WorldWideScience

Sample records for bso-induced glutathione deprivation

  1. Glutathione deficiency induced by cystine and/or methionine deprivation does not affect thyroid hormone deiodination in cultured rat hepatocytes and monkey hepatocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Robbins, J.

    1981-09-01

    To elucidate the recently advanced hypothesis that glutathione (L-gamma-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl glycine (GSH)) regulates deiodinating enzyme activities, accounting for the decreased conversion of T4 to T3 in the liver of fetal and starved animals, we investigated thyroid hormone metabolism in GSH-depleted neoplastic and normal hepatocytes. In monkey hepatocarcinoma cells, intracellular total GSH decreased below 10% of the control value (approximately 25 micrograms/mg protein) when cells were grown for 44 h in medium deficient in cystine and methionine or in cystine alone. The latter finding indicated that transsulfuration from methionine to cysteine was defective in these neoplastic cells. In primary cultured adult rat hepatocytes, on the other hand, the transsulfuration pathway was intact, and total GSH decreased below 10% of control (approximately 20 micrograms/mg protein) only in cells grown in cystine- and methionine-deficient medium. In both cell types, the oxidized GSH fraction remained constant (2-5% of total). Incubation with 125I-labeled T4 and T3, followed by chromatography, was used to evaluate 5-deiodination in hepatocarcinoma cells and both 5- and 5'-deiodination in normal hepatocytes. Deiodination was not decreased by GSH deficiency in either case, but was actually increased in hepatocarcinoma cells. This resulted from an increase in the Vmax of 5-deiodinase related to growth arrest. Diamide at 2 mM reversibly inhibited both 5'- and 5'-deiodination in rat hepatocytes, accompanied by decreased total GSH as well as increased GSH disulfide (27% of total). The data suggest that GSH is so abundant in the liver that hepatocytes can tolerate a greater than 90% decrease in intracellular concentration without any change in thyroid hormone deiodination and indicate that altered thyroid hormone metabolism in the fetus and in starvation cannot be accounted for by a decreased hepatic GSH concentration.

  2. Glutathione in cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudes, D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of light and O2 on glutathione production were determined. Results of light and dark studies under normal and reduced oxygen tensions were compared to determine the effect of reduction in oxygen tension on glutathione levels. The growth rate of Anacystis nidulans and concurrent production of glutathione is presented. The generation of time of Anacystis nidulans was approximately 12 hours. Results of light and dark incubation of Aphanothece halophytica dominated planktonic microbial community from Pond 4 and Anacystis nidulans under high and low oxygen tension is also presented. It appears that light grown Anacystis nidulans cells have equal amounts of glutathione while dark grown cells produce more glutathione in the presence of increased O2.

  3. GLUTATHIONE TRANSFERASE, GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE AND GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE OF CAECUM AND LIVER OF PIG

    OpenAIRE

    FEDETS O.M.

    2009-01-01

    The content of glutathione and the activity of enzymes have been investigated. The data of glutathione, glutathione transferase and glutathione peroxidase are the highest in the liver. In mucosa of caecum activity of glutathione reductase is the highest than in liver.

  4. Glutathione and mitochondria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ribas, Vicent; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the main non-protein thiol in cells whose functions are dependent on the redox-active thiol of its cysteine moiety that serves as a cofactor for a number of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes...

  5. Glutathione and glutathione S-transferases in Barrett's epithelium.

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, W. H.; Roelofs, H. M.; Hectors, M P; Nagengast, F. M.; Jansen, J B

    1993-01-01

    Glutathione content, enzyme activity and isoenzyme composition of glutathione S-transferases were assayed in normal and Barrett's esophageal epithelium of ten patients with Barrett's esophagus. In addition, gastric and duodenal specimens from the same patients were also investigated. Glutathione content, glutathione S-transferase enzyme activity as well as glutathione S-transferase pi content were all significantly lower in Barrett's epithelium as compared to normal esophageal mucosa. In cont...

  6. Glutathione Levels in Human Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamcsik, Michael P.; Kasibhatla, Mohit S.; Teeter, Stephanie D.; Colvin, O. Michael

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes clinical studies in which glutathione was measured in tumor tissue from patients with brain, breast, gastrointestinal, gynecological, head and neck and lung cancer. Glutathione tends to be elevated in breast, ovarian, head and neck and lung cancer and lower in brain and liver tumors compared to disease-free tissue. Cervical, colorectal, gastric and esophageal cancers show both higher and lower levels of tumor glutathione. Some studies show an inverse relationship between patient survival and tumor glutathione. Based on this survey, we recommend approaches that may improve the clinical value of glutathione as a biomarker. PMID:22900535

  7. Exploring the Lean Phenotype of Glutathione-Depleted Mice: Thiol, Amino Acid and Fatty Acid Profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amany K Elshorbagy

    Full Text Available Although reduced glutathione (rGSH is decreased in obese mice and humans, block of GSH synthesis by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO results in a lean, insulin-sensitive phenotype. Data is lacking about the effect of BSO on GSH precursors, cysteine and glutamate. Plasma total cysteine (tCys is positively associated with stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD activity and adiposity in humans and animal models.To explore the phenotype, amino acid and fatty acid profiles in BSO-treated mice.Male C3H/HeH mice aged 11 weeks were fed a high-fat diet with or without BSO in drinking water (30 mmol/L for 8 weeks. Amino acid and fatty acid changes were assessed, as well as food consumption, energy expenditure, locomotor activity, body composition and liver vacuolation (steatosis.Despite higher food intake, BSO decreased particularly fat mass but also lean mass (both P<0.001, and prevented fatty liver vacuolation. Physical activity increased during the dark phase. BSO decreased plasma free fatty acids and enhanced insulin sensitivity. BSO did not alter liver rGSH, but decreased plasma total GSH (tGSH and rGSH (by ~70%, and liver tGSH (by 82%. Glutamate accumulated in plasma and liver. Urine excretion of cysteine and its precursors was increased by BSO. tCys, rCys and cystine decreased in plasma (by 23-45%, P<0.001 for all, but were maintained in liver, at the expense of decreased taurine. Free and total plasma concentrations of the SCD products, oleic and palmitoleic acids were decreased (by 27-38%, P <0.001 for all.Counterintuitively, block of GSH synthesis decreases circulating tCys, raising the question of whether the BSO-induced obesity-resistance is linked to cysteine depletion. Cysteine-supplementation of BSO-treated mice is warranted to dissect the effects of cysteine and GSH depletion on energy metabolism.

  8. Summarizing multiple deprivation indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Cappellari, Lorenzo; Jenkins, Stephen P.

    2006-01-01

    Deprivation scales derived from multiple, typically dichotomous, indicators, are widely used to monitor households’ standards of living, and to complement measures of living standards based on income. We use an item response modelling (IRM) framework to address several issues concerning the derivation of deprivation scales in general and the use of sum-score deprivation indices in particular. Although we favour the IRM approach over the sum-score one in principle, we find in an illustrative...

  9. Deprivation and Social Exclusion

    OpenAIRE

    BOSSERT, Walter; D'AMBROSIO, Conchita; PERAGINE, Vito

    2004-01-01

    Social exclusion manifests itself in the lack of an individual’s access to functionings as compared to other members of society. Thus, the concept is closely related to deprivation. We view deprivation as having two basic determinants: the lack of identification with other members of society and the aggregate alienation experienced by an agent with respect to those with fewer functioning failures. We use an axiomatic approach to characterize classes of deprivation and exclusion measures and a...

  10. Glutathione conjugation and contaminant transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Jennifer A.; Thurman, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    The recent identification of a novel sulfonated metabolite of alachlor in groundwater and metolachlor in soil is likely the result of glutathione conjugation. Glutathione conjugation is an important biochemical reaction that leads, in the case of alachlor, to the formation of a rather difficult to detect, water-soluble, and therefore highly mobile, sulfonated metabolite. Research from weed science, toxicology, and biochemistry is discussed to support the hypothesis that glutathione conjugation is a potentially important detoxification pathway carried out by aquatic and terrestrial plants and soil microorganisms. A brief review of the biochemical basis for glutathione conjugation is presented. We recommend that multidisciplinary research focus on the occurrence and expression of glutathione and its attendant enzymes in plants and microorganisms, relationships between electrophilic substrate structure and enzyme activity, and the potential exploitation of plants and microorganisms that are competent in glutathione conjugation for phytoremediation and bioremediation.

  11. Private deprivation of liberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard

    2017-04-02

    The Court of Appeal has ruled that a person is deprived of their liberty in their own home even though care and treatment was provided in the person's own home and funded using the person's money. In this article Richard Griffith discusses when a private deprivation of liberty must be authorised by a welfare order from the Court of Protection.

  12. L-carnitine prevents memory impairment induced by chronic REM-sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Rababa'h, Abeer M; Owaisi, Amani; Khabour, Omar F

    2017-05-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) negatively impacts memory, which was related to oxidative stress induced damage. L-carnitine is a naturally occurring compound, synthesized endogenously in mammalian species and known to possess antioxidant properties. In this study, the effect of L-carnitine on learning and memory impairment induced by rapid eye movement sleep (REM-sleep) deprivation was investigated. REM-sleep deprivation was induced using modified multiple platform model (8h/day, for 6 weeks). Simultaneously, L-carnitine was administered (300mg/kg/day) intraperitoneally for 6 weeks. Thereafter, the radial arm water maze (RAWM) was used to assess spatial learning and memory. Additionally, the hippocampus levels of antioxidant biomarkers/enzymes: reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), GSH/GSSG ratio, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) were assessed. The results showed that chronic REM-sleep deprivation impaired both short- and long-term memory (Psleep deprivation induced reduction in the hippocampus ratio of GSH/GSSG, activity of catalase, GPx, and SOD. No change was observed in TBARS among tested groups (P>0.05). In conclusion, chronic REM-sleep deprivation induced memory impairment, and treatment with L-carnitine prevented this impairment through normalizing antioxidant mechanisms in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dimethyl Fumarate Induces Glutathione Recycling by Upregulation of Glutathione Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christina; Dietrich, Michael; Herrmann, Ann-Kathrin; Schacht, Teresa; Albrecht, Philipp; Methner, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration in multiple sclerosis has been linked to oxidative stress. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an effective oral therapeutic option shown to reduce disease activity and progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. DMF activates the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) leading to increased synthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and prominent neuroprotection in vitro . We previously demonstrated that DMF is capable of raising GSH levels even when glutathione synthesis is inhibited, suggesting enhanced GSH recycling. Here, we found that DMF indeed induces glutathione reductase (GSR), a homodimeric flavoprotein that catalyzes GSSG reduction to GSH by using NADPH as a reducing cofactor. Knockdown of GSR using a pool of E. coli RNase III-digested siRNAs or pharmacological inhibition of GSR, however, also induced the antioxidant response rendering it impossible to verify the suspected attenuation of DMF-mediated neuroprotection. However, in cystine-free medium, where GSH synthesis is abolished, pharmacological inhibition of GSR drastically reduced the effect of DMF on glutathione recycling. We conclude that DMF increases glutathione recycling through induction of glutathione reductase.

  14. Dimethyl Fumarate Induces Glutathione Recycling by Upregulation of Glutathione Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Hoffmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal degeneration in multiple sclerosis has been linked to oxidative stress. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF is an effective oral therapeutic option shown to reduce disease activity and progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. DMF activates the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2 leading to increased synthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH and prominent neuroprotection in vitro. We previously demonstrated that DMF is capable of raising GSH levels even when glutathione synthesis is inhibited, suggesting enhanced GSH recycling. Here, we found that DMF indeed induces glutathione reductase (GSR, a homodimeric flavoprotein that catalyzes GSSG reduction to GSH by using NADPH as a reducing cofactor. Knockdown of GSR using a pool of E. coli RNase III-digested siRNAs or pharmacological inhibition of GSR, however, also induced the antioxidant response rendering it impossible to verify the suspected attenuation of DMF-mediated neuroprotection. However, in cystine-free medium, where GSH synthesis is abolished, pharmacological inhibition of GSR drastically reduced the effect of DMF on glutathione recycling. We conclude that DMF increases glutathione recycling through induction of glutathione reductase.

  15. Short-term sleep deprivation leads to decreased systemic redox metabolites and altered epigenetic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Malav S; Holger, Dana; Bui, Anh Tuyet; Craddock, Travis J A; Tartar, Jaime L

    2017-01-01

    Sleep is critical for repair as well as the rejuvenation processes in the body and many of these functions are regulated via underlying cellular metabolic homeostasis. Changes in sleep pattern are reported to alter such metabolic function resulting in altered disease susceptibility or behavior. Here, we measured the extent to which overnight total sleep deprivation (SD) in young adult humans can influence systemic (plasma-derived) redox-metabolism including the major antioxidant, glutathione as well as DNA methylation levels. Nineteen participants (n = 19, μ age = 21, SD = 3.09) underwent morning testing before and after overnight total SD. Biochemical measures before and after SD revealed that glutathione, ATP, cysteine, and homocysteine levels were significantly reduced following one night of sleep deprivation (all p's sleep deprivation (maintaining wakefulness) uses up metabolic reserves, we observed that morning cortisol levels were blunted after sleep deprivation. There were no significant correlations between self-reported or actigraphy-measured sleep and the biochemical measurements, strongly indicating that prior sleep behavior did not have any direct influence on the biochemical measures taken at baseline or after sleep deprivation. Results from the current investigation supports the previous literature implicating the induction of oxidative stress and ATP depletion with sleep deprivation. Furthermore, such altered antioxidant status can also induce downstream epigenetic changes. Although we did not measure the specific genes that were altered under the influence of such sleep deprivation, such epigenetic changes could potentially contribute towards disease predisposition.

  16. The neuroprotective effect of vitamin E on chronic sleep deprivation-induced memory impairment: the role of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Khabour, Omar F; Rashid, Baraa Abu; Damaj, Imad M; Salah, Heba A

    2012-01-01

    Sleep deprivation induces oxidative stress and impairs learning and memory processes. Vitamin E, on the other hand, is a strong antioxidant that has neuroprotective effect on the brain. In this study, we examined the potential protective effect of chronic administration of vitamin E on chronic sleep deprivation-induced cognitive impairment. In addition, possible molecular targets for vitamin E effects on chronic sleep deprivation-induced cognitive impairment were determined. Sleep deprivation was induced in rats using modified multiple platform model. Vitamin E (100mg/kg) was administered to animals by oral gavage. Behavioral study was conducted to test the spatial learning and memory using the radial arm water maze (RAWM). In addition, the hippocampus was dissected out and antioxidant markers including glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and GSH/GSSG, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were assessed. The results of this project revealed that chronic sleep deprivation impaired both (short- and long-term) memories (Psleep deprivation-induced reduction in the hippocampus GSH/GSSG ratio, and activity of catalase, SOD, and GPx. In conclusion, sleep deprivation induces memory impairment, and treatment with vitamin E prevented this impairment probably through its antioxidant action in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of the effect of pentoxifylline on sleep-deprivation induced memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Khabour, Omar F; Tashtoush, Noor H; Al-Azzam, Sayer I; Mhaidat, Nizar M

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we examined the ability of Pentoxifylline (PTX) to prevent sleep deprivation induced memory impairment probably through decreasing oxidative stress. Sleep deprivation was chronically induced 8 h/day for 6 weeks in rats using modified multiple platform model. Concurrently, PTX (100 mg/kg) was administered to animals on daily basis. After 6 weeks of treatment, behavioral studies were conducted to test the spatial learning and memory using the Radial Arm Water Maze. Additionally, the hippocampus was dissected; and levels/activities of antioxidant defense biomarkers glutathione reduced (GSH), glutathione oxidized (GSSG), GSH/GSSG ratio, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), were assessed. The results show that chronic sleep deprivation impaired short- and long-term memories, which was prevented by chronic treatment with PTX. Additionally, PTX normalized sleep deprivation-induced reduction in the hippocampus GSH/GSSG ratio (P sleep deprivation induces memory impairment, and treatment with PTX prevented this impairment probably through normalizing antioxidant mechanisms in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Sleep deprivation and false memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenda, Steven J; Patihis, Lawrence; Loftus, Elizabeth F; Lewis, Holly C; Fenn, Kimberly M

    2014-09-01

    Many studies have investigated factors that affect susceptibility to false memories. However, few have investigated the role of sleep deprivation in the formation of false memories, despite overwhelming evidence that sleep deprivation impairs cognitive function. We examined the relationship between self-reported sleep duration and false memories and the effect of 24 hr of total sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories. We found that under certain conditions, sleep deprivation can increase the risk of developing false memories. Specifically, sleep deprivation increased false memories in a misinformation task when participants were sleep deprived during event encoding, but did not have a significant effect when the deprivation occurred after event encoding. These experiments are the first to investigate the effect of sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories, which can have dire consequences. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Sleep Deprivation and Advice Taking

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Alexander Häusser; Johannes Leder; Charlene Ketturat; Martin Dresler; Nadira Sophie Faber

    2016-01-01

    Judgements and decisions in many political, economic or medical contexts are often made while sleep deprived. Furthermore, in such contexts individuals are required to integrate information provided by - more or less qualified - advisors. We asked if sleep deprivation affects advice taking. We conducted a 2 (sleep deprivation: yes vs. no) x 2 (competency of advisor: medium vs. high) experimental study to examine the effects of sleep deprivation on advice taking in an estimation task. We compa...

  20. Sulfur Deprivation Results in Oxidative Perturbation in Chlorella sorokiniana (211/8k).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbitani, Giovanna; Vona, Vincenza; Bottone, Claudia; Petriccione, Milena; Carfagna, Simona

    2015-05-01

    Sulfur deficiency in plant cells has not been considered as a potential abiotic factor that can induce oxidative stress. We studied the antioxidant defense system of Chlorella sorokiniana cultured under sulfur (S) deficiency, imposed for a maximum period of 24 h, to evaluate the effect of an S shortage on oxidative stress. S deprivation induced an immediate (30 min) but transient increase in the intracellular H2O2 content, which suggests that S limitation can lead to a temporary redox disturbance. After 24 h, S deficiency in Chlorella cells decreased the glutathione content to Chlorella cells. The accumulation of total ascorbate, changes in the reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratios and an increase in the activity of SOD and APX enzymes indicate that oxidative perturbation occurs during S deprivation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Relative deprivation and intergroup prejudice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pettigrew, T.F.; Christ, O.; Wagner, U.; Meertens, R.W.; van Dick, R.; Zick, A.

    2008-01-01

    Using three diverse European surveys, we test the relationship between relative deprivation (RD) and anti-immigrant prejudice. We find that both group relative deprivation (GRD) and individual relative deprivation (IRD) are found primarily among working-class respondents who are politically

  2. Sleep deprivation and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsenga, Simon

    1992-01-01

    The association between depression and sleep disturbances is perhaps as old as makind. In view of the longstanding experience with this association it is amazing that only some 20 years ago, a few depressed patients attracted attention to the fact that Total Sleep Deprivation (TSD) had

  3. Efficacy of free glutathione and niosomal glutathione in the treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acetaminophen (APAP) administration results in hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats. The response to three different treatments against APAP poisoning was evaluated. Free glutathione (GSH) (200mg/kg), niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg) and free amino acids (180 mg/kg of N-acetylcysteine and 280 mg/kg of methionine) ...

  4. Active biomonitoring of a subtropical river using glutathione-S ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to establish the level of water quality impairment along a mine effluent receiving river, Pote River in Zimbabwe, using Oreochromis niloticus (Nile tilapia) as an indicator organism. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) enzyme and heat shock protein (HSP 70) expression in the stomach tissue of Nile ...

  5. Protective effect of alprazolam against sleep deprivation-induced behavior alterations and oxidative damage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anant; Kumar, Anil

    2008-04-01

    Sleep deprivation is considered as a risk factor for various diseases. Sleep deprivation leads to behavioral, hormonal, neurochemical and biochemical alterations in the animals. The present study was designed to explore the possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism in protective effect of alprazolam against 72h sleep deprivation-induced behavior alterations and oxidative damage in mice. In the present study, sleep deprivation caused anxiety-like behavior, weight loss, impaired ambulatory movements and oxidative damage as indicated by increase in lipid peroxidation, nitrite level and depletion of reduced glutathione and catalase activity in sleep-deprived mice brain. Treatment with alprazolam (0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg, ip) significantly improved behavioral alterations. Biochemically, alprazolam treatment significantly restored depleted reduced glutathione, catalase activity, reversed raised lipid peroxidation and nitrite level. Combination of flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg) and picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) with lower dose of alprazolam (0.25mg/kg) significantly antagonized protective effect of alprazolam. However, combination of muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) with alprazolam (0.25 mg/kg, ip) potentiated protective effect of alprazolam. On the basis of these results, it might be suggested that alprazolam might produce protective effect by involving GABAergic system against sleep deprivation-induced behavior alterations and related oxidative damage.

  6. The combined effect of sleep deprivation and Western diet on spatial learning and memory: role of BDNF and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Khabour, Omar F; Salah, Heba A; Abu Rashid, Baraa E

    2013-05-01

    Either sleep deprivation or Western diet can impair learning and memory via induction of oxidative stress, which results in neuronal damage and interference with the neurotransmission. In this study, we examined the combined effect of sleep deprivation and Western diet on hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory. In addition, possible molecular targets for sleep deprivation and Western diet-induced cognitive impairments were investigated. Sleep deprivation was induced in rats using the modified multiple platform model simultaneous with the administration of Western diet for 6 weeks. Thereafter, spatial learning and memory were tested using radial arm water maze. At the molecular level, BDNF protein and antioxidant markers including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), GSH/GSSG, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were assessed. The results of this study revealed that sleep deprivation, Western diet, or a combination of both impair short- and long-term memory (P memory was higher than that caused by each factor alone (P sleep deprivation and Western diet decreases BDNF levels and increases oxidative stress in the hippocampus, thus inducing memory impairment that is greater than the impairment produced by each factor alone.

  7. Glutathione role in gallium induced toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asim

    2012-01-26

    GSH) present in tissues. It is very important and interesting to study the reaction of gallium nitrate and glutathione as biomarker of glutathione role in detoxification and conjugation in whole blood components (plasma and ...

  8. The role of glutathione in intestinal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Heather; Bot, Joan; Coster, Jane; Khalil, Alizan; Hall, John C; McCauley, Rosalie D

    2003-01-01

    Glutathione plays an important cytoprotective role in the gut. Animal studies have demonstrated that the provisions of glutathione precursors are protective for different types of free-radical-mediated cellular injury. There is a need to clarify the potential role of glutathione supplementation in ischemia-reperfusion injury and inflammatory bowel disease. More speculative is whether treatment with glutathione precursors can modify the progress of colorectal cancer.

  9. Glutathione protects Lactococcus lactis against oxidative stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Hugenholtz, J.; Abee, T.; Molenaar, D.

    2003-01-01

    Glutathione was found in several dairy Lactococcus lactis strains grown in M17 medium. None of these strains was able to synthesize glutathione. In chemically defined medium, L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain SK11 was able to accumulate up to similar to60 mM glutathione when this compound was added

  10. Consequences of sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzeł-Gryglewska, Jolanta

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the history of research and the results of recent studies on the effects of sleep deprivation in animals and humans. Humans can bear several days of continuous sleeplessness, experiencing deterioration in wellbeing and effectiveness; however, also a shorter reduction in the sleep time may lead to deteriorated functioning. Sleeplessness accounts for impaired perception, difficulties in keeping concentration, vision disturbances, slower reactions, as well as the appearance of microepisodes of sleep during wakefulness which lead to lower capabilities and efficiency of task performance and to increased number of errors. Sleep deprivation results in poor memorizing, schematic thinking, which yields wrong decisions, and emotional disturbances such as deteriorated interpersonal responses and increased aggressiveness. The symptoms are accompanied by brain tissue hypometabolism, particularly in the thalamus, prefrontal, frontal and occipital cortex and motor speech centres. Sleep deficiency intensifies muscle tonus and coexisting tremor, speech performance becomes monotonous and unclear, and sensitivity to pain is higher. Sleeplessness also relates to the changes in the immune response and the pattern of hormonal secretion, of the growth hormone in particular. The risk of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease increases. The impairment of performance which is caused by 20-25 hours of sleeplessness is comparable to that after ethanol intoxication at the level of 0.10% blood alcohol concentration. The consequences of chronic sleep reduction or a shallow sleep repeated for several days tend to accumulate and resemble the effects of acute sleep deprivation lasting several dozen hours. At work, such effects hinder proper performance of many essential tasks and in extreme situations (machine operation or vehicle driving), sleep loss may be hazardous to the worker and his/her environment.

  11. Dysregulation of Glutathione Homeostasis in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M. Johnson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of glutathione homeostasis and alterations in glutathione-dependent enzyme activities are increasingly implicated in the induction and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Friedreich’s ataxia. In this review background is provided on the steady-state synthesis, regulation, and transport of glutathione, with primary focus on the brain. A brief overview is presented on the distinct but vital roles of glutathione in cellular maintenance and survival, and on the functions of key glutathione-dependent enzymes. Major contributors to initiation and progression of neurodegenerative diseases are considered, including oxidative stress, protein misfolding, and protein aggregation. In each case examples of key regulatory mechanisms are identified that are sensitive to changes in glutathione redox status and/or in the activities of glutathione-dependent enzymes. Mechanisms of dysregulation of glutathione and/or glutathione-dependent enzymes are discussed that are implicated in pathogenesis of each neurodegenerative disease. Limitations in information or interpretation are identified, and possible avenues for further research are described with an aim to elucidating novel targets for therapeutic interventions. The pros and cons of administration of N-acetylcysteine or glutathione as therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases, as well as the potential utility of serum glutathione as a biomarker, are critically evaluated.

  12. Dysregulation of Glutathione Homeostasis in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William M.; Wilson-Delfosse, Amy L.; Mieyal, John. J.

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of glutathione homeostasis and alterations in glutathione-dependent enzyme activities are increasingly implicated in the induction and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Friedreich’s ataxia. In this review background is provided on the steady-state synthesis, regulation, and transport of glutathione, with primary focus on the brain. A brief overview is presented on the distinct but vital roles of glutathione in cellular maintenance and survival, and on the functions of key glutathione-dependent enzymes. Major contributors to initiation and progression of neurodegenerative diseases are considered, including oxidative stress, protein misfolding, and protein aggregation. In each case examples of key regulatory mechanisms are identified that are sensitive to changes in glutathione redox status and/or in the activities of glutathione-dependent enzymes. Mechanisms of dysregulation of glutathione and/or glutathione-dependent enzymes are discussed that are implicated in pathogenesis of each neurodegenerative disease. Limitations in information or interpretation are identified, and possible avenues for further research are described with an aim to elucidating novel targets for therapeutic interventions. The pros and cons of administration of N-acetylcysteine or glutathione as therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases, as well as the potential utility of serum glutathione as a biomarker, are critically evaluated. PMID:23201762

  13. Exploring the effect of vitamin C on sleep deprivation induced memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhaidat, Nizar M; Alzoubi, Karem H; Khabour, Omar F; Tashtoush, Noor H; Banihani, Saleem A; Abdul-razzak, Khalid K

    2015-04-01

    In the current study, the possible beneficial effect of vitamin C (VitC) against sleep deprivation induced memory impairment was examined. Chronic sleep deprivation was induced via placing rats in a modified multiple platform apparatus for 8h/day for a period of 6 weeks. Concomitantly, VitC was administered to animals at doses of 150 and 500 mg/kg/day. After 6 weeks of treatment, the radial arm water maze (RAWM) was used to test for spatial learning and memory performance. Moreover, the hippocampus was dissected; and levels/activities of antioxidant defense biomarkers glutathione reduced (GSH), glutathione oxidized (GSSG), GSH/GSSG ratio, catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), were evaluated. Results revealed that chronic sleep deprivation impaired short- and long-term memories (Psleep deprivation induced decreases in hippocamppal GSH/GSSG ratio (Pmemory impairment was induced by chronic sleep deprivation, and VitC treatment prevented such impairment. This was possibly achieved via normalizing antioxidant defense mechanisms of the hippocampus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sleep Deprivation and Advice Taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausser, J.A.; Leder, J.; Ketturat, C.; Dresler, M.; Faber, N.S.

    2016-01-01

    Judgements and decisions in many political, economic or medical contexts are often made while sleep deprived. Furthermore, in such contexts individuals are required to integrate information provided by - more or less qualified - advisors. We asked if sleep deprivation affects advice taking. We

  15. Impaired glutathione synthesis in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gysin, René; Kraftsik, Rudolf; Sandell, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex multifactorial brain disorder with a genetic component. Convergent evidence has implicated oxidative stress and glutathione (GSH) deficits in the pathogenesis of this disease. The aim of the present study was to test whether schizophrenia is associated with a deficit...... of GSH synthesis. Cultured skin fibroblasts from schizophrenia patients and control subjects were challenged with oxidative stress, and parameters of the rate-limiting enzyme for the GSH synthesis, the glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), were measured. Stressed cells of patients had a 26% (P = 0.......002) decreased GCL activity as compared with controls. This reduction correlated with a 29% (P schizophrenia in two...

  16. Mitochondrial Swelling Induced by Glutathione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehninger, Albert L.; Schneider, Marion

    1959-01-01

    Reduced glutathione, in concentrations approximating those occurring in intact rat liver, causes swelling of rat liver mitochondria in vitro which is different in kinetics and extent from that yielded by L-thyroxine. The effect is also given by cysteine, which is more active, and reduced coenzyme A, but not by L-ascorbate, cystine, or oxidized glutathione. The optimum pH is 6.5, whereas thyroxine-induced swelling is optimal at pH 7.5. The GSH-induced swelling is not inhibited by DNP or dicumarol, nor by high concentrations of sucrose, serum albumin, or polyvinylpyrrolidone, in contrast to thyroxine-induced swelling. ATP inhibits the GSH swelling, but ADP and AMP are ineffective. Mn-+ is a very potent inhibitor, but Mg++ is ineffective. Ethylenediaminetetraacetate is also an effective inhibitor of GSH-induced swelling. The respiratory inhibitors amytal and antimycin A do not inhibit the swelling action of GSH, but cyanide does; these findings are consistent with the view that the oxidation-reduction state of the respiratory chain between cytochrome c and oxygen is a determinant of GSH-induced swelling. Reversal of GSH-induced swelling by osmotic means or by ATP in KCl media could not be observed. Large losses of nucleotides and protein occur during the swelling by GSH, suggesting that the action is irreversible. The characteristically drastic swelling action of GSH could be prevented if L-thyroxine was also present in the medium. PMID:13630941

  17. Emerging regulatory paradigms in glutathione metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yilin; Hyde, Annastasia S.; Simpson, Melanie A.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is the ability to generate and withstand unusual levels of oxidative stress. In part, this property of tumor cells is conferred by elevation of the cellular redox buffer glutathione. Though enzymes of the glutathione synthesis and salvage pathways have been characterized for several decades, we still lack a comprehensive understanding of their independent and coordinate regulatory mechanisms. Recent studies have further revealed that overall central metabolic pathways are frequently altered in various tumor types, resulting in significant increases in biosynthetic capacity, and feeding into glutathione synthesis. In this review, we will discuss the enzymes and pathways affecting glutathione flux in cancer, and summarize current models for regulating cellular glutathione through both de novo synthesis and efficient salvage. In addition, we examine the integration of glutathione metabolism with other altered fates of intermediary metabolites, and highlight remaining questions about molecular details of the accepted regulatory modes. PMID:24974179

  18. Subcellular compartmentation of glutathione in dicotyledonous plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the subcellular distribution of glutathione in roots and leaves of different plant species (Arabidopsis, Cucurbita, and Nicotiana). Glutathione is an important antioxidant and redox buffer which is involved in many metabolic processes including plant defense. Thus information on the subcellular distribution in these model plants especially during stress situations provides a deeper insight into compartment specific defense reactions and reflects the occurrence of compartment specific oxidative stress. With immunogold cytochemistry and computer-supported transmission electron microscopy glutathione could be localized in highest contents in mitochondria, followed by nuclei, peroxisomes, the cytosol, and plastids. Within chloroplasts and mitochondria, glutathione was restricted to the stroma and matrix, respectively, and did not occur in the lumen of cristae and thylakoids. Glutathione was also found at the membrane and in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. It was also associated with the trans and cis side of dictyosomes. None or only very little glutathione was detected in vacuoles and the apoplast of mesophyll and root cells. Additionally, glutathione was found in all cell compartments of phloem vessels, vascular parenchyma cells (including vacuoles) but was absent in xylem vessels. The specificity of this method was supported by the reduction of glutathione labeling in all cell compartments (up to 98%) of the glutathione-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana rml1 mutant. Additionally, we found a similar distribution of glutathione in samples after conventional fixation and rapid microwave-supported fixation. Thus, indicating that a redistribution of glutathione does not occur during sample preparation. Summing up, this study gives a detailed insight into the subcellular distribution of glutathione in plants and presents solid evidence for the accuracy and specificity of the applied method. PMID:20186447

  19. Identifying a deprivation of liberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The UK Supreme Court's judgment in Cheshire West and Chester Council v P [2014] fundamentally changed the approach to determining if a person who lacked capacity was deprived of their liberty by the State. The Supreme Court further held that a deprivation of liberty could occur in any care setting including a person's own home. In this article, Richard Griffith discusses the approach district nurses should adopt when determining whether a patient being cared for at home is deprived of his/her liberty.

  20. Is Entrepreneurship a Route Out of Deprivation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankish, Julian S.; Roberts, Richard G.; Coad, Alexander Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Frankish J. S., Roberts R. G., Coad A. and Storey D. J. Is entrepreneurship a route out of deprivation?, Regional Studies. This paper investigates whether entrepreneurship constitutes a route out of deprivation for those living in deprived areas. The measure of income/wealth used is based...... the wealth distribution. Hence, entrepreneurship can be a route out of deprivation....

  1. Effects of Prolonged Deprivation on Learned Helplessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mal, Suraj; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigated influence of prolonged deprivation on responses to uncontrollable outcome among 104 Indian students in the tenth grade. Finds high-deprived and female students displayed greater helplessness than did their low-deprived and male counterparts. Females and high-deprives students attributed uncontrollable outcome more to internal, stable,…

  2. Glutathione treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalhoff, K; Ranek, L; Mantoni, M

    1992-01-01

    abnormal alfa-1-fetoprotein (AFP) returned to normal after GSH treatment. AFP remained normal throughout the treatment period in the other women. These observations indicate that GSH may have a sex-dependent effect on HCC. However, further studies involving more patients are required to pursue......This prospective study was undertaken to substantiate observations that glutathione (GSH) inhibits or reverses tumor growth in humans with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a neoplasm with an extremely poor prognosis. Eight patients with biopsy-proven HCC not amenable to surgery were given 5 g of GSH...... daily from the time of diagnosis. Two patients withdrew shortly after receiving GSH due to intolerable side-effects. Of the six eligible patients, two had mildly advanced tumors and four moderately advanced tumors. At 1-2-month intervals the liver was CT and ultra-sound scanned to assess the growth...

  3. Neurobiological Consequences of Sleep Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkadhi, Karim; Zagaar, Munder; Alhaider, Ibrahim; Salim, Samina; Aleisa, Abdulaziz

    2013-01-01

    Although the physiological function of sleep is not completely understood, it is well documented that it contributes significantly to the process of learning and memory. Ample evidence suggests that adequate sleep is essential for fostering connections among neuronal networks for memory consolidation in the hippocampus. Sleep deprivation studies are extremely valuable in understanding why we sleep and what are the consequences of sleep loss. Experimental sleep deprivation in animals allows us to gain insight into the mechanism of sleep at levels not possible to study in human subjects. Many useful approaches have been utilized to evaluate the effect of sleep loss on cognitive function, each with relative advantages and disadvantages. In this review we discuss sleep and the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation mostly in experimental animals. The negative effects of sleep deprivation on various aspects of brain function including learning and memory, synaptic plasticity and the state of cognition-related signaling molecules are discussed. PMID:24179461

  4. Neurobiological consequences of sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkadhi, Karim; Zagaar, Munder; Alhaider, Ibrahim; Salim, Samina; Aleisa, Abdulaziz

    2013-05-01

    Although the physiological function of sleep is not completely understood, it is well documented that it contributes significantly to the process of learning and memory. Ample evidence suggests that adequate sleep is essential for fostering connections among neuronal networks for memory consolidation in the hippocampus. Sleep deprivation studies are extremely valuable in understanding why we sleep and what are the consequences of sleep loss. Experimental sleep deprivation in animals allows us to gain insight into the mechanism of sleep at levels not possible to study in human subjects. Many useful approaches have been utilized to evaluate the effect of sleep loss on cognitive function, each with relative advantages and disadvantages. In this review we discuss sleep and the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation mostly in experimental animals. The negative effects of sleep deprivation on various aspects of brain function including learning and memory, synaptic plasticity and the state of cognition-related signaling molecules are discussed.

  5. Health Effects of Sleep Deprivation,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    glucocorticoids , mineralocor- ticoids, and androgenic steroids. The main glucocorticoid is cortisol. Production of cortisol increases in response to many...L, Lidberg L: Circadian variations in performance, psychological ratings, catecholamine excretion, and diuresis during prolonged sleep deprivation

  6. Neurobiological Consequences of Sleep Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Alkadhi, Karim; Zagaar, Munder; Alhaider, Ibrahim; Salim, Samina; Aleisa, Abdulaziz

    2013-01-01

    Although the physiological function of sleep is not completely understood, it is well documented that it contributes significantly to the process of learning and memory. Ample evidence suggests that adequate sleep is essential for fostering connections among neuronal networks for memory consolidation in the hippocampus. Sleep deprivation studies are extremely valuable in understanding why we sleep and what are the consequences of sleep loss. Experimental sleep deprivation in animals allows us...

  7. Quantitative real-time imaging of glutathione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glutathione plays many important roles in biological processes; however, the dynamic changes of glutathione concentrations in living cells remain largely unknown. Here, we report a reversible reaction-based fluorescent probe—designated as RealThiol (RT)—that can quantitatively monitor the real-time ...

  8. Glutathione, cell proliferation and differentiation | Ashtiani | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All organisms require an equivalent source for living. Reduced glutathione is the most abundant thiol containing protein in mammalian cells and organs. Glutathione was discovered by Hopkins in 1924 who published his findings in JBC. It is a three peptide containing glutamic acid, cystein and glycin and is found in reduced ...

  9. Hepatitis viral load correlates to glutathione levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Several recent scientific articles have found a direct correlation between Glutathione levels and viral activity for hepatitis B and C. When viral load increases, Glutathione decreases. Researchers from Germany report that adding NAC (N-acetyl cysteine) to HBV producing cells lines can reduce hepatitis viral load 50 fold. Glutathione is used by the liver to help break down toxins. Patients who have chronic infection for more than 90 days should ask their physicians to check their Glutathione levels. A test kit is available from ImmunoSciences Labs; contact information is included. An amino acid, L-Glutamine, can be used with Alpha Lipoic Acid and NAC to increase Glutathione levels. Chlorophyll also offers benefits to people with hepatitis and other infections. Instructions on how to use a special retention enema containing chlorophyll, water, and apple cider vinegar are provided.

  10. A regulatory review for products containing glutathione

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Hidayah Abd Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione is a potent antioxidant as well as has important role for DNA synthesis and repair, protein synthesis, amino acid transport, and enzyme activation. Besides this, Glutathione products are now mainly selling as whitening agent which are mainly marketing through social media (Facebook and different websites. Information is not available whether glutathione product are following the regulatory guidelines of National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau of Malaysia (NPCB for selling, advertisement and promotion. This review was carried out by extracting information about glutathione from scientific database using PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase. Analysis of the available information, case example of glutathione products showed that a brand of glutathione (Glutacaps HQ did not show the product's registration number from NPCB, and also did not show the name, address, contact number of the advertiser, and even not found the name of the manufacture. Without providing the above mentioned information, the product is selling and promoting through social media (fb which is not allowed by the NPCB guidelines part 4.14. So far, only two clinical trials were conducted on glutathione supplementation for 4 weeks duration. There was no serious or systematic adverse effects reported in clinical trials. As the two clinic trials resulted contradictory outcomes, further studies needed for conformation of the clinic benefits of glutathione. Otherwise, random use of glutathione may be risk for the health of the people. Besides, the marketer mainly promoting glutathione as the skin whitening beauty product instead of using as health supplement, it may cause additional and serious risk to the users as the manufacturer not providing sufficient information about the product, its registration number, manufacturing company, etc.

  11. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate preserves intracellular glutathione and protects cortical neurons against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vexler, Zinaida S; Wong, Arthur; Francisco, Carla; Manabat, Catherine; Christen, Stephan; Täuber, Martin; Ferriero, Donna M; Gregory, George

    2003-01-17

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), an endogenous intermediate of glycolysis, protects the brain against ischemia-reperfusion injury. The mechanisms of FBP protection after cerebral ischemia are not well understood. The current study was undertaken to determine whether FBP protects primary neurons against hypoxia and oxidative stress by preserving reduced glutathione (GSH). Cultures of pure cortical neurons were subjected to oxygen deprivation, a donor of nitric oxide and superoxide radicals (3-morpholinosydnonimine), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis (L-buthionine-sulfoximine) or glutathione reductase (1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea) in the presence or absence of FBP (3.5 mM). Neuronal viability was determined using an 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay. FBP protected neurons against hypoxia-reoxygenation and oxidative stress under conditions of compromised GSH metabolism. The efficacy of FBP depended on duration of hypoxia and was associated with higher intracellular GSH concentration, an effect partly mediated via increased glutathione reductase activity.

  12. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  13. Glutathione Efflux and Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Glutathione (GSH) depletion is a central signaling event that regulates the activation of cell death pathways. GSH depletion is often taken as a marker of oxidative stress and thus, as a consequence of its antioxidant properties scavenging reactive species of both oxygen and nitrogen (ROS/RNS). Recent Advances: There is increasing evidence demonstrating that GSH loss is an active phenomenon regulating the redox signaling events modulating cell death activation and progression. Critical Issues: In this work, we review the role of GSH depletion by its efflux, as an important event regulating alterations in the cellular redox balance during cell death independent from oxidative stress and ROS/RNS formation. We discuss the mechanisms involved in GSH efflux during cell death progression and the redox signaling events by which GSH depletion regulates the activation of the cell death machinery. Future Directions: The evidence summarized here clearly places GSH transport as a central mechanism mediating redox signaling during cell death progression. Future studies should be directed toward identifying the molecular identity of GSH transporters mediating GSH extrusion during cell death, and addressing the lack of sensitive approaches to quantify GSH efflux. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1694–1713. PMID:22656858

  14. Impaired Glutathione Synthesis in Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Koji; Nakaki, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) was discovered in yeast cells in 1888. Studies of GSH in mammalian cells before the 1980s focused exclusively on its function for the detoxication of xenobiotics or for drug metabolism in the liver, in which GSH is present at its highest concentration in the body. Increasing evidence has demonstrated other important roles of GSH in the brain, not only for the detoxication of xenobiotics but also for antioxidant defense and the regulation of intracellular redox homeostasis. GSH also regulates cell signaling, protein function, gene expression, and cell differentiation/proliferation in the brain. Clinically, inborn errors in GSH-related enzymes are very rare, but disorders of GSH metabolism are common in major neurodegenerative diseases showing GSH depletion and increased levels of oxidative stress in the brain. GSH depletion would precipitate oxidative damage in the brain, leading to neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the significance of GSH function, the synthesis of GSH and its metabolism, and clinical disorders of GSH metabolism. A potential approach to increase brain GSH levels against neurodegeneration is also discussed. PMID:24145751

  15. A mathematical model of glutathione metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S Jill

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione (GSH plays an important role in anti-oxidant defense and detoxification reactions. It is primarily synthesized in the liver by the transsulfuration pathway and exported to provide precursors for in situ GSH synthesis by other tissues. Deficits in glutathione have been implicated in aging and a host of diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cardiovascular disease, cancer, Down syndrome and autism. Approach We explore the properties of glutathione metabolism in the liver by experimenting with a mathematical model of one-carbon metabolism, the transsulfuration pathway, and glutathione synthesis, transport, and breakdown. The model is based on known properties of the enzymes and the regulation of those enzymes by oxidative stress. We explore the half-life of glutathione, the regulation of glutathione synthesis, and its sensitivity to fluctuations in amino acid input. We use the model to simulate the metabolic profiles previously observed in Down syndrome and autism and compare the model results to clinical data. Conclusion We show that the glutathione pools in hepatic cells and in the blood are quite insensitive to fluctuations in amino acid input and offer an explanation based on model predictions. In contrast, we show that hepatic glutathione pools are highly sensitive to the level of oxidative stress. The model shows that overexpression of genes on chromosome 21 and an increase in oxidative stress can explain the metabolic profile of Down syndrome. The model also correctly simulates the metabolic profile of autism when oxidative stress is substantially increased and the adenosine concentration is raised. Finally, we discuss how individual variation arises and its consequences for one-carbon and glutathione metabolism.

  16. The antioxidant master glutathione and periodontal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar Bains

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione, considered to be the master antioxidant (AO, is the most-important redox regulator that controls inflammatory processes, and thus damage to the periodontium. Periodontitis patients have reduced total AO capacity in whole saliva, and lower concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH in serum and gingival crevicular fluid, and periodontal therapy restores the redox balance. Therapeutic considerations for the adjunctive use of glutathione in management of periodontitis, in limiting the tissue damage associated with oxidative stress, and enhancing wound healing cannot be underestimated, but need to be evaluated further through multi-centered randomized controlled trials.

  17. Glutathione peroxidase 4 and vitamin E cooperatively prevent hepatocellular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley A. Carlson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4 is an essential mammalian glutathione peroxidase, which protects cells against detrimental lipid peroxidation and governs a novel form of regulated necrotic cell death, called ferroptosis. To study the relevance of Gpx4 and of another vitally important selenoprotein, cytosolic thioredoxin reductase (Txnrd1, for liver function, mice with conditional deletion of Gpx4 in hepatocytes were studied, along with those lacking Txnrd1 and selenocysteine (Sec tRNA (Trsp in hepatocytes. Unlike Txnrd1- and Trsp-deficient mice, Gpx4−/− mice died shortly after birth and presented extensive hepatocyte degeneration. Similar to Txnrd1-deficient livers, Gpx4−/− livers manifested upregulation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived-like 2 (Nrf2 response genes. Remarkably, Gpx4−/− pups born from mothers fed a vitamin E-enriched diet survived, yet this protection was reversible as subsequent vitamin E deprivation caused death of Gpx4-deficient mice ~4 weeks thereafter. Abrogation of selenoprotein expression in Gpx4−/− mice did not result in viable mice, indicating that the combined deficiency aggravated the loss of Gpx4 in liver. By contrast, combined Trsp/Txnrd1-deficient mice were born, but had significantly shorter lifespans than either single knockout, suggesting that Txnrd1 plays an important role in supporting liver function of mice lacking Trsp. In sum our study demonstrates that the ferroptosis regulator Gpx4 is critical for hepatocyte survival and proper liver function, and that vitamin E can compensate for its loss by protecting cells against deleterious lipid peroxidation.

  18. Arbutus andrachne L. Reverses Sleep Deprivation-Induced Memory Impairments in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Malkawi, Bayan S; Khabour, Omar F; El-Elimat, Tamam; Alali, Feras Q

    2017-01-18

    Sleep deprivation (SD) is associated with cognitive deficits. It was found to affect the hippocampus region of the brain by impairing memory formation. This impairment is suggested to be caused by elevation in oxidative stress in the body, including the brain during SD. It was hypothesized that the methanolic extract of the fruits of Arbutus andrachne L. (Ericaceae) will prevent chronic SD-induced impairment of hippocampal memory via its antioxidative properties. The methanolic extract of the fruits of A. andrachne was evaluated for its beneficial properties to reverse SD-induced cognitive impairment in rats. Animals were sleep deprived for 8 weeks using a multiple platform model. The extract was administered i.p. at three doses (50, 200, and 500 mg/kg). Behavioral studies were conducted to test the spatial learning and memory using radial arm water maze (RAWM). In addition, the hippocampus was dissected to analyze the following oxidative stress markers: glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), GSH/GSSG, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase. Chronic SD impaired short- and long-term memories (P memory impairment induced by SD while such treatment prevented short-term memory impairment only at 200 and 500 mg/kg dose levels. Moreover, A. andrachne fruit extract normalized the reduction in the hippocampus GSH/GSSG ratio and activity of GPx, and catalase (P sleep deprivation. Chronic sleep deprivation impaired both short- and long-term memory formation, while methanolic extract of A. andrachne fruits reversed this impairment, probably through normalizing oxidative stress in the hippocampus.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with severe glutathione synthetase deficiency also develop recurrent bacterial infections. Related Information What does it mean if a disorder seems to run in my family? What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency ...

  20. Inactivation of glutathione peroxidase by benzaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaie, T; Floyd, R A

    1996-12-01

    Chronic benzaldehyde exposure is known to cause central nervous system (CNS) disturbances. Previous studies have shown that benzaldehyde causes the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat synaptosomal fractions. Benzaldehyde has also been implicated in ROS formation in the CNS of rats treated with toluene. We have found that benzaldehyde effectively inactivates the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (Ki approximately 15 microM), but has no effect on the other antioxidant enzymes tested: catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione reductase. This effect has been found to be specific to benzaldehyde since other structurally related and unrelated aldehydes tested were found to be devoid of inactivating capacity toward glutathione peroxidase. Since glutathione peroxidase is the main enzyme responsible for removal of hydrogen peroxide and organic hydroperoxides in brain, its inactivation by benzaldehyde may be a main contributor to the observed ROS formation and the observed neurotoxicity caused by either benzaldehyde or toluene exposure.

  1. SOCIODEMOGRAPHIC DOAMINS OF DEPRIVATION AND PRETERM BIRTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background. Neighborhood-level deprivation has long been associated with adverse outcomes, including preterm birth (PTB), as observed in the authors' previous work using a composite deprivation index. Area disadvantage is multifaceted comprising income, employment, education and...

  2. Effects of sleep deprivation on prospective memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundgeiger, Tobias; Bayen, Ute J; Horn, Sebastian S

    2014-01-01

    Sleep deprivation reduces cognitive performance; however, its effects on prospective memory (remembering to perform intended actions) are unknown. One view suggests that effects of sleep deprivation are limited to tasks associated with prefrontal functioning. An alternative view suggests a global, unspecific effect on human cognition, which should affect a variety of cognitive tasks. We investigated the impact of sleep deprivation (25 hours of sleep deprivation vs. no sleep deprivation) on prospective-memory performance in more resource-demanding and less resource-demanding prospective-memory tasks. Performance was lower after sleep deprivation and with a more resource-demanding prospective-memory task, but these factors did not interact. These results support the view that sleep deprivation affects cognition more globally and demonstrate that sleep deprivation increases failures to carry out intended actions, which may have severe consequences in safety-critical situations.

  3. Bearding the Capability Deprivation Machine: The Pedagogical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drawing on Sen and his ideas of capability deprivation, it is contended here that income-deprivation ideas by themselves do not adequately encompass the full complexity of how deprivation works. The approach taken here, therefore, is different. It works with the proposition that education needs to respond to the full range ...

  4. Multidimensional child deprivation in Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yousefzadeh Faal Daghati, Sepideh; Mideros-Mora, Andrés; De Neubourg, Chris; Minujin, Alberto; Nandy, Shailen

    The chapter analyses children's multidimensional deprivation in Iran in 2009 and explores inequalities in different regions. The study focused on outcome indicators, with the level of analysis focusing on the individual child as well as the household. A child rights approach is applied to define

  5. Relative Deprivation with Imperfect Information

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Verme; Rima Izem

    2008-01-01

    The paper proposes an alternative index of relative deprivation which allows for selection of the reference group and imperfect information, two central elements of modern theories of social justice. An application to real data and a simulation on artificial data illustrate the use and some properties of the index.

  6. Infantile nystagmus and visual deprivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fledelius, Hans C; Jensen, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate whether effects of early foveal motor instability due to infantile nystagmus might compare to those of experimental visual deprivation on refraction in a childhood series. METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of data from the Danish Register for Blind and Weaksighted...

