Membrane Protein C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniya Bharathi Raja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Enteropathogenic Escherichia Coli (EPEC continue to be a major health problem, leading to death due to diarrhea, predominantly in children below the age of five. Due to evolution of multi drug resistance in EPEC and side effects caused to host by antibiotics necessitated a search for alternative medicines from medicinal plants. One such medicinal plant used since ancient times to cure diarrhea is Aegle marmelos. This study was done to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of Aegle marmelos fruit (AEAM on outer membrane protein C (OmpC of EPEC, which plays a key role in adherence and antibiotic resistance. Approach: Fixation of minimum inhibitory concentration. In presence and absence of AEAM antibiotic susceptibility test was performed. Expression analysis of OmpC and OmpF was carried out by RT-PCR of EPEC in presence and absence of AEAM. Morphological changes of EPEC in presence and absence of AEAM were analyzed by TEM. In infant mouse ileal loop model, histological analysis, adherence of bacteria to ileal loops and Western blotting for caspase-3 and Hsp70 were done. Results: OmpC (~42kDa a porin, played an important role in selective transport of nutrients and also acted as an adhesin, whereas OmpF (~38kDa is also a porin which is non selective. Susceptibility of EPEC to β-lactam antibiotics in presence of AEAM can be attributed to down regulation of OmpC and upregulation of OmpF. The changes in Omp expression also triggered morphological changes in EPEC. Histology and western blot of Hsp70 and Caspase-3 in rat ileal loop confirmed the effect of AEAM on attenuating the virulence of EPEC by preventing its infection due to loss of adherence. Loss of adherence was due to morphological changes and down regulation of OmpC in EPEC. Conclusion: From this study, we concluded that the protection offered by AEAM against EPEC was due to down regulation of OmpC, leading to loss of adherence and up regulation of OmpF, which

  14. CpxR/OmpR interplay regulates curli gene expression in response to osmolarity in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubelin, Gregory; Vianney, Anne; Beloin, Christophe; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Lazzaroni, Jean-Claude; Lejeune, Philippe; Dorel, Corinne

    2005-03-01

    Curli fibers could be described as a virulence factor able to confer adherence properties to both abiotic and eukaryotic surfaces. The ability to adapt rapidly to changing environmental conditions through signal transduction pathways is crucial for the growth and pathogenicity of bacteria. OmpR was shown to activate csgD expression, resulting in curli production. The CpxR regulator was shown to negatively affect curli gene expression when binding to its recognition site that overlaps the csgD OmpR-binding site. This study was undertaken to clarify how the interplay between the two regulatory proteins, OmpR and CpxR, can affect the transcription of the curli gene in response to variation of the medium osmolarity. Band-shift assays with purified CpxR proteins indicate that CpxR binds to the csgD promoter region at multiple sites that are ideally positioned to explain the csg repression activity of CpxR. To understand the physiological meaning of this in vitro molecular phenomenon, we analyzed the effects of an osmolarity shift on the two-component pathway CpxA/CpxR. We establish here that the Cpx pathway is activated at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels in response to a high osmolarity medium and that CpxR represses csgD expression in high-salt-content medium, resulting in low curli production. However, csgD repression in response to high sucrose content is not mediated by CpxR but by the global regulatory protein H-NS. Therefore, multiple systems (EnvZ/OmpR, Cpx, Rcs, and H-NS) appear to be involved in sensing environmental osmolarity, leading to sophisticated regulation of the curli genes.

  15. Engineering of global regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP) in Escherichia coli for improved lycopene production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Pu, Yue; Yang, Xiuliang; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Cai, Jin; Xu, Zhinan

    2015-04-10

    Transcriptional engineering has received significant attention for improving strains by modulating the behavior of transcription factors, which could be used to reprogram a series of gene transcriptions and enable multiple simultaneous modifications at the genomic level. In this study, engineering of the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) was explored with the aim of subtly balancing entire pathway networks and potentially improving lycopene production without significant genetic intervention in other pathways. Amino acid mutations were introduced to CRP by error-prone PCR, and three variants (mcrp26, mcrp159 and mcrp424) with increased lycopene productivity were screened. Combinations of three point mutations were then created via site-directed mutagenesis. The best mutant gene (mcrp26) was integrated into the genome of E. coli BW25113-BIE to replace the wild-type crp gene (MT-1), which resulted in a higher lycopene production (18.49mg/g DCW) compared to the original strain (WT). The mutant strain MT-1 was further investigated in a 10-L bench-top fermentor with a lycopene yield of 128mg/l at 20h, approximately 25% higher than WT. DNA microarray analyses showed that 396 genes (229 up-regulated and 167 down-regulated) were differentially expressed in the mutant MT-1 compared to WT. Finally, the introduction of the mutant crp gene (mcrp26) increased β-carotene production in E. coli. This is the first report of improving the phenotype for metabolite overproduction in E. coli using a CRP engineering strategy.

  16. Variant innate immune responses of mammary epithelial cells to challenge by Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and the regulating effect of taurine on these bioprocesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liuhai; Xu, Yuanyuan; Lu, Jinye; Liu, Ming; Bin Dai; Miao, Jinfeng; Yin, Yulong

    2016-07-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) are important pathogens causing subclinical and clinical bovine mastitis, respectively. Taurine, an organic acid found in animal tissues, has been used for the treatment of various superficial infections and chronic inflammations. We challenged a bovine mammary epithelial cell (MEC) line (MAC-T) or a mouse mammary epithelial cell line (EpH4-Ev) with either E. coli or S. aureus and compared the responses of MECs to these 2 pathogens. We also examined the regulatory effects of taurine on these responses. Receptor analyses showed that both TLR2 and TLR4 are upregulated upon exposure to either E. coli or S. aureus. Taurine pre-treatment dampened upregulation to some extent. E. coli and S. aureus stimulated comparable levels of ROS, which could be inhibited by taurine pre-treatment. E. coli infection elicited a dramatic change in iNOS expression. Taurine significantly decreased iNOS expression in the S. aureus challenged group. Protein microarray demonstrated that 32/40 and 8/40 inflammatory molecules/mediators were increased after E. coli or S. aureus challenge, respectively. The fold changes of most molecules were higher in the E. coli infection group than that in the S. aureus infection group. Taurine negatively regulated the inflammatory profile in both bacterial infections. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as TNF-α) connected with TLR activation were down-regulated by taurine pre-treatment. The influence of TAK-242 and OxPAPC on cytokine/molecule expression profiles to E. coli challenge are different than to S. aureus. Some important factors (MyD88, TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS and IL-6) mediated by TLR activation were suppressed either in protein microarray or special assay (PCR/kits) or both. TAK-242 restrained ROS production and NAGase activity similar to the effect of taurine in E. coli challenge groups. The detection of 3 indices (T-AOC, SOD and MDA) reflecting oxidative stress in vivo, showed that

  17. Integration of regulatory signals through involvement of multiple global regulators: control of the Escherichia coli gltBDF operon by Lrp, IHF, Crp, and ArgR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Pankaj K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glutamate synthase operon (gltBDF contributes to one of the two main pathways of ammonia assimilation in Escherichia coli. Of the seven most-global regulators, together affecting expression of about half of all E. coli genes, two were previously shown to exert direct, positive control on gltBDF transcription: Lrp and IHF. The involvement of Lrp is unusual in two respects: first, it is insensitive to the usual coregulator leucine, and second, Lrp binds more than 150 bp upstream of the transcription starting point. There was indirect evidence for involvement of a third global regulator, Crp. Given the physiological importance of gltBDF, and the potential opportunity to learn about integration of global regulatory signals, a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches was used to investigate the involvement of additional regulatory proteins, and to determine their relative binding positions and potential interactions with one another and with RNA polymerase (RNAP. Results Crp and a more local regulator, ArgR, directly control gltBDF transcription, both acting negatively. Crp-cAMP binds a sequence centered at -65.5 relative to the transcript start. Mutation of conserved nucleotides in the Crp binding site abolishes the Crp-dependent repression. ArgR also binds to the gltBDF promoter region, upstream of the Lrp binding sites, and decreases transcription. RNAP only yields a defined DNAse I footprint under two tested conditions: in the presence of both Lrp and IHF, or in the presence of Crp-cAMP. The DNAse I footprint of RNAP in the presence of Lrp and IHF is altered by ArgR. Conclusion The involvement of nearly half of E. coli's most-global regulatory proteins in the control of gltBDF transcription is striking, but seems consistent with the central metabolic role of this operon. Determining the mechanisms of activation and repression for gltBDF was beyond the scope of this study. However the results are consistent with a

  18. Overlapping repressor binding sites result in additive regulation of Escherichia coli FadH by FadR and ArcA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Youjun; Cronan, John E

    2010-09-01

    Escherichia coli fadH encodes a 2,4-dienoyl reductase that plays an auxiliary role in beta-oxidation of certain unsaturated fatty acids. In the 2 decades since its discovery, FadH biochemistry has been studied extensively. However, the genetic regulation of FadH has been explored only partially. Here we report mapping of the fadH promoter and document its complex regulation by three independent regulators, the fatty acid degradation FadR repressor, the oxygen-responsive ArcA-ArcB two-component system, and the cyclic AMP receptor protein-cyclic AMP (CRP-cAMP) complex. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that FadR binds to the fadH promoter region and that this binding can be specifically reversed by long-chain acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters. In vivo data combining transcriptional lacZ fusion and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses indicated that fadH is strongly repressed by FadR, in agreement with induction of fadH by long-chain fatty acids. Inactivation of arcA increased fadH transcription by >3-fold under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, fadH expression was increased 8- to 10-fold under anaerobic conditions upon deletion of both the fadR and the arcA gene, indicating that anaerobic expression is additively repressed by FadR and ArcA-ArcB. Unlike fadM, a newly reported member of the E. coli fad regulon that encodes another auxiliary beta-oxidation enzyme, fadH was activated by the CRP-cAMP complex in a manner similar to those of the prototypical fad genes. In the absence of the CRP-cAMP complex, repression of fadH expression by both FadR and ArcA-ArcB was very weak, suggesting a possible interplay with other DNA binding proteins.

  19. Escherichia Coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  20. Regulation of PTS gene expression by the homologous transcriptional regulators, Mlc and NagC, in Escherichia coli (or how two similar repressors can behave differently).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumbridge, J

    2001-07-01

    NagC and Mlc are paralogous transcriptional repressors in E.coli. Unexpectedly they possess almost identical amino acid sequences in their helix-turn-helix (H-T-H), DNA binding motif and they bind to very similar consensus operator targets. Binding to each others sites can be demonstrated in vitro but no cross regulation can be detected in vivo with physiological amounts of the two proteins. Although both proteins are involved in regulating the expression of PTS genes, the characteristics of their repression and induction are very different. NagC is a dual-function, activator-repressor which co-ordinates the metabolism of the amino sugars, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and glucosamine, by repressing the divergent nagE-BA operons and by activating the glmUS operon. Repression (and activation) by NagC requires that NagC binds simultaneously to two operators, thus forming a DNA loop. This chelation effect allows use of lower affinity sites which would not individually bind the repressor. The specific inducer for NagC is GlcNAc-6-P, the product of GlcNAc transport by the PTS and a key compound in amino sugar metabolism. Mlc represses several genes implicated in the uptake of glucose; ptsG, ptsHI and manXYZ, and malT, the activator of the mal regulon. Glucose behaves like the inducer but growth on glucose only produces an overall increase in expression for ptsG and ptsHI. All Mlc repressed genes are also controlled by cAMP/CAP, so that glucose affects their transcription in two opposing ways: increasing expression by acting as the inducer for Mlc but decreasing expression by lowering the cAMP/CAP concentration. The Mlc protein is not directly responsive to glucose per se but to the activity status of the PTS. Displacement of Mlc from its binding sites occurs during growth on glucose and other PTS sugars and involves sequestration of the repressor to membranes by binding to dephosphorylated PtsG.

  1. Structural basis for morpheein-type allosteric regulation of Escherichia coli glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase: equilibrium between inactive hexamer and active dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouilleron, Stéphane; Badet-Denisot, Marie-Ange; Pecqueur, Ludovic; Madiona, Karine; Assrir, Nadine; Badet, Bernard; Golinelli-Pimpaneau, Béatrice

    2012-10-01

    The amino-terminal cysteine of glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase (GlmS) acts as a nucleophile to release and transfer ammonia from glutamine to fructose 6-phosphate through a channel. The crystal structure of the C1A mutant of Escherichia coli GlmS, solved at 2.5 Å resolution, is organized as a hexamer, where the glutaminase domains adopt an inactive conformation. Although the wild-type enzyme is active as a dimer, size exclusion chromatography, dynamic and quasi-elastic light scattering, native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and ultracentrifugation data show that the dimer is in equilibrium with a hexameric state, in vitro and in cellulo. The previously determined structures of the wild-type enzyme, alone or in complex with glucosamine 6-phosphate, are also consistent with a hexameric assembly that is catalytically inactive because the ammonia channel is not formed. The shift of the equilibrium toward the hexameric form in the presence of cyclic glucosamine 6-phosphate, together with the decrease of the specific activity with increasing enzyme concentration, strongly supports product inhibition through hexamer stabilization. Altogether, our data allow us to propose a morpheein model, in which the active dimer can rearrange into a transiently stable form, which has the propensity to form an inactive hexamer. This would account for a physiologically relevant allosteric regulation of E. coli GlmS. Finally, in addition to cyclic glucose 6-phosphate bound at the active site, the hexameric organization of E. coli GlmS enables the binding of another linear sugar molecule. Targeting this sugar-binding site to stabilize the inactive hexameric state is therefore suggested for the development of specific antibacterial inhibitors.

  2. Peroxide resistance in Escherichia coli serotype O157 : H7 biofilms is regulated by both RpoS-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlich, Gaylen A; Chen, Chin-Yi; Cottrell, Bryan J; Irwin, Peter L; Phillips, John G

    2012-09-01

    In many Escherichia coli serotype O157 : H7 strains, defences against peroxide damage include the peroxiredoxin AhpCF and three catalases: KatG (catalase/peroxidase), KatE (catalase) and the plasmid-encoded KatP (catalase/peroxidase). AhpC and KatG basal expression is maintained by RpoS, and AhpC, KatG and KatP are all induced by OxyR/σ(70) in exponential phase. KatE is regulated by RpoS during stationary growth and is independent of OxyR. In a previous study we used mutant strains of ATCC 43895 (EDL933) with deletions of katG, ahpC, katE and katP in all possible combinations to characterize peroxide resistance during both exponential and 18-24 h growth in Luria-Bertani broth at 37 °C. In this study, we used triple deletion strains that isolated each catalase/peroxidase gene to investigate their role in the peroxide resistance of biofilm-forming variant 43895OR in 48 and 72 h biofilms. We also used quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR and translational lacZ fusions to study gene expression. Peroxide resistance was greater (Pperoxide protection had both rpoS-dependent and rpoS-independent components, but katP protection was independent of rpoS. H(2)O(2) challenge induced (Pperoxide induction of the OxyR-dependent resistance genes may contribute to the RpoS-independent protection in Shiga toxin-producing E. coli biofilms.

  3. The Serine Protease EspC from Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Regulates Pore Formation and Cytotoxicity Mediated by the Type III Secretion System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Guignot

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Type III secretion systems (T3SSs are specialized macromolecular machines critical for bacterial virulence, and allowing the injection of bacterial effectors into host cells. The T3SS-dependent injection process requires the prior insertion of a protein complex, the translocon, into host cell membranes consisting of two-T3SS hydrophobic proteins, associated with pore-forming activity. In all described T3SS to date, a hydrophilic protein connects one hydrophobic component to the T3SS needle, presumably insuring the continuum between the hollow needle and the translocon. In the case of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, the hydrophilic component EspA polymerizes into a filament connecting the T3SS needle to the translocon composed of the EspB and EspD hydrophobic proteins. Here, we identify EspA and EspD as targets of EspC, a serine protease autotransporter of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE. We found that in vitro, EspC preferentially targets EspA associated with EspD, but was less efficient at proteolyzing EspA alone. Consistently, we found that EspC did not regulate EspA filaments at the surface of primed bacteria that was devoid of EspD, but controlled the levels of EspD and EspA secreted in vitro or upon cell contact. While still proficient for T3SS-mediated injection of bacterial effectors and cytoskeletal reorganization, an espC mutant showed increased levels of cell-associated EspA and EspD, as well as increased pore formation activity associated with cytotoxicity. EspP from enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC also targeted translocator components and its activity was interchangeable with that of EspC, suggesting a common and important function of these SPATEs. These findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism of T3SS-mediated pore formation and cytotoxicity control during EPEC/EHEC infection.

  4. Investigation of carbon storage regulation network (csr genes) and phenotypic differences between acid sensitive and resistant Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Escherichia coli O157:H7 and related serotype strains have previously been shown to vary in acid resistance, however, little is known about strain specific mechanisms of acid resistance. We examined sensitive and resistant E. coli strains to determine the effects of growth in minimal and...

  5. Identification of IbeR as a Stationary-Phase Regulator in Meningitic Escherichia coli K1 that Carries a Loss-of-Function Mutation in rpoS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Chi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available IbeR is a regulator present in meningitic Escherichia coli strain E44 that carries a loss-of-function mutation in the stationary-phase (SP regulatory gene rpoS. In order to determine whether IbeR is an SP regulator in E44, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS were used to compare the proteomes of a noninvasive ibeR deletion mutant BR2 and its parent strain E44 in the SP. Four up-regulated (TufB, GapA, OmpA, AhpC and three down-regulated (LpdA, TnaA, OpmC proteins in BR2 were identified when compared to E44. All these proteins contribute to energy metabolism or stress resistance, which is related to SP regulation. One of the down-regulated proteins, tryptophanase (TnaA, which is regulated by RpoS in other E. coli strains, is associated with SP regulation via production of a signal molecule indole. Our studies demonstrated that TnaA was required for E44 invasion, and that indole was able to restore the noninvasive phenotype of the tnaA mutant. The production of indole was significantly reduced in BR2, indicating that ibeR is required for the indole production via tnaA. Survival studies under different stress conditions indicated that IbeR contributed to bacteria stress resistance in the SP. Taken together, IbeR is a novel regulator contributing to the SP regulation.

  6. Chromatin architecture and gene expression in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Ussery, David

    2004-01-01

    Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli.......Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli....

  7. La textura del suelo como factor regulador de la adsorción de Escherichia coli en una cuenca de la Pampa Ondulada (Argentina Soil texture as a regulating factor of Escherichia coli adsorption in a Rolling Pampa basin (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Behrends Kraemer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El aumento de la carga animal vacuna en la Pampa Ondulada asociado a áreas frágiles supone un importante riesgo de contaminación biológica. Dicha contaminación está regulada por variables edáficas, como la textura, que controlan el transporte de contaminantes biológicos hacia los cuerpos de agua. En el presente trabajo se correlacionó la adsorción bacteriana del suelo con distintos tamaños de partículas individuales correspondientes a 27 suelos provenientes de una cuenca de la Pampa Ondulada. Para ello se utilizó una técnica de centrifugación lenta. Los valores de adsorción bacteriana, empleando en la determinación Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, variaron entre 25,3% y 73,3%, y el tamaño de partícula que mejor se correlacionó con esta propiedad fue el correspondiente a la fracción de arcillas (R² = 0,6. Esta correlación mejoró al considerar conjuntamente a todas las partículas menores de 3 µm (R² = 0,64, lo que resalta la capacidad de los limos muy finos en el fenómeno de adsorción. La curva de ajuste elaborada con los datos experimentales se comparó con la obtenida de acuerdo con el modelo propuesto por Ling et al. (2002. Se encontraron similitudes en la pendiente, no así en la ordenada al origen. Esta diferencia desapareció al emplear en la determinación una cepa autóctona aislada de deyecciones animales provenientes de la cuenca estudiada, dado que dicha cepa evidenció una adsorción 48% superior a la observada con la cepa de colección.

  8. Implications of down regulation of rcsA and rcsA-regulated colanic acid biosynthesis genes in increased acid sensitivity and enhanced curli and biofilm production in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 strain 86-24, originally linked to a disease outbreak in the western USA in 1982, exhibits acid resistance as indicated by its ability to survive exposure to acidic conditions (pH2.5) for several hours. The strain 86-24 is a poor biofilm producer ...

  9. Transcriptional and translational regulation by RNA thermometers, riboswitches and the sRNA DsrA in Escherichia coli O157:H7 Sakai under combined cold and osmotic stress adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hücker, Sarah Maria; Simon, Svenja; Scherer, Siegfried; Neuhaus, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The enteric pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 Sakai (EHEC) is able to grow at lower temperatures compared to commensal E. coli Growth at environmental conditions displays complex challenges different to those in a host. EHEC was grown at 37°C and at 14°C with 4% NaCl, a combination of cold and osmotic stress as present in the food chain. Comparison of RNAseq and RIBOseq data provided a snap shot of ongoing transcription and translation, differentiating transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation, respectively. Indeed, cold and osmotic stress related genes are simultaneously regulated at both levels, but translational regulation clearly dominates. Special emphasis was given to genes regulated by RNA secondary structures in their 5(')UTRs, such as RNA thermometers and riboswitches, or genes controlled by small RNAs encoded in trans The results reveal large differences in gene expression between short-time shock compared to adaptation in combined cold and osmotic stress. Whereas the majority of cold shock proteins, such as CspA, are translationally downregulated after adaptation, many osmotic stress genes are still significantly upregulated mainly translationally, but several also transcriptionally. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Modulating the direction of carbon flow in Escherichia coli to improve l-tryptophan production by inactivating the global regulator FruR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lina; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-08-10

    The fructose repressor (FruR) affects carbon flux through the central metabolic pathways of Escherichia coli. In this study, l-tryptophan production in Escherichia coli FB-04 was improved by knocking out the fruR gene, thereby inactivating FruR. This fruR knockout strain, E. coli FB-04(ΔfruR), not only exhibited higher growth efficiency, it also showed substantially improved l-tryptophan production. l-tryptophan production by E. coli FB-04(ΔfruR) and l-tryptophan yield per glucose were increased by 62.5% and 52.4%, respectively, compared with the parent E. coli FB-04. Metabolomics analysis showed that the fruR knockout significantly enhances metabolic flow through glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and the TCA cycle, increasing levels of critical precursors and substrates for l-tryptophan biosynthesis. These results indicate that fruR deletion should enhance l-tryptophan production and improve the efficiency of carbon source utilization independent of genetic background.

  11. Lactobacillus acidophilus INMIA 9602 Er-2 strain 317/402 probiotic regulates growth of commensal Escherichia coli in gut microbiota of familial Mediterranean fever disease subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepoyan, A Z; Balayan, M H; Manvelyan, A M; Mamikonyan, V; Isajanyan, M; Tsaturyan, V V; Kamiya, S; Netrebov, V; Chikindas, M L

    2017-04-01

    Previously, we reported a positive effect the probiotic formulation, Lactobacillus acidophilus INMIA 9602 Er-2 strain 317/402 (Narine strain), had on the blood characteristics of patients with familial Mediterranean fever disease (FMF). The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of the Narine probiotic on growth characteristics in the predominant commensal Escherichia coli isolates from the gut microbiota in FMF-positive study participants. Bacterial growth of 192 prevalent commensal E. coli isolates found in the volunteer participants' guts was evaluated using Verhulst's logistic function. This study showed that the duration of the preparatory growth phase for the E. coli isolates collected from FMF-positive volunteers was significantly shorter, whereas the duration of the logarithmic growth phase was significantly longer (P FMF subjects a month after the Narine probiotic administration was terminated. The data suggest that the mathematical model characterizes the growth of commensal E. coli isolates from FMF-positive participants and it can be useful in a decision-making process on the practical use of probiotics during FMF. This is the first study to demonstrate the effects of Narine, containing the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus, on the growth of gut commensal Escherichia coli from study participants with familial Mediterranean fever disease (FMF). Verhulst's logistic function was demonstrated to act as a possible tool for the evaluation and quantification of effects produced by the probiotic formulation in FMF participants. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. The Escherichia coli metallo-regulator RcnR represses rcnA and rcnR transcription through binding on a shared operator site: Insights into regulatory specificity towards nickel and cobalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, Didier; Arous, Safia; Blériot, Camille; Dorel, Corinne; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andrée; Rodrigue, Agnès

    2011-03-01

    RcnA is an efflux pump responsible for Ni and Co detoxification in Escherichia coli. The expression of rcnA is induced by Ni and Co via the metallo-regulator RcnR. In the present work, the functioning of the promoter-operator region of rcnR and rcnA was investigated using primer extension and DNAse I footprinting experiments. We show that the promoters of rcnR and rcnA are convergent and that apo-RcnR binds on symmetrically located sequences in this intergenic region. Moreover, RcnR DNA binding is specifically modulated by one Ni or Co equivalent and not by other metals. In addition to rcnA, RcnR controls expression of its own gene in response to Ni and Co, but the two genes are differentially expressed.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of main metabolic pathways of cyoA, cydB, fnr, and fur gene knockout Escherichia coli in C-limited and N-limited aerobic continuous cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rahul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is important to understand the cellular responses emanating from environmental perturbations to redesign the networks for practical applications. In particular, the carbon (C metabolism, nitrogen (N assimilation, and energy generation are by far important, where those are interconnected and integrated to maintain cellular integrity. In our previous study, we investigated the effect of C/N ratio on the metabolic regulation of gdhA, glnL, glt B,D mutants as well as wild type Escherichia coli (Kumar and Shimizu, MCF, 1-17, 9:8,2010, where it was shown that the transcript levels of cyoA and cydB which encode the terminal oxidases, fnr and fur which encode global regulators were significantly up-regulated under N-limited condition as compared to C-limited condition. In the present study, therefore, the effects of such single-gene knockout on the metabolic regulation were investigated to clarify the roles of those genes in the aerobic continuous culture at the dilution rate of 0.2 h-1. Results The specific glucose consumption rates and the specific CO2 production rates of cyoA, cydB, fnr, and fur mutants were all increased as compared to the wild type under both C-limited and N-limited conditions. The former phenomenon was consistent with the up-regulations of the transcript levels of ptsG and ptsH, which are consistent with down-regulations of crp and mlc genes. Moreover, the increase in the specific glucose consumption rate was also caused by up-regulations of the transcript levels of pfkA, pykF and possibly zwf, where those are consistent with the down regulations of cra, crp and mlc genes. Moreover, the transcript levels of rpoN together with glnK, glnB, glnE were up-regulated, and thus the transcript levels of glnA,L,G, and gltB,D as well as nac were up-regulated, while gdhA was down-regulated. This implies the interconnection between cAMP-Crp and PII-Ntr systems. Moreover, cyoA, cydB, fnr and fur gene deletions up-regulated

  14. Campylobacter jejuni CsrA complements an Escherichia coli csrA mutation for the regulation of biofilm formation, motility and cellular morphology but not glycogen accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Fields Joshua A; Thompson Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Although Campylobacter jejuni is consistently ranked as one of the leading causes of bacterial diarrhea worldwide, the mechanisms by which C. jejuni causes disease and how they are regulated have yet to be clearly defined. The global regulator, CsrA, has been well characterized in several bacterial genera and is known to regulate a number of independent pathways via a post transcriptional mechanism, but remains relatively uncharacterized in the genus Campylobacter. Previou...

  15. Factors involved in the regulation of early enzyme synthesis and lysis of Escherichia coli B infected with bacteriophage T4D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, S.

    1976-01-01

    The capability of T4/sup +/-infected Escherichia coli cells to display handling-induced lysis may implicate the activity of a known, untested gene, or a heretofore undiscovered gene. This gene product may be involved in the normal lytic process; it may be a new phage-induced phospholipase or a late function that activates a latent E. coli phospholipase. Another possibility is that the late function is involved in membrane biosynthesis or modification. Alternatively, the required late protein(s) may have some other role that only secondarily affects the cell's permeability barrier. Whatever the case may be, this work is of practical interest since chilling and centrifugation of infected cells are very common procedures and researchers should be aware of any handling-induced damage.

  16. A comparison of key aspects of gene regulation in Streptomyces coelicolor and Escherichia coli using nucleotide-resolution transcription maps produced in parallel by global and differential RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, David A; Hasan, Ayad H; Lin, Yu-Fei; Kime, Louise; Ruiz-Larrabeiti, Olatz; Urem, Mia; Bucca, Giselda; Mamanova, Lira; Laing, Emma E; van Wezel, Gilles P; Smith, Colin P; Kaberdin, Vladimir R; McDowall, Kenneth J

    2014-09-30

    Streptomyces coelicolor is a model for studying bacteria renowned as the foremost source of natural products used clinically. Post-genomic studies have revealed complex patterns of gene expression and links to growth, morphological development and individual genes. However, the underlying regulation remains largely obscure, but undoubtedly involves steps after transcription initiation. Here we identify sites involved in RNA processing and degradation as well as transcription within a nucleotide-resolution map of the transcriptional landscape. This was achieved by combining RNA-sequencing approaches suited to the analysis of GC-rich organisms. Escherichia coli was analysed in parallel to validate the methodology and allow comparison. Previously, sites of RNA processing and degradation had not been mapped on a transcriptome-wide scale for E. coli. Through examples, we show the value of our approach and data sets. This includes the identification of new layers of transcriptional complexity associated with several key regulators of secondary metabolism and morphological development in S. coelicolor and the identification of host-encoded leaderless mRNA and rRNA processing associated with the generation of specialized ribosomes in E. coli. New regulatory small RNAs were identified for both organisms. Overall the results illustrate the diversity in mechanisms used by different bacterial groups to facilitate and regulate gene expression. © 2014 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Role of GroEL/GroES chaperonin system and Lon protease in regulation of expression Vibrio fischeri lux genes in Escherichia coli cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukhov, I V; Kotova, V Iu; Zavil'genskiĭ, G B

    2006-01-01

    It was shown that the chaperonin GroEL/GroES and protease Lon influence the expression of the Vibrio fischeri lux regulon in Escherichia coli cells: E. coli groE mutants bearing hybrid plasmid with the lux regulon were weakly luminescent; cells of the E. coli lon- comprising the entire lux regulon display very intense bioluminescence, with no lag period in the induction curve characteristic of lon+ strains. The luxR gene was cloned from the Vibrio fischeri genome in the pGEX-KG vector. It was shown that the active fusion protein GST-LuxR by affinity chromatography on glutathione-sucrose colony is purified only with proteins GroEL and Lon. The present results showed that the LuxR, transcriptional activator of the V. fischeri lux operon, really complexes with GroEL chaperonin and Lon protease. We suppose, that the GroEL/GroES chaperonin systems is required for the folding of LuxR into an active protein, and the LuxR is the target for the ATP-dependent serine Lon protease of E. coli.

  18. Fitness of Outbreak and Environmental Strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Aerosolizable Soil and Association of Clonal Variation in Stress Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subbarao V. Ravva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Airborne dust from feedlots is a potential mechanism of contamination of nearby vegetable crops with Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EcO157. We compared the fitness of clinical and environmental strains of EcO157 in <45 µm soil from a spinach farm. Differences in survival were observed among the 35 strains with D-values (days for 90% decreases ranging from 1–12 days. Strains that survived longer, generally, were from environmental sources and lacked expression of curli, a protein associated with attachment and virulence. Furthermore, the proportion of curli-positive (C+ variants of EcO157 strains decreased with repeated soil exposure and the strains that were curli-negative (C− remained C− post-soil exposure. Soil exposure altered expression of stress-response genes linked to fitness of EcO157, but significant clonal variation in expression was measured. Mutations were detected in the stress-related sigma factor, rpoS, with a greater percentage occurring in parental strains of clinical origin prior to soil exposure. We speculate that these mutations in rpoS may confer a differential expression of genes, associated with mechanisms of survival and/or virulence, and thus may influence the fitness of EcO157.

  19. Different effects of transcriptional regulators MarA, SoxS and Rob on susceptibility of Escherichia coli to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs): Rob-dependent CAMP induction of the marRAB operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Douglas M; Levy, Stuart B

    2010-02-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs), a component of the mammalian immune system, protect the host from bacterial infections. The roles of the Escherichia coli transcriptional regulators MarA, SoxS and Rob in susceptibility to these peptides were examined. Overexpression of marA, either in an antibiotic-resistant marR mutant or from a plasmid, decreased bacterial susceptibility to CAMPs. Overexpression of the soxS gene from a plasmid, which decreased susceptibility to antibiotics, unexpectedly caused no decrease in CAMP susceptibility; instead it produced increased susceptibility to different CAMPs. Deletion or overexpression of rob had little effect on CAMP susceptibility. The marRAB operon was upregulated when E. coli was incubated in sublethal amounts of CAMPs polymyxin B, LL-37 or human beta-defensin-1; however, this upregulation required Rob. Deletion of acrAB increased bacterial susceptibility to polymyxin B, LL-37 and human beta-defensin-1 peptides. Deletion of tolC yielded an even greater increase in susceptibility to these peptides and also led to increased susceptibility to human alpha-defensin-2. Inhibition of cellular proton-motive force increased peptide susceptibility for wild-type and acrAB deletion strains; however, it decreased susceptibility of tolC mutants. These findings demonstrate that CAMPs are both inducers of marA-mediated drug resistance through interaction with Rob and also substrates for efflux in E. coli. The three related transcriptional regulators show different effects on bacterial cell susceptibility to CAMPs.

  20. Colostrum whey down-regulates the expression of early and late inflammatory response genes induced by Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium components in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, M; Fortier, M; Pouliot, Y; Gauthier, S F; Boutin, Y; Asselin, C; Lessard, M

    2015-01-28

    Pathogenic invasion by Escherichia coli and Salmonellae remains a constant threat to the integrity of the intestinal epithelium and can rapidly induce inflammatory responses. At birth, colostrum consumption exerts numerous beneficial effects on the properties of intestinal epithelial cells and protects the gastrointestinal tract of newborns from pathogenic invasion. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of colostrum on the early and late inflammatory responses induced by pathogens. The short-term (2 h) and long-term (24 h) effects of exposure to heat-killed (HK) E. coli and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium on gene expression in the porcine intestinal epithelial cell (IPEC-J2) model were first evaluated by microarray and quantitative PCR analyses. Luciferase assays were performed using a NF-κB-luc reporter construct to investigate the effect of colostrum whey treatment on the activation of NF-κB induced by HK bacteria. Luciferase assays were also performed using NF-κB-luc, IL-8-luc and IL-6-luc reporter constructs in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2/15 cells exposed to dose-response stimulations with HK bacteria and colostrum whey. Bovine colostrum whey treatment decreased the expression of early and late inflammatory genes induced by HK bacteria in IPEC-J2, as well as the transcriptional activation of NF-κB-luc induced by HK bacteria. Unlike that with colostrum whey, treatment with other milk fractions failed to decrease the activation of NF-κB-luc induced by HK bacteria. Lastly, the reduction of the HK bacteria-induced activation of NF-κB-luc, IL-8-luc and IL-6-luc by colostrum whey was dose dependent. The results of the present study indicate that bovine colostrum may protect and preserve the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier in the host by controlling the expression levels of early and late inflammatory genes following invasion by enteric pathogens.

  1. The constancy of global regulation across a species: the concentrations of ppGpp and RpoS are strain-specific in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phan Katherine

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sigma factors and the alarmone ppGpp control the allocation of RNA polymerase to promoters under stressful conditions. Both ppGpp and the sigma factor σS (RpoS are potentially subject to variability across the species Escherichia coli. To find out the extent of strain variation we measured the level of RpoS and ppGpp using 31 E. coli strains from the ECOR collection and one reference K-12 strain. Results Nine ECORs had highly deleterious mutations in rpoS, 12 had RpoS protein up to 7-fold above that of the reference strain MG1655 and the remainder had comparable or lower levels. Strain variation was also evident in ppGpp accumulation under carbon starvation and spoT mutations were present in several low-ppGpp strains. Three relationships between RpoS and ppGpp levels were found: isolates with zero RpoS but various ppGpp levels, strains where RpoS levels were proportional to ppGpp and a third unexpected class in which RpoS was present but not proportional to ppGpp concentration. High-RpoS and high-ppGpp strains accumulated rpoS mutations under nutrient limitation, providing a source of polymorphisms. Conclusions The ppGpp and σS variance means that the expression of genes involved in translation, stress and other traits affected by ppGpp and/or RpoS are likely to be strain-specific and suggest that influential components of regulatory networks are frequently reset by microevolution. Different strains of E. coli have different relationships between ppGpp and RpoS levels and only some exhibit a proportionality between increasing ppGpp and RpoS levels as demonstrated for E. coli K-12.