  7. Abnormal glutathione conjugation in patients with tyrosinaemia type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, T. M.; Bergman, D. J.; Poll-The, B. T.; Smit, G. P.; Breimer, D. D.; Mulder, G. J.; Duran, M.; Smeitink, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that tyrosinaemia type I may be associated with reduced glutathione availability due to conjugation of tyrosinaemia-associated reactive intermediates with glutathione. In the present study, the glutathione/ glutathione S-transferase system of two tyrosinaemia patients

  8. Abnormal glutathione conjugation in patients with tyrosinaemia type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, DJW; PollThe, BT; Smit, GPA; Breimer, DD; Duran, M; Smeitink, JAM

    Previous studies have suggested that tyrosinaemia type I may be associated with reduced glutathione availability due to conjugation of tyrosinaemia-associated reactive intermediates with glutathione. In the present study, the glutathione/glutathione S-transferase system of two tyrosinaemia patients

  9. 21 CFR 862.1365 - Glutathione test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione test system. 862.1365 Section 862.1365....1365 Glutathione test system. (a) Identification. A glutathione test system is a device intended to measure glutathione (the tripeptide of glycine, cysteine, and glutamic acid) in erythrocytes (red blood...

  10. Chronic Melatonin Treatment Prevents Memory Impairment Induced by Chronic Sleep Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Mayyas, Fadia A; Khabour, Omar F; Bani Salama, Fatima M; Alhashimi, Farah H; Mhaidat, Nizar M

    2016-07-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has been associated with memory impairment through induction of oxidative stress. Melatonin, which promotes the metabolism of many reactive oxygen species (ROS), has antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. In this study, the effect of melatonin on memory impairment induced by 4 weeks of SD was investigated using rat animal model. Animals were sleep deprived using modified multiple platform model. Melatonin was administered via oral gavage (100 mg/kg/day). Spatial learning and memory were assessed using the radial arm water maze (RAWM). Changes in oxidative stress biomarkers in the hippocampus following treatments were measured using ELISA procedure. The result revealed that SD impaired both short- and long-term memory (P memory impairment induced by SD. Furthermore, melatonin normalized SD-induced reduction in the hippocampus activity of catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase (SOD). In addition, melatonin enhanced the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione GSH/GSSG in sleep-deprived rats (P  0.05). In conclusion, SD induced memory impairment, which was prevented by melatonin. This was correlated with normalizing hippocampus antioxidant mechanisms during chronic SD.

  11. Materialistic Cues Boosts Personal Relative Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Three studies investigated whether exposure to materialistic cues would increase perceptions of personal relative deprivation and related emotional reactions. In Study 1, individuals who were surveyed in front of a luxury store reported higher levels of personal relative deprivation than those surveyed in front of an ordinary building. In Study 2, participants who viewed pictures of luxurious goods experienced greater personal relative deprivation than those viewed pictures of neutral scenes. Study 3 replicated the results from Study 2, with a larger sample size and a more refined assessment of relative deprivation. Implications of these findings for future studies on relative deprivation and materialism are discussed.

  12. Hepatobiliary transport of glutathione and glutathione conjugate in rats with hereditary hyperbilirubinemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, R. P.; Ottenhoff, R.; Liefting, W.; de Haan, J.; Jansen, P. L.

    1989-01-01

    TR- mutant rats have an autosomal recessive mutation that is expressed as a severely impaired hepatobiliary secretion of organic anions like bilirubin-(di)glucuronide and dibromosulphthalein (DBSP). In this paper, the hepatobiliary transport of glutathione and a glutathione conjugate was studied in

  13. Sleep deprivation and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Souza, Annie; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep occurs in a wide range of animal species as a vital process for the maintenance of homeostasis, metabolic restoration, physiological regulation, and adaptive cognitive functions in the central nervous system. Long-term perturbations induced by the lack of sleep are mostly mediated by changes at the level of transcription and translation. This chapter reviews studies in humans, rodents, and flies to address the various ways by which sleep deprivation affects gene expression in the nervous system, with a focus on genes related to neuronal plasticity, brain function, and cognition. However, the effects of sleep deprivation on gene expression and the functional consequences of sleep loss are clearly not restricted to the cognitive domain but may include increased inflammation, expression of stress-related genes, general impairment of protein translation, metabolic imbalance, and thermal deregulation.

  14. SLEEP DEPRIVATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. А. Vizir

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In a review article extensively discusses the relationship between sleep duration and cardiovascular diseases. Sleep loss is a common condition in developed countries, with evidence showing that people in Western countries are sleeping on average only 6.8 hour per night, 1.5 hour less than a century ago. Although the effect of sleep deprivation on the human body is not completely unexplained, recent epidemiological studies have revealed relationships between sleep deprivation and arterial hypertension, coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus. Increased sympathetic nervous system activity and changes in melatonin secretion are considered as the main pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease in patients with insufficient duration of nighttime sleep. Adequate sleep duration may be important for preventing cardiovascular diseases in modern society.

  15. Wege des Exports von Glutathion aus Astrocyten

    OpenAIRE

    Minich, Tobias Florian

    2008-01-01

    Vorliegender Arbeit lag die Aufgabe zugrunde herauszufinden, welche(s) Transportsystem(e) außer dem Multidrug-Transporter 1 (multidrug resistance protein 1, MRP1) zum Austritt des Tripeptides Glutathion aus Primärkulturen von Astrogliazellen in das extrazelluläre Milieu beitragen. Als Grundlage für die Untersuchungen wurde zunächst an zwei Wildtyp Mausstämmen (NMRI und FVB/N) sichergestellt, dass astrogliareiche Primärkulturen aus Mäusen sowohl reduziertes als auch oxidiertes Glutathion expor...

  16. Smartphone-based colorimetric detection of glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vobornikova, Irena; Pohanka, Miroslav

    2016-12-18

    Glutathione belongs to the family of small-molecular weight antioxidants like ascorbic acid, cysteine, α-tocopherol, uric acid, etc. These molecules play important role in the neutralization of free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress may lead to ageing and the development of large scale of pathological states of organism. This low molecular weight antioxidant´s level can alter under pathological conditions from reduced (GSH, thiols) to oxidized (oxidized glutathione -GSSG, disulfides) form. A GSSG-to-GSH ratio is indicative marker of oxidative stress. There is a large scale of methods how to determine this biomarker. The trend of the analysis is to minimalize the instrument equipment, sample application volume and analysis cost. Reduced glutathione (GSH) solutions were prepared in water in the concentration 0-16 mmol/L. Other small-molecular weight antioxidants like 0.25 mmol/L ascorbic acid, 0.15 mmol/L TROLOX and 0.02 mmol/L N-acetyl-cysteine (NAcCys) were studied as possible interferents. The samples were mixed with 5,5´-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic) acid (DTNB) resulting in yellow colored drops forming. Coloration was assayed using camera integrated in a smartphone and color channels analysis. The total volume of 10 µl of sample was applied for one analysis. The smartphone-based data were compared with the reference Ellman assay. The calibration of glutathione was evaluated. The blue channel intensity data were decreasing according to the increasing glutathione concentration. Red and green channel intensities were stagnating during the whole concentration scale of glutathione. Limits of detection were 0.4 mmol/l for glutathione. Addition of 0.25 mmol/L of ascorbic acid, 0.15 mmol/L of TROLOX and 0.02mmol/L of N-acetylcysteine to GSH in final concentration 0-16 mmol/L had minimal influence on the assay. The results from smartphone-based analysis correlate with the standard Ellman method. The detection limit for GSH was 0.03 mmol

  17. Glutathione Metabolism and Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeyne, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    It has been established that oxidative stress, defined as the condition when the sum of free radicals in a cell exceeds the antioxidant capacity of the cell, contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Glutathione is a ubiquitous thiol tripeptide that acts alone, or in concert with enzymes within cells to reduce superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals and peroxynitrites. In this review, we examine the synthesis, metabolism and functional interactions of glutathione, and discuss how this relates to protection of dopaminergic neurons from oxidative damage and its therapeutic potential in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23665395

  18. Glutathione, glutathione-related enzymes, and oxidative stress in individuals with subacute occupational exposure to lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrakowski, Michał; Pawlas, Natalia; Hudziec, Edyta; Kozłowska, Agnieszka; Mikołajczyk, Agnieszka; Birkner, Ewa; Kasperczyk, Sławomir

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of subacute exposure to lead on the glutathione-related antioxidant defense and oxidative stress parameters in 36 males occupationally exposed to lead for 40±3.2days. Blood lead level in the examined population increased significantly by 359% due to lead exposure. Simultaneously, erythrocyte glutathione level decreased by 16%, whereas the activity of glutathione-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and leukocytes decreased by 28% and 10%, respectively. Similarly, the activity of glutathione-S-transferase in erythrocytes decreased by 45%. However, the activity of glutathione reductase in erythrocytes and leukocytes increased by 26% and 6%, respectively, whereas the total oxidant status value in leukocytes increased by 37%. Subacute exposure to lead results in glutathione pool depletion and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products; however, it does not cause DNA damage. Besides, subacute exposure to lead modifies the activity of glutathione-related enzymes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Glutathione Reductase/Glutathione Is Responsible for Cytotoxic Elemental Sulfur Tolerance via Polysulfide Shuttle in Fungi*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Ikuo; Shimatani, Kanami; Fujita, Kensaku; Abe, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Fujii, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Fungi that can reduce elemental sulfur to sulfide are widely distributed, but the mechanism and physiological significance of the reaction have been poorly characterized. Here, we purified elemental sulfur-reductase (SR) and cloned its gene from the elemental sulfur-reducing fungus Fusarium oxysporum. We found that NADPH-glutathione reductase (GR) reduces elemental sulfur via glutathione as an intermediate. A loss-of-function mutant of the SR/GR gene generated less sulfide from elemental sulfur than the wild-type strain. Its growth was hypersensitive to elemental sulfur, and it accumulated higher levels of oxidized glutathione, indicating that the GR/glutathione system confers tolerance to cytotoxic elemental sulfur by reducing it to less harmful sulfide. The SR/GR reduced polysulfide as efficiently as elemental sulfur, which implies that soluble polysulfide shuttles reducing equivalents to exocellular insoluble elemental sulfur and generates sulfide. The ubiquitous distribution of the GR/glutathione system together with our findings that GR-deficient mutants derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans reduced less sulfur and that their growth was hypersensitive to elemental sulfur indicated a wide distribution of the system among fungi. These results indicate a novel biological function of the GR/glutathione system in elemental sulfur reduction, which is distinguishable from bacterial and archaeal mechanisms of glutathione- independent sulfur reduction. PMID:21474441

  20. Glutathione reductase/glutathione is responsible for cytotoxic elemental sulfur tolerance via polysulfide shuttle in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Ikuo; Shimatani, Kanami; Fujita, Kensaku; Abe, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Fujii, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2011-06-10

    Fungi that can reduce elemental sulfur to sulfide are widely distributed, but the mechanism and physiological significance of the reaction have been poorly characterized. Here, we purified elemental sulfur-reductase (SR) and cloned its gene from the elemental sulfur-reducing fungus Fusarium oxysporum. We found that NADPH-glutathione reductase (GR) reduces elemental sulfur via glutathione as an intermediate. A loss-of-function mutant of the SR/GR gene generated less sulfide from elemental sulfur than the wild-type strain. Its growth was hypersensitive to elemental sulfur, and it accumulated higher levels of oxidized glutathione, indicating that the GR/glutathione system confers tolerance to cytotoxic elemental sulfur by reducing it to less harmful sulfide. The SR/GR reduced polysulfide as efficiently as elemental sulfur, which implies that soluble polysulfide shuttles reducing equivalents to exocellular insoluble elemental sulfur and generates sulfide. The ubiquitous distribution of the GR/glutathione system together with our findings that GR-deficient mutants derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans reduced less sulfur and that their growth was hypersensitive to elemental sulfur indicated a wide distribution of the system among fungi. These results indicate a novel biological function of the GR/glutathione system in elemental sulfur reduction, which is distinguishable from bacterial and archaeal mechanisms of glutathione- independent sulfur reduction.

  1. Binding properties of ferrocene-glutathione conjugates as inhibitors and sensors for glutathione S-transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Téllez-Sanz, Ramiro; Mesa-Valle, Concepción; Quesada-Soriano, Indalecio; García-Maroto, Federico; Vargas-Berenguel, Antonio; García-Fuentes, Luís

    2012-02-01

    The binding properties of two electroactive glutathione-ferrocene conjugates that consist in glutathione attached to one or both of the cyclopentadienyl rings of ferrocene (GSFc and GSFcSG), to Schistosoma japonica glutathione S-transferase (SjGST) were studied by spectroscopy fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Such ferrocene conjugates resulted to be competitive inhibitors of glutathione S-transferase with an increased binding affinity relative to the natural substrate glutathione (GSH). We found that the conjugate having two glutathione units (GSFcSG) exhibits an affinity for SjGST approximately two orders of magnitude higher than GSH. Furthermore, it shows negative cooperativity with the affinity for the second binding site two orders of magnitude lower than that for the first one. We propose that the reason for such negative cooperativity is steric since, i) the obtained thermodynamic parameters do not indicate profound conformational changes upon GSFcSG binding and ii) docking studies have shown that, when bound, part of the first bound ligand invades the second site due to its large size. In addition, voltammetric measurements show a strong decrease of the peak current upon binding of ferrocene-glutathione conjugates to SjGST and provide very similar K values than those obtained by ITC. Moreover, the sensing ability, expressed by the sensitivity parameter shows that GSFcSG is much more sensitive than GSFc, for the detection of SjGST. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Glutathione conjugation as a bioactivation reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bladeren, P.J. van

    2000-01-01

    In general, glutathione conjugation is regarded as a detoxication reaction. However, depending on the properties of the substrate, bioactivation is also possible. Four types of activation reaction have been recognized: direct-acting compounds, conjugates that are activated through cysteine conjugate

  3. Plant glutathione transferase-mediated stress tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nianiou-Obeidat, Irini; Madesis, Panagiotis; Kissoudis, Christos; Voulgari, Georgia; Chronopoulou, Evangelia; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Labrou, Nikolaos E.

    2017-01-01

    Plant glutathione transferases (EC 2.5.1.18, GSTs) are an ancient, multimember and diverse enzyme class. Plant GSTs have diverse roles in plant development, endogenous metabolism, stress tolerance, and xenobiotic detoxification. Their study embodies both fundamental aspects and agricultural

  4. Glutathione-Dependent Detoxification Processes in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dringen, Ralf; Brandmann, Maria; Hohnholt, Michaela C

    2015-01-01

    component in many of the astrocytic detoxification processes is the tripeptide glutathione (GSH) which serves as electron donor in the GSH peroxidase-catalyzed reduction of peroxides. In addition, GSH is substrate in the detoxification of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds by GSH-S-transferases which...... knowledge on the GSH metabolism of astrocytes with a special emphasis on GSH-dependent detoxification processes....

  5. Glutathione S-transferases in earthworms (Lumbricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenersen, J; Guthenberg, C; Mannervik, B

    1979-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase activity (EC 2.5.1.18) was demonstrated in six species of earthworms of the family Lumbricidae: Eisenia foetida, Lumbricus terrestris, Lumbricus rebellus, Allolobophora longa, Allolobophora caliginosa and Allolobophora chlorotica. Considerable activity was obtained with 1-chlorl-2,4-dinitrobenzene and low activity with 3,4-dichloro-1-nitrobenzene, but no enzymic reaction was detectable with sulphobromophthalein 1,2-epoxy-3-(p-nitrophenoxy)propane of trans-4-phenylbut-3-en-2-one as substrates. Enzyme prepartations from L. rubellus and A. longa were the most active, whereas A. chlorotica gave the lowest activity. The ratio of the activities obtained with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and 3,4-cichloro-1-nitrobenzene was very different in the various species, but no phylogenetic pattern was evident. Isoelectric focusing gave rise to various activity peaks as measured with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as a substrate, and the activity profiles of the species examined appeared to follow a taxonomic pattern. The activity of Allolobophora had the highest peak in the alkaline region, whereas that of Lumbricus had the highest peak in the acid region. Eisenia showed a very complex activity profile, with the highest peak ne pH 7. As determined by an enzymic assay, all the species contained glutathione, on an average about 0.5 mumol/g wet wt. Conjugation with glutathione catalysed by glutathione S-transferases may consequently be an important detoxification mechanism in earthworms. PMID:486159

  6. Erythrocyte potassium and glutathione polymorphism determination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research is aimed at determining the erythrocyte potassium and glutathione polymorphisms and also to identify the relationship among the various blood parameters in Saanen x Malta crossbred goat raised in Turkey. The allele gene frequencies of KH and KL associated with the potassium concentration were ...

  7. The Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Kundermann

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain syndromes are associated with alterations in sleep continuity and sleep architecture. One perspective of this relationship, which has not received much attention to date, is that disturbances of sleep affect pain. To fathom this direction of cause, experimental human and animal studies on the effects of sleep deprivation on pain processing were reviewed. According to the majority of the studies, sleep deprivation produces hyperalgesic changes. Furthermore, sleep deprivation can counteract analgesic effects of pharmacological treatments involving opioidergic and serotoninergic mechanisms of action. The heterogeneity of the human data and the exclusive interest in rapid eye movement sleep deprivation in animals so far do not allow us to draw firm conclusions as to whether the hyperalgesic effects are due to the deprivation of specific sleep stages or whether they result from a generalized disruption of sleep continuity. The significance of opioidergic and serotoninergic processes as mediating mechanisms of the hyperalgesic changes produced by sleep deprivation are discussed.

  8. Glutathione synthesis is essential for pollen germination in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The antioxidant glutathione fulfills many important roles during plant development, growth and defense in the sporophyte, however the role of this important molecule in the gametophyte generation is largely unclear. Bioinformatic data indicate that critical control enzymes are negligibly transcribed in pollen and sperm cells. Therefore, we decided to investigate the role of glutathione synthesis for pollen germination in vitro in Arabidopsis thaliana accession Col-0 and in the glutathione deficient mutant pad2-1 and link it with glutathione status on the subcellular level. Results The depletion of glutathione by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, reduced pollen germination rates to 2-5% compared to 71% germination in wildtype controls. The application of reduced glutathione (GSH), together with BSO, restored pollen germination and glutathione contents to control values, demonstrating that inhibition of glutathione synthesis is responsible for the decrease of pollen germination in vitro. The addition of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to media containing BSO restored pollen germination to control values, which demonstrated that glutathione depletion in pollen grains triggered disturbances in auxin metabolism which led to inhibition of pollen germination. Conclusions This study demonstrates that glutathione synthesis is essential for pollen germination in vitro and that glutathione depletion and auxin metabolism are linked in pollen germination and early elongation of the pollen tube, as IAA addition rescues glutathione deficient pollen. PMID:21439079

  9. The Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Bernd Kundermann; Jürgen-Christian Krieg; Wolfgang Schreiber; Stefan Lautenbacher

    2004-01-01

    Chronic pain syndromes are associated with alterations in sleep continuity and sleep architecture. One perspective of this relationship, which has not received much attention to date, is that disturbances of sleep affect pain. To fathom this direction of cause, experimental human and animal studies on the effects of sleep deprivation on pain processing were reviewed. According to the majority of the studies, sleep deprivation produces hyperalgesic changes. Furthermore, sleep deprivation can c...

  10. Recovery of neurofilament following early monocular deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P O'Leary

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A brief period of monocular deprivation in early postnatal life can alter the structure of neurons within deprived-eye-receiving layers of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus. The modification of structure is accompanied by a marked reduction in labeling for neurofilament, a protein that composes the stable cytoskeleton and that supports neuron structure. This study examined the extent of neurofilament recovery in monocularly deprived cats that either had their deprived eye opened (binocular recovery, or had the deprivation reversed to the fellow eye (reverse occlusion. The degree to which recovery was dependent on visually-driven activity was examined by placing monocularly deprived animals in complete darkness (dark rearing. The loss of neurofilament and the reduction of soma size caused by monocular deprivation were both ameliorated equally following either binocular recovery or reverse occlusion for 8 days. Though monocularly deprived animals placed in complete darkness showed recovery of soma size, there was a generalized loss of neurofilament labeling that extended to originally non-deprived layers. Overall, these results indicate that recovery of soma size is achieved by removal of the competitive disadvantage of the deprived eye, and occurred even in the absence of visually-driven activity. Recovery of neurofilament occurred when the competitive disadvantage of the deprived eye was removed, but unlike the recovery of soma size, was dependent upon visually-driven activity. The role of neurofilament in providing stable neural structure raises the intriguing possibility that dark rearing, which reduced overall neurofilament levels, could be used to reset the deprived visual system so as to make it more ameliorable with treatment by experiential manipulations.

  11. Recovery of neurofilament following early monocular deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Timothy P.; Kutcher, Matthew R.; Mitchell, Donald E.; Duffy, Kevin R.

    2012-01-01

    Postnatal development of the mammalian geniculostriate visual pathway is partly guided by visually driven activity. Disruption of normal visual input during certain critical periods can alter the structure of neurons, as well as their connections and functional properties. Within the layers of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN), a brief early period of monocular deprivation can alter the structure and soma size of neurons within deprived-eye-receiving layers. This modification of structure is accompanied by a marked reduction in labeling for neurofilament protein, a principle component of the stable cytoskeleton. This study examined the extent of neurofilament recovery in monocularly deprived cats that either had their deprived eye opened (binocular recovery), or had the deprivation reversed to the fellow eye (reverse occlusion). The loss of neurofilament and the reduction of soma size caused by monocular deprivation were ameliorated equally and substantially in both recovery conditions after 8 days. The degree to which this recovery was dependent on visually driven activity was examined by placing monocularly deprived animals in complete darkness. Though monocularly deprived animals placed in darkness showed recovery of soma size in deprived layers, the manipulation catalyzed a loss of neurofilament labeling that extended to non-deprived layers as well. Overall, these results indicate that both recovery of soma size and neurofilament labeling is achieved by removal of the competitive disadvantage of the deprived eye. However, while the former occurred even in the absence of visually driven activity, recovery of neurofilament did not. The finding that a period of darkness produced an overall loss of neurofilament throughout the dLGN suggests that this experiential manipulation may cause the visual pathways to revert to an earlier more plastic developmental stage. It is possible that short periods of darkness could be incorporated as a component of

  12. Protective effects of taurine on glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes in ethanol-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushpakiran, G; Mahalakshmi, K; Anuradha, C V

    2004-11-01

    Ethanol, by its property of generating free radicals during the course of its metabolism, alters redox homeostasis and causes damage to cell structure and function. This study investigated the effect of taurine on ethanol-induced experimental toxicity in rats. Ethanol was administered chronically to rats for 28 days. This resulted in significant increases in the activities of transaminases, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and bilirubin in plasma. The activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and the contents of glutathione (GSH) and thiols in plasma and tissues were significantly reduced as compared to control animals. Simultaneous administration of taurine along with ethanol prevented the leakage of enzymes into circulation and restored glutathione and tissue thiols. The activities of antioxidant enzymes were normalized. We propose that taurine may have a bioprotective effect on ethanol-induced toxicity.

  13. SLEEP DEPRIVATION INDUCED ANXIETY AND ANAEROBIC PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Arzu Vardar

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation induced anxiety on anaerobic performance. Thirteen volunteer male physical education students completed the Turkish version of State Anxiety Inventory and performed Wingate anaerobic test for three times: (1 following a full-night of habitual sleep (baseline measurements, (2 following 30 hours of sleep deprivation, and (3 following partial-night sleep deprivation. Baseline measurements were performed the day before total sleep deprivation. Measurements following partial sleep deprivation were made 2 weeks later than total sleep deprivation measurements. State anxiety was measured prior to each Wingate test. The mean state anxiety following total sleep deprivation was higher than the baseline measurement (44.9 ± 12.9 vs. 27.6 ± 4.2, respectively, p = 0.02 whereas anaerobic performance parameters remained unchanged. Neither anaerobic parameters nor state anxiety levels were affected by one night partial sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that 30 hours continuous wakefulness may increase anxiety level without impairing anaerobic performance, whereas one night of partial sleep deprivation was ineffective on both state anxiety and anaerobic performance

  14. Glutathione synthetase deficiency associated with antenatal cerebral bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brüggemann, L. W.; Groenendaal, F.; Ristoff, E.; Larsson, A.; Duran, M.; van Lier, J. A. C.; Dorland, L.; Berger, R.; de Koning, T. J.

    2004-01-01

    We present a newborn with glutathione synthetase deficiency and intracranial haemorrhages. Because the latter are rare in term newborns a possible relationship with glutathione synthetase deficiency will be discussed

  15. Comparative study of biological activity of glutathione, sodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative study of biological activity of glutathione, sodium tungstate and glutathione-tungstate mixture. Arshad Farid, Abdul Haleem Shah, Muhammad Ayaz, Adnan Amin, Muhammad Yaseen, Hafeez Ullah, Fazal Haq ...

  16. Plant glutathione S-transferase classification, structure and evolution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glutathione S-transferases are multifunctional proteins involved in diverse intracellular events such as primary and secondary metabolisms, stress metabolism, herbicide detoxification and plant protection ... Key words: Glutathione S-transferases (GST), classification, structure, evolution, phylogenetic analysis, xenobiotics.

  17. Relative deprivation and political protest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Kliuchnyk

    2017-03-01

    Examples of anti-system political parties and movements have been given. Many of them have changed the political disposition in Europe. Lega Nord (Italy, PEGIDA (Germany, Movimento 5 Stelle (Italy, Front National (France, Ataka (Bulgaria, etc are between them. These parties and movements influence increasingly on the European political process. Nativism and populism are marked as main peculiarities of such right parties. According to the author, Anti-Trump protests in the USA are the examples of the relative deprivation of numerous groups of people that feel their rights and freedoms being threatened.

  18. Glutathione role in gallium induced toxicity | Ahmad | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of gallium metal on glutathione in blood components was discussed in this study in in vitro condition as a model for in vivo condition. Key words: Gallium nitrate, reduced glutathione (GSH), whole blood, plasma, cytosolic fraction (CF), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), Di-thiobis- dinitro-benzoic acid (DTNB).

  19. Effect of Vitamin C on Glutathione Peroxidase Activities in Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glutathione peroxidase is one of the most important antioxidant enzymes in humans. We studied the relationship between serum glutathione peroxidase activity and vitamin C ingestion during normal pregnancy in women attending antenatal clinic in the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin. Glutathione peroxidase ...

  20. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375 Glutathione reductase assay. (a) Identification. A glutathione reductase assay is a device used to determine the...

  1. Subcellular Distribution of Glutathione Precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffler, Barbara Eva; Maier, Romana; Zechmann, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glutathione is an important antioxidant and has many important functions in plant development, growth and defense. Glutathione synthesis and degradation is highly compartment-specific and relies on the subcellular availability of its precursors, cysteine, glutamate, glycine and γ-glutamylcysteine especially in plastids and the cytosol which are considered as the main centers for glutathione synthesis. The availability of glutathione precursors within these cell compartments is therefore of great importance for successful plant development and defense. The aim of this study was to investigate the compartment-specific importance of glutathione precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The subcellular distribution was compared between wild type plants (Col-0), plants with impaired glutathione synthesis (glutathione deficient pad2-1 mutant, wild type plants treated with buthionine sulfoximine), and one complemented line (OE3) with restored glutathione synthesis. Immunocytohistochemistry revealed that the inhibition of glutathione synthesis induced the accumulation of the glutathione precursors cysteine, glutamate and glycine in most cell compartments including plastids and the cytosol. A strong decrease could be observed in γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC) contents in these cell compartments. These experiments demonstrated that the inhibition of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) – the first enzyme of glutathione synthesis – causes a reduction of γ-EC levels and an accumulation of all other glutathione precursors within the cells. PMID:22050910

  2. Effect of monocular deprivation on rabbit neural retinal cell densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Maseghe Mwachaka

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: In this rabbit model, monocular deprivation resulted in activity-dependent changes in cell densities of the neural retina in favour of the non-deprived eye along with reduced cell densities in the deprived eye.

  3. Sleep deprivation and false confessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenda, Steven J.; Berkowitz, Shari R.; Loftus, Elizabeth F.; Fenn, Kimberly M.

    2016-01-01

    False confession is a major contributor to the problem of wrongful convictions in the United States. Here, we provide direct evidence linking sleep deprivation and false confessions. In a procedure adapted from Kassin and Kiechel [(1996) Psychol Sci 7(3):125–128], participants completed computer tasks across multiple sessions and repeatedly received warnings that pressing the “Escape” key on their keyboard would cause the loss of study data. In their final session, participants either slept all night in laboratory bedrooms or remained awake all night. In the morning, all participants were asked to sign a statement, which summarized their activities in the laboratory and falsely alleged that they pressed the Escape key during an earlier session. After a single request, the odds of signing were 4.5 times higher for the sleep-deprived participants than for the rested participants. These findings have important implications and highlight the need for further research on factors affecting true and false confessions. PMID:26858426

  4. Neurocognitive consequences of sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Namni; Rao, Hengyi; Durmer, Jeffrey S; Dinges, David F

    2009-09-01

    Sleep deprivation is associated with considerable social, financial, and health-related costs, in large measure because it produces impaired cognitive performance due to increasing sleep propensity and instability of waking neurobehavioral functions. Cognitive functions particularly affected by sleep loss include psychomotor and cognitive speed, vigilant and executive attention, working memory, and higher cognitive abilities. Chronic sleep-restriction experiments--which model the kind of sleep loss experienced by many individuals with sleep fragmentation and premature sleep curtailment due to disorders and lifestyle--demonstrate that cognitive deficits accumulate to severe levels over time without full awareness by the affected individual. Functional neuroimaging has revealed that frequent and progressively longer cognitive lapses, which are a hallmark of sleep deprivation, involve distributed changes in brain regions including frontal and parietal control areas, secondary sensory processing areas, and thalamic areas. There are robust differences among individuals in the degree of their cognitive vulnerability to sleep loss that may involve differences in prefrontal and parietal cortices, and that may have a basis in genes regulating sleep homeostasis and circadian rhythms. Thus, cognitive deficits believed to be a function of the severity of clinical sleep disturbance may be a product of genetic alleles associated with differential cognitive vulnerability to sleep loss. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  5. Glutathione and its antiaging and antimelanogenic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weschawalit S

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sinee Weschawalit,1 Siriwan Thongthip,2 Phanupong Phutrakool,3 Pravit Asawanonda1 1Department of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, 2Chula Clinical Research Center, 3Chula Data Management Center, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand Background: Previous studies showed that supplementation of reduced form of glutathione (GSH, 500 mg/d has a skin-lightening efficacy in humans. This study was designed to evaluate the influences of both GSH and oxidized form (GSSG, at doses lower than 500 mg/d, on improving skin properties. Patients and methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel, three-arm study was conducted. Healthy female subjects were equally randomized into three groups and took GSH (250 mg/d, GSSG (250 mg/d, or placebo orally for 12 weeks. At each visit at baseline and for 12 weeks, skin features including melanin index, wrinkles, and other relevant biophysical properties were measured. Blood samples were collected for safety monitoring. Results: In generalized estimating equation analyses, melanin index and ultraviolet spots of all sites including face and arm when given GSH and GSSG tended to be lower than placebo. At some sites evaluated, subjects who received GSH showed a significant reduction in wrinkles compared with those taking placebo. A tendency toward increased skin elasticity was observed in GSH and GSSG compared with placebo. There were no serious adverse effects throughout the study. Conclusion: We showed that oral glutathione, 250 mg/d, in both reduced and oxidized forms effectively influences skin properties. Overall, glutathione in both forms are well tolerated. Keywords: glutathione, melanin, pigment, aging, wrinkle, whitening

  6. Cystine uptake through the cystine/glutamate antiporter xCT triggers glioblastoma cell death under glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goji, Takeo; Takahara, Kazuhiko; Negishi, Manabu; Katoh, Hironori

    2017-12-01

    Oncogenic signaling in cancer cells alters glucose uptake and utilization to supply sufficient energy and biosynthetic intermediates for survival and sustained proliferation. Oncogenic signaling also prevents oxidative stress and cell death caused by increased production of reactive oxygen species. However, elevated glucose metabolism in cancer cells, especially in glioblastoma, results in the cells becoming sensitive to glucose deprivation ( i.e. in high glucose dependence), which rapidly induces cell death. However, the precise mechanism of this type of cell death remains unknown. Here, we report that glucose deprivation alone does not trigger glioblastoma cell death. We found that, for cell death to occur in glucose-deprived glioblastoma cells, cystine and glutamine also need to be present in culture media. We observed that cystine uptake through the cystine/glutamate antiporter xCT under glucose deprivation rapidly induces NADPH depletion, reactive oxygen species accumulation, and cell death. We conclude that although cystine uptake is crucial for production of antioxidant glutathione in cancer cells its transport through xCT also induces oxidative stress and cell death in glucose-deprived glioblastoma cells. Combining inhibitors targeting cancer-specific glucose metabolism with cystine and glutamine treatment may offer a therapeutic approach for glioblastoma tumors exhibiting high xCT expression. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Resident Performance and Sleep Deprivation: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asken, Michael J.; Raham, David C.

    1983-01-01

    A review of the literature on resident performance and sleep deprivation suggests that current research is sparse and inconclusive, and existing research suggests potentially severe negative effects. It is proposed that justifications for sleep-depriving night call schedules remain untested, and their use as part of residency training should be…

  8. Motor development after vestibular deprivation in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geisler, HC; Gramsbergen, A

    This review summarizes the postural development in the rat and the influences of vestibular deprivation from the 5th postnatal day on this development. Vestibular deprivation leads to a delay in motor development. Most probably this delay is caused by a delay in the development of postural control,

  9. Physiological responses of men during sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-05-01

    The effects of 84 hours of sleep deprivation were examined in a group of six young men and compared with a group of six controls. Subjects were studied in pairs, one sleep-deprived and one control. Primary attention was given to the responses to acut...

  10. Health-risk behaviour in deprived neighbourhoods compared with non-deprived neighbourhoods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Algren, Maria Holst; Bak, Carsten Kronborg; Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    in deprived neighbourhoods compared with those who live in non-deprived neighbourhoods and to summarise what kind of operationalisations of neighbourhood deprivation that were used in the studies. METHODS: PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews were followed. Systematic searches were performed in Pub......Med, Embase, Web of Science and Sociological Abstracts using relevant search terms, Boolean operators, and truncation, and reference lists were scanned. Quantitative observational studies that examined health-risk behaviour in deprived neighbourhoods compared with non-deprived neighbourhoods were eligible...... consumption, the results were ambiguous, and no clear differences were found. Numerous different operationalisations of neighbourhood deprivation were used in the studies. CONCLUSION: Substantial evidence indicates that future health interventions in deprived neighbourhoods should focus on smoking...

  11. Fast food and deprivation in Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer; Terashima, Mikiko; Rainham, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    To examine the relationship between density of fast food restaurants and measures of social and material deprivation at the community level in Nova Scotia, Canada. Census information on population and key variables required for the calculation of deprivation indices were obtained for 266 communities in Nova Scotia. The density of fast food restaurants per 1000 individuals for each community was calculated and communities were divided into quintiles of material and psychosocial deprivation. One-way analysis of variance was used to investigate associations between fast food outlet densities and deprivation scores at the community level. A statistically significant inverse association was found between community-level material deprivation and the mean number of fast food restaurants per 1000 people for Nova Scotia (p Nova Scotia is associated with fast food outlet density and lends support for environmental explanations for variations in the prevalence of obesity. Such findings are valuable to population health intervention initiatives targeting the modification of environmental determinants of obesity.

  12. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07643.001 PMID:26216041

  13. No Net Splanchnic Release of Glutathione in Man during N-Acetylcysteine Infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E.; Vilstrup, H.; Almdal, Thomas Peter

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, N-acetylcysteine, glutathione, indocyanine green, amino acid analysis, glutathione synthesis, liver/liver vein catheterization......Farmakologi, N-acetylcysteine, glutathione, indocyanine green, amino acid analysis, glutathione synthesis, liver/liver vein catheterization...

  14. Lifestyle intervention program in deprived obese adult patients and their non-deprived counterparts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine Loddo

    Full Text Available Although it is known that the prevalence of obesity is high in deprived patients, the link between deprivation and obesity, and the impact of deprivation on compliance and efficacy of a lifestyle intervention program are not known.Deprivation was assessed in 40 patients (23 Females, mean±SD age: 49±17 years from the diabetology department and 140 patients (101 Females, age: 50±15 years from the nutrition department of Bordeaux University hospital. Eighty-seven patients suffering from obesity were evaluated before and after a tailored, multidisciplinary lifestyle intervention. Deprivation was assessed using EPICES scores. Deprivation was defined with an EPICES score > 30.Deprived patients suffering from obesity had significantly higher current (43.8 ±8.4 versus 40.9 ± 5.5 kg/m2, p = 0,02 and maximal BMI (46.1± 8.6 versus 42.3± 5.2 kg/m2, p = 0.002 compared to non-deprived obese. Percentage of body weight loss was not different according to deprivation (4.74 ± 0.75 versus 4.65 ± 1.04%, p = 0.9. EPICES scores were not different according to adherence to lifestyle intervention program (20.5 ± 8.5 versus 29.9 ± 3.9 versus 29.0 ±2.5, no follow up versus partial follow up versus total follow up, p = 0,58.Deprived patients suffering from obesity have a more serious disease than non-deprived patients. However, neither compliance to the lifestyle intervention program nor body weight loss differed between deprived patients with obesity and non-deprived ones. Deprivation should not be a limitation when enrolling patients with obesity in lifestyle intervention programs.

  15. Glutathione cycle in diquat neurotoxicity: Assessed by intrastriatal pre-treatment with glutathione reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurđević Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diquat (DQ neurotoxicity mechanisms are unknown, although, it's systemic toxicity is mediated by free radical reactions. The role of glutathione cycle was assessed by glutathione reductase (GR applied in the pre-treatment of DQ poisoning. Wistar rats were used and tested compounds were administered intrastriatally (i.s. in one single dose. Total glutathione (tGSH, glutathione disulfide (GSSG and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were measured in the vulnerable brain regions (VBRs (striatum, hippocampus and cortex, at 30 minutes, 24 hours and 7 days post treatment. Results from the intact and the sham operated groups were not statistically different. Rapid spatial spreading of oxidative stress was confirmed in the examined VBRs. Mortality (30-40%, within 24hrs and signs of lethargy were observed in the DQ group. Activity of GPx activity was elevated and GSSG/GSH was higher in the examined VBRs during the experiment, compared to the controls. The i.s. pre-treatment with GR achieved neuroprotective role against DQ induced neurotoxicity, based on animal survival, absence of lethargy and decreased GPx activity and GSSG/GSH in the examined VBRs during the experiment, compared to the DQ group. Our results confirmed that oxidation of GSH was the reason for the reduced antioxidative defense against DQ neurotoxicity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III41018

  16. [Glutathione participation in regulating the secretory function of the stomach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlygin, G K; Vasilevskaia, L S; Martinchik, A N; Ignatenko, L G

    1987-01-01

    In experiments on dogs with Pavlov's pouches it was shown that glutathione infusion into the blood produced a highly pronounced stimulating effect on the gastric secretion induced by pentagastrin. Endogenous glutathione produced similar effect. It was found that intake as a drink of mono-sodium glutamate led to a significant increase of glutathione concentration in the dogs' blood, that was, probably, the result of its intensified production in the intestinal wall and passing into the blood. The growth of glutathione concentration in the blood coincided with its stimulating effect on the gastric secretion. Glutathione administered separately into the blood, or intake of glutathione without pentagastrin did not produce stimulating effect on gastric secretion. The data presented have evidenced that glutathione, besides its known functions, plays a role of the factor engaged in the regulation of gastric secretion.

  17. Regulation of Hepatic Glutathione Turnover in Rats In Vivo and Evidence for Kinetic Homogeneity of the Hepatic Glutathione Pool

    OpenAIRE

    Lauterburg, Bernhard H.; Mitchell, Jerry R.

    1981-01-01

    The intracellular distribution of glutathione into kinetically distinct pools and the determinants of glutathione turnover were examined in vivo. Glutathione turnover was measured in individual, restrained rats with a biliary fistula by administration of acetaminophen to trap the previously labeled hepatic glutathione as an excretable acetaminophen adduct. Fasting for 48 h resulted in a decrease of hepatic glutathione from 4.7±0.9 to 3.6±0.8 μmol/g liver and a marked increase in the fractiona...

  18. Sleep deprivation: consequences for students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhefka, Julie King

    2011-09-01

    During the adolescent years, a delayed pattern of the sleep-wake cycle occurs. Many parents and health care providers are not aware that once established, these poor sleep habits can continue into adulthood. Early school hours start a pattern of sleep loss that begins a cycle of daytime sleepiness, which may affect mood, behavior, and increase risk for accidents or injury. These sleep-deprived habits established in adolescence can often lead to problems during college years. Sleep hygiene can be initiated to help break the cycle, along with education and implementation of a strict regimen. Monitoring all adolescents and college-aged students for sleep insufficiency is imperative to improve both academic and emotional well-being. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. [Smoking cessation and social deprivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merson, F; Perriot, J; Underner, M; Peiffer, G; Fieulaine, N

    2014-12-01

    Smoking is a major of public health policy issue; one in two lifelong smokers will die from a disease related to tobacco use. In France, smoking is responsible for more than 70,000 deaths every year. The benefits linked to stopping smoking include reduced mortality and morbidity related to the use of tobacco. Recent data show an increase in the prevalence of smoking in the lowest socioeconomic population. Tobacco control needs a better understanding of the determinants of smoking in this population, which are also factors in the failure of cessation attempts. Based on international literature, this review specifies the educational and socioeconomic factors involved in tobacco smoking and in the result of an attempt to quit. Its aim is to propose ways to improve the management of smoking cessation in a socially deprived population. Copyright © 2014 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Glutathione-binding site of a bombyx mori theta-class glutathione transferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M D Tofazzal Hossain

    Full Text Available The glutathione transferase (GST superfamily plays key roles in the detoxification of various xenobiotics. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a silkworm protein belonging to a previously reported theta-class GST family. The enzyme (bmGSTT catalyzes the reaction of glutathione with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, 1,2-epoxy-3-(4-nitrophenoxy-propane, and 4-nitrophenethyl bromide. Mutagenesis of highly conserved residues in the catalytic site revealed that Glu66 and Ser67 are important for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTT and into the metabolism of exogenous chemical agents.

  1. Immediate error correction process following sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Shulan; Cheng, I-Chen; Tsai, Ling-Ling

    2007-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that one night of sleep deprivation decreases frontal lobe metabolic activity, particularly in the anterior cingulated cortex (ACC), resulting in decreased performance in various executive function tasks. This study thus attempted to address whether sleep deprivation impaired the executive function of error detection and error correction. Sixteen young healthy college students (seven women, nine men, with ages ranging from 18 to 23 years) participated in this study. Participants performed a modified letter flanker task and were instructed to make immediate error corrections on detecting performance errors. Event-related potentials (ERPs) during the flanker task were obtained using a within-subject, repeated-measure design. The error negativity or error-related negativity (Ne/ERN) and the error positivity (Pe) seen immediately after errors were analyzed. The results show that the amplitude of the Ne/ERN was reduced significantly following sleep deprivation. Reduction also occurred for error trials with subsequent correction, indicating that sleep deprivation influenced error correction ability. This study further demonstrated that the impairment in immediate error correction following sleep deprivation was confined to specific stimulus types, with both Ne/ERN and behavioral correction rates being reduced only for trials in which flanker stimuli were incongruent with the target stimulus, while the response to the target was compatible with that of the flanker stimuli following sleep deprivation. The results thus warrant future systematic investigation of the interaction between stimulus type and error correction following sleep deprivation.

  2. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašić, Ana; Horvat, Lucija; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione plays numerous important functions in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Whereas it can be found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, its production in prokaryotes is restricted to cyanobacteria and proteobacteria and a few strains of gram-positive bacteria. In bacteria, it is involved in the protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS), osmotic shock, acidic conditions, toxic chemicals, and heavy metals. Glutathione synthesis in bacteria takes place in two steps out of cysteine, glutamate, and glycine. Cysteine is the limiting factor for glutathione biosynthesis which can be especially crucial for cyanobacteria, which rely on both the sufficient sulfur supply from the growth media and on the protection of glutathione against ROS that are produced during photosynthesis. In this study, we report a method that allows detection and visualization of the subcellular distribution of glutathione in Synechocystis sp. This method is based on immunogold cytochemistry with glutathione and cysteine antisera and computer-supported transmission electron microscopy. Labeling of glutathione and cysteine was restricted to the cytosol and interthylakoidal spaces. Glutathione and cysteine could not be detected in carboxysomes, cyanophycin granules, cell walls, intrathylakoidal spaces, periplasm, and vacuoles. The accuracy of the glutathione and cysteine labeling is supported by two observations. First, preadsorption of the antiglutathione and anticysteine antisera with glutathione and cysteine, respectively, reduced the density of the gold particles to background levels. Second, labeling of glutathione and cysteine was strongly decreased by 98.5% and 100%, respectively, in Synechocystis sp. cells grown on media without sulfur. This study indicates a strong similarity of the subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria and plastids of plants and provides a deeper insight into glutathione metabolism in bacteria. PMID:20349253

  3. Conjugate products of pyocyanin-glutathione reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheluvappa, Rajkumar; Eri, Rajaraman

    2015-08-05

    This "Letter to the Editor" is a "gentle but purposeful rejoinder" to specific comments made in pages 36-37 of your Muller and Merrett (2015) publication regarding the data presented in our Cheluvappa et al. (2008) paper. Our rebuttal topics include the effect of oxygen on the pyocyanin-glutathione reaction, relevance of reaction-duration to pathophysiology, rationale of experiments, veracity of statements germane to molecular-structure construction, and correction of hyperbole. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of rosella ( Hibiscus sabdariffa L ) extract on glutathione-S ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the effect of rosella (Hibiscus sabdariffa L) extract on glutathione-S-trasferase (GST) activity and its hepatoprotective effect. Methods: A total of 25 rats were divided randomly into 5 groups (5 rats per group). Group I served as the baseline, group II was the negative control group, while groups III, IV and ...

  5. Sleep deprivation affects reactivity to positive but not negative stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, June J; Callan, Christina; Posey, J Laura

    2015-12-01

    The current study examined the effects of partial and total sleep deprivation on emotional reactivity. Twenty-eight partially sleep-deprived participants and 31 totally sleep-deprived participants rated their valence and arousal responses to positive and negative pictures across four testing sessions during the day following partial sleep deprivation or during the night under total sleep deprivation. The results suggest that valence and arousal ratings decreased under both sleep deprivation conditions. In addition, partial and total sleep deprivation had a greater negative effect on positive events than negative events. These results suggest that sleep-deprived persons are more likely to respond less to positive events than negative events. One explanation for the current findings is that negative events could elicit more attentive behavior and thus stable responding under sleep deprivation conditions. As such, sleep deprivation could impact reactivity to emotional stimuli through automated attentional and self-regulatory processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sleep deprivation and neurobehavioral functioning in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maski, Kiran P; Kothare, Sanjeev V

    2013-08-01

    Sleep deprivation can result in significant impairments in daytime neurobehavioral functioning in children. Neural substrates impacted by sleep deprivation include the prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia and amygdala and result in difficulties with executive functioning, reward anticipation and emotional reactivity respectively. In everyday life, such difficulties contribute to academic struggles, challenging behaviors and public health concerns of substance abuse and suicidality. In this article, we aim to review 1) core neural structures impacted by sleep deprivation; 2) neurobehavioral problems associated with sleep deprivation; 3) specific mechanisms that may explain the relationship between sleep disturbances and neurobehavioral dysfunction; and 4) sleep problems reported in common neurodevelopmental disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs). Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Court-authorised deprivation of liberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The United Kingdom Supreme Court judgment in Cheshire West and Chester Council v P in 2014 introduced a more inclusive 'acid test' for determining the objective element of a deprivation of liberty in cases concerning people who lack decision-making capacity. The case made clear that adults and young people who lack capacity could be deprived of their liberty in care settings other than hospitals and care homes, including the person's own home. A deprivation of liberty that occurs in a setting other than a hospital or care home must be authorised by a Court. This article explains the revised process for applying for Court authorisation of a deprivation of liberty where it occurs in supported living, Shared Lives placements or the incapable person's own home.

  8. Systemic bacterial invasion induced by sleep deprivation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carol A. Everson; Linda A. Toth

    2000-01-01

    .... The present study investigated the conditions antecedent to advanced morbidity in sleep-deprived rats by determining the time course and distribution of live microorganisms in body tissues that are normally sterile...

  9. Mushrooms: A rich source of the antioxidants ergothioneine and glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaras, Michael D; Richie, John P; Calcagnotto, Ana; Beelman, Robert B

    2017-10-15

    While mushrooms are the highest dietary source for the unique sulfur-containing antioxidant ergothioneine, little is known regarding levels of the major biological antioxidant glutathione. Thus, our objectives were to determine and compare levels of glutathione, as well as ergothioneine, in different species of mushrooms. Glutathione levels varied >20-fold (0.11-2.41mg/gdw) with some varieties having higher levels than reported for other foods. Ergothioneine levels also varied widely (0.15-7.27mg/gdw) and were highly correlated with those of glutathione (r=0.62, Pmushrooms species. Agaricus bisporus harvested during the third cropping flush contained higher levels of ergothioneine and glutathione compared to the first flush, possibly as a response to increased oxidative stress. This study demonstrated that certain mushroom species are high in glutathione and ergothioneine and should be considered an excellent dietary source of these important antioxidants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Deficient Glutathione in the Pathophysiology of Mycotoxin-Related Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilford, Frederick T.; Hope, Janette

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of mycotoxin-related illness is increasing. The glutathione antioxidant and detoxification systems play a major role in the antioxidant function of cells. Exposure to mycotoxins in humans requires the production of glutathione on an “as needed” basis. Research suggests that mycotoxins can decrease the formation of glutathione due to decreased gene expression of the enzymes needed to form glutathione. Mycotoxin-related compromise of glutathione production can result in an excess of oxidative stress that leads to tissue damage and systemic illness. The review discusses the mechanisms by which mycotoxin-related deficiency of glutathione may lead to both acute and chronic illnesses. PMID:24517907

  11. Sleep deprivation increases formation of false memory

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, June C.; Chong, Pearlynne L.H.; Ganesan, Shankari; Leong, Ruth L. F.; Chee, Michael W.L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Retrieving false information can have serious consequences. Sleep is important for memory, but voluntary sleep curtailment is becoming more rampant. Here, the misinformation paradigm was used to investigate false memory formation after 1 night of total sleep deprivation in healthy young adults (N?=?58, mean age???SD?=?22.10???1.60?years; 29 males), and 7 nights of partial sleep deprivation (5?h sleep opportunity) in these young adults and healthy adolescents (N?=?54, mean age???SD?=?1...

  12. Women in prison: Deprivations of prison life

    OpenAIRE

    Špadijer-Džinić Jelena; Pavićević Olivera; Simeunović-Patić Biljana

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an empirical study of prison deprivations suffered by women, conducted at the Female Department of Correctional Facility in Požarevac within the scope of a wider study of women's prison system. It was supposed that female prisoners in this penal institution face similar prison experience and suffer the same or similar deprivations as women in other penal institutions do. The research sample included female prisoners sentenced to more than one year, staying in...

  13. Motor development after vestibular deprivation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, H C; Gramsbergen, A

    1998-07-01

    This review summarizes the postural development in the rat and the influences of vestibular deprivation from the 5th postnatal day on this development. Vestibular deprivation leads to a delay in motor development. Most probably this delay is caused by a delay in the development of postural control, which is characterized by a retarded EMG development in postural muscles. Our results indicate that the developing nervous system cannot compensate for a vestibular deficit during the early phase of ontogeny.

  14. Sensory deprivation leading to late onset psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnajeet Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensory deprivation is understood as diminution or absence of perceptual experiences to the usual external stimuli. Sensory deprivation in elderly is reported to be associated with depression, anxiety, psychosis, dementia, etc. In this report, we present the case of an 84-year- elderly man who developed auditory hallucination and after 1 year of onset of hearing difficulties. He was managed with quetiapine, with which he showed significant improvement.

  15. Plant Glutathione Biosynthesis: Diversity in Biochemical Regulation and Reaction Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley eGalant

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In plants, exposure to temperature extremes, heavy metal-contaminated soils, drought, air pollutants, and pathogens results in the generation of reactive oxygen species that alter the intracellular redox environment, which in turn influences signaling pathways and cell fate. As part of their response to these stresses, plants produce glutathione. Glutathione acts as an antioxidant by quenching reactive oxygen species, and is involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle that eliminates damaging peroxides. Plants also use glutathione for the detoxification of xenobiotics, herbicides, air pollutants (sulfur dioxide and ozone, and toxic heavy metals. Two enzymes catalyze glutathione synthesis: glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL, and glutathione synthetase (GS. Glutathione is a ubiquitous protective compound in plants, but the structural and functional details of the proteins that synthesize it, as well as the potential biochemical mechanisms of their regulation, have only begun to be explored. As discussed here, the core reactions of glutathione synthesis are conserved across various organisms, but plants have diversified both the regulatory mechanisms that control its synthesis and the range of products derived from this pathway. Understanding the molecular basis of glutathione biosynthesis and its regulation will expand our knowledge of this component in the plant stress response network.