  2. Lactobacillus amylovorus Inhibits the TLR4 Inflammatory Signaling Triggered by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli via Modulation of the Negative Regulators and Involvement of TLR2 in Intestinal Caco-2 Cells and Pig Explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finamore, Alberto; Roselli, Marianna; Imbinto, Ambra; Seeboth, Julie; Oswald, Isabelle P.; Mengheri, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation derived from pathogen infection involves the activation of toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling. Despite the established immunomodulatory activities of probiotics, studies relating the ability of such bacteria to inhibit the TLR signaling pathways are limited or controversial. In a previous study we showed that Lactobacillus amylovorus DSM 16698T, a novel lactobacillus isolated from unweaned pigs, protects the intestinal cells from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 infection through cytokine regulation. In the present study we investigated whether the ability of L. amylovorus to counteract the inflammatory status triggered by ETEC in intestine is elicited through inhibition of the TLR4 signaling pathway. We used the human intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells and intestinal explants isolated from 5 week-old crossbreed Pietrain/Duroc/Large-White piglets, treated with ETEC, L. amylovorus or L. amylovorus cell free supernatant, either alone or simultaneously with ETEC. Western blot analysis showed that L. amylovorus and its cell free supernatant suppress the activation of the different steps of TLR4 signaling in Caco-2/TC7 cells and pig explants, by inhibiting the ETEC induced increase in the level of TLR4 and MyD88, the phosphorylation of the IKKα, IKKβ, IκBα and NF-κB subunit p65, as well as the over-production of inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and IL-1β. The immunofluorescence analysis confirms the lack of phospho-p65 translocation into the nucleus. These anti-inflammatory effects are achieved through modulation of the negative regulators Tollip and IRAK-M. We also found that L. amylovorus blocks the up-regulation of the extracellular heat shock protein (Hsp)72 and Hsp90, that are critical for TLR4 function. By using anti-TLR2 antibody, we demonstrate that TLR2 is required for the suppression of TLR4 signaling activation. These results may contribute to develop therapeutic interventions using L. amylovorus in intestinal disorders of piglets and humans

  3. Expression, Functional Characterization and X-ray Analysis of HosA, A Member of MarR Family of Transcription Regulator from Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ajit; Reddi, Ravikumar; Sawhney, Bhavik; Ghosh, Debasish Kumar; Addlagatta, Anthony; Ranjan, Akash

    2016-08-01

    Regulators belonging to multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family are widespread in prokaryotes and are involved in regulation of genes that are responsible for virulence and pathogenicity in most of the clinically important pathogens. Here we report the transcriptional, biophysical, and X-ray analyses of homologue of SlyA (HosA), a member of MarR family that is predominantly present in the pathogenic strains of Enterobacteriaceae family. The initiation of hosA transcription was observed to occur at two independent start sites and subsequent binding study has revealed that the purified HosA interacts with its upstream region suggesting a probable autoregulation. The secondary structure analysis through circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that HosA is predominantly composed of the alpha helix with higher thermal stability. To further understand the three-dimensional structure, HosA was crystallized and the crystals were diffracted to maximum of 2.9 Ǻ on exposure to X-rays. Analysis of the X-ray crystallographic data suggested a primitive space group (P 6 ? 2 2), with unit cell parameters a = b = 64.19 Å and c = 244.25 Å. The solvent content and Matthews coefficient were 41 % and 2.11 Å(3) Da(-1), respectively, which indicated the existence of two molecules of HosA in the asymmetric unit of crystal.

  4. IrrE, a global regulator of extreme radiation resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans, enhances salt tolerance in Escherichia coli and Brassica napus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Pan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Globally, about 20% of cultivated land is now affected by salinity. Salt tolerance is a trait of importance to all crops in saline soils. Previous efforts to improve salt tolerance in crop plants have met with only limited success. Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are known for their ability to survive highly stressful conditions, and therefore possess a unique pool of genes conferring extreme resistance. In Deinococcus radiodurans, the irrE gene encodes a global regulator responsible for extreme radioresistance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using plate assays, we showed that IrrE protected E. coli cells against salt shock and other abiotic stresses such as oxidative, osmotic and thermal shocks. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed that IrrE functions as a switch to regulate different sets of proteins such as stress responsive proteins, protein kinases, glycerol-degrading enzymes, detoxification proteins, and growth-related proteins in E. coli. We also used quantitative RT-PCR to investigate expression of nine selected stress-responsive genes in transgenic and wild-type Brassica napus plants. Transgenic B. napus plants expressing the IrrE protein can tolerate 350 mM NaCl, a concentration that inhibits the growth of almost all crop plants. CONCLUSIONS: Expression of IrrE, a global regulator for extreme radiation resistance in D. radiodurans, confers significantly enhanced salt tolerance in both E. coli and B. napus. We thus propose that the irrE gene might be used as a potentially promising transgene to improve abiotic stress tolerances in crop plants.

  5. The Carbon Storage Regulator (Csr) System Exerts a Nutrient-Specific Control over Central Metabolism in Escherichia coli Strain Nissle 1917

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Revelles; Pierre Millard; Jean-Philippe Nougayrède; Ulrich Dobrindt; Eric Oswald; Fabien Létisse; Jean-Charles Portais

    2013-01-01

    The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr) system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations) showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the c...

  6. The Regulation of Expression of the Stx2d Toxins in Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli O91:H21 Strain B2F1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    EHEC 1 group consists only of O157:H7 and O157:NM, two serotypes that appear to represent recent clones that have spread globally . Members of the...which carnitine is used in the bacterial cell (Fig. 22). The role this gene might have as a global regulator is unclear; however, the caiD-coding...mRNA secondary structure in differential expression of Shiga toxin genes J.Bacteriol. 175: 597-603. Hamilton,C.M., Aldea ,M., Washburn,B.K

  7. Structure of the Escherichia coli Antitoxin MqsA (YgiT/b3021) Bound to Its Gene Promoter Reveals Extensive Domain Rearrangements and the Specificity of Transcriptional Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B Brown; T Wood; W Peti; R Page

    2011-12-31

    Bacterial cultures, especially biofilms, produce a small number of persister cells, a genetically identical subpopulation of wild type cells that are metabolically dormant, exhibit multidrug tolerance, and are highly enriched in bacterial toxins. The gene most highly up-regulated in Escherichia coli persisters is mqsR, a ribonuclease toxin that, along with mqsA, forms a novel toxin-antitoxin (TA) system. Like all known TA systems, both the MqsR-MqsA complex and MqsA alone regulate their own transcription. Despite the importance of TA systems in persistence and biofilms, very little is known about how TA modules, and antitoxins in particular, bind and recognize DNA at a molecular level. Here, we report the crystal structure of MqsA bound to a 26-bp fragment from the mqsRA promoter. We show that MqsA binds DNA predominantly via its C-terminal helix-turn-helix domain, with direct binding of recognition helix residues Asn{sup 97} and Arg{sup 010} to the DNA major groove. Unexpectedly, the structure also revealed that the MqsA N-terminal domain interacts with the DNA phosphate backbone. This results in a more than 105{sup o} rotation of the N-terminal domains between the free and complexed states, an unprecedented rearrangement for an antitoxin. The structure also shows that MqsA bends the DNA by more than 55{sup o} in order to achieve symmetrical binding. Finally, using a combination of biochemical and NMR studies, we show that the DNA sequence specificity of MqsA is mediated by direct readout.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of the outer membrane porin gene ompW reveals its physiological role during the transition from the aerobic to the anaerobic lifestyle of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minfeng eXiao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding bacterial physiology relies on elucidating the regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions of those differentially expressed genes in response to environmental changes. A widespread Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein OmpW has been implicated in the adaptation to stresses in various species. It is recently found to be present in the regulon of the global anaerobic transcription factor FNR and ArcA in E. coli. However, little is known about the physiological implications of this regulatory disposition. In this study, we demonstrate that transcription of ompW is indeed mediated by a series of global regulators involved in the anaerobiosis of E. coli. We show that FNR can both activate and repress the expression of ompW through its direct binding to two distinctive sites, -81.5 and -126.5 bp respectively, on ompW promoter. ArcA also participates in repression of ompW under anaerobic condition, but in an FNR dependent manner. Additionally, ompW is also subject to the regulation by CRP and NarL which senses the availability and types of carbon sources and respiration electron acceptors in the environment respectively, implying a role of OmpW in the carbon and energy metabolism of E. coli during its anaerobic adaptation. Molecular docking reveals that OmpW can bind fumarate, an alternative electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration, with sufficient affinity. Moreover, supplement of fumarate or succinate which belongs to the C4-dicarboxylates family of metabolite, to E. coli culture rescues OmpW-mediated colicin S4 killing. Taken together, we propose that OmpW is involved in anaerobic carbon and energy metabolism to mediate the transition from aerobic to anaerobic lifestyle in E. coli.

  9. The host response to the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917: Specific up-regulation of the proinflammatory chemokine MCP-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ukena Sya N

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of live microorganisms to influence positively the course of intestinal disorders such as infectious diarrhea or chronic inflammatory conditions has recently gained increasing interest as a therapeutic alternative. In vitro and in vivo investigations have demonstrated that probiotic-host eukaryotic cell interactions evoke a large number of responses potentially responsible for the effects of probiotics. The aim of this study was to improve our understanding of the E. coli Nissle 1917-host interaction by analyzing the gene expression pattern initiated by this probiotic in human intestinal epithelial cells. Methods Gene expression profiles of Caco-2 cells treated with E. coli Nissle 1917 were analyzed with microarrays. A second human intestinal cell line and also pieces of small intestine from BALB/c mice were used to confirm regulatory data of selected genes by real-time RT-PCR and cytometric bead array (CBA to detect secretion of corresponding proteins. Results Whole genome expression analysis revealed 126 genes specifically regulated after treatment of confluent Caco-2 cells with E. coli Nissle 1917. Among others, expression of genes encoding the proinflammatory molecules monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 ligand 2 (MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 alpha (MIP-2α and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 beta (MIP-2β was increased up to 10 fold. Caco-2 cells cocultured with E. coli Nissle 1917 also secreted high amounts of MCP-1 protein. Elevated levels of MCP-1 and MIP-2α mRNA could be confirmed with Lovo cells. MCP-1 gene expression was also up-regulated in mouse intestinal tissue. Conclusion Thus, probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 specifically upregulates expression of proinflammatory genes and proteins in human and mouse intestinal epithelial cells.

  10. The carbon storage regulator (Csr system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Revelles

    Full Text Available The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the csrA51 mutant affects the growth efficiency on a broad range of physiologically relevant carbon sources, including compounds utilized by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED pathway. Detailed investigations of the metabolomes and fluxomes of mutants and wild-type cells grown on carbon sources representative of glycolysis and of the ED pathway (glucose and gluconate, respectively, revealed significant re-adjusting of central carbon metabolism for both compounds in the csrA51 mutant. However, the metabolic re-adjusting observed on gluconate was strikingly different from that observed on glucose, indicating a nutrient-specific control of metabolism by the Csr system.

  11. The carbon storage regulator (Csr) system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelles, Olga; Millard, Pierre; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Oswald, Eric; Létisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr) system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations) showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the csrA51 mutant affects the growth efficiency on a broad range of physiologically relevant carbon sources, including compounds utilized by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. Detailed investigations of the metabolomes and fluxomes of mutants and wild-type cells grown on carbon sources representative of glycolysis and of the ED pathway (glucose and gluconate, respectively), revealed significant re-adjusting of central carbon metabolism for both compounds in the csrA51 mutant. However, the metabolic re-adjusting observed on gluconate was strikingly different from that observed on glucose, indicating a nutrient-specific control of metabolism by the Csr system.

  12. Visualized and precise design of artificial small RNAs for regulating T7 RNA polymerase and enhancing recombinant protein folding in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujia Zhao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs have received much attention in recent years due to their unique biological properties, which can efficiently and specifically tune target gene expressions in bacteria. Inspired by natural sRNAs, recent works have proposed the use of artificial sRNAs (asRNAs as genetic tools to regulate desired gene that has been applied in several fields, such as metabolic engineering and bacterial physiology studies. However, the rational design of asRNAs is still a challenge. In this study, we proposed structure and length as two criteria to implement rational visualized and precise design of asRNAs. T7 expression system was one of the most useful recombinant protein expression systems. However, it was deeply limited by the formation of inclusion body. To settle this problem, we designed a series of asRNAs to inhibit the T7 RNA polymerase (Gene1 expression to balance the rate between transcription and folding of recombinant protein. Based on the heterologous expression of Aspergillus oryzae Li-3 glucuronidase in E. coli, the asRNA-antigene1-17bp can effectively decrease the inclusion body and increase the enzyme activity by 169.9%.

  13. Outer Membrane Vesicles and Soluble Factors Released by Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and Commensal ECOR63 Enhance Barrier Function by Regulating Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Carina-Shianya; Badia, Josefa; Bosch, Manel; Giménez, Rosa; Baldomà, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelial layer forms a physical and biochemical barrier that maintains the segregation between host and intestinal microbiota. The integrity of this barrier is critical in maintaining homeostasis in the body and its dysfunction is linked to a variety of illnesses, especially inflammatory bowel disease. Gut microbes, and particularly probiotic bacteria, modulate the barrier integrity by reducing gut permeability and reinforcing tight junctions. Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a good colonizer of the human gut with proven therapeutic efficacy in the remission of ulcerative colitis in humans. EcN positively modulates the intestinal epithelial barrier through upregulation and redistribution of the tight junction proteins ZO-1, ZO-2 and claudin-14. Upregulation of claudin-14 has been attributed to the secreted protein TcpC. Whether regulation of ZO-1 and ZO-2 is mediated by EcN secreted factors remains unknown. The aim of this study was to explore whether outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by EcN strengthen the epithelial barrier. This study includes other E. coli strains of human intestinal origin that contain the tcpC gene, such as ECOR63. Cell-free supernatants collected from the wild-type strains and from the derived tcpC mutants were fractionated into isolated OMVs and soluble secreted factors. The impact of these extracellular fractions on the epithelial barrier was evaluated by measuring transepithelial resistance and expression of several tight junction proteins in T-84 and Caco-2 polarized monolayers. Our results show that the strengthening activity of EcN and ECOR63 does not exclusively depend on TcpC. Both OMVs and soluble factors secreted by these strains promote upregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-14, and down-regulation of claudin-2. The OMVs-mediated effects are TcpC-independent. Soluble secreted TcpC contributes to the upregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-14, but this protein has no effect on the transcriptional

  14. Co-ordinated regulation of the extracytoplasmic stress factor, sigmaE, with other Escherichia coli sigma factors by (p)ppGpp and DksA may be achieved by specific regulation of individual holoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalkrishnan, Saumya; Nicoloff, Herve; Ades, Sarah E

    2014-08-01

    The E. coli alternative sigma factor, σ(E) , transcribes genes required to maintain the cell envelope and is activated by conditions that destabilize the envelope. σ(E) is also activated during entry into stationary phase in the absence of envelope stress by the alarmone (p)ppGpp. (p)ppGpp controls a large regulatory network, reducing expression of σ(70) -dependent genes required for rapid growth and activating σ(70) -dependent and alternative sigma factor-dependent genes required for stress survival. The DksA protein often potentiates the effects of (p)ppGpp. Here we examine regulation of σ(E) by (p)ppGpp and DksA following starvation for nutrients. We find that (p)ppGpp is required for increased σ(E) activity under all conditions tested, but the requirement for DksA varies. DksA is required during amino acid starvation, but is dispensable during phosphate starvation. In contrast, regulation of σ(S) is (p)ppGpp- and DksA-dependent under all conditions tested, while negative regulation of σ(70) is DksA- but not (p)ppGpp-dependent during phosphate starvation, yet requires both factors during amino acid starvation. These findings suggest that the mechanism of transcriptional regulation by (p)ppGpp and/or DksA cannot yet be explained by a unifying model and is specific to individual promoters, individual holoenzymes, and specific starvation conditions.

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: Escherichia coli [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli Escherichia coli Escherichia_coli_L.png Escherichia_coli_NL.png Escherich...ia_coli_S.png Escherichia_coli_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+co...li&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=NS ...

  16. EscO, a functional and structural analog of the flagellar FliJ protein, is a positive regulator of EscN ATPase activity of the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli injectisome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Castillo, Mariana; Andrade, Angel; Espinosa, Norma; Monjarás Feria, Julia; Soto, Eduardo; Díaz-Guerrero, Miguel; González-Pedrajo, Bertha

    2014-06-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are multiprotein molecular devices used by many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. A T3SS is also used for protein export in flagellar assembly, which promotes bacterial motility. The two systems are evolutionarily related, possessing highly conserved components in their export apparatuses. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) employs a T3SS, encoded by genes in the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island, to colonize the human intestine and cause diarrheal disease. In the present work, we investigated the role of the LEE-encoded EscO protein (previously Orf15 or EscA) in T3SS biogenesis. We show that EscO shares similar properties with the flagellar FliJ and the Yersinia YscO protein families. Our findings demonstrate that EscO is essential for secretion of all categories of T3SS substrates. Consistent with its central role in protein secretion, it was found to interact with the ATPase EscN and its negative regulator, EscL, of the export apparatus. Moreover, we show that EscO stimulates EscN enzymatic activity; however, it is unable to upregulate ATP hydrolysis in the presence of EscL. Remarkably, EscO partially restored the swimming defect of a Salmonella flagellar fliJ mutant and was able to stimulate the ATPase activity of FliI. Overall, our data indicate that EscO is the virulence counterpart of the flagellar FliJ protein.

  17. Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustino Martinez-Antonio

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is the most well-know bacterial model about the function of its molecular components. In this review are presented several structural and functional aspects of their transcriptional regulatory network constituted by transcription factors and target genes. The network discussed here represent to 1531 genes and 3421 regulatory interactions. This network shows a power-law distribution with a few global regulators and most of genes poorly connected. 176 of genes in the network correspond to transcription factors, which form a sub-network of seven hierarchical layers where global regulators tend to be set in superior layers while local regulators are located in the lower ones. There is a small set of proteins know as nucleoid-associated proteins, which are in a high cellular concentrations and reshape the nucleoid structure to influence the running of global transcriptional programs, to this mode of regulation is named analog regulation. Specific signal effectors assist the activity of most of transcription factors in E. coli. These effectors switch and tune the activity of transcription factors. To this type of regulation, depending of environmental signals is named the digital-precise-regulation. The integration of regulatory programs have place in the promoter region of transcription units where it is common to observe co-regulation among global and local TFs as well as of TFs sensing exogenous and endogenous conditions. The mechanistic logic to understand the harmonious operation of regulatory programs in the network should consider the globalism of TFs, their signal perceived, coregulation, genome position, and cellular concentration. Finally, duplicated TFs and their horizontal transfer influence the evolvability of members of the network. The most duplicated and transferred TFs are located in the network periphery.

  18. Evolution of transcriptional regulation in "Escherichia coli"

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Luise

    2014-01-01

    During gene expression, transcription initiation marks the first step towards synthesis of functional proteins. Expression levels of specific types of RNA molecules in the cell depend on the underlying genotype of the promoter sequence. Prediction of expression levels from the promoter sequence alone can have important implications for the design of artificial promoters. In this work, we explored promoter determinants that cause differences in expression levels and tracked how ...

  19. Initiation of Replication in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob

    The circular chromosome of Escherichia coli is replicated by two replisomes assembled at the unique origin and moving in the opposite direction until they meet in the less well defined terminus. The key protein in initiation of replication, DnaA, facilitates the unwinding of double-stranded DNA...... to single-stranded DNA in oriC. Although DnaA is able to bind both ADP and ATP, DnaA is only active in initiation when bound to ATP. Although initiation of replication, and the regulation of this, is thoroughly investigated it is still not fully understood. The overall aim of the thesis was to investigate...... the regulation of initiation, the effect on the cell when regulation fails, and if regulation was interlinked to chromosomal organization. This thesis uncovers that there exists a subtle balance between chromosome replication and reactive oxygen species (ROS) inflicted DNA damage. Thus, failure in regulation...

  20. PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species which inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of man and warm-blooded animals. Because of the ubiquity of this bacterium in the intestinal flora, it serves as an important indicator organism of fecal contamination. E. coli, aside from serving a...

  1. EscO, a Functional and Structural Analog of the Flagellar FliJ Protein, Is a Positive Regulator of EscN ATPase Activity of the Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Injectisome

    OpenAIRE

    Romo-Castillo, Mariana; Andrade, Angel; Espinosa, Norma; Monjarás Feria, Julia; Soto, Eduardo; Díaz-Guerrero, Miguel; González-Pedrajo, Bertha

    2014-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are multiprotein molecular devices used by many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. A T3SS is also used for protein export in flagellar assembly, which promotes bacterial motility. The two systems are evolutionarily related, possessing highly conserved components in their export apparatuses. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) employs a T3SS, encoded by genes in the locus of enterocyte effacement (LE...

  2. Biogenesis of membrane bound respiratory complexes in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Price, Claire E.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia colt is one of the preferred bacteria for studies on the energetics and regulation of respiration Respiratory chains consist of primary dehydrogenases and terminal reductases or oxidases linked by quinones. In order to assemble this complex arrangement of protein complexes, synthesis of

  3. Oral administration of synthetic porcine beta-defensin-2 improves growth performance and cecal microbial flora and down-regulates the expression of intestinal toll-like receptor-4 and inflammatory cytokines in weaned piglets challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhiru; Xu, Ling; Shi, Baoshi; Deng, Huang; Lai, Xin; Liu, Jingyan; Sun, Zhihong

    2016-10-01

    Synthetic porcine beta-defensin-2 (pBD-2) was tested as an alternative to antimicrobial growth-promoters in pig production. Thirty 21-day weaned piglets were challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, and orally dosed with either sterile water (CON), pBD-2 (BD) or neomycin sulphate (NS) twice daily for 21 days. pBD-2 and NS led to higher growth performance, jejunum villus height and increased expression of insulin-like growth factor-I compared with the CON group (P growth performance, reduce inflammatory cytokine expression and affect intestinal morphological indices in the same way as probiotics. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  4. Metabolic regulation of isocitrate lyase regulator in Escherichia coli based on metabolic flux information%基于代谢流量分布信息理解大肠杆菌中异柠檬酸裂解酶调节因子的代谢调控作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳志杰; 周利; 花强

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by different transcriptional regulators. The transcriptional regulator isocitrate lyase regulator (IclR) of Escherichia coli represses the expression of the aceBAK operon that codes for the glyoxylate pathway enzymes. In this study, physiological and metabolic responses of the deletion of the iclR gene in E. coli BW25113 were investigated based on the quantification and analysis of intracellular metabolic fluxes. The knockout of the iclR gene resulted in a decrease in the growth rate, glucose uptake rate and the acetate secretion rate, but a slight increase in biomass yield. The latter could be attributed to the lowered metabolic fluxes through several CO2 generating pathways, including the redirection of 33% of isocitrate directly to succtnate and malate without CO2 production as well as the reduced flux through the pentose phosphate pathway. Furthermore, although the glyoxylate shunt was activated in the iclR mutant, the flux through phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase kept almost unchanged, implying an inactive PEP-glyoxylate cycle and no extra loss of carbon atoms in the mutant strain. Both the reduced glucose uptake rate and the active glyoxylate shunt were responsible for the minor decrease in acetate secretion in the iclR knockout strain compared to that in the wild-type E. coli strain.%基因的表达受不同的转录调节因子调节.大肠杆菌中的异柠檬酸裂解酶调节因子(IclR)能够抑制编码乙醛酸支路酶的aceBAK操纵子的表达.本研究基于代谢物的13C同位体物质分布来定量解析代谢反应,主要研究了iclR基因在大肠杆菌生理和代谢中的作用.大肠杆菌iclR基因缺失突变株的生长速率、糖耗速率和乙酸的产量相对于原始菌株都有所降低,但菌体得率略有增加.通过代谢途径的流量比率分析发现基因缺失株的乙醛酸支路得到了激活,33%的异柠檬酸流经了乙醛酸支路;戊糖磷酸

  5. Findings of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. in homemade cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambur Zoran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During the period from February until March 2004, 108 samples of soft cheese originating from markets of Pancevo, Subotica and Belgrade were examined. Microbiological analyses of the cheese samples to the presence of Escherichia coli was performed using methods described in the Regulations on methods for performing microbiological analyses and super analyses of consumer articles, while the presence of bacteria Enteroccocus spp. was performed on the dexter agar. From 108 samples of soft cheese from the territories of Pancevo, Belgrade and Subotica were isolated: Enterococcus spp. from 96% and Escherichia coli from 69%, cheese samples. Verocytotoxic E.coli was not isolated from any of the taken cheese samples.

  6. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Tânia A T; Elias, Waldir P; Scaletsky, Isabel C A; Guth, Beatriz E C; Rodrigues, Juliana F; Piazza, Roxane M F; Ferreira, Luís C S; Martinez, Marina B

    2016-12-01

    Most Escherichia coli strains live harmlessly in the intestines and rarely cause disease in healthy individuals. Nonetheless, a number of pathogenic strains can cause diarrhea or extraintestinal diseases both in healthy and immunocompromised individuals. Diarrheal illnesses are a severe public health problem and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and young children, especially in developing countries. E. coli strains that cause diarrhea have evolved by acquiring, through horizontal gene transfer, a particular set of characteristics that have successfully persisted in the host. According to the group of virulence determinants acquired, specific combinations were formed determining the currently known E. coli pathotypes, which are collectively known as diarrheagenic E. coli. In this review, we have gathered information on current definitions, serotypes, lineages, virulence mechanisms, epidemiology, and diagnosis of the major diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes.

  7. Escherichia coli Uropathogenesis In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas E; Khandige, Surabhi; Madelung, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are capable of invading bladder epithelial cells (BECs) on the bladder luminal surface. Based primarily on studies in mouse models, invasion is proposed to trigger an intracellular uropathogenic cascade involving intracellular bacterial proliferation...

  8. PART I. ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa Mahdi Oraibi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Escherichia coli in the air of facilities involved in management and composting of post-slaughter poultry wastes in selected plants of West Western Pomerania region was studied. Measurements were made on four dates in a variety of weather conditions during the year. The study was conducted at 5 objects that differ in the type of waste and the degree of preparation for composting. These were: chemical treatment and preliminary processing plant, liquid wastes reservoir, platform for preparation of materials for composting, storage of biological sediments, and composting facility. Measurement of bacteria count was carried out in accordance with the applicable procedures on selective chromogenic TBX medium. The assays revealed the presence of E. coli at all test objects, but not always on all measurement dates. It has been shown that the presence of E. coli was from 20 to 3047 CFU∙m-3 of air, although the largest quantities were most frequently detected in the air of the building for post-slaughter waste pre-treatment in chemical treatment plant.

  9. Zoonotic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasteson Yngvild

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is a normal inhabitant of the gastrointestinal tract of all warm-blooded animals, but variants of this species is also among the important etiological agents of enteritis and several extraintestinal diseases. The E. coli strains that cause diarrhoeal illness are categorised into pathogenicity groups based on virulence properties, mechanisms of pathogenicity, clinical symptoms and serology. The five main categories include enterotoxinogenic E. coli (ETEC, enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, enteroaggregative E. coli (EAggEC, enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC and Shiga (Vero toxin-producing E. coli (STEC/VTEC. From a zoonotic point of view, STEC is the only E. coli pathogenicity group of major interest, as the shiga toxin-producing strains are able to cause severe disease in humans when being transmitted through the food chain from their animal reservoirs. The focus of this manuscript is therefore on STEC; pathogenicity factors, disease, the reservoirs and on-farm ecology, transmission into the food chain, growth and survival in food and in the environment, and the shiga toxin-encoding bacteriophages.

  10. Deciphering Fur transcriptional regulatory network highlights its complex role beyond iron metabolism in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; Latif, Haythem;

    2014-01-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism. However, the full regulatory potential of Fur remains undefined. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the Fur transcriptional regulatory network in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in response...

  11. Asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Nielsen, E.M.; Klemm, Per

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect millions of people each year. Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) in humans. Persons affected by ABU may carry a particular E. coli strain for extended periods of time without any symptoms. In contrast...

  12. Asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Nielsen, E.M.; Klemm, Per

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect millions of people each year. Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) in humans. Persons affected by ABU may carry a particular E. coli strain for extended periods of time without any symptoms. In contrast...

  13. The Regulation of Autoinducer-2 in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli%信号分子AI-2对禽致病性大肠杆菌的调控作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白灏; 于圣青; 韩先干; 刘蕾; 单雪芹; 宋军; 刘瑞; 董洪亮; 刘海文; 丁铲

    2012-01-01

    [目的]研究信号分子AI-2对禽致病性大肠杆菌(APEC)的调控作用.[方法]采用改良结晶紫半定量法和荧光染色法检测AI-2对APEC生物被膜形成能力的影响.Real-time PCR检测AI-2对APEC毒力基因转录水平的影响.活菌计数法观察AI-2对APEC黏附和入侵鸡胚成纤维细胞DF-1的影响.[结果]AI-2在浓度为0.185 mmol·L-1时,生物被膜形成能力显著增强,而浓度为0.037mmol· L-1和0.285mmol·L-1时,生物被膜形成能力无显著变化.Real-time PCR结果显示加入AI-2后,APEC毒力基因pfs,vat,luxS,tsh,fuyA,iucD转录水平显著下调,ompA和iss则上调.加入AI-2后,APEC对DF-1细胞的黏附和入侵能力分别下降到原来的57.35%和36.64%.[结论]AI-2对禽致病性大肠杆菌生物被膜形成具有浓度依赖性,在适宜浓度下能显著增强.AI-2能减弱禽致病性大肠杆菌毒力基因的转录水平和对DF-1的黏附和入侵能力.表明AI-2参与调控APEC致病性.%[Objective] The aim of the study was to investigate the modulation of AI-2 on the biofilm forming ability and virulence in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC). [Method] The improved crystal violet seme-quantitative method and fluorescence staining method were used to study the effects of AI-2 on the biofilm forming ability in APEC. The effects of AI-2 on the mRNA levels of the virulence genes were analyzed using real-time PCR. Viable bacteria counting method was used to evaluate the effects of AI-2 on the capability of APEC to adhere and invade DF-lcell. [Result] The results showed that the biofilm forming ability decreased at the concentration of 0.185 mmol·L-1 AI-2,while the biofilm forming ability had no significant change at the concentration of 0.037 mmol·L-1 and 0.278 mmol·L-1 AI-2. Real-time PCR showed that Al-2 decreased the transcription of pfs, vat, lux, tsh,fuyA, iucD genes, while increased the transcription of ompA and iss genes. The adherence and invasion was decreased to 57.35% and 36

  14. 口服益生菌Escherichia coli Nissle 1917调控断奶仔猪空肠黏膜屏障功能的机理研究%Study on the Mechanism of Orally Administered Probiotics Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 Regulating Intestine Barrier in Weaned Piglets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐志如; 邓欢; 孙卫忠; 张小龙; 张翥

    2014-01-01

    旨在探讨口服益生菌Escherichia coli(E.coli) Nissle 1917调控病原菌E.coli Abbottstown攻毒或未攻毒21d断奶仔猪肠道屏障功能的机理.将20头21d断奶仔猪((6.35±0.38) kg)随机分为4组:(1)饲喂基础日粮的对照组(CON);(2)正试期口服E.coli Nissle 1917组(EcN);(3)预试期E.coli Abbottstown攻毒组(EcA);(4)预试期E.coli Abbottstown攻毒和正试期口服Ecoli Nissle 1917组(EcN+ EcA).每个处理5个重复,每个重复1头仔猪.试验分为3d预试期和21d正试期.预试期EcA和EcN+ EcA组的断奶仔猪接种5×109 E.coli Ab-bottstown.正试期EcN和EcN+EcA组仔猪每天每头口服1×1010E.coli Nissle 1917.试验结果表明,未攻毒的断奶仔猪中,与CON相比,口服1×1010E.coli Nissle 1917能显著改善生长性能(P<0.05),降低腹泻率,提高oc-cludin蛋白水平(P<0.05),显著降低空肠黏膜calprotectin蛋白水平(P<0.05),显著下调空肠黏膜蛋白激酶R(Protein kinase R,PKR)、toll样受体-2(Toll-like receptor-2,TLR-2)和真核起始因子-5A(eukaryotic initiation fac-tor-5A,eIF 5A)mRNA的相对表达丰度(P<0.05),上调空肠黏膜内皮生长因子(Endothelial growth factor,EGF)、肝细胞生长因子(Hepatocyte growth factor,HGF)、胰岛素样生长因子(Insulin-like growth factor,IGF-I)、三叶肽因子-3(trefoil peptide factor 3,TFF-3)mRNA的相对表达丰度(P<0.05);在E.coli Abbottstown攻毒的断奶仔猪中,与EcA组相比,口服1×1010E.coli Nissle 1917能显著改善生长性能(P<0.05),降低腹泻率,降低血清二胺氧化酶(DAO)活性(P<0.05)和一氧化氮(N())含量(P<0.05),下调空肠黏膜PKR、eIF-5A和TLR-2 mRNA相对表达丰度(P<0.05),显著降低空肠黏膜calprotectin蛋白水平和淋巴细胞数量(P<0.05),显著提高空肠黏膜oc-eludin蛋白水平(P<0.05),上调空肠黏膜IGF I、HGF、TFF-3和EGF mRNA相对表达丰度(P<0.05).本试验结果提示,口服1× 1010E.coli Nissle 1917能降低病原大肠杆菌攻毒或未攻毒21

  15. An epidemiological survey on Escherichia coli producing plasmid-mediated AmpC enzyme and regulation of expression of AmpC enzyme%产质粒介导AmpC酶大肠埃希菌的流行病学调查及其酶的表达调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓江锦; 张文林; 张志祥; 李小庆

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the expression and regulation of Escherichia coli producing plasmid-mediated AmpC enzymes.Methods 30 strains of E.Coli producing plasmid-mediated AmpC enzyme were isolated.An epidemiological survey were conducted on Escherichia coli producing plasmidmediated AmpC enzyme,and transfer bonding test was carried out.6 primer bacterial plasmid DNA extracted for the multiplex PCR amplification were set.Results According to the epidemiological survey,a total of 20 strains producing β-lactamase were detected,5 of which produced AmpC β-lactamase enzymes and extended-spectrum β-lactamase enzyme,12 only produced extended-spectrum β-lactamase enzymes,and 3 produced lactamase AmpC β alone.5 strains were transferred successfully.PCR amplification test and the Genbank database sequence alignment analysis showed that 6 strains were amplified to produce plasmidmediated ampC gene,4 of which were CIT and 2 of which were type DHA.Conclusions Clinically,strains of Escherichia coli producing plasmid AmpC enzyme widely spread.Control of the regulatory mechanism of high expression is helpful in guiding clinical antibiotic uses.%目的 研究产质粒介导AmpC酶大肠埃希菌的流行病学状况及其酶的表达调控.方法 选择临床中分离到的疑似产质粒介导AmpC酶的大肠埃希菌30株,对产质粒介导AmpC酶大肠埃希菌的流行病学特征进行调查分析,并行转移接合试验.用6组引物对提取的细菌质粒DNA进行多重PCR扩增,从而对质粒介导的AmpC酶的表达调控进行分析.结果 流行病学调查,共检出20株产β-内酰胺酶菌株,其中有5株菌株同时产AmpC β-内酰胺酶和超广谱β-内酰胺酶,12株只产超广谱β-内酰胺酶,3株只产AmpC β-内酰胺酶,5株转移接合成功.PCR扩增试验后,与Genbank数据库进行序列比对分析,发现有6株扩增产生质粒介导的AmpC基因,其中CIT型4株,DHA型2株.结论 产质粒AmpC酶大肠埃希菌在临床上广泛传播,把握

  16. The Lrp family of transcriptional regulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, A.B.; Ettema, T.J.G.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2003-01-01

    Genome analysis has revealed that members of the Lrp family of transcriptional regulators are widely distributed among prokaryotes, both bacteria and archaea. The archetype Leucine-responsive Regulatory Protein from Escherichia coli is a global regulator involved in modulating a variety of metabolic

  17. Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Allen; Youngster, Ilan; McAdam, Alexander J

    2015-06-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is among the common causes of foodborne gastroenteritis. STEC is defined by the production of specific toxins, but within this pathotype there is a diverse group of organisms. This diversity has important consequences for understanding the pathogenesis of the organism, as well as for selecting the optimum strategy for diagnostic testing in the clinical laboratory. This review includes discussions of the mechanisms of pathogenesis, the range of manifestations of infection, and the several different methods of laboratory detection of Shiga toxin-producing E coli.

  18. Functional reconstitution and osmoregulatory properties of the ProU ABC transporter from Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gul, Nadia; Poolman, Bert

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter ProU from Escherichia coli translocates a wide range of compatible solutes and contributes to the regulation of cell volume, which is particularly important when the osmolality of the environment fluctuates. We have purified the components of ProU, i.e., th

  19. Molecular cloning of the Salmonella typhimurium lep gene in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijl, J M; van den Bergh, R; Reversma, T; Smith, H; Bron, S; Venema, G

    1990-01-01

    A system is described which enabled the selection of a heterologous lep gene, encoding signal peptidase I, in Escherichia coli. It is based on complementation of an E. coli mutant, in which the synthesis of signal peptidase I can be regulated. With this system the lep gene of Salmonella typhimurium

  20. Respiratory electron transfer in Escherichia coli : components, energetics and regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, M.

    2009-01-01

    The respiratory chain that is housed in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, generally transfers electrons from NADH to oxygen; in the absence of oxygen it can use several alternative electron acceptors, such as nitrate and fumarate. Transfer of electrons through this chain is usually coupled to the

  1. Regulation of Hexose and Pentose Metabolism by "Escherichia coli"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Tasha A.