  16. Prodrug Approach for Increasing Cellular Glutathione Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Cacciatore

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Reduced glutathione (GSH is the most abundant non-protein thiol in mammalian cells and the preferred substrate for several enzymes in xenobiotic metabolism and antioxidant defense. It plays an important role in many cellular processes, such as cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. GSH deficiency has been observed in aging and in a wide range of pathologies, including neurodegenerative disorders and cystic fibrosis (CF, as well as in several viral infections. Use of GSH as a therapeutic agent is limited because of its unfavorable biochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. Several reports have provided evidence for the use of GSH prodrugs able to replenish intracellular GSH levels. This review discusses different strategies for increasing GSH levels by supplying reversible bioconjugates able to cross the cellular membrane more easily than GSH and to provide a source of thiols for GSH synthesis.

  17. Glutathione attenuates uranyl toxicity in Lactococcus lactis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahmy, Karim; Oertel, Jana [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biophysics; Obeid, M. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Solioz, M. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland)

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the role of intracellular glutathione (GSH), which in a large number of taxa plays a role in the protection against the toxicity of heavy metals. Anaerobically grown Lactococcus lactis containing an inducible GSH synthesis pathway was used as a model organism allowing the study of GSH-dependent uranyl detoxification without interference from additional reactive oxygen species. Microcalorimetric measurements of the metabolic heat showed that intracellular GSH attenuates the toxicity of uranium at a concentration in the range of 10-150 μM. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed the endothermic binding of U(VI) to the carboxyl group(s) of GSH. The data indicate that the primary detoxifying mechanism is the intracellular sequestration of carboxyl-coordinated U(VI) into an insoluble complex with GSH.

  18. Decreased oxidized glutathione with aerosolized cyclosporine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, A; Coran, A G; Oldham, K T; Guice, K S

    1993-06-01

    Cyclosporine immunosuppression remains vital for successful lung transplantation. Cyclosporine also functions as a membrane active biological response modifier and has been noted to have a variable effect on ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in various tissues. Glutathione plays an important role in the endogenous antioxidant defense system; plasma oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels are useful as a sensitive indicator of in vivo oxidant stress and I/R injury. Lung transplantation results in ischemia, followed by a period of reperfusion, potentially producing functional injury. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of cyclosporine on oxygen radical generation in a model of single-lung transplantation. Single-lung transplantation was performed in 12 mongrel puppies, with animals assigned to receive either intravenous or aerosolized cyclosporine. Arterial blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples were obtained to determine GSSG levels via a spectrophotometric technique. Samples were obtained both prior to and following the revascularization of the transplanted lung. Whole blood and tissue cyclosporine levels were determined via an high-performance liquid chromatography technique 3 hr following the completion of the transplant. Aerosolized cyclosporine administration resulted in greatly decreased arterial plasma and BALF GSSG levels, whole blood cyclosporine levels, and equivalent tissue cyclosporine levels when compared to intravenous cyclosporine delivery. These findings support the hypothesis that the transplanted lung is a source of GSSG production and release into plasma. Additionally, these findings suggest that cyclosporine may have a direct antioxidant effect on pulmonary tissue, with this activity occurring at the epithelial surface, an area susceptible to oxidant injury.

  19. Response of Glutathione and Glutathione S-transferase in Rice Seedlings Exposed to Cadmium Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-hua ZHANG

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A hydroponic culture experiment was done to investigate the effect of Cd stress on glutathione content (GSH and glutathione S-transferase (GST, EC 2.5.1.18 activity in rice seedlings. The rice growth was severely inhibited when Cd level in the solution was higher than 10 mg/L. In rice shoots, GSH content and GST activity increased with the increasing Cd level, while in roots, GST was obviously inhibited by Cd treatments. Compared with shoots, the rice roots had higher GSH content and GST activity, indicating the ability of Cd detoxification was much higher in roots than in shoots. There was a significant correlation between Cd level and GSH content or GST activity, suggesting that both parameters may be used as biomarkers of Cd stress in rice.

  20. Lower plasma levels of selenium and glutathione in smear- positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Abstract. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate selenium and glutathione levels in pulmonary tuberculosis patients and controls in Malawi. Methods: The case-control study included 19 patients and 15 apparently healthy controls for whom, levels of selenium and glutathione were measured. Results: The ...

  1. Kinetic analysis of glutathione transferase from rats exposed to sub ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of lethal and sublethal doses of lead acetate on the induction and kinetic characteristics of glutathione transferase (GST) isozymes in rat liver and kidney were investigated. GST isozymes induction was monitored by the ability of the induced enzyme to conjugate glutathione (GSH) with model GST substrates.

  2. Glutathione Redox System in β-Thalassemia/Hb E Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchaneekorn W. Kalpravidh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available β-thalassemia/Hb E is known to cause oxidative stress induced by iron overload. The glutathione system is the major endogenous antioxidant that protects animal cells from oxidative damage. This study aimed to determine the effect of disease state and splenectomy on redox status expressed by whole blood glutathione (GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG and also to evaluate glutathione-related responses to oxidation in β-thalassemia/Hb E patients. Twenty-seven normal subjects and 25 β-thalassemia/Hb E patients were recruited and blood was collected. The GSH/GSSG ratio, activities of glutathione-related enzymes, hematological parameters, and serum ferritin levels were determined in individuals. Patients had high iron-induced oxidative stress, shown as significantly increased serum ferritin, a decreased GSH/GSSG ratio, and increased activities of glutathione-related enzymes. Splenectomy increased serum ferritin levels and decreased GSH levels concomitant with unchanged glutathione-related enzyme activities. The redox ratio had a positive correlation with hemoglobin levels and negative correlation with levels of serum ferritin. The glutathione system may be the body’s first-line defense used against oxidative stress and to maintain redox homeostasis in thalassemic patients based on the significant correlations between the GSH/GSSH ratio and degree of anemia or body iron stores.

  3. Effects Of Alcohol And Paracetamol On Hepatic Glutathione ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of paracetamol on hepatic glutathione concentration in rats after chronic alcohol and given intoxication was investigated using biochemical indices. Male albino rats were grouped into five and the different dosage regimens of paracetamol (300 mg/kg) and 12% alcohol. Hepatic glutathione concentration and the ...

  4. Compartment specific importance of glutathione during abiotic and biotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd eZechmann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The tripeptide thiol glutathione (γ-L-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine is the most important sulfur containing antioxidant in plants and essential for plant defense against abiotic and biotic stress conditions. It is involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species, redox signaling, the modulation of defense gene expression and important for the regulation of enzymatic activities. Even though changes in glutathione contents are well documented in plants and its roles in plant defense are well established, still too little is known about its compartment specific importance during abiotic and biotic stress conditions. Due to technical advances in the visualization of glutathione and the redox state of plants through microscopical methods some progress was made in the last few years in studying the importance of subcellular glutathione contents during stress conditions in plants. This review summarizes the data available on compartment specific importance of glutathione in the protection against abiotic and biotic stress conditions such as high light stress, exposure to cadmium, drought, and pathogen attack (Pseudomonas, Botrytis, Tobacco Mosaic Virus. The data will be discussed in connection with the subcellular accumulation of ROS during these conditions and glutathione synthesis which are both highly compartment specific (e.g. glutathione synthesis takes place in chloroplasts and the cytosol. Thus this review will reveal the compartment specific importance of glutathione during abiotic and biotic stress conditions.

  5. Induction of Glutathione Synthesis and Glutathione Reductase Activity by Abiotic Stresses in Maize and Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Kocsy

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different abiotic stresses (extreme temperatures and osmotic stress on the synthesis of glutathione and hydroxymethylglutathione, on the ratio of the reduced to oxidised forms of these thiols (GSH/GSSG, hmGSH/hmGSSG, and on the glutathione reductase (GR activity was studied in maize and wheat genotypes having different sensitivity to low temperature stress. Cold treatment induced a greater increase in total glutathione (TG content and in GR activity in tolerant genotypes of both species than in sensitive ones. The GSH/GSSG and hmGSH/hmGSSG ratios were increased by this treatment only in the frost-tolerant wheat variety. High-temperature stress increased the TG content and the GSH/GSSG ratio only in the chilling-sensitive maize genotype, but GR activity was greater after this treatment in both maize genotypes. Osmotic stress resulted in a great increase in the TG content in wheat and the GR activity in maize. The amount of total hydroxymethylglutathione increased following all stress treatments. These results indicate the involvement of these antioxidants in the stress responses of wheat and maize.

  6. Interocular suppression in children with deprivation amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Lisa; Chen, Zidong; Li, Jinrong; Black, Joanna; Dai, Shuan; Yuan, Junpeng; Yu, Minbin; Thompson, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    In patients with anisometropic or strabismic amblyopia, interocular suppression can be minimized by presenting high contrast stimulus elements to the amblyopic eye and lower contrast elements to the fellow eye. This suggests a structurally intact binocular visual system that is functionally suppressed. We investigated whether suppression can also be overcome by contrast balancing in children with deprivation amblyopia due to childhood cataracts. To quantify interocular contrast balance, contrast interference thresholds were measured using an established dichoptic global motion technique for 21 children with deprivation amblyopia, 14 with anisometropic or mixed strabismic/anisometropic amblyopia and 10 visually normal children (mean age mean=9.9years, range 5-16years). We found that interocular suppression could be overcome by contrast balancing in most children with deprivation amblyopia, at least intermittently, and all children with anisometropic or mixed anisometropic/strabismic amblyopia. However, children with deprivation amblyopia due to early unilateral or bilateral cataracts could tolerate only very low contrast levels to the stronger eye indicating strong suppression. Our results suggest that treatment options reliant on contrast balanced dichoptic presentation could be attempted in a subset of children with deprivation amblyopia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Material deprivation and health: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tøge, Anne Grete; Bell, Ruth

    2016-08-08

    Does material deprivation affect the consequences of ill health? Answering this question requires that we move beyond the effects of income. Longitudinal data on material deprivation, longstanding illness and limiting longstanding illness enables investigations of the effects of material deprivation on risk of limiting longstanding illness. This study investigates whether a shift from affording to not affording a car predicts the probability of limiting longstanding ill (LLSI). The 2008-2011 longitudinal panel of Statistics on Income, Social Inclusion and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) is utilised. Longitudinal fixed effects logit models are applied, using LLSI as dependent variable. Transition from affording a car to not affording a car is used as a proxy for material deprivation. All models are controlled for whether the person becomes longstanding ill (LSI) as well as other time-variant covariates that could affect the results. The analysis shows a statistically significant increased odds ratio of LLSI when individuals no longer can afford a car, after controlling for confounders and LSI in the previous year (1.129, CI = 1.022-1.248). However, when restricting the sample to observations where respondents report longstanding illness the results are no longer significant (1.032, CI = 0.910-1.171). The results indicate an individual level effect of material deprivation on LLSI, suggesting that material resources can affect the consequences of ill health.

  8. Sleep deprivation impairs recognition of specific emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D.S. Killgore

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Emotional processing is particularly sensitive to sleep deprivation, but research on the topic has been limited and prior studies have generally evaluated only a circumscribed subset of emotion categories. Here, we evaluated the effects of one night of sleep deprivation and a night of subsequent recovery sleep on the ability to identify the six most widely agreed upon basic emotion categories (happiness, surprise, fear, sadness, disgust, anger. Healthy adults (29 males; 25 females classified a series of 120 standard facial expressions that were computer morphed with their most highly confusable expression counterparts to create continua of expressions that differed in discriminability between emotion categories (e.g., combining 70% happiness+30% surprise; 90% surprise+10% fear. Accuracy at identifying the dominant emotion for each morph was assessed after a normal night of sleep, again following a night of total sleep deprivation, and finally after a night of recovery sleep. Sleep deprivation was associated with significantly reduced accuracy for identifying the expressions of happiness and sadness in the morphed faces. Gender differences in accuracy were not observed and none of the other emotions showed significant changes as a function of sleep loss. Accuracy returned to baseline after recovery sleep. Findings suggest that sleep deprivation adversely affects the recognition of subtle facial cues of happiness and sadness, the two emotions that are most relevant to highly evolved prosocial interpersonal interactions involving affiliation and empathy, while the recognition of other more primitive survival-oriented emotional face cues may be relatively robust against sleep loss.

  9. Human glutathione S-transferase-mediated glutathione conjugation of curcumin and efflux of these conjugates in caco-2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Usta, M.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Vervoort, J.; Boersma, M.G.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Cnubben, N.H.P.

    2007-01-01

    Curcumin, an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compound, reacts with glutathione, leading to the formation of two monoglutathionyl curcumin conjugates. In the present study, the structures of both glutathione conjugates of curcumin were identified by LC-MS and one- and two-dimensional 1H NMR analysis, and

  10. Human glutathione S-transferase-mediated glutathione conjugation of curcumin and efflux of these conjugates in Caco-2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Usta, M.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Vervoort, J.J.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Cnubben, N.H.P.

    2007-01-01

    Curcumin, an alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl compound, reacts with glutathione, leading to the formation of two monoglutathionyl curcumin conjugates. In the present study, the structures of both glutathione conjugates of curcumin were identified by LC-MS and one- and two-dimensional H-1 NMR

  11. Quantitation of protein S-glutathionylation by liquid chromatograph-tandem mass spectrometry: Correction for contaminating glutathione and glutathione disulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein S-glutathionylation is a posttranslational modification that links oxidative stimuli to reversible changes in cellular function. Protein-glutathione mixed disulfides (PSSG) are commonly quantified by the reduction of the disulfide and detection of the resultant glutathione species. This met...

  12. Nursing diagnoses in women deprived of freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabelle de Freitas Ferreira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the nursing diagnoses profile of women deprived of freedom, using the International Classification for Nursing® Practice version 1.0. Methods: a descriptive study, conducted with 186 women deprived of freedom. Nursing Diagnoses were extrapolated based on the clinical data of the participants, collected through a structured form and clinical reasoning. Results: there were 44 nursing diagnostic statements, among the most common, there were: infection risk (70.9%; fluid intake, decreased (61.2%; Sleep, impaired (60.7%; tobacco abuse, started (51.6%; health seeking behavior, committed (50.0%. Conclusion: the diagnoses are related to factors that compromise the biopsychosocial health. The nurse, health staff member in the prison setting, must recognize and assess the individual and collective needs of women deprived of freedom. The inference of nursing diagnoses, based on clinical reasoning, contributes to a humanized, empathic and special care.

  13. Comparison of plasma malondialdehyde, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, hydroxyproline and selenium levels in patients with vitiligo and healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozturk I

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology and pathophysiologic mechanism of vitiligo are still unclear. The relationship between increased oxidative stress due to the accumulation of radicals and reactive oxygen species and the associated changes in blood and epidermal component of vitiliginous skin have been reported many times. We investigated the possible changes of plasma malondialdehyde, glutathione, selenium, hydroxyproline and glutathione peroxidase activity levels in patients with vitiligo in order to evaluate the relationship between oxidative stress and etiopathogenesis of vitiligo. Materials and Methods: Plasma malondialdehyde, glutathione, hydroxyproline and glutathione peroxidase activity levels were measured by spectrophotometric methods, and HPLC was used for measurement of selenium concentrations. Results: Our results showed increased malondialdehyde, hydroxyproline and glutathione peroxidase activity levels in plasma of vitiligo group ( P < 0.05. Conclusion: Support of antioxidant system via nonenzymatic antioxidant compounds and antioxidant enzymes may be useful to prevent of melanocyte degeneration which occur due to oxidative damage in vitiligo.

  14. Deprivation and non-institutional political participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, Anders

    2017-01-01

    This article examines how the relationship between perceived economic deprivation (PED) and non-institutional forms of political activity interacted with institutional trust during the economic crisis in 24 European countries. Using multi-level regression analysis, two broad questions are addressed...... the opposite correlation on an individual level within the countries. Second, the analysis provides evidence that the institutional context shapes the connection between PED and political participation on the individual level. In countries with a high level of institutional trust, economically deprived...

  15. Deprivation of Dignity in Nursing Home Residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2016-01-01

    deepened knowledge in how to maintain and promote dignity in nursing home residents. The purpose of this paper is to present results concerning the question: How is nursing home residents’ dignity maintained or deprived from the perspective of close family caregivers? In this presentation we only focus...... on deprivation of dignity. Methodology: The overall design of this study is modified clinical application research. The study took place at six different nursing home residences in Sweden, Denmark and Norway. Data collection methods were individual research interviews. All together the sample consisted of 28...

  16. Labor Augmentation with Oxytocin Decreases Glutathione Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Schneid-Kofman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare oxidative stress following spontaneous vaginal delivery with that induced by Oxytocin augmented delivery. Methods. 98 women recruited prior to labor. 57 delivered spontaneously, while 41 received Oxytocin for augmentation of labor. Complicated deliveries and high-risk pregnancies were excluded. Informed consent was documented. Arterial cord blood gases, levels of Hematocrit, Hemoglobin, and Bilirubin were studied. Glutathione (GSH concentration was measured by a spectroscopic method. Plasma and red blood cell (RBC levels of Malondialdehyde indicated lipid peroxidation. RBC uptake of phenol red denoted cell penetrability. SPSS data analysis was used. Results. Cord blood GSH was significantly lower in the Oxytocin group (2.3±0.55 mM versus 2.55±0.55 mM, =.01. No differences were found in plasma or RBC levels of MDA or in uptake of Phenol red between the groups. Conclusion. Lower GSH levels following Oxytocin augmentation indicate an oxidative stress, though selected measures of oxidative stress demonstrate no cell damage.

  17. The Genetic Architecture of Murine Glutathione Transferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Lu

    Full Text Available Glutathione S-transferase (GST genes play a protective role against oxidative stress and may influence disease risk and drug pharmacokinetics. In this study, massive multiscalar trait profiling across a large population of mice derived from a cross between C57BL/6J (B6 and DBA2/J (D2--the BXD family--was combined with linkage and bioinformatic analyses to characterize mechanisms controlling GST expression and to identify downstream consequences of this variation. Similar to humans, mice show a wide range in expression of GST family members. Variation in the expression of Gsta4, Gstt2, Gstz1, Gsto1, and Mgst3 is modulated by local expression QTLs (eQTLs in several tissues. Higher expression of Gsto1 in brain and liver of BXD strains is strongly associated (P < 0.01 with inheritance of the B6 parental allele whereas higher expression of Gsta4 and Mgst3 in brain and liver, and Gstt2 and Gstz1 in brain is strongly associated with inheritance of the D2 parental allele. Allele-specific assays confirmed that expression of Gsto1, Gsta4, and Mgst3 are modulated by sequence variants within or near each gene locus. We exploited this endogenous variation to identify coexpression networks and downstream targets in mouse and human. Through a combined systems genetics approach, we provide new insight into the biological role of naturally occurring variants in GST genes.

  18. Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards: ethical and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Arpita

    2015-04-01

    The Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards were introduced in 2009 as an addition to the Mental Capacity Act 2005. This review discusses the legal impact of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards in the management of incapacitated patients.

  19. Prognostic significance of glutathione peroxidase 2 in gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongzhe; Sun, Liang; Tong, Jinxue; Chen, Xiuhui; Li, Hui; Zhang, Qifan

    2017-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the glutathione peroxidase 2 may actually play important roles in tumorigenesis and progression in various human cancers such as colorectal carcinomas and lung adenocarcinomas. However, the role of glutathione peroxidase 2 in gastric carcinoma remains to be determined. In this study, the expression and prognostic significance of glutathione peroxidase 2 in gastric carcinoma were investigated and the well-known prognostic factor Ki-67 labeling index was also assessed as positive control. Glutathione peroxidase 2 expression levels in the tumor tissue specimens, the matched adjacent normal tissue specimens, and the lymph node metastases of 176 patients with gastric carcinoma were evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining. The associations between glutathione peroxidase 2 expression levels, as determined by immunohistochemical staining, and multiple clinicopathological characteristics were determined by Pearson's chi-square test and Spearman's correlation analysis. The relationships between glutathione peroxidase 2 expression and other clinicopathological variables and patient prognoses were analyzed further by the Kaplan-Meier method, the log-rank test, and Cox multivariate regression. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining results showed that glutathione peroxidase 2 expression levels were upregulated in both the primary tumor foci and the lymph node metastases of patients with gastric carcinoma (all p values carcinoma (all p values carcinoma that may be used to devise personalized therapeutic regimens and precision treatments for this disease.

  20. Occlusion for stimulus deprivation amblyopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio-Santos, Aileen; Vedula, Satyanarayana S; Hatt, Sarah R; Powell, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Background Stimulus deprivation amblyopia (SDA) develops due to an obstruction to the passage of light secondary to a condition such as cataract. The obstruction prevents formation of a clear image on the retina. SDA can be resistant to treatment, leading to poor visual prognosis. SDA probably constitutes less than 3% of all amblyopia cases, although precise estimates of prevalence are unknown. In developed countries, most patients present under the age of one year; in less developed parts of the world patients are likely to be older at the time of presentation. The mainstay of treatment is removal of the cataract and then occlusion of the better-seeing eye, but regimens vary, can be difficult to execute, and traditionally are believed to lead to disappointing results. Objectives Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of occlusion therapy for SDA in an attempt to establish realistic treatment outcomes. Where data were available, we also planned to examine evidence of any dose response effect and to assess the effect of the duration, severity, and causative factor on the size and direction of the treatment effect. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 9), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to October 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2013), the Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2013), PubMed (January 1946 to October 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 28 October 2013. Selection criteria We planned

  1. Glutathione imbalance in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Sara; Piemonte, Fiorella; Pastore, Anna; Tozzi, Giulia; Aiello, Chiara; Pujol, Aurora; Cappa, Marco; Bertini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Background X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a genetic disorder of X-linked inheritance caused by a mutation in the ABCD1 gene which determines an accumulation of long-chain fatty acids in plasma and tissues. Recent evidence shows that oxidative stress may be a hallmark in the pathogenesis of X-ALD and glutathione plays an important role in the defense against free radicals. In this study we have analyzed glutathione homeostasis in lymphocytes of 14 patients with X-ALD and evaluated the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of glutathione, in order to define the role of this crucial redox marker in this condition. Methods Lymphocytes, plasma and erythrocytes were obtained from the whole blood of 14 subjects with X-ALD and in 30 healthy subjects. Total, reduced and protein-bound glutathione levels were measured in lymphocytes by HPLC analysis. Erythrocyte free glutathione and antioxidant enzyme activities, plasma thiols and carbonyl content were determined by spectrophotometric assays. Results A significant decrease of total and reduced glutathione was found in lymphocytes of patients, associated to high levels of all oxidized glutathione forms. A decline of free glutathione was particularly significant in erythrocytes. The increased oxidative stress in X-ALD was additionally confirmed by the decrease of plasma thiols and the high level of carbonyls. Conclusion Our results strongly support a role for oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of X-ALD and strengthen the importance of the balance among glutathione forms as a hallmark and a potential biomarker of the disease. PMID:23768953

  2. Glutathione imbalance in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Sara; Piemonte, Fiorella; Pastore, Anna; Tozzi, Giulia; Aiello, Chiara; Pujol, Aurora; Cappa, Marco; Bertini, Enrico

    2013-08-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a genetic disorder of X-linked inheritance caused by a mutation in the ABCD1 gene which determines an accumulation of long-chain fatty acids in plasma and tissues. Recent evidence shows that oxidative stress may be a hallmark in the pathogenesis of X-ALD and glutathione plays an important role in the defense against free radicals. In this study we have analyzed glutathione homeostasis in lymphocytes of 14 patients with X-ALD and evaluated the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of glutathione, in order to define the role of this crucial redox marker in this condition. Lymphocytes, plasma and erythrocytes were obtained from the whole blood of 14 subjects with X-ALD and in 30 healthy subjects. Total, reduced and protein-bound glutathione levels were measured in lymphocytes by HPLC analysis. Erythrocyte free glutathione and antioxidant enzyme activities, plasma thiols and carbonyl content were determined by spectrophotometric assays. A significant decrease of total and reduced glutathione was found in lymphocytes of patients, associated to high levels of all oxidized glutathione forms. A decline of free glutathione was particularly significant in erythrocytes. The increased oxidative stress in X-ALD was additionally confirmed by the decrease of plasma thiols and the high level of carbonyls. Our results strongly support a role for oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of X-ALD and strengthen the importance of the balance among glutathione forms as a hallmark and a potential biomarker of the disease. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of sleep deprivation on neural functioning: an integrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Boonstra, T.W.; Stins, J. F.; Daffertshofer, A; Beek, P. J.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract. Sleep deprivation has a broad variety of effects on human performance and neural functioning that manifest themselves at different levels of description. On a macroscopic level, sleep deprivation mainly affects executive functions, especially in novel tasks. Macroscopic and mesoscopic effects of sleep deprivation on brain activity include reduced cortical responsiveness to incoming stimuli, reflecting reduced attention. On a microscopic level, sleep deprivation is associated with in...

  4. Glutathione redox dynamics and expression of glutathione-related genes in the developing embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timme-Laragy, Alicia R.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Imhoff, Barry R.; Stegeman, John J.; Hahn, Mark E.; Hansen, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic development involves dramatic changes in cell proliferation and differentiation that must be highly coordinated and tightly regulated. Cellular redox balance is critical for cell fate decisions, but it is susceptible to disruption by endogenous and exogenous sources of oxidative stress. The most abundant endogenous non-protein antioxidant defense molecule is the tri-peptide glutathione (γ-glutamyl-cysteinylglycine, GSH), but the ontogeny of GSH concentration and redox state during early life stages is poorly understood. Here, we describe the GSH redox dynamics during embryonic and early larval development (0–5 days post-fertilization) in the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a model vertebrate embryo. We measured reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH, GSSG) using HPLC, and calculated the whole embryo total glutathione (GSHT) concentrations and redox potentials (Eh) over 0–120 hours of zebrafish development (including mature oocytes, fertilization, mid-blastula transition, gastrulation, somitogenesis, pharyngula, pre-hatch embryos, and hatched eleutheroembryos). GSHT concentration doubled between 12 hours post fertilization (hpf) and hatching. The GSH Eh increased, becoming more oxidizing during the first 12 h, and then oscillated around −190 mV through organogenesis, followed by a rapid change, associated with hatching, to a more negative (more reducing) Eh (−220 mV). After hatching, Eh stabilized and remained steady through 120 hpf. The dynamic changes in GSH redox status and concentration defined discrete windows of development: primary organogenesis, organ differentiation, and larval growth. We identified the set of zebrafish genes involved in the synthesis, utilization, and recycling of GSH, including several novel paralogs, and measured how expression of these genes changes during development. Ontogenic changes in the expression of GSH-related genes support the hypothesis that GSH redox state is tightly regulated early in development. This study

  5. Glutathione content in sperm cells of infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Fafula

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperproduction of reactive oxygen species can damage sperm cells and is considered to be one of the mechanisms of male infertility. Cell protection from the damaging effects of free radicals and lipid peroxidation products is generally determined by the degree of antioxidant protection. Glutathione is non-enzymatic antioxidant which plays an important protective role against oxidative damages and lipid peroxidation. The aim of the present work is to determine the content of reduced and oxidized glutathione in sperm cells of infertile men. Semen samples from 20 fertile men (normozoospermics and 72 infertile patients (12 oligozoospermics, 17 asthenozoospermics, 10 oligoasthenozoosper­mics and 33 leucocytospermic were used. The total, oxidized (GSSG and reduced (GSH glutathione levels were measured spectrophotometrically. The levels of total glutathione were significantly lower in the spermatozoa of patients with oligozoo-, asthenozoo- and oligoasthenozoospermia than in the control. Infertile groups showed significantly decreased values of reduced glutathione in sperm cells vs. fertile men, indicating an alteration of oxidative status. The oxidized glutathione levels in sperm cells of infertile men did not differ from those of normozoospermic men with proven fertility. The GSH/GSSG ratio was significantly decreased in the oligo-, astheno- and oligoasthenozoospermic groups compared to the normozoospermic group. In patients with leucocytospermia the GSH/GSSG ratio was lower but these changes were not significant. In addition, glutathione peroxidase activity in sperm cells was decreased in patients with oligozoo-, astenozoo-, oligoastenozoospermia and with leucocytospermia. The most significant changes in glutathione peroxidase activity were observed in infertile men with leucocytospermia. Decreased GSH/GSSG ratio indicates a decline in redox-potential of the glutathione system in sperm cells of men with decreased fertilizing potential

  6. Sleep deprivation impairs cAMP signalling in the hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vecsey, Christopher G; Baillie, George S; Jaganath, Devan; Havekes, Robbert; Daniels, Andrew; Wimmer, Mathieu; Huang, Ted; Brown, Kim M; Li, Xiang-Yao; Descalzi, Giannina; Kim, Susan S; Chen, Tao; Shang, Yu-Ze; Zhuo, Min; Houslay, Miles D; Abel, Ted

    2009-01-01

    Millions of people regularly obtain insufficient sleep. Given the effect of sleep deprivation on our lives, understanding the cellular and molecular pathways affected by sleep deprivation is clearly of social and clinical importance. One of the major effects of sleep deprivation on the brain is to

  7. Quantitation of protein S-glutathionylation by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: correction for contaminating glutathione and glutathione disulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Michael R; Bucklin, Christopher; Picklo, Matthew J

    2015-01-15

    Protein S-glutathionylation is a posttranslational modification that links oxidative stimuli to reversible changes in cellular function. Protein-glutathione mixed disulfide (PSSG) is commonly quantified by reduction of the disulfide and detection of the resultant glutathione species. This methodology is susceptible to contamination by free unreacted cellular glutathione (GSH) species, which are present in 1000-fold greater concentration. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based method was developed for quantification of glutathione and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), which was used for the determination of PSSG in biological samples. Analysis of rat liver samples demonstrated that GSH and GSSG coprecipitated with proteins similar to the range for PSSG in the sample. The use of [(13)C2,(5)N]GSH and [(13)C4,(5)N2]GSSG validated these results and demonstrated that the release of GSH from PSSG did not occur during sample preparation and analysis. These data demonstrate that GSH and GSSG contamination must be accounted for when determining PSSG content in cellular/tissue preparations. A protocol for rinsing samples to remove the adventitious glutathione species is demonstrated. The fragmentation patterns for glutathione were determined by high-resolution mass spectrometry, and candidate ions for detection of PSSG on protein and protein fragments were identified. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Play Deprivation: A Factor in Juvenile Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Joe; Jacobs, Paul J.

    1995-01-01

    Notes that the increasing number of violent crimes committed by children is a result of play deprivation. Discusses different forms of play and distinguishes between controlled and free play. Examines factors such as inadequate outdoor spaces, organized sports, and hi-tech entertainment which interfere with spontaneous play. Discusses the concept…

  9. Deprivation among unemployed South African youth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    25% among the economically active population, and where .... unemployment, growing up with one parent, educational deprivation, and ... transmission thereof. Based on a study in the developing countries of Namibia,. Mozambique and Zambia, Devereux. (2002: 672) concluded that social security nets can impact ...

  10. Relative Deprivation and the Gender Wage Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Linda A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses how gender differences in the value of pay, based on relative deprivation theory, explain women's paradoxical contentment with lower wages. Presents a model of pay satisfaction to integrate value-based and comparative-referent explanations of the relationship between gender and pay satisfaction. Discusses economic approaches to the…

  11. Nursing diagnoses in women deprived of freedom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Izabelle de Freitas Ferreira; Tatiane Gomes Guedes; Sheila Coelho Ramalho Vasconcelos Morais; José Cristovam Martins Vieira; Marcelle Guimarães de Mello; Francisca Márcia Pereira Linhares

    2016-01-01

    ...: the diagnoses are related to factors that compromise the biopsychosocial health. The nurse, health staff member in the prison setting, must recognize and assess the individual and collective needs of women deprived of freedom. The inference of nursing diagnoses, based on clinical reasoning, contributes to a humanized, empathic and special care.

  12. Control deprivation and styles of thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinyue; He, Lingnan; Yang, Qing; Lao, Junpeng; Baumeister, Roy F

    2012-03-01

    Westerners habitually think in analytical ways, whereas East Asians tend to favor holistic styles of thinking. We replicated this difference but showed that it disappeared after control deprivation (Experiment 1). Brief experiences of control deprivation, which stimulate increased desire for control, caused Chinese participants to shift toward Western-style analytical thinking in multiple ways (Experiments 2-5). Western Caucasian participants also increased their use of analytical thinking after control deprivation (Experiment 6). Manipulations that required Chinese participants to think in Western, analytical ways caused their sense of personal control to increase (Experiments 7-9). Prolonged experiences of control deprivation, which past work suggested foster an attitude more akin to learned helplessness than striving for control, had the opposite effect of causing Chinese participants to shift back toward a strongly holistic style of thinking (Experiments 10-12). Taken together, the results support the reality of cultural differences in cognition but also the cross-cultural similarity of using analytical thinking when seeking to enhance personal control.

  13. Improving health related behavior in deprived neighborhoods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Kloek (Gitte)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe core of this thesis describes the evaluation of the community intervention "Wijkgezondheidswerk", a community health behavior intervention program to improve health related behavior in deprived neighborhoods in the city of Eindhoven. Besides this evaluation study, we were able to

  14. Deprivation, HIV and AIDS in Northern Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focuses on HIV infection within the context of poverty and deprivation. The study used both quantitative and qualitative methods from a stratified random sample of 98 respondents, Key Informant Interviews and six Focus Group discussions, to investigate risk of. HIV infection in Paimol Internally Displaced People's ...

  15. Sleep deprivation impairs object recognition in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palchykova, S; Winsky-Sommerer, R; Meerlo, P; Durr, R; Tobler, Irene

    2006-01-01

    Many studies in animals and humans suggest that sleep facilitates learning, memory consolidation, and retrieval. Moreover, sleep deprivation (SD) incurred after learning, impaired memory in humans, mice, rats, and hamsters. We investigated the importance of sleep and its timing in in object

  16. Purification and biochemical characterization of a novel glutathione ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-05

    dinitrobenzene as a substrate. ..... purification of GST enzyme from other insect species, which were from 3 to 26% in Hyphantria .... Glutathione S-transferases from the larval gut of the silkworm. Bombyx mori: cDNA cloning, gene ...

  17. Central nervous system uptake of intranasal glutathione in Parkinson's disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Laurie K Mischley; Kevin E Conley; Eric G Shankland; Terrance J Kavanagh; Michael E Rosenfeld; John E Duda; Collin C White; Timothy K Wilbur; Prysilla U De La Torre; Jeannie M Padowski

    2016-01-01

      Glutathione (GSH) is depleted early in the course of Parkinson's disease (PD), and deficiency has been shown to perpetuate oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired autophagy, and cell death...

  18. Glutathione transferase mimics : Micellar catalysis of an enzymic reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindkvist, Björn; Weinander, Rolf; Engman, Lars; Koetse, Marc; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.; Morgenstern, Ralf

    1997-01-01

    Substances that mimic the enzyme action of glutathione transferases (which serve in detoxification) are described. These micellar catalysts enhance the reaction rate between thiols and activated halogenated nitroarenes as well as alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls. The nucleophilic aromatic

  19. Nanofiltration concentration of extracellular glutathione produced by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kengo; Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Sazuka, Takashi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to optimize extracellular glutathione production by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered strain and to concentrate the extracellular glutathione by membrane separation processes, including ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF). Synthetic defined (SD) medium containing 20 g L(-1) glucose was fermented for 48 h; the fermentation liquid was passed through an UF membrane to remove macromolecules. Glutathione in this permeate was concentrated for 48 h to 545.1 ± 33.6 mg L(-1) using the NF membrane; this was a significantly higher concentration than that obtained with yeast extract peptone dextrose (YPD) medium following 96 h NF concentration (217.9 ± 57.4 mg L(-1)). This higher glutathione concentration results from lower cellular growth in SD medium (final OD600 = 6.9 ± 0.1) than in YPD medium (final OD600 = 11.0 ± 0.6) and thus higher production of extracellular glutathione (16.0 ± 1.3 compared to 9.2 ± 2.1 mg L(-1) in YPD medium, respectively). Similar fermentation and membrane processing of sweet sorghum juice containing 20 g L(-1) total sugars provided 240.3 ± 60.6 mg L(-1) glutathione. Increased extracellular production of glutathione by this engineered strain in SD medium and subsequent UF permeation and NF concentration in shortend time may help realize industrial recovery of extracellular glutathione. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ethnic diversity in a critical gene responsible for glutathione synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Alecia S; Freeman, Michael L; Summar, Samantha R; Barr, Frederick E; Williams, Scott M; Dawson, Elliott; Summar, Marshall L

    2003-01-01

    The tripeptide glutathione is an important biomolecule that acts as a scavenger of free radicals and plays a role in a number of other cellular processes. A number of diseases, including Parkinson's disease, cancer, sickle cell anemia, and HIV infection, are thought to involve oxidative stress and depletion of glutathione. The heterodimeric enzyme glutamate cysteine ligase catalyzes the first, rate-limiting step in the de novo synthesis of glutathione. Functional polymorphisms within the gene encoding the subunits of glutamate cysteine ligase have the potential to affect the body's capacity to synthesize glutathione and thus, may affect those diseases in which oxidative stress and glutathione have roles. We undertook systematic screening for polymorphisms within the exons and intronic flanking sequences of the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC). We identified 11 polymorphisms in GCLC and established allele frequencies for those polymorphisms in a population fitting the demographics of the middle Tennessee area. The nonsynonymous polymorphism C1384T was found only in individuals of African descent. In addition, allele frequencies for three other polymorphisms differ between Caucasians and African-Americans. Understanding these polymorphisms may lead to better understanding of diseases where glutathione is important so that better treatments may be developed.

  1. Child Welfare Deprivation in Rural Nigeria: A Counting Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufemi Adebola Popoola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study applies the counting approach to explain the deprivation concept among children under 5 years of age using the 2008 DHS data. Five dimensions of deprivation were used: safe drinking water, sanitation, housing, health, and nutrition largely recognized in the SDGs. In all, a total of 13561 children were sampled. About half of the children were males with a mean age of 28.27 months old. The assessment of dimensional deprivation showed that children are most deprived in sanitation, health, and access to safe drinking water while they were least deprived in nutrition. The situation is also marked with regional disparities with northern regions reporting higher deprivation rates than the southern regions but this rate was significantly higher in the sanitation dimension across regions. Considering deprivation counts, 33.9% of children suffer from more than three deprivations and approximately 85.2% from at least two deprivations. Child deprivation should be tackled using a holistic approach through social protection programmes to resolve children’s problems in an integrated manner which would in this case be more efficient and effective in safeguarding children’s rights to survival and development. Identifying the children suffering from single and multiple deprivations can help to target the interventions.

  2. Methylmercury alters glutathione homeostasis by inhibiting glutaredoxin 1 and enhancing glutathione biosynthesis in cultured human astrocytoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Stephan; Mailloux, Ryan J; Chan, Hing Man

    2016-08-10

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxin that binds strongly to thiol residues on protein and low molecular weight molecules like reduced glutathione (GSH). The mechanism of its effects on GSH homeostasis particularly at environmentally relevant low doses is not fully known. We hypothesized that exposure to MeHg would lead to a depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) and an accumulation of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) leading to alterations in S-glutathionylation of proteins. Our results showed exposure to low concentrations of MeHg (1μM) did not significantly alter GSH levels but increased GSSG levels by ∼12-fold. This effect was associated with a significant increase in total cellular glutathione content and a decrease in GSH/GSSG. Immunoblot analyses revealed that proteins involved in glutathione synthesis were upregulated accounting for the increase in cellular glutathione. This was associated an increase in cellular Nrf2 protein levels which is required to induce the expression of antioxidant genes in response to cellular stress. Intriguingly, we noted that a key enzyme involved in reversing protein S-glutathionylation and maintaining glutathione homeostasis, glutaredoxin-1 (Grx1), was inhibited by ∼50%. MeHg treatment also increased the S-glutathionylation of a high molecular weight protein. This observation is consistent with the inhibition of Grx1 and elevated H2O2 production however; contrary to our original hypothesis we found few S-glutathionylated proteins in the astrocytoma cells. Collectively, MeHg affects multiple arms of glutathione homeostasis ranging from pool management to protein S-glutathionylation and Grx1 activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Quercetin reduces manic-like behavior and brain oxidative stress induced by paradoxical sleep deprivation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Luiz K S; Vecchia, Débora D; Wendler, Etiéli M; Hocayen, Palloma de A S; Dos Reis Lívero, Francislaine A; Stipp, Maria Carolina; Barcaro, Inara M R; Acco, Alexandra; Andreatini, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Quercetin is a known antioxidant and protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor. Previous studies have shown that mania involves oxidative stress and an increase in PKC activity. We hypothesized that quercetin affects manic symptoms. In the present study, manic-like behavior (hyperlocomotion) and oxidative stress were induced by 24h paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) in male Swiss mice. Both 10 and 40mg/kg quercetin prevented PSD-induced hyperlocomotion. Quercetin reversed the PSD-induced decrease in glutathione (GSH) levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum. Quercetin also reversed the PSD-induced increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the PFC, hippocampus, and striatum. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between locomotor activity and GSH in the PFC in sleep-deprived mice and a positive correlation between locomotor activity and LPO in the PFC and striatum in sleep-deprived mice. These results suggest that quercetin exerts an antimanic-like effect at doses that do not impair spontaneous locomotor activity, and the antioxidant action of quercetin might contribute to its antimanic-like effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of glutathione reductase on diquat neurotoxcity assessed by oxidative/nitrosative stress in the cortex of intrastriatally treated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Mirjana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined if the response of the cortex against diquat (DQ, intrastriatally (i.s. applied to Wistar rats, was mediated by oxidative/nitrosative stress (OS/NS. In particular, we were focused on the glutathione (GSH antioxidative role, thus we applied i.s. glutathione reductase (GR in the pre-treatment of DQ administration. Superoxide anion radical (O2 •-, nitrate (NO3 -, malondialdehyde (MDA and superoxide dismutase (SOD, were measured in ipsi- and contra- lateral sides of the cortex, at 30 minutes, 24 hours and 7 days post treatment. The redox balance was not significantly changed in the cortex of sham operated and intact groups. Also, no differences were observed between the ipsi- and contra- lateral side of the cortex. Lethargy and mortality (30-40% of the animals in the DQ group within 24 hrs, coincided with rapidly developed lipid peroxidation supported by OS/NS upon i.s. DQ administration. Strong redox potential of DQ probably resulted in a huge deprivation of molecular oxygen. The pretreatment with GR acted neuro-protectively, based on animal survival and absence of lethargy, although, lipid peroxidation was not developed in the GR+DQ group, OS was documented by a high concentration of O2 •- (within 24 hrs, descending and eventually inhibiting SOD activity (at 7 days. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III41018

  5. Reduced glutathione as a persistence indicator of alien plants of the Amelancheir family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Dolgova

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available It was proved that glutathione is an important indicator of the vegetation condition and persistence. According to the amount of glutathione the studied mespilus species are adapted to the environmental conditions. Increase of the glutathione amount is caused by some abiotic factors, e.g. temperature. Some differences of the glutathione content may be explained by the plants species patterns.

  6. Low colonic glutathione detoxification capacity in patients at risk for colon cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grubben, M.J.A.L.; Braak, C.C.M.; Nagengast, F.M.; Peters, W.H.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colon carcinogenesis is a multifactorial process influenced by hereditary as well as environmental factors. The glutathione/glutathione S-transferase detoxification system in the colon is important for protection against carcinogens. We investigated the levels of glutathione/glutathione

  7. Human reproductive cloning and reasons for deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, D A

    2008-08-01

    Human reproductive cloning provides the possibility of genetically related children for persons for whom present technologies are ineffective. I argue that the desire for genetically related children is not, by itself, a sufficient reason to engage in human reproductive cloning. I show this by arguing that the value underlying the desire for genetically related children implies a tension between the parent and the future child. This tension stems from an instance of a deprivation and violates a general principle of reasons for deprivation. Alternative considerations, such as a right to procreative autonomy, do not appear helpful in making the case for human reproductive cloning merely on the basis of the desire for genetically related children.

  8. Occupational deprivation in an asylum centre:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morville, Anne-Le; Erlandsson, Lena-Karin

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a study of three asylum-seeking men from Iran and Afghanistan. It aimed to explore how and if they experienced occupations as occupations in a Danish asylum centre and how their life experience shaped their choice and value of current occupations. In-depth narrative interviews...... explored the participants’ occupational history and its influence on their occupations in the asylum centre. A thematic analysis showed that the participants had been subjected to occupational disruption and deprivation by politically oppressive systems even before their flight. Their occupations...... in Denmark were to a certain extent influenced by their earlier occupations and the current occupational deprivation they all experienced was due to limited possibilities in the centre. Although they tried their best to fill their days and create structure, there was a loss of valued occupations...

  9. Deprivation as un-experienced harm?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keerus, Külli; Gjerris, Mickey; Röcklinsberg, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Tom Regan encapsulated his principle of harm as a prima facie direct duty not to harm experiencing subjects of a life. However, his consideration of harm as deprivation, one example of which is loss of freedom, can easily be interpreted as a harm, which may not be experienced by its subject....... This creates a gap between Regan’s criterion for moral status and his account of what our duties are. However, in comparison with three basic paradigms of welfare known in nonhuman animal welfare science, Regan’s understanding coheres with a modified version of a feelings-based paradigm: not only the immediate...... feelings of satisfaction, but also future opportunities to have such feelings, must be taken into account. Such an interpretation is compatible with Regan’s understanding of harm as deprivation. The potential source of confusion, however, lies in Regan’s own possible argumentative mistakes....

  10. Do glutathione levels decline in aging human brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Junchao; Fitzmaurice, Paul S; Moszczynska, Anna; Mattina, Katie; Ang, Lee-Cyn; Boileau, Isabelle; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Sailasuta, Napapon; Kish, Stephen J

    2016-04-01

    For the past 60 years a major theory of "aging" is that age-related damage is largely caused by excessive uncompensated oxidative stress. The ubiquitous tripeptide glutathione is a major antioxidant defense mechanism against reactive free radicals and has also served as a marker of changes in oxidative stress. Some (albeit conflicting) animal data suggest a loss of glutathione in brain senescence, which might compromise the ability of the aging brain to meet the demands of oxidative stress. Our objective was to establish whether advancing age is associated with glutathione deficiency in human brain. We measured reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in multiple regions of autopsied brain of normal subjects (n=74) aged one day to 99 years. Brain GSH levels during the infancy/teenage years were generally similar to those in the oldest examined adult group (76-99 years). During adulthood (23-99 years) GSH levels remained either stable (occipital cortex) or increased (caudate nucleus, frontal and cerebellar cortices). To the extent that GSH levels represent glutathione antioxidant capacity, our postmortem data suggest that human brain aging is not associated with declining glutathione status. We suggest that aged healthy human brains can maintain antioxidant capacity related to glutathione and that an age-related increase in GSH levels in some brain regions might possibly be a compensatory response to increased oxidative stress. Since our findings, although suggestive, suffer from the generic limitations of all postmortem brain studies, we also suggest the need for "replication" investigations employing the new (1)H MRS imaging procedures in living human brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Androgen deprivation therapy-associated vasomotor symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Jason M; Kohli, Manish; Loprinzi, Charles L

    2012-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is widely used as standard therapy in the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. While efficacious, ADT is associated with multiple side effects, including decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, diabetes, loss of muscle tone and altered body composition, osteoporosis, lipid changes, memory loss, gynecomastia and hot flashes. The breadth of literature for the treatment of hot flashes is much smaller in men than that in women. While hor...

  12. Performance with total and partial sleep deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Kurt, Cem; Pekünlü, Ekim; ATALAĞ, Ozan; ÇATIKKAŞ, Fatih

    2010-01-01

    Sleep as an important part of daily life is accepted as the process of recuperation and recovery in central nervous system. There’s a considerable relationship betweenphysical activity and sleep. American Sleep Disorders Association determined that physical activity is a non-pharmalogical cure for the quality and regulation of sleep. Sleep deprivation is a commonly seen health problem among athletes as well as among otheroccupations. The first aim of this review is to explain the effects of p...

  13. Sustained Perceptual Deficits from Transient Sensory Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Caras, Melissa L.; Sanes, Dan H.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory pathways display heightened plasticity during development, yet the perceptual consequences of early experience are generally assessed in adulthood. This approach does not allow one to identify transient perceptual changes that may be linked to the central plasticity observed in juvenile animals. Here, we determined whether a brief period of bilateral auditory deprivation affects sound perception in developing and adult gerbils. Animals were reared with bilateral earplugs, either from ...

  14. Metabolic and endocrine effects of sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copinschi, Georges

    2005-01-01

    Sleep deprivation has multiple effects on endocrine and metabolic function. In particular, sleep restriction is accompanied by increased cortisol levels in the afternoon and early evening and a shorter quiescent period compared with extended sleep periods. Those alterations could facilitate central and peripheral disturbances that are associated with glucocorticoid excess, such as memory deficits, and are similar to those observed in aging. Thus, chronic sleep loss could contribute to acceleration of the aging process. Sleep restriction is also associated with an impairment of carbohydrate tolerance, similar to that observed in individuals with clinically significant impaired glucose tolerance. Thus, chronic sleep deprivation may increase the risk for diabetes. Finally, sleep plays an important role in energy balance. Partial sleep deprivation was found to be associated with a decrease in plasma levels of leptin and a concomitant increase in plasma levels of ghrelin; subjective ratings of hunger and appetite also increased (the appetite for protein-rich foods was not significantly affected). Moreover, a remarkable correlation was found between the increase in hunger and the increase in the ghrelin:leptin ratio. Thus, the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite and food intake appears to be influenced by sleep duration, and sleep restriction may favor the development of obesity.

  15. Sleep deprivation increases formation of false memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, June C; Chong, Pearlynne L H; Ganesan, Shankari; Leong, Ruth L F; Chee, Michael W L

    2016-12-01

    Retrieving false information can have serious consequences. Sleep is important for memory, but voluntary sleep curtailment is becoming more rampant. Here, the misinformation paradigm was used to investigate false memory formation after 1 night of total sleep deprivation in healthy young adults (N = 58, mean age ± SD = 22.10 ± 1.60 years; 29 males), and 7 nights of partial sleep deprivation (5 h sleep opportunity) in these young adults and healthy adolescents (N = 54, mean age ± SD = 16.67 ± 1.03 years; 25 males). In both age groups, sleep-deprived individuals were more likely than well-rested persons to incorporate misleading post-event information into their responses during memory retrieval (P sleep in optimal cognitive functioning, reveal the vulnerability of adolescents' memory during sleep curtailment, and suggest the need to assess eyewitnesses' sleep history after encountering misleading information. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Sleep Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Sleep Research Society.

  16. Cues of fatigue: effects of sleep deprivation on facial appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundelin, Tina; Lekander, Mats; Kecklund, Göran; Van Someren, Eus J W; Olsson, Andreas; Axelsson, John

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the facial cues by which one recognizes that someone is sleep deprived versus not sleep deprived. Experimental laboratory study. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Forty observers (20 women, mean age 25 ± 5 y) rated 20 facial photographs with respect to fatigue, 10 facial cues, and sadness. The stimulus material consisted of 10 individuals (five women) photographed at 14:30 after normal sleep and after 31 h of sleep deprivation following a night with 5 h of sleep. Ratings of fatigue, fatigue-related cues, and sadness in facial photographs. The faces of sleep deprived individuals were perceived as having more hanging eyelids, redder eyes, more swollen eyes, darker circles under the eyes, paler skin, more wrinkles/fine lines, and more droopy corners of the mouth (effects ranging from b = +3 ± 1 to b = +15 ± 1 mm on 100-mm visual analog scales, P sleep deprivation (P sleep deprivation, nor associated with judgements of fatigue. In addition, sleep-deprived individuals looked sadder than after normal sleep, and sadness was related to looking fatigued (P sleep deprivation affects features relating to the eyes, mouth, and skin, and that these features function as cues of sleep loss to other people. Because these facial regions are important in the communication between humans, facial cues of sleep deprivation and fatigue may carry social consequences for the sleep deprived individual in everyday life.