    2009-01-01

    Microorganisms can be used to produce a variety of chemicals such as drugs, enzymes, and fuels from different sugars. Traditionally, these processes have involved a single feedstock, most often glucose. More recently, significant effort has been devoted towards developing processes that directly use plant-based material as the feedstock. One…

  2. Regulation of ribosomal rna synthesis in escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostra, Bernard Anne

    1981-01-01

    Bacterien kunnen met verschillende snelheden groeien. De groeisnelheid hangt af van het milieu waarin de bakterien zich bevinden. De expressie van genen wordt aangepast aan de groeiomstandigheden. Omdat op een bepaald moment slechts een beperkt deel van de genen tot expressie komt, moet er sprake

  3. Respiratory electron transfer in Escherichia coli : components, energetics and regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, M.

    2009-01-01

    The respiratory chain that is housed in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, generally transfers electrons from NADH to oxygen; in the absence of oxygen it can use several alternative electron acceptors, such as nitrate and fumarate. Transfer of electrons through this chain is usually coupled to the

  4. Combinatorial Gene Regulation Using Auto-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, Rutger; Ursem, Bas; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2010-01-01

    As many as 59% of the transcription factors in Escherichia coli regulate the transcription rate of their own genes. This suggests that auto-regulation has one or more important functions. Here, one possible function is studied. Often the transcription rate of an auto-regulator is also controlled by additional transcription factors. In these cases, the way the expression of the auto-regulator responds to changes in the concentrations of the “input” regulators (the response function) is obviously affected by the auto-regulation. We suggest that, conversely, auto-regulation may be used to optimize this response function. To test this hypothesis, we use an evolutionary algorithm and a chemical–physical model of transcription regulation to design model cis-regulatory constructs with predefined response functions. In these simulations, auto-regulation can evolve if this provides a functional benefit. When selecting for a series of elementary response functions—Boolean logic gates and linear responses—the cis-regulatory regions resulting from the simulations indeed often exploit auto-regulation. Surprisingly, the resulting constructs use auto-activation rather than auto-repression. Several design principles show up repeatedly in the simulation results. They demonstrate how auto-activation can be used to generate sharp, switch-like activation and repression circuits and how linearly decreasing response functions can be obtained. Auto-repression, on the other hand, resulted only when a high response speed or a suppression of intrinsic noise was also selected for. The results suggest that, while auto-repression may primarily be valuable to improve the dynamical properties of regulatory circuits, auto-activation is likely to evolve even when selection acts on the shape of response function only. PMID:20548950

  5. Genomics of Escherichia and Shigella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Nicole T.

    The laboratory workhorse Escherichia coli K-12 is among the most intensively studied living organisms on earth, and this single strain serves as the model system behind much of our understanding of prokaryotic molecular biology. Dense genome sequencing and recent insightful comparative analyses are making the species E. coli, as a whole, an emerging system for studying prokaryotic population genetics and the relationship between system-scale, or genome-scale, molecular evolution and complex traits like host range and pathogenic potential. Genomic perspective has revealed a coherent but dynamic species united by intraspecific gene flow via homologous lateral or horizontal transfer and differentiated by content flux mediated by acquisition of DNA segments from interspecies transfers.

  6. Robust growth of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Robert, Lydia; Pelletier, James; Dang, Wei Lien; Taddei, Francois; Wright, Andrew; Jun, Suckjoon

    2010-06-22

    The quantitative study of the cell growth has led to many fundamental insights in our understanding of a wide range of subjects, from the cell cycle to senescence. Of particular importance is the growth rate, whose constancy represents a physiological steady state of an organism. Recent studies, however, suggest that the rate of elongation during exponential growth of bacterial cells decreases cumulatively with replicative age for both asymmetrically and symmetrically dividing organisms, implying that a "steady-state" population consists of individual cells that are never in a steady state of growth. To resolve this seeming paradoxical observation, we studied the long-term growth and division patterns of Escherichia coli cells by employing a microfluidic device designed to follow steady-state growth and division of a large number of cells at a defined reproductive age. Our analysis of approximately 10(5) individual cells reveals a remarkable stability of growth whereby the mother cell inherits the same pole for hundreds of generations. We further show that death of E. coli is not purely stochastic but is the result of accumulating damages. We conclude that E. coli, unlike all other aging model systems studied to date, has a robust mechanism of growth that is decoupled from cell death.

  7. Horizontal gene transfer and the evolution of transcriptionalregulation in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Morgan N.; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2007-12-20

    Background: Most bacterial genes were acquired by horizontalgene transfer from other bacteria instead of being inherited bycontinuous vertical descent from an ancient ancestor}. To understand howthe regulation of these {acquired} genes evolved, we examined theevolutionary histories of transcription factors and of regulatoryinteractions from the model bacterium Escherichia coli K12. Results:Although most transcription factors have paralogs, these usually arose byhorizontal gene transfer rather than by duplication within the E. colilineage, as previously believed. In general, most neighbor regulators --regulators that are adjacent to genes that they regulate -- were acquiredby horizontal gene transfer, while most global regulators evolvedvertically within the gamma-Proteobacteria. Neighbor regulators wereoften acquired together with the adjacent operon that they regulate, sothe proximity might be maintained by repeated transfers (like "selfishoperons"). Many of the as-yet-uncharacterized (putative) regulators havealso been acquired together with adjacent genes, so we predict that theseare neighbor regulators as well. When we analyzed the histories ofregulatory interactions, we found that the evolution of regulation byduplication was rare, and surprisingly, many of the regulatoryinteractions that are shared between paralogs result from convergentevolution. Another surprise was that horizontally transferred genes aremore likely than other genes to be regulated by multiple regulators, andmost of this complex regulation probably evolved after the transfer.Conclusions: Our results highlight the rapid evolution of niche-specificgene regulation in bacteria.

  8. Structure of Escherichia coli tryptophanase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Shao Yang; Yip, Patrick; Howell, P Lynne

    2006-07-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent tryptophanase has been isolated from Escherichia coli and its crystal structure has been determined. The structure shares the same fold with and has similar quaternary structure to Proteus vulgaris tryptophanase and tyrosine-phenol lyase, but is found in a closed conformation when compared with these two enzymes. The tryptophanase structure, solved in its apo form, does not have covalent PLP bound in the active site, but two sulfate ions. The sulfate ions occupy the phosphoryl-binding site of PLP and the binding site of the alpha-carboxyl of the natural substrate tryptophan. One of the sulfate ions makes extensive interactions with both the transferase and PLP-binding domains of the protein and appears to be responsible for holding the enzyme in its closed conformation. Based on the sulfate density and the structure of the P. vulgaris enzyme, PLP and the substrate tryptophan were modeled into the active site. The resulting model is consistent with the roles of Arg419 in orienting the substrate to PLP and acidifying the alpha-proton of the substrate for beta-elimination, Lys269 in the formation and decomposition of the PLP quinonoid intermediate, Arg230 in orienting the substrate-PLP intermediates in the optimal conformation for catalysis, and His463 and Tyr74 in determining substrate specificity and suggests that the closed conformation observed in the structure could be induced by substrate binding and that significant conformational changes occur during catalysis. A catalytic mechanism for tryptophanase is proposed. Since E. coli tryptophanase has resisted forming diffraction-quality crystals for many years, the molecular surface of tryptophanase has been analyzed in various crystal forms and it was rationalized that strong crystal contacts occur on the flat surface of the protein and that the size of crystal contact surface seems to correlate with the diffraction quality of the crystal.

  9. Structure of Escherichia Coli Tryptophanase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku,S.; Yip, P.; Howell, P.

    2006-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent tryptophanase has been isolated from Escherichia coli and its crystal structure has been determined. The structure shares the same fold with and has similar quaternary structure to Proteus vulgaris tryptophanase and tyrosine-phenol lyase, but is found in a closed conformation when compared with these two enzymes. The tryptophanase structure, solved in its apo form, does not have covalent PLP bound in the active site, but two sulfate ions. The sulfate ions occupy the phosphoryl-binding site of PLP and the binding site of the {alpha}-carboxyl of the natural substrate tryptophan. One of the sulfate ions makes extensive interactions with both the transferase and PLP-binding domains of the protein and appears to be responsible for holding the enzyme in its closed conformation. Based on the sulfate density and the structure of the P. vulgaris enzyme, PLP and the substrate tryptophan were modeled into the active site. The resulting model is consistent with the roles of Arg419 in orienting the substrate to PLP and acidifying the {alpha}-proton of the substrate for {beta}-elimination, Lys269 in the formation and decomposition of the PLP quinonoid intermediate, Arg230 in orienting the substrate-PLP intermediates in the optimal conformation for catalysis, and His463 and Tyr74 in determining substrate specificity and suggests that the closed conformation observed in the structure could be induced by substrate binding and that significant conformational changes occur during catalysis. A catalytic mechanism for tryptophanase is proposed. Since E. coli tryptophanase has resisted forming diffraction-quality crystals for many years, the molecular surface of tryptophanase has been analyzed in various crystal forms and it was rationalized that strong crystal contacts occur on the flat surface of the protein and that the size of crystal contact surface seems to correlate with the diffraction quality of the crystal.

  10. SYNTHESIS AND PROCESSING OF ESCHERICHIA-COLI TEM-BETA-LACTAMASE AND BACILLUS-LICHENIFORMIS ALPHA-AMYLASE IN ESCHERICHIA-COLI : THE ROLE OF SIGNAL PEPTIDASE-I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijl, J M; SMITH, H; BRON, S; VENEMA, G

    A mutant of Escherichia coli, in which signal peptidase I synthesis can be regulated, was constructed. The mutant was used to study the effects of signal peptidase I limitation on the synthesis and efficiency of processing of two proteins: the periplasmic E. coli TEM-beta-lactamase and Bacillus

  11. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J.;

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehens...

  12. SUMO: regulating the regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossis Guillaume

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Post-translational modifiers of the SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-related Modifier family have emerged as key regulators of protein function and fate. While the past few years have seen an enormous increase in knowledge on SUMO enzymes, substrates, and consequences of modification, regulation of SUMO conjugation is far from being understood. This brief review will provide an overview on recent advances concerning (i the interplay between sumoylation and other post-translational modifications at the level of individual targets and (ii global regulation of SUMO conjugation and deconjugation.

  13. Free RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Michael; Dennis, Patrick P; Ehrenberg, Mans; Bremer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    The frequencies of transcription initiation of regulated and constitutive genes depend on the concentration of free RNA polymerase holoenzyme [Rf] near their promoters. Although RNA polymerase is largely confined to the nucleoid, it is difficult to determine absolute concentrations of [Rf] at particular locations within the nucleoid structure. However, relative concentrations of free RNA polymerase at different growth rates, [Rf]rel, can be estimated from the activities of constitutive promoters. Previous studies indicated that the rrnB P2 promoter is constitutive and that [Rf]rel in the vicinity of rrnB P2 increases with increasing growth rate. Recently it has become possible to directly visualize Rf in growing Escherichia coli cells. Here we examine some of the important issues relating to gene expression based on these new observations. We conclude that: (i) At a growth rate of 2 doublings/h, there are about 1000 free and 2350 non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules per average cell (12 and 28%, respectively, of 8400 total) which are in rapid equilibrium. (ii) The reversibility of the non-specific binding generates more than 1000 free RNA polymerase molecules every second in the immediate vicinity of the DNA. Of these, most rebind non-specifically to the DNA within a few ms; the frequency of non-specific binding is at least two orders of magnitude greater than specific binding and transcript initiation. (iii) At a given amount of RNA polymerase per cell, [Rf] and the density of non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules along the DNA both vary reciprocally with the amount of DNA in the cell. (iv) At 2 doublings/h an E. coli cell contains, on the average, about 1 non-specifically bound RNA polymerase per 9 kbp of DNA and 1 free RNA polymerase per 20 kbp of DNA. However some DNA regions (i.e. near active rRNA operons) may have significantly higher than average [Rf].

  14. Blue straggler star populations in globular clusters - II. Proper-motion cleaned HST catalogues of BSSs in 38 Galactic GCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, Mirko; Puzia, Thomas H.

    2016-11-01

    We present new blue straggler star (BSS) catalogues in 38 Milky Way globular clusters (GCs) based on multipassband and multi-epoch treasury survey data from the Hubble Space Telescope. We measure precise astrometry and relative proper motions of stars in all target clusters and performed a subsequent cluster membership selection. We study the accuracy of our proper-motion measurements using estimates of central velocity dispersions and find very good agreement with previous studies in the literature. Finally, we present a homogeneous BSS selection method, that expands the classic BSS selection parameter space to more evolved BSS evolutionary stages. We apply this method to the proper-motion cleaned GC star catalogues in order to define proper-motion cleaned BSS catalogues in all 38 GCs, which we make publicly available to enable further study and follow-up observations.

  15. Blue Straggler Star Populations in Globular Clusters: II. Proper-Motion Cleaned HST Catalogs of BSSs in 38 Galactic GCs

    CERN Document Server

    Simunovic, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    We present new Blue Straggler Star (BSS) catalogs in 38 Milky Way globular clusters (GCs) based on multi-passband and multi-epoch treasury survey data from the Hubble Space Telescope. We measure precise astrometry and relative proper motions of stars in all target clusters and performed a subsequent cluster membership selection. We study the accuracy of our proper motion measurements using estimates of central velocity dispersions and find very good agreement with previous studies in the literature. Finally, we present a homogeneous BSS selection method, that expands the classic BSS selection parameter space to more evolved BSS evolutionary stages. We apply this method to the proper-motion cleaned GC star catalogs in order to define proper-motion cleaned BSS catalogs in all 38 GCs, which we make publicly available to enable further study and follow-up observations.

  16. 77 FR 9888 - Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products... manufacturing trimmings for six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45..., non-intact product, that are contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26,...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  18. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to improve recombinant protein production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Feng, Xinjun; Ding, Yamei; Zhao, Guang; Liu, Huizhou; Xian, Mo

    2015-12-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most widely used strains for recombinant protein production. However, obstacles also exist in both academic researches and industrial applications, such as the metabolic burden, the carbon source waste, and the cells' physiological deterioration. This article reviews recent approaches for improving recombinant protein production in metabolic engineering, including workhorse selection, stress factor application, and carbon flux regulation. Selecting a suitable host is the first key point for recombinant protein production. In general, it all depends on characteristics of the strains and the target proteins. It will be triggered cells physiological deterioration when the medium is significantly different from the cell's natural environment. Coexpression of stress factors can help proteins to fold into their native conformation. Carbon flux regulation is a direct approach for redirecting more carbon flux toward the desirable pathways and products. However, some undesirable consequences are usually found in metabolic engineering, such as glucose transport inhibition, cell growth retardation, and useless metabolite accumulation. More efficient regulators and platform cell factories should be explored to meet a variety of production demands.

  19. Characterization of the YdeO regulon in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available Enterobacteria are able to survive under stressful conditions within animals, such as acidic conditions in the stomach, bile salts during transfer to the intestine and anaerobic conditions within the intestine. The glutamate-dependent (GAD system plays a major role in acid resistance in Escherichia coli, and expression of the GAD system is controlled by the regulatory cascade consisting of EvgAS > YdeO > GadE. To understand the YdeO regulon in vivo, we used ChIP-chip to interrogate the E. coli genome for candidate YdeO binding sites. All of the seven operons identified by ChIP-chip as being potentially regulated by YdeO were confirmed as being under the direct control of YdeO using RT-qPCR, EMSA, DNaseI-footprinting and reporter assays. Within this YdeO regulon, we identified four stress-response transcription factors, DctR, NhaR, GadE, and GadW and enzymes for anaerobic respiration. Both GadE and GadW are involved in regulation of the GAD system and NhaR is an activator for the sodium/proton antiporter gene. In conjunction with co-transcribed Slp, DctR is involved in protection against metabolic endoproducts under acidic conditions. Taken all together, we suggest that YdeO is a key regulator of E. coli survival in both acidic and anaerobic conditions.

  20. Characterization of the YdeO regulon in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yuki; Oshima, Taku; Ishihama, Akira; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacteria are able to survive under stressful conditions within animals, such as acidic conditions in the stomach, bile salts during transfer to the intestine and anaerobic conditions within the intestine. The glutamate-dependent (GAD) system plays a major role in acid resistance in Escherichia coli, and expression of the GAD system is controlled by the regulatory cascade consisting of EvgAS > YdeO > GadE. To understand the YdeO regulon in vivo, we used ChIP-chip to interrogate the E. coli genome for candidate YdeO binding sites. All of the seven operons identified by ChIP-chip as being potentially regulated by YdeO were confirmed as being under the direct control of YdeO using RT-qPCR, EMSA, DNaseI-footprinting and reporter assays. Within this YdeO regulon, we identified four stress-response transcription factors, DctR, NhaR, GadE, and GadW and enzymes for anaerobic respiration. Both GadE and GadW are involved in regulation of the GAD system and NhaR is an activator for the sodium/proton antiporter gene. In conjunction with co-transcribed Slp, DctR is involved in protection against metabolic endoproducts under acidic conditions. Taken all together, we suggest that YdeO is a key regulator of E. coli survival in both acidic and anaerobic conditions.

  1. Control of Ribosome Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Søren; Meyenburg, K. von; Måløe, O.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of ribosome synthesis and accumulation in Escherichia coli during the transition after an energy source shift-down was analyzed. The shift was imposed on cultures of stringent and relaxed strains growing in glucose minimal medium by the addition of the glucose analogue {alpha}-methylgluc...

  2. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, J.P.; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome...

  3. Fosfomycin Resistance in Escherichia coli, Pennsylvania, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrowais, Hind; McElheny, Christi L; Spychala, Caressa N; Sastry, Sangeeta; Guo, Qinglan; Butt, Adeel A; Doi, Yohei

    2015-11-01

    Fosfomycin resistance in Escherichia coli is rare in the United States. An extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli clinical strain identified in Pennsylvania, USA, showed high-level fosfomycin resistance caused by the fosA3 gene. The IncFII plasmid carrying this gene had a structure similar to those found in China, where fosfomycin resistance is commonly described.

  4. Synergistic effects in mixed Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Holler, B.M.; Molin, Søren

    2006-01-01

    the pathways governing development of more complex heterogeneous communities. In this study, we established a laboratory model where biofilm-stimulating effects due to interactions between genetically diverse strains of Escherichia coli were monitored. Synergistic induction of biofilm formation resulting from...

  5. Escherichia Coli--Key to Modern Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregegere, Francois

    1982-01-01

    Mid-nineteenth century work by Mendel on plant hybrids and by Pasteur on fermentation gave birth by way of bacterial genetics to modern-day molecular biology. The bacterium Escherichia Coli has occupied a key position in genetic studies leading from early gene identification with DNA to current genetic engineering using recombinant DNA technology.…

  6. Fimbrial adhesins from extraintestinal Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Hancock, Viktoria; Schembri, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) represent an important subclass of E. coli that cause a wide spectrum of diseases in human and animal hosts. Fimbriae are key virulence factors of ExPEC strains. These long surface located rod-shaped organelles mediate receptor-specific attachment...

  7. Progressive segregation of the Escherichia coli chromosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2006-01-01

    We have followed the fate of 14 different loci around the Escherichia coli chromosome in living cells at slow growth rate using a highly efficient labelling system and automated measurements. Loci are segregated as they are replicated, but with a marked delay. Most markers segregate in a smooth...

  8. Infectious endocarditis caused by Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Trine Kiilerich; Arpi, Magnus; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli is among the most common causes of Gram-negative bacteraemia, infectious endocarditis (IE) due to this pathogen is rare. A 67-y-old male without a previous medical history presented with a new mitral regurgitation murmur and persisting E. coli bacteraemia in spite of broad...

  9. Leaner and meaner genomes in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David

    2006-01-01

    A 'better' Escherichia coli K-12 genome has recently been engineered in which about 15% of the genome has been removed by planned deletions. Comparison with related bacterial genomes that have undergone a natural reduction in size suggests that there is plenty of scope for yet more deletions....

  10. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, J.P.; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome...

  11. Compaction of isolated Escherichia coli nucleoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, Anna S.; Wintraecken, Kathelijne; Spurio, Roberto; Woldringh, Conrad L.; Vries, de Renko; Odijk, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli nucleoids were compacted by the inert polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG) in the presence of the H-NS protein. The protein by itself appears to have little impact on the size of the nucleoids as determined by fluorescent microscopy. However, it has a significant impact on the nucle

  12. Prevalence of Escherichia coli O157

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdissa, Rosa; Haile, Woynshet; Fite, Akafete Teklu; Beyi, Ashenafi Feyisa; Agga, Getahun E.; Edao, Bedaso Mammo; Tadesse, Fanos; Korsa, Mesula Geloye; Beyene, Takele; Beyene, Tariku Jibat; Zutter, De Lieven; Cox, Eric; Goddeeris, Bruno Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is paucity of information regarding the epidemiology of Escherichia coli O157: H7 in developing countries. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of E. coli O157: H7 associated with beef cattle at processing plants and at retail shops in Ethiopia. Methods: Various samples

  13. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  14. Strategies for Protein Overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and the role of regulatory sequences which control gene expression at transcription resulting in abundant production of messenger RNA and regulatory sequences in mRNA which promote efficient translation. Also examines the role of E. coli cells in stabilizing mRNA and protein that is…

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Recombinant Escherichia coli Expressing Zymomonas mobilis pdc and adh Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoqin Wang; Xuefeng Li; Hui Wang; Mingfeng Yang; Xiushan Yang; Yikun He

    2012-01-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) are efficient enzymes for ethanol production in Zymomonas mobilis.These two enzymes were over-expressed in Escherichia coli,which was a better candidate for industrial ethanol production,resulting in a recombinant Escherichia coli strain efficient for ethanol production.To investigate the underlying mechanism,2-DE and LC-MS/MS were preformed.More than 1000 protein spots were reproducibly detected in the gel by image analysis,and 99 protein spots showed significant changes in recombinant E.coli,in which 46 were down-regulated and 53 were up-regulated.These proteins were mainly involved in energy metabolism,small molecule biosynthesis and degradation,transport,and stress.Except for the expected significant upregulation of PDC and ADH,most proteins involved in energy metabolism,purine/pyrimidine ribonucleotide biosynthesis,amino acid biosynthesis,and transport were up-regulated.It suggested that in response to a significant up-regulation of foreign proteins,E.coli could readjust other pathways to reach a new balance in cells,and these up-regulated proteins and pathways cooperated in ethanol production efficiently.

  16. Metabolic and transcriptional response to cofactor perturbations in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Anders K; Blank, Lars M; Oldiges, Marco; Schmid, Andreas; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter R; Vemuri, Goutham N

    2010-06-04

    Metabolic cofactors such as NADH and ATP play important roles in a large number of cellular reactions, and it is of great interest to dissect the role of these cofactors in different aspects of metabolism. Toward this goal, we overexpressed NADH oxidase and the soluble F1-ATPase in Escherichia coli to lower the level of NADH and ATP, respectively. We used a global interaction network, comprising of protein interactions, transcriptional regulation, and metabolic networks, to integrate data from transcription profiles, metabolic fluxes, and the metabolite levels. We identified high-scoring networks for the two strains. The results revealed a smaller, but denser network for perturbations of ATP level, compared with that of NADH level. The action of many global transcription factors such as ArcA, Fnr, CRP, and IHF commonly involved both NADH and ATP, whereas others responded to either ATP or NADH. Overexpressing NADH oxidase invokes response in widespread aspects of metabolism involving the redox cofactors (NADH and NADPH), whereas ATPase has a more focused response to restore ATP level by enhancing proton translocation mechanisms and repressing biosynthesis. Interestingly, NADPH played a key role in restoring redox homeostasis through the concerted activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase and UdhA transhydrogenase. We present a reconciled network of regulation that illustrates the overlapping and distinct aspects of metabolism controlled by NADH and ATP. Our study contributes to the general understanding of redox and energy metabolism and should help in developing metabolic engineering strategies in E. coli.

  17. Market, Regulation, Market, Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Christian; Galland, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the European Regulatory system which was settled both for opening the Single Market for products and ensuring the consumers' safety. It claims that the New Approach and Standardization, and the Global Approach to conformity assessment, which suppressed the last technical...... barriers to trade in Europe, realized the free movement of products by organizing progressively several orders of markets and regulation. Based on historical and institutional documents, on technical publications, and on interviews, this article relates how the European Commission and the Member States had...... alternatively recourse to markets and to regulations, at the three main levels of the New Approach Directives implementation. The article focuses also more specifically on the Medical Devices sector, not only because this New Approach sector has long been controversial in Europe, and has recently been concerned...

  18. Market, Regulation, Market, Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Christian; Galland, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the European Regulatory system which was settled both for opening the Single Market for products and ensuring the consumers' safety. It claims that the New Approach and Standardization, and the Global Approach to conformity assessment, which suppressed the last technical...... barriers to trade in Europe, realized the free movement of products by organizing progressively several orders of markets and regulation. Based on historical and institutional documents, on technical publications, and on interviews, this article relates how the European Commission and the Member States had...... alternatively recourse to markets and to regulations, at the three main levels of the New Approach Directives implementation. The article focuses also more specifically on the Medical Devices sector, not only because this New Approach sector has long been controversial in Europe, and has recently been concerned...

  19. Automatic tracking of Escherichia coli bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun; Khan, Shahid; Shah, Mubarak

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method for estimating the trajectories of Escherichia coli bacteria from in vivo phase-contrast microscopy videos. To address the low-contrast boundaries in cellular images, an adaptive kernel-based technique is applied to detect cells in sequence of frames. Then a novel matching gain measure is introduced to cope with the challenges such as dramatic changes of cells' appearance and serious overlapping and occlusion. For multiple cell tracking, an optimal matching strategy is proposed to improve the handling of cell collision and broken trajectories. The results of successful tracking of Escherichia coli from various phase-contrast sequences are reported and compared with manually-determined trajectories, as well as those obtained from existing tracking methods. The stability of the algorithm with different parameter values is also analyzed and discussed.

  20. Escherichia coli necrotizing fasciitis in Hirschsprung's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal A. Alsaif

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare post-operative complication of Hirschsprung's disease. Very recently the only previous case of necrotizing fasciitis following a Soave procedure was reported with the etiologic agent being Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we are reporting the second case of necrotizing fasciitis following a Soave procedure caused by an extended spectrum beta lactamase harboring strain of Escherichia coli which is a rare pathogen in type II necrotizing fasciitis.

  1. Homology requirements for recombination in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Watt, V M; Ingles, C J; Urdea, M S; Rutter, W J

    1985-01-01

    The DNA sequence homology required for recombination in Escherichia coli has been determined by measuring the recombination frequency between insulin DNA in a miniplasmid pi VX and a homologous sequence in a bacteriophage lambda vector. A minimum of approximately equal to 20 base pairs in a completely homologous segment is required for significant recombination. There is an exponential increase in the frequency of recombination when the length of homologous DNA is increased from 20 base pairs...

  2. Native valve Escherichia coli endocarditis following urosepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, D; Ramakrishnan, S; Patro, K C; Devaraj, S; Krishnamurthy, V; Kothari, Y; Satyaki, N

    2013-05-01

    Gram-negative organisms are a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Escherichia coli, the most common cause of urinary tract infection and gram-negative septicemia involves endocardium rarely. In this case report, we describe infection of native mitral valve by E. coli following septicemia of urinary tract origin in a diabetic male; subsequently, he required prosthetic tissue valve replacement indicated by persistent sepsis and congestive cardiac failure.

  3. Shigella strains are not clones of Escherichia coli but sister species in the genus Escherichia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Guanghong; Xu, Zhao; Hao, Bailin

    2013-02-01

    Shigella species and Escherichia coli are closely related organisms. Early phenotyping experiments and several recent molecular studies put Shigella within the species E. coli. However, the whole-genome-based, alignment-free and parameter-free CVTree approach shows convincingly that four established Shigella species, Shigella boydii, Shigella sonnei, Shigella felxneri and Shigella dysenteriae, are distinct from E. coli strains, and form sister species to E. coli within the genus Escherichia. In view of the overall success and high resolution power of the CVTree approach, this result should be taken seriously. We hope that the present report may promote further in-depth study of the Shigella-E. coli relationship.

  4. Integration of AI-2 Based Cell-Cell Signaling with Metabolic Cues in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Mitra

    Full Text Available The quorum sensing molecule Autoinducer-2 (AI-2 is generated as a byproduct of activated methyl cycle by the action of LuxS in Escherichia coli. AI-2 is synthesized, released and later internalized in a cell-density dependent manner. Here, by mutational analysis of the genes, uvrY and csrA, we describe a regulatory circuit of accumulation and uptake of AI-2. We constructed a single-copy chromosomal luxS-lacZ fusion in a luxS + merodiploid strain and evaluated its relative expression in uvrY and csrA mutants. At the entry of stationary phase, the expression of the fusion and AI-2 accumulation was positively regulated by uvrY and negatively regulated by csrA respectively. A deletion of csrA altered message stability of the luxS transcript and CsrA protein exhibited weak binding to 5' luxS regulatory region. DNA protein interaction and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed direct interaction of UvrY with the luxS promoter. Additionally, reduced expression of the fusion in hfq deletion mutant suggested involvement of small RNA interactions in luxS regulation. In contrast, the expression of lsrA operon involved in AI-2 uptake, is negatively regulated by uvrY and positively by csrA in a cell-density dependent manner. The dual role of csrA in AI-2 synthesis and uptake suggested a regulatory crosstalk of cell signaling with carbon regulation in Escherichia coli. We found that the cAMP-CRP mediated catabolite repression of luxS expression was uvrY dependent. This study suggests that luxS expression is complex and regulated at the level of transcription and translation. The multifactorial regulation supports the notion that cell-cell communication requires interaction and integration of multiple metabolic signals.

  5. Proteomic adaptations to starvation prepare Escherichia coli for disinfection tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhe; Nandakumar, Renu; Nickerson, Kenneth W; Li, Xu

    2015-02-01

    Despite the low nutrient level and constant presence of secondary disinfectants, bacterial re-growth still occurs in drinking water distribution systems. The molecular mechanisms that starved bacteria use to survive low-level chlorine-based disinfectants are not well understood. The objective of this study is to investigate these molecular mechanisms at the protein level that prepare starved cells for disinfection tolerance. Two commonly used secondary disinfectants chlorine and monochloramine, both at 1 mg/L, were used in this study. The proteomes of normal and starved Escherichia coli (K12 MG1655) cells were studied using quantitative proteomics. Over 60-min disinfection, starved cells showed significantly higher disinfection tolerance than normal cells based on the inactivation curves for both chlorine and monochloramine. Proteomic analyses suggest that starvation may prepare cells for the oxidative stress that chlorine-based disinfection will cause by affecting glutathione metabolism. In addition, proteins involved in stress regulation and stress responses were among the ones up-regulated under both starvation and chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. By comparing the fold changes under different conditions, it is suggested that starvation prepares E. coli for disinfection tolerance by increasing the expression of enzymes that can help cells survive chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. Protein co-expression analyses show that proteins in glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway that were up-regulated under starvation are also involved in disinfection tolerance. Finally, the production and detoxification of methylglyoxal may be involved in the chlorine-based disinfection and cell defense mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Preliminary Study of Key Regulated Enzymes Forglucosamine Metabolism in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3)%大肠杆菌BL21(DE3)氨基葡萄糖代谢调控相关基因的敲除及glmS在其中的表达研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂宇鹏; 何京桦; 乐科易; 严维耀

    2012-01-01

    氨基葡萄糖(Glucosamine,GleN)是一类广泛使用的保健品,对于人类软骨再生及关节炎的临床治疗都具有良好的疗效.为构建以代谢工程为基础的氨基葡萄糖生产菌株,采用λRed同源重组系统将大肠杆菌BL21(DE3)中甘露糖-磷酸转移酶系统操纵子(manXYZ)和乙酰氨基葡萄糖(GlcNAc)转运和代谢特异性系统操纵子(nagBACD-nagE)进行双剔除.随后构建含新型氨基葡萄糖合成酶基因(glmS)的表达载体pETG,并将它转化该双操纵子剔除菌株.结果表明,改造后的菌株不能以GleN或GlcNAc作为碳源进行代谢生长.表达GlmS菌株的上清液经Ni-NTA亲和层析纯化,其酶活性达8.63 U/mg,表明该菌株已具备发酵生产GleN的初步特性.%As a class of widely used healthcare products in the world, glucosamine (GlcN) provides good regeneration of human joint cartilage and palliation the pain or disability of osteoarthritis (OA). For the purposes to create a new method of GlcN production based on metabolic engineering, operon manXYZ(mannose-specific PTS enzymes) and operon nagBACD-nagE (include acetylglucosamine-specific transporter, deacetylase, deaminase and its regulatory proteins) of Escherichia colt BL21 (DE3) were deleted using λRed homology recombination system. A new expression vector pETG was constructed in order to highly express the GlmS protein. Compared to the wild type Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), the engineered strain failed to use glucosamine or acetyl-glucosamine as carbon source. By the modified Morgan-Elson method, an 8. 63 U/mg activity of glmS protein was identified after purification by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. These suggest that the result bacterial has initial characteristics of the ideal GlcN production strain.

  7. Ethanol production by Escherichia coli KO11; Producao de etanol por Escherichia coli KO11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Katia Gianni de Carvalho [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Lab. de Microbiologia de Alimentos]. E-mail: gianni@usp.br; Takahashi, Caroline Maki; Alterthum, Flavio [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas. Dept. de Microbiologia

    2002-08-01

    This paper discusses the potential use of Escherichia coli KO11 in production of ethanol, based on observation that this organism can efficiently metabolize sugar complex moistures obtained from the acid hydrolysis of lignocellulose materials such as sugar-cane bagasse, corncob, corn husk, Pinus sp and oak wood.

  8. Hydrogen production by recombinant Escherichia coli strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Toshinari; Sanchez‐Torres, Viviana; Wood, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The production of hydrogen via microbial biotechnology is an active field of research. Given its ease of manipulation, the best‐studied bacterium Escherichia coli has become a workhorse for enhanced hydrogen production through metabolic engineering, heterologous gene expression, adaptive evolution, and protein engineering. Herein, the utility of E. coli strains to produce hydrogen, via native hydrogenases or heterologous ones, is reviewed. In addition, potential strategies for increasing hydrogen production are outlined and whole‐cell systems and cell‐free systems are compared. PMID:21895995

  9. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli: foe or innocent bystander?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J; Torres, A G

    2015-08-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) remain one the most important pathogens infecting children and they are one of the main causes of persistent diarrhoea worldwide. Historically, typical EPEC (tEPEC), defined as those isolates with the attaching and effacement (A/E) genotype (eae(+)), which possess bfpA(+) and lack the stx(-) genes are found strongly associated with diarrhoeal cases. However, occurrence of atypical EPEC (aEPEC; eae(+)bfpA(-)stx(-)) in diarrhoeal and asymptomatic hosts has made investigators question the role of these pathogens in human disease. Current epidemiological data are helping to answer the question of whether EPEC is mainly a foe or an innocent bystander during infection.

  10. Escherichia coli fliAZY operon.

    OpenAIRE

    Mytelka, D S; Chamberlin, M J

    1996-01-01

    We have cloned the Escherichia coli fliAZY operon, which contains the fliA gene (the alternative sigma factor sigma F) and two novel genes, fliZ and fliY. Transcriptional mapping of this operon shows two start sites, one of which is preceded by a canonical E sigma F-dependent consensus and is dependent on sigma F for expression in vivo and in vitro. We have overexpressed and purified sigma F and demonstrated that it can direct core polymerase to E sigma F-dependent promoters. FliZ and FliY ar...

  11. Escherichia coli O157:H7 lacking qseBC encoded quorum sensing system outcompetes the parent strain in colonization of cattle intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The qseBC encoded quorum-sensing system (QS) regulates motility of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 in response to bacterial autoinducer-3 (AI-3) and mammalian stress hormones epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE). The qseC gene encodes a sensory kinase that post-autophosphorylati...

  12. Initial characterization of a bolA homologue from Pseudomonas fluorescens indicates different roles for BolA-like proteins in em>P. fluorescens and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Birgit; Nybroe, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The RpoS-regulated bolA gene in Escherichia coli is important for the decrease in cell size during stationary phase or sudden carbon starvation. A Pseudomonas fluorescens strain mutated in a gene with homology to bolA reduced its cell size upon carbon starvation, and RpoS had little effect on bol...

  13. The soluble periplasmic domains of Escherichia coli cell division proteins FtsQ/FtsB/FtsL form a trimeric complex with submicromolar affinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glas, Marjolein; Bart Van Den Berg Van Saparoea, H.; McLaughlin, Stephen H.; Roseboom, Winfried; Liu, Fan; Koningstein, Gregory M.; Fish, Alexander; Den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Heck, Albert J R; De Jong, Luitzen; Bitter, Wilbert; De Esch, Iwan J P; Luirink, Joen

    2015-01-01

    Cell division in Escherichia coli involves a set of essential proteins that assembles at midcell to form the so-called divisome. The divisome regulates the invagination of the inner membrane, cell wall synthesis, and inward growth of the outer membrane. One of the divisome proteins, FtsQ, plays a ce

  14. Prophage insertions in mlrA are not the major obstacle to biofilm formation in Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Although a curli and biofilm expressing phenotype can be induced in Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7, strains examined under laboratory conditions are almost exclusively biofilm deficient and the reason for these deficiencies have remained elusive. CsgD, the central biofilm regulator, i...

  15. Phage insertion in mlrA and variations in rpoS limit curli expression and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofilm formation in Escherichia coli is a tightly controlled process requiring the expression of adhesive curli fibers and certain polysaccharides such as cellulose. The transcriptional regulator CsgD is central to biofilm formation, controlling the expression of the curli structural and export pro...

  16. Revealing genome-scale transcriptional regulatory landscape of OmpR highlights its expanded regulatory roles under osmotic stress in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Sang Woo; Gao, Ye; Kim, Donghyuk

    2017-01-01

    A transcription factor (TF), OmpR, plays a critical role in transcriptional regulation of the osmotic stress response in bacteria. Here, we reveal a genome-scale OmpR regulon in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. Integrative data analysis reveals that a total of 37 genes in 24 transcription units (TUs...

  17. The Soluble Periplasmic Domains of Escherichia coli Cell Division Proteins FtsQ/FtsB/FtsL form a Trimeric Complex with Sub-micromolar Affinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glas, M.; van den Berg van Saparoea, H.B.; McLaughlin, S.H.; Roseboom, W.; Liu, F.; Koningstein, G.M.; Fish, A.; den Blaauwen, T.; Heck, A.J.R.; de Jong, L.; Bitter, W.; de Esch, I.J.P.; Luirink, J.

    2015-01-01

    Cell division in Escherichia coli involves a set of essential proteins that assembles at midcell to form the so-called divisome. The divisome regulates the invagination of the inner membrane, cell wall synthesis, and inward growth of the outer membrane. One of the divisome proteins, FtsQ, plays a ce

  18. The EcoCyc database: reflecting new knowledge about Escherichia coli K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keseler, Ingrid M.; Mackie, Amanda; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Billington, Richard; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Caspi, Ron; Fulcher, Carol; Gama-Castro, Socorro; Kothari, Anamika; Krummenacker, Markus; Latendresse, Mario; Muñiz-Rascado, Luis; Ong, Quang; Paley, Suzanne; Peralta-Gil, Martin; Subhraveti, Pallavi; Velázquez-Ramírez, David A.; Weaver, Daniel; Collado-Vides, Julio; Paulsen, Ian; Karp, Peter D.

    2017-01-01

    EcoCyc (EcoCyc.org) is a freely accessible, comprehensive database that collects and summarizes experimental data for Escherichia coli K-12, the best-studied bacterial model organism. New experimental discoveries about gene products, their function and regulation, new metabolic pathways, enzymes and cofactors are regularly added to EcoCyc. New SmartTable tools allow users to browse collections of related EcoCyc content. SmartTables can also serve as repositories for user- or curator-generated lists. EcoCyc now supports running and modifying E. coli metabolic models directly on the EcoCyc website. PMID:27899573

  19. Autogenous control of PspF, a constitutively active enhancer-binding protein of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanovic, G; Dworkin, J; Model, P

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia coli sigma54-dependent phage shock protein operon (pspA to -E) transcription is under the control of PspF, a constitutively active activator. Sigma70-dependent transcription of pspF is under autogenous control by wild-type PspF but not by a DNA-binding mutant, PspF deltaHTH. Negative autoregulation of PspF is continual and not affected by stimuli, like f1 pIV, that induce the pspA to -E operon. PspF production is independent of PspA (the negative regulator of the pspA to -E operon...

  20. A pmrA Constitutive Mutant Sensitizes Escherichia coli to Deoxycholic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Froelich, Jamie M.; Tran, Khoa; Wall, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    An Escherichia coli mutant was isolated and shown to be polymyxin B resistant. Mapping and sequence analysis revealed a missense mutation at codon 53 within the pmrA (basR) gene that results in a G-to-V substitution. Fusions of promoters from the pmrC, yibD, and pmrH genes with the lacZ reporter showed that they were constitutively expressed in pmrA53 cells. In pmrA+ strains, these promoters were induced by iron and zinc, while a ΔpmrA mutation blocked induction. The PmrA regulon regulates ge...

  1. Structure of Escherichia coli Hfq bound to polyriboadenylate RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Link, Todd M; Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Brennan, Richard G

    2009-01-01

    in the down-regulation of gene expression. Hfq also plays a key role in bacterial RNA decay by binding tightly to polyadenylate [poly(A)] tracts. The structural mechanism by which Hfq recognizes and binds poly(A) is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of Escherichia coli Hfq bound to the poly(A......) RNA, A(15). The structure reveals a unique RNA binding mechanism. Unlike uridine-containing sequences, which bind to the "proximal" face, the poly(A) tract binds to the "distal" face of Hfq using 6 tripartite binding motifs. Each motif consists of an adenosine specificity site (A site), which...

  2. Improving heterologous polyketide production in Escherichia coli by transporter engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingya; Xiong, Zhi-Qiang; Song, Shu-Jie; Wang, Jian-Feng; Lv, Hua-Jun; Wang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Expelling heterologous compounds out of hosts by transporters is a potential strategy to enhance product titers in microbial cell factories. In this work, to increase heterologous polyketide 6-deoxyerythronolide B (6dEB, erythromycin precursor) production, tripartite multidrug efflux pumps MacAB-TolC, AcrAB-TolC, MdtEF-TolC, and MexAB-OprM were modulated in a 6dEB production strain. Compared with the control, overexpression of a single component of efflux pumps (except oprM) repressed 6dEB production, but modulation of two components MacA and MacB or the complete pumps MacAB-TolC and MdtEF-TolC significantly improved 6dEB titer by 100 ± 11, 118 ± 54, and 98 ± 12 %, respectively. In addition, to avoid the challenging fine-tuning components of pumps, the transcriptional regulators of efflux pumps were modulated to improve the 6dEB production. Overexpression of RpoH (activator of MdtEF-TolC) and EvgA (activator of EmrKY-TolC and AcrAD-TolC) strongly increased 6dEB titer by 152 ± 54 and 142 ± 85 %, respectively. This is the first report of transporter engineering for improving heterologous polyketide production in Escherichia coli. Our results provide an effective strategy for improving the yield of the heterologous products in chassis cell.

  3. Noise characteristics of the Escherichia coli rotary motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clausznitzer Diana

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chemotaxis pathway in the bacterium Escherichia coli allows cells to detect changes in external ligand concentration (e.g. nutrients. The pathway regulates the flagellated rotary motors and hence the cells' swimming behaviour, steering them towards more favourable environments. While the molecular components are well characterised, the motor behaviour measured by tethered cell experiments has been difficult to interpret. Results We study the effects of sensing and signalling noise on the motor behaviour. Specifically, we consider fluctuations stemming from ligand concentration, receptor switching between their signalling states, adaptation, modification of proteins by phosphorylation, and motor switching between its two rotational states. We develop a model which includes all signalling steps in the pathway, and discuss a simplified version, which captures the essential features of the full model. We find that the noise characteristics of the motor contain signatures from all these processes, albeit with varying magnitudes. Conclusions Our analysis allows us to address how cell-to-cell variation affects motor behaviour and the question of optimal pathway design. A similar comprehensive analysis can be applied to other two-component signalling pathways.

  4. Recombination Phenotypes of Escherichia coli greA Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poteete Anthony R

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elongation factor GreA binds to RNA polymerase and modulates transcriptional pausing. Some recent research suggests that the primary role of GreA may not be to regulate gene expression, but rather, to promote the progression of replication forks which collide with RNA polymerase, and which might otherwise collapse. Replication fork collapse is known to generate dsDNA breaks, which can be recombinogenic. It follows that GreA malfunction could have consequences affecting homologous recombination. Results Escherichia coli mutants bearing substitutions of the active site acidic residues of the transcription elongation factor GreA, D41N and E44K, were isolated as suppressors of growth inhibition by a toxic variant of the bacteriophage lambda Red-beta recombination protein. These mutants, as well as a D41A greA mutant and a greA deletion, were tested for proficiency in recombination events. The mutations were found to increase the efficiency of RecA-RecBCD-mediated and RecA-Red-mediated recombination, which are replication-independent, and to decrease the efficiency of replication-dependent Red-mediated recombination. Conclusion These observations provide new evidence for a role of GreA in resolving conflicts between replication and transcription.

  5. Iron induces bimodal population development by Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePas, William H; Hufnagel, David A; Lee, John S; Blanco, Luz P; Bernstein, Hans C; Fisher, Steve T; James, Garth A; Stewart, Philip S; Chapman, Matthew R

    2013-02-12

    Bacterial biofilm formation is a complex developmental process involving cellular differentiation and the formation of intricate 3D structures. Here we demonstrate that exposure to ferric chloride triggers rugose biofilm formation by the uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain UTI89 and by enteric bacteria Citrobacter koseri and Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium. Two unique and separable cellular populations emerge in iron-triggered, rugose biofilms. Bacteria at the air-biofilm interface express high levels of the biofilm regulator csgD, the cellulose activator adrA, and the curli subunit operon csgBAC. Bacteria in the interior of rugose biofilms express low levels of csgD and undetectable levels of matrix components curli and cellulose. Iron activation of rugose biofilms is linked to oxidative stress. Superoxide generation, either through addition of phenazine methosulfate or by deletion of sodA and sodB, stimulates rugose biofilm formation in the absence of high iron. Additionally, overexpression of Mn-superoxide dismutase, which can mitigate iron-derived reactive oxygen stress, decreases biofilm formation in a WT strain upon iron exposure. Not only does reactive oxygen stress promote rugose biofilm formation, but bacteria in the rugose biofilms display increased resistance to H(2)O(2) toxicity. Altogether, we demonstrate that iron and superoxide stress trigger rugose biofilm formation in UTI89. Rugose biofilm development involves the elaboration of two distinct bacterial populations and increased resistance to oxidative stress.

  6. Escherichia coli lipoprotein binds human plasminogen via an intramolecular domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy eGonzalez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli lipoprotein (Lpp is a major cellular component that exists in two distinct states, bound-form and free-form. Bound-form Lpp is known to interact with the periplasmic bacterial cell wall, while free-form Lpp is localized to the bacterial cell surface. A function for surface-exposed Lpp has yet to be determined. We hypothesized that the presence of C-terminal lysines in the surface-exposed region of Lpp would facilitate binding to the host zymogen plasminogen, a protease commandeered by a number of clinically important bacteria. Recombinant Lpp was synthesized and the binding of Lpp to plasminogen, the effect of various inhibitors on this binding, and the effects of various mutations of Lpp on Lpp-plasminogen interactions were examined. Additionally, the ability of Lpp-bound plasminogen to be converted to active plasmin was analyzed. We determined that Lpp binds plasminogen via an atypical domain located near the center of mature Lpp that may not be exposed on the surface of intact E. coli according to the current localization model. Finally, we found that plasminogen bound by Lpp can be converted to active plasmin. While the consequences of Lpp binding plasminogen are unclear, these results prompt further investigation of the ability of surface exposed Lpp to interact with host molecules such as extracellular matrix components and complement regulators, and the role of these interactions in infections caused by E. coli and other bacteria.

  7. Escherichia coli exports cyclic AMP via TolC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantke, Klaus; Winkler, Karin; Schultz, Joachim E

    2011-03-01

    In Escherichia coli more than 180 genes are regulated by the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex. However, more than 90% of cAMP that is made by intracellular adenylyl cyclases is found in the culture medium. How is cAMP exported from E. coli? In a tolC mutant, 0.03 mM IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) was sufficient to induce β-galactosidase compared to 0.1 mM IPTG in the parent strain. In a cya mutant unable to produce cAMP about 1 mM extracellular cAMP was required to induce β-galactosidase, whereas in a cya tolC mutant 0.1 mM cAMP was sufficient. When cAMP in E. coli cya was generated intracellularly by a recombinant, weakly active adenylyl cyclase from Corynebacterium glutamicum, the critical level of cAMP necessary for induction of maltose degradation was only achieved in a tolC mutant and not in the parent strain. Deletion of a putative cAMP phosphodiesterase of E. coli, CpdA, resulted in a slightly similar, yet more diffuse phenotype. The data demonstrate that export of cAMP via TolC is a most efficient way of E. coli to lower high concentrations of cAMP in the cell and maintain its sensitivity in changing metabolic environments.

  8. Adenosine diphosphate sugar pyrophosphatase prevents glycogen biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Bruna, Beatriz; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Muñoz, Francisco José; Bastarrica-Berasategui, Ainara; Zandueta-Criado, Aitor; Rodríguez-López, Milagros; Lasa, Iñigo; Akazawa, Takashi; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2001-01-01

    An adenosine diphosphate sugar pyrophosphatase (ASPPase, EC 3.6.1.21) has been characterized by using Escherichia coli. This enzyme, whose activities in the cell are inversely correlated with the intracellular glycogen content and the glucose concentration in the culture medium, hydrolyzes ADP-glucose, the precursor molecule of glycogen biosynthesis. ASPPase was purified to apparent homogeneity (over 3,000-fold), and sequence analyses revealed that it is a member of the ubiquitously distributed group of nucleotide pyrophosphatases designated as “nudix” hydrolases. Insertional mutagenesis experiments leading to the inactivation of the ASPPase encoding gene, aspP, produced cells with marginally low enzymatic activities and higher glycogen content than wild-type bacteria. aspP was cloned into an expression vector and introduced into E. coli. Transformed cells were shown to contain a dramatically reduced amount of glycogen, as compared with the untransformed bacteria. No pleiotropic changes in the bacterial growth occurred in both the aspP-overexpressing and aspP-deficient strains. The overall results pinpoint the reaction catalyzed by ASPPase as a potential step of regulating glycogen biosynthesis in E. coli. PMID:11416161

  9. rec genes and homologous recombination proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A J

    1991-04-01

    The twenty-five years since the first published report of recA mutants in Escherichia coli has seen the identification of more than 12 other recombination genes. The genes are usually grouped into three pathways named RecBCD, RecE and RecF for prominent genes which function in each. A proposal is made here that there are two RecF pathways, one sensitive and one resistant to exonuclease I, the SbcB enzyme. Five methods of grouping the genes functionally are discussed: 1) by enzyme activity, 2) by common indirect suppressor, 3) by common phenotype, 4) by common regulation and 5) by epistasis. Five classes of enzyme activities implicated in recombination are discussed according to their involvement in presynapsis, synapsis or postsynapsis: 1) nucleases 2) helicases 3) DNA-binding proteins 4) topoisomerases and 5) ligases. Plausible presynaptic steps for the RecBCD, RecF (SbcBS) and RecE pathways show the common feature of generating 3'-terminated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). On this ssDNA it is proposed that a RecA protein filament is generated discontinuously. This implies the existence of nucleation and possibly measurement and 3' end protection proteins. Specific proposals are made for which recombination genes might encode such products. Finally the generality of the RecA-ssDNA-filament mechanism of synapsis in the cellular biological world is discussed.

  10. Ferritinophagy drives uropathogenic Escherichia coli persistence in bladder epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauckman, Kyle A; Mysorekar, Indira U

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is a cellular recycling pathway, which in many cases, protects host cells from infections by degrading pathogens. However, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the predominant cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs), persist within the urinary tract epithelium (urothelium) by forming reservoirs within autophagosomes. Iron is a critical nutrient for both host and pathogen, and regulation of iron availability is a key host defense against pathogens. Iron homeostasis depends on the shuttling of iron-bound ferritin to the lysosome for recycling, a process termed ferritinophagy (a form of selective autophagy). Here, we demonstrate for the first time that UPEC shuttles with ferritin-bound iron into the autophagosomal and lysosomal compartments within the urothelium. Iron overload in urothelial cells induces ferritinophagy in an NCOA4-dependent manner causing increased iron availability for UPEC, triggering bacterial overproliferation and host cell death. Addition of even moderate levels of iron is sufficient to increase and prolong bacterial burden. Furthermore, we show that lysosomal damage due to iron overload is the specific mechanism causing host cell death. Significantly, we demonstrate that host cell death and bacterial burden can be reversed by inhibition of autophagy or inhibition of iron-regulatory proteins, or chelation of iron. Together, our findings suggest that UPEC persist in host cells by taking advantage of ferritinophagy. Thus, modulation of iron levels in the bladder may provide a therapeutic avenue to controlling UPEC persistence, epithelial cell death, and recurrent UTIs.

  11. Identification of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Surface Proteins by Shotgun Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Matthew S.; Mobley, Harry L.T.

    2009-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cause the majority of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in humans. In the process of identifying candidate antigens for a vaccine, two methods for the identification of the UPEC surface proteome during growth in human urine were investigated. The first approach utilized a protease to ‘shave’ surface-exposed peptides from the bacterial cell surface and identify them by mass spectrometry. Although this approach has been successfully applied to a Gram-positive pathogen, the adaptation to Gram-negative UPEC resulted in cytoplasmic protein contamination. In a more direct approach, whole-cell bacteria were labeled with a biotin tag to indicate surface-exposed peptides and two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2-DLC-MS/MS) was used to identify proteins isolated from the outer membrane. This method discovered 25 predicted outer membrane proteins expressed by UPEC while growing in human urine. Nine of the 25 predicted outer membrane proteins were part of iron transport systems or putative iron-regulated virulence proteins, indicating the importance of iron acquisition during growth in urine. One of the iron transport proteins identified, Hma, appears to be a promising vaccine candidate is being further investigated. The method described here presents a system to rapidly identify the outer membrane proteome of bacteria, which may prove valuable in vaccine development. PMID:19426766

  12. Escherichia coli O157 infections and unpasteurised milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allerberger, F; Wagner, M; Schweiger, P; Rammer, H P; Resch, A; Dierich, M P; Friedrich, A W; Karch, H

    2001-01-01

    We report on two children with Escherichia coli O157 infection, one of whom developed haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). Both had drunk raw cows or goats milk in the week before their illness. Molecular subtyping identified a sorbitol fermenting Escherichia coli O157:H isolate from a dairy cow. This

  13. Escherichia coli O157 infections and unpasteurised milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allerberger, F; Wagner, M; Schweiger, P; Rammer, H P; Resch, A; Dierich, M P; Friedrich, A W; Karch, H

    2001-01-01

    We report on two children with Escherichia coli O157 infection, one of whom developed haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). Both had drunk raw cows or goats milk in the week before their illness. Molecular subtyping identified a sorbitol fermenting Escherichia coli O157:H isolate from a dairy cow. This

  14. Reduction of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli in production of fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holck, Askild L; Axelsson, Lars; Rode, Tone Mari; Høy, Martin; Måge, Ingrid; Alvseike, Ole; L'abée-Lund, Trine M; Omer, Mohamed K; Granum, Per Einar; Heir, Even

    2011-11-01

    After a number of foodborne outbreaks of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli involving fermented sausages, some countries have imposed regulations on sausage production. For example, the US Food Safety and Inspection Service requires a 5 log(10) reduction of E. coli in fermented products. Such regulations have led to a number of studies on the inactivation of E. coli in fermented sausages by changing processing and post-processing conditions. Several factors influence the survival of E. coli such as pre-treatment of the meat, amount of NaCl, nitrite and lactic acid, water activity, pH, choice of starter cultures and addition of antimicrobial compounds. Also process variables like fermentation temperature and storage time play important roles. Though a large variety of different production processes of sausages exist, generally the reduction of E. coli caused by production is in the range 1-2 log(10). In many cases this may not be enough to ensure microbial food safety. By optimising ingredients and process parameters it is possible to increase E. coli reduction to some extent, but in some cases still other post process treatments may be required. Such treatments may be storage at ambient temperatures, specific heat treatments, high pressure processing or irradiation. HACCP analyses have identified the quality of the raw materials, low temperature in the batter when preparing the sausages and a rapid pH drop during fermentation as critical control points in sausage production. This review summarises the literature on the reduction verotoxigenic E. coli in production of fermented sausages.

  15. Escherichia coli and the French School of Molecular Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, Agnes

    2010-09-01

    André Lwoff, Jacques Monod, and François Jacob, the leaders of the French school of molecular biology, greatly contributed between 1937 and 1965 to its development and triumph. The main discovery of Lwoff was the elucidation of the mechanism of bacteriophage induction, the phenomenon of lysogeny, that led to the model of genetic regulation uncovered later by Jacob and Monod. Working on bacterial growth, Monod discovered in 1941 the phenomenon of diauxy and uncovered the nature of enzyme induction. By combining genetic and biochemical approaches, Monod brought to light the structure and functions of the Escherichia coli lactose system, comprising the genes necessary for lactose metabolism, i.e., β-galactosidase and lactose permease, a pump responsible for accumulation of galactosides into the cells. An additional genetic factor (the i gene) determines the inducibility and constitutivity of enzyme synthesis. Around the same time, François Jacob and Elie Wollman dissected the main events of bacterial conjugation that enabled them to construct a map of the E. coli chromosome and to demonstrate its circularity. The genetic analysis of the lactose system led Monod and Jacob to elucidate the mechanism of the regulation of gene expression and to propose the operon model: a unit of coordinate transcription. One of the new concepts that emerged from the operon model was messenger RNA. In 1963, Monod developed one of the most elegant concepts of molecular biology, the theory of allostery. In 1965, Lwoff, Monod and Jacob were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

  16. Kinetic Model for Signal Binding to the Quorum Sensing Regulator LasR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussen, Anetta; Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bjarnsholt, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    of the active LasR quorum-sensing regulator was studied in an Escherichia coli background as a function of signal molecule concentration. The functional activity of the regulator was monitored via a GFP reporter fusion to lasB expressed from the native lasB promoter. The new data shows that the active form...

  17. Autogenous Regulation of Splicing of the Transcript of a Yeast Ribosomal Protein Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabeva, Mariana D.; Post-Beittenmiller, Martha A.; Warner, Jonathan R.

    1986-08-01

    The gene for a yeast ribosomal protein, RPL32, contains a single intron. The product of this gene appears to participate in feedback control of the splicing of the intron from the transcript. This autogenous regulation of splicing provides a striking analogy to the autogenous regulation of translation of ribosomal proteins in Escherichia coli.

  18. Regulatory Interactions of Csr Components: the RNA Binding Protein CsrA Activates csrB Transcription in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Gudapaty, Seshagirirao; Suzuki, Kazushi; Wang, Xin; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2002-01-01

    The global regulator CsrA (carbon storage regulator) of Escherichia coli is a small RNA binding protein that represses various metabolic pathways and processes that are induced in the stationary phase of growth, while it activates certain exponential phase functions. Both repression and activation by CsrA involve posttranscriptional mechanisms, in which CsrA binding to mRNA leads to decreased or increased transcript stability, respectively. CsrA also binds to a small untranslated RNA, CsrB, f...

  19. General considerations regarding the infections with the Escherichia coli pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Necşulescu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is the species of the genus Escherichia with the greatest epidemiological impact. Escherichia coli infections are found mainly in places with poor hygiene; the infants with ages between 1 and 3 years old are included in the category with the highest risk. It is a "fecal-oral" transmission mechanism as a result of consumption of contaminated food or water, or by "dirty hands". The foods most commonly implicated in the transmission of the infection are unpasteurized milk and milk products, beef, especially the one insufficiently cooked, unpasteurized fruit juice, lettuce and insufficiently washed vegetables. The disease has been reported worldwide, being described numerous episodes of infection with Escherichia coli that caused multiple illnesses and deaths. Escherichia coli has three types of antigens: antigen "O" (somatic, antigen "H" (flagella and antigen "K" (capsular. Clinical manifestations are present in the form of non-specific diarrhea, a dysentery form of enteritis, choleriform enteritis, hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. The Escherichia coli infection diagnosis is made by identifying the etiologic agent and/or by highlighting the VTI toxin in the feces. The treatment consists in precautionary antibiotherapy, hydrodynamics and electrolyte rebalancing, blood transfusions and dialysis, if in the case of renal failure. The prevention of infections with Escherichia coli is achieved by personal hygiene, food hygiene and work hygiene.

  20. Identification and Prevalence of Escherichia coli and Escherichia coli O157: H7 in Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancuta Mihaela Rotar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the incidence of Escherichia coli in animal and non-animal foods, and mainly the incidence of the serotype O157: H7 producing verotoxin. The presence of common Escherichia coli and Escherichia coli O157: H7 in various foods (of animal and non animal origin was performed in Transylvania area. We analyzed a total of one hundred forty-one samples of minced meat, one hundred twenty-six samples of meat , twenty six samples of meat products, five samples of alcoholic beverages, three samples of seafood, one hundred samples of cheese from pasteurized milk, seventeen samples of butter, four samples of vegetables and one sample of milk powder, using the standard cultural method and Vidas Eco method for E. coli O157: H7 strains. E. coli was identified in 50 samples of minced meat, 55 samples of meat prepared, 4 samples of meat products, 2 samples of alcoholic beverages, 25 samples of cheese from pasteurized milk, 6 samples of butter and 1 sample of vegetables. In this study were not been identified any foods contaminated with the E. coli O157: H7 serotype. The results of this reasearch have demostrated that E. coli wich represents a hygienic indicator of recent food contamination, can be destroyed with heat treatment and hygienic handling of foods. Our country over the years has been among the few countries where the incidence of the E. coli O157: H7 serotype has been minimal.

  1. Global gene expression in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Kjærgaard, K.; Klemm, Per

    2003-01-01

    in expression have no current defined function. These genes, as well as those induced by stresses relevant to biofilm growth such as oxygen and nutrient limitation, may be important factors that trigger enhanced resistance mechanisms of sessile communities to antibiotics and hydrodynamic shear forces.......It is now apparent that microorganisms undergo significant changes during the transition from planktonic to biofilm growth. These changes result in phenotypic adaptations that allow the formation of highly organized and structured sessile communities, which possess enhanced resistance...... to antimicrobial treatments and host immune defence responses. Escherichia coli has been used as a model organism to study the mechanisms of growth within adhered communities. In this study, we use DNA microarray technology to examine the global gene expression profile of E. coli during sessile growth compared...

  2. Cellular chain formation in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Klemm, Per

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on a novel structural phenotype in Escherichia coli biofilms: cellular chain formation. Biofilm chaining in E. coli K-12 was found to occur primarily by clonal expansion, but was not due to filamentous growth. Rather, chain formation was the result of intercellular......; type I fimbriae expression significantly reduced cellular chain formation, presumably by steric hindrance. Cellular chain formation did not appear to be specific to E coli K-12. Although many urinary tract infection (UTI) isolates were found to form rather homogeneous, flat biofilms, three isolates......, including the prototypic asymptomatic bacteriuria strain, 83972, formed highly elaborate cellular chains during biofilm growth in human urine. Combined, these results illustrate the diversity of biofilm architectures that can be observed even within a single microbial species....

  3. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, Jonathan P; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome......, including cell surface proteins such as beta barrel porins, presumably because of the involvement of these genes in evolutionary arms races with other bacteria, phages, and/or the host immune system. Structural mapping of positively selected sites on trans-membrane beta barrel porins reveals...... that the residues under positive selection occur almost exclusively in the extracellular region of the proteins that are enriched with sites known to be targets of phages, colicins, or the host immune system. More surprisingly, we also find a number of other categories of genes that show very strong evidence...

  4. Interaction between Escherichia coli and lunar fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    A sample of mature lunar fines (10084.151) was solubilized to a high degree (about 17 percent) by the chelating agent salicylic acid (0.01. M). The neutralized (pH adjusted to 7.0) leachate was found to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli (ATCC 259922) in a minimial mineral salts glucose medium; however, the inhibition was somewhat less than that caused by neutralized salicylic acid alone. The presence of lunar fines in the minimal medium was highly stimulatory to growth of E. coli following an early inhibitory response. The bacterium survived less well in the lunar leachate than in distilled water, no doubt because of the salicylate. It was concluded that the sample of lunar soil tested has nutritional value to E. coli and that certain products of fermentation helped to solubilize the lunar soil.

  5. Production of recombinant avidin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airenne, K J; Sarkkinen, P; Punnonen, E L; Kulomaa, M S

    1994-06-24

    A recombinant avidin (re-Avd), containing amino acids (aa) 1-123 of the native chicken egg-white Avd, was produced in Escherichia coli. When cells were grown at 37 degrees C production was over 1 microgram/ml, due to altering the codon preference of the first ten codons. The re-Avd was recovered as a soluble protein from cells grown at 25 or 30 degrees C, whereas at 37 degrees C it was mostly insoluble in inclusion bodies. Our results indicated that, despite the potentially harmful biotin-binding activity of Avd, it is possible to produce biologically active Avd in E. coli which then can easily be purified by affinity chromatography on a biotin column in a single step.

  6. The eclipse period of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Freiesleben, Ulrik; Krekling, Martin A.; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2000-01-01

    The minimal time between successive initiations on the same origin (the eclipse) in Escherichia coli was determined to be approximately 25-30 min. An inverse relationship was found between the length of the eclipse and the amount of Dam methyltransferase in the cell, indicating that the eclipse...... corresponds to the period of origin hemimethylation. The SeqA protein was absolutely required for the eclipse, and DnaA titration studies suggested that the SeqA protein prevented the binding of multiple DnaA molecules on oriC (initial complex formation). No correlation between the amount of SeqA and eclipse...... length was revealed, but increased SeqA levels affected chromosome partitioning and/or cell division. This was corroborated further by an aberrant nucleoid distribution in SeqA-deficient cells. We suggest that the SeqA protein's role in maintaining the eclipse is tied to a function in chromosome...

  7. Escherichia coli growth under modeled reduced gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Paul W.; Meyer, Michelle L.; Leff, Laura G.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit varying responses to modeled reduced gravity that can be simulated by clino-rotation. When Escherichia coli was subjected to different rotation speeds during clino-rotation, significant differences between modeled reduced gravity and normal gravity controls were observed only at higher speeds (30-50 rpm). There was no apparent affect of removing samples on the results obtained. When E. coli was grown in minimal medium (at 40 rpm), cell size was not affected by modeled reduced gravity and there were few differences in cell numbers. However, in higher nutrient conditions (i.e., dilute nutrient broth), total cell numbers were higher and cells were smaller under reduced gravity compared to normal gravity controls. Overall, the responses to modeled reduced gravity varied with nutrient conditions; larger surface to volume ratios may help compensate for the zone of nutrient depletion around the cells under modeled reduced gravity.

  8. Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System 2 ATPase EivC Is Involved in the Motility and Virulence of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xuan; Yang, Denghui; Wang, Dong; Han, Xiangan; Shi, Yonghong; Tian, Mingxing; Ding, Chan; Peng, Daxin; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are crucial for bacterial infections because they deliver effector proteins into host cells. The Escherichia coli type III secretion system 2 (ETT2) is present in the majority of E. coli strains, and although it is degenerate, ETT2 regulates bacterial virulence. An ATPase is essential for T3SS secretion, but the function of the ETT2 ATPase has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that EivC is homologous to the β subunit of F0F1 ATPases and it possesses ATPase activity. To investigate the effects of ETT2 ATPase EivC on the phenotype and virulence of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), eivC mutant and complemented strains were constructed and characterized. Inactivation of eivC led to impaired flagella production and augmented fimbriae on the bacterial surface, and, consequently, reduced bacterial motility. In addition, the eivC mutant strain exhibited attenuated virulence in ducks, diminished serum resistance, reduced survival in macrophage cells and in ducks, upregulated fimbrial gene expression, and downregulated flagellar and virulence gene expression. The expression of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 were increased in HD-11 macrophages infected with the eivC mutant strain, compared with the wild-type strain. These virulence-related phenotypes were restored by genetic complementation. These findings demonstrate that ETT2 ATPase EivC is involved in the motility and pathogenicity of APEC. PMID:27630634

  9. Messenger RNA Turnover Processes in Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Emerging Studies in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsi L. Anderson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of mRNA turnover is a recently appreciated phenomenon by which bacteria modulate gene expression. This review outlines the mechanisms by which three major classes of bacterial trans-acting factors, ribonucleases (RNases, RNA binding proteins, and small noncoding RNAs (sRNA, regulate the transcript stability and protein production of target genes. Because the mechanisms of RNA decay and maturation are best characterized in Escherichia coli, the majority of this review will focus on how these factors modulate mRNA stability in this organism. However, we also address the effects of RNases, RNA binding proteins, sRNAs on mRNA turnover, and gene expression in Bacillus subtilis, which has served as a model for studying RNA processing in gram-positive organisms. We conclude by discussing emerging studies on the role modulating mRNA stability has on gene expression in the important human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus.

  10. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli senses low biotin status in the large intestine for colonization and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Feng, Lu; Wang, Fang; Wang, Lei

    2015-03-20

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is an important foodborne pathogen that infects humans by colonizing the large intestine. Here we identify a virulence-regulating pathway in which the biotin protein ligase BirA signals to the global regulator Fur, which in turn activates LEE (locus of enterocyte effacement) genes to promote EHEC adherence in the low-biotin large intestine. LEE genes are repressed in the high-biotin small intestine, thus preventing adherence and ensuring selective colonization of the large intestine. The presence of this pathway in all nine EHEC serotypes tested indicates that it is an important evolutionary strategy for EHEC. The pathway is incomplete in closely related small-intestinal enteropathogenic E. coli due to the lack of the Fur response to BirA. Mice fed with a biotin-rich diet show significantly reduced EHEC adherence, indicating that biotin might be useful to prevent EHEC infection in humans.

  11. Metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli knockouts: lessons from the Keio collection and future outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Christopher P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2014-08-01

    Cellular metabolic and regulatory systems are of fundamental interest to biologists and engineers. Incomplete understanding of these complex systems remains an obstacle to progress in biotechnology and metabolic engineering. An established method for obtaining new information on network structure, regulation and dynamics is to study the cellular system following a perturbation such as a genetic knockout. The Keio collection of all viable Escherichia coli single-gene knockouts is facilitating a systematic investigation of the regulation and metabolism of E. coli. Of all omics measurements available, the metabolic flux profile (the fluxome) provides the most direct and relevant representation of the cellular phenotype. Recent advances in (13)C-metabolic flux analysis are now permitting highly precise and accurate flux measurements for investigating cellular systems and guiding metabolic engineering efforts.

  12. Dissecting the genetic components of adaptation of Escherichia coli to the mouse gut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Giraud

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available While pleiotropic adaptive mutations are thought to be central for evolution, little is known on the downstream molecular effects allowing adaptation to complex ecologically relevant environments. Here we show that Escherichia coli MG1655 adapts rapidly to the intestine of germ-free mice by single point mutations in EnvZ/OmpR two-component signal transduction system, which controls more than 100 genes. The selective advantage conferred by the mutations that modulate EnvZ/OmpR activities was the result of their independent and additive effects on flagellin expression and permeability. These results obtained in vivo thus suggest that global regulators may have evolved to coordinate activities that need to be fine-tuned simultaneously during adaptation to complex environments and that mutations in such regulators permit adjustment of the boundaries of physiological adaptation when switching between two very distinct environments.

  13. Regulating Transplants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Legislation to determine brain death is viewed as essential in controlling the organ transplant industry Organ transplant represents a very sensitive and complicated issue. Experts say the temporary administrative regulations recently promulgated by the Central Government are an important step, but relevant laws and regulations must follow. Among these, the

  14. Dynamics of Escherichia coli Chromosome Segregation during Multifork Replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2007-01-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division...

  15. The incidence and antibiotics susceptibility of Escherichia coli O157 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-22

    Feb 22, 2010 ... The incidence of Escherichia coli 0157: H7 was assessed in meat samples from .... of this product resulting from contamination with STEC, a zoonotic .... Adak GK, Longs SM, O'Briens SJ (2002) Trends in indigenous forborne.

  16. mcr-1 identified in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicolle Lima Barbieri; Daniel W Nielsen; Yvonne Wannemuehler; Tia Cavender; Ashraf Hussein; Shi-gan Yan; Lisa K Nolan; Catherine M Logue

    2017-01-01

    .... Here, we examined a collection (n = 980) of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) isolated from poultry with colibacillosis from the US and internationally for the presence of mcr-1 and mcr-2, genes known to encode colistin resistance...

  17. Overexpression of vsr in Escherichia coli is mutagenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, K M; Viau, S; Koutroumanis, M; Cupples, C G

    1996-01-01

    Overexpression of vsr in Escherichia coli stimulates transition and frameshift mutations. The pattern of mutations suggests that mutagenesis is due to saturation or inactivation of dam-directed mismatch repair. PMID:8763960

  18. Norfloxacin resistance in a clinical isolate of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Aoyama, H; Sato, K; Kato, T.; Hirai, K; Mitsuhashi, S.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of DNA gyrase supercoiling and of norfloxacin uptake in Escherichia coli GN14176, a moderately norfloxacin-resistant clinical isolate, indicated that resistance was associated with both an altered drug target and a reduction in drug uptake.

  19. In vitro evolution of an archetypal enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisa, Shahista; Hazen, Tracy H; Assatourian, Lillian; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Rasko, David A; Donnenberg, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a leading cause of infantile diarrhea in developing countries. EPEC strain E2348/69 is used worldwide as a prototype to study EPEC genetics and disease. However, isolates of E2348/69 differ phenotypically, reflecting a history of in vitro selection. To identify the genomic and phenotypic changes in the prototype strain, we sequenced the genome of the nalidixic acid-resistant (Nal(r)) E2348/69 clone. We also sequenced a recent nleF mutant derived by one-step PCR mutagenesis from the Nal(r) strain. The sequencing results revealed no unintended changes between the mutant and the parent strain. However, loss of the pE2348-2 plasmid and 3 nonsynonymous mutations were found in comparison to the published streptomycin-resistant (Str(r)) E2348/69 reference genome. One mutation is a conservative amino acid substitution in ftsK. Another, in gyrA, is a mutation known to result in resistance to nalidixic acid. The third mutation converts a stop codon to a tryptophan, predicted to result in the fusion of hflD, the lysogenization regulator, to purB. The purB gene encodes an adenylosuccinate lyase involved in purine biosynthesis. The Nal(r) clone has a lower growth rate than the Str(r) isolate when cultured in minimal media, a difference which is corrected upon addition of adenine or by genetic complementation with purB. Addition of adenine or genetic complementation also restored the invasion efficiency of the Nal(r) clone. This report reconciles longstanding inconsistencies in phenotypic properties of an archetypal strain and provides both reassurance and cautions regarding intentional and unintentional evolution in vitro.