  17. Arsenate V induced glutathione efflux from human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Deniz; Cakir, Yeliz

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate if arsenate V exposure results in glutathione efflux from human erythrocytes. The changes in intracellular and extracellular nonprotein sulfhydryl and glutathione levels were determined in arsenate (V) exposed erythrocytes. Presence of any cellular membrane damage was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase activity measurement in the supernatant. When erythrocytes were exposed to 10 mM of arsenate (V) for 4 h, the intracellular NPSH level decreased to 0.28±0025 μmol/ml erythrocyte. In contrast, extracellular nonprotein thiol level was increased to 0.180±0.010 μmol/ml erythrocyte in 4 h. Extracellular glutathione levels reached to 0.028±0.001, 0.052±0.002, and 0.054±0.004 μmol/ml erythrocyte with 1, 5, and 10 mM of arsenate (V), respectively. Utilization of MK571 a multi drug resistance-associated protein 1 inhibitor decreased the rate of glutathione efflux from erythrocytes suggesting a role for this membrane transporter in the process. The results of the present study indicate that erythrocytes efflux glutathione when exposed to arsenate (V). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Glutathione-dependent responses of plants to drought: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Labudda

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Water is a renewable resource. However, with the human population growth, economic development and improved living standards, the world’s supply of fresh water is steadily decreasing and consequently water resources for agricultural production are limited and diminishing. Water deficiency is a significant problem in agriculture and increasing efforts are currently being made to understand plant tolerance mechanisms and to develop new tools (especially molecular that could underpin plant breeding and cultivation. However, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of plant water deficit tolerance are not fully understood, and the data available is incomplete. Here, we review the significance of glutathione and its related enzymes in plant responses to drought. Firstly, the roles of reduced glutathione and reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio, are discussed, followed by an extensive discussion of glutathione related enzymes, which play an important role in plant responses to drought. Special attention is given to the S-glutathionylation of proteins, which is involved in cell metabolism regulation and redox signaling in photosynthetic organisms subjected to abiotic stress. The review concludes with a brief overview of future perspectives for the involvement of glutathione and related enzymes in drought stress responses.

  19. Augmented Reality as a Countermeasure for Sleep Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, James; Dorrlan, Jillian; Banks, Siobhan; Chatburn, Alex; Smith, Ross T; Carskadon, Mary A; Lushington, Kurt; Thomas, Bruce H

    2016-04-01

    Sleep deprivation is known to have serious deleterious effects on executive functioning and job performance. Augmented reality has an ability to place pertinent information at the fore, guiding visual focus and reducing instructional complexity. This paper presents a study to explore how spatial augmented reality instructions impact procedural task performance on sleep deprived users. The user study was conducted to examine performance on a procedural task at six time points over the course of a night of total sleep deprivation. Tasks were provided either by spatial augmented reality-based projections or on an adjacent monitor. The results indicate that participant errors significantly increased with the monitor condition when sleep deprived. The augmented reality condition exhibited a positive influence with participant errors and completion time having no significant increase when sleep deprived. The results of our study show that spatial augmented reality is an effective sleep deprivation countermeasure under laboratory conditions.

  20. Effects of sleep deprivation on neural functioning: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, T W; Stins, J F; Daffertshofer, A; Beek, P J

    2007-04-01

    Sleep deprivation has a broad variety of effects on human performance and neural functioning that manifest themselves at different levels of description. On a macroscopic level, sleep deprivation mainly affects executive functions, especially in novel tasks. Macroscopic and mesoscopic effects of sleep deprivation on brain activity include reduced cortical responsiveness to incoming stimuli, reflecting reduced attention. On a microscopic level, sleep deprivation is associated with increased levels of adenosine, a neuromodulator that has a general inhibitory effect on neural activity. The inhibition of cholinergic nuclei appears particularly relevant, as the associated decrease in cortical acetylcholine seems to cause effects of sleep deprivation on macroscopic brain activity. In general, however, the relationships between the neural effects of sleep deprivation across observation scales are poorly understood and uncovering these relationships should be a primary target in future research.

  1. Hemolytic anemia and metabolic acidosis: think about glutathione synthetase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ameur, Salma; Aloulou, Hajer; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Kamoun, Thouraya; Kaabachi, Naziha; Hachicha, Mongia

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency (GSSD) is a rare disorder of glutathione metabolism with varying clinical severity. Patients may present with hemolytic anemia alone or together with acidosis and central nervous system impairment. Diagnosis is made by clinical presentation and detection of elevated concentrations of 5-oxoproline in urine and low glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes or cultured skin fibroblasts. The prognosis seems to depend on early diagnosis and treatment. We report a 4 months old Tunisian male infant who presented with severe metabolic acidosis with high anion gap and hemolytic anemia. High level of 5-oxoproline was detected in her urine and diagnosis of GSSD was made. Treatment consists of the correction of acidosis, blood transfusion, and supplementation with antioxidants. He died of severe metabolic acidosis and sepsis at the age of 15 months.

  2. Glutathione synthesis is compromised in erythrocytes from individuals with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwanath eVenketaraman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated that the levels of enzymes responsible for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH such as glutathione synthase (GSS, glutamate-cysteine ligase-catalytic subunit (GCLC and glutathione reductase (GSR were significantly reduced in the red blood cells (RBCs isolated from individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and this reduction correlated with decreased levels of intracellular GSH. GSH content in RBCs can be used as a marker for increased overall oxidative stress and immune dysfunctions caused by HIV infection. Our data supports our hypothesis that compromised levels of GSH in HIV infected individuals’ is due to decreased levels of GSH-synthetic enzymes. The role of GSH in combating oxidative stress and improving the functions of immune cells in HIV patients’ indicates the benefit of an antioxidant supplement which can reduce the cellular damage and promote the functions of immune cells.

  3. Balneotherapy and platelet glutathione metabolism in type II diabetic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Agishi, Yuko

    1996-09-01

    Effects of balneotherapy on platelet glutathione metabolism were investigated in 12 type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. Levels of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) on admission were well correlated with those of fasting plasma glucose (FPG; r=0.692, P150 mg/dl), the value decreased ( Pplatelet GSH synthesis appeared to be induced in response to oxidative stress; (2) lowered GPX activities indicated that the antioxidative defense system was impaired; and (3) platelet glutathione metabolism was partially improved by 4 weeks balneotherapy, an effect thought to be dependent on the control status of plasma glucose levels. It is suggested that balneotherapy is beneficial for patients whose platelet antioxidative defense system is damaged, such as those with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease.

  4. Thiol-Disulfide Exchange between Glutaredoxin and Glutathione

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Rasmus; Andersen, Peter Anders; Jensen, Kristine Steen

    2010-01-01

    Glutaredoxins are ubiquitous thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases which catalyze the reduction of glutathione-protein mixed disulfides. Belonging to the thioredoxin family, they contain a conserved active site CXXC motif. The N-proximal active site cysteine can form a mixed disulfide with glutathione ...... has been replaced with serine. The exchange reaction between the reduced protein and oxidized glutathione leading to formation of the mixed disulfide could readily be monitored by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) due to the enthalpic contributions from the noncovalent interactions...... potential of -295 mV for the mixed disulfide. In another set of experiments, the pKa value of the active site cysteine was determined. In line with what has been observed for other glutaredoxins, this cysteine was found to have a very low pKa value. The glutathionylation of glutaredoxin was shown to have...

  5. Total sleep deprivation decreases flow experience and mood status

    OpenAIRE

    Kaida K; Niki K

    2013-01-01

    Kosuke Kaida, Kazuhisa NikiHuman Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of sleep deprivation on flow experience.Methods: Sixteen healthy male volunteers of mean age 21.4±1.59 (21–24) years participated in two experimental conditions, ie, sleep-deprivation and normal sleep. In the sleep-deprived condition, participants stayed awake at home...

  6. Sleep deprivation and spike-wave discharges in epileptic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Drinkenburg, W.H.I.M.; Coenen, A.M.L.; Vossen, J.M.H.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    1995-01-01

    The effects of sleep deprivation were studied on the occurrence of spike-wave discharges in the electroencephalogram of rats of the epileptic WAG/Rij strain, a model for absence epilepsy. This was done before, during and after a period of 12 hours of near total sleep deprivation. A substantial increase in the number of spike-wave discharges was found during the first 4 hours of the deprivation period, whereas in the following deprivation hours epileptic activity returned to baseline values. I...

  7. Prevention and treatment of sleep deprivation among emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Douglas

    2007-07-01

    Emergency physicians commonly experience sleep deprivation because of the need to work shifts during evening and late night hours. The negative effects of this problem are compounded by job stress and traditional methods of scheduling work shifts. Sleep deprivation may be reduced by schedules designed to lessen interference with normal sleep patterns and circadian rhythms. Pharmacological treatments for sleep deprivation exist in the form of alertness-enhancing agents, caffeine and modafinil. Sleep-promoting agents may also help treat the problem by helping physicians to sleep during daytime hours. Minimizing sleep deprivation may help prevent job burnout and prolong the length of an emergency physician's career.

  8. Nurses need a standard definition of a deprivation of liberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard

    The House of Commons health committee has called for an urgent review of the implementation of the deprivation of liberty safeguards. They are particularly concerned that nurses, as gatekeepers of the safeguards, often do not know when a deprivation of liberty occurs in practice. In this article the author argues that given the lack of a standard definition of what amounts to a deprivation of liberty and the introduction by the courts of often contradictory factors that nurses are required to consider when determining if a patient is being deprived of their liberty it is little wonder that confusion is common place.

  9. The impact of area deprivation on parenting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spijkers, Willem; Jansen, Daniëlle E M C; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2012-12-01

    Area deprivation negatively affects health and lifestyles, among which child behaviours. The latter may aggravate the effects of area deprivation on parental health due to higher rates of parenting stress. However, evidence on the influence of the living environment on parenting stress is mostly lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of area deprivation and urbanization on the occurrence of parenting stress. A cross-sectional multi-level study was conducted using both neighbourhood- and individual-level data. Living areas were categorized into tertiles of deprivation. Data on parenting stress (Parenting Stress Index), child psychosocial problems (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire) and family background were collected among 9453 parents prior to a routine health examination of their child (response: 65%). In the deprived areas, parents reported parenting stress more often compared with the least deprived tertile (OR = 1.23; 95% CI 1.04-1.46). Adjusted for child problem behaviour, the association decreases (OR = 1.11; 95% CI 0.92-1.34). A small clustering of parenting stress by area was found which increased when child and family characteristics were taken into account. Parents from deprived areas were most likely to report parenting stress. Differences by area deprivation were partially accounted for by child problem behaviour and parental concerns about the behavioural and emotional problems of the child. This shows a rather large potential to improve both parental and child health by targeted parenting support in deprived areas.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum transport of glutathione by Sec61 is regulated by Ero1 and Bip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponsero, Alise J.; Igbaria, Aeid; Darch, Maxwell A.

    2017-01-01

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Ero1 catalyzes disulfide bond formation and promotes glutathione (GSH) oxidation to GSSG. Since GSSG cannot be reduced in the ER, maintenance of the ER glutathione redox state and levels likely depends on ER glutathione import and GSSG export. We used quantitative...... GSH and GSSG biosensors to monitor glutathione import into the ER of yeast cells. We found that glutathione enters the ER by facilitated diffusion through the Sec61 protein-conducting channel, while oxidized Bip (Kar2) inhibits transport. Increased ER glutathione import triggers H2O2-dependent Bip...... oxidation through Ero1 reductive activation, which inhibits glutathione import in a negative regulatory loop. During ER stress, transport is activated by UPR-dependent Ero1 induction, and cytosolic glutathione levels increase. Thus, the ER redox poise is tuned by reciprocal control of glutathione import...

  11. Development of glutathione-deficient embryos in Arabidopsis is influenced by the maternal level of glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, B; Meyer, A J; Cobbett, C S

    2011-07-01

    Glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis-deficient gsh1 and gsh2 null mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana have late embryonic-lethal and early seedling-lethal phenotypes, respectively, when segregating from a phenotypically wild-type parent plant, indicating that GSH is required for seed maturation and during germination. In this study, we show that gsh2 embryos generated in a partially GSH-deficient parent plant, homozygous for either the cad2 mutation in the GSH1 gene or homozygous for mutations in CLT1, CLT2 and CLT3 encoding plastid thiol transporters, abort early in embryogenesis. In contrast, individuals homozygous for the same combinations of mutations but segregating from heterozygous, phenotypically wild-type parents exhibit the parental gsh2 seedling-lethal phenotype. Similarly, homozygous gsh1 embryos generated in a gsh1/cad2 partially GSH-deficient parent plant abort early in development. These observations indicate that the development of gsh1 and gsh2 embryos to a late stage is dependent on the level of GSH in the maternal plant. © 2011 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  12. The Munchausen paradigm for deprived neighbourhoods: pulling yourself out of the swamp of deprivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. Nijkamp; J. Burgers; Dr. C.H.Z. Kuiper

    2017-01-01

    Since the 1980s, many initiatives have attempted to tackle the deprivation currently experienced in South Rotterdam. Efforts have been made to attract creative workers and, in a counter-reaction, other initiatives have aimed to encourage the creative talents of poorer residents to strengthen

  13. [Effects of sleep deprivation in hippocampal neurogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Virgen, Verónica; Zárate-López, David; Adirsch, Fabián L; Collas-Aguilar, Jorge; González-Pérez, Óscar

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus is a process that involves proliferation, differentiation, maturation, migration, and integration of young neurons in the granular layer of DG. These newborn neurons mature in three to four weeks and incorporate into neural circuits in the hippocampus. There, these new neurons play a role in cognitive functions, such as acquisition and retention of memory, which are consolidated during sleep period. In this review, we describe recent findings that associate sleep deprivation with changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive processes. In addition, we describe possible mechanisms implicated in this deterioration such as circadian rhythm, melatonin receptors, and growth factors.

  14. How to apply Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton, Jacqueline

    The Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards are contained in the Mental Capacity Act and provide formal protection for individuals who lack capacity and are detained in a hospital or care home. Those detained under the Mental Health Act have clear legal protection but, before these safeguards were introduced, those detained outside the Mental Health Act did not. This article examines the rights of individuals without capacity, the origins of the safeguards, their application in the general ward setting and their place in protecting patients and healthcare staff.

  15. Individual Income, Area Deprivation, and Health: Do Income-Related Health Inequalities Vary by Small Area Deprivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Martin; Mielck, Andreas; Maier, Werner

    2015-11-01

    This paper aims to explore potential associations between health inequalities related to socioeconomic deprivation at the individual and the small area level. We use German cross-sectional survey data for the years 2002 and 2006, and measure small area deprivation via the German Index of Multiple Deprivation. We test the differences between concentration indices of income-related and small area deprivation related inequalities in obesity, hypertension, and diabetes. Our results suggest that small area deprivation and individual income both yield inequalities in health favoring the better-off, where individual income-related inequalities are significantly more pronounced than those related to small area deprivation. We then apply a semiparametric extension of Wagstaff's corrected concentration index to explore how individual-level health inequalities vary with the degree of regional deprivation. We find that the concentration of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes among lower income groups also exists at the small area level. The degree of deprivation-specific income-related inequalities in the three health outcomes exhibits only little variations across different levels of multiple deprivation for both sexes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The politics of relative deprivation: A transdisciplinary social justice perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mengzhu; Exeter, Daniel J; Anderson, Anneka

    2015-05-01

    Relative deprivation was defined by Townsend (1987, p. 125) as "a state of observable and demonstrable disadvantage, relative to the local community or the wider society or nation to which an individual, family or group belongs". This definition is widely used within social and health sciences to identify, measure, and explain forms of inequality in human societies based on material and social conditions. From a multi-disciplinary social science perspective, we conducted a systematic literature review of published material in English through online database searches and books since 1966. We review the concept and measurement of relative 'deprivation' focussing on area-based deprivation in relation to inequities in health and social outcomes. This paper presents a perspective based in Aotearoa/New Zealand where colonisation has shaped the contours of racialised health inequities and current applications and understandings of 'deprivation'. We provide a critique of Townsend's concept of deprivation and area-based deprivation through a critical, structural analysis and suggest alternatives to give social justice a better chance. Deprivation measures used without critical reflection can lead to deficit framing of populations and maintain current inequities in health and social outcomes. We contend therefore that the lack of consideration of (bio)power, privilege, epistemology and (bio)politics is a central concern in studies of deprivation. Our review highlights the need for the academy to balance the asymmetry between qualitative and quantitative studies of deprivation through trans-disciplinary approaches to understanding deprivation, and subsequently, social and health inequities. We recommend that deprivation research needs be critically applied through a decolonising lens to avoid deficit framing and suggest that there is space for a tool that focuses on measuring the unequal distribution of power and privilege in populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All

  17. Is Glutathione the Major Cellular Target of Cisplatin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasherman, Yonit; Stürup, Stefan; gibson, dan

    2009-01-01

    Cisplatin is an anticancer drug whose efficacy is limited because tumors develop resistance to the drug. Resistant cells often have elevated levels of cellular glutathione (GSH), believed to be the major cellular target of cisplatin that inactivates the drug by binding to it irreversibly, forming...

  18. Effects of antioxidants on drug-induced glutathione instability and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glutathione (GSH) instability leading to its depletion, and enhanced lipid peroxidation, are associated with the pathogenesis, progression and therapy of many diseases / disease conditions – including sickle cell disease. In this study, the effects of two antioxidants, ascorbic acid and á - tocopherol, on GSH instability and ...

  19. Role and Regulation of Glutathione Metabolism in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylke Müller

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria in humans is caused by one of five species of obligate intracellular protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. P. falciparum causes the most severe disease and is responsible for 600,000 deaths annually, primarily in Sub-Saharan Africa. It has long been suggested that during their development, malaria parasites are exposed to environmental and metabolic stresses. One strategy to drug discovery was to increase these stresses by interfering with the parasites’ antioxidant and redox systems, which may be a valuable approach to disease intervention. Plasmodium possesses two redox systems—the thioredoxin and the glutathione system—with overlapping but also distinct functions. Glutathione is the most abundant low molecular weight redox active thiol in the parasites existing primarily in its reduced form representing an excellent thiol redox buffer. This allows for an efficient maintenance of the intracellular reducing environment of the parasite cytoplasm and its organelles. This review will highlight the mechanisms that are responsible for sustaining an adequate concentration of glutathione and maintaining its redox state in Plasmodium. It will provide a summary of the functions of the tripeptide and will discuss the potential of glutathione metabolism for drug discovery against human malaria parasites.

  20. Comparative Study of Glutathione S-Transferase Activity of Three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation to ascertain the levels of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity of three human erythrocyte genotypes (HbAA, HbAS and HbSS) obtained from apparently healthy and clinically confirmed malarious subjects/volunteers was carried out. The incubation of human erythrocytes with 1-chloro-2,4- dinitrobenzene ...

  1. Spectral study of the complexation of Nd (III) with glutathione ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Studies on the difference in energy parameters and comparative absorption spectrophotometry involving 4-4 transitions on Nd(III) and glutathione reduced (GSH) in the absence and presence of Zn(II) have been carried out in aquated organic solvents (50 : 50) like methanol, dioxane, acetonitrile and dimethylformamide.

  2. Oxidative Stress Markers and Genetic Polymorphisms of Glutathione ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... Hence, we evaluated the serum levels of oxidative stress markers and investigated genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase associated with autism. Materials and Methods: Forty-two children clinically diagnosed with ASD using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) ...

  3. (Monodora myristica) on reduced glutathione, uric acid levels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effect of the methanolic extract of. Aframomum sceptrum and Monodora myristica on the reduced glutathione (GSH) and uric acid levels in the plasma and liver of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced-diabetic rats. The possible hepatic damage resulting from the administration of the spices was also

  4. Metabolic modulation of glutathione in whole blood components ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lead has been found to have the ability to interfere in the metabolism and biological activities of many proteins. It has also been found that metalloelements have strong affinity for sulfhydryl (-SH) groups in biological molecules including glutathione (GSH) in tissues. Because of these facts, it was of interest to investigate ...

  5. Glutathione dysregulation and the etiology and progression of human diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballatori, N.; Krance, S.M.; Notenboom, S.; Shi, S.; Tieu, K.; Hammond, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in a multitude of cellular processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, and as a result, disturbances in GSH homeostasis are implicated in the etiology and/or progression of a number of human diseases, including cancer, diseases

  6. Molecular characterization of zeta class glutathione S-transferases ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Glutathione transferases (GSTs; EC 2.5.1.18) play important roles in stress tolerance and metabolic detoxification in plants. In higher plants, studies on GSTs have focussed largely on agricultural plants. There is restricted information about molecular characterization of GSTs in gymnosperms. To date, only tau class ...

  7. Purification and biochemical characterization of a novel glutathione ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-05

    Feb 5, 2008 ... Purification and biochemical characterization of a novel glutathione S-transferase of the silkworm, ... silkworm as a model for lepidopteran insects is also useful to obtain data on its detoxification .... The effect of temperature on CDNB conjugation reaction catalyzed by BmGST was examined under the ...

  8. Activation of human erythrocyte glutathione – s – transferase (EC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) of the isolated caffeine were tested in-vitro on their possible effect on human erythrocyte (red cell) glutathione – S – transferase (EC. 2.5.1.18) activity. The result indicated significant (P < 0.05) activation of the erythrocyte enzyme (GST) by ...

  9. Intravenous glutathione for skin lightening: Inadequate safety data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two controlled clinical trials (GSH capsules: 60 patients; 2% glutathione disulphide lotion: 30 patients) and a case series (GSH lozenges: 30 patients) reported a significantly decreased melanin index. A case series (GSH soap: 15 patients) reported skin lightening based on photography. Two systematic reviews of IV GSH ...

  10. Selection of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides against glutathione S-transferase Mu

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ’t Hoen, Peter a.C; Out, Ruud; Commandeur, Jan N M; Vermeulen, Nico P E; van Batenburg, F H D; Manoharan, Muthiah; van Berkel, Theo J C; Biessen, Erik A L; Bijsterbosch, Martin K

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify functional antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) against the rat glutathione S-transferase Mu (GSTM) isoforms, GSTM1 and GSTM2. These antisense ODNs would enable the study of the physiological consequences of GSTM deficiency. Because it has been

  11. Cloning and expression of a tomato glutathione S- transferase (GST ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-03-20

    Mar 20, 2012 ... 1Key laboratory of Plant-Microbe Interaction, Department of Life Science, Shangqiu Normal University, Shangqiu. 476000, China. ..... (2011). A putative glutathione S-transferase gene is required for Ol-1- mediated resistance against powdery mildew in tomato. Plant Mol. Biol. Rep. 29: 972-978. Sheehan D ...

  12. Comparative study of biological activity of glutathione, sodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asim ur Rehman

    Glutathione (GSH) and sodium tungstate (Na2WO4) are important pharmacological agents. They provide protection to cells against cytotoxic agents and thus reduce their cytotoxicity. It was of interest to study the biological activity of these two pharmacological active agents. Different strains of bacteria were used and the ...

  13. Effects Of Alcohol And Paracetamol On Hepatic Glutathione ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In conclusion the administration of paracetamol after excessive consumption of alcohol may cause more damage than the expected relief. KEY WORDS: Hepatic Glutathione concentration, Paracetamol and alcohol which revealed that administration. Journal of Medical Investigation and Practice Vol. 4: 2003: 8-11 ...

  14. Role of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle during senescence and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Programmed cell death is an integral part of normal plant development including leaf senescence. This study investigated the response of some component of ascorbate-glutathione cycle, chlorophylls.a & b, protein content, and membrane leakage during the developmental stages of Phaseolus cotyledons from imbibition till ...

  15. Insecticide resistance and glutathione S-transferases in mosquitoes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mosquito glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) have received considerable attention in the last 20 years because of their role in insecticide metabolism producing resistance. Many different compounds, including toxic xenobiotics and reactive products of intracellular processes such as lipid peroxidation, act as GST substrates.

  16. Erythrocyte glutathione levels in lithium-induced hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engin, Atilla; Altan, Nilgun; Isik, Erdal

    2005-01-01

    Lithium, widely used in the prophylaxis of psychiatric patients with bipolar affective disorders, is well known to induce thyroid alterations. However, a possible metabolic linkage between blood thyroxine levels and its regulatory function on erythrocyte glutathione concentration has not yet been evaluated in lithium-treated patients. The aim of this study was to assess the antioxidative capacity of erythrocytes in lithium-induced hypothyroidism before and after thyroxine replacement. Thyroid ultrasound with clinical and laboratory evaluation of thyroid function and thyroid-stimulating hormone assay were performed prior to and at 6-month intervals during lithium prophylaxis in 76 patients with bipolar affective disorders. The daily lithium dosage was adjusted to 600-1200 mg and the mean duration of treatment was 2.2 +/- 0.4 years. Final assessment revealed that 12 patients had evidence of primary hypothyroidism, and these were assigned as the test group. Lithium prophylaxis was supplemented with thyroxine at a dosage of 100 mg/day within 6 months after thyroid dysfunction was diagnosed. Red blood cell superoxide dismutase activities and the glutathione contents were measured before and after thyroxine replacement. In order to assess the effect of long-term lithium administration on red blood cell glutathione and superoxide dismutase levels, 12 patients who had not developed hypothyroidism during the follow-up period were selected for the lithium-treated euthyroid group. Mann Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon rank sum W-test were used for comparison of data. A comparison of the lithium-treated test group with healthy volunteers and their own values after thyroxine replacement revealed a significant decrease in red blood cell glutathione concentrations (p = 0.000) in the hypothyroid state. However, no clinically significant changes were observed in red blood cell superoxide dismutase activities of the test group. A statistical survey also demonstrated that there was no

  17. Social comparison, personal relative deprivation, and materialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunji; Callan, Mitchell J; Gheorghiu, Ana I; Matthews, William J

    2017-06-01

    Across five studies, we found consistent evidence for the idea that personal relative deprivation (PRD), which refers to resentment stemming from the belief that one is deprived of deserved outcomes compared to others, uniquely contributes to materialism. In Study 1, self-reports of PRD positively predicted materialistic values over and above socioeconomic status, personal power, self-esteem, and emotional uncertainty. The experience of PRD starts with social comparison, and Studies 2 and 3 found that PRD mediated the positive relation between a tendency to make social comparisons of abilities and materialism. In Study 4, participants who learned that they had less (vs. similar) discretionary income than people like them reported a stronger desire for more money relative to donating more to charity. In Study 5, during a windfall-spending task, participants higher in PRD spent more on things they wanted relative to other spending categories (e.g., paying off debts). © 2016 The Authors. British Journal of Social Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Psychological Society.

  18. BDNF in sleep, insomnia, and sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Karen; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Eckert, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The protein brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors involved in plasticity of neurons in several brain regions. There are numerous evidence that BDNF expression is decreased by experiencing psychological stress and that, accordingly, a lack of neurotrophic support causes major depression. Furthermore, disruption in sleep homeostatic processes results in higher stress vulnerability and is often associated with stress-related mental disorders. Recently, we reported, for the first time, a relationship between BDNF and insomnia and sleep deprivation (SD). Using a biphasic stress model as explanation approach, we discuss here the hypothesis that chronic stress might induce a deregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system. In the long-term it leads to sleep disturbance and depression as well as decreased BDNF levels, whereas acute stress like SD can be used as therapeutic intervention in some insomniac or depressed patients as compensatory process to normalize BDNF levels. Indeed, partial SD (PSD) induced a fast increase in BDNF serum levels within hours after PSD which is similar to effects seen after ketamine infusion, another fast-acting antidepressant intervention, while traditional antidepressants are characterized by a major delay until treatment response as well as delayed BDNF level increase. Key messages Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in the pathophysiology of stress-related mood disorders. The interplay of stress and sleep impacts on BDNF level. Partial sleep deprivation (PSD) shows a fast action on BDNF level increase.

  19. A Western diet induced NAFLD in LDLR(-/)(-) mice is associated with reduced hepatic glutathione synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Zhang, Guo-Fang; Lee, Kwangwon; Lopez, Rocio; Previs, Stephen F; Willard, Belinda; McCullough, Arthur; Kasumov, Takhar

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Glutathione is the major anti-oxidant involved in cellular oxidative defense, however there are currently no simple non-invasive methods for assessing hepatic glutathione metabolism in patients with NAFLD. As a primary source of plasma glutathione, liver plays an important role in interorgan glutathione homeostasis. In this study, we have tested the hypothesis that measurements of plasma glutathione turnover could be used to assess the hepatic glutathione metabolism in LDLR(-/)(-) mice, a mouse model of diet-induced NAFLD. Mice were fed a standard low fat diet (LFD) or a high fat diet containing cholesterol (a Western type diet (WD)). The kinetics of hepatic and plasma glutathione were quantified using the (2)H2O metabolic labeling approach. Our results show that a WD leads to reduced fractional synthesis rates (FSR) of hepatic (25%/h in LFD vs. 18%/h in WD, Pplasma glutathione (43%/h in LFD vs. 21%/h in WD, Pinduced concordant changes in both hepatic and plasma glutathione turnover suggest that the plasma glutathione turnover measurements could be used to assess hepatic glutathione metabolism. The safety, simplicity, and low cost of the (2)H2O-based glutathione turnover approach suggest that this method has the potential for non-invasive probing of hepatic glutathione metabolism in patients with NAFLD and other diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Relative Deprivation and Adolescent Outcomes in Iceland: A Multilevel Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernburg, Jon Gunnar; Thorlindsson, Thorolfur; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora

    2009-01-01

    The theory of relative deprivation emphasizes that social comparisons contextualize how people experience impoverishment. An important application of this theory argues that relative deprivation that stems from unfavorable social comparisons can result in anger, normlessness and an increased likelihood of deviant behavior. We test this theory in a…

  1. Minding the gap: Subjective relative deprivation and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshai, Shadi; Mishra, Sandeep; Meadows, Tyler J S; Parmar, Priya; Huang, Vivian

    2017-01-01

    Substantial evidence has linked depressive symptoms to various indices of societal-level inequality and relative deprivation. A larger literature has also addressed cognitive vulnerability and correlates of depression. Despite this evidence, little research to date has examined the relationship of depressive symptoms with such downstream individual-level consequences of inequality as subjective relative deprivation, or whether relative deprivation is associated with cognitive vulnerability in depression. We conducted two investigations among four separate samples (total N = 2999) to examine associations between subjective relative deprivation and depressive symptoms and cognitions. Across our studies and four different self-report measures of depressive symptoms, we found consistent significant positive associations between subjective relative deprivation and depression symptoms. Further, we found that subjective relative deprivation was predictive of depressive symptoms over and above other known vulnerability factors. Finally, we found that the relationship between subjective relative deprivation and depressive symptoms was fully mediated by negative automatic thoughts about self. These results provide further evidence of the importance of subjective deprivation in maintaining negative mental health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cues of fatigue: effects of sleep deprivation on facial appearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sundelin, T.; Lekander, M.; Kecklund, G.; van Someren, E.J.W.; Olsson, A.; Axelsson, J.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To investigate the facial cues by which one recognizes that someone is sleep deprived versus not sleep deprived. Design: Experimental laboratory study. Setting: Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Participants: Forty observers (20 women, mean age 25 ± 5 y) rated 20 facial

  3. Effect of sleep deprivation on saccades and eyelid blinking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crevits, Luc; Simons, Brian; Wildenbeest, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    In this study the effect of sleep deprivation on specific components of eye and eyelid movement was investigated in a group of young and healthy subjects. The duration of sleep deprivation was 20 h. Each subject had to execute different saccade tasks: reflexive saccades, voluntary prosaccades and

  4. Vitamin C Prevents Sleep Deprivation-induced Elevation in Cortisol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we examined the potential protective effects of administration of vitamin C on acute and chronic sleep deprivation-induced metabolic derangement. In addition, possible processes involved in vitamin C effects on acute and chronic sleep deprivation-induced metabolic derangement were determined. Thirty-five ...

  5. Sleep deprivation and spike-wave discharges in epileptic rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drinkenburg, W.H.I.M.; Coenen, A.M.L.; Vossen, J.M.H.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    1995-01-01

    The effects of sleep deprivation were studied on the occurrence of spike-wave discharges in the electroencephalogram of rats of the epileptic WAG/Rij strain, a model for absence epilepsy. This was done before, during and after a period of 12 hours of near total sleep deprivation. A substantial

  6. Effects of sleep deprivation on neural functioning: an integrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, T.W.; Stins, J.F.; Daffertshofer, A.; Beek, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Sleep deprivation has a broad variety of effects on human performance and neural functioning that manifest themselves at different levels of description. On a macroscopic level, sleep deprivation mainly affects executive functions, especially in novel tasks. Macroscopic and mesoscopic effects of

  7. Effect of Monocular Deprivation on Rabbit Neural Retinal Cell Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwachaka, Philip Maseghe; Saidi, Hassan; Odula, Paul Ochieng; Mandela, Pamela Idenya

    2015-01-01

    To describe the effect of monocular deprivation on densities of neural retinal cells in rabbits. Thirty rabbits, comprised of 18 subject and 12 control animals, were included and monocular deprivation was achieved through unilateral lid suturing in all subject animals. The rabbits were observed for three weeks. At the end of each week, 6 experimental and 3 control animals were euthanized, their retinas was harvested and processed for light microscopy. Photomicrographs of the retina were taken and imported into FIJI software for analysis. Neural retinal cell densities of deprived eyes were reduced along with increasing period of deprivation. The percentage of reductions were 60.9% (P < 0.001), 41.6% (P = 0.003), and 18.9% (P = 0.326) for ganglion, inner nuclear, and outer nuclear cells, respectively. In non-deprived eyes, cell densities in contrast were increased by 116% (P < 0.001), 52% (P < 0.001) and 59.6% (P < 0.001) in ganglion, inner nuclear, and outer nuclear cells, respectively. In this rabbit model, monocular deprivation resulted in activity-dependent changes in cell densities of the neural retina in favour of the non-deprived eye along with reduced cell densities in the deprived eye.

  8. Effect of sleep deprivation on labour epidural catheter placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayter, M A; Friedman, Z; Katznelson, R; Hanlon, J G; Borges, B; Naik, V N

    2010-05-01

    Epidural catheter insertion for labour analgesia is an invasive procedure with potential serious complications, often performed by a sleep-deprived clinician. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of sleep deprivation on physicians of variable levels of experience performing this procedural skill in the clinical setting. After institutional review board approval, anaesthetists of three levels of experience were recruited: novice residents (100 epidurals, n=8), and attending anaesthetists (>500 epidurals, n=12). All participants were measured twice, rested and sleep deprived in a random order while performing a labour epidural for analgesia. Our primary outcome measures were scores achieved on the Imperial College Surgical Assessment Device (ICSAD) (measuring path length, number of movements, and time), task-specific checklist (CL), and global rating scale (GRS). Sleep deprivation was documented by the ActiGraph and Epworth sleepiness scale. Subjects were adequately sleep deprived for their sleep deprivation observation. Data were analysed with a two-way mixed design analysis of variance. No significant difference in the effect of sleep deprivation on performance was detected between the groups on the ICSAD measures of movement (P=0.86), path length (P=0.79), and time (P=0.80), or for the CL (P=0.65), and GRS (P=0.86). The performance of this procedural skill in a clinical setting does not seem to be affected by sleep deprivation irrespective of the level of experience.

  9. Violent Crime, Sociopathy and Love Deprivation among Adolescent Delinquents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Anthony; Beyer, J. Arthur

    1987-01-01

    Examined relationships between performance-verbal (P-V) discrepancy scores on Wechsler Intelligence Quotient Scales, love deprivation, and juvenile delinquency among 131 male juvenile probationers. P-V discrepancy scores were significantly related to love deprivation and violent crimes, supporting assertion that early emotional stresses affect…

  10. Interspousal Violence and Maternal Deprivation on a Child's Mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents a case of an emotionally deprived child with some evidence of child neglect resulting from husband – wife violence and subsequent separation of parents. It also further confirms the long recognized fact that the most successful treatment of growth failure and weight loss due to psychosocial deprivation ...

  11. Sleep deprivation in pigeons and rats using motion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Sarah M; Paletz, Elliott M; Obermeyer, William H; Benca, Ruth M

    2009-10-01

    Forced sleep deprivation results in substantial behavioral and physiologic effects in mammals. The disk-over-water (DOW) method produces a syndrome characterized by increased energy expenditure and a robust preferentially rapid-eye-movement sleep rebound upon recovery or eventual death after several weeks of sleep deprivation. The DOW has been used successfully only in rats. This paper presents a method to enforce long-term controlled sleep deprivation across species and to compare its effects in rats and pigeons. A conveyor was substituted for the DOW disk. Behavior rather than electroencephalography was used to trigger arousal stimuli, as in gentle-handling deprivation. Rats and pigeons were deprived using this apparatus, and the results were compared with each other and with published reports. The physiologic consequences and recovery sleep in rats were like those published for DOW rats. Magnitude of sleep loss and recovery patterns in pigeons were similar to those seen in rats, but expected symptoms of the sleep deprivation syndrome were absent in pigeons. The use of a motion trigger allowed us to measure and, thus, to assess the quality and impact of the procedure. Prolonged and controlled sleep deprivation can be enforced using automated motion detection and a conveyor-over-water system. Pigeons and rats, deprived of sleep to the same extent, showed similar patterns of recovery sleep, but pigeons did not exhibit the hyperphagia, weight loss, and debilitation seen in rats.

  12. The impact of area deprivation on parenting stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijkers, Willem; Jansen, Danielle E. M. C.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Area deprivation negatively affects health and lifestyles, among which child behaviours. The latter may aggravate the effects of area deprivation on parental health due to higher rates of parenting stress. However, evidence on the influence of the living environment on parenting stress

  13. Are seizures in the setting of sleep deprivation provoked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Nicholas; Lieblich, Sam; Lee, Judy; Dunne, John

    2014-04-01

    It is generally accepted that sleep deprivation contributes to seizures. However, it is unclear whether a seizure occurring in the setting of sleep deprivation should be considered as provoked or not and whether this is influenced by seizure type and etiology. This information may have an important impact on epilepsy diagnosis and management. We prospectively analyzed the influence of sleep deprivation on the risk of seizure recurrence in patients with first-ever unprovoked seizures and compared the findings with patients with first-ever provoked seizures. Of 1026 patients with first-ever unprovoked seizures, 204 (20%) were associated with sleep deprivation. While the overall likelihood of seizure recurrence was slightly lower in sleep-deprived patients with first-ever seizures (log-rank p=0.03), sleep deprivation was not an independent predictor of seizure recurrence on multivariate analysis. Seizure recurrence following a first-ever unprovoked seizure associated with sleep deprivation was far more likely than for 174 patients with a provoked first-ever seizure (log-rank psleep deprivation should not be regarded as provoked. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sleep Deprivation, Allergy Symptoms, and Negatively Reinforced Problem Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Craig H.; Meyer, Kim A.

    1996-01-01

    A study of the relationship between presence or absence of sleep deprivation, allergy symptoms, and the rate and function of problem behavior in three adolescents with moderate to profound mental retardation found that problem behavior was negatively reinforced by escape from instruction, and both allergy symptoms and sleep deprivation influenced…

  15. A new model to study sleep deprivation-induced seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Brendan P; Leahy, Averi; Rosas, Regine; Shaw, Paul J

    2015-05-01

    A relationship between sleep and seizures is well-described in both humans and rodent animal models; however, the mechanism underlying this relationship is unknown. Using Drosophila melanogaster mutants with seizure phenotypes, we demonstrate that seizure activity can be modified by sleep deprivation. Seizure activity was evaluated in an adult bang-sensitive seizure mutant, stress sensitive B (sesB(9ed4)), and in an adult temperature sensitive seizure mutant seizure (sei(ts1)) under baseline and following 12 h of sleep deprivation. The long-term effect of sleep deprivation on young, immature sesB(9ed4) flies was also assessed. Laboratory. Drosophila melanogaster. Sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation increased seizure susceptibility in adult sesB(9ed4)/+ and sei(ts1) mutant flies. Sleep deprivation also increased seizure susceptibility when sesB was disrupted using RNAi. The effect of sleep deprivation on seizure activity was reduced when sesB(9ed4)/+ flies were given the anti-seizure drug, valproic acid. In contrast to adult flies, sleep deprivation during early fly development resulted in chronic seizure susceptibility when sesB(9ed4)/+ became adults. These findings show that Drosophila is a model organism for investigating the relationship between sleep and seizure activity. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  16. Sleep deprivation and the effect on exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanHelder, T; Radomski, M W

    1989-04-01

    Sleep deprivation or partial sleep loss are common in work conditions as rotating shifts and prolonged work hours, in sustained military operations and in athletes competing in events after crossing several time zones or engaged in ultramarathon or triathlon events. Although it is well established that sleep loss has negative effects on mental performance, its effects on physical performance are equivocal. This review examines the latter question in light of recent studies published on this problem. Sleep deprivation of 30 to 72 hours does not affect cardiovascular and respiratory responses to exercise of varying intensity, or the aerobic and anaerobic performance capability of individuals. Muscle strength and electromechanical responses are also not affected. Time to exhaustion, however, is decreased by sleep deprivation. Although ratings of perceived exertion always increased during exercise in sleep-deprived (30 to 60 hours) subjects compared with normal sleep, this is not a reliable assessment of a subject's ability to perform physical work as the ratings of perceived exertion are dissociated from any cardiovascular changes in sleep deprivation. Examination of the various hormonal and metabolic parameters which have been measured in the studies reviewed reveals that the major metabolic perturbations accompanying sleep deprivation in humans are an increase in insulin resistance and a decrease in glucose tolerance. This may explain the reduction in observed time to exhaustion in sleep-deprived subjects. The role of growth hormone in mediating altered carbohydrate metabolism may be of particular relevance as to how sleep deprivation alters the supply of energy substrate to the muscle.

  17. Tempol prevents chronic sleep-deprivation induced memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Khabour, Omar F; Albawaana, Amal S; Alhashimi, Farah H; Athamneh, Rabaa Y

    2016-01-01

    Sleep deprivation is associated with oxidative stress that causes learning and memory impairment. Tempol is a nitroxide compound that promotes the metabolism of many reactive oxygen species (ROS) and has antioxidant and neuroprotective effect. The current study investigated whether chronic administration of tempol can overcome oxidative stress and prevent learning and memory impairment induced by sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation was induced in rats using multiple platform model. Tempol was administered to rats via oral gavages. Behavioral studies were conducted to test the spatial learning and memory using radial arm water maze. The hippocampus was dissected; antioxidant biomarkers (GSH, GSSG, GSH/GSSG ratio, GPx, SOD, and catalase) were assessed. The result of this project revealed that chronic sleep deprivation impaired both short and long term memory (Psleep deprivation induced reduction in the hippocampus activity of catalase, GPx, and SOD (Psleep deprived rats treated with tempol as compared with only sleep deprived rats (Psleep deprivation induced memory impairment, and treatment with tempol prevented this impairment probably through normalizing antioxidant mechanisms in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of partial water deprivation on the performance and carcass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, in the second experiment, when the birds were exposed to longer period of water deprivation (5 weeks), body weight and water consumption were significantly affected (P<0.05) by treatments. But weight gain, feed intake, EFU, water/feed ratio and efficiency of water utilization were not affected. Depriving birds of ...

  19. Expression of Glutathione Peroxidase and Glutathione Reductase and Level of Free Radical Processes under Toxic Hepatitis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Y. Iskusnykh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Correlation between intensity of free radical processes estimated by biochemiluminesce parameters, content of lipoperoxidation products, and changes of glutathione peroxidase (GP, EC 1.11.1.9 and glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2 activities at rats liver injury, after 12, 36, 70, 96, 110, and 125 hours & tetrachloromethane administration have been investigated. The histological examination of the liver sections of rats showed that prominent hepatocytes with marked vacuolisation and inflammatory cells which were arranged around the necrotic tissue are more at 96 h after exposure to CCl4. Moreover maximum increase in GR and GP activities, 2.1 and 2.5 times, respectively, was observed at 96 h after exposure to CCl4, what coincided with the maximum of free radical oxidation processes. Using a combination of reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction, expression of the glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase genes (Gpx1 and Gsr was analyzed by the determination of their respective mRNAs in the rat liver tissue under toxic hepatitis conditions. The analyses of Gpx1 and Gsr expression revealed that the transcript levels increased in 2.5- and 3.0-folds, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that the amounts of hepatic Gpx1 and Gsr proteins increased considerably after CCl4 administration. It can be proposed that the overexpression of these enzymes could be a mechanism of enhancement of hepatocytes tolerance to oxidative stress.

  20. Activation of the microsomal glutathione-S-transferase and reduction of the glutathione dependent protection against lipid peroxidation by acrolein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haenen, G R; Vermeulen, N P; Tai Tin Tsoi, J N; Ragetli, H M; Timmerman, H; Blast, A

    1988-01-01

    Allyl alcohol is hepatotoxic. It is generally believed that acrolein, generated out of allyl alcohol by cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase, is responsible for this toxicity. The effect of acrolein in vitro and in vivo on the glutathione (GSH) dependent protection of liver microsomes against lipid

  1. Multiscale modelling approach combining a kinetic model of glutathione metabolism with PBPK models of paracetamol and the potential glutathione-depletion biomarkers ophthalmic acid and 5-oxoproline in humans and rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geenen, S.; Yates, J.W.T.; Kenna, J.G.; Bois, F.Y.; Wilson, I.D.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    2013-01-01

    A key role of the antioxidant glutathione is detoxification of chemically reactive electrophilic drug metabolites within the liver. Therefore glutathione depletion can have severe toxic consequences. Ophthalmic acid and 5-oxoproline are metabolites involved in glutathione metabolism, which can be

  2. Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Dissociated Components of Executive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Adrienne M.; Whitney, Paul; Belenky, Gregory; Hinson, John M.; Van Dongen, Hans P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: We studied the effects of sleep deprivation on executive functions using a task battery which included a modified Sternberg task, a probed recall task, and a phonemic verbal fluency task. These tasks were selected because they allow dissociation of some important executive processes from non-executive components of cognition. Design: Subjects were randomized to a total sleep deprivation condition or a control condition. Performance on the executive functions task battery was assessed at baseline, after 51 h of total sleep deprivation (or no sleep deprivation in the control group), and following 2 nights of recovery sleep, at fixed time of day (11:00). Performance was also measured repeatedly throughout the experiment on a control task battery, for which the effects of total sleep deprivation had been documented in previously published studies. Setting: Six consecutive days and nights in a controlled laboratory environment with continuous behavioral monitoring. Participants: Twenty-three healthy adults (age range 22–38 y; 11 women). Twelve subjects were randomized to the sleep deprivation condition; the others were controls. Results: Performance on the control task battery was considerably degraded during sleep deprivation. Overall performance on the modified Sternberg task also showed impairment during sleep deprivation, as compared to baseline and recovery and compared to controls. However, two dissociated components of executive functioning on this task—working memory scanning efficiency and resistance to proactive interference—were maintained at levels equivalent to baseline. On the probed recall task, resistance to proactive interference was also preserved. Executive aspects of performance on the phonemic verbal fluency task showed improvement during sleep deprivation, as did overall performance on this task. Conclusion: Sleep deprivation affected distinct components of cognitive processing differentially. Dissociated non

  3. Deprivation of liberty safeguards: how prepared are we?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepping, Peter; Sambhi, Rajvinder Singh; Williams-Jones, Karen

    2010-03-01

    The Mental Health Act 2007 introduced Deprivation of Liberty safeguards into the Mental Capacity Act 2005 with potentially far reaching resource implications. There appears to be no scientific data regarding the prevalence of deprivation of liberty in clinical settings such as hospitals and nursing homes. We examined how many patients across a whole Trust area in Wales were subject to some lack of capacity, how well documented this was and how many were potentially deprived of their liberty. We found that no patient was deprived of their liberty, but 8% lacked capacity to make either basic or complex decisions; another 5% lacked capacity to make complex decisions. Documentation was good in mental health and community directorates, but there were gaps in documentation (not practice) in the medical and surgical directorates. Routine collection of data improved documentation regarding deprivation of liberty criteria. There is a high likelihood that senior nursing staff underestimate the number of patients who lack capacity.

  4. Identifying a deprivation of liberty: a guide for community nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2012-11-01

    The ability to identify situations that amount to a deprivation of liberty is crucial to a district nurse's role in protecting the vulnerable adults in their care. The courts acknowledge that the elements that have to be applied when assessing if there is a deprivation of liberty are complex and technical, so it is essential that district nurses apply the elements is a methodical manner and inform their decision-making by reference to the case law and the Mental Capacity Act 2005, Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards Code of Practice. This article reviews the European Court of Human Rights and UK domestic case law on deprivation of liberty and highlights the elements district nurses must take notice of when identifying situations that amount to a deprivation of liberty.

  5. The prospective association between sleep deprivation and depression among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Robert E; Duong, Hao T

    2014-02-01

    To examine the prospective, reciprocal association between sleep deprivation and depression among adolescents. A community-based two-wave cohort study. A metropolitan area with a population of over 4 million. 4,175 youths 11-17 at baseline, and 3,134 of these followed up a year later. Depression is measured using both symptoms of depression and DSM-IV major depression. Sleep deprivation is defined as ≤ 6 h of sleep per night. Sleep deprivation at baseline predicted both measures of depression at follow-up, controlling for depression at baseline. Examining the reciprocal association, major depression at baseline, but not symptoms predicted sleep deprivation at follow-up. These results are the first to document reciprocal effects for major depression and sleep deprivation among adolescents using prospective data. The data suggest reduced quantity of sleep increases risk for major depression, which in turn increases risk for decreased sleep.

  6. Expression of the glutathione enzyme system of human colon mucosa by localisation, gender and age.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoensch, H.; Peters, W.H.M.; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Kirch, W.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The glutathione S-transferases (GST) can metabolise endogenous and exogenous toxins and carcinogens by catalysing the conjugation of diverse electrophiles with reduced glutathione (GSH). Variations of GST enzyme activity could influence the susceptibility of developing cancers in certain

  7. Sleep deprived and sweating it out: the effects of total sleep deprivation on skin conductance reactivity to psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jean C J; Verhulst, Silvan; Massar, Stijn A A; Chee, Michael W L

    2015-01-01

    We examined how sleep deprivation alters physiological responses to psychosocial stress by evaluating changes in skin conductance. Between-subjects design with one group allocated to 24 h of total sleep deprivation and the other to rested wakefulness. The study took place in a research laboratory. Participants were 40 healthy young adults recruited from a university. Sleep deprivation and feedback. Electrodermal activity was monitored while participants completed a difficult perceptual task with false feedback. All participants showed increased skin conductance levels following stress. However, compared to well-rested participants, sleep deprived participants showed higher skin conductance reactivity with increasing stress levels. Our results suggest that sleep deprivation augments allostatic responses to increasing psychosocial stress. Consequentially, we propose sleep loss as a risk factor that can influence the pathogenic effects of stress. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  8. Transport of the glutathione conjugate of ethacrynic acid by the human multidrug resistance protein MRP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaman, G.J.R.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Evers, R.; Borst, P.

    1996-01-01

    The multidrug resistance protein MRP has been shown to mediate the transport of glutathione S-conjugates across membranes. In this study we demonstrate that the glutathione S-conjugate of the diuretic drug ethacrynic acid, which is an efficient inhibitor of glutathione S-transferases, is a

  9. THE ROLE OF GLUTATHIONE IN BILE SECRETION OF ENDOGENOUS TRACE-ELEMENTS IN RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJKSTRA, M; KUIPERS, F; SMIT, EP; HAVINGA, R; VONK, RJ

    To evaluate the role of glutathione in biliary secretion of endogenous trace elements, we quantitated trace element output rates by proton-induced x-ray emission under various conditions with altered biliary glutathione secretion and hepatic glutathione content in the rat. Treatment with

  10. The sleep-deprived human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Adam J; Simon, Eti Ben; Mander, Bryce A; Greer, Stephanie M; Saletin, Jared M; Goldstein-Piekarski, Andrea N; Walker, Matthew P

    2017-07-01

    How does a lack of sleep affect our brains? In contrast to the benefits of sleep, frameworks exploring the impact of sleep loss are relatively lacking. Importantly, the effects of sleep deprivation (SD) do not simply reflect the absence of sleep and the benefits attributed to it; rather, they reflect the consequences of several additional factors, including extended wakefulness. With a focus on neuroimaging studies, we review the consequences of SD on attention and working memory, positive and negative emotion, and hippocampal learning. We explore how this evidence informs our mechanistic understanding of the known changes in cognition and emotion associated with SD, and the insights it provides regarding clinical conditions associated with sleep disruption.

  11. Socioeconomic deprivation and accident and emergency attendances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scantlebury, Rachel; Rowlands, Gillian; Durbaba, Stevo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Demand for England's accident and emergency (A&E) services is increasing and is particularly concentrated in areas of high deprivation. The extent to which primary care services, relative to population characteristics, can impact on A&E is not fully understood. AIM: To conduct...... a detailed analysis to identify population and primary care characteristics associated with A&E attendance rates, particularly those that may be amenable to change by primary care services. DESIGN AND SETTING: This study used a cross-sectional population-based design. The setting was general practices...... in England, in the year 2011-2012. METHOD: Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to create a model to explain the variability in practice A&E attendance rates. Predictor variables included population demographics, practice characteristics, and measures of patient experiences of primary care...