  20. The stringent response and cell cycle arrest in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Ferullo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial stringent response, triggered by nutritional deprivation, causes an accumulation of the signaling nucleotides pppGpp and ppGpp. We characterize the replication arrest that occurs during the stringent response in Escherichia coli. Wild type cells undergo a RelA-dependent arrest after treatment with serine hydroxamate to contain an integer number of chromosomes and a replication origin-to-terminus ratio of 1. The growth rate prior to starvation determines the number of chromosomes upon arrest. Nucleoids of these cells are decondensed; in the absence of the ability to synthesize ppGpp, nucleoids become highly condensed, similar to that seen after treatment with the translational inhibitor chloramphenicol. After induction of the stringent response, while regions corresponding to the origins of replication segregate, the termini remain colocalized in wild-type cells. In contrast, cells arrested by rifampicin and cephalexin do not show colocalized termini, suggesting that the stringent response arrests chromosome segregation at a specific point. Release from starvation causes rapid nucleoid reorganization, chromosome segregation, and resumption of replication. Arrest of replication and inhibition of colony formation by ppGpp accumulation is relieved in seqA and dam mutants, although other aspects of the stringent response appear to be intact. We propose that DNA methylation and SeqA binding to non-origin loci is necessary to enforce a full stringent arrest, affecting both initiation of replication and chromosome segregation. This is the first indication that bacterial chromosome segregation, whose mechanism is not understood, is a step that may be regulated in response to environmental conditions.

  1. ENERGY REQUIREMENT FOR THYMINELESS DEATH IN CELLS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FREIFELDER, D; MAALOE, O

    1964-10-01

    Freifelder, David (University of California, Berkeley), and Ole Maaløe. Energy requirement for thymineless death in cells of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 88:987-990. 1964.-Thymineless death in thymine-requiring Escherichia coli is arrested immediately and reversibly by nitrogenation if the bacterial population is growing in a medium containing a carbon source that can only be metabolized aerobically. The mechanism of death, therefore, involves a metabolic process.

  2. Induction of the Escherichia coli yijE gene expression by cystine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Nonaka, Gen; Ozawa, Takahiro; Takumi, Kazuhiro; Ishihama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Cystine is formed from two molecules of the cysteine under oxidized conditions, but is reversibly converted to cysteine by reduction. Growth of Escherichia coli is retarded in the presence of excess cystine. Transcriptome analysis showed 11 up-regulated and 26 down-regulated genes upon exposure to excess cystine. The reporter assay confirmed regulation by cystine of the expression of one up-regulated membrane gene, yijE, and two down-regulated membrane genes, yhdT and yihN. In order to identify the as yet unidentified gene encoding cystine efflux transporter, the putative cystine efflux candidate, yijE gene, was over-expressed. Expression of the yijE gene suppressed the slow growth of E. coli in the presence of high concentration of extracellular cystine. In good agreement, the knock-out of yijE gene increased the sensibility to cystine. These observations altogether imply that the yijE gene is involved in response to cystine in E. coli.

  3. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-03-18

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, 'Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli' (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Many chromosomal genes modulate MarA-mediated multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Cristian; Levy, Stuart B

    2010-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli can be associated with overexpression of marA, a transcription factor that upregulates multidrug efflux and downregulates membrane permeability. Using random transposome mutagenesis, we found that many chromosomal genes and environmental stimuli affected MarA-mediated antibiotic resistance. Seven genes affected resistance mediated by MarA in an antibiotic-specific way; these were mostly genes encoding unrelated enzymes, transporters, and unknown proteins. Other genes affected MarA-mediated resistance to all antibiotics tested. These genes were acrA, acrB, and tolC (which encode the major MarA-regulated multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC), crp, cyaA, hns, and pcnB (four genes involved in global regulation of gene expression), and the unknown gene damX. The last five genes affected MarA-mediated MDR by altering marA expression or MarA function specifically on acrA. These findings demonstrate that MarA-mediated MDR is regulated at multiple levels by different genes and stimuli, which makes it both complex and fine-tuned and interconnects it with global cell regulation and metabolism. Such a regulation could contribute to the adaptation and spread of MDR strains and may be targeted to treat antibiotic-resistant E. coli and related pathogens.

  5. 顺势疗法药物山金车30C通过上调核苷酸切除修复基因的表达减少紫外线照射后大肠杆菌的DNA损伤%Potential of the homeopathic remedy, Arnica Montana 30C,to reduce DNA damage in Escherichia coli exposed to ultraviolet irradiation through up-regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sreemanti Das; Santu Kumar Saha; Arnab De; Durba Das; Anisur Rahman Khuda-Bukhs

    2012-01-01

    目的:检测高度稀释的顺势疗法药物山金车30C是否能够调节暴露于紫外线照射下的大肠杆菌的核苷酸切除修复基因的表达.方法:大肠杆菌在标准培养基中培养至对数阶段,然后接受亚致死剂量的紫外线照射(25和50 J/m2分别照射22.5和45 s).接受不同剂量紫外线照射的大肠杆菌分别与山金车30C及安慰剂30C共同培养,90 min后检测其DNA损伤情况及氧化应激状态.采用多种方法及指标如彗星实验、梯度凝胶电泳、细胞内活性氧生成及测量其他生物活性指标如过氧化物歧化酶、过氧化氢酶及谷胱甘肽衡量DNA损伤情况及细胞氧化应激状态.逆转录聚合酶链反应检测大肠杆菌细胞紫外线损伤修复基因uvrA、B、C(核苷酸切除修复基因)mRNA的表达情况.结果:接受照射后的大肠杆菌出现了DNA损伤及氧化应激反应,表现为细胞内活性氧生成增加及过氧化物歧化酶、过氧化氢酶和谷胱甘肽活性降低.与安慰剂组相比,山金车30C降低了大肠杆菌的DNA损伤及氧化应激反应,表现为细胞内活性氧生成减少及过氧化物歧化酶、过氧化氢酶和谷胱甘肽活性增强.与对照组相比,山金车30C上调了大肠杆菌细胞紫外线损伤修复基因的表达.结论:山金车30C能够通过上调紫外线损伤修复基因的表达修复紫外线引起的大肠杆菌细胞的DNA损伤,并通过减少细胞内活性氧的生成及调节抗氧化酶活性降低细胞的氧化应激反应.%OBJECTIVE:To examine to what degree an ultra-highly diluted homeopathic remedy,Arnica Montana 30C (AM-30C),used in the treatment of shock and injury,can modulate the expression of nucleotide excision repair genes in Escherichia coii exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation.METHODS:E.coli were cultured to their log phase in a standard Luria-Bertani medium and then exposed to sublethal doses of UV irradiation at 25 and 50 J/m2 for 22.5 and 45 s,respectively.The UV

  6. Long term effects of Escherichia coli mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Shlomo E; Heller, Elimelech D; Leitner, Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most frequently diagnosed causes of bovine mastitis, and is typically associated with acute, clinical mastitis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the long term effects of intramammary infections by E. coli on milk yield and quality, especially milk coagulation. Twenty-four Israeli Holstein cows diagnosed with clinical mastitis due to intramammary infection by E. coli were used in this study. Mean lactation number, days in milk (DIM) and daily milk yield (DMY) at the time of infection was 3.3 ± 1.3, 131.7 days ± 78.6 and 45.7 L ± 8.4, respectively. DMY, milk constituents, somatic cells count (SCC), differential leukocytes count and coagulation parameters were subsequently assessed. Two patterns of inflammation were identified: 'short inflammation', characterized by 15% decrease in DMY and >30 days to reach a new maximum DMY (n = 19). The estimated mean loss of marketable milk during the study was 200 L/cow for 'short inflammation' cases, and 1,500 L/cow for 'long inflammation' ones. Significant differences between 'short' and 'long inflammation' effects were found in almost all parameters studied. Long-term detrimental effects on milk quality were found regardless of clinical or bacteriological cure of affected glands.

  7. Escherichia coli biofilms: Accepting the therapeutic challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trupti Bajpai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infections (UTI′s are a major public health concern globally. Recurrent UTI′s that are predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli′s forms biofilm that is an intracellular, structured bacterial community, enclosed in a self-produced matrix, adherent to an inert, or living surface. Biofilm physiology is characterized by increased tolerance to stress, antibiotics, and immunological defenses, which is at the origin of their resilience in most medical and industrial settings. Materials and Methods: The present prospective study was carried out from December 2013 to May 2014 in the Department of Microbiology of a Teaching Tertiary Care hospital located in central India. A total of 100 consecutive, nonrepetitive E. coli isolates were subjected to biofilm formation study by Christensen′s tube adherence method. All the isolates were also subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method in accordance with the Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute 2013 guidelines. Results and Discussion: Out of the 100 E. coli isolates studied, 62 (62% were positive for biofilm formation. High percentage of resistance was detected in isolates among the male inpatient group. Overall drug resistance was found to be very high among both biofilm as well as nonbiofilm forming isolates indicating excessive drug resistance among both community and hospital organisms. Conclusion: A greater understanding of the nature of biofilm organisms in chronic UTI′s would help in the development of novel and more effective treatments for these problematic diseases.

  8. Expanding ester biosynthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Tashiro, Yohei; Atsumi, Shota

    2014-04-01

    To expand the capabilities of whole-cell biocatalysis, we have engineered Escherichia coli to produce various esters. The alcohol O-acyltransferase (ATF) class of enzyme uses acyl-CoA units for ester formation. The release of free CoA upon esterification with an alcohol provides the free energy to facilitate ester formation. The diversity of CoA molecules found in nature in combination with various alcohol biosynthetic pathways allows for the biosynthesis of a multitude of esters. Small to medium volatile esters have extensive applications in the flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, solvent, paint and coating industries. The present work enables the production of these compounds by designing several ester pathways in E. coli. The engineered pathways generated acetate esters of ethyl, propyl, isobutyl, 2-methyl-1-butyl, 3-methyl-1-butyl and 2-phenylethyl alcohols. In particular, we achieved high-level production of isobutyl acetate from glucose (17.2 g l(-1)). This strategy was expanded to realize pathways for tetradecyl acetate and several isobutyrate esters.

  9. The evolution of the Escherichia coli phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Roy R; Henderson, Ian R

    2012-03-01

    Escherichia coli is familiar to biologists as a classical model system, ubiquitous in molecular biology laboratories around the world. Outside of the laboratory, E. coli strains exist as an almost universal component of the lower-gut flora of humans and animals. Although usually a commensal, E. coli has an alter ego as a pathogen, and is associated with diarrhoeal disease and extra-intestinal infections. The study of E. coli diversity predates the availability of molecular data, with strains initially distinguished by serotyping and metabolic profiling, and genomic diversity illustrated by DNA hybridisation. The quantitative study of E. coli diversity began with the application of multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), and has progressed with the accumulation of nucleotide sequence data, from single genes through multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to whole genome sequencing. Phylogenetic methods have shed light on the processes of genomic evolution in this extraordinarily diverse species, and revealed the origins of pathogenic E. coli strains, including members of the phylogenetically indistinguishable "genus"Shigella. In May and June 2011, an outbreak of haemorrhagic uraemic syndrome in Germany was linked to a strain of enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O104:H4. Application of high-throughput sequencing technologies allowed the genome and origins of the outbreak strain to be characterised in real time as the outbreak was in progress.

  10. The crystal structure Escherichia coli Spy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eunju; Kim, Dong Young; Gross, Carol A; Gross, John D; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2010-11-01

    Escherichia coli spheroplast protein y (EcSpy) is a small periplasmic protein that is homologous with CpxP, an inhibitor of the extracytoplasmic stress response. Stress conditions such as spheroplast formation induce the expression of Spy via the Cpx or the Bae two-component systems in E. coli, though the function of Spy is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of EcSpy, which reveals a long kinked hairpin-like structure of four α-helices that form an antiparallel dimer. The dimer contains a curved oval shape with a highly positively charged concave surface that may function as a ligand binding site. Sequence analysis reveals that Spy is highly conserved over the Enterobacteriaceae family. Notably, three conserved regions that contain identical residues and two LTxxQ motifs are placed at the horizontal end of the dimer structure, stabilizing the overall fold. CpxP also contains the conserved sequence motifs and has a predicted secondary structure similar to Spy, suggesting that Spy and CpxP likely share the same fold.

  11. Completion of DNA replication in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Brian M; Courcelle, Charmain T; Courcelle, Justin

    2014-11-18

    The mechanism by which cells recognize and complete replicated regions at their precise doubling point must be remarkably efficient, occurring thousands of times per cell division along the chromosomes of humans. However, this process remains poorly understood. Here we show that, in Escherichia coli, the completion of replication involves an enzymatic system that effectively counts pairs and limits cellular replication to its doubling point by allowing converging replication forks to transiently continue through the doubling point before the excess, over-replicated regions are incised, resected, and joined. Completion requires RecBCD and involves several proteins associated with repairing double-strand breaks including, ExoI, SbcDC, and RecG. However, unlike double-strand break repair, completion occurs independently of homologous recombination and RecA. In some bacterial viruses, the completion mechanism is specifically targeted for inactivation to allow over-replication to occur during lytic replication. The results suggest that a primary cause of genomic instabilities in many double-strand-break-repair mutants arises from an impaired ability to complete replication, independent from DNA damage.

  12. Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, P S; Griffin, P M

    1998-10-10

    Escherichia coli O157 was first identified as a human pathogen in 1982. One of several Shiga toxin-producing serotypes known to cause human illness, the organism probably evolved through horizontal acquisition of genes for Shiga toxins and other virulence factors. E. coli O157 is found regularly in the faeces of healthy cattle, and is transmitted to humans through contaminated food, water, and direct contact with infected people or animals. Human infection is associated with a wide range of clinical illness, including asymptomatic shedding, non-bloody diarrhoea, haemorrhagic colitis, haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and death. Since laboratory practices vary, physicians need to know whether laboratories in their area routinely test for E. coli O157 in stool specimens. Treatment with antimicrobial agents remains controversial: some studies suggest that treatment may precipitate haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and other studies suggest no effect or even a protective effect. Physicians can help to prevent E. coli O157 infections by counselling patients about the hazards of consuming undercooked ground meat or unpasteurised milk products and juices, and about the importance of handwashing to prevent the spread of diarrhoeal illness, and by informing public-health authorities when they see unusual numbers of cases of bloody diarrhoea or haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

  13. Independence of replisomes in Escherichia coli chromosomalreplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breier, Adam M.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R.

    2005-03-13

    In Escherichia coli DNA replication is carried out by the coordinated action of the proteins within a replisome. After replication initiation, the two bidirectionally oriented replisomes from a single origin are colocalized into higher-order structures termed replication factories. The factory model postulated that the two replisomes are also functionally coupled. We tested this hypothesis by using DNA combing and whole-genome microarrays. Nascent DNA surrounding oriC in single, combed chromosomes showed instead that one replisome, usually the leftward one, was significantly ahead of the other 70% of the time. We next used microarrays to follow replication throughout the genome by measuring DNA copy number. We found in multiple E. coli strains that the replisomes are independent, with the leftward replisome ahead of the rightward one. The size of the bias was strain-specific, varying from 50 to 130 kb in the array results. When we artificially blocked one replisome, the other continued unabated, again demonstrating independence. We suggest an improved version of the factory model that retains the advantages of threading DNA through colocalized replisomes at about equal rates, but allows the cell flexibility to overcome obstacles encountered during elongation.

  14. Biosynthesis of ethylene glycol in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaiwei; Ramos, Kristine Rose M; Valdehuesa, Kris Niño G; Nisola, Grace M; Lee, Won-Keun; Chung, Wook-Jin

    2013-04-01

    Ethylene glycol (EG) is an important platform chemical with steadily expanding global demand. Its commercial production is currently limited to fossil resources; no biosynthesis route has been delineated. Herein, a biosynthesis route for EG production from D-xylose is reported. This route consists of four steps: D-xylose → D-xylonate → 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-D-pentonate → glycoaldehyde → EG. Respective enzymes, D-xylose dehydrogenase, D-xylonate dehydratase, 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-D-pentonate aldolase, and glycoaldehyde reductase, were assembled. The route was implemented in a metabolically engineered Escherichia coli, in which the D-xylose → D-xylulose reaction was prevented by disrupting the D-xylose isomerase gene. The most efficient construct produced 11.7 g L(-1) of EG from 40.0 g L(-1) of D-xylose. Glycolate is a carbon-competing by-product during EG production in E. coli; blockage of glycoaldehyde → glycolate reaction was also performed by disrupting the gene encoding aldehyde dehydrogenase, but from this approach, EG productivity was not improved but rather led to D-xylonate accumulation. To channel more carbon flux towards EG than the glycolate pathway, further systematic metabolic engineering and fermentation optimization studies are still required to improve EG productivity.

  15. Engineering Escherichia coli for methanol conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jonas E N; Meyer, Fabian; Litsanov, Boris; Kiefer, Patrick; Potthoff, Eva; Heux, Stéphanie; Quax, Wim J; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vorholt, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria utilize methanol and other reduced one-carbon compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy. For this purpose, these bacteria evolved a number of specialized enzymes and pathways. Here, we used a synthetic biology approach to select and introduce a set of "methylotrophy genes" into Escherichia coli based on in silico considerations and flux balance analysis to enable methanol dissimilation and assimilation. We determined that the most promising approach allowing the utilization of methanol was the implementation of NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase and the establishment of the ribulose monophosphate cycle by expressing the genes for hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase (Phi). To test for the best-performing enzymes in the heterologous host, a number of enzyme candidates from different donor organisms were selected and systematically analyzed for their in vitro and in vivo activities in E. coli. Among these, Mdh2, Hps and Phi originating from Bacillus methanolicus were found to be the most effective. Labeling experiments using (13)C methanol with E. coli producing these enzymes showed up to 40% incorporation of methanol into central metabolites. The presence of the endogenous glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation pathway of E. coli did not adversely affect the methanol conversion rate. Taken together, the results of this study represent a major advancement towards establishing synthetic methylotrophs by gene transfer.

  16. Survival of Escherichia coli in stormwater biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasena, G I; Deletic, A; McCarthy, D T

    2014-04-01

    Biofilters are widely adopted in Australia for stormwater treatment, but the reported removal of common faecal indicators (such as Escherichia coli (E. coli)) varies from net removal to net leaching. Currently, the underlying mechanisms that govern the faecal microbial removal in the biofilters are poorly understood. Therefore, it is important to study retention and subsequent survival of faecal microorganisms in the biofilters under different biofilter designs and operational characteristics. The current study investigates how E. coli survival is influenced by temperature, moisture content, sunlight exposure and presence of other microorganisms in filter media and top surface sediment. Soil samples were taken from two different biofilters to investigate E. coli survival under controlled laboratory conditions. Results revealed that the presence of other microorganisms and temperature are vital stressors which govern the survival of E. coli captured either in the top surface sediment or filter media, while sunlight exposure and moisture content are important for the survival of E. coli captured in the top surface sediment compared to that of the filter media. Moreover, increased survival was found in the filter media compared to the top sediment, and sand filter media was found be more hostile than loamy sand filter media towards E. coli survival. Results also suggest that the contribution from the tested environmental stressors on E. coli survival in biofilters will be greatly affected by the seasonality and may vary from one site to another.

  17. Siderophore production by uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagrali Manjula

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most frequently encountered problems in ambulatory medicine. The present study was designed to determine siderophore production as the urovirulence factor of Escherichia coli isolated from the patients of UTI. A total of 160 strains of E. coli isolated from urine of patients with clinically diagnosed UTI were included in the study and 50 fecal isolates of E. coli, siderophore production was seen in 156 (97.5%. In 50 fecal isolates, siderophore production was seen in 2 (4%. Siderophore production has been shown to be more frequent in E. coli from patients with UTI, than in fecal isolates. The results suggest that siderophore production positive strains can be considered as UPEC. Thus, although a great deal has been learned regarding E. coli virulence mechanisms in UTI, much remains to be learned and the practical application of our growing understanding of E. coli virulence factors to the prevention and treatment of UTI has to be continued.

  18. Escherichia coli in Europe: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerino Allocati

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli remains one of the most frequent causes of several common bacterial infections in humans and animals. E. coli is the prominent cause of enteritis, urinary tract infection, septicaemia and other clinical infections, such as neonatal meningitis. E. coli is also prominently associated with diarrhoea in pet and farm animals. The therapeutic treatment of E. coli infections is threatened by the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant E. coli strains is increasing worldwide principally due to the spread of mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids. The rise of multidrug-resistant strains of E. coli also occurs in Europe. Therefore, the spread of resistance in E. coli is an increasing public health concern in European countries. This paper summarizes the current status of E. coli strains clinically relevant in European countries. Furthermore, therapeutic interventions and strategies to prevent and control infections are presented and discussed. The article also provides an overview of the current knowledge concerning promising alternative therapies against E. coli diseases.

  19. Escherichia coli as a bioreporter in ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbens, Johan; Dardenne, Freddy; Devriese, Lisa; De Coen, Wim; Blust, Ronny

    2010-11-01

    Ecotoxicological assessment relies to a large extent on the information gathered with surrogate species and the extrapolation of test results across species and different levels of biological organisation. Bacteria have long been used as a bioreporter for genotoxic testing and general toxicity. Today, it is clear that bacteria have the potential for screening of other toxicological endpoints. Escherichia coli has been studied for years; in-depth knowledge of its biochemistry and genetics makes it the most proficient prokaryote for the development of new toxicological assays. Several assays have been designed with E. coli as a bioreporter, and the recent trend to develop novel, better advanced reporters makes bioreporter development one of the most dynamic in ecotoxicology. Based on in-depth knowledge of E. coli, new assays are being developed or existing ones redesigned, thanks to the availability of new reporter genes and new or improved substrates. The technological evolution towards easier and more sensitive detection of different gene products is another important aspect. Often, this requires the redesign of the bacterium to make it compatible with the novel measuring tests. Recent advances in surface chemistry and nanoelectronics open the perspective for advanced reporter based on novel measuring platforms and with an online potential. In this article, we will discuss the use of E. coli-based bioreporters in ecotoxicological applications as well as some innovative sensors awaited for the future.

  20. Cyclomodulins in urosepsis strains of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Damien; Delmas, Julien; Cady, Anne; Robin, Frédéric; Sivignon, Adeline; Oswald, Eric; Bonnet, Richard

    2010-06-01

    Determinants of urosepsis in Escherichia coli remain incompletely defined. Cyclomodulins (CMs) are a growing functional family of toxins that hijack the eukaryotic cell cycle. Four cyclomodulin types are actually known in E. coli: cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNFs), cycle-inhibiting factor (Cif), cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs), and the pks-encoded toxin. In the present study, the distribution of CM-encoding genes and the functionality of these toxins were investigated in 197 E. coli strains isolated from patients with community-acquired urosepsis (n = 146) and from uninfected subjects (n = 51). This distribution was analyzed in relation to the phylogenetic background, clinical origin, and antibiotic resistance of the strains. It emerged from this study that strains harboring the pks island and the cnf1 gene (i) were strongly associated with the B2 phylogroup (P, urosepsis origin (P, urosepsis groups, suggesting that the pks island is more important for the colonization process and the cnf1 gene for virulence. pks- or cnf1-harboring strains were significantly associated with susceptibility to antibiotics (amoxicillin, cotrimoxazole, and quinolones [P, <0.001 to 0.043]). Otherwise, only 6% and 1% of all strains harbored the cdtB and cif genes, respectively, with no particular distribution by phylogenetic background, antimicrobial susceptibility, or clinical origin.

  1. Prokaryotic genome regulation: A revolutionary paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ISHIHAMA, Akira

    2012-01-01

    After determination of the whole genome sequence, the research frontier of bacterial molecular genetics has shifted to reveal the genome regulation under stressful conditions in nature. The gene selectivity of RNA polymerase is modulated after interaction with two groups of regulatory proteins, 7 sigma factors and 300 transcription factors. For identification of regulation targets of transcription factors in Escherichia coli, we have developed Genomic SELEX system and subjected to screening the binding sites of these factors on the genome. The number of regulation targets by a single transcription factor was more than those hitherto recognized, ranging up to hundreds of promoters. The number of transcription factors involved in regulation of a single promoter also increased to as many as 30 regulators. The multi-target transcription factors and the multi-factor promoters were assembled into complex networks of transcription regulation. The most complex network was identified in the regulation cascades of transcription of two master regulators for planktonic growth and biofilm formation. PMID:23138451

  2. Role of wild birds as carriers of multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli and Escherichia vulneris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobrak, Mohammed Y; Abo-Amer, Aly E

    2014-01-01

    Emergence and distribution of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria in environments pose a risk to human and animal health. A total of 82 isolates of Escherichia spp. were recovered from cloacal swabs of migrating and non-migrating wild birds. All bacterial isolates were identified and characterized morphologically and biochemically. 72% and 50% of isolates recovered from non-migrating and migrating birds, respectively, showed positive congo red dye binding (a virulence factor). Also, hemolysin production (a virulence factor) was showed in 8% of isolates recovered from non-migrating birds and 75% of isolates recovered from migrating birds. All isolates recovered from non-migrating birds were found resistant to Oxacillin while all isolates recovered from migrating birds demonstrated resistance to Oxacillin, Chloramphenicol, Oxytetracycline and Lincomycin. Some bacterial isolates recovered from non-migrating birds and migrating birds exhibited MDR phenotype. The MDR isolates were further characterized by API 20E and 16S rRNA as E. coli and E. vulneris. MDR Escherichia isolates contain ~1-5 plasmids of high-molecular weights. Accordingly, wild birds could create a potential threat to human and animal health by transmitting MDR bacteria to water streams and other environmental sources through their faecal residues, and to remote regions by migration.

  3. Intramammary challenge with Escherichia coli following immunization with a curli-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todhunter, D A; Smith, K L; Hogan, J S; Nelson, L

    1991-03-01

    Holstein and Jersey cattle were immunized with a curli-producing strain of Escherichia coli (pCRL65/A012) or a noncurli-producing strain (pUC18/HB101) to determine differences in resistance to establishment of experimental intramammary infection. Cows (n = 6 per group) were immunized at 14 d prior to drying off, 7 d of involution, and at calving with 3 x 10(10) E. coli in Freund's Incomplete Adjuvant. At 30 d of lactation, one mammary quarter of each cow was infused with a wild strain of E. coli (727). Escherichia coli 727 was isolated from a naturally occurring intramammary infection and produced curli. All challenged quarters became infected, and all cows developed acute clinical mastitis. Geometric mean duration of intramammary infections was 6 d for both immunization groups. All infections were spontaneously eliminated within 10 d. No differences occurred between immunization groups in blood selenium and glutathione peroxidase activity, plasma selenium, number of E. coli 727 isolated from secretion after challenge, rectal temperature and SCC response, clinical status of mammary quarters, or DMI. Reduction in milk production after challenge was greater for cows immunized with E. coli pCRL65/A012. Immunization of dairy cattle with a curli-producing strain of E. coli did not protect against experimental intramammary challenge during lactation.

  4. Differentiation between Shigella, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) and noninvasive Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Beld, M J C; Reubsaet, F A G

    2012-06-01

    Shigella causes bacillary dysentery and is classified into four species based on their antigen characteristics. This classification does not reflect genetic relatedness; in fact, Shigella species are so related to Escherichia coli , they should be classified as one distinctive species in the genus Escherichia. The differentiation of Shigella and E. coli is even more complicated with the description of enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC). EIEC are strains that possess some of the biochemical characteristics of E. coli and have the ability to cause dysentery using the same method of invasion as Shigella does. Sequencing of multiple housekeeping genes indicates that EIEC is more related to Shigella than to non-invasive E. coli. Shigella and EIEC evolved from the same ancestor and form a single pathovar within E. coli. Shigella and EIEC could be separated from other E. coli by a PCR targeting the ipaH-gene; this is a multicopy gene exclusively found in all Shigella and EIEC. It is possible to differentiate Shigella and all E. coli, including EIEC, by using multiple tests, including ipaH-gene PCR, physiological and biochemical typing and serological typing. Based on literature study, a key is designed for daily use in diagnostic laboratories to identify Shigella and all E. coli.

  5. ArgR and AhrC are both required for regulation of arginine metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, R; Buist, G; Kuipers, OP; Kok, J

    2004-01-01

    The DNA binding proteins ArgR and AhrC are essential for regulation of arginine metabolism in Escherichia Coli and Bacillus subtilis, respectively. A unique property of these regulators is that they form hexameric protein complexes, mediating repression of arginine biosynthetic pathways as well as a

  6. Microarray analysis of the Ler regulon in enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis E H Bingle

    Full Text Available The type III protein secretion system is an important pathogenicity factor of enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli pathotypes. The genes encoding this apparatus are located on a pathogenicity island (the locus of enterocyte effacement and are transcriptionally activated by the master regulator Ler. In each pathotype Ler is also known to regulate genes located elsewhere on the chromosome, but the full extent of the Ler regulon is unclear, especially for enteropathogenic E. coli. The Ler regulon was defined for two strains of E. coli: E2348/69 (enteropathogenic and EDL933 (enterohaemorrhagic in mid and late log phases of growth by DNA microarray analysis of the transcriptomes of wild-type and ler mutant versions of each strain. In both strains the Ler regulon is focused on the locus of enterocyte effacement - all major transcriptional units of which are activated by Ler, with the sole exception of the LEE1 operon during mid-log phase growth in E2348/69. However, the Ler regulon does extend more widely and also includes unlinked pathogenicity genes: in E2348/69 more than 50 genes outside of this locus were regulated, including a number of known or potential pathogenicity determinants; in EDL933 only 4 extra-LEE genes, again including known pathogenicity factors, were activated. In E2348/69, where the Ler regulon is clearly growth phase dependent, a number of genes including the plasmid-encoded regulator operon perABC, were found to be negatively regulated by Ler. Negative regulation by Ler of PerC, itself a positive regulator of the ler promoter, suggests a negative feedback loop involving these proteins.

  7. Adaptive evolution of the lactose utilization network in experimentally evolved populations of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selwyn Quan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation to novel environments is often associated with changes in gene regulation. Nevertheless, few studies have been able both to identify the genetic basis of changes in regulation and to demonstrate why these changes are beneficial. To this end, we have focused on understanding both how and why the lactose utilization network has evolved in replicate populations of Escherichia coli. We found that lac operon regulation became strikingly variable, including changes in the mode of environmental response (bimodal, graded, and constitutive, sensitivity to inducer concentration, and maximum expression level. In addition, some classes of regulatory change were enriched in specific selective environments. Sequencing of evolved clones, combined with reconstruction of individual mutations in the ancestral background, identified mutations within the lac operon that recapitulate many of the evolved regulatory changes. These mutations conferred fitness benefits in environments containing lactose, indicating that the regulatory changes are adaptive. The same mutations conferred different fitness effects when present in an evolved clone, indicating that interactions between the lac operon and other evolved mutations also contribute to fitness. Similarly, changes in lac regulation not explained by lac operon mutations also point to important interactions with other evolved mutations. Together these results underline how dynamic regulatory interactions can be, in this case evolving through mutations both within and external to the canonical lactose utilization network.

  8. Nitrogen Assimilation in Escherichia coli: Putting Molecular Data into a Systems Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heeswijk, Wally C.; Westerhoff, Hans V.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We present a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical network of intracellular processes revolving around central nitrogen metabolism in Escherichia coli. The hierarchy intertwines transport, metabolism, signaling leading to posttranslational modification, and transcription. The protein components of the network include an ammonium transporter (AmtB), a glutamine transporter (GlnHPQ), two ammonium assimilation pathways (glutamine synthetase [GS]-glutamate synthase [glutamine 2-oxoglutarate amidotransferase {GOGAT}] and glutamate dehydrogenase [GDH]), the two bifunctional enzymes adenylyl transferase/adenylyl-removing enzyme (ATase) and uridylyl transferase/uridylyl-removing enzyme (UTase), the two trimeric signal transduction proteins (GlnB and GlnK), the two-component regulatory system composed of the histidine protein kinase nitrogen regulator II (NRII) and the response nitrogen regulator I (NRI), three global transcriptional regulators called nitrogen assimilation control (Nac) protein, leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp), and cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (Crp), the glutaminases, and the nitrogen-phosphotransferase system. First, the structural and molecular knowledge on these proteins is reviewed. Thereafter, the activities of the components as they engage together in transport, metabolism, signal transduction, and transcription and their regulation are discussed. Next, old and new molecular data and physiological data are put into a common perspective on integral cellular functioning, especially with the aim of resolving counterintuitive or paradoxical processes featured in nitrogen assimilation. Finally, we articulate what still remains to be discovered and what general lessons can be learned from the vast amounts of data that are available now. PMID:24296575

  9. Control of Transposon-Mediated Directed Mutation by the Escherichia coli Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saier, Milton H; Zhang, Zhongge

    2015-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) has been shown to control transport, cell metabolism and gene expression. We here present results supporting the novel suggestion that in certain instances it also regulates the mutation rate. Directed mutations are defined as mutations that occur at higher frequencies when beneficial than when neutral or detrimental. To date, the occurrence of directed point mutations has not been documented and confirmed, but a few examples of transposon-mediated directed mutations have been reported. Here we focus on the first and best-studied example of directed mutation, which involves the regulation of insertion sequence-5 hopping into a specific site upstream of the glpFK glycerol utilization operon in Escherichia coli. This insertional event specifically activates expression of the glpFK operon, allowing the growth of wild-type cells with glycerol as a carbon source in the presence of nonmetabolizable glucose analogues which normally block glycerol utilization. The sugar-transporting PTS controls this process by regulating levels of cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate and cyclic (c)AMP as established in previous publications. Direct involvement of the glycerol repressor, GlpR, and the cAMP receptor protein, Crp, in the regulation of transposon-mediated directed mutation has been demonstrated.

  10. Nanotextile membranes for bacteria Escherichia coli capturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Lev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes an experimental study dealing with the possibility of nanotextile materials usa­ge for microbiologically contaminated water filtration. The aim of the study is to verify filtration ability of different nanotextile materials and evaluate the possibilities of practical usage. Good detention ability of these materials in the air filtration is the presumption for nanotextile to be used for bacteria filtration from a liquid. High nanotextile porosity with the nanotextile pores dimensions smaller than a bacteria size predicates the possibility of a successful usage of these materials. For the experiment were used materials made from electrospinning nanofibres under the label PA612, PUR1, PUR2 s PUR3 on the supporting unwoven textiles (viscose and PP. As a model simulation of the microbial contamination, bacteria Escherichia coli was chosen. Contaminated water was filtered during the overpressure activity of 105Pa on the input side of the filter from the mentioned material. After three-day incubation on the nutrient medium, cultures found in the samples before and after filtration were compared. In the filtrated water, bacteria E. coli were indicated, which did not verify the theoretical presumptions about an absolut bacteria detention. However, used materials caught at least 94% of bacteria in case of material PUR1 and up to 99,996% in case of material PUR2. These results predict the possibility of producing effective nanotextile filters for microbiologically contaminated water filtration.Recommendation: For the production of materials with better filtrating qualities, experiments need to be done, enabling better understanding of the bacteria detention mechanisms on the nanotextile material, and parameters of the used materials that influence the filtrating abilities need to be verified.

  11. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. © 2015 The

  12. Production of glycoprotein vaccines in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihssen Julian

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conjugate vaccines in which polysaccharide antigens are covalently linked to carrier proteins belong to the most effective and safest vaccines against bacterial pathogens. State-of-the art production of conjugate vaccines using chemical methods is a laborious, multi-step process. In vivo enzymatic coupling using the general glycosylation pathway of Campylobacter jejuni in recombinant Escherichia coli has been suggested as a simpler method for producing conjugate vaccines. In this study we describe the in vivo biosynthesis of two novel conjugate vaccine candidates against Shigella dysenteriae type 1, an important bacterial pathogen causing severe gastro-intestinal disease states mainly in developing countries. Results Two different periplasmic carrier proteins, AcrA from C. jejuni and a toxoid form of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin were glycosylated with Shigella O antigens in E. coli. Starting from shake flask cultivation in standard complex medium a lab-scale fed-batch process was developed for glycoconjugate production. It was found that efficiency of glycosylation but not carrier protein expression was highly susceptible to the physiological state at induction. After induction glycoconjugates generally appeared later than unglycosylated carrier protein, suggesting that glycosylation was the rate-limiting step for synthesis of conjugate vaccines in E. coli. Glycoconjugate synthesis, in particular expression of oligosaccharyltransferase PglB, strongly inhibited growth of E. coli cells after induction, making it necessary to separate biomass growth and recombinant protein expression phases. With a simple pulse and linear feed strategy and the use of semi-defined glycerol medium, volumetric glycoconjugate yield was increased 30 to 50-fold. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that glycosylated proteins can be produced in recombinant E. coli at a larger scale. The described methodologies constitute an important step

  13. NORM regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    The author reviews the question of regulation for naturally occuring radioactive material (NORM), and the factors that have made this a more prominent concern today. Past practices have been very relaxed, and have often involved very poor records, the involvment of contractors, and the disposition of contaminated equipment back into commercial service. The rationale behind the establishment of regulations is to provide worker protection, to exempt low risk materials, to aid in scrap recycling, to provide direction for remediation and to examine disposal options. The author reviews existing regulations at federal and state levels, impending legislation, and touches on the issue of site remediation and potential liabilities affecting the release of sites contaminated by NORM.