  12. Ethnicity, deprivation and mental health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauer, Tom; Eagar, Kathy; Mellsop, Graham

    2006-08-01

    To describe and measure differences between ethnic groups on standard measures of mental health outcome. Clinical staff in eight New Zealand Health Districts collected consumer outcomes data at the start, end and review of episodes of care. Consumers were allocated to one of three ethnicity groupings -- Maori, Pacific Island and "All Other". There were large differences between the three ethnicity groupings on the measures. Maori and Pacific Island consumers appeared to demonstrate more psychotic phenomena and overall worse scores, and the All Other group, more depression. Changes in scores between start and end of episodes of care were proportionately similar across the three groups. Differences between ethnic groupings varied according to socio-economic deprivation level. Potential reasons for some of the effects observed are discussed, including differing pathways to care, clinician and selection bias, and differing models of mental health.

  13. Glutathione Utilization by Candida albicans Requires a Functional Glutathione Degradation (DUG) Pathway and OPT7, an Unusual Member of the Oligopeptide Transporter Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Prashant Ramesh; Thakur, Anil; Ganguli, Dwaipayan; Paul, Sanjoy; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Bachhawat, Anand K.

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans lacks the ability to survive within its mammalian host in the absence of endogenous glutathione biosynthesis. To examine the ability of this yeast to utilize exogenous glutathione, we exploited the organic sulfur auxotrophy of C. albicans met15Δ strains. We observed that glutathione is utilized efficiently by the alternative pathway of glutathione degradation (DUG pathway). The major oligopeptide transporters OPT1–OPT5 of C. albicans that were most similar to the known yeast glutathione transporters were not found to contribute to glutathione transport to any significant extent. A genomic library approach to identify the glutathione transporter of C. albicans yielded OPT7 as the primary glutathione transporter. Biochemical studies on OPT7 using radiolabeled GSH uptake revealed a Km of 205 μm, indicating that it was a high affinity glutathione transporter. OPT7 is unusual in several aspects. It is the most remote member to known yeast glutathione transporters, lacks the two highly conserved cysteines in the family that are known to be crucial in trafficking, and also has the ability to take up tripeptides. The transporter was regulated by sulfur sources in the medium. OPT7 orthologues were prevalent among many pathogenic yeasts and fungi and formed a distinct cluster quite remote from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HGT1 glutathione transporter cluster. In vivo experiments using a systemic model of candidiasis failed to detect expression of OPT7 in vivo, and strains disrupted either in the degradation (dug3Δ) or transport (opt7Δ) of glutathione failed to show a defect in virulence. PMID:21994941

  14. Glutathione transferases: emerging multidisciplinary tools in red and green biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronopoulou, Evangelia G; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2009-01-01

    Cytosolic glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a diverse family of enzymes involved in a wide range of biological processes, many of which involve the conjugation of the tripeptide glutathione (GSH) to an electrophilic substrate. Detailed studies of GSTs are justified because of the considerable interest of these enzymes in medicine, agriculture and analytical biotechnology. For example, in medicine, GSTs are explored as molecular targets for the design of new anticancer drugs as a plausible means to sensitize drug-resistant tumors that overexpress GSTs. In agriculture, GSTs are exploited in the development of transgenic plants with increased resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Recently, selected isoenzymes of GSTs have found successful applications in the development of enzyme biosensors for the direct monitoring of environmental pollutants, such as herbicides and insecticides. This review article summarizes recent representative patents related to GSTs and their applications in biotechnology.

  15. Effects of donepezil on cognitive performance after sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Chris M; Bullmore, Edward T; Henson, Richard N; Christensen, Soren; Miller, Sam; Smith, Marie; Dewit, Odile; Lawrence, Phil; Nathan, Pradeep J

    2011-12-01

    To identify tasks that were sensitive to a temporary decline in cognitive performance after sleep deprivation and to investigate the ability of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil to reverse any sleep deprivation-induced impairment. Thirty healthy volunteers were administered either a 5-mg daily dose of donepezil or placebo for 14-17 days, in a double-blind parallel group design, then underwent either 24 h sleep deprivation or a normal night of sleep in non-blinded crossover, and were subsequently tested on a battery of cognitive tasks designed to measure different components of memory and executive function. Sleep deprivation selectively impaired performance on several memory tasks whilst also impairing non-memory function on these tasks. Performance on other tasks was spared. Despite partially reversing the decline in subjective alertness associated with sleep deprivation, treatment with donepezil failed to significantly reverse the decline in cognitive performance on any of the tasks. The results demonstrate the sensitivity of certain tests, particularly those that measure memory function, to cognitive impairment after sleep deprivation. The inability of donepezil to reverse this performance decline suggests that the sleep deprivation model of cognitive impairment may not be suitable for detecting pro-cognitive effects of cholinergic augmentation. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The effects of sleep deprivation on dissociable prototype learning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, W Todd; Glass, Brian D; Zeithamova, Dagmar; Savarie, Zachary R; Bowen, Christopher; Matthews, Michael D; Schnyer, David M

    2011-03-01

    The cognitive neural underpinnings of prototype learning are becoming clear. Evidence points to 2 different neural systems, depending on the learning parameters. A/not-A (AN) prototype learning is mediated by posterior brain regions that are involved in early perceptual learning, whereas A/B (AB) is mediated by frontal and medial temporal lobe regions. To investigate the effects of sleep deprivation on AN and AB prototype learning and to use established prototype models to provide insights into the cognitive-processing locus of sleep-deprivation deficits. Participants performed an AN and an AB prototype learning task twice, separated by a 24-hour period, with or without sleep between testing sessions. Eighteen West Point cadets participated in the sleep-deprivation group, and 17 West Point cadets participated in a control group. Sleep deprivation led to an AN, but not an AB, performance deficit. Prototype model analyses indicated that the AN deficit was due to changes in attentional focus and a decrease in confidence that is reflected in an increased bias to respond non-A. The findings suggest that AN, but not AB, prototype learning is affected by sleep deprivation. Prototype model analyses support the notion that the effect of sleep deprivation on AN is consistent with lapses in attentional focus that are more detrimental to AN than to AB. This finding adds to a growing body of work that suggests that different performance changes associated with sleep deprivation can be attributed to a common mechanism of changes in simple attention and vigilance.

  17. District nurses' crucial role in identifying unlawful deprivation of liberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard

    2014-05-01

    A recent judgement by the UK Supreme Court has widened the criteria for the type of care and treatment that amounts to a deprivation of liberty in hospitals and care homes. Very many more vulnerable residents in care homes should now benefit from the protection of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 deprivation of liberty safeguards. This protection will only happen if care-home staff, who are the gatekeepers of the system, recognise which of their residents are deprived of their liberty. District nurses have a crucial role to play in promoting the use of the deprivation of liberty safeguards. They are ideally placed to help identify care that amounts to a deprivation of liberty in the care homes that they visit. This article discusses how district nurses must inform their practice by making reference to the UK Supreme Court judgement on the use of the deprivation of liberty safeguards and the actions that district nurses must take if they suspect a care home is depriving a resident of their liberty without authorisation.

  18. Vascular compliance limits during sleep deprivation and recovery sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Derrick J; Schei, Jennifer L; Rector, David M

    2013-10-01

    Our previous studies showed that evoked hemodynamic responses are smaller during wake compared to sleep; suggesting neural activity is associated with vascular expansion and decreased compliance. We explored whether prolonged activity during sleep deprivation may exacerbate vascular expansion and blunt hemodynamic responses. Evoked auditory responses were generated with periodic 65 dB speaker clicks over a 72-h period and measured with cortical electrodes. Evoked hemodynamic responses were measured simultaneously with optical techniques using three light-emitting diodes, and a photodiode. Animals were housed in separate 30×30×80 cm enclosures, tethered to a commutator system and maintained on a 12-h light/dark cycle. Food and water were available ad libitum. Seven adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. Following a 24-h baseline recording, sleep deprivation was initiated for 0 to 10 h by gentle handling, followed by a 24-h recovery sleep recording. Evoked electrical and hemodynamic responses were measured before, during, and after sleep deprivation. Following deprivation, evoked hemodynamic amplitudes were blunted. Steady-state oxyhemoglobin concentration increased during deprivation and remained high during the initial recovery period before returning to baseline levels after approximately 9-h. Sleep deprivation resulted in blood vessel expansion and decreased compliance while lower basal neural activity during recovery sleep may allow blood vessel compliance to recover. Chronic sleep restriction or sleep deprivation could push the vasculature to critical levels, limiting blood delivery, and leading to metabolic deficits with the potential for neural trauma.

  19. Sleep Deprivation and Time-Based Prospective Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Maria José; Occhionero, Miranda; Cicogna, PierCarla

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of sleep deprivation on time-based prospective memory performance, that is, realizing delayed intentions at an appropriate time in the future (e.g., to take a medicine in 30 minutes). Between-subjects experimental design. The experimental group underwent 24 h of total sleep deprivation, and the control group had a regular sleep-wake cycle. Participants were tested at 08:00. Laboratory. Fifty healthy young adults (mean age 22 ± 2.1, 31 female). 24 h of total sleep deprivation. Participants were monitored by wrist actigraphy for 3 days before the experimental session. The following cognitive tasks were administered: one time-based prospective memory task and 3 reasoning tasks as ongoing activity. Objective and subjective vigilance was assessed by the psychomotor vigilance task and a visual analog scale, respectively. To measure the time-based prospective memory task we assessed compliance and clock checking behavior (time monitoring). Sleep deprivation negatively affected time-based prospective memory compliance (P sleep deprivation on human behavior, particularly the ability to perform an intended action after a few minutes. Sleep deprivation strongly compromises time-based prospective memory compliance but does not affect time check frequency. Sleep deprivation may impair the mechanism that allows the integration of information related to time monitoring with the prospective intention. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  20. The Munchausen paradigm for deprived neighbourhoods: pulling yourself out of the swamp of deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette Nijkamp

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Munchausen paradigm for deprived neighbourhoods: pulling yourself out of the swamp of deprivation Since the 1980s, many initiatives have attempted to tackle the deprivation currently experienced in South Rotterdam. Efforts have been made to attract creative workers and, in a counter-reaction, other initiatives have aimed to encourage the creative talents of poorer residents to strengthen their economic position. One example of this is Freehouse, which has established projects in the Afrikaanderwijk, including a neighbourhood cooperative. Our article addresses two questions: 1 What are the effects of the Freehouse projects on the economic position of residents of the Afrikaanderwijk? and 2 Which insights do our results provide into the possible effects of local government policies that rely on citizens playing an active role? Although the economic effects of the projects were limited, our study reveals that citizens’ initiatives, such as the Afrikaander Cooperative, can help residents gain employment. In order to succeed, these initiatives should not be hindered by obstructive regulations, and they should include input from the residents who function as staff. However, in deprived neighbourhoods, many residents require support to be able to contribute to citizens’ initiatives, and cannot be expected to act like Baron Münchausen and pull themselves out of the swamp of deprivation by their own hair. Het Münchausen paradigma voor achterstandswijken: jezelf uit het moeras van achterstand trekken Sinds de jaren 80 hebben veel initiatieven geprobeerd het achterstandsniveau in Rotterdam Zuid te verminderen. Verschillende initiatieven waren gericht op het aantrekken van creatieve professionals. Als tegenreactie stimuleerden andere initiatieven de creatieve talenten van arme wijkbewoners teneinde hun economische positie te versterken. Een voorbeeld hiervan is Freehouse, dat projecten in de Afrikaanderwijk startte, waaronder de oprichting van

  1. Night shifts, sleep deprivation, and attention performance in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Olmos, Isabel; Ibáñez-Pinilla, Milcíades

    2014-03-29

    To determine attention performance of medical students after sleep deprivation due to night shift work. Prospective cohort design. All seventh, eighth and ninth semester students were invited to participate (n= 209). The effectiveness and concentration indices (d2 Test for attention, dependent variable) from 180 students at 3 evaluations during the semester were compared. Eighth and ninth semester students underwent their second evaluation after a night shift. The independent variables were nocturnal sleep measurements. No differences in nocturnal sleep hours during the previous week (p=0.966), sleep deprivation (p=0.703) or effectiveness in the d2 Test (p=0.428) were found between the groups at the beginning of the semester. At the beginning and the end of the semester, the d2 Test results were not different between groups (p=0.410, p=0.394) respectively. The second evaluation showed greater sleep deprivation in students with night shift work (p=0.001). The sleep deprived students had lower concentration indices (p=0.001).The differences were associated with the magnitude of sleep deprivation (p=0.008). Multivariate regression analysis showed that attention performance was explained by sleep deprivation due to night shift work, adjusting for age and gender. Students with sleep deprivation had worse concentration than those without. Sleep deprivation due to night shift work in medical students had a negative impact on their attention performance. Medical educators should address these potential negative learning and patient care consequences of sleep deprivation in medical students due to night shifts.

  2. Stress-free automatic sleep deprivation using air puffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Brooks A; Vanderheyden, William M; Urpa, Lea M; Davis, Devon E; Fitzpatrick, Christopher J; Prabhu, Kaustubh; Poe, Gina R

    2015-08-15

    Sleep deprivation via gentle handling is time-consuming and personnel-intensive. We present here an automated sleep deprivation system via air puffs. Implanted EMG and EEG electrodes were used to assess sleep/waking states in six male Sprague-Dawley rats. Blood samples were collected from an implanted intravenous catheter every 4h during the 12-h light cycle on baseline, 8h of sleep deprivation via air puffs, and 8h of sleep deprivation by gentle handling days. The automated system was capable of scoring sleep and waking states as accurately as our offline version (∼90% for sleep) and with sufficient speed to trigger a feedback response within an acceptable amount of time (1.76s). Manual state scoring confirmed normal sleep on the baseline day and sleep deprivation on the two manipulation days (68% decrease in non-REM, 63% decrease in REM, and 74% increase in waking). No significant differences in levels of ACTH and corticosterone (stress hormones indicative of HPA axis activity) were found at any time point between baseline sleep and sleep deprivation via air puffs. There were no significant differences in ACTH or corticosterone concentrations between sleep deprivation by air puffs and gentle handling over the 8-h period. Our system accurately detects sleep and delivers air puffs to acutely deprive rats of sleep with sufficient temporal resolution during the critical 4-5h post learning sleep-dependent memory consolidation period. The system is stress-free and a viable alternative to existing sleep deprivation techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Monocular Visual Deprivation Suppresses Excitability in Adult Human Visual Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Astrid Rosenstand; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Paulson, Olaf Bjarne

    2011-01-01

    The adult visual cortex maintains a substantial potential for plasticity in response to a change in visual input. For instance, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies have shown that binocular deprivation (BD) increases the cortical excitability for inducing phosphenes with TMS. Here, we...... employed TMS to trace plastic changes in adult visual cortex before, during, and after 48 h of monocular deprivation (MD) of the right dominant eye. In healthy adult volunteers, MD-induced changes in visual cortex excitability were probed with paired-pulse TMS applied to the left and right occipital cortex...... of visual deprivation has a substantial impact on experience-dependent plasticity of the human visual cortex....

  4. Deprivation of liberty in penitentiaries in Medellín

    OpenAIRE

    Posada Segura, Juan David; Universidad de Antioquia; Acevedo Jaramillo, Luz Marina

    2012-01-01

    The research "the state of the fundamental rights of people deprived of liberty in correctional and prison institutions in Medellín" dealt with defining the historical and the current context of institutions of deprivation of liberty in the municipality of Medellín. Based on that, those that have existed in the municipality are described, as well as those which currently exist for the deprivation of liberty for the members of the National Police, the National Army, and civilian adult men and ...

  5. Global analysis of gene expression in response to L-Cysteine deprivation in the anaerobic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeelani Ghulam

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric protozoan parasite, causes amebic colitis and extra intestinal abscesses in millions of inhabitants of endemic areas. E. histolytica completely lacks glutathione metabolism but possesses L-cysteine as the principle low molecular weight thiol. L-Cysteine is essential for the structure, stability, and various protein functions, including catalysis, electron transfer, redox regulation, nitrogen fixation, and sensing for regulatory processes. Recently, we demonstrated that in E. histolytica, L-cysteine regulates various metabolic pathways including energy, amino acid, and phospholipid metabolism. Results In this study, employing custom-made Affymetrix microarrays, we performed time course (3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h gene expression analysis upon L-cysteine deprivation. We identified that out of 9,327 genes represented on the array, 290 genes encoding proteins with functions in metabolism, signalling, DNA/RNA regulation, electron transport, stress response, membrane transport, vesicular trafficking/secretion, and cytoskeleton were differentially expressed (≥3 fold at one or more time points upon L-cysteine deprivation. Approximately 60% of these modulated genes encoded proteins of no known function and annotated as hypothetical proteins. We also attempted further functional analysis of some of the most highly modulated genes by L-cysteine depletion. Conclusions To our surprise, L-cysteine depletion caused only limited changes in the expression of genes involved in sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism and oxidative stress defense. In contrast, we observed significant changes in the expression of several genes encoding iron sulfur flavoproteins, a major facilitator super-family transporter, regulator of nonsense transcripts, NADPH-dependent oxido-reductase, short chain dehydrogenase, acetyltransferases, and various other genes involved in diverse cellular functions. This study represents the first

  6. Impact of deprivation on occurrence, outcomes and health care costs of people with multiple morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Judith; Rudisill, Caroline; Bhattarai, Nawaraj; Gulliford, Martin

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to estimate the impact of deprivation on the occurrence, health outcomes and health care costs of people with multiple morbidity in England. Cohort study in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink, using deprivation quintile (IMD2010) at individual postcode level. Incidence and mortality from diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, stroke and colorectal cancer, and prevalence of depression, were used to define multidisease states. Costs of health care use were estimated for each state from a two-part model. Data were analysed for 141,535 men and 141,352 women aged ≥30 years, with 33,862 disease incidence events, and 13,933 deaths. Among incidences of single conditions, 22% were in the most deprived quintile and 19% in the least deprived; dual conditions, most deprived 26%, least deprived 16% and triple conditions, most deprived 29%, least deprived 14%. Deaths in participants without disease were distributed most deprived 22%, least deprived 19%; in participants with single conditions, most deprived 24%, least deprived 18%; dual conditions, most deprived 27%, least deprived 15%, and triple conditions, most deprived 33%, least deprived 17%. The relative rate of depression in most deprived participants with triple conditions, compared with least deprived and no disease, was 2.48 (1.74 to 3.54). Costs of health care use were associated with increasing deprivation and level of morbidity. The higher incidence of disease, associated with deprivation, channels deprived populations into categories of multiple morbidity with a greater prevalence of depression, higher mortality and higher costs. This has implications for the way that resources are allocated in England's National Health Service.

  7. Role of glutathione in tolerance to arsenite in Salvinia molesta, an aquatic fern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adinan Alves da Silva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In many plant species, tolerance to toxic metals is highly dependent on glutathione, an essential metabolite for cellular detoxification. We evaluated the responses of glutathione metabolism to arsenite (AsIII in Salvinia molesta, an aquatic fern that has unexplored phytoremediation potential. Plants were exposed to different AsIII concentrations in nutrient solution for 24 h. AsIII caused cell membrane damage to submerged leaves, indicating oxidative stress. There was an increase in the glutathione content and ϒ-glutamylcysteine synthetase enzyme activity in the submerged and floating leaves. The glutathione peroxidase and glutathione sulfotransferase enzymes also showed increased activity in both plant parts, whereas glutathione reductase only showed increased activity in the submerged leaves. These findings suggest an important role for glutathione in the protection of S. molesta against the toxic effects of AsIII, with more effective tolerance responses in the floating leaves.

  8. Role of glutathione in ethanol stress tolerance in yeast Pachysolen tannophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharan, Rajesh Kumar; Kanwal, Smita; Sharma, Sukesh Chander

    2010-06-25

    The effect of glutathione enrichment and depletion on the survival of Pachysolen tannophilus after ethanol stress was investigated. In this work, we verified that both control and glutathione deficient yeast cells were much more oxidized after ethanol stress. Depletion of cellular glutathione enhanced the sensitivity to ethanol and suppressed the adaptation. Incubation of the cell with amino acids constituting glutathione (GIu, Cys, Gly) increased the intracellular glutathione content, and subsequently the cell acquired resistance against ethanol. The level of reactive oxygen species, protein carbonyl, and lipid peroxidation in glutathione enriched groups were also studied. These results strongly suggest that intracellular glutathione plays an important role in the adaptive response in P. tannophilus to ethanol induced oxidative stress. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of glutathione on phytochelatin synthesis in tomato cells. [Lycopersicon esculentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendum, M.L.; Gupta, S.C.; Goldsbrough, P.B. (Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Growth of cell suspension cultures of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv VFNT-Cherry, in the presence of cadmium is inhibited by buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis. Cell growth and phytochelatin synthesis are restored to cells treated with buthionine sulfoximine by the addition of glutathione to the medium. Glutathione stimulates the accumulation of phytochelatins in cadmium treated cells, indicating that availability of glutathione can limit synthesis of these peptides. Exogenous glutathione causes a disproportionate increase in the level of smaller phytochelatins, notably ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 2}-Gly. In the presence of buthionine sulfoximine and glutathione, phytochelatins that are produced upon exposure to cadmium incorporate little ({sup 35}S)cysteine, indicating that these peptides are probably not synthesized by sequential addition of cysteine and glutamate to glutathione.

  10. GABA-BZD Receptor Modulating Mechanism of Panax quinquefolius against 72-hours Sleep Deprivation Induced Anxiety like Behavior: Possible Roles of Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka eChanana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTRationale- Panax quinquefolius (American Ginseng is known for its therapeutic potential against various neurological disorders, but its plausible mechanism of action still remains undeciphered. GABA (Gamma Amino Butyric Acid plays an important role in sleep wake cycle homeostasis. Thus there exists rationale in exploring the GABA-ergic potential of Panax quinquefolius as neuroprotective strategy in sleep deprivation induced secondary neurological problems.Objective- The present study was designed to explore the possible GABA-ergic mechanism in the neuro-protective effect of Panax quinquefolius against 72-hours sleep deprivation induced anxiety like behaviour, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, HPA-axis activation and neuroinflammation.Materials and Methods- Male laca mice were sleep deprived for 72-hours by using Grid suspended over water method. Panax quinquefolius (American Ginseng 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg was administered alone and in combination with GABA modulators (GABA Cl- channel inhibitor, GABA-benzodiazepine receptor inhibitor and GABAA agonist for 8 days, starting five days prior to 72-hours sleep deprivation period. Various behavioural (locomotor activity, mirror chamber test, biochemical (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, catalase, nitrite levels, mitochondrial complexes, neuroinflammation marker (Tumour Necrosis Factor, TNF-alpha, serum corticosterone, and histopathological sections of brains were assessed. Results- 72-hours sleep deprivation significantly impaired locomotor activity, caused anxiety-like behaviour, conditions of oxidative stress, alterations in mitochondrial enzyme complex activities, raised serum corticosterone levels, brain TNFα levels and led to neuroinflammation like signs in discrete brain areas as compared to naive group. Panax quinquefolius (100 and 200 mg/kg treatment restored the behavioural, biochemical, mitochondrial, molecular and histopathological alterations. Pre-treatment of

  11. Possible Involvement of Nitric Oxide Modulatory Mechanisms in the Neuroprotective Effect of Centella asiatica Against Sleep Deprivation Induced Anxiety Like Behaviour, Oxidative Damage and Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanana, Priyanka; Kumar, Anil

    2016-04-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) is an experience of inadequate or poor quality of sleep that may produce significant alterations in multiple neural systems. Centella asiatica (CA) is a psychoactive medicinal herb with immense therapeutic potential. The present study was designed to explore the possible nitric oxide (NO) modulatory mechanism in the neuroprotective effect of CA against SD induced anxiety like behaviour, oxidative damage and neuroinflammation. Male laca mice were sleep deprived for 72 h, and CA (150 and 300 mg/kg) was administered alone and in combination with NO modulators for 8 days, starting five days before 72-h SD exposure. Various behavioural (locomotor activity, elevated plus maze) and biochemical (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, catalase, nitrite levels and superoxide dismutase activity), neuroinflammation marker (TNF-alpha) were assessed subsequently. CA (150 and 300 mg/kg) treatment for 8 days significantly improved locomotor activity, anti-anxiety like effect and attenuated oxidative damage and TNF α level as compared to sleep-deprived 72-h group. Also while the neuroprotective effect of CA was increased by NO antagonists, it was diminished by NO agonists. The present study suggests that NO modulatory mechanism could be involved in the protective effect of CA against SD-induced anxiety-like behaviour, oxidative damage and neuroinflammation in mice. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Sleep Deprivation and Oxidative Stress in Animal Models: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Villafuerte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Because the function and mechanisms of sleep are partially clear, here we applied a meta-analysis to address the issue whether sleep function includes antioxidative properties in mice and rats. Given the expansion of the knowledge in the sleep field, it is indeed ambitious to describe all mammals, or other animals, in which sleep shows an antioxidant function. However, in this paper we reviewed the current understanding from basic studies in two species to drive the hypothesis that sleep is a dynamic-resting state with antioxidative properties. We performed a systematic review of articles cited in Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science until March 2015 using the following search terms: Sleep or sleep deprivation and oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, glutathione, nitric oxide, catalase or superoxide dismutase. We found a total of 266 studies. After inclusion and exclusion criteria, 44 articles were included, which are presented and discussed in this study. The complex relationship between sleep duration and oxidative stress is discussed. Further studies should consider molecular and genetic approaches to determine whether disrupted sleep promotes oxidative stress.

  13. Sleep deprivation and oxidative stress in animal models: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafuerte, Gabriel; Miguel-Puga, Adán; Rodríguez, Eric Murillo; Machado, Sergio; Manjarrez, Elias; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Because the function and mechanisms of sleep are partially clear, here we applied a meta-analysis to address the issue whether sleep function includes antioxidative properties in mice and rats. Given the expansion of the knowledge in the sleep field, it is indeed ambitious to describe all mammals, or other animals, in which sleep shows an antioxidant function. However, in this paper we reviewed the current understanding from basic studies in two species to drive the hypothesis that sleep is a dynamic-resting state with antioxidative properties. We performed a systematic review of articles cited in Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science until March 2015 using the following search terms: Sleep or sleep deprivation and oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, glutathione, nitric oxide, catalase or superoxide dismutase. We found a total of 266 studies. After inclusion and exclusion criteria, 44 articles were included, which are presented and discussed in this study. The complex relationship between sleep duration and oxidative stress is discussed. Further studies should consider molecular and genetic approaches to determine whether disrupted sleep promotes oxidative stress.

  14. Sleep Deprivation and Oxidative Stress in Animal Models: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafuerte, Gabriel; Miguel-Puga, Adán; Murillo Rodríguez, Eric; Machado, Sergio; Manjarrez, Elias; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Because the function and mechanisms of sleep are partially clear, here we applied a meta-analysis to address the issue whether sleep function includes antioxidative properties in mice and rats. Given the expansion of the knowledge in the sleep field, it is indeed ambitious to describe all mammals, or other animals, in which sleep shows an antioxidant function. However, in this paper we reviewed the current understanding from basic studies in two species to drive the hypothesis that sleep is a dynamic-resting state with antioxidative properties. We performed a systematic review of articles cited in Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science until March 2015 using the following search terms: Sleep or sleep deprivation and oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, glutathione, nitric oxide, catalase or superoxide dismutase. We found a total of 266 studies. After inclusion and exclusion criteria, 44 articles were included, which are presented and discussed in this study. The complex relationship between sleep duration and oxidative stress is discussed. Further studies should consider molecular and genetic approaches to determine whether disrupted sleep promotes oxidative stress. PMID:25945148

  15. Sustained Perceptual Deficits from Transient Sensory Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanes, Dan H.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory pathways display heightened plasticity during development, yet the perceptual consequences of early experience are generally assessed in adulthood. This approach does not allow one to identify transient perceptual changes that may be linked to the central plasticity observed in juvenile animals. Here, we determined whether a brief period of bilateral auditory deprivation affects sound perception in developing and adult gerbils. Animals were reared with bilateral earplugs, either from postnatal day 11 (P11) to postnatal day 23 (P23) (a manipulation previously found to disrupt gerbil cortical properties), or from P23-P35. Fifteen days after earplug removal and restoration of normal thresholds, animals were tested on their ability to detect the presence of amplitude modulation (AM), a temporal cue that supports vocal communication. Animals reared with earplugs from P11-P23 displayed elevated AM detection thresholds, compared with age-matched controls. In contrast, an identical period of earplug rearing at a later age (P23-P35) did not impair auditory perception. Although the AM thresholds of earplug-reared juveniles improved during a week of repeated testing, a subset of juveniles continued to display a perceptual deficit. Furthermore, although the perceptual deficits induced by transient earplug rearing had resolved for most animals by adulthood, a subset of adults displayed impaired performance. Control experiments indicated that earplugging did not disrupt the integrity of the auditory periphery. Together, our results suggest that P11-P23 encompasses a critical period during which sensory deprivation disrupts central mechanisms that support auditory perceptual skills. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sensory systems are particularly malleable during development. This heightened degree of plasticity is beneficial because it enables the acquisition of complex skills, such as music or language. However, this plasticity comes with a cost: nervous system development

  16. The effects of total sleep deprivation on Bayesian updating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Dickinson

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Subjects performed a decision task (Grether, 1980 in both a well-rested and experimentally sleep-deprived state. We found two main results: 1 final choice accuracy was unaffected by sleep deprivation, and yet 2 the estimated decision model differed significantly following sleep-deprivation. Following sleep deprivation, subjects placed significantly less weight on new information in forming their beliefs. Because the altered decision process still maintains decision accuracy, it may suggest that increased accident and error rates attributed to reduced sleep in modern society stem from reduced auxiliary function performance (e.g., slowed reaction time, reduced motor skills or other components of decision making, rather than the inability to integrate multiple pieces of information.

  17. Spatial reversal learning is robust to total sleep deprivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenaars, C.H.; Joosten, R.N.J.M.; Kramer, M.; Post, G.; Eggels, L.; Wuite, M.; Dematteis, M.; Feenstra, M.G.P.; van Someren, E.J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep deprivation affects cognitive functions that depend on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) such as cognitive flexibility, and the consolidation of newly learned information. The identification of cognitive processes that are either robustly sensitive or robustly insensitive to the same experimental

  18. Arbitrary Deprivation of an Unregistered Credit Provider's Right to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arbitrary Deprivation of an Unregistered Credit Provider's Right to Claim Restitution of Performance Rendered Opperman v Boonzaaier (24887/2010) 2012 ZAWCHC 27 (17 April 2012) and National Credit Regulator v Opperman 2013 2 SA 1 (CC)

  19. Neural sensitivity to odorants in deprived and normal olfactory bulbs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco B Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Early olfactory deprivation in rodents is accompanied by an homeostatic regulation of the synaptic connectivity in the olfactory bulb (OB. However, its consequences in the neural sensitivity and discrimination have not been elucidated. We compared the odorant sensitivity and discrimination in early sensory deprived and normal OBs in anesthetized rats. We show that the deprived OB exhibits an increased sensitivity to different odorants when compared to the normal OB. Our results indicate that early olfactory stimulation enhances discriminability of the olfactory stimuli. We found that deprived olfactory bulbs adjusts the overall excitatory and inhibitory mitral cells (MCs responses to odorants but the receptive fields become wider than in the normal olfactory bulbs. Taken together, these results suggest that an early natural sensory stimulation sharpens the receptor fields resulting in a larger discrimination capability. These results are consistent with previous evidence that a varied experience with odorants modulates the OB's synaptic connections and increases MCs selectivity.

  20. Consequences of sleep deprivation on neurotransmitter receptor expression and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longordo, Fabio; Kopp, Caroline; Lüthi, Anita

    2009-05-01

    Several pieces of evidence suggest that sleep deprivation causes marked alterations in neurotransmitter receptor function in diverse neuronal cell types. To date, this has been studied mainly in wake- and sleep-promoting areas of the brain and in the hippocampus, which is implicated in learning and memory. This article reviews findings linking sleep deprivation to modifications in neurotransmitter receptor function, including changes in receptor subunit expression, ligand affinity and signal transduction mechanisms. We focus on studies using sleep deprivation procedures that control for side-effects such as stress. We classify the changes with respect to their functional consequences on the activity of wake-promoting and/or sleep-promoting systems. We suggest that elucidation of how sleep deprivation affects neurotransmitter receptor function will provide functional insight into the detrimental effects of sleep loss.

  1. Deprivation of liberty in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard

    2017-03-09

    Richard Griffith, Senior Lecturer in Health Law at Swansea University, considers the implications of a Court of Appeal decision that deprivations of liberty do not occur where the person is receiving lifesaving treatment.

  2. Stress, social support and psychosomatic symptoms in a deprived neighbourhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bancila, Delia; Andersen, Pernille Tanggaard; Kronborg Bak, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    From a transactional perspective on stress, the study aimed to examine if the relationships of social support with perceived stress and psychosomatic symptoms are equivalent in deprived and wealthier neighbourhoods. Cross-sectional data were randomly collected from 2906 inhabitants in a deprived...... neighbourhood (851) and wealthier communities (2055), in Esbjerg, Denmark. A model that included psychosomatic symptoms as outcome, and daily worries, economic deprivation, perceived stress and social support as predictors was tested with structural equation modelling in two-group analyses. The findings showed...... significant differences (D2 (6)¼16.66, p.¼0.011) between neighbourhoods, and the fit statistics (CFI¼0.930, RMSEA¼0.034, R2¼0.48) showed good fit. Under an increased perceived stress’ effect, the social support’s impact on psychosomatic symptoms decreased in the deprived neighbourhood compared with the other...

  3. Sleep and Nutritional Deprivation and Performance of House Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Michael R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A study to compare cognitive functioning in acutely and chronically sleep-deprived house officers is described. A multivariate analysis of variance revealed significant deficits in primary mental tasks involving basic rote memory, language, and numeric skills. (Author/MLW)

  4. Conjugation of isoprene monoepoxides with glutathione, catalyzed by α, μ, π and θ-class glutathione S-transferases of rat and man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaards, J.J.P.; Venekamp, J.C.; Salmon, F.G.C.; Bladeren, P.J. van

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, the enzymatic conjugation of the isoprene monoepoxides 3,4 epoxy-3-methyl-1-butene (EPOX-I) and 3,4-epoxy-2-methyl-1-butene (EPOX-II) with glutathione was investigated, using purified glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) of the α, μ, π and θ-class of rat and man. HPLC analysis of

  5. Plastid-Localized Glutathione Reductase2–Regulated Glutathione Redox Status Is Essential for Arabidopsis Root Apical Meristem Maintenance[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin; Pasternak, Taras; Eiblmeier, Monika; Ditengou, Franck; Kochersperger, Philip; Sun, Jiaqiang; Wang, Hui; Rennenberg, Heinz; Teale, William; Paponov, Ivan; Zhou, Wenkun; Li, Chuanyou; Li, Xugang; Palme, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione is involved in thiol redox signaling and acts as a major redox buffer against reactive oxygen species, helping to maintain a reducing environment in vivo. Glutathione reductase (GR) catalyzes the reduction of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) into reduced glutathione (GSH). The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes two GRs: GR1 and GR2. Whereas the cytosolic/peroxisomal GR1 is not crucial for plant development, we show here that the plastid-localized GR2 is essential for root growth and root apical meristem (RAM) maintenance. We identify a GR2 mutant, miao, that displays strong inhibition of root growth and severe defects in the RAM, with GR activity being reduced to ∼50%. miao accumulates high levels of GSSG and exhibits increased glutathione oxidation. The exogenous application of GSH or the thiol-reducing agent DTT can rescue the root phenotype of miao, demonstrating that the RAM defects in miao are triggered by glutathione oxidation. Our in silico analysis of public microarray data shows that auxin and glutathione redox signaling generally act independently at the transcriptional level. We propose that glutathione redox status is essential for RAM maintenance through both auxin/PLETHORA (PLT)-dependent and auxin/PLT-independent redox signaling pathways. PMID:24249834

  6. Effects of sleep deprivation on central auditory processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberalesso Paulo Breno

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleep deprivation is extremely common in contemporary society, and is considered to be a frequent cause of behavioral disorders, mood, alertness, and cognitive performance. Although the impacts of sleep deprivation have been studied extensively in various experimental paradigms, very few studies have addressed the impact of sleep deprivation on central auditory processing (CAP. Therefore, we examined the impact of sleep deprivation on CAP, for which there is sparse information. In the present study, thirty healthy adult volunteers (17 females and 13 males, aged 30.75 ± 7.14 years were subjected to a pure tone audiometry test, a speech recognition threshold test, a speech recognition task, the Staggered Spondaic Word Test (SSWT, and the Random Gap Detection Test (RGDT. Baseline (BSL performance was compared to performance after 24 hours of being sleep deprived (24hSD using the Student’s t test. Results Mean RGDT score was elevated in the 24hSD condition (8.0 ± 2.9 ms relative to the BSL condition for the whole cohort (6.4 ± 2.8 ms; p = 0.0005, for males (p = 0.0066, and for females (p = 0.0208. Sleep deprivation reduced SSWT scores for the whole cohort in both ears [(right: BSL, 98.4 % ± 1.8 % vs. SD, 94.2 % ± 6.3 %. p = 0.0005(left: BSL, 96.7 % ± 3.1 % vs. SD, 92.1 % ± 6.1 %, p  Conclusion Sleep deprivation impairs RGDT and SSWT performance. These findings confirm that sleep deprivation has central effects that may impair performance in other areas of life.

  7. Sleep Deprivation in Adolescents and Adults: Changes in Affect

    OpenAIRE

    Talbot, Lisa S.; McGlinchey, Eleanor L.; Kaplan, Katherine A.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Harvey, Allison G.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the impact of sleep deprivation on several aspects of affective functioning in healthy participants selected from three different developmental periods: early adolescence (ages 10–13), midadolescence (ages 13–16), and adulthood (ages 30–60). Participants completed an affective functioning battery under conditions of sleep deprivation (a maximum of 6.5 hours total sleep time on the first night followed by a maximum of 2 hours total sleep time on the second night)...

  8. Effect of Monocular Deprivation on Rabbit Neural Retinal Cell Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Maseghe Mwachaka; Hassan Saidi; Paul Ochieng Odula; Pamela Idenya Mandela

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the effect of monocular deprivation on densities of neural retinal cells in rabbits. Methods: Thirty rabbits, comprised of 18 subject and 12 control animals, were included and monocular deprivation was achieved through unilateral lid suturing in all subject animals. The rabbits were observed for three weeks. At the end of each week, 6 experimental and 3 control animals were euthanized, their retinas was harvested and processed for light microscopy. Photomicrographs of ...

  9. Effects of sleep deprivation on central auditory processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberalesso, Paulo Breno Noronha; D'Andrea, Karlin Fabianne Klagenberg; Cordeiro, Mara L; Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone; Marques, Jair Mendes; Jurkiewicz, Ari Leon

    2012-07-23

    Sleep deprivation is extremely common in contemporary society, and is considered to be a frequent cause of behavioral disorders, mood, alertness, and cognitive performance. Although the impacts of sleep deprivation have been studied extensively in various experimental paradigms, very few studies have addressed the impact of sleep deprivation on central auditory processing (CAP). Therefore, we examined the impact of sleep deprivation on CAP, for which there is sparse information. In the present study, thirty healthy adult volunteers (17 females and 13 males, aged 30.75±7.14 years) were subjected to a pure tone audiometry test, a speech recognition threshold test, a speech recognition task, the Staggered Spondaic Word Test (SSWT), and the Random Gap Detection Test (RGDT). Baseline (BSL) performance was compared to performance after 24 hours of being sleep deprived (24hSD) using the Student's t test. Mean RGDT score was elevated in the 24hSD condition (8.0±2.9 ms) relative to the BSL condition for the whole cohort (6.4±2.8 ms; p=0.0005), for males (p=0.0066), and for females (p=0.0208). Sleep deprivation reduced SSWT scores for the whole cohort in both ears [(right: BSL, 98.4%±1.8% vs. SD, 94.2%±6.3%. p=0.0005)(left: BSL, 96.7%±3.1% vs. SD, 92.1%±6.1%, peffects were evident within both gender subgroups [(right: males, p=0.0080; females, p=0.0143)(left: males, p=0.0076; females: p=0.0010). Sleep deprivation impairs RGDT and SSWT performance. These findings confirm that sleep deprivation has central effects that may impair performance in other areas of life.

  10. Sleep deprivation, pain and prematurity: a review study

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly Cristina Santos de Carvalho Bonan; João da Costa Pimentel Filho; Rosana Maria Tristão; José Alfredo Lacerda de Jesus; Dioclécio Campos Junior

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to describe current reports in the scientific literature on sleep in the intensive care environment and sleep deprivation associated with painful experiences in premature infant. A systematic search was conducted for studies on sleep, pain, premature birth and care of the newborn. Web of Knowledge, MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, VHL and SciELO databases were consulted. The association between sleep deprivation and pain generates effects that are observe...

  11. Metabolic, Endocrine, and Immune Consequences of Sleep Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    AlDabal, Laila; BaHammam, Ahmed S.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last three to four decades, it has been observed that the average total hours of sleep have decreased to less than seven hours per person per night. Concomitantly, global figures relating to obesity and diabetes mellitus have increased in an alarming fashion in adults and children, and it has been hypothesized that neuro-hormonal changes accompanying this behavioral sleep deprivation may lead to insulin resistance and, subsequently, to diabetes mellitus. Sleep deprivation has been as...

  12. Sleep Deprivation Selectively Impairs Memory Consolidation for Contextual Fear Conditioning

    OpenAIRE

    Graves, Laurel A.; Heller, Elizabeth A.; Pack, Allan I.; Abel, Ted

    2003-01-01

    Many behavioral and electrophysiological studies in animals and humans have suggested that sleep and circadian rhythms influence memory consolidation. In rodents, hippocampus-dependent memory may be particularly sensitive to sleep deprivation after training, as spatial memory in the Morris water maze is impaired by rapid eye movement sleep deprivation following training. Spatial learning in the Morris water maze, however, requires multiple training trials and performan...

  13. Chronic sleep deprivation and seasonality: Implications for the obesity epidemic

    OpenAIRE

    Cizza, G.; Requena, M.; Galli, G.; de Jonge, L.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep duration has progressively fallen over the last 100 years while obesity has increased in the past 30 years. Several studies have reported an association between chronic sleep deprivation and long-term weight gain. Increased energy intake due to sleep loss has been listed as the main mechanism. The consequences of chronic sleep deprivation on energy expenditure have not been fully explored. Sleep, body weight, mood and behavior are subjected to circannual changes. However, in our modern ...

  14. Glutathione peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.9) and superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1) activities in riboflavin-deficient rats infected with Plasmodium berghei malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelekan, D A; Thurnham, D I

    1998-03-01

    Riboflavin deficiency interferes with the growth and multiplication of malaria parasites as well as the host response to malaria. The objective of the present work was to determine the effects of riboflavin deficiency on erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.9; GPx) and superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1; SOD) in rats infected with Plasmodium berghei malaria. Riboflavin in its co-enzyme form, FAD, is required by glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.1) to regenerate GSH and GSH is an important cellular antioxidant both in its own right and also as a substrate for the enzyme GPx. Weanling rats were deprived of riboflavin for 8 weeks before intraperitoneal injection of 1 x 10(6) P. berghei parasites. Control animals were weight-matched to the respective riboflavin-deficient group. At 10 d post-infection, parasite counts were higher in the weight-matched control group than the riboflavin-deficient group (P = 0.004). GPx activity was higher in erythrocytes of rats parasitized with P. berghei than comparable non-infected rats regardless of riboflavin status (P diets adequate in riboflavin (weight-matched controls) whether parasitized or not, but the difference was not significant. Neither riboflavin deficiency nor malaria had any effect on erythrocyte SOD activity. It was concluded that riboflavin deficiency has no marked effect on erythrocyte GPx or SOD activity in the rat.

  15. Energy expenditure during sleep, sleep deprivation and sleep following sleep deprivation in adult humans

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Christopher M.; Melanson, Edward L.; Frydendall, Emily J; Perreault, Leigh; Robert H Eckel; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep has been proposed to be a physiological adaptation to conserve energy, but little research has examined this proposed function of sleep in humans. We quantified effects of sleep, sleep deprivation and recovery sleep on whole-body total daily energy expenditure (EE) and on EE during the habitual day and nighttime. We also determined effects of sleep stage during baseline and recovery sleep on EE. Seven healthy participants aged 22 ± 5 years (mean ± s.d.) maintained ∼8 h per night sleep s...

  16. Sleep deprivation in adolescents and adults: changes in affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Lisa S; McGlinchey, Eleanor L; Kaplan, Katherine A; Dahl, Ronald E; Harvey, Allison G

    2010-12-01

    The present study investigated the impact of sleep deprivation on several aspects of affective functioning in healthy participants selected from three different developmental periods: early adolescence (ages 10-13), midadolescence (ages 13-16), and adulthood (ages 30-60). Participants completed an affective functioning battery under conditions of sleep deprivation (a maximum of 6.5 hours total sleep time on the first night followed by a maximum of 2 hours total sleep time on the second night) and rest (approximately 7-8 hours total sleep time each night for two consecutive nights). Less positive affect was observed in the sleep-deprived, compared to rested, condition. This effect held for 9 of the 12 positive affect items on the PANAS-C. Participants also reported a greater increase in anxiety during a catastrophizing task and rated the likelihood of potential catastrophes as higher when sleep deprived, relative to when rested. Early adolescents appraised their main worry as more threatening when sleep deprived, relative to when rested. These results support and extend previous research underscoring the adverse affective consequences of sleep deprivation.

  17. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Chouchou

    Full Text Available The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers. Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1 placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2 pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3 REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated.

  18. The sleep-deprived electroencephalogram: evidence and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Thomas H

    2002-08-01

    Sleep deprivation for the initial electroencephalogram for suspected seizures is a widespread but inconsistent practice not informed by balanced evidence. Daily practice suggests that nonneurologists are confused by the meaning and value of, and indications for, "sleep" (tracing) vs "sleep deprivation" (and other alternatives). They need specific, informed guidance from general neurologists on best practices. To document illustratively the variability of neurologists' practices, the level of relevant information among nonneurologists, and the current state of published evidence; and to stimulate formulation of consensus advisories. I surveyed knowledge and practices of (1) nonneurologists in a community teaching hospital; (2) local and national neurologists and epileptologists; (3) electroencephalogram laboratory protocols; and (4) textbook accounts and recommendations and the relevant journal literature. National professional organizations were contacted for advisories or guidelines. Most nonneurologists surveyed misunderstood "sleep" vs "sleep-deprived" electroencephalograms and their actual protocols. They are unaware of evidence on benefits vs burdens. Neurologists' practices are inconsistent. Experts generally agree that sleep deprivation produces substantial activation of interictal epileptiform discharges beyond the activation of sleep per se. However, most published recommendations and interviewed epileptologists do not suggest sleep deprivation for the initial electroencephalogram because of "inconvenience" (burdens) for the patient. Evidence-based or reasoned guidance is minimal, and professional societies have not issued advisories. Confusion over sleep deprivation, disparities between evidence and recommendations, and inconsistent practices create a need for expert consensus for guidance, as well as comparative research on alternative methods of increasing diagnostic yield.

  19. Sleep Deprivation Reveals Altered Brain Perfusion Patterns in Somnambulism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien Thanh Dang-Vu

    Full Text Available Despite its high prevalence, relatively little is known about the pathophysiology of somnambulism. Increasing evidence indicates that somnambulism is associated with functional abnormalities during wakefulness and that sleep deprivation constitutes an important drive that facilitates sleepwalking in predisposed patients. Here, we studied the neural mechanisms associated with somnambulism using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT with 99mTc-Ethylene Cysteinate Dimer (ECD, during wakefulness and after sleep deprivation.Ten adult sleepwalkers and twelve controls with normal sleep were scanned using 99mTc-ECD SPECT in morning wakefulness after a full night of sleep. Eight of the sleepwalkers and nine of the controls were also scanned during wakefulness after a night of total sleep deprivation. Between-group comparisons of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF were performed to characterize brain activity patterns during wakefulness in sleepwalkers.During wakefulness following a night of total sleep deprivation, rCBF was decreased bilaterally in the inferior temporal gyrus in sleepwalkers compared to controls.Functional neural abnormalities can be observed during wakefulness in somnambulism, particularly after sleep deprivation and in the inferior temporal cortex. Sleep deprivation thus not only facilitates the occurrence of sleepwalking episodes, but also uncovers patterns of neural dysfunction that characterize sleepwalkers during wakefulness.

  20. Sleep Deprivation Reveals Altered Brain Perfusion Patterns in Somnambulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Zadra, Antonio; Labelle, Marc-Antoine; Petit, Dominique; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Despite its high prevalence, relatively little is known about the pathophysiology of somnambulism. Increasing evidence indicates that somnambulism is associated with functional abnormalities during wakefulness and that sleep deprivation constitutes an important drive that facilitates sleepwalking in predisposed patients. Here, we studied the neural mechanisms associated with somnambulism using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) with 99mTc-Ethylene Cysteinate Dimer (ECD), during wakefulness and after sleep deprivation. Ten adult sleepwalkers and twelve controls with normal sleep were scanned using 99mTc-ECD SPECT in morning wakefulness after a full night of sleep. Eight of the sleepwalkers and nine of the controls were also scanned during wakefulness after a night of total sleep deprivation. Between-group comparisons of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were performed to characterize brain activity patterns during wakefulness in sleepwalkers. During wakefulness following a night of total sleep deprivation, rCBF was decreased bilaterally in the inferior temporal gyrus in sleepwalkers compared to controls. Functional neural abnormalities can be observed during wakefulness in somnambulism, particularly after sleep deprivation and in the inferior temporal cortex. Sleep deprivation thus not only facilitates the occurrence of sleepwalking episodes, but also uncovers patterns of neural dysfunction that characterize sleepwalkers during wakefulness.

  1. Polysomnographic diagnosis of sleepwalking: effects of sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadra, Antonio; Pilon, Mathieu; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2008-04-01

    Somnambulism affects up to 4% of adults and constitutes one of the leading causes of sleep-related violence and self-injury. Diagnosing somnambulism with objective instruments is often difficult because episodes rarely occur in the laboratory. Because sleep deprivation can precipitate sleepwalking, we aimed to determine the effects of 25 hours of sleep deprivation on the frequency and complexity of somnambulistic episodes recorded in the laboratory. Thirty consecutive sleepwalkers were evaluated prospectively by video-polysomnography for one baseline night and during recovery sleep after 25 hours of sleep deprivation. Ten sleepwalkers with a concomitant sleep disturbance were investigated with the same protocol. Sleepwalkers experienced a significant increase in the mean frequency of somnambulistic episodes during postdeprivation recovery sleep. Postsleep deprivation also resulted in a significantly greater proportion of patients experiencing more complex forms of somnambulism. Sleep deprivation was similarly effective in 9 of the 10 patients presenting with a comorbid sleep disturbance. Combining data from all 40 patients shows that whereas 32 episodes were recorded from 20 sleepwalkers (50%) at baseline, recovery sleep resulted in 92 episodes being recorded from 36 patients (90%). The findings support the view that sleepwalkers suffer from a dysfunction of the mechanisms responsible for sustaining stable slow-wave sleep and suggest that these patients are particularly vulnerable to increased homeostatic sleep pressure. Strong evidence is provided that 25 hours of sleep deprivation can be a valuable tool that facilitates the polysomnographically based diagnosis of somnambulism in predisposed patients.

  2. [Sleep deprivation and pain: a review of the newest literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmann, A J; Kundermann, B; Lautenbacher, S

    2014-04-01

    It has now been established that sleep deprivation or fragmentation causes hyperalgesia which cannot be explained by a general change in somatosensory perception. However, it has not yet been clarified which of the sleep stages are most relevant for this effect. The seemingly paradoxical effects of sleep deprivation on pain-evoked brain potentials on the one hand and the subjective pain report on the other hand suggest complex changes in gating mechanisms. As the effects on pain and affect can be dissociated a common mechanism of action seems unlikely. Data from animal studies suggest that hyperalgesia due to sleep deprivation might be particularly strong under preexisting neuropathic conditions. Together with results from animal research the finding that endogenous pain modulation (CPM) is impaired by sleep deprivation suggests that the serotoninergic system mediates the effect of sleep deprivation on pain perception. However, other neurotransmitters and neuromodulators still have to be considered. The clinically relevant question arises why sleep deprivation induces hyperalgesia more easily in certain individuals than in others and why this effect then has a longer duration?

  3. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouchou, Florian; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Rainville, Pierre; Lavigne, Gilles J

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers). Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1) placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2) pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3) REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated.

  4. Growth hormone rescues hippocampal synaptic function after sleep deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunyoung; Bertolotti, Don; Green, Todd L.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep is required for, and sleep loss impairs, normal hippocampal synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor function and expression, hippocampal NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity, and hippocampal-dependent memory function. Although sleep is essential, the signals linking sleep to hippocampal function are not known. One potential signal is growth hormone. Growth hormone is released during sleep, and its release is suppressed during sleep deprivation. If growth hormone links sleep to hippocampal function, then restoration of growth hormone during sleep deprivation should prevent adverse consequences of sleep loss. To test this hypothesis, we examined rat hippocampus for spontaneous excitatory synaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons, long-term potentiation in area CA1, and NMDA receptor subunit proteins in synaptic membranes. Three days of sleep deprivation caused a significant reduction in NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents compared with control treatments. When rats were injected with growth hormone once per day during sleep deprivation, the loss of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents was prevented. Growth hormone injections also prevented the impairment of long-term potentiation that normally follows sleep deprivation. In addition, sleep deprivation led to a selective loss of NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) from hippocampal synaptic membranes, but normal NR2B expression was restored by growth hormone injection. Our results identify growth hormone as a critical mediator linking sleep to normal synaptic function of the hippocampus. PMID:20237303

  5. THE IMPACT OF SLEEP DEPRIVATION ON THE BRAIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobić, Tatjana Trošt; Šečić, Ana; Zavoreo, Iris; Matijević, Valentina; Filipović, Branimir; Kolak, Željka; Kes, Vanja Bašić; Ciliga, Dubravka; Sajković, Dubravka

    2016-09-01

    Each sleep phase is characterized by specific chemical, cellular and anatomic events of vital importance for normal neural functioning. Different forms of sleep deprivation may lead to a decline of cognitive functions in individuals. Studies in this field make a distinction between total sleep deprivation, chronic sleep restriction, and the situation of sleep disruption. Investigations covering the acute effects of sleep deprivation on the brain show that the discovered behavioral deficits in most cases regenerate after two nights of complete sleep. However, some studies done on mice emphasize the possible chronic effects of long-term sleep deprivation or chronic restriction on the occurrence of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. In order to better understand the acute and chronic effects of sleep loss, the mechanisms of neural adaptation in the situations of insufficient sleep need to be further investigated. Future integrative research on the impact of sleep deprivation on neural functioning measured through the macro level of cognitive functions and the micro molecular and cell level could contribute to more accurate conclusions about the basic cellular mechanisms responsible for the detected behavioral deficits occurring due to sleep deprivation.

  6. Total sleep deprivation decreases flow experience and mood status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaida K

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Kosuke Kaida, Kazuhisa NikiHuman Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of sleep deprivation on flow experience.Methods: Sixteen healthy male volunteers of mean age 21.4±1.59 (21–24 years participated in two experimental conditions, ie, sleep-deprivation and normal sleep. In the sleep-deprived condition, participants stayed awake at home for 36 hours (from 8 am until 10 pm the next day beginning on the day prior to an experimental day. In both conditions, participants carried out a simple reaction time (psychomotor vigilance task and responded to a questionnaire measuring flow experience and mood status.Results: Flow experience was reduced after one night of total sleep deprivation. Sleep loss also decreased positive mood, increased negative mood, and decreased psychomotor performance.Conclusion: Sleep deprivation has a strong impact on mental and behavioral states associated with the maintenance of flow, namely subjective well-being.Keywords: sleep deprivation, sleepiness, flow, mood, vigilance

  7. [Effects of sleep deprivation on human performance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Z J; Ma, R S

    2000-08-01

    Objective. To investigate the effects of sleep deprivation (SD) on human performance. Method. 8 healthy male college students participated the test. During 26 h of continuous awakeness (from 6:00 to 8:00 the next day), the volunteers were demanded to perform a battery of tests at 9 different time (7:00, 12:00, 16:00, 20:00, 0:00, 2:00, 4:00, 6:00, 8:00). The tests include: (1) single task: aural Oddball response, the response time (RT1) and correct rate (CR1) were recorded; (2) dual tasks: manual tracking and aural Oddball response, the response time (RT2), tracking error (ER) and correct rate (CR2) were recorded; (3) The Stanford sleepiness scale and subjective ratings of task difficulty access. Result. SD had significant effects on CT1, CT2 and ER (P=0.0001, P=0.00001, P=0.0004 respectively); SD increased RT1, RT2, ER at night time. SD had significant effects on SR, SSS score (P=0.0001, P=0.0000 respectively); SD increased SR, SSS score at night time. Since the subjects changed their response strategy, CR1 and CR2 were not influenced by SD at night time. Conclusion. SD has significant effects on response time, tracking error, subjective difficulty of cognitive tasks and subjective sleepiness.

  8. Circadian Rhythms, Sleep Deprivation, and Human Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Namni; Basner, Mathias; Rao, Hengyi; Dinges, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Much of the current science on, and mathematical modeling of, dynamic changes in human performance within and between days is dominated by the two-process model of sleep–wake regulation, which posits a neurobiological drive for sleep that varies homeostatically (increasing as a saturating exponential during wakefulness and decreasing in a like manner during sleep), and a circadian process that neurobiologically modulates both the homeostatic drive for sleep and waking alertness and performance. Endogenous circadian rhythms in neurobehavioral functions, including physiological alertness and cognitive performance, have been demonstrated using special laboratory protocols that reveal the interaction of the biological clock with the sleep homeostatic drive. Individual differences in circadian rhythms and genetic and other components underlying such differences also influence waking neurobehavioral functions. Both acute total sleep deprivation and chronic sleep restriction increase homeostatic sleep drive and degrade waking neurobehavioral functions as reflected in sleepiness, attention, cognitive speed, and memory. Recent evidence indicating a high degree of stability in neurobehavioral responses to sleep loss suggests that these trait-like individual differences are phenotypic and likely involve genetic components, including circadian genes. Recent experiments have revealed both sleep homeostatic and circadian effects on brain metabolism and neural activation. Investigation of the neural and genetic mechanisms underlying the dynamically complex interaction between sleep homeostasis and circadian systems is beginning. A key goal of this work is to identify biomarkers that accurately predict human performance in situations in which the circadian and sleep homeostatic systems are perturbed. PMID:23899598

  9. Sleep deprivation due to shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation due to shift work is related to perturbation of the sleep/wake cycle, associated with the modified activity/rest pattern. This may cause a significant disruption of circadian rhythms of biologic functions, driven by the body clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. Shift and night workers have to change sleep times and strategies according to their duty periods; consequently, both sleep length and quality can be considerably affected depending on the variable start and finish times on different shifts. About 10% of night and rotating shift workers, aged between 18 and 65 years, have been estimated to have a diagnosable "shift-work sleep disorder," according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, version 2 (ICSD-2). In the long run, this may lead to persistent and severe disturbances of sleep, chronic fatigue and psychoneurotic syndromes, besides being a risk or aggravating factor for accidents, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and reproductive disorders, as well as, probably, for cancer. Preventive and corrective actions deal with the organization of shift schedules according to ergonomic criteria, careful health surveillance, appropriate education and training on effective countermeasures, in particular, sleep hygiene and napping. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Glutathione S-transferase gene polymorphisms in presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateş, Nurcan Aras; Unal, Murat; Tamer, Lülüfer; Derici, Ebru; Karakaş, Sevim; Ercan, Bahadir; Pata, Yavuz Selim; Akbaş, Yücel; Vayisoğlu, Yusuf; Camdeviren, Handan

    2005-05-01

    Glutathione and glutathione-related antioxidant enzymes are involved in the metabolism and detoxification of cytotoxic and carcinogenic compounds as well as reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species generation occurs in prolonged relative hypoperfusion conditions such as in aging. The etiology of presbycusis is much less certain; however, a complex genetic cause is most likely. The effect of aging shows a wide interindividual range; we aimed to investigate whether profiles of (glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1, T1 and P1 genotypes may be associated with the risk of age-related hearing loss. We examined 68 adults with presbycusis and 69 healthy controls. DNA was extracted from whole blood, and the GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms were determined using a real-time polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence resonance energy transfer with a Light-Cycler Instrument. Associations between specific genotypes and the development of presbycusis were examined by use of logistic regression analyses to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Gene polymorphisms at GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 in subjects with presbycusis were not significantly different than in the controls (p > 0.05). Also, the combinations of different GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 genotypes were not an increased risk of presbycusis (p > 0.05). We could not demonstrate any significant association between the GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 polymorphism and age-related hearing loss in this population. This may be because of our sample size, and further studies need to investigate the exact role of GST gene polymorphisms in the etiopathogenesis of the presbycusis.

  11. Glutathione in the human brain: Review of its roles and measurement by magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Caroline D; Williams, Stephen R

    2017-07-15

    We review the transport, synthesis and catabolism of glutathione in the brain as well as its compartmentation and biochemistry in different brain cells. The major reactions involving glutathione are reviewed and the factors limiting its availability in brain cells are discussed. We also describe and critique current methods for measuring glutathione in the human brain using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and review the literature on glutathione measurements in healthy brains and in neurological, psychiatric, neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental conditions In summary: Healthy human brain glutathione concentration is ∼1-2 mM, but it varies by brain region, with evidence of gender differences and age effects; in neurological disease glutathione appears reduced in multiple sclerosis, motor neurone disease and epilepsy, while being increased in meningiomas; in psychiatric disease the picture is complex and confounded by methodological differences, regional effects, length of disease and drug-treatment. Both increases and decreases in glutathione have been reported in depression and schizophrenia. In Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment there is evidence for a decrease in glutathione compared to age-matched healthy controls. Improved methods to measure glutathione in vivo will provide better precision in glutathione determination and help resolve the complex biochemistry of this molecule in health and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  13. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and its dynamic changes under oxidative stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechmann, Bernd; Liou, Liang-Chun; Koffler, Barbara E; Horvat, Lucija; Tomašić, Ana; Fulgosi, Hrvoje; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione is an important antioxidant in most prokaryotes and eukaryotes. It detoxifies reactive oxygen species and is also involved in the modulation of gene expression, in redox signaling, and in the regulation of enzymatic activities. In this study, the subcellular distribution of glutathione was studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by quantitative immunoelectron microscopy. Highest glutathione contents were detected in mitochondria and subsequently in the cytosol, nuclei, cell walls, and vacuoles. The induction of oxidative stress by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) led to changes in glutathione-specific labeling. Three cell types were identified. Cell types I and II contained more glutathione than control cells. Cell type II differed from cell type I in showing a decrease in glutathione-specific labeling solely in mitochondria. Cell type III contained much less glutathione contents than the control and showed the strongest decrease in mitochondria, suggesting that high and stable levels of glutathione in mitochondria are important for the protection and survival of the cells during oxidative stress. Additionally, large amounts of glutathione were relocated and stored in vacuoles in cell type III, suggesting the importance of the sequestration of glutathione in vacuoles under oxidative stress. PMID:22093747

  14. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis in the liver leads to S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, F; Ochoa, P; Rivas, C; Martin-Lomas, M; Mato, J M; Pajares, M A

    1991-09-01

    The hepatic levels of glutathione in rats treated with buthionine sulfoximine (4 mmol/kg), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, were 72.5% +/- 4.9% of those determined in control animals. This decrease in glutathione concentration was prevented by the administration of glutathione monoethyl ester (7.5 mmol/kg). S-Adenosyl-L-methionine-synthetase activity in the liver of rats treated with buthionine sulfoximine was 39.4% +/- 6.5% of that determined in control animals. Again, glutathione monoethyl ester prevented the effect of buthionine sulfoximine on S-adenosyl-L-methionine-synthetase activity. There was a close correlation (r = 0.936) between the hepatic levels of glutathione and S-adenosyl-L-methionine-synthetase activity. The hepatic concentration of S-adenosyl-L-methionine in buthionine sulfoximine-treated animals was 59.7% +/- 3.7% of that measured in control rats. Contrasting with the protective effects mentioned above, glutathione monoester had no preventive action on buthionine sulfoximine-induced S-adenosyl-L-methionine depletion. Electron microscopic examination of liver samples of rats after buthionine sulfoximine administration showed evidence of liver degeneration, which was attenuated by glutathione monoethyl ester treatment. Glutathione (7.5 mmol/kg) treatment was less effective than glutathione monoethyl ester in attenuating buthionine sulfoximine effects on hepatic S-adenosyl-L-methionine metabolism and morphology. The reduction of S-adenosyl-L-methionine-synthetase activity observed after treatment with buthionine sulfoximine and its prevention by glutathione monoethyl ester, as well as the correlation between the activity of this enzyme and glutathione levels, indicate that glutathione plays an important role in maintaining S-adenosyl-L-methionine-synthetase activity in the liver.

  15. Glutathione: new roles in redox signalling for an old antioxidant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KATIA eAQUILANO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The physiological roles played by the tripeptide glutathione have greatly advanced over the past decades superimposing the research on free radicals, oxidative stress and, more recently, redox signalling. In particular, GSH is involved in nutrient metabolism, antioxidant defence and regulation of cellular metabolic functions ranging from gene expression, DNA and protein synthesis to signal transduction, cell proliferation and apoptosis. This review will be focused on the role of GSH in cell signalling by analysing the more recent advancements about its capability to modulate nitroxidative stress, autophagy and viral infection.

  16. Efficacy of glutathione mesotherapy in burns: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buz, A; Görgülü, T; Olgun, A; Kargi, E

    2016-12-01

    Thermal burns are the leading cause of trauma worldwide. Currently, no consensus on optimal treatment of deep partial-thickness (second-degree) burns has emerged, as reflected by the wide variability in available wound-care materials. The relative efficacies of products used for treatment of partial-thickness thermal burns remain unclear. Mesotherapy features intradermal administration of various agents, depending on burn location. In the present experimental study, we explored the efficacy of mesotherapy used to treat partial-thickness thermal burns in 50 male Wistar rats divided into five groups of equal number. No procedure was performed after infliction of thermal burns in control group (Group 1). Mesotherapy was applied with physiological saline in sham group (Group 2), glutathione, taurine, and L-carnitine were separately applied in Group 3, Group 4, and Group 5, respectively. Mesotherapeutic agents were injected intradermally into the reticular layer of the dermis using the point technique. The first course of mesotherapy was given within the first 2 h after infliction of thermal burns, and therapy was continued to day 10. On day 22, unhealed thermal burn areas were measured prior to sacrifice, and biopsies covering the total areas of burns were performed to allow of pathological evaluation. Group 3 (the glutathione group) showed the best extent of healing, followed by Group 4 (the taurine group) and Group 5 (the L-carnitine group). The healed thermal burn areas in these groups were significantly greater than those in the control and sham groups (P = 0.001). All of healing, acute and chronic inflammation, the amount of granulation tissue, the level of fibroblast maturation, the amount of collagen, the extent of re-epithelization and neovascularization, and ulcer depth were scored upon pathological examination of tissue cross-sections. The best outcomes were evident in the glutathione group, with statistical significance. Although wound healing in the L

  17. Glutathione S-Transferase Enzyme Gene Polymorphisms and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Yigit

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases still ranks in first place among causes of death around the world. Environmental and genetic factors both play roles in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. One of the genetic changes that are claimed to contribute to the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases is the Glutathione S-Transferase (GST family that has been intensely examined recently. GST gene polymorphisms, which are among antioxidant system enzymes, have a relationship with each of the factors that are considered among the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Consequently, it can be said that the polymorphisms of GST genes are effective both in the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases and directly in cardiovascular diseases.

  18. The Impact of Early Visual Deprivation on Spatial Hearing: A Comparison between Totally and Partially Visually Deprived Children

    OpenAIRE

    Cappagli, Giulia; Finocchietti, Sara; Cocchi, Elena; Gori, Monica

    2017-01-01

    The specific role of early visual deprivation on spatial hearing is still unclear, mainly due to the difficulty of comparing similar spatial skills at different ages and to the difficulty in recruiting young blind children from birth. In this study, the effects of early visual deprivation on the development of auditory spatial localization have been assessed in a group of seven 3–5 years old children with congenital blindness (n = 2; light perception or no perception of light) or low vision (...

  19. Walkability around primary schools and area deprivation across Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Laura; McCrorie, Paul; Nicholls, Natalie; Ellaway, Anne

    2016-04-14

    A number of studies based in the US, Canada, and Australia, have found evidence of associations between the built environment (BE) and mode of transport to school, and links between active travel and deprivation. Limited research in the UK compares potential BE supports for walking to school by area deprivation. Within this study, we gathered data on BE attributes previously linked to active travel, i.e., street/path connectivity, and dwelling density, created a composite 'walkability score' (WS) for areas around primary schools across urban Scotland, and explored whether poorer areas exhibit lower scores than more affluent areas, or vice versa. We consider this to be a novel approach as few studies have compared BE features by deprivation across a whole country. Address and road/path maps were obtained and primary schools (N = 937) across mainland Scotland were mapped. Schools were attributed income deprivation scores (scores divided into quintiles (Q1: least deprived, Q5: most deprived)). Catchment area (CA) boundaries, i.e., the geographic area representing eligibility for local school attendance, were drawn around schools, and WS calculated for each CA. We compared mean WS by income quintile (ANOVA), for all local authorities (LAs) combined (N = 29), and separately for the four LAs with the greatest number of schools included in the analysis. For all LAs combined, the least deprived quintile (Q1) showed a significantly lower WS (-0.61), than quintiles 3, 4 and 5 (Q2: -0.04 (non-sig), Q3: 0.38, Q4: 0.09, Q5: 0.18); while for Glasgow the second least deprived quintile (Q2) showed significantly higher WS (Q1: 1.35, Q2: 1.73), than middling (Q3: 0.18) and most deprived quintiles (Q4: 0.06, Q5: -0.10). WS differ by deprivation with patterns varying depending on the spatial scale of the analysis. It is essential that less walkable areas are provided with the resources to improve opportunities to engage in active travel.

  20. Contrast-balanced binocular treatment in children with deprivation amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Lisa M; Chen, Zidong; Li, Jinrong; Dai, Shuan; Black, Joanna; Yuan, Junpeng; Yu, Minbin; Thompson, Benjamin

    2017-11-28

    Children with deprivation amblyopia due to childhood cataract have been excluded from much of the emerging research into amblyopia treatment. An investigation was conducted to determine whether contrast-balanced binocular treatment - a strategy currently being explored for children with anisometropic and strabismic amblyopia - may be effective in children with deprivation amblyopia. An unmasked, case-series design intended to assess proof of principle was employed. Eighteen children with deprivation amblyopia due to childhood cataracts (early bilateral n = 7, early unilateral n = 7, developmental n = 4), as well as 10 children with anisometropic (n = 8) or mixed anisometropic and strabismic amblyopia (n = 2) were prescribed one hour a day of treatment over a six-week period. Supervised treatment was available. Visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, global motion perception and interocular suppression were measured pre- and post-treatment. Visual acuity improvements occurred in the anisometropic/strabismic group (0.15 ± 0.05 logMAR, p = 0.014), but contrast sensitivity did not change. As a group, children with deprivation amblyopia had a smaller but statistically significant improvement in weaker eye visual acuity (0.09 ± 0.03 logMAR, p = 0.004), as well a significant improvement in weaker eye contrast sensitivity (p = 0.004). Subgroup analysis suggested that the children with early bilateral deprivation had the largest improvements, while children with early unilateral cataract did not improve. Interestingly, binocular contrast sensitivity also improved in children with early bilateral deprivation. Global motion perception improved for both subgroups with early visual deprivation, as well as children with anisometropic or mixed anisometropic/strabismic amblyopia. Interocular suppression improved for all subgroups except children with early unilateral deprivation. These data suggest that supervised contrast-balanced binocular

  1. Single-bilayer graphene oxide sheet tolerance and glutathione redox system significance assessment in faba bean ( Vicia faba L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Naser A.; Singh, Neetu; Singh, Manoj K.; Shah, Zahoor A.; Duarte, Armando C.; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2013-07-01

    Adsorbents based on single-bilayer graphene oxide sheet (hereafter termed "graphene oxide") are widely used in contaminated environments cleanup which may easily open the avenues for their entry to different environmental compartments, exposure to organisms and their subsequent transfer to human/animal food chain. Considering a common food crop—faba bean ( Vicia faba L.) germinating seedlings as a model plant system, this study assesses the V. faba-tolerance to different concentrations (0, 100, 200, 400, 800, and 1600 mg L-1) of graphene oxide (0.5-5 μm) and evaluates glutathione (γ-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine) redox system significance in this context. The results showed significantly increased V. faba sensitivity under three graphene oxide concentrations (in order of impact: 1,600 > 200 > 100 mg graphene oxide L-1), which was accompanied by decreased glutathione redox (reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione) ratio, reduced glutathione pool, as well as significant and equally elevated activities of glutathione-regenerating (glutathione reductase) and glutathione-metabolizing (glutathione peroxidase; glutathione sulfo-transferase) enzymes. Contrarily, the two graphene oxide concentrations (in order of impact: 800 > 400 graphene oxide mg L-1) yielded promising results; where, significant improvements in V. faba health status (measured as increased graphene oxide tolerance) were clearly perceptible with increased ratio of the reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione, reduced glutathione pool and glutathione reductase activity but decreased activities of glutathione-metabolizing enzymes. It is inferred that V. faba seedlings-sensitivity and/or tolerance to graphene oxide concentrations depends on both the cellular redox state (reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione ratio) and the reduced glutathione pool which in turn are controlled by a finely tuned modulation of the coordination between glutathione-regenerating and glutathione-metabolizing enzymes.

  2. Deprivations, futures and the wrongness of killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, D

    2001-12-01

    In my essay, Why abortion is immoral, I criticised discussions of the morality of abortion in which the crucial issue is whether fetuses are human beings or whether fetuses are persons. Both argument strategies are inadequate because they rely on indefensible assumptions. Why should being a human being or being a person make a moral difference? I argued that the correct account of the morality of abortion should be based upon a defensible account of why killing children and adults is wrong. I claimed that what makes killing us wrong is that our premature deaths deprive us of our futures of value, that is, the goods of life we would have experienced had we survived. This account of the wrongness of killing explains why killing is one of the worst of crimes and how killing greatly harms the victim. It coheres with the attitudes of those with cancer or HIV facing premature death. It explains why we believe it is wrong to kill infants (as personhood theories do not). It does not entail that it wrongs a human being to end her life if she is in persistent vegetative state or if her future must consist only of unbearable physical suffering and she wants to die (as sanctity of human life theories do not). This account of the wrongness of killing implies (with some defensible additional assumptions) that abortion is immoral because we were fetuses once and we know those fetuses had futures of value. Mark Brown claims that this potential future of value account is unsound because it implies that we have welfare rights to what we need to stay alive that most people would reject. I argue that Brown is incorrect in two ways: a welfare right to what we need to stay alive is not directly implied by my account and, in addition, most of us do believe that dependent human beings have substantial welfare rights to what they need to stay alive. Brown argues that depriving us of a future of value of which we have mental representations both is a better explanation of the wrongness of

  3. Interspecific variation for thermal dependence of glutathione reductase in sainfoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidambi, S P; Mahan, J R; Matches, A G

    1990-05-01

    Understanding the biochemical and physiological consequences of species variation would expedite improvement in agronomically useful genotypes of sainfoin (Onobrychis spp.) Information on variation among sainfoin species is lacking on thermal dependence of glutathione reductase (B.C. 1.6.4.2.), which plays an important role in the protection of plants from both high and low temperature stresses by preventing harmful oxidation of enzymes and membranes. Our objective was to investigate the interspecific variation for thermal dependency of glutathione reductase in sainfoin. Large variation among species was found for: (i) the minimum apparent Km (0.4-2.5 μM NADPH), (ii) the temperature at which the minimum apparent Km was observed (15°-5°C), and (iii) the thermal kinetic windows (2°-30°C width) over a 15°-45°C temperature gradient. In general, tetraploid species had narrower (≤17°C) thermal kinetic windows than did diploid species (∼30°C), with one exception among the diploids. Within the tetraploid species, the cultivars of O. viciifolia had a broader thermal kinetic window (≥7°C) than the plant introduction (PI 212241, >2 °C) itself.

  4. A glutathione s-transferase confers herbicide tolerance in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingzhang Hu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant glutathione S-transferases (GSTs have been a focus of attention due to their role in herbicide detoxification. OsGSTL2 is a glutathione S-transferase, lambda class gene from rice (Oryza sativa L.. Transgenic rice plants over-expressing OsGSTL2 were generated from rice calli by the use of an Agrobacterium transformation system, and were screened by a combination of hygromycin resistance, PCR and Southern blot analysis. In the vegetative tissues of transgenic rice plants, the over-expression of OsGSTL2 not only increased levels of OsGSTL2 transcripts, but also GST and GPX expression, while reduced superoxide. Transgenic rice plants also showed higher tolerance to glyphosate and chlorsulfuron, which often contaminate agricultural fields. The findings demonstrate the detoxification role of OsGSTL2 in the growth and development of rice plants. It should be possible to apply the present results to crops for developing herbicide tolerance and for limiting herbicide contamination in the food chain.

  5. The role of glutathione transferases in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćorić Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence suggest that members of the subfamily of cytosolic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs possess roles far beyond the classical glutathione-dependent enzymatic conjugation of electrophilic metabolites and xenobiotics. Namely, monomeric forms of certain GSTs are capable of forming protein: protein interactions with protein kinases and regulate cell apoptotic pathways. Due to this dual functionality of cytosolic GSTs, they might be implicated in both the development and the progression of renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Prominent genetic heterogeneity, resulting from the gene deletions, as well as from SNPs in the coding and non-coding regions of GST genes, might affect GST isoenzyme profiles in renal parenchyma and therefore serve as a valuable indicator for predicting the risk of cancer development. Namely, GSTs are involved in the biotransformation of several compounds recognized as risk factors for RCC. The most potent carcinogen of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon diol epoxides, present in cigarette smoke, is of benzo(apyrene (BPDE, detoxified by GSTs. So far, the relationship between GST genotype and BPDE-DNA adduct formation, in determining the risk for RCC, has not been evaluated in patients with RCC. Although the association between certain individual and combined GST genotypes and RCC risk has been debated in a the literature, the data on the prognostic value of GST polymorphism in patients with RCC are scarce, probably due to the fact that the molecular mechanism supporting the role of GSTs in RCC progression has not been clarified as yet.

  6. Reactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin with reduced glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheluvappa, Rajkumar; Shimmon, Ronald; Dawson, Michael; Hilmer, Sarah N; Le Couteur, David G

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common cause of chronic and recurrent lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) whose sputa contain copious quantities of P. aeruginosa toxin, pyocyanin. Pyocyanin triggers tissue damage mainly by its redox cycling and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The reactions between reduced glutathione (GSH) and pyocyanin were observed using absorption spectra from spectrophotometry and the reaction products analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Pyocyanin reacted with GSH non-enzymatically at 37 degrees C resulting in the production of red-brown products, spectophotometrically visible as a 480 nm maximum absorption peak after 24 h of incubation. The reaction was concentration-dependent on reduced glutathione but not on pyocyanin. Minimizing the accessibility of oxygen to the reaction decreased its rate. The anti-oxidant enzyme catalase circumvented the reaction. Proton-NMR analysis demonstrated the persistence of the original aromatic ring and the methyl-group of pyocyanin in the red-brown products. Anti-oxidant agents having thiol groups produced similar spectophotometrically visible peaks. The presence of a previously unidentified non-enzymatic GSH-dependent metabolic pathway for pyocyanin has thus been identified. The reaction between pyocyanin and GSH is concentration-, time-, and O(2)-dependent. The formation of H(2)O(2) as an intermediate and the thiol group in GSH seem to be important in this reaction.

  7. Acrolein-detoxifying isozymes of glutathione transferase in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Jun'ichi; Ishibashi, Asami; Muneuchi, Hitoshi; Morita, Chihiro; Sakai, Hiroki; Biswas, Md Sanaullah; Koeduka, Takao; Kitajima, Sakihito

    2017-02-01

    Acrolein is a lipid-derived highly reactive aldehyde, mediating oxidative signal and damage in plants. We found acrolein-scavenging glutathione transferase activity in plants and purified a low K M isozyme from spinach. Various environmental stressors on plants cause the generation of acrolein, a highly toxic aldehyde produced from lipid peroxides, via the promotion of the formation of reactive oxygen species, which oxidize membrane lipids. In mammals, acrolein is scavenged by glutathione transferase (GST; EC 2.5.1.18) isozymes of Alpha, Pi, and Mu classes, but plants lack these GST classes. We detected the acrolein-scavenging GST activity in four species of plants, and purified an isozyme showing this activity from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves. The isozyme (GST-Acr), obtained after an affinity chromatography and two ion exchange chromatography steps, showed the K M value for acrolein 93 μM, the smallest value known for acrolein-detoxifying enzymes in plants. Peptide sequence homology search revealed that GST-Acr belongs to the GST Tau, a plant-specific class. The Arabidopsis thaliana GST Tau19, which has the closest sequence similar to spinach GST-Acr, also showed a high catalytic efficiency for acrolein. These results suggest that GST plays as a scavenger for acrolein in plants.

  8. Glutathione-mediated biodegradable polyurethanes derived from L-arabinitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paz, M Violante; Zamora, Francisca; Begines, Belén; Ferris, Cristina; Galbis, Juan A

    2010-01-11

    The synthesis, characterization, and some properties of new glutathione-mediated biodegradable sugar-based copolyurethanes are described. These copolyurethanes were obtained by polyaddition reaction of mixtures of 2,2'-dithiodiethanol (DiT) and 2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-L-arabinitol (ArBn) or 2,3,4-tri-O-methyl-L-arabinitol (ArMe) to 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI). The copolymer compositions were studied by elemental microanalyses and (1)H NMR, revealing that the content of the copolymer units is in all cases very similar to that of their corresponding feed. The PU(DiT-HMDI) homopolymer exhibited a high crystallinity, but the introduction of the arabinitol-based diols led to a reduction in the crystallinity of the copolymers. In their TG curves, the copolymers exhibited a mixed trend of the related homopolymers, and all of them were thermally stable, with degradation temperatures above 220 degrees C. The degradation properties of the macromolecules under physiological conditions in the presence of glutathione were tested. All the copolyurethanes proved to be biodegradable under the experimental conditions (pH = 7.02 and 37 degrees C). The degradation pattern of the copolymers depended not only on the dithiodiethanol (DiT) reactive units ratio in the polymer backbone, but also on the crystallinity of the macromolecule.

  9. Regulation of melanization by glutathione in the moth Pseudoplusia includens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kevin D; Lu, Zhiqiang; Strand, Michael R

    2010-06-01

    The phenoloxidase (PO) cascade regulates the melanization of hemolymph, which serves as a conserved humoral immune response in insects and other arthropods. The reductant glutathione (GSH) has long been used to inhibit melanization of hemolymph from insects but whether GSH levels in hemolymph are sufficient to play a physiological role in regulating melanization is unknown. Here, we characterized the abundance and effects of GSH on the melanization of plasma from larval stage Pseudoplusia includens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). GSH concentration in newly collected plasma from day two fifth instars ranged from 50 to 115 microM, while the titer of tyrosine, a substrate for the PO cascade, was 141 microM. GSH titers rapidly declined in plasma after collection from larvae, but no melanin formation occurred until GSH levels fell below 20 microM. Added GSH dose-dependently blocked melanization while PO substrates overrode GSH inhibition. Experiments conducted in the absence of oxygen and presence of PO cascade inhibitors further suggested that depletion of GSH from plasma was primarily due to formation of reactive intermediates produced by activated PO. Additional studies identified hemocytes as a potential source of plasma GSH. Hemocyte lysates recycled oxidized glutathione (GSSG) into GSH using NADPH, while intact hemocytes released GSH into the medium. These results suggest that in addition to protease cascade-related mechanisms that regulate phenoloxidase, GSH exerts another level of control on melanization of insect hemolymph. (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Sleep Deprivation Impairs the Accurate Recognition of Human Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Helm, Els; Gujar, Ninad; Walker, Matthew P.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Investigate the impact of sleep deprivation on the ability to recognize the intensity of human facial emotions. Design: Randomized total sleep-deprivation or sleep-rested conditions, involving between-group and within-group repeated measures analysis. Setting: Experimental laboratory study. Participants: Thirty-seven healthy participants, (21 females) aged 18–25 y, were randomly assigned to the sleep control (SC: n = 17) or total sleep deprivation group (TSD: n = 20). Interventions: Participants performed an emotional face recognition task, in which they evaluated 3 different affective face categories: Sad, Happy, and Angry, each ranging in a gradient from neutral to increasingly emotional. In the TSD group, the task was performed once under conditions of sleep deprivation, and twice under sleep-rested conditions following different durations of sleep recovery. In the SC group, the task was performed twice under sleep-rested conditions, controlling for repeatability. Measurements and Results: In the TSD group, when sleep-deprived, there was a marked and significant blunting in the recognition of Angry and Happy affective expressions in the moderate (but not extreme) emotional intensity range; differences that were most reliable and significant in female participants. No change in the recognition of Sad expressions was observed. These recognition deficits were, however, ameliorated following one night of recovery sleep. No changes in task performance were observed in the SC group. Conclusions: Sleep deprivation selectively impairs the accurate judgment of human facial emotions, especially threat relevant (Anger) and reward relevant (Happy) categories, an effect observed most significantly in females. Such findings suggest that sleep loss impairs discrete affective neural systems, disrupting the identification of salient affective social cues. Citation: van der Helm E; Gujar N; Walker MP. Sleep deprivation impairs the accurate recognition of human

  11. Deprivation, occupational hazards and perinatal outcomes in pregnant workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrotin, J-B; Vaissière, M; Etaix, M; Dziurla, M; Radauceanu, A; Malard, S; Lafon, D

    2017-01-01

    Recent global economic difficulties have widened social inequalities, but their impact on pregnant workers is not known. To investigate the association between deprivation, exposure to occupational hazards and adverse perinatal outcomes in pregnant workers. A cross-sectional study performed in 2014 in French occupational health services. Eligible workers were women who had worked during their pregnancy and had a medical visit by occupational health physicians (OHPs) after delivery and at the time of returning to work. Deprivation was measured using the EPICES scale (Evaluation of Precariousness and Inequalities in Health Examination Centres). Information on birth outcomes was self-reported. Occupational risks for pregnancy were assessed by OHPs. Jobs were coded by the occupational health team using standardized French nomenclature. The groups (deprivation/no deprivation) were compared using univariate (chi-squared test) and multivariate Poisson regression analyses. Of 1402 pregnant workers, 293 (21%) were classed as deprived. This group more frequently encountered occupational hazards, particularly for physical exposures (P occupational hazards of three or more for pregnancy [adjusted relative risk (RRa) = 4.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.2-7.9]. Our findings suggest that deprivation and exposure to three or more occupational hazards during pregnancy cumulatively increased the risk of pre-term birth (RRa = 3.9; 95% CI 1.2-12.4). Our data suggest that deprived pregnant workers are an occupationally vulnerable group. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Impact of Acute Sleep Deprivation on Sarcasm Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliens, Gaétane; Stercq, Fanny; Mary, Alison; Slama, Hichem; Cleeremans, Axel; Peigneux, Philippe; Kissine, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that sleep plays a pivotal role on health, cognition and emotional regulation. However, the interplay between sleep and social cognition remains an uncharted research area. In particular, little is known about the impact of sleep deprivation on sarcasm detection, an ability which, once altered, may hamper everyday social interactions. The aim of this study is to determine whether sleep-deprived participants are as able as sleep-rested participants to adopt another perspective in gauging sarcastic statements. At 9am, after a whole night of sleep (n = 15) or a sleep deprivation night (n = 15), participants had to read the description of an event happening to a group of friends. An ambiguous voicemail message left by one of the friends on another's phone was then presented, and participants had to decide whether the recipient would perceive the message as sincere or as sarcastic. Messages were uttered with a neutral intonation and were either: (1) sarcastic from both the participant's and the addressee's perspectives (i.e. both had access to the relevant background knowledge to gauge the message as sarcastic), (2) sarcastic from the participant's but not from the addressee's perspective (i.e. the addressee lacked context knowledge to detect sarcasm) or (3) sincere. A fourth category consisted in messages sarcastic from both the participant's and from the addressee's perspective, uttered with a sarcastic tone. Although sleep-deprived participants were as accurate as sleep-rested participants in interpreting the voice message, they were also slower. Blunted reaction time was not fully explained by generalized cognitive slowing after sleep deprivation; rather, it could reflect a compensatory mechanism supporting normative accuracy level in sarcasm understanding. Introducing prosodic cues compensated for increased processing difficulties in sarcasm detection after sleep deprivation. Our findings support the hypothesis that sleep deprivation might

  13. Impact of partial sleep deprivation on immune markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, A; Mustafa, F B; Earnest, A; Gen, L; Macary, P A

    2013-10-01

    Sleep quality is considered to be an important predictor of immunity. Lack of sleep therefore may reduce immunity, thereby increasing the susceptibility to respiratory pathogens. A previous study showed that reduced sleep duration was associated with an increased likelihood of the common cold. It is important to understand the role of sleep in altering immune responses to understand how sleep deprivation leads to an increased susceptibility to the common cold or other respiratory infections. We sought to examine the impact of partial sleep deprivation on various immune markers. Fifty-two healthy volunteers were partially sleep deprived for one night. We took blood samples before the sleep deprivation, immediately after, and 4 and 7 days after sleep deprivation. We measured various immune markers and used a generalized estimating equation (GEE) to examine the differences in the repeated measures. CD4, CD8, CD14, and CD16 all showed significant time-dependent changes, but CD3 did not. The most striking time-dependent change was observed for the mitogen proliferation assay and for HLA-DR. There was a significant decrease in the mitogen proliferation values and HLA-DR immediately after the sleep deprivation experiment, which started to rise again on day 4 and normalized by day 7. The transiently impaired mitogen proliferation, the decreased HLA-DR, the upregulated CD14, and the variations in CD4 and CD8 that we observed in temporal relationship with partial sleep deprivation could be one possible explanation for the increased susceptibility to respiratory infections reported after reduced sleep duration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Decreased cortical response to verbal working memory following sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Qiwen; Nahas, Ziad; Johnson, Kevin A; Yamanaka, Kaori; Mishory, Alexander; Koola, Jejo; Hill, Sarah; Horner, Michael D; Bohning, Daryl E; George, Mark S

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the cerebral hemodynamic response to verbal working memory following sleep deprivation. Subjects were scheduled for 3 functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning visits: an initial screening day (screening state), after a normal night of sleep (rested state), and after 30 hours of sleep deprivation (sleep-deprivation state). Subjects performed the Sternberg working memory task alternated with a control task during an approximate 13-minute functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Inpatient General Clinical Research Center and outpatient functional magnetic resonance imaging center. Results from 33 men (mean age, 28.6 +/- 6.6 years) were included in the final analyses. None. Subjects performed the same Sternberg working memory task at the 3 states within the magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Neuroimaging data revealed that, in the screening and rested states, the brain regions activated by the Sternberg working memory task were found in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, Broca's area, supplementary motor area, right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, and the bilateral posterior parietal cortexes. After 30 hours of sleep deprivation, the activations in these brain regions significantly decreased, especially in the bilateral posterior parietal cortices. Task performance also decreased. A repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed that subjects at the screening and rested states had similar activation patterns, with each having significantly more activation than during the sleep-deprivation state. These results suggest that human sleep-deprivation deficits are not caused solely or even predominantly by prefrontal cortex dysfunction and that the paretal cortex, in particular, and other brain regions involved in verbal working memory exhibit significant sleep-deprivation vulnerability.

  15. Impact of Acute Sleep Deprivation on Sarcasm Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaétane Deliens

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that sleep plays a pivotal role on health, cognition and emotional regulation. However, the interplay between sleep and social cognition remains an uncharted research area. In particular, little is known about the impact of sleep deprivation on sarcasm detection, an ability which, once altered, may hamper everyday social interactions. The aim of this study is to determine whether sleep-deprived participants are as able as sleep-rested participants to adopt another perspective in gauging sarcastic statements. At 9am, after a whole night of sleep (n = 15 or a sleep deprivation night (n = 15, participants had to read the description of an event happening to a group of friends. An ambiguous voicemail message left by one of the friends on another's phone was then presented, and participants had to decide whether the recipient would perceive the message as sincere or as sarcastic. Messages were uttered with a neutral intonation and were either: (1 sarcastic from both the participant's and the addressee's perspectives (i.e. both had access to the relevant background knowledge to gauge the message as sarcastic, (2 sarcastic from the participant's but not from the addressee's perspective (i.e. the addressee lacked context knowledge to detect sarcasm or (3 sincere. A fourth category consisted in messages sarcastic from both the participant's and from the addressee's perspective, uttered with a sarcastic tone. Although sleep-deprived participants were as accurate as sleep-rested participants in interpreting the voice message, they were also slower. Blunted reaction time was not fully explained by generalized cognitive slowing after sleep deprivation; rather, it could reflect a compensatory mechanism supporting normative accuracy level in sarcasm understanding. Introducing prosodic cues compensated for increased processing difficulties in sarcasm detection after sleep deprivation. Our findings support the hypothesis that sleep

  16. Enhancement of Combined Umami and Salty Taste by Glutathione in the Human Tongue and Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tazuko K; Yeung, Andy Wai Kan; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Ito, Yuki; Jung, Han-Sung; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-09-01

    Glutathione, a natural substance, acts on calcium receptors on the tongue and is known to enhance basic taste sensations. However, the effects of glutathione on brain activity associated with taste sensation on the tongue have not been determined under standardized taste delivery conditions. In this study, we investigated the sensory effect of glutathione on taste with no effect of the smell when glutathione added to a combined umami and salty taste stimulus. Twenty-six volunteers (12 women and 14 men; age 19-27 years) performed a sensory evaluation of taste of a solution of monosodium L-glutamate and sodium chloride, with and without glutathione. The addition of glutathione changed taste qualities and significantly increased taste intensity ratings under standardized taste delivery conditions (P umami and salty mixture. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Glutathione production from mannan-based bioresource by mannanase/mannosidase expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prima, Alex; Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Djohan, Apridah Cameliawati; Kashiwagi, Norimasa; Kahar, Prihardi; Ishii, Jun; Nakayama, Hideki; Okazaki, Fumiyoshi; Prasetya, Bambang; Kondo, Akihiko; Yopi; Ogino, Chiaki

    2017-12-01

    This work aims to produce glutathione directly from mannan-based bioresources using engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mannan proved to be a valuable carbon source for glutathione production by this organism. Mannan-hydrolyzing S. cerevisiae was developed by heterologous expression of mannanase/mannosidase on its cell surface. This strain efficiently produced glutathione from mannose polysaccharide, β-1,4-mannan. Furthermore, it produced glutathione from locust bean gum (LBG), a highly dense and inexpensive mannan-based bioresource, as sole carbon source. Glutathione productivity from LBG was enhanced by engineering the glutathione metabolism of mannan-hydrolyzing S. cerevisiae. Expression of extracellular mannanase/mannosidase protein combined with intracellular metabolic engineering is potentially applicable to the efficient, environmentally friendly bioproduction of targeted products from mannan-based bioresources. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Extraction of glutathione from EFB fermentation waste using methanol with sonication process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muryanto, Muryanto; Alvin, Nurdin, Muhammad; Hanifah, Ummu; Sudiyani, Yanni

    2017-11-01

    Glutathione is important compound on the human body. Glutathione have a widely use at pharmacy and cosmetics as detoxification, skin whitening agent, antioxidant and many other. This study aims to obtain glutathione from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in fermentation waste of second generation bioethanol. The remaining yeast in the empty fruit bunch (EFB) fermentation was separated from the fermentation solution use centrifugation process and then extracted using a methanol-water solution. The extraction process was done by maceration which was assisted by sonication process. Solvent concentration and time of sonication were varied to see its effect on glutathione concentration. The concentration of glutathione from the extraction process was analyzed using alloxan method with UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The results show that the highest glutathione concentration was approximately 1.32 g/L obtained with methanol solvent at 90 minutes of maceration following with 15 minutes sonication.

  19. [Effects of chronic partial sleep deprivation on growth and learning/memory in young rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fan; Shen, Xiao-Ming; Li, Sheng-Hui; Cui, Mao-Long; Zhang, Yin; Wang, Cheng; Yu, Xiao-Gang; Yan, Chong-Huai

    2009-02-01

    The effects of sleep deprivation on the immature brain remain unknown. Based on a computer controlled chronic sleep deprivation animal model, the effects of chronic partial sleep deprivation on growth, learning and memory in young rats were explored. Twelve weaned male Spraque-Dawley rats (3-week-old) were randomly divided into sleep deprivation, test control and blank control groups. Sleep deprivation was performed using computer-controlled "disc-over-water" technique at 8-11 am daily, for 14 days. The temperature and weights were measured every 7 days. Morris water maze was used to test spatial learning and memory abilities before and 7 and 14 days after sleep deprivation. After 14 days of sleep deprivation, the rats were sacrificed for weighting their major organs. After 14 days of sleep deprivation, the rats' temperature increased significantly. During the sleep deprivation, the rate of weight gain in the sleep deprivation group was much slower than that in the test control and blank control groups. The thymus of the rats subjected to sleep deprivation was much lighter than that of the blank control group. After 7 days of sleep deprivation, the rats showed slower acquisition of reference memory, but were capable of successfully performing the task by repeated exposure to the test. Such impairment of reference memory was not seen 14 days after sleep deprivation. Chronic sleep deprivation can affect growth of immature rats, as well as their abilities to acquire spatial reference memory.

  20. Glutathione Preservation during Storage of Rat Lenses in Optisol-GS and Castor Oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Thomas; Brøgger-Jensen, Martin Rocho; Johnson, Leif

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione concentration in the lens decreases in aging and cataractous lenses, providing a marker for tissue condition. Experimental procedures requiring unfrozen lenses from donor banks rely on transportation in storage medium, affecting lens homeostasis and alterations in glutathione levels....... The aim of the study was to examine the effects of Optisol-GS and castor oil on lens condition, determined from their ability to maintain glutathione concentrations....

  1. Profiling patterns of glutathione reductase inhibition by the natural product illudin S and its acylfulvene analogues

    OpenAIRE

    LIU, XIAODAN; Sturla, Shana J.

    2009-01-01

    Acylfulvenes (AFs) are a class of antitumor agents with favorable cytotoxic selectivity profiles compared to their natural product precursor, illudin S. Like many alkylating agents, illudin S and AFs readily react with thiol-containing small molecules such as cysteine, glutathione and cysteine-containing peptides; reduced cellular glutathione levels can affect illudin S toxicity. Glutathione reductase (GR) is a critical cellular anti-oxidant enzyme that regulates the intracellular ratio of re...

  2. Further structure?activity relationships study of substituted dithiolethiones as glutathione-inducing neuroprotective agents

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Dennis A.; Betharia, Swati; Yen, Jui-Hung; Kuo, Ping-Chang; Mistry, Hitesh

    2016-01-01

    Background Parkinson?s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with oxidative stress and glutathione depletion. The induction of cellular glutathione levels by exogenous molecules is a promising neuroprotective approach to limit the oxidative damage that characterizes Parkinson?s disease pathophysiology. Dithiolethiones, a class of sulfur-containing heterocyclic molecules, are known to increase cellular levels of glutathione; however, limited information is available regarding the ...

  3. Histochemical localization of glutathione dependent NBT-reductase in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Y

    2001-09-01

    Localization of the glutathione dependent Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reductase in fresh frozen sections of mouse skin and possible dependence of NBT reductase on tissue thiol levels has been investigated. The fresh frozen tissue sections (8 m thickness) were prepared and incubated in medium containing NBT, reduced glutathione (GSH) and phosphate buffer. The staining for GSH was performed with mercury orange. The activity of the NBT-reductase in mouse skin has been found to be localized in the areas rich in glutathione and actively proliferating area of the skin. The activity of the NBT-reductase seems to be dependent on the glutathione contents.

  4. Peroxidase-catalyzed-3-(glutathion-S-yl)-p,p'-biphenol formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGirr, L G; Subrahmanyam, V V; Moore, G A; O'Brien, P J

    1986-10-15

    Oxidation of p,p'-biphenol with horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-hydrogen peroxide in the presence of bovine serum albumin or with bone marrow cell homogenate-hydrogen peroxide resulted in the formation of reactive products that conjugate with protein. Glutathione prevented the protein binding. Glutathione readily reacted with p,p'-biphenoquinone, the principal oxidation product of p,p'-biphenol in the HRP-hydrogen peroxide system and resulted in the formation of several glutathione conjugates, p,p'-biphenol and small amounts of oxidized glutathione. The major glutathione conjugate was identified as 3-(glutathion-S-yl)-p,p'-biphenol by high field nuclear magnetic resonance and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. The same conjugate was formed in the bone marrow homogenate-hydrogen peroxide system. p,p'-Biphenoquinone reduction by glutathione to p,p'-biphenol without glutathione oxidation was explained by the rapid reduction of p,p'-biphenoquinone by 3-(glutathion-S-yl)-p,p'-biphenol.

  5. Stereochemical aspects of the glutathione S-transferase-catalyzed conjugations of alkyl halides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgewell, R E; Abdel-Monem, M M

    1987-01-01

    (R,S)-2-iodooctane and (R,S)-2-bromooctane were found to be substrates for the glutathione S-transferases from rat liver. The conjugation reactions of the enantiomeric 2-halooctanes and glutathione were found to proceed with inversion of configuration at the chiral carbon of the substrate. Selective titration of the free cysteine residues of the glutathione S-transferases provided no observable effect on the stereochemical course of these conjugation reactions. No evidence for substrate stereoselectivity was observed. The diastereomeric S-(2-octyl)glutathiones were produced in approximately equal amounts from racemic 2-halooctane substrates. With S-(+)-2-iodooctane as the electrophilic substrate, a biphasic double reciprocal plot of glutathione concentration vs. initial velocity of product formation was observed suggesting complex kinetics. The S-2-octylglutathione diastereomers were found to be potent inhibitors of the glutathione S-transferase-catalyzed conjugation of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. These results provide support for a single displacement mechanism for the conjugation of 2-halooctanes and glutathione catalyzed by the glutathione S-transferases with product inhibition at low glutathione concentrations.

  6. A review of sleep deprivation studies evaluating the brain transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Alisa S; Huber, Jason D; O'Callaghan, James P; Rosen, Charles L; Miller, Diane B

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show a positive association between adequate sleep and good health. Further, disrupted sleep may increase the risk for CNS diseases, such as stroke and Alzheimer's disease. However, there has been limited progress in determining how sleep is linked to brain health or how sleep disruption may increase susceptibility to brain insult and disease. Animal studies can aid in understanding these links. In reviewing the animal literature related to the effects of sleep disruption on the brain, we found most of the work was directed toward investigating and characterizing the role of various brain areas or structures in initiating and regulating sleep. In contrast, limited effort has been directed towards understanding how sleep disruption alters the brain's health or susceptibility to insult. We also note many current studies have determined the changes in the brain following compromised sleep by examining, for example, the brain transcriptome or to a more limited extent the proteome. However, these studies have utilized almost exclusively total sleep deprivation (e.g., 24 out of 24 hours) paradigms or single short periods of limited acute sleep deprivation (e.g., 3 out of 24 hours). While such strategies are beneficial in understanding how sleep is controlled, they may not have much translational value for determining links between sleep and brain health or for determining how sleep disruption may increase brain susceptibility to insult. Surprisingly, few studies have determined how the duration and recurrence of sleep deprivation influence the effects seen after sleep deprivation. Our aim in this review was to identify relevant rodent studies from 1980 through 2012 and analyze those that use varying durations of sleep deprivation or restriction in their effort to evaluate the effects of sleep deprivation on the brain transcriptome and to a more limited extent the proteome. We examined how differences in the duration of sleep deprivation affect

  7. Molecularly imprinted polymer for glutathione by modified precipitation polymerization and its application to determination of glutathione in supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yukari; Masumoto, Shizuka; Matsunaga, Hisami; Haginaka, Jun

    2017-09-10

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) particles for glutathione (GSH) with a narrow particle size distribution were prepared by modified precipitation polymerization using methacrylic acid as a functional monomer, divinylbenzene as a crosslinker and water as a co-solvent. The particle diameters of the MIP and non-imprinted polymer (NIP) prepared under the optimum conditions were 3.81±0.95 (average±standard deviation) and 3.39±1.22μm, respectively. The retention and molecular-recognition properties of the prepared MIP were evaluated using a mixture of acetonitrile and water as a mobile phase in hydrophilic interaction chromatography. With an increase of acetonitrile content, the retention factor of GSH was increased on the MIP. In addition to shape recognition, hydrophilic interactions seem to work for the recognition of GSH on the MIP. The MIP had a specific molecular-recognition ability for GSH, while glutathione disulfide, l-Glu, l-Cys, Gly-Gly and l-Cys-Gly could not be retained or recognized on the MIP. The effect of column temperature revealed that the separation of GSH on the MIP was entropically driven. Binding experiments and Scatchard analyses revealed that one binding sites were formed on both the MIP and NIP, while the MIP gave higher affinity and capacity for GSH than the NIP. Furthermore, the MIP was successfully applied for determination of GSH in the supplements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Associating gender with neighbourhood deprivation in Lagos State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojikutu, Rasheed Kola

    2009-08-01

    The study examines the effect of neighborhood deprivation on gender. It shows that most residents are deprived and that though, in Lagos State, the gender differences in the level of deprivation may not be too pronounced, yet, women, because of their socio-traditional roles in the society are more at a receiving end. There is gender difference in the distance an individual has to cover to get to the place of work with men having to cover more distance than women to get to their offices. The study shows that there is no difference between men and women in terms of accessibility to electricity and water as all residents are deprived almost equally. An interesting aspect of the study is that the fear of being killed or maimed as a result of crime within the neighborhood does not depend on the gender of the individual concerned. However, in general, there is gender difference in deprivation within the neighborhood with clear difference in the level of neighborhood convenience (chi2=97.131 and pgender difference in neighborhood Safety (chi2=35.097, p>0.05), Health (chi2=63.933, p>0.05) and Community Relationship (chi2=12.905, p>0.05).