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis of Protein and mRNA Copy Numbers in Single Escherichia coli Cells with Single-Molecule Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Single-cell proteomic and transcriptomic analysis is an emerging approach for providing quantitative and comprehensive characterization of gene functions in individual cells. This analysis, however, is often hampered by insufficient sensitivity for detecting low copy gene expression products such as transcription factors and regulators. Here I describe a method for the quantitative genome-wide analysis of single-cell protein and mRNA copy numbers with single molecule sensitivity for the model organism Escherichia coli.

  15. Roles of Serine Accumulation and Catabolism in the Colonization of the Murine Urinary Tract by Escherichia coli CFT073▿

    OpenAIRE

    Anfora, Andrew T.; Haugen, Brian J.; Roesch, Paula; Redford, Peter; Welch, Rodney A.

    2007-01-01

    A d-serine deaminase (DsdA) mutant of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain CFT073 has a hypercolonization phenotype in a murine model of urinary tract infection (UTI) due to increased virulence gene expression by an unknown mechanism (B. J. Haugen et al., Infect. Immun. 75:278-289, 2007). DsdC is a d-serine-dependent activator of dsdXA transcription. DsdC may regulate the virulence genes responsible for hypercolonization. The loss of DsdA leads to increased intracellular accumulation of d-se...

  16. A novel dual allosteric activation mechanism of Escherichia coli ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase: the role of pyruvate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías D Asención Diez

    Full Text Available Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate activates ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and the synthesis of glycogen in Escherichia coli. Here, we show that although pyruvate is a weak activator by itself, it synergically enhances the fructose-1,6-bisphosphate activation. They increase the enzyme affinity for each other, and the combination increases Vmax, substrate apparent affinity, and decreases AMP inhibition. Our results indicate that there are two distinct interacting allosteric sites for activation. Hence, pyruvate modulates E. coli glycogen metabolism by orchestrating a functional network of allosteric regulators. We postulate that this novel dual activator mechanism increases the evolvability of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and its related metabolic control.

  17. Effect of overexpressing nhaA and nhaR on sodium tolerance and lactate production in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xianghao; Altman, Ronni; Eiteman, Mark A; Altman, Elliot

    2013-01-01

    Background Like other bacteria, Escherichia coli must carefully regulate the intracellular concentration of sodium ion (Na+). During the bacterial production of any organic acid, cations like Na+ invariably accumulate during a process which must maintain a near neutral pH. In this study, the E. coli nhaA gene encoding the Na+/H+ antiporter membrane protein and the nhaR gene encoding the NhaA regulatory protein were overexpressed in wild-type E. coli MG1655 and in MG1655 pflB (ALS1317) which l...

  18. Construction, Expression, and Characterization of Thymosin Alpha 1 Tandem Repeats in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Chang Xue

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymosin alpha 1 (Tα1, which is composed of 28 amino acids, has been commercialized worldwide for its immune-modulatory and antitumor effects. Tα1 can stimulate T cell proliferation and differentiation from bone marrow stem cells, augment cell-mediated immune responses, and regulate homeostasis of immune system. In this study, we developed a novel strategy to produce Tα1 concatemer (Tα1 in Escherichia coli and compared its activity with chemically synthesized Tα1. Results showed that Tα1 can more effectively stimulate T cell proliferation and significantly upregulate IL-2 receptor expression. We concluded that the expression system for Tα1 concatemer was constructed successfully, which could serve as an efficient tool for the production of large quantities of the active protein.

  19. The Crystal Structure of the Escherichia coli Autoinducer-2 Processing Protein LsrF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Z.; Xavier, K; Miller, S

    2009-01-01

    Many bacteria produce and respond to the quorum sensing signal autoinducer-2 (AI-2). Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium are among the species with the lsr operon, an operon containing AI-2 transport and processing genes that are up regulated in response to AI-2. One of the Lsr proteins, LsrF, has been implicated in processing the phosphorylated form of AI-2. Here, we present the structure of LsrF, unliganded and in complex with two phospho-AI-2 analogues, ribose-5-phosphate and ribulose-5-phosphate. The crystal structure shows that LsrF is a decamer of (??)8-barrels that exhibit a previously unseen N-terminal domain swap and have high structural homology with aldolases that process phosphorylated sugars. Ligand binding sites and key catalytic residues are structurally conserved, strongly implicating LsrF as a class I aldolase.

  20. Anaerobically Grown Escherichia coli Has an Enhanced Mutation Rate and Distinct Mutational Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewaramani, Sonal; Finn, Thomas J.; Kassen, Rees; Rainey, Paul B.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of mutation but little is known about how growth in the absence of oxygen impacts the rate and spectrum of mutations. We employed long-term mutation accumulation experiments to directly measure the rates and spectra of spontaneous mutation events in Escherichia coli populations propagated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To detect mutations, whole genome sequencing was coupled with methods of analysis sufficient to identify a broad range of mutational classes, including structural variants (SVs) generated by movement of repetitive elements. The anaerobically grown populations displayed a mutation rate nearly twice that of the aerobic populations, showed distinct asymmetric mutational strand biases, and greater insertion element activity. Consistent with mutation rate and spectra observations, genes for transposition and recombination repair associated with SVs were up-regulated during anaerobic growth. Together, these results define differences in mutational spectra affecting the evolution of facultative anaerobes. PMID:28103245

  1. Co-translational membrane association of the Escherichia coli SRP receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovich-Kinori, Adi; Bibi, Eitan

    2015-04-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) receptor is a major player in the pathway of membrane protein biogenesis in all organisms. The receptor functions as a membrane-bound entity but very little is known about its targeting to the membrane. Here, we demonstrate in vivo that the Escherichia coli SRP receptor targets the membrane co-translationally. This requires emergence from the ribosome of the four-helix-long N-domain of the receptor, of which only helices 2-4 are required for co-translational membrane attachment. The results also suggest that the targeting might be regulated co-translationally. Taken together, our in vivo studies shed light on the biogenesis of the SRP receptor and its hypothetical role in targeting ribosomes to the E. coli membrane.

  2. Division genes in Escherichia coli are expressed coordinately to cell septum requirements by gearbox promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, M; Garrido, T; Pla, J; Vicente, M

    1990-11-01

    The cell division ftsQAZ cluster and the ftsZ-dependent bolA morphogene of Escherichia coli are found to be driven by gearboxes, a distinct class of promoters characterized by showing an activity that is inversely dependent on growth rate. These promoters contain specific sequences upstream from the mRNA start point, and their -10 region is essential for the inverse growth rate dependence. Gearbox promoters are essential for driving ftsQAZ and bolA gene expression so that the encoded products are synthesized at constant amounts per cell independently of cell size. This mode of regulation would be expected for the expression of proteins that either play a regulatory role in cell division or form a stoichiometric component of the septum, a structure that, independently of cell size and growth rate, is produced once per cell cycle.

  3. Posttranslationally caused bioluminescence burst of the Escherichia coli luciferase reporter strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideguchi, Yamato; Oshikoshi, Yuta; Ryo, Masashi; Motoki, Shogo; Kuwano, Takashi; Tezuka, Takafumi; Aoki, Setsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We continuously monitored bioluminescence from a wild-type reporter strain of Escherichia coli (lacp::luc+/WT), which carries the promoter of the lac operon (lacp) fused with the firefly luciferase gene (luc+). This strain showed a bioluminescence burst when shifted into the stationary growth phase. Bioluminescence profiles of other wild-type reporter strains (rpsPp::luc+ and argAp::luc+) and gene-deletion reporter strains (lacp::luc+/crp- and lacp::luc+/lacI-) indicate that transcriptional regulation is not responsible for generation of the burst. Consistently, changes in the luciferase protein levels did not recapitulate the profile of the burst. On the other hand, dissolved oxygen levels increased over the period across the burst, suggesting that the burst is, at least partially, caused by an increase in intracellular oxygen levels. We discuss limits of the firefly luciferase when used as a reporter for gene expression and its potential utility for monitoring metabolic changes in cells.

  4. Structure and function of Escherichia coli met repressor: similarities and contrasts with trp repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, S E; Stockley, P G

    1996-04-29

    Transcription of genes encoding enzymes for the biosynthesis of methionine and trytophan in Escherichia coli is regulated by the ligand-activated met and trp repressors. X-ray crystallographic studies show how these two small proteins, although similar in size and function, have totally different three-dimensional structures and specifically recognize their respective DNA operator sequences in different ways. A common feature is that both repressors bind as cooperative arrays to tandem repeats of 8 base-pair 'Met' or 'Trp boxes' respectively, and the consensus sequences share the rare tetranucleotide CTAG. A series of structural and functional studies have shown how the two repressors discriminate between their operators, using a combination of direct contacts between side chains and bases, and indirect sensing of conformational properties of the DNA.

  5. Depiction of metabolome changes in histidine-starved Escherichia coli by CE-TOFMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Yoshiaki; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Ishikawa, Takamasa; Nakamura, Seira; Shimizu, Kaori; Ueno, Yuki; Tomita, Masaru; Soga, Tomoyoshi

    2008-02-01

    Metabolic changes in response to histidine starvation were observed in histidine-auxotrophic Escherichia coli using a capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS)-based metabolomics technique. Prior to the analysis, we prepared an E. coli metabolome list of 727 metabolites reported in the literature. An improved method for metabolite extraction was developed, which resulted in higher extraction efficiency in phosphate-rich metabolites, e.g., ATP and GTP. Based on the results, 375 charged, hydrophilic intermediates in primary metabolisms were analysed simultaneously, providing quantitative data of 198 metabolites. We confirmed that the intracellular levels of intermediates in histidine biosynthesis are rapidly accumulated in response to a drop in histidine level under histidine-starved conditions. Simultaneously, disciplined responses were observed in the glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis pathways as regulated by amino acid starvation.

  6. Production of Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate-co-3-Hydroxyhexanoate) by Aeromonas hydrophila and Recombinant Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丘远征; 刘力平; 陈国强

    2003-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila (A.hydrophila) 4AK4 produced poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3- hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) with an almost constant 3-hydroxyhexanoate (3HHx) content of 10%-15% from lauric acid and/or soybean oil.Both A.hydrophila 4AK4 and recombinant Escherichia coli (E.coli) JMU193 (pBH32) produced PHBHHx with controllable 3HHx content when fed lauric acid and another co-substrate.With glucose or gluconate as the co-substrate, the 3HHx content in the copolyester produced by A.hydrophila 4AK4 was reduced slightly from 12% to 9%.However, the 3HHx content in the copolyester produced by E.coli JMU193 (pBH32) was significantly reduced from 9% to 2% with fructose as the co-substrate.These results show that regulation of 3HHx content in PHBHHx can be achieved using genetically engineered E.coli.

  7. The EcoCyc database: reflecting new knowledge about Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keseler, Ingrid M; Mackie, Amanda; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Billington, Richard; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Caspi, Ron; Fulcher, Carol; Gama-Castro, Socorro; Kothari, Anamika; Krummenacker, Markus; Latendresse, Mario; Muñiz-Rascado, Luis; Ong, Quang; Paley, Suzanne; Peralta-Gil, Martin; Subhraveti, Pallavi; Velázquez-Ramírez, David A; Weaver, Daniel; Collado-Vides, Julio; Paulsen, Ian; Karp, Peter D

    2017-01-04

    EcoCyc (EcoCyc.org) is a freely accessible, comprehensive database that collects and summarizes experimental data for Escherichia coli K-12, the best-studied bacterial model organism. New experimental discoveries about gene products, their function and regulation, new metabolic pathways, enzymes and cofactors are regularly added to EcoCyc. New SmartTable tools allow users to browse collections of related EcoCyc content. SmartTables can also serve as repositories for user- or curator-generated lists. EcoCyc now supports running and modifying E. coli metabolic models directly on the EcoCyc website. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Modeling the role of covalent enzyme modification in Escherichia coli nitrogen metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Philip B.; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2010-03-01

    In the bacterium Escherichia coli, the enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) converts ammonium into the amino acid glutamine. GS is principally active when the cell is experiencing nitrogen limitation, and its activity is regulated by a bicyclic covalent modification cascade. The advantages of this bicyclic-cascade architecture are poorly understood. We analyze a simple model of the GS cascade in comparison to other regulatory schemes and conclude that the bicyclic cascade is suboptimal for maintaining metabolic homeostasis of the free glutamine pool. Instead, we argue that the lag inherent in the covalent modification of GS slows the response to an ammonium shock and thereby allows GS to transiently detoxify the cell, while maintaining homeostasis over longer times.

  9. Adaptive Laboratory Evolution of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 for Growth at High Hydrostatic Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki eMarietou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Much of microbial life on Earth grows and reproduces under the elevated hydrostatic pressure conditions that exist in deep-ocean and deep-subsurface environments. In this study adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE experiments were conducted to investigate the possible modification of the piezosensitive Escherichia coli for improved growth at high pressure. After approximately 500 generations of selection, a strain was isolated that acquired the ability to grow at pressure non-permissive for the parental strain. Remarkably, this strain displayed growth properties and changes in the proportion and regulation of unsaturated fatty acids that indicated the acquisition of multiple piezotolerant properties. These changes developed concomitantly with a change in the gene encoding the acyl carrier protein, which is required for fatty acid synthesis.

  10. Mutational analysis of the nucleotide binding site of Escherichia coli dCTP deaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thymark, Majbritt; Johansson, Eva; Larsen, Sine;

    2007-01-01

    In Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium about 80% of the dUMP used for dTMP synthesis is derived from deamination of dCTP. The dCTP deaminase produces dUTP that subsequently is hydrolyzed by dUTPase to dUMP and diphosphate. The dCTP deaminase is regulated by dTTP that inhibits the enzyme...... of E138D in complex with dUTP showed a hydrogen bonding network in the active site similar to wild-type enzyme. However, changes in the hydrogen bond lengths between the carboxylate and a catalytic water molecule as well as a slightly different orientation of the pyrimidine ring of the bound nucleotide...

  11. Implications of alpha-amylase production and beta-glucuronidase expression in Escherichia coli strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldini, G; Strappini, C; Trotta, F; Cenci, G

    1999-01-01

    Two Escherichia coli strains in which alpha-amylase production differed were used to study in depth some characteristics related to beta-glucuronidase induction by starch. The beta-glucuronidase background activity in Luria broth medium was comparable for the two isolates, but only amylase positive S1 was able to grow on starch molecules supplied as the sole carbon source. In this case growth resulted at higher beta-glucuronidase levels (p beta-glucuronidase activity of amylase negative M94 remained unchanged during starvation on starch medium, but an induced response was observed with methylumbelliferyl-glucuronide. These results further support the hypothesis that starch metabolism is involved in the complex beta-glucuronidase regulation of E. coli strains. This is relevant not only for basic research but also to investigating gut microbial enzymology.

  12. Transfer of phosphoethanolamine residues from phosphatidylethanolamine to the membrane-derived oligosaccharides of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K J; Kennedy, E P

    1987-01-01

    The membrane-derived oligosaccharides (MDO) of Escherichia coli are periplasmic constituents composed of glucose residues linked by beta-1,2 and beta-1,6 glycosidic bonds. MDO are substituted with phosphoglycerol, phosphoethanolamine, and succinic acid moieties. The phosphoglycerol residues present on MDO are derived from phosphatidylglycerol (B. J. Jackson and E. P. Kennedy, J. Biol. Chem. 258:2394-2398, 1983), but evidence as to the source of the phosphoethanolamine residues has been lacking. We now report that phosphatidylethanolamine, exogenously added to intact cells of E. coli, provides a source of phosphoethanolamine residues that are transferred to MDO. The biosynthesis of phosphoethanolamine-labeled MDO is osmotically regulated, with maximum synthesis occurring during growth in medium of low osmolarity. PMID:3542966

  13. Free RCK arrangement in Kch, a putative escherichia coli potassium channel, as suggested by electron crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Qie; Purhonen, Pasi; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Koeck, Philip J B; Hebert, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-gated potassium channels are stimulated by various kinds of messengers. Previous studies showed that ligand-gated potassium channels containing RCK domains (the regulator of the conductance of potassium ion) form a dimer of tetramer structure through the RCK octameric gating ring in the presence of detergent. Here, we have analyzed the structure of Kch, a channel of this type from Escherichia coli, in a lipid environment using electron crystallography. By combining information from the 3D map of the transmembrane part of the protein and docking of an atomic model of a potassium channel, we conclude that the RCK domains face the solution and that an RCK octameric gating ring arrangement does not form under our crystallization condition. Our findings may be applied to other potassium channels that have an RCK gating ring arrangement.

  14. GlnB is specifically required for Azospirillum brasilense NifA activity in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Luiza M; Monteiro, Rose A; Souza, Emanuel M; Steffens, M Berenice R; Rigo, Liu U; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Chubatsu, Leda S

    2004-01-01

    The Azospirillum brasilense transcription regulator NifA and the nitrogen-status signaling proteins GlnB, GlnZ and GlnK were expressed in Escherichia coli and analyzed for their ability to activate nif gene expression. When expressed separately, none of the proteins were able to activate nifH promoter expression in any tested conditions; in contrast, nifH expression was observed in cells grown in the absence of ammonium and oxygen and when expressing simultaneously NifA and GlnB proteins, but not when expressing NifA and GlnZ or GlnK. Our results show that the GlnB protein is required for transcription activation by Azospirillum brasilense NifA and it cannot be replaced by GlnZ or GlnK.

  15. Genome-wide Escherichia coli stress response and improved tolerance towards industrially relevant chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rau, Martin Holm; Calero Valdayo, Patricia; Lennen, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    of transcription changes within and between chemical groups, with functions such as energy metabolism, stress response, membrane modification, transporters and iron metabolism being affected. Regulon enrichment analysis identified key regulators likely mediating the transcriptional response, including CRP, Rpo...... approach was employed to understand the chemical stress response of Escherichia coli, including a genome-wide screen for mutants with increased fitness during chemical stress. Twelve chemicals with significant production potential were selected, consisting of organic solvent-like chemicals (butanol...... stress identified 294 enriched and 336 depleted mutants and experimental validation revealed up to 60 % increase in mutant growth rates. Mutants enriched in several conditions contained, among others, insertions in genes of the Mar-Sox-Rob regulon as well as transcription and translation related gene...

  16. Automated Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography System for Enrichment of Escherichia coli Phosphoproteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Yi; Wu, Si; Zhao, Rui; Zink, Erika M.; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Meng, Da; Clauss, Therese RW; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2013-06-05

    Enrichment of bacterial phosphopeptides is an essential step prior to bottom-up mass spectrometry-based analysis of the phosphoproteome, which is fundamental to understanding the role of phosphoproteins in cell signaling and regulation of protein activity. We developed an automated IMAC system to enrich strong cation exchange-fractionated phosphopeptides from the soluble proteome of Escherichia coli MG1655 grown on minimal medium. Initial demonstration of the system resulted in identification of 75 phosphopeptides covering 52 phosphoproteins. Consistent with previous studies, many of these phosphoproteins are involved in the carbohydrate portion of central metabolism. The automated system utilizes a large capacity IMAC column that can effectively enrich phosphopeptides from a bacterial sample by increasing peptide loading and reducing the wash time. An additional benefit of the automated IMAC system is reduced labor and associated costs.

  17. Lysogeny with Shiga toxin 2-encoding bacteriophages represses type III secretion in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuefang; McAteer, Sean P; Tree, Jai J; Shaw, Darren J; Wolfson, Eliza B K; Beatson, Scott A; Roe, Andrew J; Allison, Lesley J; Chase-Topping, Margo E; Mahajan, Arvind; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Woolhouse, Mark E J; Morabito, Stefano; Gally, David L

    2012-01-01

    Lytic or lysogenic infections by bacteriophages drive the evolution of enteric bacteria. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) have recently emerged as a significant zoonotic infection of humans with the main serotypes carried by ruminants. Typical EHEC strains are defined by the expression of a type III secretion (T3S) system, the production of Shiga toxins (Stx) and association with specific clinical symptoms. The genes for Stx are present on lambdoid bacteriophages integrated into the E. coli genome. Phage type (PT) 21/28 is the most prevalent strain type linked with human EHEC infections in the United Kingdom and is more likely to be associated with cattle shedding high levels of the organism than PT32 strains. In this study we have demonstrated that the majority (90%) of PT 21/28 strains contain both Stx2 and Stx2c phages, irrespective of source. This is in contrast to PT 32 strains for which only a minority of strains contain both Stx2 and 2c phages (28%). PT21/28 strains had a lower median level of T3S compared to PT32 strains and so the relationship between Stx phage lysogeny and T3S was investigated. Deletion of Stx2 phages from EHEC strains increased the level of T3S whereas lysogeny decreased T3S. This regulation was confirmed in an E. coli K12 background transduced with a marked Stx2 phage followed by measurement of a T3S reporter controlled by induced levels of the LEE-encoded regulator (Ler). The presence of an integrated Stx2 phage was shown to repress Ler induction of LEE1 and this regulation involved the CII phage regulator. This repression could be relieved by ectopic expression of a cognate CI regulator. A model is proposed in which Stx2-encoding bacteriophages regulate T3S to co-ordinate epithelial cell colonisation that is promoted by Stx and secreted effector proteins.

  18. Lysogeny with Shiga toxin 2-encoding bacteriophages represses type III secretion in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefang Xu

    Full Text Available Lytic or lysogenic infections by bacteriophages drive the evolution of enteric bacteria. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC have recently emerged as a significant zoonotic infection of humans with the main serotypes carried by ruminants. Typical EHEC strains are defined by the expression of a type III secretion (T3S system, the production of Shiga toxins (Stx and association with specific clinical symptoms. The genes for Stx are present on lambdoid bacteriophages integrated into the E. coli genome. Phage type (PT 21/28 is the most prevalent strain type linked with human EHEC infections in the United Kingdom and is more likely to be associated with cattle shedding high levels of the organism than PT32 strains. In this study we have demonstrated that the majority (90% of PT 21/28 strains contain both Stx2 and Stx2c phages, irrespective of source. This is in contrast to PT 32 strains for which only a minority of strains contain both Stx2 and 2c phages (28%. PT21/28 strains had a lower median level of T3S compared to PT32 strains and so the relationship between Stx phage lysogeny and T3S was investigated. Deletion of Stx2 phages from EHEC strains increased the level of T3S whereas lysogeny decreased T3S. This regulation was confirmed in an E. coli K12 background transduced with a marked Stx2 phage followed by measurement of a T3S reporter controlled by induced levels of the LEE-encoded regulator (Ler. The presence of an integrated Stx2 phage was shown to repress Ler induction of LEE1 and this regulation involved the CII phage regulator. This repression could be relieved by ectopic expression of a cognate CI regulator. A model is proposed in which Stx2-encoding bacteriophages regulate T3S to co-ordinate epithelial cell colonisation that is promoted by Stx and secreted effector proteins.

  19. Few regulatory metabolites coordinate expression of central metabolic genes in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanowski, Karl; Gerosa, Luca; Brunner, Simon F; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Nikolaev, Yaroslav V; Sauer, Uwe

    2017-01-03

    Transcription networks consist of hundreds of transcription factors with thousands of often overlapping target genes. While we can reliably measure gene expression changes, we still understand relatively little why expression changes the way it does. How does a coordinated response emerge in such complex networks and how many input signals are necessary to achieve it? Here, we unravel the regulatory program of gene expression in Escherichia coli central carbon metabolism with more than 30 known transcription factors. Using a library of fluorescent transcriptional reporters, we comprehensively quantify the activity of central metabolic promoters in 26 environmental conditions. The expression patterns were dominated by growth rate-dependent global regulation for most central metabolic promoters in concert with highly condition-specific activation for only few promoters. Using an approximate mathematical description of promoter activity, we dissect the contribution of global and specific transcriptional regulation. About 70% of the total variance in promoter activity across conditions was explained by global transcriptional regulation. Correlating the remaining specific transcriptional regulation of each promoter with the cell's metabolome response across the same conditions identified potential regulatory metabolites. Remarkably, cyclic AMP, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, and fructose-1-phosphate alone explained most of the specific transcriptional regulation through their interaction with the two major transcription factors Crp and Cra. Thus, a surprisingly simple regulatory program that relies on global transcriptional regulation and input from few intracellular metabolites appears to be sufficient to coordinate E. coli central metabolism and explain about 90% of the experimentally observed transcription changes in 100 genes. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  20. Transcriptional effects of CRP* expression in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Debashis

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli exhibits diauxic growth in sugar mixtures due to CRP-mediated catabolite repression and inducer exclusion related to phosphotransferase system enzyme activity. Replacement of the native crp gene with a catabolite repression mutant (referred to as crp* enables co-utilization of glucose and other sugars in E. coli. While previous studies have examined the effects of expressing CRP* mutants on the expression of specific catabolic genes, little is known about the global transcriptional effects of CRP* expression. In this study, we compare the transcriptome of E. coli W3110 (expressing wild-type CRP to that of mutant strain PC05 (expressing CRP* in the presence and absence of glucose. Results The glucose effect is significantly suppressed in strain PC05 relative to strain W3110. The expression levels of glucose-sensitive genes are generally not altered by glucose to the same extent in strain PCO5 as compared to W3110. Only 23 of the 80 genes showing significant differential expression in the presence of glucose for strain PC05 are present among the 418 genes believed to be directly regulated by CRP. Genes involved in central carbon metabolism (including several TCA cycle genes and amino acid biosynthesis, as well as genes encoding nutrient transport systems are among those whose transcript levels are most significantly affected by CRP* expression. We present a detailed transcription analysis and relate these results to phenotypic differences between strains expressing wild-type CRP and CRP*. Notably, CRP* expression in the presence of glucose results in an elevated intracellular NADPH concentration and reduced NADH concentration relative to wild-type CRP. Meanwhile, a more drastic decrease in the NADPH/NADP+ ratio is observed for the case of CRP* expression in strains engineered to reduce xylose to xylitol via a heterologously expressed, NADPH-dependent xylose reductase. Altered expression levels of

  1. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical. Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  2. Viabilidad de Escherichia coli en presencia De diferentes contaminantes

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Rivera T,; Edith Chávez B.; Gisela Rendón A.; Silvia Giono C

    2006-01-01

    La contaminación en ríos condiciona la presencia de microorganismos adaptados al ecosistema entre ellos a pató-genos de importancia en salud pública. Objetivo: Determinar la viabilidad de Escherichia coli en presencia de nitrato de plata, carbonato de amonio, fenol y formaldehído. Materiales y métodos: Se tomaron muestras de agua del río Alseseca, que luego se sembró en medios de cultivo selectivos para enterobacterias, seleccionándose las colonias del género Escherichia, las cuales fueron se...

  3. Characterization of the sensor domain of QseE histidine kinase from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Kwon Joo; Park, Jin-Wan; Kim, Eun-Hee; Jeon, Young Ho; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Cheong, Hae-Kap

    2016-10-01

    In enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), the QseEF two-component system causes attaching and effacing (AE) lesion on epithelial cells. QseE histidine kinase senses the host hormone epinephrine, sulfate, and phosphate; it also regulates QseF response regulator, which activates LEE gene that encodes AE lesion. In order to understand the recognition of ligand molecules and signal transfer mechanism in pathogenic bacteria, structural studies of the sensor domain of QseE of Escherichia coli should be conducted. In this study, we describe the overexpression, purification, and structural and biophysical properties of the sensor domain of QseE. The fusion protein had a 6×His tag at its N-terminus; this protein was overexpressed as inclusion bodies in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The protein was denatured in 7M guanidine hydrochloride and refolded by dialysis. The purification of the refolded protein was carried out using Ni-NTA affinity column and size-exclusion chromatography. Thereafter, the characteristics of the refolded protein were determined from NMR, CD, and MALS spectroscopies. In a pH range of 7.4-5.0, the folded protein existed in a monomeric form with a predominantly helical structure. (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR spectra shows that approximately 93% backbone amide peaks are detected at pH 5.0, suggesting that the number of backbone signals is sufficient for NMR studies. These data might provide an opportunity for structural and functional studies of the sensor domain of QseE.

  4. Detection of virulence factors of Uropathoigenic Escherichia coli isolates from infertile women high vaginal swabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Safarpourdehkourdi

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The high vaginal Escherichia coli harbored certain virulence genes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains. The urinary tract infections should be treated well to diminish its upstream transfer into vagina. Some more investigation should be perform for identifying the epidemiological aspects of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in high vaginal part of infertile women.

  5. 76 FR 72331 - Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products AGENCY: Food Safety and Inspection Service... methods for controlling non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in raw, intact and non-intact beef... Escherichia coli in raw, intact and non-intact beef products and product components on or before December...

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Escherichia Phage ADB-2 Isolated from a Fecal Sample of Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhensdadia, D V; Bhimani, H D; Rawal, C M; Kothari, V V; Raval, V H; Kothari, C R; Patel, A B; Bhatt, V D; Parmar, N R; Sajnani, M R; Koringa, P G; Joshi, C G; Singh, S P; Kothari, R K

    2013-03-14

    Escherichia phage ADB-2 was isolated from a chicken fecal sample. It is a virulent phage and shows effective inhibition of Escherichia coli strains. Here we announce the completely sequenced genome of Escherichia phage ADB-2, and major findings from its annotation are described.

  7. ESCHERICHIA COLI REDOX MUTANTS AS MICROBIAL CELL FACTORIES FOR THE SYNTHESIS OF REDUCED BIOCHEMICALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena A. Ruiz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioprocesses conducted under conditions with restricted O2 supply are increasingly exploited for the synthesis of reduced biochemicals using different biocatalysts. The model facultative aerobe Escherichia coli, the microbial cell factory par excellence, has elaborate sensing and signal transduction mechanisms that respond to the availability of electron acceptors and alternative carbon sources in the surrounding environment. In particular, the ArcBA and CreBC two-component signal transduction systems are largely responsible for the metabolic regulation of redox control in response to O2 availability and carbon source utilization, respectively. Significant advances in the understanding of the biochemical, genetic, and physiological duties of these regulatory systems have been achieved in recent years. This situation allowed to rationally-design novel engineering approaches that ensure optimal carbon and energy flows within central metabolism, as well as to manipulate redox homeostasis, in order to optimize the production of industrially-relevant metabolites. In particular, metabolic flux analysis provided new clues to understand the metabolic regulation mediated by the ArcBA and CreBC systems. Genetic manipulation of these regulators proved useful for designing microbial cells factories tailored for the synthesis of reduced biochemicals with added value, such as poly(3-hydroxybutyrate, under conditions with restricted O2 supply. This network-wide strategy is in contrast with traditional metabolic engineering approaches, that entail direct modification of the pathway(s at stake, and opens new avenues for the targeted modulation of central catabolic pathways at the transcriptional level.

  8. Defects in Polynucleotide phosphorylase impairs virulence in Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia eHu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase is reported to regulate virulence in Salmonella, Yersinia spp. and Campylobacter jejuni, yet its role in Escherichia coli O157:H7 has not been investigated. To gain insights into its roles in E. coli O157:H7 virulence, pnp deletion mutants were generated and the major virulence factors were compared to their parental wild type strains. Deletion of pnp in E. coli O157:H7 dramatically decreased stx2 mRNA expression and Stx2 protein production, and impaired lambdoid prophage activation in E. coli O157:H7. Quantitative PCR further confirmed that the Stx2 phage lytic growth was repressed by pnp deletion. Consistent with reduced Stx2 production and Stx2 phage activation, the transcriptional levels of genes involved in phage lysis and replication were down-regulated. In addition, disruption of pnp in E. coli O157:H7 decreased its adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells as well as cattle colonic explant tissues. On the other hand, PNPase inactivation in E. coli O157:H7 enhanced Tir protein content and the transcription of type three secretion system components, including genes encoding intimin, Tir and EspB as well as LEE positive regulator, Ler. Collectively, data indicate that PNPase has pleiotropic effects on the virulence of E. coli O157:H7.

  9. Characterization of Escherichia coli MG1655 grown in a low-shear modeled microgravity environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierson Duane L

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extra-cellular shear force is an important environmental parameter that is significant both medically and in the space environment. Escherichia coli cells grown in a low-shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG environment produced in a high aspect rotating vessel (HARV were subjected to transcriptional and physiological analysis. Results Aerobic LSMMG cultures were grown in rich (LB and minimal (MOPS + glucose medium with a normal gravity vector HARV control. Reproducible changes in transcription were seen, but no specific LSMMG responsive genes were identified. Instead, absence of shear and a randomized gravity vector appears to cause local extra-cellular environmental changes, which elicit reproducible cellular responses. In minimal media, the majority of the significantly up- or down-regulated genes of known function were associated with the cell envelope. In rich medium, most LSMMG down-regulated genes were involved in translation. No observable changes in post-culture stress responses and antibiotic sensitivity were seen in cells immediately after exposure to LSMMG. Comparison with earlier studies of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium conducted under similar growth conditions, revealed essentially no similarity in the genes that were significantly up- or down-regulated. Conclusion Comparison of these results to previous studies suggests that different organisms may dramatically differ in their responses to medically significant low-shear and space environments. Depending on their specific response, some organisms, such as Salmonella, may become preadapted in a manner that predisposes them to increased virulence.

  10. Engineering artificial small RNAs for conditional gene silencing in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vandana; Yamamura, Asami; Yokobayashi, Yohei

    2012-01-20

    It has become increasingly evident that noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs) play a significant and global role in bacterial gene regulation. A majority of the trans-acting sRNAs in bacteria interact with the 5' untranslated region (UTR) and/or the translation initiation region of the targeted mRNAs via imperfect base pairing, resulting in reduced translation efficiency and/or mRNA stability. Additionally, bacterial sRNAs often contain distinct scaffolds that recruit RNA chaperones such as Hfq to facilitate gene regulation. In this study, we describe a strategy to engineer artificial sRNAs that can regulate desired endogenous genes in Escherichia coli. Using a fluorescent reporter gene that was translationally fused to a native 5' mRNA leader sequence, active artificial sRNAs were screened from libraries in which natural sRNA scaffolds were fused to a randomized antisense domain. Artificial sRNAs that posttranscriptionally repress two endogenous genes ompF and fliC were isolated and characterized. We anticipate that the artificial sRNAs will be useful for dynamic control and fine-tuning of endogenous gene expression in bacteria for applications in synthetic biology.

  11. Proteomic analysis of the immune response of the silkworm infected by Escherichia coli and Bacillus bombyseptieus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Wu Zhong; Ping Zhao; Yong Zou; Hong-Yi Nie; Qi-Ying Yi; Qing-You Xia; Zhong-Huai Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The silkworm,Bombyx mori,is an economically important insect with a 5 000-year history of domestication.During evolution,the silkworm has developed highly effective defenses against invasion and parasitization by microorganisms.In this study,two microorganisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus bombyseptieus were orally infected to silkworm larvae.After infection with E.coli and B.bombyseptieus for 24 h,we investigated the polypeptide changes in the hemolymph,midgut and integument using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry.Forty-seven differentially expressed proteins were identified in these tissues.They belonged to a variety of functional classes,including immune proteins,metabolic proteins and structural proteins.Compared with controls,E.coli-infected silkworms showed 21 upregulated proteius,25 down-regulated proteins and lost one protein.After infection with B.bombyseptieus,silkworms showed 15 up-regulated proteins,27 down-regulated proteins,lost three proteins and retained two proteins unchanged.We speculate that all these proteins may play a role in the silkworm immune response,although it is unclear why and how the two kinds of bacteria can so markedly alter expression of these proteins.These resuits offer valuable insights for measuring the proteomic responses of the silkworm innate immune mechanism.

  12. Proteomic analysis of beryllium-induced genotoxicity in an Escherichia coli mutant model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-McCabe, Kirsten J; Wang, Zaolin; Sauer, Nancy N; Marrone, Babetta L

    2006-03-01

    Beryllium is the second lightest metal, has a high melting point and high strength-to-weight ratio, and is chemically stable. These unique chemical characteristics make beryllium metal an ideal choice as a component material for a wide variety of applications in aerospace, defense, nuclear weapons, and industry. However, inhalation of beryllium dust or fumes induces significant health effects, including chronic beryllium disease and lung cancer. In this study, the mutagenicity of beryllium sulfate (BeSO(4)) and the comutagenicity of beryllium with a known mutagen 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) were evaluated using a forward mutant detection system developed in Escherichia coli. In this system, BeSO(4) was shown to be weakly mutagenic alone and significantly enhanced the mutagenicity of MNNG up to 3.5-fold over MNNG alone. Based on these results a proteomic study was conducted to identify the proteins regulated by BeSO(4). Using the techniques of 2-DE and oMALDI-TOF MS, we successfully identified 32 proteins being differentially regulated by beryllium and/or MNNG in the E. coli test system. This is the first study to describe the proteins regulated by beryllium in vitro, and the results suggest several potential pathways for the focus of further research into the mechanisms underlying beryllium-induced genotoxicity.