  9. Income and individual deprivation as predictors of health over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imlach Gunasekara, Fiona; Carter, Kristie N; Crampton, Peter; Blakely, Tony

    2013-08-01

    Poverty, often defined as a lack of resources to achieve a living standard that is deemed acceptable by society, may be assessed using level of income or a measure of individual deprivation. However, the relationship between low income and deprivation is complex--for example, not everyone who has low income is deprived (and vice versa). In addition, longitudinal studies show only a small relationship between short-term changes in income and health but an alternative measure of poverty, such as deprivation, may have a stronger association with health over time. We aim to compare low income and individual deprivation as predictors of self-rated health (SRH), using longitudinal survey data, to test the hypothesis that different measures of poverty may have different associations with health. We used three waves from the longitudinal Survey of Family, Income and Employment and fixed-effect linear regression models to compare low income (poverty with health, using alternative measures, in addition to income, is advisable.

  10. Deconstructing and reconstructing cognitive performance in sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Melinda L; Gunzelmann, Glenn; Whitney, Paul; Hinson, John M; Belenky, Gregory; Rabat, Arnaud; Van Dongen, Hans P A

    2013-06-01

    Mitigation of cognitive impairment due to sleep deprivation in operational settings is critical for safety and productivity. Achievements in this area are hampered by limited knowledge about the effects of sleep loss on actual job tasks. Sleep deprivation has different effects on different cognitive performance tasks, but the mechanisms behind this task-specificity are poorly understood. In this context it is important to recognize that cognitive performance is not a unitary process, but involves a number of component processes. There is emerging evidence that these component processes are differentially affected by sleep loss. Experiments have been conducted to decompose sleep-deprived performance into underlying cognitive processes using cognitive-behavioral, neuroimaging and cognitive modeling techniques. Furthermore, computational modeling in cognitive architectures has been employed to simulate sleep-deprived cognitive performance on the basis of the constituent cognitive processes. These efforts are beginning to enable quantitative prediction of the effects of sleep deprivation across different task contexts. This paper reviews a rapidly evolving area of research, and outlines a theoretical framework in which the effects of sleep loss on cognition may be understood from the deficits in the underlying neurobiology to the applied consequences in real-world job tasks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. DEPRIVATION AND STRABISMIC AMBLYOPIA: ABNORMALITIES IN GENICULOCORTICAL VISUAL PATHWAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Alekseenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are inconsistent data on the changes of functional performance in subcortical structures of visual system caused by early binocular vision impairment. Aim: To study neuronal functional activity of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGNd in monocularly deprived cats and strabismic cats. Materials and methods: 4 cats with monocular convergent strabismus, 7 cats with monocular divergent strabismus, 3 monocularly deprived cats and 4 intact cats were studied. Histochemical method was used to detect cytochrome oxidase – the mitochondrial enzyme of respiratory chain correlating with neuronal functional activity. Optical density in ocular-specific layers A and A1 was measured on the images of stained LGNd sections, and the contrast was calculated. Results: Relative reduction of functional activity in the layers innervated from deprived and squinted eyes was demonstrated in LGNd bilaterally. In strabismic animals, the changes were observed only in the projection of the central part of the visual field, whereas in monocularly deprived animals the changes were in the projection of the whole visual field. Conclusion: These findings indicate differences between the mechanisms determining the development of strabismic and deprivation amblyopia. Thus, in amblyopia, preservation of peripheral stereoscopic vision is possible.

  12. Nutrient Deprivation Induces Property Variations in Spider Gluey Silk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamires, Sean J.; Sahni, Vasav; Dhinojwala, Ali; Blackledge, Todd A.; Tso, I-Min

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms facilitating property variability in biological adhesives may promote biomimetic innovations. Spider gluey silks such as the spiral threads in orb webs and the gumfoot threads in cobwebs, both of which comprise of an axial thread coated by glue, are biological adhesives that have variable physical and chemical properties. Studies show that the physical and chemical properties of orb web gluey threads change when spiders are deprived of food. It is, however, unknown whether gumfoot threads undergo similar property variations when under nutritional stress. Here we tested whether protein deprivation induces similar variations in spiral and gumfoot thread morphology and stickiness. We manipulated protein intake for the orb web spider Nephila clavipes and the cobweb spider Latrodectus hesperus and measured the diameter, glue droplet volume, number of droplets per mm, axial thread width, thread stickiness and adhesive energy of their gluey silks. We found that the gluey silks of both species were stickier when the spiders were deprived of protein than when the spiders were fed protein. In N. clavipes a concomitant increase in glue droplet volume was found. Load-extension curves showed that protein deprivation induced glue property variations independent of the axial thread extensions in both species. We predicted that changes in salt composition of the glues were primarily responsible for the changes in stickiness of the silks, although changes in axial thread properties might also contribute. We, additionally, showed that N. clavipes' glue changes color under protein deprivation, probably as a consequence of changes to its biochemical composition. PMID:24523902

  13. Relationships between affect, vigilance, and sleepiness following sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Peter L; Siegle, Greg J; Buysse, Daniel J

    2008-03-01

    This pilot study examined the relationships between the effects of sleep deprivation on subjective and objective measures of sleepiness and affect, and psychomotor vigilance performance. Following an adaptation night in the laboratory, healthy young adults were randomly assigned to either a night of total sleep deprivation (SD group; n = 15) or to a night of normal sleep (non-SD group; n = 14) under controlled laboratory conditions. The following day, subjective reports of mood and sleepiness, objective sleepiness (Multiple Sleep Latency Test and spontaneous oscillations in pupil diameter, PUI), affective reactivity/regulation (pupil dilation responses to emotional pictures), and psychomotor vigilance performance (PVT) were measured. Sleep deprivation had a significant impact on all three domains (affect, sleepiness, and vigilance), with significant group differences for eight of the nine outcome measures. Exploratory factor analyses performed across the entire sample and within the SD group alone revealed that the outcomes clustered on three orthogonal dimensions reflecting the method of measurement: physiological measures of sleepiness and affective reactivity/regulation, subjective measures of sleepiness and mood, and vigilance performance. Sleepiness and affective responses to sleep deprivation were associated (although separately for objective and subjective measures). PVT performance was also independent of the sleepiness and affect outcomes. These findings suggest that objective and subjective measures represent distinct entities that should not be assumed to be equivalent. By including affective outcomes in experimental sleep deprivation research, the impact of sleep loss on affective function and their relationship to other neurobehavioral domains can be assessed.

  14. Can sleep deprivation studies explain why human adults sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lee K

    2012-11-01

    This review will concentrate on the consequences of sleep deprivation in adult humans. These findings form a paradigm that serves to demonstrate many of the critical functions of the sleep states. The drive to obtain food, water, and sleep constitutes important vegetative appetites throughout the animal kingdom. Unlike nutrition and hydration, the reasons for sleep have largely remained speculative. When adult humans are nonspecifically sleep-deprived, systemic effects may include defects in cognition, vigilance, emotional stability, risk-taking, and, possibly, moral reasoning. Appetite (for foodstuffs) increases and glucose intolerance may ensue. Procedural, declarative, and emotional memory are affected. Widespread alterations of immune function and inflammatory regulators can be observed, and functional MRI reveals profound changes in regional cerebral activity related to attention and memory. Selective deprivation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, on the contrary, appears to be more activating and to have lesser effects on immunity and inflammation. The findings support a critical need for sleep due to the widespread effects on the adult human that result from nonselective sleep deprivation. The effects of selective REM deprivation appear to be different and possibly less profound, and the functions of this sleep state remain enigmatic.

  15. Mortality of persons deprived of liberty in the penal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanić Goran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this research is to determine the scope, dynamics, and structure of deaths of persons deprived of their liberty who resided in the penal system due to custody, security measures, serving a prison sentence or an alternative sanction, with regard to their demographic, criminological, penal, and psychological characteristics. Article 111, paragraph b of the United Nations Rules for the Protection of Juveniles Deprived of their Liberty (1990 determines that deprivation of liberty refers to any kind of detention, imprisonment, i.e. placement in a public or private institution which the imprisoned person cannot leave, by order of judicial, administrative or other public authority. The data used included information on persons deprived of their liberty who died in the territory of the Republic of Serbia in the period from 2008 to 2012. The data was obtained from The Directorate for Execution of Criminal Sanctions of the Ministry of Justice of the Republic of Serbia. In the past, researches mainly focused on violence in prisons, death penalty, prison riots, auto-aggressive behavior, i.e. certain forms of mortality such as a suicide. This paper aims to point out the characteristics of deaths which occur while persons deprived of their liberty are under the authority of judicial institutions, both before and after passing a criminal sanction.

  16. Deconstructing and Reconstructing Cognitive Performance in Sleep Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Melinda L.; Gunzelmann, Glenn; Whitney, Paul; Hinson, John M.; Belenky, Gregory; Rabat, Arnaud; Van Dongen, Hans P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mitigation of cognitive impairment due to sleep deprivation in operational settings is critical for safety and productivity. Achievements in this area are hampered by limited knowledge about the effects of sleep loss on actual job tasks. Sleep deprivation has different effects on different cognitive performance tasks, but the mechanisms behind this task-specificity are poorly understood. In this context it is important to recognize that cognitive performance is not a unitary process, but involves a number of component processes. There is emerging evidence that these component processes are differentially affected by sleep loss. Experiments have been conducted to decompose sleep-deprived performance into underlying cognitive processes using cognitive-behavioral, neuroimaging and cognitive modeling techniques. Furthermore, computational modeling in cognitive architectures has been employed to simulate sleep-deprived cognitive performance on the basis of the constituent cognitive processes. These efforts are beginning to enable quantitative prediction of the effects of sleep deprivation across different task contexts. This paper reviews a rapidly evolving area of research, and outlines a theoretical framework in which the effects of sleep loss on cognition may be understood from the deficits in the underlying neurobiology to the applied consequences in real-world job tasks. PMID:22884948

  17. Sleep Deprivation Influences Circadian Gene Expression in the Lateral Habenula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Beilin; Gao, Yanxia; Li, Yang; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is governed by homeostasis and the circadian clock. Clock genes play an important role in the generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms but are also involved in regulating sleep homeostasis. The lateral habenular nucleus (LHb) has been implicated in sleep-wake regulation, since LHb gene expression demonstrates circadian oscillation characteristics. This study focuses on the participation of LHb clock genes in regulating sleep homeostasis, as the nature of their involvement is unclear. In this study, we observed changes in sleep pattern following sleep deprivation in LHb-lesioned rats using EEG recording techniques. And then the changes of clock gene expression (Per1, Per2, and Bmal1) in the LHb after 6 hours of sleep deprivation were detected by using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). We found that sleep deprivation increased the length of Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (NREMS) and decreased wakefulness. LHb-lesioning decreased the amplitude of reduced wake time and increased NREMS following sleep deprivation in rats. qPCR results demonstrated that Per2 expression was elevated after sleep deprivation, while the other two genes were unaffected. Following sleep recovery, Per2 expression was comparable to the control group. This study provides the basis for further research on the role of LHb Per2 gene in the regulation of sleep homeostasis.

  18. Melatonin modulates adiponectin expression on murine colitis with sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Kyun; Park, Young Sook; Baik, Haing-Woon; Jun, Jin Hyun; Kim, Eun Kyung; Sull, Jae Woong; Sung, Ho Joong; Choi, Jin Woo; Chung, Sook Hee; Gye, Myung Chan; Lim, Ju Yeon; Kim, Jun Bong; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2016-09-07

    To determine adiponectin expression in colonic tissue of murine colitis and systemic cytokine expression after melatonin treatments and sleep deprivation. The following five groups of C57BL/6 mice were used in this study: (1) group I, control; (2) group II, 2% DSS induced colitis for 7 d; (3) group III, 2% DSS induced colitis and melatonin treatment; (4) group IV, 2% DSS induced colitis with sleep deprivation (SD) using specially designed and modified multiple platform water baths; and (5) group V, 2% DSS induced colitis with SD and melatonin treatment. Melatonin (10 mg/kg) or saline was intraperitoneally injected daily to mice for 4 d. The body weight was monitored daily. The degree of colitis was evaluated histologically after sacrificing the mice. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis was performed using anti-adiponectin antibody. After sampling by intracardiac punctures, levels of serum cytokines were measured by ELISA. Sleep deprivation in water bath exacerbated DSS induced colitis and worsened weight loss. Melatonin injection not only alleviated the severity of mucosal injury, but also helped survival during stressful condition. The expression level of adiponectin in mucosa was decreased in colitis, with the lowest level observed in colitis combined with sleep deprivation. Melatonin injection significantly (P sleep deprivation.

  19. Sleep Deprivation Influences Circadian Gene Expression in the Lateral Habenula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beilin Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is governed by homeostasis and the circadian clock. Clock genes play an important role in the generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms but are also involved in regulating sleep homeostasis. The lateral habenular nucleus (LHb has been implicated in sleep-wake regulation, since LHb gene expression demonstrates circadian oscillation characteristics. This study focuses on the participation of LHb clock genes in regulating sleep homeostasis, as the nature of their involvement is unclear. In this study, we observed changes in sleep pattern following sleep deprivation in LHb-lesioned rats using EEG recording techniques. And then the changes of clock gene expression (Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 in the LHb after 6 hours of sleep deprivation were detected by using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR. We found that sleep deprivation increased the length of Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (NREMS and decreased wakefulness. LHb-lesioning decreased the amplitude of reduced wake time and increased NREMS following sleep deprivation in rats. qPCR results demonstrated that Per2 expression was elevated after sleep deprivation, while the other two genes were unaffected. Following sleep recovery, Per2 expression was comparable to the control group. This study provides the basis for further research on the role of LHb Per2 gene in the regulation of sleep homeostasis.

  20. Short-Term Monocular Deprivation Enhances Physiological Pupillary Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Binda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-term monocular deprivation alters visual perception in adult humans, increasing the dominance of the deprived eye, for example, as measured with binocular rivalry. This form of plasticity may depend upon the inhibition/excitation balance in the visual cortex. Recent work suggests that cortical excitability is reliably tracked by dilations and constrictions of the pupils of the eyes. Here, we ask whether monocular deprivation produces a systematic change of pupil behavior, as measured at rest, that is independent of the change of visual perception. During periods of minimal sensory stimulation (in the dark and task requirements (minimizing body and gaze movements, slow pupil oscillations, “hippus,” spontaneously appear. We find that hippus amplitude increases after monocular deprivation, with larger hippus changes in participants showing larger ocular dominance changes (measured by binocular rivalry. This tight correlation suggests that a single latent variable explains both the change of ocular dominance and hippus. We speculate that the neurotransmitter norepinephrine may be implicated in this phenomenon, given its important role in both plasticity and pupil control. On the practical side, our results indicate that measuring the pupil hippus (a simple and short procedure provides a sensitive index of the change of ocular dominance induced by short-term monocular deprivation, hence a proxy for plasticity.

  1. Empirical evidence of child poverty and deprivation in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogwumike, Fidelis O; Ozughalu, Uche M

    2017-12-30

    Development economists and policy makers have in recent times focused attention on child poverty as a crucial aspect of poverty. The importance of the analysis of child poverty partly lies in the fact that children are the most vulnerable group in every society. This study used two poverty lines and the Foster-Greer-Thorbecke index to analyze extreme and overall child poverty headcount, depth and severity in Nigeria. The study also used the headcount ratio to analyze the extent of child deprivation in education, health, nutrition, child protection, water and sanitation. The study was based on the 2010 Harmonized Nigeria Living Standard Survey (HNLSS) and the 2011 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS), obtained from the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS), Abuja, Nigeria. The study revealed that 23.22% of children in Nigeria were in extreme child poverty while 70.31% of children in the country were in overall child poverty. The study further showed that there was pronounced child deprivation in education, health, nutrition, child protection, water and sanitation. Both child poverty and child deprivation were more pronounced in the rural sector than in the urban sector and in Northern Nigeria than in Southern Nigeria. Therefore, the Nigerian government should take adequate steps to eradicate child poverty and obliterate all forms of child deprivation in Nigeria - particularly deprivation in basic needs. In taking such steps, more attention should be focused on rural areas and Northern Nigeria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative observation on teeth during calcium deprivation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, P

    1977-07-01

    Adult female rats were subjected to severe calcium deprivation by feeding them a calcium-deficient diet containing oxalate (Group A). Furthermore, pregnant and lactating animals were subjected to the same diet (Group B). The mandibular teeth were collected for ash determination and for linear measurements. The ash content of the growing incisors was only slightly reduced in Group A, while the reduction in Group B was 27%. Linear measurements demonstrated that the outer dimensions of the incisors were not affected by the calcium-depriving regimen in either group, while the inner dimensions (pulp cavity) were considerably increased in Group B due to reduced thickness of the dentin mantle. The daily dentin apposition in Group A did not deviate much from the control values, while in Group B it was severely reduced. The thickness of incisor enamel was unaffected by the calcium-depriving regimen. The ash content of the molars was normal in Group A, but slightly reduced in Group B.

  3. Deprivation of liberty and intensive care: an update post Ferreira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharlo, Behrad; Bryden, Daniele; Brett, Stephen J

    2018-02-01

    The right to liberty and security of the person is protected by Article 5 of the European Convention on Human Rights which has been incorporated into the Human Rights Act 1998. The 2014 Supreme Court judgment in the case commonly known as Cheshire West provided for an 'acid test' to be employed in establishing a deprivation of liberty. This 'acid test' of 'continuous supervision and not free to leave' led to concerns that patients lacking capacity being treated on an Intensive Care Unit could be at risk of a 'deprivation of liberty', if this authority was applicable to this setting. This article revisits the aftermath of Cheshire West before describing the recent legal developments around deprivation of liberty pertaining to intensive care by summarising the recent Ferreira judgments which appear for now to answer the question as to the applicability of Cheshire West in life-saving treatment.

  4. Acute sleep deprivation increases food purchasing in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Colin D; Nilsson, Emil K; Nilsson, Victor C; Cedernaes, Jonathan; Rångtell, Frida H; Vogel, Heike; Dickson, Suzanne L; Broman, Jan-Erik; Hogenkamp, Pleunie S; Schiöth, Helgi B; Benedict, Christian

    2013-12-01

    To investigate if acute sleep deprivation affects food purchasing choices in a mock supermarket. On the morning after one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) or after one night of sleep, 14 normal-weight men were given a fixed budget (300 SEK-approximately 50 USD). They were instructed to purchase as much as they could out of a possible 40 items, including 20 high-caloric foods (>2 kcal/g) and 20 low-caloric foods (ghrelin were measured under fasting conditions. Independent of both type of food offered and price condition, sleep-deprived men purchased significantly more calories (+9%) and grams (+18%) of food than they did after one night of sleep (both P ghrelin concentrations were also higher after TSD (P sleep loss alters food purchasing behavior in men. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  5. A socioeconomic deprivation index for small areas in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijer, Mathias; Engholm, Gerda; Grittner, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    -parish variation in all-cause mortality, while the Townsend index and individual socioeconomic factors accounted for 71 and 76%, respectively. Conclusions: The index can be used to identify Danish parishes by their levels of deprivation and it provides municipalities with a tool to allocate resources......Aims: To describe the development of a deprivation index for Danish parishes and to investigate its association with all-cause mortality compared with the Townsend index and individual-level factors. Methods: Nine socioeconomic factors were aggregated to the parish level from individual......-level register data comprising the entire Danish population in 2005. A principal component analysis was conducted to reduce the number of factors and to apply weights. An ecological analysis investigated the association between the Danish Deprivation Index (DANDEX) and standardised mortality ratios in Danish...

  6. Reindeer & Wolves: Exploring Sensory Deprivation in Multiplayer Digital Bodily Play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnegan, Daniel; Velloso, Eduardo; Mitchell, Robb

    2014-01-01

    Games designed around digital bodily play involve bodily movement and expression to create engaging gameplay experiences. Most feedback in these games takes the form of visual stimuli. To explore the gameplay mechanics afforded by depriving players from these visual cues, we designed Reindeer & W...... & Wolves, a role-playing game where blindfolded players capture other players relying on their hearing alone. Based on our design and play testing, we devised four strategies for designing games that incorporate sensory deprivation as an element of the core mechanic.......Games designed around digital bodily play involve bodily movement and expression to create engaging gameplay experiences. Most feedback in these games takes the form of visual stimuli. To explore the gameplay mechanics afforded by depriving players from these visual cues, we designed Reindeer...

  7. The behavioral and health consequences of sleep deprivation among U.S. high school students: relative deprivation matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, Ryan Charles; Restivo, Emily

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate whether the strength of the association between sleep deprivation and negative behavioral and health outcomes varies according to the relative amount of sleep deprivation experienced by adolescents. 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Survey data of high school students (N=15,364) were analyzed. Associations were examined on weighted data using logistic regression. Twelve outcomes were examined, ranging from weapon carrying to obesity. The primary independent variable was a self-reported measure of average number of hours slept on school nights. Participants who reported deprivations in sleep were at an increased risk of a number of negative outcomes. However, this varied considerably across different degrees of sleep deprivation. For each of the outcomes considered, those who slept less than 5h were more likely to report negative outcomes (adjusted odds ratios ranging from 1.38 to 2.72; psleeping 8 or more hours. However, less extreme forms of sleep deprivation were, in many instances, unrelated to the outcomes considered. Among U.S. high school students, deficits in sleep are significantly and substantively associated with a variety of negative outcomes, and this association is particularly pronounced for students achieving fewer than 5h of sleep at night. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. From glutathione transferase to pore in a CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Cromer, B A; Morton, C J; Parker, M W; 10.1007/s00249-002-0219-1

    2002-01-01

    Many plasma membrane chloride channels have been cloned and characterized in great detail. In contrast, very little is known about intracellular chloride channels. Members of a novel class of such channels, called the CLICs (chloride intracellular channels), have been identified over the last few years. A striking feature of the CLIC family of ion channels is that they can exist in a water- soluble state as well as a membrane-bound state. A major step forward in understanding the functioning of these channels has been the recent crystal structure determination of one family member, CLIC1. The structure confirms that CLICs are members of the glutathione S- transferase superfamily and provides clues as to how CLICs can insert into membranes to form chloride channels. (69 refs).

  9. Effect of ethanol on glutathione concentration in isolated hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viña, J; Estrela, J M; Guerri, C; Romero, F J

    1980-01-01

    1. Ethanol induces a decrease in GSH (reduced glutathione) concentration is isolated hepatocytes. Maximal effects appear at 20 mM-ethanol. The concentration-dependence of this decrease is paralleled by the concentration-dependence of the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase. 2. Pyrazole, a specific inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase, prevents the ethanol-induced GSH depletion. 3. Acetaldehyde, above 0.05 mM, also promotes a decrease in GSH concentration in hepatocytes. 4. Disulfiram (0.05 mM), an inhibitor of aldehyde dehydrogenase, potentiates the fall in GSH concentration caused by acetaldehyde. 5. The findings support the hypothesis that acetaldehyde is responsible for the depletion of GSH induced by ethanol. 6. Methionine prevents the effect of alcohol or acetaldehyde on GSH concentration in hepatocytes. PMID:6994718

  10. Fumarate induces redox-dependent senescence by modifying glutathione metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liang; Cardaci, Simone; Jerby, Livnat; MacKenzie, Elaine D; Sciacovelli, Marco; Johnson, T Isaac; Gaude, Edoardo; King, Ayala; Leach, Joshua D G; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; Hedley, Ann; Morrice, Nicholas A; Kalna, Gabriela; Blyth, Karen; Ruppin, Eytan; Frezza, Christian; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-01-23

    Mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzyme fumarate hydratase (FH) are associated with a highly malignant form of renal cancer. We combined analytical chemistry and metabolic computational modelling to investigate the metabolic implications of FH loss in immortalized and primary mouse kidney cells. Here, we show that the accumulation of fumarate caused by the inactivation of FH leads to oxidative stress that is mediated by the formation of succinicGSH, a covalent adduct between fumarate and glutathione. Chronic succination of GSH, caused by the loss of FH, or by exogenous fumarate, leads to persistent oxidative stress and cellular senescence in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, the ablation of p21, a key mediator of senescence, in Fh1-deficient mice resulted in the transformation of benign renal cysts into a hyperplastic lesion, suggesting that fumarate-induced senescence needs to be bypassed for the initiation of renal cancers.

  11. Improvement of oxidized glutathione fermentation by thiol redox metabolism engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Aoki, Naoko; Kobayashi, Jyumpei; Kiriyama, Kentaro; Nishida, Keiji; Araki, Michihiro; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-11-01

    Glutathione is a valuable tripeptide widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. In industrial fermentation, glutathione is currently produced primarily using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Intracellular glutathione exists in two forms; the majority is present as reduced glutathione (GSH) and a small amount is present as oxidized glutathione (GSSG). However, GSSG is more stable than GSH and is a more attractive form for the storage of glutathione extracted from yeast cells after fermentation. In this study, intracellular GSSG content was improved by engineering thiol oxidization metabolism in yeast. An engineered strain producing high amounts of glutathione from over-expression of glutathione synthases and lacking glutathione reductase was used as a platform strain. Additional over-expression of thiol oxidase (1.8.3.2) genes ERV1 or ERO1 increased the GSSG content by 2.9-fold and 2.0-fold, respectively, compared with the platform strain, without decreasing cell growth. However, over-expression of thiol oxidase gene ERV2 showed almost no effect on the GSSG content. Interestingly, ERO1 over-expression did not decrease the GSH content, raising the total glutathione content of the cell, but ERV1 over-expression decreased the GSH content, balancing the increase in the GSSG content. Furthermore, the increase in the GSSG content due to ERO1 over-expression was enhanced by additional over-expression of the gene encoding Pdi1, whose reduced form activates Ero1 in the endoplasmic reticulum. These results indicate that engineering the thiol redox metabolism of S. cerevisiae improves GSSG and is critical to increasing the total productivity and stability of glutathione.

  12. Dairy intake is associated with brain glutathione concentration in older adults123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Phil; Denney, Douglas R; Spaeth, Kendra; Nast, Olivia; Ptomey, Lauren; Roth, Alexandra K; Lierman, Jo Ann; Sullivan, Debra K

    2015-01-01

    Background: A reduction in key antioxidants such as glutathione has been noted in brain tissue undergoing oxidative stress in aging and neurodegeneration. To date, no dietary factor has been linked to a higher glutathione concentration. However, in an earlier pilot study, we showed evidence of a positive association between cerebral glutathione and dairy intake. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that dairy food consumption is associated with cerebral glutathione concentrations in older adults. Design: In this observational study, we measured cerebral glutathione concentrations in 60 healthy subjects (mean ± SD age: 68.7 ± 6.2 y) whose routine dairy intakes varied. Glutathione concentrations were measured by using a unique, noninvasive magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging technique at 3 T and compared with dairy intakes reported in 7-d food records. Results: Glutathione concentrations in the frontal [Spearman's rank-order correlation (rs) = 0.39, P = 0.013], parietal (rs = 0.50, P = 0.001), and frontoparietal regions (rs = 0.47, P = 0.003) were correlated with average daily dairy servings. In particular, glutathione concentrations in all 3 regions were positively correlated with milk servings (P ≤ 0.013), and those in the parietal region were also correlated with cheese servings (P = 0.015) and calcium intake (P = 0.039). Dairy intake was related to sex, fat-free mass, and daily intakes of energy, protein, and carbohydrates. However, when these factors were controlled through a partial correlation, correlations between glutathione concentrations and dairy and milk servings remained significant. Conclusions: Higher cerebral glutathione concentrations were associated with greater dairy consumption in older adults. One possible explanation for this association is that dairy foods may serve as a good source of substrates for glutathione synthesis in the human brain. PMID:25646325

  13. Lipid peroxide, glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzyme (GST) in mixed zooplankton from the North-West Coast of India: Implication for the use of environmental monitoring

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rathod, V.; Patil, B.A.

    This work deals with an experiment on mixed zooplanktonic organisms collected from the shore water of Diu coast. The study analyzed and measured lipid peroxidation (LPX), as a marker of oxidative stress and glutathione-s-transferase (GST) activity...

  14. The effects of sleep deprivation on oculomotor responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldich, Yakov; Barkana, Yaniv; Pras, Eran; Zadok, David; Hartstein, Morris; Morad, Yair

    2010-12-01

     Fatigue due to sleep deprivation is one of the main causes of accidents. An objective and efficient method for determining whether the person is tired could provide a valuable tool in accident prevention. In this study, we evaluated whether oculomotor responses related to pupillary light reflex and saccadic velocity can identify subjects with sleep deprivation and whether these objective values correlate with subjective feeling of sleepiness.  Thirteen normal subjects (5 male, 8 female) participated in a 4-day study. During the first two days following a full night's (8 hr in bed) sleep, they underwent baseline automated oculomotor testing using the FIT-2500-Fatigue-Analyzer. Following a third full night's sleep, participants were then sleep-deprived for 28 hr. Ten measurements of automated oculomotor tests were performed during the sleep deprivation period. Visually-guided saccadic velocity (SV), initial pupil diameter (PD), pupillary constriction latency (CL), and amplitude of pupil constriction (CA) were assessed using the FIT-2500-Fatigue-Analyzer. The FIT-index, which expresses the deviation of the ocular parameters from the baseline measurements, was calculated. Correlation of oculomotor parameters with the subjective Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS) was performed.  We found that oculomotor measures showed a significant increase in CL (298.6 to 308.4 msec, P sleep deprivation. The SSS was found to significantly increase over the sleep deprivation period (2.05 to 5.05, P  0.66, P < 0.02).  Evaluation of oculomotor responses, particularly CL and SV together with the FIT-index, might have practical applications for the assessment of an individual's state of alertness or fatigue. Correlation of the FIT-index to the SSS provides evidence for the potential usefulness of oculomotor function measurements in the detection of subjective sleepiness.

  15. Alteration in the glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and lipid peroxidation by ascorbic acid in the skin of mice exposed to fractionated gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra Jagetia, Ganesh; Rajanikant, G K; Rao, Shaival K; Shrinath Baliga, M

    2003-06-01

    In spite of the immense therapeutic gains produced by the fractionated irradiation (IR) regimen, radiation burden on the skin increases significantly. Protection of skin might enable use of higher radiation doses for better therapeutic gains. Ascorbic acid (AA), an essential ingredient of the human diet, is known to be a free radical scavenger and radioprotective agent. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of ascorbic acid on the radiation-induced changes in the status of glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lipid peroxidation (LPx) in the skin of mice exposed to 10, 16 and 20 Gy of fractionated gamma radiation. One group of the animals was administered daily with double distilled water (DDW), while the other group received 250 mg/kg b. wt. of ascorbic acid once daily, consecutively for 5, 8 or 10 days, before hemibody (below rib cage) exposure to 2 Gy/day of gamma-rays. Skin biopsies from both the groups were collected for the biochemical estimations. The irradiation of animals resulted in a dose-dependent decline in the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione contents. Ascorbic acid pretreatment resulted in a significant increase in the activities of both the enzymes and glutathione in the irradiated mouse skin. Normal concentrations of glutathione could not be restored even by day 6 post-irradiation. Conversely, lipid peroxidation increased in a dose-dependent manner in both the groups reaching a peak concentration by 3 h post-irradiation, while the ascorbic acid pretreatment inhibited the radiation-induced increase in lipid peroxidation. The ascorbic acid treatment arrested the decline in the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, glutathione contents and inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the skin of mice exposed to different doses of fractionated gamma radiation.

  16. Age-related changes in catalase, glutathione reductase activities, the amount of glutathione in total body of oregon and vestigial Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiskin, K; Kandemir, S; Hamamci, D; Yesilada, E; Bozcuk, A N

    1994-01-01

    Natural antioxidants, free radical scavengers as catalase, glutathione reductase and glutathione are considered for aging mechanism. The objective of our study was to investigate the differences in the life span of male Oregon (w.t.) and vestigial Drosophila melanogaster, the possible role of free radical scavengers such as catalase, glutathione reductase and reduced-oxidized glutathione levels in the aging process by studying the pattern of age-related changes. The life span of male Oregon D. melanogaster is longer than that of the vestigial D. melanogaster. The beginning of the dying phase of Oregon was around 40 days, while the vestigial's around 20 days. The maximum life span was 85 days in Oregon population and 56 days in vestigial population. Age-related changes of catalase activities were similar in male Oregon and vestigial and showed a decreasing curve during aging. Glutathione reductase activity of Oregon increased slightly between 10 and 40 days, decreased sharply therafter. Glutathione reductase activity of vestigial followed a pot-shaped trend with 60% decrease during the first 40 days and followed by a sharp increase during the late part of life. The amounts of reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) increased slightly up to 40 days of age and followed a sharp decline thereafter in male Oregon D. melanogaster. In male vestigial D. melanogaster, the concentrations of GSH and GSSG remained quite stable for the nogaster, the concentrations of GSH and GSSG remained quite stable for the first 10 days, followed by a sharp decline around 20th day and increased thereafter.

  17. Functional consequences of sustained sleep deprivation in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, C A

    1995-01-01

    Sleep deprivation disrupts vital biological processes that are necessary for cognitive ability and physical health, but the physiological changes that underlie these outward effects are largely unknown. The purpose of the present studies in the laboratory rat is to prolong sleep deprivation to delineate the pathophysiology and to determine its mediation. In the rat, the course of prolonged sleep deprivation has a syndromic nature and eventuates in a life-threatening state. An early and central symptom of sleep deprivation is a progressive increase in peripheral energy expenditure to nearly double normal levels. An attempt to alleviate this negative energy balance by feeding rats a balanced diet that is high in its efficiency of utilization prolongs survival and attenuates or delays development of malnutrition-like symptoms, indicating that several symptoms can be manipulated to some extent by energy and nutrient consumption. Most changes in neuroendocrine parameters appear to be responses to metabolic demands, such as increased plasma catecholamines indicating sympathetic activation. Plasma total thyroid hormones, however, decline to severely low levels; a metabolic complication that is associated with other sleep deprivation-induced symptoms, such as a decline in body temperature to hypothermic levels despite increased energy expenditure. Metabolic mapping of the brain revealed a dissociation between the energy metabolism of the brain and that of the body. Sleep deprivation's effects on cerebral structures are heterogeneous and unidirectional toward decreased functional activity. The hypometabolic brain structures are concentrated in the hypothalamus, thalamus and limbic systems, whereas few regions in the rest of the brain and none in the medulla, are affected. Correspondence can be found between some of the affected cerebral structures and several of the peripheral symptoms, such as hyperphagia and possible heat retention problems. The factor predisposing to

  18. Causes and consequences of sleep deprivation in hospitalised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, Stephanie

    Sleep is a fundamental component of good health, however its promotion in acute hospital settings does not appear to be a priority. This literature review, which considered qualitative and quantitative research methodology, aimed to determine the factors that affect the quality of sleep experienced by patients in hospital, and the effects of sleep deprivation on the health and wellbeing of these individuals. Causes of sleep disruption are varied and include environmental and bio-cognitive factors, including pain, bright light, noise, anxiety and stress. The environmental and bio-cognitive consequences of sleep deprivation on the health and recovery of hospital inpatients are outlined.

  19. Subjective relative deprivation is associated with poorer physical and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sandeep; Carleton, R Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    Substantial epidemiological evidence has shown that income inequality and objective measures of relative deprivation are associated with poorer health outcomes. However, surprisingly little research has examined whether subjective feelings of relative deprivation are similarly linked with poorer health outcomes. The relative deprivation hypothesis suggests that inequality affects health at the individual level through negative consequences of social comparison. We directly examined the relationship between subjective feelings of personal relative deprivation and self-reported physical and mental health in a diverse community sample (n = 328). Results demonstrated that subjective feelings of personal relative deprivation are associated with significantly poorer physical and mental health. These relationships held even when accounting for covariates that have been previously associated with both relative deprivation and health. These results further support the link between relative deprivation and health outcomes and suggest that addressing root causes of relative deprivation may lead to greater individual health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sleep deprivation leads to a loss of functional connectivity in frontal brain regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, I.M.; Romeijn, N.; Smit, D.J.A.; Piantoni, G.; van Someren, E.J.W.; van der Werf, Y.D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The restorative effect of sleep on waking brain activity remains poorly understood. Previous studies have compared overall neural network characteristics after normal sleep and sleep deprivation. To study whether sleep and sleep deprivation might differentially affect subsequent

  1. Sleep deprivation leads to a loss of functional connectivity in frontal brain regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, Ilse M; Romeijn, Nico; Smit, Dirk Ja; Piantoni, Giovanni; Van Someren, Eus Jw; van der Werf, Ysbrand D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The restorative effect of sleep on waking brain activity remains poorly understood. Previous studies have compared overall neural network characteristics after normal sleep and sleep deprivation. To study whether sleep and sleep deprivation might differentially affect subsequent

  2. Glutathione facilitates antibiotic resistance and photosystem I stability during exposure to gentamicin in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jeffrey C; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2011-05-01

    Understanding mechanisms of antibiotic resistance is important to the fields of biology and medicine. We find that glutathione contributes to antibiotic resistance in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Our results also suggest that glutathione protects photosystem I from oxidative damage resulting from growth in the presence of gentamicin.

  3. Interactions of prostaglandin A2 with the glutathione-mediated biotransformation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iersel, M.L.P.S. van; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Smink, N.; Koeman, J.H.; Bladeren, P.J. van

    1999-01-01

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin A2 (PGA2) is known to inhibit cell proliferation, and metabolism of this compound thus might be important in controlling its ultimate function. The glutathione-related metabolism of PGA2 was therefore investigated both with purified glutathione S-transferase P1-1

  4. Habitual consumption of fruits and vegetables: associations with human rectal glutathione S-transferase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wark, P.A.; Grubben, M.J.A.L.; Peters, W.H.M.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kampman, E.; Kok, F.J.; Veer, P. van 't

    2004-01-01

    The glutathione (GSH)/glutathione S-transferase (GST) system is an important detoxification system in the gastrointestinal tract. A high activity of this system may benefit cancer prevention. The aim of the study was to assess whether habitual consumption of fruits and vegetables, especially citrus

  5. Altered Glutathione Homeostasis in Heart Augments Cardiac Lipotoxicity Associated with Diet-induced Obesity in Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy; Sulistyoningrum, Dian C.; Glier, Melissa B.; Verchere, C. Bruce; Devlin, Angela M.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity-related cardiac lipid accumulation is associated with increased myocardial oxidative stress. The role of the antioxidant glutathione in cardiac lipotoxicity is unclear. Cystathionine β-synthase (Cbs) catalyzes the first step in the trans-sulfuration of homocysteine to cysteine, which is estimated to provide ∼50% of cysteine for hepatic glutathione biosynthesis. As cardiac glutathione is a reflection of the liver glutathione pool, we hypothesize that mice heterozygous for targeted disruption of Cbs (Cbs+/−) are more susceptible to obesity-related cardiolipotoxicity because of impaired liver glutathione synthesis. Cbs+/+ and Cbs+/− mice were fed a high fat diet (60% energy) from weaning for 13 weeks to induce obesity and had similar increases in body weight and body fat. This was accompanied by increased hepatic triglyceride but no differences in hepatic glutathione levels compared with mice fed chow. However, Cbs+/− mice with diet-induced obesity had greater glucose intolerance and lower total and reduced glutathione levels in the heart, accompanied by lower plasma cysteine levels compared with Cbs+/+ mice. Higher triglyceride concentrations, increased oxidative stress, and increased markers of apoptosis were also observed in heart from Cbs+/− mice with diet-induced obesity compared with Cbs+/+ mice. This study suggests a novel role for Cbs in maintaining the cardiac glutathione pool and protecting against cardiac lipid accumulation and oxidative stress during diet-induced obesity in mice. PMID:22021075

  6. Altered glutathione homeostasis in heart augments cardiac lipotoxicity associated with diet-induced obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy; Sulistyoningrum, Dian C; Glier, Melissa B; Verchere, C Bruce; Devlin, Angela M

    2011-12-09

    Obesity-related cardiac lipid accumulation is associated with increased myocardial oxidative stress. The role of the antioxidant glutathione in cardiac lipotoxicity is unclear. Cystathionine β-synthase (Cbs) catalyzes the first step in the trans-sulfuration of homocysteine to cysteine, which is estimated to provide ∼50% of cysteine for hepatic glutathione biosynthesis. As cardiac glutathione is a reflection of the liver glutathione pool, we hypothesize that mice heterozygous for targeted disruption of Cbs (Cbs(+/-)) are more susceptible to obesity-related cardiolipotoxicity because of impaired liver glutathione synthesis. Cbs(+/+) and Cbs(+/-) mice were fed a high fat diet (60% energy) from weaning for 13 weeks to induce obesity and had similar increases in body weight and body fat. This was accompanied by increased hepatic triglyceride but no differences in hepatic glutathione levels compared with mice fed chow. However, Cbs(+/-) mice with diet-induced obesity had greater glucose intolerance and lower total and reduced glutathione levels in the heart, accompanied by lower plasma cysteine levels compared with Cbs(+/+) mice. Higher triglyceride concentrations, increased oxidative stress, and increased markers of apoptosis were also observed in heart from Cbs(+/-) mice with diet-induced obesity compared with Cbs(+/+) mice. This study suggests a novel role for Cbs in maintaining the cardiac glutathione pool and protecting against cardiac lipid accumulation and oxidative stress during diet-induced obesity in mice.

  7. Habitual consumption of fruits and vegetables: associations with human rectal glutathione S-transferase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wark, P.A.; Grubben, M.J.A.L.; Peters, W.H.M.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kampman, E.; Kok, F.J.; Veer, van 't P.

    2004-01-01

    The glutathione (GSH)/glutathione S-transferase (GST) system is an important detoxification system in the gastrointestinal tract. A high activity of this system may benefit cancer prevention. The aim of the study was to assess whether habitual consumption of fruits and vegetables, especially citrus

  8. Low activity of superoxide dismutase and high activity of glutathione reductase in erythrocytes from centenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Jeune, B; Nybo, H

    1998-01-01

    aged between 60 and 79 years. MEASUREMENTS: enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase (GR) in erythrocytes. Functional capacity among the centenarians was evaluated by Katz' index of activities of daily living, the Physical...

  9. Regioselectivity and reversibility of the glutathione conjugation of quercetin quinone methide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, M.G.; Vervoort, J.; Szymusiak, H.; Lemanska, K.; Tyrakowska, B.; Cenas, N.; Segura-Aguilar, J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2000-01-01

    The chemical reactivity, isomerization, and glutathione conjugation of quercetin o-quinone were investigated. Tyrosinase was used to generate the unstable quercetin o-quinone derivative which could be observed upon its subsequent scavenging by glutathione. Identification of the products revealed

  10. Inherited glutathione reductase deficiency and Plasmodium falciparum malaria--a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallo, Valentina; Schwarzer, Evelin; Rahlfs, Stefan; Schirmer, R. Heiner; van Zwieten, Rob; Roos, Dirk; Arese, Paolo; Becker, Katja

    2009-01-01

    In Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (RBCs), the flavoenzyme glutathione reductase (GR) regenerates reduced glutathione, which is essential for antioxidant defense. GR utilizes NADPH produced in the pentose phosphate shunt by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Thus, conditions

  11. Freedom deprivation punishment in Serbia during 1804-1860

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This text is on freedom deprivation punishment in Serbia during the first half of 19th century, i.e. since the beginning of the First Serbian uprising in 1804 and till passing the Criminal law in 1860. Author first emphasises that the freedom deprivation punishment doesn't have long tradition, although in medieval Serbia and under Turkish rule existed imprisonment in dungeon, but it was foremost some form of custody before a trial, and subsequently as keeping a prisoner after the verdict until its effectuation. It wasn't a freedom deprivation punishment in modern sense. During 1804 - 1813 there was so called 'haps' i.e. apprehension, though Uprising authorities built also 'real' prisons for punishment purpose. Imprisonment of culprits was a condition for compulsory labour, which could be very useful utilized under given circumstances. Since the beginning 1820-ties when first Serbian courts were established, beside 'haps' appears also imprisonment in heavy shackles. However there was no substantial difference between apprehension and imprisonment. In this time the sentence to imprisonment was combined with the punishment with beating (or sometimes with the flogging at the end of imprisonment. The Regulation of County courts from January 26th 1840 mentions several forms of freedom deprivation punishment, but in praxis freedom deprivation was reduced on either 'eternal' imprisonment or time-sentenced imprisonment. Since the beginning of 1840-ties freedom deprivation was more frequently used as punishment and its implementation was continually spreading. For heaviest crimes was instead death penalty and running gauntlet sentenced freedom deprivation, either from courts or from supreme authority in the amnesty process. Imprisonment was effectuated either at police reformatories (for shorter penalties or at the penitentiary institutions (for longer imprisonment. By the end of 1830-ties an issue of imprisonment of female perpetrators emerged, together

  12. [Effects of glutathione on plasma heat shock protein 70 of acute gastric mucosal injury in rats exposed to positive acceleration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ying-tan; Li, Jing; Chen, Ying; Yang, Chun-min; Tang, He-lan; Wang, Jian-chang

    2013-12-01

    To explore the change of plasma heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in rats exposed to acute gastric mucosal injury under the condition of positive acceleration (+Gz) and elucidate the effects of glutathione (GSH) and the corresponding protective mechanisms. A total of 40 male SD rats were randomly by computer randomization into 4 groups of ethanol control, +5 Gz value exposure, +10 Gz value exposure and GSH protection (n = 10 each). GSH protection group received adaptive feeding for 7 days and then an intraperitoneal injection of GSH for 3 consecutive days. All 4 groups fasted for 24 hours within 10 days, water deprivation for 12 hours and a gastric lavage of anhydrous ethanol (0.4 ml/100 g) for 1 hour, ethanol control group had no acceleration,+5 Gz value exposure group at + 5 Gz and the latter two groups respectively at +10 Gz for around 3 min.Each group underwent anesthesia of pentobarbital after centrifuge immediately. Abdominal aortic blood samples were collected and gastric tissues harvested for observation of mucosal injury. Mucosal damage index was calculated by the GUTH method. And the plasma content of HSP70 was measured by radioimmunoassay. (1) Gastric mucosa of each groups rats were injured. Damage was significantly reduced by GSH pretreatment, ethanol control group had less injury, the injury of +5 Gz value exposure group was aggravated compared with the control group (gastric mucosal injury index: 25.4 (14.0-30.0) vs 10.0 (9.2-13.9), P = 0.001); +10 Gz value exposure group mucosal injury was heaviest (47.2 (41.5-60.1)) . There were diffuse hyperemia, edema and erosion with a large area of bleeding spots and flat mucosal folds.It had statistically significant differences with the first two groups (all P ethanol groups ((6.5 ± 0.5) ng/ml, P = 0.897); HSP70 plasma level ((5.9 ± 0.5) ng/ml) of +10 Gz value exposure was significantly lower than those of the first two groups (P = 0.018,0.014); GSH protection group ((7.0 ± 0.5) ng/ml) was significantly higher

  13. The Effects of Two Types of Sleep Deprivation on Visual Working Memory Capacity and Filtering Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Drummond, Sean P.A.; Dane E Anderson; Straus, Laura D.; Vogel, Edward K.; Perez, Veronica B.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep deprivation has adverse consequences for a variety of cognitive functions. The exact effects of sleep deprivation, though, are dependent upon the cognitive process examined. Within working memory, for example, some component processes are more vulnerable to sleep deprivation than others. Additionally, the differential impacts on cognition of different types of sleep deprivation have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of one night of total sleep depri...

  14. The effects of sleep deprivation on brain fMRI activation during motion detection and tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, G

    2008-01-01

    Sleep deprivation is common and leads to inattention and impaired vigilance. Sleep deprived drivers have an increased road traffic accident rate. Police data suggest that sleep deprivation accounts for up to 23% of all accidents on UK roads. How sleep deprivation leads to impaired driving is uncertain. The skills needed for error free driving are the detection of moving objects, and the ability to track. Work using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has established which brain areas...

  15. Monitoring Child Well-being in the European Union: Measuring cumulative deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Geranda Notten; Keetie Roelen

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes and empirically tests a number of candidate measures of cumulative deprivation to monitor child well-being in the EU.The authors posit that the ideal measure should be sensitive to changes in the depth of cumulative deprivation and, given its broad use in the policy community, has an intuitive interpretation. Using the 2007 wave of the EU-SILC data, the authors constructed several measures of cumulative deprivation from a set of 13 deprivation indicators for Germany, Fran...

  16. Regional Deprivation Index and Socioeconomic Inequalities Related to Infant Deaths in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Jae-Won; Kim, Young-Ju; Son, Mia

    2016-01-01

    Deprivation indices have been widely used to evaluate neighborhood socioeconomic status and therefore examine individuals within their regional context. Although some studies on the development of deprivation indices were conducted in Korea, additional research is needed to construct a more valid and reliable deprivation index. Therefore, a new deprivation index, named the K index, was constructed using principal component analysis. This index was compared with the Carstairs, Townsend and Cho...

  17. Comparing non-monetary deprivation and inequality levels in the EU countries

    OpenAIRE

    PI ALPERIN Maria Noel

    2010-01-01

    This paper analizes the links between non-monetary deprivation and inequalities in poverty levels in Europe. Non-monetary deprivation is defined as an enforced lack of a combination of items depicting material living conditions, such as housing conditions, possession of durable goods and capacity to afford basic requirements. The analytical tools selected to compare the deprivation and inequality levels are the direct indicators of deprivation based on the fuzzy set theory and the Gini Index ...

  18. Inhibition of acetaminophen oxidation by cimetidine and the effects on glutathione and activated sulphate synthesis rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalhoff, K; Poulsen, H E

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of the hepatotoxic drug, acetaminophen, on the synthesis rates of glutathione, activated sulphate (PAPS, adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phosphosulphate) and the acetaminophen metabolites, acetaminophen-glutathione and acetaminophen-sulphate after...... inhibition of cytochrome P-450 drug oxidation by cimetidine in isolated rat hepatocytes. The synthesis rates of glutathione and PAPS were determined simultaneously by an established method based on trapping of radioactivity (35S) in the prelabelled glutathione and PAPS pools. Preincubation of the hepatocytes...... with 60 micrograms/ml cimetidine for 30 min. did not affect PAPS (1.71 versus 1.78 nmol/10(6) cells) nor glutathione concentration (16.0 versus 16.4 nmol/10(6) cells). The subsequent incubation with 5 mM acetaminophen resulted in decreased PAPS synthesis in the cimetidine treated cells [0.79 x 10...

  19. The glutathione response to salt stress in the thermophilic fungus thermomyces lanuginosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friborg Jepsen, Helene; Posci, Istvan; Jensen, Bo

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of glutathione in response to salt stress in the thermophilic fungus, Thermomyces lanuginosus, the biomass and the intracellular pool of protein and the glutathione + glutathione disulphid (GSH + GSSG) was measured for four days in a medium with NaCl or KCl added...... and in the basal medium. Due to the osmotic and ionic stress imposed by the salts, the growth of T. lanuginosus was delayed and the inhibitory effect of KCl exceeded that of NaCl. Glutathione seemed to be involved in the response of T. lanuginosus towards high concentrations of salt, as the level of stress...... was negatively correlated with the amount of total glutathione. Salt stress did not result in an increased intracellular protein production. GSH accumulated while nutrients were abundant and were subsequently degraded later, suggesting that nutrients stored in GSH are used when the medium is depleted....