  13. Chromatin structure regulates gene conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Jason Cummings

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Homology-directed repair is a powerful mechanism for maintaining and altering genomic structure. We asked how chromatin structure contributes to the use of homologous sequences as donors for repair using the chicken B cell line DT40 as a model. In DT40, immunoglobulin genes undergo regulated sequence diversification by gene conversion templated by pseudogene donors. We found that the immunoglobulin Vlambda pseudogene array is characterized by histone modifications associated with active chromatin. We directly demonstrated the importance of chromatin structure for gene conversion, using a regulatable experimental system in which the heterochromatin protein HP1 (Drosophila melanogaster Su[var]205, expressed as a fusion to Escherichia coli lactose repressor, is tethered to polymerized lactose operators integrated within the pseudo-Vlambda donor array. Tethered HP1 diminished histone acetylation within the pseudo-Vlambda array, and altered the outcome of Vlambda diversification, so that nontemplated mutations rather than templated mutations predominated. Thus, chromatin structure regulates homology-directed repair. These results suggest that histone modifications may contribute to maintaining genomic stability by preventing recombination between repetitive sequences.

  14. Antibiotic treatment of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Morten; Scheutz, Flemming; Villumsen, Steen;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A consensus has existed on not to treat verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC)-infected individuals with antibiotics because of possible subsequent increased risk of developing haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). The aim of this systematic review is to clarify the risk...

  15. DNA replication of single-stranded Escherichia coli DNA phages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    Research on single-stranded DNA phages has contributed tremendously to our knowledge of several fundamental life-processes. The small size of their genomes and the fast rate at which they multiply in their host, Escherichia coil, made them attractive candidates for various studies. There are two cla

  16. Escherichia coli mutants with a temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorowitz, W; Clark, D.

    1982-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli resistant to allyl alcohol were selected. Such mutants were found to lack alcohol dehydrogenase. In addition, mutants with temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase activity were obtained. These mutations, designated adhE, are all located at the previously described adh regulatory locus. Most adhE mutants were also defective in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

  17. New types of Escherichia coli recombination-deficient mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifelder, D

    1976-11-01

    A set of Escherichia coli mutants deficient in intramolecular recombination and different from those previously found is described. All have temperature-sensitive lethal mutations. The mutants have been characterized with respect to the following properties: the Pap phenotype, deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, sensitivity to ultraviolet light, ability to support the growth of phage lambda, filament formation, and mutation frequency.

  18. Escherichia coli and virus isolated from ''sticky kits''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M.; Scheutz, F.; Strandbygaard, Bertel

    1996-01-01

    A total of 121 Escherichia coli strains isolated from 3-week-old mink kits were serotyped and examined for virulence factors. 56 strains were isolated from healthy kits while 65 were from ''sticky kits''. Among these, 34 different serotypes were detected. No difference in serotypes or the presenc...

  19. (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolated from cl

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolated from clinical ... Methods: A total of 127 E. coli were collected from clinical samples in Kerman hospitals. The antibiotic ..... in Mexico and 26.1 % in Turkey [23,24]. These.

  20. armA and aminoglycoside resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Zorn, Bruno; Teshager, Tirushet; Casas, María; Porrero, María C; Moreno, Miguel A; Courvalin, Patrice; Domínguez, Lucas

    2005-06-01

    We report armA in an Escherichia coli pig isolate from Spain. The resistance gene was borne by self-transferable IncN plasmid pMUR050. Molecular analysis of the plasmid and of the armA locus confirmed the spread of this resistance determinant.

  1. armA and Aminoglycoside Resistance in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    González-Zorn, Bruno; Teshager, Tirushet; Casas, María; Porrero, María C.; Moreno, Miguel A.; Courvalin, Patrice; Domínguez, Lucas

    2005-01-01

    We report armA in an Escherichia coli pig isolate from Spain. The resistance gene was borne by self-transferable IncN plasmid pMUR050. Molecular analysis of the plasmid and of the armA locus confirmed the spread of this resistance determinant.

  2. Combating enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infections: the way forward

    OpenAIRE

    Michael S Donnenberg; Finlay, B. Brett

    2013-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strains continue to cause severe and sometimes fatal infantile diarrhea, particularly in Africa. Increased efforts at diagnosis, defining the clinical spectrum of disease, understanding pathogenic mechanisms, and delineating immune responses are desperately needed to develop new strategies to combat EPEC.

  3. Characterization of Escherichia coli nucleoids released by osmotic shock.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, A.S.; Alexeeva, S.; Odijk, T.; Woldringh, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleoids were isolated by osmotic shock from Escherichia coli spheroplasts at relatively low salt concentrations and in the absence of detergents. Sucrose-protected cells, made osmotically sensitive by growth in the presence of ampicillin or by digestion with low lysozyme concentrations (50-5 μg/ml

  4. Characterization of Escherichia coli nucleoids released by osmotic shock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, S.; Alexeeva, S.V.; Odijk, T.; Woldringh, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleoids were isolated by osmotic shock from Escherichia coli spheroplasts at relatively low salt concentrations and in the absence of detergents. Sucrose-protected cells, made osmotically sensitive by growth in the presence of ampicillin or by digestion with low lysozyme concentrations (50–5 µg/ml

  5. Immunologic Control of Diarrheal Disease Due to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Classical Enteropathogenic (Serotyped) Escherichia coli Strains of Proven Pathogenicity. Infect. Immun. 38:798-801, 1982. 8. Levine, M.M. Vacunas Contra...Microbiol., 18:808-815, 1983. 8 15. Levine, M.M., Lanata, C. Progresos en Vacunas Contra Diarrea Bacteriana. Adelantos Microbiol. Enferm. Inf., 2:67-117

  6. Transport of Escherichia coli in saturated porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foppen, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over de manier waarop de bacterie en tevens meest bekende fecale indicator soort Escherichia coli getransporteerd wordt in grondwater is relatief weinig bekend. In deze studie wordt de verwijdering van E. coli uit grondwater ten gevolge van E. coli - sediment interacties bestudeerd en modelmatig

  7. Decorating microbes : surface display of proteins on Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloois, Edwin; Winter, Remko T.; Kolmar, Harald; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial surface display entails the presentation of recombinant proteins or peptides on the surface of bacterial cells. Escherichia coil is the most frequently used bacterial host for surface display and, as such, a variety of E. coil display systems have been described that primarily promote the

  8. Sequencing of Escherichia coli that cause persistent and transient Mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genomes of two strains of Escherichia coli that cause bovine mastitis were sequenced. These strains are known to be associated with persistent and transient mastitis: strain ECA-B causes a transient infection, and ECC-M leads to a persistent infection....

  9. Comparative Genomics of Escherichia coli Strains Causing Urinary Tract Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria; Schembri, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The virulence determinants of uropathogenic Escherichia coli have been studied extensively over the years, but relatively little is known about what differentiates isolates causing various types of urinary tract infections. In this study, we compared the genomic profiles of 45 strains from a range...

  10. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by titanium dioxide photocatalytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titanium dioxide in the anatase crystalline form was used as a photocatalyst to generate hydroxyl radicals in a flowthrough water reactor. Experiments were performed on pure cultures of Escherichia coli in dechlorinated tap water and a surface water sample to evaluate the disinfe...

  11. Efficient expression of the yeast metallothionein gene in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berka, T.; Shatzman, A.; Zimmerman, J.; Strickler, J.; Rosenberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    The yeast metallothionein gene CUP1 was cloned into a bacterial expression system to achieve efficient, controlled expression of the stable, unprocessed protein product. The Escherichia coli-synthesized yeast metallothionein bound copper, cadmium, zinc, indicating that the protein was functional. Furthermore, E. coli cells expressing CUP1 acquired a new, inducible ability to selectively sequester heavy metal ions from the growth medium.

  12. Chromosomal replication incompatibility in Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiesleben, Ulrik Von

    1996-01-01

    Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells containing minichromosomes were constructed. Free plasmid DNA could not be detected in these cells and the minichromosomes were found to be integrated in multiple copies in the origin of replication (oriC) region of the host chromosome...

  13. FimH-mediated autoaggregation of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Christiansen, G.; Klemm, Per

    2001-01-01

    Autoaggregation is a phenomenon thought to contribute to colonization of mammalian hosts by pathogenic bacteria. Type 1 fimbriae are surface organelles of Escherichia coli that mediate D-mannose-sensitive binding to various host surfaces. This binding is conferred by the minor fimbrial component...

  14. Antimicrobial activity of peptidomimetics against multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnsen, Rasmus D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Franzyk, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    -lactamase-producing Escherichia coli was assessed by testing an array comprising different types of cationic peptidomimetics obtained by a general monomer-based solid-phase synthesis protocol. Most of the peptidomimetics possessed high to moderate activity toward multidrug-resistant E. coli as opposed to the corresponding...

  15. DNA supercoiling depends on the phosphorylation potential in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Workum, M.; van Dooren, S.J.M; Oldenburg, N

    1996-01-01

    ATP/ADP ratios were varied in different ways and the degree of negative supercoiling was determined in Escherichia coli. Independent of whether the ATP/ADP ratio was reduced by a shift to anaerobic conditions, by addition of protonophore (dinitrophenol) or by potassium cyanide addition, DNA...

  16. Novel Aggregative Adherence Fimbria Variant of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønsson, Rie; Struve, Carsten; Boisen, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) organisms belong to a diarrheagenic pathotype known to cause diarrhea and can be characterized by distinct aggregative adherence (AA) in a stacked-brick pattern to cultured epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated 118 EAEC strains isolated from...

  17. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) antisense effects in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Good, L; Nielsen, P E

    1999-01-01

    Antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) can be used to control cell growth, gene expression and growth phenotypes in the bacteria Escherichia coli. PNAs targeted to the RNA components of the ribosome can inhibit translation and cell growth, and PNAs targeted to mRNA can limit gene expression with gene...

  18. Suppressors of DnaAATP imposed overinitiation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Riber, Leise; Cohen, Malene

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is limited by the supply of DnaA associated with ATP. Cells deficient in RIDA (Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA) due to a deletion of the hda gene accumulate suppressor mutations (hsm) to counteract the overinitiation caused by an elevated DnaAATP level...

  19. Characterization of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli on veal hides and carcasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) associated with the most severe forms of foodborne illnesses. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) has identified a higher percentage of non-O157 EHEC compared to E....

  20. Differential expression of the Escherichia coli autoaggregation factor antigen 43

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Hjerrild, Louise; Gjermansen, Morten

    2003-01-01

    Antigen 43 (Ag43) is a self-recognizing surface adhesin found in most Escherichia coli strains. Due to its excellent cell-to-cell aggregation characteristics, Ag43 expression confers clumping and fluffing of cells and promotes biofilm formation. Ag43 expression is repressed by the cellular redox...

  1. Molecular characterization of the Escherichia coli asymptomatic bacteriuria strain 83972

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Hancock, Viktoria; Ulett, G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli 83972 is a clinical asymptomatia bacteriuric isolate that is able to colonize the human urinary bladder without inducing an immune response. Here we demonstrate that one of the mechanisms by which this strain has become attenuated is through the mutation of its genes encoding type...

  2. Binding of divalent magnesium by Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of binding of the substrates Mg x ATP and ribose 5-phosphate as well as Mg2+ to the enzyme 5-phospho-D-ribosyl (alpha-1-diphosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli has been analyzed. By use of the competive inhibitors of ATP and ribose 5-phosphate binding, alpha,beta-methylene ATP ...

  3. A rapid differentiation method for enteroinvasive Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aribam, Swarmistha Devi; Hirota, Jiro; Kusumoto, Masahiro; Harada, Tomoyuki; Shiraiwa, Kazumasa; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Shimoji, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Masahiro

    2014-03-01

    Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) comprise 21 major serotypes defined by the presence of O and H antigens, and diagnosis depends on determining its invasive potential. Using HEp-2 cells infected with an EIEC strain, we developed a simple growth-dependent assay that differentiated EIEC strain from non-invasive strains 6 h after infection.

  4. Kwantitatief gevoeligheidsonderzoek met intra- en extramurale isolaten van Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Neeling AJ; de Jong J; Overbeek BP; de Bruin RW; Dessens-Kroon M; van Klingeren B

    1990-01-01

    Three Dutch laboratories for medical microbiology collected a total number of 1432 strains of Escherichia coli. Of these 995 were obtained from routine samples taken in clinic and policlinic, 290 had been sent spontaneously by general practitioners for microbiological examination and 147 had been i

  5. Sensitivity of Escherichia albertii to food preservation treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherichia albertii is a potential foodborne pathogen because of its documented ability to cause diarrheal disease by producing attachment and effacement lesions. Its tolerance to food preservation treatments has not been investigated. Heat, acid, and pressure tolerance were determined for stationa...

  6. prevalence and antibiotic resistance patterns of escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... 91 No. 6 June 2014 ... Resistance for imipenem and tazobactam was 7% and 12 % respectively. Conclusion: Due to ... urinary tract infections (2). Escherichia ... Information sheets explaining the purpose of the ... Quality control organisms used to test for disc potency ... Ms excel and STATA tool respectively.

  7. Molecular characterization of the Escherichia coli asymptomatic bacteriuria strain 83972

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Hancock, Viktoria; Ulett, G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli 83972 is a clinical asymptomatia bacteriuric isolate that is able to colonize the human urinary bladder without inducing an immune response. Here we demonstrate that one of the mechanisms by which this strain has become attenuated is through the mutation of its genes encoding typ...

  8. Fragility of the permeability barrier of Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haest, C.W.M.; Gier, J. de; Es, G.A. van; Verkleij, A.J.; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1972-01-01

    An unsaturated fatty acid requiring auxotroph of Escherichia coli was grown with addition of various unsaturated fatty acids. The permeability of the cells for erythritol appeared to be strongly dependent on the fatty acid incorporated in the membrane lipid. Below certain temperatures, depending on

  9. Transport of Escherichia coli in saturated porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foppen, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over de manier waarop de bacterie en tevens meest bekende fecale indicator soort Escherichia coli getransporteerd wordt in grondwater is relatief weinig bekend. In deze studie wordt de verwijdering van E. coli uit grondwater ten gevolge van E. coli - sediment interacties bestudeerd en modelmatig ge

  10. Stringent control of FLP recombinase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Steven D; Palani, Nagendra P; Libourel, Igor G L

    2017-02-01

    Site specific recombinases are invaluable tools in molecular biology, and are emerging as powerful recorders of cellular events in synthetic biology. We have developed a stringently controlled FLP recombinase system in Escherichia coli using an arabinose inducible promoter combined with a weak ribosome binding site.

  11. Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae: Food poisoning and health effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    The family Enterobactericeae consists of rod-shaped, Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, non-spore forming bacteria and also includes the food-borne pathogens, Cronobacter spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., and Yersinia spp. Illness caused by these pathogens is acquired...

  12. Escherichia coli as other Enterobacteriaceae: food poisoning and health effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many Escherichia coli strains are harmless, and they are an important commensal in the intestinal microflora; however, pathogenic strains also exist. The pathogenic strains can be divided into diarrhea-inducing strains and strains that reside in the intestines but only cause disease in bodily sites...

  13. Plasmid cloning vehicle for Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, D.; Clayton, N.L.; Setlow, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    A new plasmid cloning vehicle (pDM2) was used to introduce a library of Haemophilus influenzae chromosomal fragments into H. influenzae. Transformants of the higly recombination-defective rec-1 mutant were more likely to contain exclusively recombinant plasmids after exposure to ligated DNA mixtures than was the wild type. pDM2 could replicate in Escherichia coli K-12.

  14. WGS accurately predicts antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in identifying resistance genotypes of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) and whether these correlate with observed phenotypes. Methods: Seventy-six E. coli strains were isolated from farm cattle and measured f...

  15. Production of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Ramesh Prasad; Malla, Sailesh; Simkhada, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Quercetin, a flavonol aglycone, is one of the most abundant flavonoids with high medicinal value. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetic properties of quercetin are influenced by the type of sugars attached to the molecule. To efficiently diversify the therapeutic uses of quercetin, Escherichia ...

  16. Norfloxacin resistance in a clinical isolate of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, H; Sato, K; Kato, T; Hirai, K; Mitsuhashi, S

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of DNA gyrase supercoiling and of norfloxacin uptake in Escherichia coli GN14176, a moderately norfloxacin-resistant clinical isolate, indicated that resistance was associated with both an altered drug target and a reduction in drug uptake. Images PMID:2829712

  17. Kwantitatief gevoeligheidsonderzoek met intra- en extramurale isolaten van Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Neeling AJ; de Jong J; Overbeek BP; de Bruin RW; Dessens-Kroon M; van Klingeren B

    1990-01-01

    Three Dutch laboratories for medical microbiology collected a total number of 1432 strains of Escherichia coli. Of these 995 were obtained from routine samples taken in clinic and policlinic, 290 had been sent spontaneously by general practitioners for microbiological examination and 147 had been

  18. Transport of Escherichia coli in saturated porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foppen, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over de manier waarop de bacterie en tevens meest bekende fecale indicator soort Escherichia coli getransporteerd wordt in grondwater is relatief weinig bekend. In deze studie wordt de verwijdering van E. coli uit grondwater ten gevolge van E. coli - sediment interacties bestudeerd en modelmatig ge

  19. Characterization of relationships between transcriptional units and operon structures in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanehisa Minoru

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Operon structures play an important role in transcriptional regulation in prokaryotes. However, there have been fewer studies on complicated operon structures in which the transcriptional units vary with changing environmental conditions. Information about such complicated operons is helpful for predicting and analyzing operon structures, as well as understanding gene functions and transcriptional regulation. Results We systematically analyzed the experimentally verified transcriptional units (TUs in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli obtained from ODB and RegulonDB. To understand the relationships between TUs and operons, we defined a new classification system for adjacent gene pairs, divided into three groups according to the level of gene co-regulation: operon pairs (OP belong to the same TU, sub-operon pairs (SOP that are at the transcriptional boundaries within an operon, and non-operon pairs (NOP belonging to different operons. Consequently, we found that the levels of gene co-regulation was correlated to intergenic distances and gene expression levels. Additional analysis revealed that they were also correlated to the levels of conservation across about 200 prokaryotic genomes. Most interestingly, we found that functional associations in SOPs were more observed in the environmental and genetic information processes. Conclusion Complicated operon strucutures were correlated with genome organization and gene expression profiles. Such intricately regulated operons allow functional differences depending on environmental conditions. These regulatory mechanisms are helpful in accommodating the variety of changes that happen around the cell. In addition, such differences may play an important role in the evolution of gene order across genomes.

  20. [The clinical characteristics analysis of Escherichia coli bloodstream infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; Huang, J A; Chen, Y B

    2016-05-17

    To explore the clinical features of Escherichia coli bloodstream infection. The clinical data of underlying diseases, antimicrobial susceptibility, temperature at blood sampling, results of routine blood tests, venous catheterization, therapy and prognosis of Escherichia coli bloodstream infection in the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University from January 2007 to December 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. The pathogens were routinely isolated and identified. Susceptibilities against antimicrobial agents were determined by Kirby-Bauer methods. All patients had at least one underlying disease. Most of the basic diseases were hematological malignancies, malignant solid tumors, pneumonia and so on. Body temperature was normal in 40 patients (6.4%), fever in 587 patients (93.5%) and low temperature in 1 patient. There were 252 patients with leukopenia (40.1%), 237 patients with granulocytopenia (37.7%) and 216 patients with agranulocytosis. The resistance rate to imipenem was 3.3%, which was the lowest among the total antimicrobial susceptibilities of 628 Escherichia Coli. The extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing strains accounted for 53.8% among the total patients. The resistance rates of ESBLs-producing-Escherichia coli for the Sulfamethoxazole, Ampicillin, Gentamicin, Cefazolin, Cefuroxime, Cefotaxime, Ceftriaxone, Cefepime, Ceftazidime, Cefoperazone, Piperacillin and Ciprofloxacin were 80.2%, 100.0%, 62.4%, 99.1%, 99.1%, 98.8%, 98.2%, 48.5%, 50.6%, 95.0%, 98.2%, 79.6%, respectively, which were higher than that of non-ESBLs-producing-Escherichia coli (67.9%, 79.7%, 47.6%, 50.0%, 47.2%, 41.0%, 40.3%, 27.2%, 24.1%, 40.0%, 56.2%, 58.3%, respectively), the differences were significant statistically (χ(2)=12.33, 75.90, 13.92, 209.00, 224.94, 259.25, 256.59, 27.79, 46.19, 222.85, 165.08, 33.59, all PEscherichia coli bloodstream infection. The antimicrobial resistance rate of ESBLs-producing-Escherichia coli is higher than that of none-ESBLs-producing-Escherichia

  1. Region 4 of sigma as a target for transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Simon L; Darst, Seth A; Hochschild, Ann

    2003-05-01

    Bacterial sigma factors play a key role in promoter recognition, making direct contact with conserved promoter elements. Most sigma factors belong to the sigma70 family, named for the primary sigma factor in Escherichia coli. Members of the sigma70 family typically share four conserved regions and, here, we focus on region 4, which is directly involved in promoter recognition and serves as a target for a variety of regulators of transcription initiation. We review recent advances in the understanding of the mechanism of action of regulators that target region 4 of sigma.

  2. Colonization of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in chickens and humans in southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Nhung, Hoang Ngoc; Carrique-Mas, Juan J; Mai, Ho Huynh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Van Minh, Pham; Wagenaar, Jaap A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126613354; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Schultsz, Constance; Hoa, Ngo Thi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enteroaggregative (EAEC) and Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide. E. coli carrying both virulence factors characteristic for EAEC and STEC and producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase caused severe and protracted disease during an

  3. Colonization of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in chickens and humans in southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Nhung, Hoang Ngoc; Carrique-Mas, Juan J.; Mai, Ho Huynh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Minh, Van Pham; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Schultsz, Constance; Hoa, Ngo Thi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enteroaggregative (EAEC) and Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide. E. coli carrying both virulence factors characteristic for EAEC and STEC and producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase caused severe and protracted disease during an

  4. Colonization of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in chickens and humans in southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Nhung, Hoang Ngoc; Carrique-Mas, Juan J.; Mai, Ho Huynh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Minh, Van Pham; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Schultsz, Constance; Hoa, Ngo Thi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enteroaggregative (EAEC) and Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide. E. coli carrying both virulence factors characteristic for EAEC and STEC and producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase caused severe and protracted disease during an ou

  5. Regulating the production of (R-3-hydroxybutyrate in Escherichia coli by N or P limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica eGuevara-Martínez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The chiral compound (R-3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB is naturally produced by many wild type organisms as the monomer for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB. Both compounds are commercially valuable and co-polymeric polyhydroxyalkanoates have been used e.g. in medical applications for skin grafting and as components in pharmaceuticals.In this paper we investigate cultivation strategies for production of 3HB in the previously described E. coli strain AF1000 pJBGT3RX. This strain produces extracellular 3HB by expression of two genes from the PHB pathway of Halomonas boliviensis. H. boliviensis is a newly isolated halophile that forms PHB as a storage compound during carbon excess and simultaneous limitation of another nutrient like nitrogen and phosphorous. We hypothesize that a similar approach can be used to control the flux from acetyl-CoA to 3HB also in E. coli; decreasing the flux to biomass and favouring the pathway to the product. We employed ammonium- or phosphate-limited fed-batch processes for comparison of the productivity at different nutrient limitation or starvation conditions. The feed rate was shown to affect the rate of glucose consumption, respiration, 3HB and acetic acid production, although the proportions between them were more difficult to affect. The highest 3HB volumetric productivity, 1.5 g L-1 h-1, was seen for phosphate-limitation.

  6. Mosaic structure and regulation of conjugal transfer of the Escherichia coli plasmid pRK100

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starcic Erjavec, Marjanca

    2003-01-01

    Plasmids are extrachromosomal DNA elements that can be found in prokaryotic as well as in eukaryotic cells. They can vary in size and genetic make-up. The plasmid pRK100, which is the study subject of this thesis, is a large (145 kb) natural conjugative plasmid, which was isolated from an uropathoge

  7. Escherichia coli in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases: An update on adherent invasive Escherichia coli pathogenicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Margarita; Martinez-Medina; Librado; Jesus; Garcia-Gil

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli(E. coli), and particularly the adherent invasive E. coli(AIEC) pathotype, has been increasingly implicated in the ethiopathogenesis of Crohn’s disease(CD). E. coli strains with similar pathogenic features to AIEC have been associated with other intestinal disorders such as ulcerative colitis, colorectal cancer, and coeliac disease, but AIEC prevalence in these diseases remains largely unexplored. Since AIEC was described one decade ago, substantial progress has been made in deciphering its mechanisms of pathogenicity. However, the molecular bases that characterize the phenotypic properties of this pathotype are still not well resolved. A review of studies focused on E. coli populations in inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) is presented here and we discuss about the putative role of this species on each IBD subtype. Given the relevance of AIEC in CD pathogenesis, we present the latest research findings concerning AIEC host-microbe interactions and pathogenicity. We also review the existing data regarding the prevalence and abundance of AIEC in CD and its association with other intestinal diseases from humans and animals, in order to discuss the AIEC disease- and hostspecificity. Finally, we highlight the fact that dietarycomponents frequently found in industrialized countries may enhance AIEC colonization in the gut, which merits further investigation and the implementation of preventative measures.

  8. The Escherichia coli modE gene: effect of modE mutations on molybdate dependent modA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicholas, P M; Chiang, R C; Gunsalus, R P

    1996-11-15

    The Escherichia coli modABCD operon, which encodes a high-affinity molybdate uptake system, is transcriptionally regulated in response to molybdate availability by ModE. Here we describe a highly effective enrichment protocol, applicable to any gene with a repressor role, and establish its application in the isolation of transposon mutations in modE. In addition we show that disruption of the ModE C-terminus abolishes derepression in the absence of molybdate, implying this region of ModE controls the repressor activity. Finally, a mutational analysis of a proposed molybdate binding motif indicates that this motif does not function in regulating the repressor activity of ModE.

  9. Increasing dissolved-oxygen disrupts iron homeostasis in production cultures of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez, Antonino; Shiloach, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The damaging effect of high oxygen concentration on growth of Escherichia coli is well established. Over-oxygenation increases the intracellular concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS), causing the destruction of the [4Fe-4S] cluster of dehydratases and limiting the biosynthesis of both branched-chain amino acids and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. A key enzyme that reduces the damaging effect of superoxide is superoxide dismutase (SOD). Its transcriptional regulation is controlled by global transcription regulators that respond to changes in oxygen and iron concentrations and pH. Production of biological compounds from E. coli is currently achieved using cultures grown to high cell densities which require oxygen-enriched air supply. It is, therefore, important to study the effect of over-oxygenation on E. coli metabolism and the bacterial protecting mechanism. The effect of over-oxygenation on the superoxide dismutase regulation system was evaluated in cultures grown in a bioreactor by increasing the oxygen concentration from 30 to 300 % air saturation. Following the change in the dissolved oxygen (DO), the expression of sodC, the periplasmic CuZn-containing SOD, and sodA, the cytosolic Mn-containing SOD, was higher in all the tested strains, while the expression of the sodB, the cytosolic Fe-containing SOD, was lower. The down-regulation of the sodB was found to be related to the activation of the small RNA RyhB. It was revealed that iron homeostasis, in particular ferric iron, was involved in the RyhB activation and in sodB regulation but not in sodA. Supplementation of amino acids to the culture medium reduced the intracellular ROS accumulation and reduced the activation of both SodA and SodC following the increase in the oxygen concentration. The study provides evidence that at conditions of over-oxygenation, sodA and sodC are strongly regulated by the amount of ROS, in particular superoxide; and sodB is regulated by iron availability through the

  10. PerC Manipulates Metabolism and Surface Antigens in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellies, Jay L.; Platenkamp, Amy; Osborn, Jossef; Ben-Avi, Lily

    2017-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli is an important cause of profuse, watery diarrhea in infants living in developing regions of the world. Typical strains of EPEC (tEPEC) possess a virulence plasmid, while related clinical isolates that lack the pEAF plasmid are termed atypical EPEC (aEPEC). tEPEC and aEPEC tend to cause acute vs. more chronic type infections, respectively. The pEAF plasmid encodes an attachment factor as well as a regulatory operon, perABC. PerC, a poorly understood regulator, was previously shown to regulate expression of the type III secretion system through Ler. Here we elucidate the regulon of PerC using RNA sequencing analysis to better our understanding of the role of the pEAF in tEPEC infection. We demonstrate that PerC controls anaerobic metabolism by increasing expression of genes necessary for nitrate reduction. A tEPEC strain overexpressing PerC exhibited a growth advantage compared to a strain lacking this regulator, when grown anaerobically in the presence of nitrate, conditions mimicking the human intestine. We show that PerC strongly down-regulates type I fimbriae expression by manipulating fim phase variation. The quantities of a number of non-coding RNA molecules were altered by PerC. In sum, this protein controls niche adaptation, and could help to explain the function of the PerC homologs (Pch), many of which are encoded within prophages in related, Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:28224117

  11. Study of the effects of high-energy proton beams on escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection is one of the most serious risks to public health care today. However, discouragingly, the development of new antibiotics has progressed little over the last decade. There is an urgent need for alternative approaches to treat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Novel methods, which include photothermal therapy based on gold nano-materials and ionizing radiation such as X-rays and gamma rays, have been reported. Studies of the effects of high-energy proton radiation on bacteria have mainly focused on Bacillus species and its spores. The effect of proton beams on Escherichia coli (E. coli) has been limitedly reported. Escherichia coli is an important biological tool to obtain metabolic and genetic information and is a common model microorganism for studying toxicity and antimicrobial activity. In addition, E. coli is a common bacterium in the intestinal tract of mammals. In this research, the morphological and the physiological changes of E. coli after proton irradiation were investigated. Diluted solutions of cells were used for proton beam radiation. LB agar plates were used to count the number of colonies formed. The growth profile of the cells was monitored by using the optical density at 600 nm. The morphology of the irradiated cells was observed with an optical microscope. A microarray analysis was performed to examine the gene expression changes between irradiated samples and control samples without irradiation. E coli cells have observed to be elongated after proton irradiation with doses ranging from 13 to 93 Gy. Twenty-two were up-regulated more than twofold in proton-irradiated samples (93 Gy) compared with unexposed one.

  12. Evolutionary adaptation of an AraC-like regulatory protein in Citrobacter rodentium and Escherichia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Aimee; Petty, Nicola K; Hocking, Dianna; Bennett-Wood, Vicki; Wakefield, Matthew; Praszkier, Judyta; Tauschek, Marija; Yang, Ji; Robins-Browne, Roy

    2015-04-01

    The evolution of pathogenic bacteria is a multifaceted and complex process, which is strongly influenced by the horizontal acquisition of genetic elements and their subsequent expression in their new hosts. A well-studied example is the RegA regulon of the enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. The RegA regulatory protein is a member of the AraC/XylS superfamily, which coordinates the expression of a gene repertoire that is necessary for full pathogenicity of this murine pathogen. Upon stimulation by an exogenous, gut-associated signal, namely, bicarbonate ions, RegA activates the expression of a series of genes, including virulence factors, such as autotransporters, fimbriae, a dispersin-like protein, and the grlRA operon on the locus of enterocyte effacement pathogenicity island. Interestingly, the genes encoding RegA homologues are distributed across the genus Escherichia, encompassing pathogenic and nonpathogenic subtypes. In this study, we carried out a series of bioinformatic, transcriptional, and functional analyses of the RegA regulons of these bacteria. Our results demonstrated that regA has been horizontally transferred to Escherichia spp. and C. rodentium. Comparative studies of two RegA homologues, namely, those from C. rodentium and E. coli SMS-3-5, a multiresistant environmental strain of E. coli, showed that the two regulators acted similarly in vitro but differed in terms of their abilities to activate the virulence of C. rodentium in vivo, which evidently was due to their differential activation of grlRA. Our data indicate that RegA from C. rodentium has strain-specific adaptations that facilitate infection of its murine host. These findings shed new light on the development of virulence by C. rodentium and on the evolution of virulence-regulatory genes of bacterial pathogens in general.

  13. EcoBrowser: a web-based tool for visualizing transcriptome data of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Peng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli has been extensively studied as a prokaryotic model organism whose whole genome was determined in 1997. However, it is difficult to identify all the gene products involved in diverse functions by using whole genome sequencesalone. The high-resolution transcriptome mapping using tiling arrays has proved effective to improve the annotation of transcript units and discover new transcripts of ncRNAs. While abundant tiling array data have been generated, the lack of appropriate visualization tools to accommodate and integrate multiple sources of data has emerged. Findings EcoBrowser is a web-based tool for visualizing genome annotations and transcriptome data of E. coli. Important tiling array data of E. coli from different experimental platforms are collected and processed for query. An AJAX based genome browser is embedded for visualization. Thus, genome annotations can be compared with transcript profiling and genome occupancy profiling from independent experiments, which will be helpful in discovering new transcripts including novel mRNAs and ncRNAs, generating a detailed description of the transcription unit architecture, further providing clues for investigation of prokaryotic transcriptional regulation that has proved to be far more complex than previously thought. Conclusions With the help of EcoBrowser, users can get a systemic view both from the vertical and parallel sides, as well as inspirations for the design of new experiments which will expand our understanding of the regulation mechanism.

  14. Expression and Purification of Soluble Human Programmed Death-1 in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihui Xu; Yi Liu; Xianhui He

    2006-01-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1), a member of CD28 family, is able to negatively regulate the TCR complex-initiated signaling by interacting with its cognate ligands (PD-L1 and/or PD-L2). PD-1/PD-L1 pathway plays an important role in down-regulating the effective phase of adaptive immune responses and the blockade of this pathway has been proved to enhance antiviral and antitumoral immunity, suggesting that it might be a potential target for the development of therapies to improve T cell responses in patients with virus infections or malignancies. In present study, the extracellular domain of human PD-1 with a carboxyl terminal His-tag (designated as sPD-1) was expressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. The product was on-column refolded, purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, and characterized by Western blotting. Furthermore, the soluble PD-1 with high purity possessed specific binding activity with its cognate ligand PD-L1, and the dissociation constant was 0.43 nmol/L as determined by Scatchard plot analysis. These results suggest that refolded sPD-1 from prokaryotic cells may be of therapeutic interest in enhancing antivirus and antitumoral immune responses.

  15. Control of Initiation of DNA Replication in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie H. Jameson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Initiation of DNA Replication is tightly regulated in all cells since imbalances in chromosomal copy number are deleterious and often lethal. In bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, at the point of cytokinesis, there must be two complete copies of the chromosome to partition into the daughter cells following division at mid-cell during vegetative growth. Under conditions of rapid growth, when the time taken to replicate the chromosome exceeds the doubling time of the cells, there will be multiple initiations per cell cycle and daughter cells will inherit chromosomes that are already undergoing replication. In contrast, cells entering the sporulation pathway in B. subtilis can do so only during a short interval in the cell cycle when there are two, and only two, chromosomes per cell, one destined for the spore and one for the mother cell. Here, we briefly describe the overall process of DNA replication in bacteria before reviewing initiation of DNA replication in detail. The review covers DnaA-directed assembly of the replisome at oriC and the multitude of mechanisms of regulation of initiation, with a focus on the similarities and differences between E. coli and B. subtilis.

  16. Discoordinate gene expression in the dnaA-dnaN operon of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones, A; Messer, W

    1988-07-01

    The dnaN gene of Escherichia coli encodes the beta-subunit of the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme. Previous work has established that dnaN lies immediately downstream of dnaA and that both genes may be cotranscribed from the dnaA promoters; no promoter for dnaN has been described. We investigated the in vivo regulation of transcription of the dnaN gene by transcriptional fusions to the galK gene, translational fusion to the lacZ gene and S1 mapping analysis. We found that there are at least three dnaN promoters residing entirely in the reading frame of the preceding dnaA gene, and that transcription from these promoters can occur independently of dnaA transcription which, however, extends at least up to dnaN. Furthermore, we found evidence for the inducibility of the dnaN promoters in a dam background under conditions of simultaneously reduced dnaA transcription. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that although dnaA and dnaN are organized in an operon considerable discoordinate transcription can occur, thus uncoupling dnaN and dnaA regulation, when needed.

  17. A moonlighting enzyme links Escherichia coli cell size with central metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert S Hill

    Full Text Available Growth rate and nutrient availability are the primary determinants of size in single-celled organisms: rapidly growing Escherichia coli cells are more than twice as large as their slow growing counterparts. Here we report the identification of the glucosyltransferase OpgH as a nutrient-dependent regulator of E. coli cell size. During growth under nutrient-rich conditions, OpgH localizes to the nascent septal site, where it antagonizes assembly of the tubulin-like cell division protein FtsZ, delaying division and increasing cell size. Biochemical analysis is consistent with OpgH sequestering FtsZ from growing polymers. OpgH is functionally analogous to UgtP, a Bacillus subtilis glucosyltransferase that inhibits cell division in a growth rate-dependent fashion. In a striking example of convergent evolution, OpgH and UgtP share no homology, have distinct enzymatic activities, and appear to inhibit FtsZ assembly through different mechanisms. Comparative analysis of E. coli and B. subtilis reveals conserved aspects of growth rate regulation and cell size control that are likely to be broadly applicable. These include the conservation of uridine diphosphate glucose as a proxy for nutrient status and the use of moonlighting enzymes to couple growth rate-dependent phenomena to central metabolism.

  18. Toxicity of ZnO and TiO2 to Escherichia coli cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Yu Hang; Xu, Xiaoying; Ma, Angel P. Y.; Liu, Fangzhou; Ng, Alan M. C.; Shen, Zhiyong; Gethings, Lee A.; Guo, Mu Yao; Djurišić, Aleksandra B.; Lee, Patrick K. H.; Lee, Hung Kay; Chan, Wai Kin; Leung, Frederick C. C.

    2016-10-01

    We performed a comprehensive investigation of the toxicity of ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles using Escherichia coli as a model organism. Both materials are wide band gap n-type semiconductors and they can interact with lipopolysaccharide molecules present in the outer membrane of E. coli, as well as produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) under UV illumination. Despite the similarities in their properties, the response of the bacteria to the two nanomaterials was fundamentally different. When the ROS generation is observed, the toxicity of nanomaterial is commonly attributed to oxidative stress and cell membrane damage caused by lipid peroxidation. However, we found that significant toxicity does not necessarily correlate with up-regulation of ROS-related proteins. TiO2 exhibited significant antibacterial activity, but the protein expression profile of bacteria exposed to TiO2 was different compared to H2O2 and the ROS-related proteins were not strongly expressed. On the other hand, ZnO exhibited lower antibacterial activity compared to TiO2, and the bacterial response involved up-regulating ROS-related proteins similar to the bacterial response to the exposure to H2O2. Reasons for the observed differences in toxicity and bacterial response to the two metal oxides are discussed.

  19. The global gene expression response of Escherichia coli to L-phenylalanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polen, T; Krämer, M; Bongaerts, J; Wubbolts, M; Wendisch, V F

    2005-02-09

    We investigated the global gene expression changes of Escherichia coli due to the presence of different concentrations of phenylalanine or shikimate in the growth medium. The response to 0.5 g l(-1) phenylalanine primarily reflected a perturbed aromatic amino acid metabolism, in particular due to TyrR-mediated regulation. The addition of 5g l(-1) phenylalanine reduced the growth rate by half and elicited a great number of likely indirect effects on genes regulated in response to changed pH, nitrogen or carbon availability. Consistent with the observed gene expression changes, supplementation with shikimate, tyrosine and tryptophan relieved growth inhibition by phenylalanine. In contrast to the wild-type, a tyrR disruption strain showed increased expression of pckA and of tktB in the presence of phenylalanine, but its growth was not affected by phenylalanine at the concentrations tested. The absence of growth inhibition by phenylalanine suggested that at high phenylalanine concentrations TyrR-defective strains might perform better in phenylalanine production.

  20. Construction of a photo-responsive chimeric histidine kinase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Mayuko; Oka, Shyunsuke; Sugie, Yoshimi; Ohtsuka, Hokuto; Aiba, Hirofumi

    2017-01-31

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS), that are also referred to as His to Asp phosphorelay systems, are involved in widespread cellular responses to diverse signals from bacteria to plants. Previously, we succeeded in reconstructing a cyanobacterial photo-perception system in Escherichia coli by employing a CcaS-CcaR two-component system from Nostoc punctiforme. In this study, we have added a photo-responsive ability to ArcB-ArcA (anoxic redox control) TCS of E. coli by fusing a cyanobacterial photoreceptor domain of CcaS with an intracellular histidine kinase (HK) domain of ArcB. For this, we constructed several chimeric HKs between CcaS and ArcB and found that one chimeric HK, named ArcaS9, has a photo-responsive ability. When ArcaS9 was expressed with an ArcA response regulator in E. coli expressing phycocyanobilin (PCB)-producing enzymes, the expression of sdh, a target gene of ArcB-ArcA TCS was regulated in a light-color-dependent manner. Thus we succeeded in endowing E. coli HK with a photo-responsive ability. This provides an insight into how the sensing ability of HK can be manipulated by a chimeric construct.

  1. Involvement of multiple transcription factors for metal-induced spy gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ogasawara, Hiroshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2008-01-20

    Bacteria are directly exposed to metals in environment. To maintain the intracellular metal homeostasis, Escherichia coli contain a number of gene regulation systems, each for response to a specific metal. A periplasmic protein Spy of E. coli was found to be induced upon short-exposure to copper ion in CpxAR-dependent manner. Transcription of the spy gene was also induced by long-exposure to zinc ion. This induction, however, depended on another two-component system BaeSR. Using DNase-I footprinting assay, we identified two BaeR-binding regions on the spy promoter with a direct repeat of the BaeR-box sequence, TCTNCANAA. The zinc-responsive BaeR-binding sites were separated from copper-responsive CpxR-binding site, implying that the spy promoter responds to two species of metal independently through different using sensor-response regulator systems. Since BaeSR-dependent zinc response requires longer time, the induction of spy gene transcription by external zinc may include multiple steps such as through sensing the zinc-induced envelope disorder by BaeSR.

  2. UV-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli SOS response: a quantitative model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Krishna

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli bacteria respond to DNA damage by a highly orchestrated series of events known as the SOS response, regulated by transcription factors, protein-protein binding, and active protein degradation. We present a dynamical model of the UV-induced SOS response, incorporating mutagenesis by the error-prone polymerase, Pol V. In our model, mutagenesis depends on a combination of two key processes: damage counting by the replication forks and a long-term memory associated with the accumulation of UmuD'. Together, these provide a tight regulation of mutagenesis, resulting, we show, in a "digital" turn-on and turn-off of Pol V. Our model provides a compact view of the topology and design of the SOS network, pinpointing the specific functional role of each of the regulatory processes. In particular, we suggest that the recently observed second peak in the activity of promoters in the SOS regulon (Friedman et al., 2005, PLoS Biology 3(7: e238 is the result of positive feedback from Pol V to RecA filaments.

  3. Control of Initiation of DNA Replication in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Katie H; Wilkinson, Anthony J

    2017-01-10

    Initiation of DNA Replication is tightly regulated in all cells since imbalances in chromosomal copy number are deleterious and often lethal. In bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, at the point of cytokinesis, there must be two complete copies of the chromosome to partition into the daughter cells following division at mid-cell during vegetative growth. Under conditions of rapid growth, when the time taken to replicate the chromosome exceeds the doubling time of the cells, there will be multiple initiations per cell cycle and daughter cells will inherit chromosomes that are already undergoing replication. In contrast, cells entering the sporulation pathway in B. subtilis can do so only during a short interval in the cell cycle when there are two, and only two, chromosomes per cell, one destined for the spore and one for the mother cell. Here, we briefly describe the overall process of DNA replication in bacteria before reviewing initiation of DNA replication in detail. The review covers DnaA-directed assembly of the replisome at oriC and the multitude of mechanisms of regulation of initiation, with a focus on the similarities and differences between E. coli and B. subtilis.

  4. Engineering the pentose phosphate pathway to improve hydrogen yield in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Mi; Cho, Han-Saem; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Park, Jong Moon

    2011-12-01

    Among various routes for the biological hydrogen production, the NAD(P)H-dependent pentose phosphate (PP) pathway is the most efficient for the dark fermentation. Few studies, however, have focused on the glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase, encoded by zwf, as a key enzyme activating the PP pathway. Although the gluconeogenic activity is essential for activating the PP pathway, it is difficult to enhance the NADPH production by regulating only this activity because the gluconeogenesis is robust and highly sensitive to concentrations of glucose and AMP inside the cell. In this study, the FBPase II (encoded by glpX), a regulation-insensitive enzyme in the gluconeogenic pathway, was activated. Physiological studies of several recombinant, ferredoxin-dependent hydrogenase system-containing Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains showed that overexpression of glpX alone could increase the hydrogen yield by 1.48-fold compared to a strain with the ferredoxin-dependent hydrogenase system only; the co-overexpression of glpX with zwf increased the hydrogen yield further to 2.32-fold. These results indicate that activation of the PP pathway by glpX overexpression-enhanced gluconeogenic flux is crucial for the increase of NAD(P)H-dependent hydrogen production in E. coli BL21(DE3).

  5. Transcriptome analyses to understand effects of the Fusarium deoxynivalenol and nivalenol mycotoxins on Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungwook; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Youn, Kihoon; Kim, Sunyoung; Jung, Boknam; Lee, Jungkwan; Seo, Young-Su

    2014-12-20

    Fusarium spp. cause many diseases in farming systems and can produce diverse mycotoxins that can easily impact humans and animals through the ingestion of food and feed. Among these mycotoxins, deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV) are considered the most important hazards because they can rapidly diffuse into cells and block eukaryotic ribosomes, leading to inhibition of the translation system. Conversely, the effects of DON and NIV mycotoxins on bacteria remain unclear. We employed RNA-seq technology to obtain information regarding the biological responses of bacteria and putative bacterial mechanisms of resistance to DON and NIV mycotoxins. Most differentially expressed genes down-regulated in response to these mycotoxins were commonly involved in phenylalanine metabolism, glyoxylate cycle, and cytochrome o ubiquinol oxidase systems. In addition, we generated an overall network of 1028 up-regulated genes to identify core genes under DON and NIV conditions. The results of our study provide a snapshot view of the transcriptome of Escherichia coli K-12 under DON and NIV conditions. Furthermore, the information provided herein will be useful for development of methods to detect DON and NIV.

  6. Transcriptome analysis of parallel-evolved Escherichia coli strains under ethanol stress

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    Yomo Tetsuya

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding ethanol tolerance in microorganisms is important for the improvement of bioethanol production. Hence, we performed parallel-evolution experiments using Escherichia coli cells under ethanol stress to determine the phenotypic changes necessary for ethanol tolerance. Results After cultivation of 1,000 generations under 5% ethanol stress, we obtained 6 ethanol-tolerant strains that showed an approximately 2-fold increase in their specific growth rate in comparison with their ancestor. Expression analysis using microarrays revealed that common expression changes occurred during the adaptive evolution to the ethanol stress environment. Biosynthetic pathways of amino acids, including tryptophan, histidine, and branched-chain amino acids, were commonly up-regulated in the tolerant strains, suggesting that activating these pathways is involved in the development of ethanol tolerance. In support of this hypothesis, supplementation of isoleucine, tryptophan, and histidine to the culture medium increased the specific growth rate under ethanol stress. Furthermore, genes related to iron ion metabolism were commonly up-regulated in the tolerant strains, which suggests the change in intracellular redox state during adaptive evolution. Conclusions The common phenotypic changes in the ethanol-tolerant strains we identified could provide a fundamental basis for designing ethanol-tolerant strains for industrial purposes.

  7. The pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway modulates production of biofilm determinants in Escherichia coli.

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    Marco Garavaglia

    Full Text Available Bacteria are often found in multicellular communities known as biofilms, which constitute a resistance form against environmental stresses. Extracellular adhesion and cell aggregation factors, responsible for bacterial biofilm formation and maintenance, are tightly regulated in response to physiological and environmental cues. We show that, in Escherichia coli, inactivation of genes belonging to the de novo uridine monophosphate (UMP biosynthetic pathway impairs production of curli fibers and cellulose, important components of the bacterial biofilm matrix, by inhibiting transcription of the csgDEFG operon, thus preventing production of the biofilm master regulator CsgD protein. Supplementing growth media with exogenous uracil, which can be converted to UMP through the pyrimidine nucleotide salvage pathway, restores csgDEFG transcription and curli production. In addition, however, exogenous uracil triggers cellulose production, particularly in strains defective in either carB or pyrB genes, which encode enzymes catalyzing the first steps of de novo UMP biosynthesis. Our results indicate the existence of tight and complex links between pyrimidine metabolism and curli/cellulose production: transcription of the csgDEFG operon responds to pyrimidine nucleotide availability, while cellulose production is triggered by exogenous uracil in the absence of active de novo UMP biosynthesis. We speculate that perturbations in the UMP biosynthetic pathways allow the bacterial cell to sense signals such as starvation, nucleic acids degradation, and availability of exogenous pyrimidines, and to adapt the production of the extracellular matrix to the changing environmental conditions.

  8. RNA Primer Extension Hinders DNA Synthesis by Escherichia coli Mutagenic DNA Polymerase IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashjian, Tommy F.; Lin, Ida; Belt, Verena; Cafarelli, Tiziana M.; Godoy, Veronica G.

    2017-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the highly conserved DNA damage regulated dinB gene encodes DNA Polymerase IV (DinB), an error prone specialized DNA polymerase with a central role in stress-induced mutagenesis. Since DinB is the DNA polymerase with the highest intracellular concentrations upon induction of the SOS response, further regulation must exist to maintain genomic stability. Remarkably, we find that DinB DNA synthesis is inherently poor when using an RNA primer compared to a DNA primer, while high fidelity DNA polymerases are known to have no primer preference. Moreover, we show that the poor DNA synthesis from an RNA primer is conserved in DNA polymerase Kappa, the human DinB homolog. The activity of DinB is modulated by interactions with several other proteins, one of which is the equally evolutionarily conserved recombinase RecA. This interaction is known to positively affect DinB’s fidelity on damaged templates. We find that upon interaction with RecA, DinB shows a significant reduction in DNA synthesis when using an RNA primer. Furthermore, with DinB or DinB:RecA a robust pause, sequence and lesion independent, occurs only when RNA is used as a primer. The robust pause is likely to result in abortive DNA synthesis when RNA is the primer. These data suggest a novel mechanism to prevent DinB synthesis when it is not needed despite its high concentrations, thus protecting genome stability.

  9. Long polar fimbriae of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 bind to extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, Mauricio J; Cantero, Lidia; Vidal, Roberto; Botkin, Douglas J; Torres, Alfredo G

    2011-09-01

    Adherence to intestinal cells is a key process in infection caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). Several adhesion factors that mediate the binding of EHEC to intestinal cells have been described, but the receptors involved in their recognition are not fully characterized. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins might act as receptors involved in the recognition of enteric pathogens, including EHEC. In this study, we sought to characterize the binding of EHEC O157:H7 to ECM proteins commonly present in the intestine. We found that EHEC prototype strains as well as other clinical isolates adhered more abundantly to surfaces coated with fibronectin, laminin, and collagen IV. Further characterization of this phenotype, by using antiserum raised against the LpfA1 putative major fimbrial subunit and by addition of mannose, showed that a reduced binding of EHEC to ECM proteins was observed in a long polar fimbria (lpf) mutant. We also found that the two regulators, H-NS and Ler, had an effect in EHEC Lpf-mediated binding to ECM, supporting the roles of these tightly regulated fimbriae as adherence factors. Purified Lpf major subunit bound to all of the ECM proteins tested. Finally, increased bacterial adherence was observed when T84 cells, preincubated with ECM proteins, were infected with EHEC. Taken together, these findings suggest that the interaction of Lpf and ECM proteins contributes to the EHEC colonization of the gastrointestinal tract.

  10. Characterization of spontaneous mutation in the oxyR strain of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, E; Nunoshiba, T; Kawata, M; Yamamoto, K

    2000-12-20

    Escherichia coli K-12 strain EY5, deficient in oxyR, was constructed to assess the role of oxyR and oxyR-regulated regulon in spontaneous mutagenesis. Mutagenesis was monitored by selecting two forward mutations of colicin B-sensitive to resistance and valine-sensitive to resistance, one base substitution mutation of rifampicin-sensitive to resistance and one reversion of argE3 his-4 to Arg(+) His(+). Deficiency of oxyR did not lead to the enhancement of spontaneous mutation frequencies of the four markers tested. By DNA sequence analysis, we determined 49 colicin B-resistant mutants derived from EY5 and found that 37% were base substitutions, 29% IS element insertions, 20% deletions, and 14% single base frameshifts. Among the base substitutions, G:C-->T:A transversions predominated followed by G:C-->A:T transitions and A:T-->T:A transversions. These spectra were essentially the same as those from oxyR(+) strains. The results indicate that oxyR and oxyR-regulated genes do not play a significant role in the defense against spontaneous mutagenesis.

  11. The post-transcriptional regulatory system CSR controls the balance of metabolic pools in upper glycolysis of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Manon; Ropers, Delphine; Letisse, Fabien; Laguerre, Sandrine; Portais, Jean-Charles; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Enjalbert, Brice

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic control in Escherichia coli is a complex process involving multilevel regulatory systems but the involvement of post-transcriptional regulation is uncertain. The post-transcriptional factor CsrA is stated as being the only regulator essential for the use of glycolytic substrates. A dozen enzymes in the central carbon metabolism (CCM) have been reported as potentially controlled by CsrA, but its impact on the CCM functioning has not been demonstrated. Here, a multiscale analysis was performed in a wild-type strain and its isogenic mutant attenuated for CsrA (including growth parameters, gene expression levels, metabolite pools, abundance of enzymes and fluxes). Data integration and regulation analysis showed a coordinated control of the expression of glycolytic enzymes. This also revealed the imbalance of metabolite pools in the csrA mutant upper glycolysis, before the phosphofructokinase PfkA step. This imbalance is associated with a glucose-phosphate stress. Restoring PfkA activity in the csrA mutant strain suppressed this stress and increased the mutant growth rate on glucose. Thus, the carbon storage regulator system is essential for the effective functioning of the upper glycolysis mainly through its control of PfkA. This work demonstrates the pivotal role of post-transcriptional regulation to shape the carbon metabolism.

  12. Pathogenic Escherichia coli and food handlers in luxury hotels in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyango, Abel O; Kenya, Eucharia U; Mbithi, John J N; Ng'ayo, Musa O

    2009-11-01

    The epidemiology and virulence properties of pathogenic Escherichia coli among food handlers in tourist destination hotels in Kenya are largely uncharacterized. This cross-sectional study among consenting 885 food handlers working in nine luxurious tourist hotels in Nairobi, Kenya determined the epidemiology, virulence properties, antibiotics susceptibility profiles and conjugation abilities of pathogenic Escherichia coli. Pathogenic Escherichia coli was detected among 39 (4.4%) subjects, including 1.8% enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) harboring aggR genes, 1.2% enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) expressing both LT and STp toxins, 1.1% enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and 0.2% Shiga-like Escherichia coli (EHEC) both harboring eaeA and stx2 genes respectively. All the pathotypes had increased surface hydrophobicity. Using multivariate analyses, food handlers with loose stools were more likely to be infected with pathogenic Escherichia coli. Majority 53.8% of the pathotypes were resistant to tetracycline with 40.2% being multi-drug resistant. About 85.7% pathotypes trans-conjugated with Escherichia coli K12 F(-) NA(r) LA. The carriage of multi-drug resistant, toxin expressing pathogenic Escherichia coli by this population is of public health concern because exposure to low doses can result in infection. Screening food handlers and implementing public awareness programs is recommended as an intervention to control transmission of enteric pathogens.

  13. Biogenesis of inner membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luirink, Joen; Yu, Zhong; Wagner, Samuel; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2012-06-01

    The inner membrane proteome of the model organism Escherichia coli is composed of inner membrane proteins, lipoproteins and peripherally attached soluble proteins. Our knowledge of the biogenesis of inner membrane proteins is rapidly increasing. This is in particular true for the early steps of biogenesis - protein targeting to and insertion into the membrane. However, our knowledge of inner membrane protein folding and quality control is still fragmentary. Furthering our knowledge in these areas will bring us closer to understand the biogenesis of individual inner membrane proteins in the context of the biogenesis of the inner membrane proteome of Escherichia coli as a whole. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biogenesis/Assembly of Respiratory Enzyme Complexes.

  14. Tranformasi Fragmen Dna Kromosom Xanthomonas Campestris ke dalam Escherichia Coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wibowo Mangunwardoyo

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Research on DNA transformation of Xanthomonas campestris into Escherichia coli DH5αα using plasmid vector Escherichia coli (pUC19. was carried out. DNA chromosome was isolated using CTAB method, alkali lysis method was used to isolate DNA plasmid. Both of DNA plasmid and chromosome were digested using restriction enzyme EcoRI. Competent cell was prepared with CaCl2 and heat shock method for transformation procedure. The result revealed transformation obtain 5 white colonies, with transformation frequency was 1,22 x 10-8 colony/competent cell. Electrophoresis analysis showed the DNA fragment (insert in range 0.5 – 7,5 kb. Further research should be carried out to prepare the genomic library to obtain better result of transformant.

  15. Mechanobiology of Antimicrobial Resistant Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajkarimi, Mehrdad; Harrison, Scott H; Hung, Albert M; Graves, Joseph L

    2016-01-01

    A majority of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in the United States are associated with biofilms. Nanoscale biophysical measures are increasingly revealing that adhesive and viscoelastic properties of bacteria play essential roles across multiple stages of biofilm development. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) applied to strains with variation in antimicrobial resistance enables new opportunities for investigating the function of adhesive forces (stickiness) in biofilm formation. AFM force spectroscopy analysis of a field strain of Listeria innocua and the strain Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 revealed differing adhesive forces between antimicrobial resistant and nonresistant strains. Significant increases in stickiness were found at the nanonewton level for strains of Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli in association with benzalkonium chloride and silver nanoparticle resistance respectively. This advancement in the usage of AFM provides for a fast and reliable avenue for analyzing antimicrobial resistant cells and the molecular dynamics of biofilm formation as a protective mechanism.

  16. The versatile strategies of Escherichia coli pathotypes: a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Sousa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread species Escherichia coli includes a broad variety of different types, ranging from highly pathogenic strains to avirulent isolates. Few microorganisms are as versatile as E. coli. Pathogenic strains remain a leading cause of severe and persistent infant diarrhea in developing countries. They may be limited to colonization of a mucosal surface or can disseminate throughout the body and have been implicated in urinary tract infection, sepsis/meningitis and gastrointestinal infection. The human gastrointestinal tract is susceptible to diarrheagenic E. coli infections. Escherichia coli have effectively managed to subvert the host cytoskeleton for their own purposes causing substantial diarrheal disease, a major public health problem worldwide. This review deals with the different strategies regarding E. coli as a pathogen and the virulence traits of its pathotypes highlighting the species as a commensal, opportunistic and specialized pathogen.

  17. Posttranslational Modifications of Ribosomal Proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterchuk, M V; Sergiev, P V; Dontsova, O A

    2011-04-01

    А number of ribosomal proteins inEscherichia coliundergo posttranslational modifications. Six ribosomal proteins are methylated (S11, L3, L11, L7/L12, L16, and L33), three proteins are acetylated (S5, S18, and L7), and protein S12 is methylthiolated. Extra amino acid residues are added to protein S6. С-terminal amino acid residues are partially removed from protein L31. The functional significance of these modifications has remained unclear. These modifications are not vital to the cells, and it is likely that they have regulatory functions. This paper reviews all the known posttranslational modifications of ribosomal proteins inEscherichia coli. Certain enzymes responsible for the modifications and mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are also discussed.

  18. Specific mistranslation in hisT mutants of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J

    1982-01-01

    Certain strains of Escherichia coli mistranslate at very high frequencies when starved for asparagine or histidine. This mistranslation is the result of misreading events on the ribosome. The introduction of a hisT mutation into such a strain decreases the frequency of mistranslation during histidine starvation but not during asparagine starvation. The most likely explanation is that the replacement of the pseudouridine residue in the anticodon loop of glutamine specific transfer ribonucleic acid by uridine in hisT mutants leads to an increase in fidelity of transfer ribonucleic acid function. The hisT gene in Escherichia coli has also been more accurately mapped, giving the gene order purF-hisT-aroC-fadL-dsdA.

  19. Escherichia fergusonii Associated with Pneumonia in a Beef Cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo M. Rimoldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An adult Angus cow developed hyperthermia, prostration, and respiratory distress, dying 36 hours after the onset of clinical signs. The main finding during postmortem examination was a severe focally extensive pneumonia. Icterus and a chronic mastitis were also noticed. Histologic examination of the lungs detected fibrinonecrotic pneumonia, with large number of oat cells and intralesional Gram-negative bacterial colonies. Samples from lung lesions were collected, and a pure growth of Escherichia fergusonii was obtained. E. fergusonii is a member of Enterobacteriaceae, related to Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp. In veterinary medicine, E. fergusonii has been reported in calves and sheep with clinical cases suggestive of salmonellosis; in a horse and a goat with enteritis and septicemia; and in ostriches with fibrinonecrotic typhlitis. To our knowledge, this report represents the first description of E. fergusonii associated with an acute pneumonia in cattle.

  20. A Prophage-Encoded Small RNA Controls Metabolism and Cell Division in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Divya; Ragunathan, Preethi T; Fei, Jingyi; Vanderpool, Carin K

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of small RNAs (sRNAs) have been identified in diverse bacterial species, and while the functions of most remain unknown, some regulate key processes, particularly stress responses. The sRNA DicF was identified over 25 years ago as an inhibitor of cell division but since then has remained uncharacterized. DicF consists of 53 nucleotides and is encoded by a gene carried on a prophage (Qin) in the genomes of many Escherichia coli strains. We demonstrated that DicF inhibits cell division via direct base pairing with ftsZ mRNA to repress translation and prevent new synthesis of the bacterial tubulin homolog FtsZ. Systems analysis using computational and experimental methods identified additional mRNA targets of DicF: xylR and pykA mRNAs, encoding the xylose uptake and catabolism regulator and pyruvate kinase, respectively. Genetic analyses showed that DicF directly base pairs with and represses translation of these targets. Phenotypes of cells expressing DicF variants demonstrated that DicF-associated growth inhibition is not solely due to repression of ftsZ, indicating that the physiological consequences of DicF-mediated regulation extend beyond effects on cell division caused by reduced FtsZ synthesis. IMPORTANCE sRNAs are ubiquitous and versatile regulators of bacterial gene expression. A number of well-characterized examples in E. coli are highly conserved and present in the E. coli core genome. In contrast, the sRNA DicF (identified over 20 years ago but remaining poorly characterized) is encoded by a gene carried on a defective prophage element in many E. coli genomes. Here, we characterize DicF in order to better understand how horizontally acquired sRNA regulators impact bacterial gene expression and physiology. Our data confirm the long-hypothesized DicF-mediated regulation of ftsZ, encoding the bacterial tubulin homolog required for cell division. We further uncover DicF-mediated posttranscriptional control of metabolic gene expression. Ectopic

  1. Plasmolysis during the division cycle of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Olijhoek, A J; Eden, C G; Trueba, F J; Pas, E; Nanninga, N

    1982-01-01

    Cells of Escherichia coli were plasmolyzed with sucrose. They were classified according to length by way of electron micrographs taken from samples prepared by agar filtration. The percentage of plasmolyzed cells increased about two- and threefold between mean cell sizes of newborn and separating cells. However, dividing cells were less frequently plasmolyzed than nondividing cells of the same length class. Analysis of cell halves (prospective daughters) in dividing cells showed that they beh...

  2. Role for the female in bacterial conjugation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifelder, D

    1967-08-01

    Hfr and F' Lac male strains of Escherichia coli were mated with purine-requiring females which had been starved for purine. These females formed mating pairs with the males. However, a mating in the absence of purine markedly reduced the yield of recombinants. Transfer of F' Lac or of lambda prophage also occurred infrequently. It was concluded that deoxyribonucleic acid transfer from male to female requires some, as yet unknown, function of the female.

  3. Arginine Catabolism and the Arginine Succinyltransferase Pathway in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Barbara L.; Kiupakis, Alexandros K.; Reitzer, Lawrence J.

    1998-01-01

    Arginine catabolism produces ammonia without transferring nitrogen to another compound, yet the only known pathway of arginine catabolism in Escherichia coli (through arginine decarboxylase) does not produce ammonia. Our aims were to find the ammonia-producing pathway of arginine catabolism in E. coli and to examine its function. We showed that the only previously described pathway of arginine catabolism, which does not produce ammonia, accounted for only 3% of the arginine consumed. A search...

  4. Probability of recovering pathogenic Escherichia coli from foods.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, W E; Ferreira, J. L; Payne, W L; Jones, V.M.

    1985-01-01

    The probability of recovering pathogenic Escherichia coli from food by the Bacteriological Analytical Manual method was determined by the effects of several factors: the number of strains per food, the ability of pathogenic strains to survive enrichment, and the frequency of plasmid loss during enrichment. Biochemical patterns indicated the presence of about six E. coli strains per food sample. About half of the strains isolated from humans did not survive enrichment. Among those which grew, ...

  5. Prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli in suckling rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) in suckling rabbit causes collibacillosis, which is characterized by sever yellow diarrhea, poor growth and high mortalities. This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of diarrheagenic E. coli in suckling rabbits in Egypt. Additionally, expression of some virulence-associated genes in the isolated E. coli serotypes were examined using the polymerase chain reaction. Finally, antibiogram of the identified E. coli serotypes was also investig...

  6. Multiplex PCR Assay for Identification of Human Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Toma, Claudia; Lu, Yan; Higa, Naomi; Nakasone, Noboru; Isabel CHINEN; Baschkier, Ariela; Rivas, Marta; Iwanaga, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    A multiplex PCR assay for the identification of human diarrheagenic Escherichia coli was developed. The targets selected for each category were eae for enteropathogenic E. coli, stx for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, elt and est for enterotoxigenic E. coli, ipaH for enteroinvasive E. coli, and aggR for enteroaggregative E. coli. This assay allowed the categorization of a diarrheagenic E. coli strain in a single reaction tube.

  7. Maturation of the Escherichia coli divisome occurs in two steps.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarsman, M.E.G.; Piette, A.; Fraipont, C.; Vinkenvleugel, T.M.F.; Nguyen-Distèche, M.; den Blaauwen, T.

    2005-01-01

    Cell division proteins FtsZ (FtsA, ZipA, ZapA), FtsE/X, FtsK, FtsQ, FtsL/B, FtsW, PBP3, FtsN and AmiC localize at mid cell in Escherichia coli in an interdependent order as listed. To investigate whether this reflects a time dependent maturation of the divisome, the average cell age at which FtsZ,

  8. Methane production from kitchen waste using Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayalakshmi, S; Joseph, Kurian; Sukumaran, V

    2007-04-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain isolated from biogas plant sludge was examined for its ability to enhance biogas from kitchen waste during solid phase anaerobic digestion. The laboratory experiments were conducted for total solid concentrations of 20% and 22%. Kitchen waste was characterized for physico-chemical parameters and laboratory experiments were conducted with and without E. coli strain. It was found that the reactor with E. coli produced 17% more biogas than the reactors that are operated without E. coli strain.

  9. Complementation analysis of eleven tryptophanase mutations in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M K; Yudkin, M D

    1979-10-01

    Nine independent mutants deficient in tryptophanase activity were isolated. Each mutation was transferred to a specialized transducing phage that carries the tryptophanase region of the Escherichia coli chromosome. The nine phages thus produced, and a tenth carrying a previously characterized tryptophanase mutation, were used to lysogenize a bacterial strain harbouring a mutation in the tryptophanase structural gene and also a suppressor of polarity. In no case was complementation observed; we conclude that there is no closely linked positive regulatory gene for tryptophanase.

  10. Molecular Evolutionary Relationships of Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli and Shigella spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Lan, Ruiting; Alles, M. Chehani; Donohoe, Kathy; Marina B Martinez; Reeves, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC), a distinctive pathogenic form of E. coli causing dysentery, is similar in many properties to bacteria placed in the four species of Shigella. Shigella has been separated as a genus but in fact comprises several clones of E. coli. The evolutionary relationships of 32 EIEC strains of 12 serotypes have been determined by sequencing of four housekeeping genes and two plasmid genes which were used previously to determine the relationships of Shigella strains...

  11. DNA microarray analysis of fim mutations in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Ussery, David; Workman, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion is often mediated by complex polymeric surface structures referred to as fimbriae. Type I fimbriae of Escherichia coli represent the archetypical and best characterised fimbrial system. These adhesive organelles mediate binding to D-mannose and are directly associated with viru...... the number of fimbriae expressed on the cell surface. The use of high-resolution oligonucleotide arrays for defining points of transcription initiation and termination is also demonstrated....

  12. Characterization of Aspergillus oryzae aspartyl aminopeptidase expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Jun; Tanaka, Hisaki; Akagawa, Takumi; Mogi, Yoshinobu; Yamazaki, Tatsuo

    2007-10-01

    To characterize aspartyl aminopeptidase from Aspergillus oryzae, the recombinant enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme cleaves N-terminal acidic amino acids. About 30% activity was retained in 20% NaCl. Digestion of defatted soybean by the enzyme resulted in an increase in the glutamic acid content, suggesting that the enzyme is potentially responsible for the release of glutamic acid in soy sauce mash.

  13. Escherichia coli and virus isolated from ''sticky kits''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M.; Scheutz, F.; Strandbygaard, Bertel

    1996-01-01

    A total of 121 Escherichia coli strains isolated from 3-week-old mink kits were serotyped and examined for virulence factors. 56 strains were isolated from healthy kits while 65 were from ''sticky kits''. Among these, 34 different serotypes were detected. No difference in serotypes or the presenc...... of virulence factors could be detected between healthy and diseased kits. By electron microscopy of faecal samples corona-, rota-, and calicivirus were demonstrated among healthy as well as diseased kits....

  14. Two Tales of Prokaryotic Genomic Diversity: Escherichia coli and Halophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejla Pašić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prokaryotes are generally characterized by vast genomic diversity that has been shaped by mutations, horizontal gene transfer, bacteriocins and phage predation. Enormous genetic diversity has developed as a result of stresses imposed in harsh environments and the ability of microorganisms to adapt. Two examples of prokaryotic diversity are presented: on intraspecies level, exemplified by Escherichia coli, and the diversity of the hypersaline environment, with the discussion of food-related health issues and biotechnological potential.

  15. Engineered biosynthesis of bacterial aromatic polyketides in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wenjun; Li, Yanran; Tang, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial aromatic polyketides are important therapeutic compounds including front line antibiotics and anticancer drugs. It is one of the last remaining major classes of natural products of which the biosynthesis has not been reconstituted in the genetically superior host Escherichia coli. Here, we demonstrate the engineered biosynthesis of bacterial aromatic polyketides in E. coli by using a dissected and reassembled fungal polyketide synthase (PKS). The minimal PKS of the megasynthase PKS4...

  16. Osmoprotection of Escherichia coli by ectoine: uptake and accumulation characteristics.

    OpenAIRE

    Jebbar, M; Talibart, R; Gloux, K; Bernard, T.; BLANCO, C.

    1992-01-01

    Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) is a cyclic amino acid, identified as a compatible solute in moderately halophilic bacteria. Exogenously provided ectoine was found to stimulate growth of Escherichia coli in media of inhibitory osmotic strength. The stimulation was independent of any specific solute, electrolyte or nonelectrolyte. It is accumulated in E. coli cells proportionally to the osmotic strength of the medium, and it is not metabolized. Its osmoprotect...

  17. Multiplex PCR Assay for Identification of Human Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    A multiplex PCR assay for the identification of human diarrheagenic Escherichia coli was developed. The targets selected for each category were eae for enteropathogenic E. coli, stx for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, elt and est for enterotoxigenic E. coli, ipaH for enteroinvasive E. coli, and aggR for enteroaggregative E. coli. This assay allowed the categorization of a diarrheagenic E. coli strain in a single reaction tube.

  18. Current perspectivesin pathogenesis and antimicrobial resistance of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Haishen; Hong, Xiaoping; Li, Xuefen

    2015-08-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an emerging pathogen that causes acute and persistent diarrhea in children and adults. While the pathogenic mechanisms of EAEC intestinal colonization have been uncovered (including bacterial adhesion, enterotoxin and cytotoxin secretion, and stimulation of mucosal inflammation), those of severe extraintestinal infections remain largely unknown. The recent emergence of multidrug resistant EAEC represents an alarming public health threat and clinical challenge, and research on the molecular mechanisms of resistance is urgently needed.

  19. Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia fergusonii: a Case of Acute Cystitis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Vincenzo; Catavitello, Chiara; Talia, Marzia; Manna, Assunta; Pompetti, Franca; Favaro, Marco; Fontana, Carla; Febbo, Fabio; Balbinot, Andrea; Di Berardino, Fabio; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Di Zacomo, Silvia; Esattore, Francesca; D'Antonio, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    We report a case in which Escherichia fergusonii, an emerging pathogen in various types of infections, was associated with cystitis in a 52-year-old woman. The offending strain was found to be multidrug resistant. Despite in vitro activity, beta-lactam treatment failed because of a lack of patient compliance with therapy. The work confirms the pathogenic potential of E. fergusonii. PMID:18256229

  20. Effect of cobalt on Escherichia coli metabolism and metalloporphyrin formation

    OpenAIRE

    Majtan, Tomas; Frerman, Frank E.; Kraus, Jan P.

    2010-01-01

    Toxicity in Escherichia coli resulting from high concentrations of cobalt has been explained by competition of cobalt with iron in various metabolic processes including Fe–S cluster assembly, sulfur assimilation, production of free radicals and reduction of free thiol pool. Here we present another aspect of increased cobalt concentrations in the culture medium resulting in the production of cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX), which was incorporated into heme proteins including membrane-bound c...