  20. A novel plant glutathione S-transferase/peroxidase suppresses Bax lethality in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Damianova, R; Atallah, M

    2000-01-01

    for the identification of plant genes, which inhibit either directly or indirectly the lethal phenotype of Bax. Using this method a number of cDNA clones were isolated, the more potent of which encodes a protein homologous to the class theta glutathione S-transferases. This Bax-inhibiting (BI) protein was expressed...... in Escherichia coli and found to possess glutathione S-transferase (GST) and weak glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity. Expression of Bax in yeast decreases the intracellular levels of total glutathione, causes a substantial reduction of total cellular phospholipids, diminishes the mitochondrial membrane...... potential, and alters the intracellular redox potential. Co-expression of the BI-GST/GPX protein brought the total glutathione levels back to normal and re-established the mitochondrial membrane potential but had no effect on the phospholipid alterations. Moreover, expression of BI-GST/GPX in yeast...

  1. Glutathione prevents ethanol induced gastric mucosal damage and depletion of sulfhydryl compounds in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loguercio, C; Taranto, D; Beneduce, F; del Vecchio Blanco, C; de Vincentiis, A; Nardi, G; Romano, M

    1993-01-01

    Whether parenteral administration of reduced glutathione prevented ethanol induced damage to and depletion of sulfhydryl compounds in the human gastric mucosa was investigated. Ten healthy volunteers underwent endoscopy on three separate occasions. Gastric mucosal damage was induced by spraying 80% ethanol on to the gastric mucosa through the biopsy channel of the endoscope. The gastric mucosal score, total sulfhydryls, glutathione, and cysteine were evaluated in basal conditions and after ethanol administration with and without pretreatment with parenteral glutathione. Glutathione significantly decreased the extent of ethanol induced macroscopic injury to the mucosa of the gastric body and antrum. Glutathione's protective effect is associated with appreciable inhibition of ethanol induced depletion of gastric sulfhydryl compounds. This is the first report of protection against ethanol induced gastric mucosal damage by a sulfhydryl containing agent in humans. PMID:8432465

  2. Determination of Glutathione and Its Redox Status in Isolated Vacuoles of Red Beetroot Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Pradedova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The glutathione of the red beetroot vacuoles (Beta vulgaris L. was measured using three well-known methods: the spectrofluorimetric method with orthophthalic aldehyde (OPT; the spectrophotometric method with 5.5'-dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB; the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The content of reduced (GSH and oxidized glutathione (GSSG differed depending on the research method. With OPT the concentration of glutathione was: GSH – 0.059 µmol /mg protein; GSSG – 0.019 µmol/mg protein and total glutathione (GSHtotal – 0.097 µmol/mg protein. In the case of determining with DTNB the concentration of glutathione was: GSH – 0.091 µmol/mg protein; GSSG – 0.031 µmol/mg protein; GSHtotal – 0.153 µmol/mg protein. HPLC-defined concentration of glutathione was lower: GSH – 0.039 µmol/mg protein; GSSG – 0.007 µmol/mg protein; GSHtotal – 0.053 µmol/mg protein. Redox ratio of GSH/GSSG was also dependent on the method of determination: with OPT – 3.11; with DTNB – 2.96 and HPLC – 5.57. Redox ratio of glutathione in vacuoles was much lower than the tissue extracts of red beetroot, which, depending on the method of determination, was: 7.23, 7.16 and 9.22. The results showed the vacuoles of red beetroot parenchyma cells contain glutathione. Despite the low value of the redox ratio GSH/GSSG, in vacuoles the pool of reduced glutathione prevailed over the pool of oxidized glutathione.

  3. Intestinal barrier function in response to abundant or depleted mucosal glutathione in Salmonella-infected rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vink Carolien

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione, the main antioxidant of intestinal epithelial cells, is suggested to play an important role in gut barrier function and prevention of inflammation-related oxidative damage as induced by acute bacterial infection. Most studies on intestinal glutathione focus on oxidative stress reduction without considering functional disease outcome. Our aim was to determine whether depletion or maintenance of intestinal glutathione changes susceptibility of rats to Salmonella infection and associated inflammation. Rats were fed a control diet or the same diet supplemented with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO; glutathione depletion or cystine (glutathione maintenance. Inert chromium ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (CrEDTA was added to the diets to quantify intestinal permeability. At day 4 after oral gavage with Salmonella enteritidis (or saline for non-infected controls, Salmonella translocation was determined by culturing extra-intestinal organs. Liver and ileal mucosa were collected for analyses of glutathione, inflammation markers and oxidative damage. Faeces was collected to quantify diarrhoea. Results Glutathione depletion aggravated ileal inflammation after infection as indicated by increased levels of mucosal myeloperoxidase and interleukin-1β. Remarkably, intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation were not increased. Cystine supplementation maintained glutathione in the intestinal mucosa but inflammation and oxidative damage were not diminished. Nevertheless, cystine reduced intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation. Conclusion Despite increased infection-induced mucosal inflammation upon glutathione depletion, this tripeptide does not play a role in intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation and diarrhoea. On the other hand, cystine enhances gut barrier function by a mechanism unlikely to be related to glutathione.

  4. The Institutionalized Geriatric Patient Considered in a Framework of Developmental Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erber, Joan T.

    1979-01-01

    An overview is presented of several areas of deprivation research (animal, child, young adult) and methods of conceptualizing and measuring deprivation is applied to institutionalized geriatric patients. Suggestions are made for more precise approaches to studying and treating deprivation in this population. (Author/SS)

  5. Double Trouble? The Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Chronotype on Adolescent Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagys, Natasha; McGlinchey, Eleanor L.; Talbot, Lisa S.; Kaplan, Katherine A.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Harvey, Allison G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Two understudied risk factors that have been linked to emotional difficulties in adolescence are chronotype and sleep deprivation. This study extended past research by using an experimental design to investigate the role of sleep deprivation and chronotype on emotion in adolescents. It was hypothesized that sleep deprivation and an…

  6. Meta-Analysis of the Antidepressant Effects of Acute Sleep Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Elaine M; Rao, Hengyi; Dinges, David F; Smith, Rachel V; Goel, Namni; Detre, John A; Basner, Mathias; Sheline, Yvette I; Thase, Michael E; Gehrman, Philip R

    To provide a quantitative meta-analysis of the antidepressant effects of sleep deprivation to complement qualitative reviews addressing response rates. English-language studies from 1974 to 2016 using the keywords sleep deprivation and depression searched through PubMed and PsycINFO databases. A total of 66 independent studies met criteria for inclusion: conducted experimental sleep deprivation, reported the percentage of the sample that responded to sleep deprivation, provided a priori definition of antidepressant response, and did not seamlessly combine sleep deprivation with other therapies (eg, chronotherapeutics, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation). Data extracted included percentage of responders, type of sample (eg, bipolar, unipolar), type of sleep deprivation (eg, total, partial), demographics, medication use, type of outcome measure used, and definition of response (eg, 30% reduction in depression ratings). Data were analyzed with meta-analysis of proportions and a Poisson mixed-effects regression model. The overall response rate to sleep deprivation was 45% among studies that utilized a randomized control group and 50% among studies that did not. The response to sleep deprivation was not affected significantly by the type of sleep deprivation performed, the nature of the clinical sample, medication status, the definition of response used, or age and gender of the sample. These findings support a significant effect of sleep deprivation and suggest the need for future studies on the phenotypic nature of the antidepressant response to sleep deprivation, on the neurobiological mechanisms of action, and on moderators of the sleep deprivation treatment response in depression.

  7. Context or composition : How does neighbourhood deprivation impact upon adolescent smoking behaviour?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morris, T.; Manley, D.J.; van Ham, M.

    2018-01-01

    Neighbourhood effects studies have demonstrated an association between area deprivation and smoking behaviour whereby people living in deprived neighbourhoods are more likely to smoke than those in non-deprived neighbourhoods. This evidence though is based largely upon data that ignores long term

  8. Sleep Deprivation: A Cause of High Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is it true that sleep deprivation can cause high blood pressure? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Possibly. It's thought ... night may be at higher risk of developing high blood pressure or worsening already high blood pressure. There's also ...

  9. Does neighbourhood deprivation affect the genetic influence on body mass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Gwilym; Jones, Kelvyn; Harris, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Most research into the role of gene-environment interactions in the etiology of obesity has taken environment to mean behaviours such as exercise and diet. While interesting, this is somewhat at odds with research into the social determinants of obesity, in which the focus has shifted away from individuals and behaviours to the types of wider obesogenic environments in which individuals live, which influence and produce these behaviours. This study combines these two strands of research by investigating how the genetic influence on body mass index (BMI), used as a proxy for obesity, changes across different neighbourhood environments measured by levels of deprivation. Genetics are incorporated using a classical twin design with data from Twins UK, a longitudinal study of UK twins running since 1992. A multilevel modelling approach is taken to decompose variation between individuals into genetic, shared environmental, and non-shared environmental components. Neighbourhood deprivation is found to be a statistically significant predictor of BMI after conditioning on individual characteristics, and a heritability of 0.75 is estimated for the entire sample. This heritability estimate is shown, however, to be higher in more deprived neighbourhoods and lower in less deprived ones, and this relationship is statistically significant. While this research cannot say anything directly about the mechanisms behind the relationship, it does highlight how the relative importance of genetic factors can vary across different social environments, and therefore the value of considering both genetic and social determinants of health simultaneously. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cervical Ectopic Pregnancy in Resource Deprived Areas: A Rare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ectopic pregnancy is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in women of reproductive age especially in resource deprived areas worldwide. Cervical ectopic pregnancy is a rare, life threatening form of ectopic pregnancy which needs a high index of suspicion for diagnosis, thus adding a complex twist to the dilemma ...

  11. Effects of total sleep deprivation on divided attention performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Chern-Pin Chua

    Full Text Available Dividing attention across two tasks performed simultaneously usually results in impaired performance on one or both tasks. Most studies have found no difference in the dual-task cost of dividing attention in rested and sleep-deprived states. We hypothesized that, for a divided attention task that is highly cognitively-demanding, performance would show greater impairment during exposure to sleep deprivation. A group of 30 healthy males aged 21-30 years was exposed to 40 h of continuous wakefulness in a laboratory setting. Every 2 h, subjects completed a divided attention task comprising 3 blocks in which an auditory Go/No-Go task was 1 performed alone (single task; 2 performed simultaneously with a visual Go/No-Go task (dual task; and 3 performed simultaneously with both a visual Go/No-Go task and a visually-guided motor tracking task (triple task. Performance on all tasks showed substantial deterioration during exposure to sleep deprivation. A significant interaction was observed between task load and time since wake on auditory Go/No-Go task performance, with greater impairment in response times and accuracy during extended wakefulness. Our results suggest that the ability to divide attention between multiple tasks is impaired during exposure to sleep deprivation. These findings have potential implications for occupations that require multi-tasking combined with long work hours and exposure to sleep loss.

  12. Aging worsens the effects of sleep deprivation on postural control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rébecca Robillard

    Full Text Available Falls increase with age and cause significant injuries in the elderly. This study aimed to determine whether age modulates the interactions between sleep deprivation and postural control and to evaluate how attention influences these interactions in the elderly. Fifteen young (24±2.7 y.o. and 15 older adults (64±3.2 y.o. stood still on a force plate after a night of sleep and after total sleep deprivation. Center of pressure range and velocity were measured with eyes open and with eyes closed while participants performed an interference task, a control task, and no cognitive task. Sleep deprivation increased the antero-posterior range of center of pressure in both age groups and center of pressure speed in older participants only. In elderly participants, the destabilizing effects of sleep deprivation were more pronounced with eyes closed. The interference task did not alter postural control beyond the destabilization induced by sleep loss in older subjects. It was concluded that sleep loss has greater destabilizing effects on postural control in older than in younger participants, and may therefore increase the risk of falls in the elderly.

  13. Responses of Tswana goats to various lengths of water deprivation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this trial was to determine the water intake of Tswana goats and investigate the effects of short term water deprivation in summer or winter (6000 ml water offered either once every 72 h, 48 h, 24 h or ad libitum) on feed intake, dry matter digestibility, growth rate and health. Goats were fed a diet comprising 60% ...

  14. Sleep deprivation amplifies striatal activation to monetary reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, B C; Phillips, M L; Siegle, G J; Buysse, D J; Forbes, E E; Franzen, P L

    2013-10-01

    Sleep loss produces abnormal increases in reward seeking but the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. The present study examined the influence of one night of sleep deprivation on neural responses to a monetary reward task in a sample of late adolescents/young adults. Using a within-subjects crossover design, 27 healthy, right-handed late adolescents/young adults (16 females, 11 males; mean age 23.1 years) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) following a night of sleep deprivation and following a night of normal sleep. Participants’ recent sleep history was monitored using actigraphy for 1 week prior to each sleep condition. Following sleep deprivation, participants exhibited increased activity in the ventral striatum (VS) and reduced deactivation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during the winning of monetary reward, relative to the same task following normal sleep conditions. Shorter total sleep time over the five nights before the sleep-deprived testing condition was associated with reduced deactivation in the mPFC during reward. These findings support the hypothesis that sleep loss produces aberrant functioning in reward neural circuitry, increasing the salience of positively reinforcing stimuli. Aberrant reward functioning related to insufficient sleep may contribute to the development and maintenance of reward dysfunction-related disorders, such as compulsive gambling, eating, substance abuse and mood disorders.

  15. Aging worsens the effects of sleep deprivation on postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robillard, Rébecca; Prince, François; Filipini, Daniel; Carrier, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Falls increase with age and cause significant injuries in the elderly. This study aimed to determine whether age modulates the interactions between sleep deprivation and postural control and to evaluate how attention influences these interactions in the elderly. Fifteen young (24±2.7 y.o.) and 15 older adults (64±3.2 y.o.) stood still on a force plate after a night of sleep and after total sleep deprivation. Center of pressure range and velocity were measured with eyes open and with eyes closed while participants performed an interference task, a control task, and no cognitive task. Sleep deprivation increased the antero-posterior range of center of pressure in both age groups and center of pressure speed in older participants only. In elderly participants, the destabilizing effects of sleep deprivation were more pronounced with eyes closed. The interference task did not alter postural control beyond the destabilization induced by sleep loss in older subjects. It was concluded that sleep loss has greater destabilizing effects on postural control in older than in younger participants, and may therefore increase the risk of falls in the elderly.

  16. Androgen deprivation modulates the inflammatory response induced by irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Paul-Yang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine whether radiation (RT-induced inflammatory responses and organ damage might be modulated by androgen deprivation therapies. Methods The mRNA and tissue sections obtained from the lungs, intestines and livers of irradiated mice with or without androgen deprivation were analyzed by real-time PCR and histological analysis. Activation of NF-kappa B was examined by measuring nuclear protein levels in the intestine and lung 24 h after irradiation. We also examined the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, TGF-β1 and p-AKT to elucidate the related pathway responsible to irradiation (RT -induced fibrosis. Results We found androgen deprivation by castration significantly augmented RT-induced inflammation, associated with the increase NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression. However, administration of flutamide had no obvious effect on the radiation-induced inflammation response in the lung and intestine. These different responses were probably due to the increase of RT-induced NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression by castration or lupron treatment. In addition, our data suggest that TGF-β1 and the induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway may contribute to RT-induced fibrosis. Conclusion When irradiation was given to patients with total androgen deprivation, the augmenting effects on the RT-induced inflammation and fibrosis should take into consideration for complications associated with radiotherapy.

  17. Material Deprivation in Tanure Ojaide's the Eagles' Vision | Badaki ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The idea of material deprivation, in the third instance, is developed by memorable illustrations of pennilessness, exploitation, insolvency, low income and burdensome responsibility. The paper captures Tanure Ojaide as a poet whose thematic scope covers various conditions of poverty; despite his themes on social activism ...

  18. Insights into the bacterial diversity in a freshwater-deprived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to conduct an investigation into the bacterial diversity in the freshwater-deprived Kariega Estuary, situated along the Eastern Cape coastline, using ribosomal RNA gene sequences obtained by pyrosequencing. Shifts in the microbial diversity were correlated to selected physico-chemical variables ...

  19. Effect of sleep deprivation on the human metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sarah K; Ang, Joo Ern; Revell, Victoria L; Holmes, Ben; Mann, Anuska; Robertson, Francesca P; Cui, Nanyi; Middleton, Benita; Ackermann, Katrin; Kayser, Manfred; Thumser, Alfred E; Raynaud, Florence I; Skene, Debra J

    2014-07-22

    Sleep restriction and circadian clock disruption are associated with metabolic disorders such as obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. The metabolic pathways involved in human sleep, however, have yet to be investigated with the use of a metabolomics approach. Here we have used untargeted and targeted liquid chromatography (LC)/MS metabolomics to examine the effect of acute sleep deprivation on plasma metabolite rhythms. Twelve healthy young male subjects remained in controlled laboratory conditions with respect to environmental light, sleep, meals, and posture during a 24-h wake/sleep cycle, followed by 24 h of wakefulness. Two-hourly plasma samples collected over the 48 h period were analyzed by LC/MS. Principal component analysis revealed a clear time of day variation with a significant cosine fit during the wake/sleep cycle and during 24 h of wakefulness in untargeted and targeted analysis. Of 171 metabolites quantified, daily rhythms were observed in the majority (n = 109), with 78 of these maintaining their rhythmicity during 24 h of wakefulness, most with reduced amplitude (n = 66). During sleep deprivation, 27 metabolites (tryptophan, serotonin, taurine, 8 acylcarnitines, 13 glycerophospholipids, and 3 sphingolipids) exhibited significantly increased levels compared with during sleep. The increased levels of serotonin, tryptophan, and taurine may explain the antidepressive effect of acute sleep deprivation and deserve further study. This report, to our knowledge the first of metabolic profiling during sleep and sleep deprivation and characterization of 24 h rhythms under these conditions, offers a novel view of human sleep/wake regulation.

  20. Failing Young People? Education and Aspirations in a Deprived Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, S.; McKendrick, J. H.; Scott, G.

    2010-01-01

    Recent UK government statements and education policies have emphasized the need to instil a "culture of aspiration" among young people in deprived communities to address social exclusion. Specific proposals include raising the school leaving age to 18 and extending compulsory employment training. These statements and measures express the…

  1. Acute sleep deprivation reduces energy expenditure in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Christian; Hallschmid, Manfred; Lassen, Arne; Mahnke, Christin; Schultes, Bernd; Schiöth, Helgi Birgir; Born, Jan; Lange, Tanja

    2011-06-01

    Epidemiologic evidence indicates that chronic sleep curtailment increases risk of developing obesity, but the mechanisms behind this relation are largely unknown. We examined the influence of a single night of total sleep deprivation on morning energy expenditures and food intakes in healthy humans. According to a balanced crossover design, we examined 14 normal-weight male subjects on 2 occasions during a regular 24-h sleep-wake cycle (including 8 h of nocturnal sleep) and a 24-h period of continuous wakefulness. On the morning after regular sleep and total sleep deprivation, resting and postprandial energy expenditures were assessed by indirect calorimetry, and the free-choice food intake from an opulent buffet was tested in the late afternoon at the end of the experiment. Circulating concentrations of ghrelin, leptin, norepinephrine, cortisol, thyreotropin, glucose, and insulin were repeatedly measured over the entire 24-h session. In comparison with normal sleep, resting and postprandial energy expenditures assessed on the subsequent morning were significantly reduced after sleep deprivation by ≈5% and 20%, respectively (P ghrelin concentrations (P sleep conditions were detected. Our findings show that one night of sleep deprivation acutely reduces energy expenditure in healthy men, which suggests that sleep contributes to the acute regulation of daytime energy expenditure in humans.

  2. The Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Soccer Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallesen, Ståle; Gundersen, Hilde Stokvold; Kristoffersen, Morten; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Thun, Eirunn; Harris, Anette

    2017-08-01

    Many athletes sleep poorly due to stress, travel, and competition anxiety. In the present study, we investigated the effects of sleep deprivation on soccer skills (juggling, dribbling, ball control, continuous kicking, 20 and 40 m sprint, and 30 m sprint with changes of direction). In all, 19 male junior soccer players (14-19 years old) were recruited and participated in a cross-balanced experimental study comprising two conditions; habitual sleep and 24 hours sleep deprivation. In both conditions, testing took place between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. Order of tests was counterbalanced. Each test was conducted once or twice in a sequence repeated three times. The results revealed a negative effect of sleep deprivation on the continuous kicking test. On one test, 30 meter sprint with directional changes, a significant condition × test repetition interaction was found, indicating a steeper learning curve in the sleep deprived condition from Test 1 to Test 2 and a steeper learning curve in the rested condition from Test 2 to Test 3. The results are discussed in terms of limitations and strengths, and recommendations for future studies are outlined.

  3. Food deprivation and drinking in two African rodents, Mastomys ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1986-02-12

    Feb 12, 1986 ... Food deprivation and drinking in two African rodents, Mastomys natalensis and ... therefore able to survive for longer on a given energy in- ... drinking). No adaptive explanation was advanced re- garding these trends, but a hypothesis was proposed which predicted similar responses in other mesophilic.

  4. Neurodevelopmental Effects of Early Deprivation in Postinstitutionalized Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Seth D.; Nelson, Charles A.; Schlaak, Mary F.; Roeber, Barbara J.; Wewerka, Sandi S.; Wiik, Kristen L.; Frenn, Kristin A.; Loman, Michelle M.; Gunnar, Megan R.

    2010-01-01

    The neurodevelopmental sequelae of early deprivation were examined by testing (N = 132) 8- and 9-year-old children who had endured prolonged versus brief institutionalized rearing or rearing in the natal family. Behavioral tasks included measures that permit inferences about underlying neural circuitry. Children raised in institutionalized…

  5. Deprivation, Social Exclusion and Subjective Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellani, Luna; D'Ambrosio, Conchita

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at investigating empirically the relationship between self-declared satisfaction with life and an individual's well-being as measured by the indices of deprivation and social exclusion proposed in the income distribution literature. Results on European countries show that life satisfaction decreases with an increase in deprivation…

  6. [Validation of Hungarian Smartphone Deprivation Inventory (HSDI) with school children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csibi, Sándor; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Szabo, Attila

    2017-01-01

    The widespread use of smartphones generates new habits and behaviors among the users, including schoolchildren. Advance technology-based applications, capturing interest and attention, influence cognitive focus and time spent with the device. Examination of these factors points toward the risk of addiction, as well as the deprivations sensations associated with the latter, that call for scholastic attention. The aim of this study was to validate a Hungarian Smartphone Deprivation Inventory (HSDI), to gauge the deprivation feelings and their severity in schoolchildren when they cannot access their device. A 9-item, 7-point, agree-disagree inventory was developed on the basis of an earlier exercise deprivation scale (Robbins and Joseph, 1985). The inventory was completed by 258 Hungarian schoolchildren (mean age=12.4 ± SD = 1.71 years). The participants also completed the Hungarian version of the Brief Addiction to Smartphone Scale (BASS). An exploratory factor analysis of the HSDI yielded a single factor that accounted for 55.84 % of the variance. The internal consistency of the inventory was excellent (Cronbach's α = 0.90). Content validity of the HSDI was checked by comparing the scores of those scoring above and below the median on the BASS that yielded statistically significant differences (p smartphone access in schoolchildren.

  7. A Study of Possible Sleep Deprivation in Medical Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred medical students were investigated for possible sleep deprivation using questionnaires. The use of drugs in form of stimulants, use of sleeping pills, and the nature of hostel space accommodation for the students were also investigated. A similar sizeable number of non-medical students were also investigated.

  8. Behavior Problems in Children Adopted from Psychosocially Depriving Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Emily C.; McCall, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Behavior problems were investigated in 342 6- to 18-year-old children adopted from psychosocially depriving Russian institutions that provided adequate physical resources but not consistent, responsive caregiving. Results indicated that attention and externalizing problems were the most prevalent types of behavior problems in the sample as a…

  9. Vitamin C Prevents Sleep Deprivation-induced Elevation in Cortisol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    person can be aroused by sensory or other stimuli. (Hall, 2015), is an essential physiological need that must be satisfied to ensure normal physiological functions (Rechtschaffen and Bergmann, 2002). Sleep deprivation can be defined as the restriction of sleep below the level of basal sleep need (Lim and Dinges,. 2007).

  10. Wnt signaling in form deprivation myopia of the mice retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The canonical Wnt signaling pathway plays important roles in cellular proliferation and differentiation, axonal outgrowth, cellular maintenance in retinas. Here we test the hypothesis that elements of the Wnt signaling pathway are involved in the regulation of eye growth and prevention of myopia, in the mouse form-deprivation myopia model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (1 One hundred twenty-five C57BL/6 mice were randomly distributed into form-deprivation myopia and control groups. Form-deprivation myopia (FDM was induced by suturing the right eyelid, while the control group received no treatment. After 1, 2, and 4 weeks of treatment, eyes were assessed in vivo by cycloplegic retinoscopic refraction and axial length measurement by photography or A-scan ultrasonography. Levels of retinal Wnt2b, Fzd5 and β-catenin mRNA and protein were evaluated using RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. (2 Another 96 mice were divided into three groups: control, drugs-only, and drugs+FDM (by diffuser. Experimentally treated eyes in the last two groups received intravitreal injections of vehicle or the proteins, DKK-1 (Wnt-pathway antagonist or Norrin (Wnt-pathway agonist, once every three days, for 4 injections total. Axial length and retinoscopic refraction were measured on the 14th day of form deprivation. Following form-deprivation for 1, 2, and 4 weeks, FDM eyes had a relatively myopic refractive error, compared with contralateral eyes. There were no significant differences in refractive error between right and left eye in control group. The amounts of Wnt2b, Fzd5 and β-catenin mRNA and protein were significantly greater in form-deprived myopia eyes than in control eyes.DKK-1 (antagonist reduced the myopic shift in refractive error and increase in axial elongation, whereas Norrin had the opposite effect in FDM eyes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our studies provide the first evidence that the Wnt2b signaling pathway may play a role in the

  11. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercules R Freitas

    Full Text Available Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1-10 mM showed that 5-10 mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells, while neurons responded to 50 mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells. BBG 100 nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70 μM and MK-801 20 μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG at 5 mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit.

  12. Importance of glutathione and associated enzymes in drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H; Kauvar, L; Tew, K D

    1997-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular homeostasis is a critical survival trait in tumors when exposed to anticancer drugs. Because conjugation and elimination of drugs and their metabolites is dependent upon sequential and coordinated pathways, acquired drug resistance through a gradual adaptive response would rarely be expected to be the consequence of changes in the expression of one gene product. We have used a number of drug-resistant human cell lines to characterize those genes that are implicated in maintaining a resistant phenotype. Human HT29 colon cancer cells chronically exposed to ethacrynic acid (EA) [a glutathione (GSH) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) modulator] have acquired resistance to the drug. Commensurate with resistance, EA is more effectively conjugated to GSH and effluxed from the resistant cells. Using directed and random (differential display) approaches, a number of detoxification and/or protective gene products have been shown to be expressed at elevated levels. These include: gamma-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS, the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH biosynthesis); GST pi (the enzyme catalyzing the conjugation reaction); multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) (the membrane pump responsible for effluxing the conjugate from the cell interior). In addition, other gene products not directly linked with EA metabolism were induced, including dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (an alpha-ketoreductase) (30-fold), DT-diaphorase (threefold), and a transcriptional regulator SSP 3521 (threefold). HL60 cells resistant to a GSH paralog Ter199 also show increased expression of some of these gene products. Furthermore, an adriamycin-resistant human HL60 cell line also shows overexpression of GST pi, gamma-GCS, and MRP, but in addition has approximately 20-fold more DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). This enzyme is an early stress response gene that can phosphorylate and activate downstream transcription factors. Such overexpression could

  13. Prolonged Eyelid Closure Episodes during Sleep Deprivation in Professional Drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro, Pasquale K; Jackson, Melinda L; Berlowitz, David J; Swann, Philip; Howard, Mark E

    2016-08-15

    Real life ocular measures of drowsiness use average blink duration, amplitude and velocity of eyelid movements to reflect drowsiness in drivers. However, averaged data may conceal the variability in duration of eyelid closure episodes, and more prolonged episodes that indicate higher levels of drowsiness. The current study aimed to describe the frequency and duration of prolonged eyelid closure episodes during acute sleep deprivation. Twenty male professional drivers (mean age ± standard deviation = 41.9 ± 8.3 years) were recruited from the Transport Workers Union newsletter and newspaper advertisements in Melbourne, Australia. Each participant underwent 24 hours of sleep deprivation and completed a simulated driving task (AusEd), the Psychomotor Vigilance Task, and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale. Eyelid closure episodes during the driving task were recorded and analyzed manually from digital video recordings. Eyelid closure episodes increased in frequency and duration with a median of zero s/h of eyelid closure after 3 h increasing to 34 s/h after 23 h awake. Eyelid closure episodes were short and infrequent from 3 to 14 h of wakefulness. After 17 h of sleep deprivation, longer and more frequent eyelid closure episodes began to occur. Episodes lasting from 7 seconds up to 18 seconds developed after 20 h of wakefulness. Length of eyelid closure episodes was moderately to highly correlated with the standard deviation of lateral lane position, braking reaction time, crashes, impaired vigilance, and subjective sleepiness. The frequency and duration of episodes of prolonged eyelid closure increases during acute sleep deprivation, with very prolonged episodes after 17 hours awake. Automated devices that assess drowsiness using averaged measures of eyelid closure episodes need to be able to detect prolonged eyelid closure episodes that occur during more severe sleep deprivation. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  14. Nutrient deprivation induces property variations in spider gluey silk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean J Blamires

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms facilitating property variability in biological adhesives may promote biomimetic innovations. Spider gluey silks such as the spiral threads in orb webs and the gumfoot threads in cobwebs, both of which comprise of an axial thread coated by glue, are biological adhesives that have variable physical and chemical properties. Studies show that the physical and chemical properties of orb web gluey threads change when spiders are deprived of food. It is, however, unknown whether gumfoot threads undergo similar property variations when under nutritional stress. Here we tested whether protein deprivation induces similar variations in spiral and gumfoot thread morphology and stickiness. We manipulated protein intake for the orb web spider Nephila clavipes and the cobweb spider Latrodectus hesperus and measured the diameter, glue droplet volume, number of droplets per mm, axial thread width, thread stickiness and adhesive energy of their gluey silks. We found that the gluey silks of both species were stickier when the spiders were deprived of protein than when the spiders were fed protein. In N. clavipes a concomitant increase in glue droplet volume was found. Load-extension curves showed that protein deprivation induced glue property variations independent of the axial thread extensions in both species. We predicted that changes in salt composition of the glues were primarily responsible for the changes in stickiness of the silks, although changes in axial thread properties might also contribute. We, additionally, showed that N. clavipes' glue changes color under protein deprivation, probably as a consequence of changes to its biochemical composition.

  15. Selective neuronal lapses precede human cognitive lapses following sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Yuval; Andrillon, Thomas; Marmelshtein, Amit; Suthana, Nanthia; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio; Fried, Itzhak

    2017-12-01

    Sleep deprivation is a major source of morbidity with widespread health effects, including increased risk of hypertension, diabetes, obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Moreover, sleep deprivation brings about vehicle accidents and medical errors and is therefore an urgent topic of investigation. During sleep deprivation, homeostatic and circadian processes interact to build up sleep pressure, which results in slow behavioral performance (cognitive lapses) typically attributed to attentional thalamic and frontoparietal circuits, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, through study of electroencephalograms (EEGs) in humans and local field potentials (LFPs) in nonhuman primates and rodents it was found that, during sleep deprivation, regional 'sleep-like' slow and theta (slow/theta) waves co-occur with impaired behavioral performance during wakefulness. Here we used intracranial electrodes to record single-neuron activities and LFPs in human neurosurgical patients performing a face/nonface categorization psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) over multiple experimental sessions, including a session after full-night sleep deprivation. We find that, just before cognitive lapses, the selective spiking responses of individual neurons in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) are attenuated, delayed, and lengthened. These 'neuronal lapses' are evident on a trial-by-trial basis when comparing the slowest behavioral PVT reaction times to the fastest. Furthermore, during cognitive lapses, LFPs exhibit a relative local increase in slow/theta activity that is correlated with degraded single-neuron responses and with baseline theta activity. Our results show that cognitive lapses involve local state-dependent changes in neuronal activity already present in the MTL.

  16. Increased Automaticity and Altered Temporal Preparation Following Sleep Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Danyang; Asplund, Christopher L; Ling, Aiqing; Chee, Michael W L

    2015-08-01

    Temporal expectation enables us to focus limited processing resources, thereby optimizing perceptual and motor processing for critical upcoming events. We investigated the effects of total sleep deprivation (TSD) on temporal expectation by evaluating the foreperiod and sequential effects during a psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). We also examined how these two measures were modulated by vulnerability to TSD. Three 10-min visual PVT sessions using uniformly distributed foreperiods were conducted in the wake-maintenance zone the evening before sleep deprivation (ESD) and three more in the morning following approximately 22 h of TSD. TSD vulnerable and nonvulnerable groups were determined by a tertile split of participants based on the change in the number of behavioral lapses recorded during ESD and TSD. A subset of participants performed six additional 10-min modified auditory PVTs with exponentially distributed foreperiods during rested wakefulness (RW) and TSD to test the effect of temporal distribution on foreperiod and sequential effects. Sleep laboratory. There were 172 young healthy participants (90 males) with regular sleep patterns. Nineteen of these participants performed the modified auditory PVT. Despite behavioral lapses and slower response times, sleep deprived participants could still perceive the conditional probability of temporal events and modify their level of preparation accordingly. Both foreperiod and sequential effects were magnified following sleep deprivation in vulnerable individuals. Only the foreperiod effect increased in nonvulnerable individuals. The preservation of foreperiod and sequential effects suggests that implicit time perception and temporal preparedness are intact during total sleep deprivation. Individuals appear to reallocate their depleted preparatory resources to more probable event timings in ongoing trials, whereas vulnerable participants also rely more on automatic processes. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep

  17. Voluntary oculomotor performance upon awakening after total sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, M; De Gennaro MFL; Bertini, M

    2000-09-15

    The potential impact of sleep inertia on measures of voluntary oculomotor control have been surprisingly neglected. The present study examined the effects of 40 hours of sleep deprivation on saccadic (SAC) and smooth pursuit (SP) performance, attentional/visual search performance (Letter Cancellation Task, LCT) and subjective sleepiness (Sleepiness Visual Analog Scale, SVAS) recorded immediately after awakening. Standard polysomnography of nine normal subjects was recorded for 3 nights (1 adaptation, AD; 1 baseline, BSL; 1 recovery, REC); BSL and REC were separated by a period of 40 h of continuous wakefulness, during which subjects were tested every two hours. Within 30 s of each morning awakening, a test battery (SAC, SP, LCT, SVAS) was administered to subjects in bed. For data analysis, mean performance obtained during the day preceding the sleep deprivation night was considered as "Diurnal Baseline" and compared to performance upon awakening from nocturnal sleep. As a consequence of sleep deprivation, SWS percentage was doubled during REC. Saccade latency increased and velocity decreased significantly upon awakening from REC as compared to the other three conditions (Diurnal baseline, AD awakening, BSL awakening); accuracy was unaffected. As regards SP, phase did not show any impairment upon awakening, while velocity gain upon awakening from REC was significantly lower as compared to the other conditions. Finally, number of hits on LCT upon awakening from REC was significantly lower and subjective sleepiness higher as compared to Diurnal Baseline. It is concluded that 40 h of sleep deprivation significantly impaired performance to SAC and SP tasks recorded upon awakening from recovery sleep. This performance worsening is limited to the measures of speed, while both SAC accuracy and SP phase do not show a significant decrease upon awakening. Since saccadic velocity has recently been found to negatively correlate with simulator vehicle crash rates, it is

  18. Glutathione and glutathione S-transferases A1-1 and P1-1 in seminal plasma may play a role in protecting against oxidative damage to spermatozoa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raijmakers, M.; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Steegers, E.A.P.; Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.; Mulder, T.P.J.; Knapen, M.F.C.M.; Wong, W.Y.; Peters, W.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the levels of glutathione, glutathione S-transferase A1-1, and glutathione S-transferase P1-1 in seminal fluid of fertile and subfertile men. DESIGN: Retrospective case-control study. SETTING: Departments of gastroenterology, obstetrics and gynecology, and epidemiology and

  19. The relationship between tiredness prior to sleep deprivation and the antidepressant response to sleep deprivation in depression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Burg, W.; Bouhuys, A.L; van den Hoofdakker, R.H

    1995-01-01

    Recently it was hypothesized that the antidepressant response to total sleep deprivation (SD) results from a disinhibition process induced by the increase of tiredness in the course of SD. In the present study, the role of tiredness in the antidepressant response to SD is further investigated,

  20. Smoking initiation, continuation and prevalence in deprived urban areas compared to non-deprived urban areas in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Mirte A. G.; Wingen, Marleen; Stronks, Karien; Kunst, Anton E.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that smoking prevalence is higher in deprived areas than in affluent areas. We aimed to determine whether smoking initiation or continuation contributes most to inequalities in current smoking, and in which population subgroups these area differences were largest.

  1. Regional modulation of the response to glutathione in Hydra vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierobon, Paola

    2015-07-01

    In the presence of prey, or upon exposure to reduced glutathione (GSH), Hydra polyps open a mouth to ingest the captured prey and close it after feeding; at rest the mouth is not evident. In previous papers we have shown that GABA, glycine and NMDA modulate the mechanisms of mouth closure through ligand-gated-ion-channel receptors that are similar to their mammalian analogues in terms of biochemical and pharmacological properties. In order to study the regional distribution of these receptors, we have applied the GSH assay to polyps amputated at different levels of the body column. The response to 1-10 µmol l(-1) GSH of polyps lacking either peduncle and foot or the entire body columns (heads) was not different from control, whole animals. In the presence of GABA or muscimol, duration of the response was significantly decreased in heads; the decrease was suppressed by the GABA antagonists gabazine and bicuculline. By contrast, in animals lacking peduncle and foot, duration of the response did not vary upon GABA administration. Conversely, in the presence of glycine, duration of the response in heads preparations was similar to control, whereas in footless polyps, it was significantly reduced. The decrease was mimicked by the glycine agonists taurine and β-alanine, and counteracted by strychnine. These results suggest a regional distribution of receptors to GABA and glycine in the neuromuscular circuitry modulating the feeding behaviour. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Measuring glutathione-induced feeding response in hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Ram; Galande, Sanjeev

    2014-11-16

    Hydra is among the most primitive organisms possessing a nervous system and chemosensation for detecting reduced glutathione (GSH) for capturing the prey. The movement of prey organisms causes mechanosensory discharge of the stinging cells called nematocysts from hydra, which are inserted into the prey. The feeding response in hydra, which includes curling of the tentacles to bring the prey towards the mouth, opening of the mouth and consequent engulfing of the prey, is triggered by GSH present in the fluid released from the injured prey. To be able to identify the molecular mechanism of the feeding response in hydra which is unknown to date, it is necessary to establish an assay to measure the feeding response. Here, we describe a simple method for the quantitation of the feeding response in which the distance between the apical end of the tentacle and mouth of hydra is measured and the ratio of such distance before and after the addition of GSH is determined. The ratio, called the relative tentacle spread, was found to give a measure of the feeding response. This assay was validated using a starvation model in which starved hydra show an enhanced feeding response in comparison with daily fed hydra.

  3. A Synthetic Chalcone as a Potent Inducer of Glutathione Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachadourian, Remy; Day, Brian J.; Pugazhenti, Subbiah; Franklin, Christopher C.; Genoux-Bastide, Estelle; Mahaffey, Gregory; Gauthier, Charlotte; Di Pietro, Attilio; Boumendjel, Ahcène

    2014-01-01

    Chalcones continue to attract considerable interest due to their anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties. We recently reported the ability of 2′,5′-dihydroxychalcone (2′,5′-DHC) to induce both breast cancer resistance protein-mediated export of glutathione (GSH) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase-mediated increased intracellular GSH levels. Herein, we report a structure–activity relationship study of a series of 30 synthetic chalcone derivatives with hydroxyl, methoxyl, and halogen (F and Cl) substituents and their ability to increase intracellular GSH levels. This effect was drastically improved with one or two electrowithdrawing groups on phenyl ring B and up to three methoxyl and/or hydroxyl groups on phenyl ring A. The optimal structure, 2-chloro-4′,6′-dimethoxy-2′-hydroxychalcone, induced both a potent NF-E2-related factor 2-mediated transcriptional response and an increased formation of glutamate cysteine ligase holoenzyme, as shown using a human breast cancer cell line stably expressing a luciferase reporter gene driven by antioxidant response elements. PMID:22239485

  4. Caffeine and uric acid mediate glutathione synthesis for neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, K; Matsumura, N; Watabe, M; Wang, F; Kikuchi-Utsumi, K; Nakaki, T

    2011-05-05

    Several lines of epidemiological studies have indicated that caffeine consumption and plasma uric acid (UA) level were negatively correlated with the incidence of some neurodegenerative diseases. We report here a novel mechanism by which these purine derivatives increase neuronal glutathione (GSH) synthesis. Intraperitoneal injection of caffeine or UA into male C57BL/6 mice significantly increased total GSH levels in the hippocampus. Neither SCH58261, an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, nor rolipram, a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, increased GSH levels. Pretreatment with allopurinol, a drug to inhibit UA production, did not change the GSH level in the caffeine-treated mice. Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons treated with caffeine or UA were resistant to oxidant exposure in the slice culture experiments. In experiments with the SH-SY5Y cell line, cysteine uptake was sodium-dependent and pretreatment with caffeine or UA increased cysteine uptake significantly as compared with the control conditions. Slice culture experiments using the hippocampus also showed increased cysteine and GSH contents after the treatment with caffeine or UA. Immunohistochemical analysis showed increased GSH levels in the hippocampal excitatory amino acid carrier-1 (EAAC1)-positive neurons of mice treated with caffeine or UA. These findings suggest that purine derivatives caffeine and UA induce neuronal GSH synthesis by promoting cysteine uptake, leading to neuroprotection. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The evolution of glutathione metabolism in phototrophic microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Robert C.; Buschbacher, Ralph M.; Newton, Gerald L.

    1988-01-01

    The low molecular weight thiol composition of a variety of phototropic microorganisms is examined in order to ascertain how evolution of glutathione (GSH) production is related to the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cells were extracted in the presence of monobromobimane (mBBr) to convert thiols (RSH) to fluorescent derivatives (RSmB) which were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Significant levels of GSH were not found in green sulfur bacteria. Substantial levels were present in purple bacteria, cyanobacteria, and eukaryotic algae. Other thiols measured included cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine, thiosulfate, coenzyme A, and sulfide. Many of the organisms also exhibited a marked ability to reduce mBBr to syn-(methyl,methyl)bimane, an ability which was quenched by treatment with 2-pyridyl disulfide or 5,5 prime-bisdithio - (2-nitrobenzoic acid) prior to reaction with mBBr. These observations indicate the presence of a reducing system capable of electron transfer to mBBr and reduction of reactive disulfides. The distribution of GSH in phototropic eubacteria indicates that GSH synthesis evolved at or around the time that oxygenic photosynthesis evolved.

  6. Role of glutathione in immunity and inflammation in the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Ghezzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pietro GhezziBrighton and Sussex Medical School, Trafford Centre, Falmer, Brighton, UKAbstract: Reactive oxygen species and thiol antioxidants, including glutathione (GSH, regulate innate immunity at various levels. This review outlines the redox-sensitive steps of the cellular mechanisms implicated in inflammation and host defense against infection, and describes how GSH is not only important as an antioxidant but also as a signaling molecule. There is an extensive literature of the role of GSH in immunity. Most reviews are biased by an oversimplified picture where “bad” free radicals cause all sorts of diseases and “good” antioxidants protect from them and prevent oxidative stress. While this may be the case in certain fields (eg, toxicology, the role of thiols (the topic of this review in immunity certainly requires wearing scientist’s goggles and being prepared to accept a more complex picture. This review aims at describing the role of GSH in the lung in the context of immunity and inflammation. The first part summarizes the history and basic concepts of this picture. The second part focuses on GSH metabolism/levels in pathology, the third on the role of GSH in innate immunity and inflammation, and the fourth gives 4 examples describing the importance of GSH in the response to infections.Keywords: antioxidants, oxidative stress, sepsis, infection, cysteine

  7. Glutathione Transferase GSTπ In Breast Tumors Evaluated By Three Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Molina

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The glutathione transferases are involved in intracellular detoxification reactions. One of these, GSTπ, is elevated in some breast cancer cells, particularly cells selected for resistance to anticancer agents. We evaluated GSTπ expression in 60 human breast tumors by three techniques, immunohistochemistry, Northern hybridization, and Western blot analysis. There was a significant positive correlation between the three methods, with complete concordance seen in 64% of the tumors. There was strong, inverse relationship between GSTπ expression and steroid receptor status with all of the techniques utili zed. [n addition, there was a trend toward higher GSTπ expression in poorly differentiated tumors, but no correlation was found between tumor GSTπ content and DNA ploidy or %S-phase. GSTπ expression was also detected in adjacent benign breast tissue as well as infiltrating lymphocytes; this expression may contribute to GSTπ measurements using either Northern hybridization or Western blot analysis. These re sults suggest that immunohistochemistry is the method of choice for measuring GSTπ in breast tumors.

  8. Glutathione-s-transferase modified electrodes for detecting anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materon, Elsa M; Jimmy Huang, Po-Jung; Wong, Ademar; Pupim Ferreira, Antonio A; Sotomayor, Maria Del Pilar Taboada; Liu, Juewen

    2014-08-15

    With the fast growth of cancer research, new analytical methods are needed to measure anticancer drugs. This is usually accomplished by using sophisticated analytical instruments. Biosensors are attractive candidates for measuring anticancer drugs, but currently few biosensors can achieve this goal. In particular, it is challenging to have a general method to monitor various types of anticancer drugs with different structures. In this work, a biosensor was developed to detect anticancer drugs by modifying carbon paste electrodes with glutathione-s-transferase (GST) enzymes. GST is widely studied in the metabolism of xenobiotics and is a major contributing factor in resistance to anticancer drugs. The measurement of anticancer drugs is based on competition between 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and the drugs for the GST enzyme in the electrochemical potential at 0.1V vs. Ag/AgCl by square wave voltammetry (SWV) or using a colorimetric method. The sensor shows a detection limit of 8.8μM cisplatin and exhibits relatively long life time in daily measurements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The depletion of nuclear glutathione impairs cell proliferation in 3t3 fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Markovic

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione is considered essential for survival in mammalian cells and yeast but not in prokaryotic cells. The presence of a nuclear pool of glutathione has been demonstrated but its role in cellular proliferation and differentiation is still a matter of debate.We have studied proliferation of 3T3 fibroblasts for a period of 5 days. Cells were treated with two well known depleting agents, diethyl maleate (DEM and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, and the cellular and nuclear glutathione levels were assessed by analytical and confocal microscopic techniques, respectively. Both agents decreased total cellular glutathione although depletion by BSO was more sustained. However, the nuclear glutathione pool resisted depletion by BSO but not with DEM. Interestingly, cell proliferation was impaired by DEM, but not by BSO. Treating the cells simultaneously with DEM and with glutathione ethyl ester to restore intracellular GSH levels completely prevented the effects of DEM on cell proliferation.Our results demonstrate the importance of nuclear glutathione in the control of cell proliferation in 3T3 fibroblasts and suggest that a reduced nuclear environment is necessary for cells to progress in the cell cycle.

  10. ENDURANCE TRAINING AND GLUTATHIONE-DEPENDENT ANTIOXIDANT DEFENSE MECHANISM IN HEART OF THE DIABETIC RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Atalay

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Regular physical exercise beneficially influences cardiac antioxidant defenses in normal rats. The aim of this study was to test whether endurance training can strengthen glutathione-dependent antioxidant defense mechanism and decrease lipid peroxidation in heart of the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Redox status of glutathione in blood of diabetic rats in response to training and acute exercise was also examined. Eight weeks of treadmill training increased the endurance in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. It did not affect glutathione level in heart tissue at rest and also after exercise. On the other hand, endurance training decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in heart, while glutathione reductase and glutathione S-transferase activities were not affected either by acute exhaustive exercise or endurance training. Reduced and oxidized glutathione levels in blood were not affected by either training or acute exercise. Conjugated dienes levels in heart tissue were increased by acute exhaustive exercise and also 8 weeks treadmill training. Longer duration of exhaustion in trained group may have contributed to the increased conjugated dienes levels in heart after acute exercise. Our results suggest that endurance type exercise may make heart more susceptible to oxidative stress. Therefore it may be wise to combine aerobic exercise with insulin treatment to prevent its adverse effects on antioxidant defense in heart in patients with diabetes mellitus

  11. Unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways suggests potential involvement in plant defense against the gall midge mayetiola destructor in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glutathione, a thiol tripeptide of '-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. In this study, we found that the abundance of total glutathion...

  12. Purification and Biochemical Characterization of Glutathione S-Transferase from Down Syndrome and Normal Children Erythrocytes: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Ragaa R.; Maharem, Tahany M.; Abdel-Meguid, Nagwa; Sabry, Gilane M.; Abdalla, Abdel-Monem; Guneidy, Rasha A.

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the phenotypic manifestation of trisomy 21. Our study was concerned with the characterization and purification of glutathione S-transferase enzyme (GST) from normal and Down syndrome (DS) erythrocytes to illustrate the difference in the role of this enzyme in the cell. Glutathione S-transferase and glutathione (GSH) was…

  13. Monocular deprivation of Fourier phase information boosts the deprived eye's dominance during interocular competition but not interocular phase combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jianying; Dong, Xue; He, Sheng; Bao, Min

    2017-06-03

    Ocular dominance has been extensively studied, often with the goal to understand neuroplasticity, which is a key characteristic within the critical period. Recent work on monocular deprivation, however, demonstrates residual neuroplasticity in the adult visual cortex. After deprivation of patterned inputs by monocular patching, the patched eye becomes more dominant. Since patching blocks both the Fourier amplitude and phase information of the input image, it remains unclear whether deprivation of the Fourier phase information alone is able to reshape eye dominance. Here, for the first time, we show that removing of the phase regularity without changing the amplitude spectra of the input image induced a shift of eye dominance toward the deprived eye, but only if the eye dominance was measured with a binocular rivalry task rather than an interocular phase combination task. These different results indicate that the two measurements are supported by different mechanisms. Phase integration requires the fusion of monocular images. The fused percept highly relies on the weights of the phase-sensitive monocular neurons that respond to the two monocular images. However, binocular rivalry reflects the result of direct interocular competition that strongly weights the contour information transmitted along each monocular pathway. Monocular phase deprivation may not change the weights in the integration (fusion) mechanism much, but alters the balance in the rivalry (competition) mechanism. Our work suggests that ocular dominance plasticity may occur at different stages of visual processing, and that homeostatic compensation also occurs for the lack of phase regularity in natural scenes. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Glutathione Preservation during Storage of Rat Lenses in Optisol-GS and Castor Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Thomas; Brøgger-Jensen, Martin Rocho; Johnson, Leif; Kessel, Line

    2013-01-01

    Background Glutathione concentration in the lens decreases in aging and cataractous lenses, providing a marker for tissue condition. Experimental procedures requiring unfrozen lenses from donor banks rely on transportation in storage medium, affecting lens homeostasis and alterations in glutathione levels. The aim of the study was to examine the effects of Optisol-GS and castor oil on lens condition, determined from their ability to maintain glutathione concentrations. Methodology/Principal Findings Rat lenses were stored in the two types of storage media at varying time intervals up to 3 days. Glutathione concentration was afterwards determined in an enzymatic detection assay, specific for both reduced and oxidized forms. Lenses removed immediately after death exhibited a glutathione concentration of 4.70±0.29 mM. In vitro stored lenses in Optisol-GS lost glutathione quickly, ending with a concentration of 0.60±0.34 mM after 3 days while castor oil stored lenses exhibited a slower decline and ended at 3 times the concentration. A group of lenses were additionally stored under post mortem conditions within the host for 6 hours before its removal. Total glutathione after 6 hours was similar to that of lenses removed immediately after death, but with altered GSH and GSSG concentrations. Subsequent storage of these lenses in media showed changes similar to those in the first series of experiments, albeit to a lesser degree. Conclusions/Significance It was determined that storage in Optisol-GS resulted in a higher loss of glutathione than lenses stored in castor oil. Storage for more than 12 hours reduced glutathione to half its original concentration, and was considered unusable after 24 hours. PMID:24260265

  15. Sex-dependent effects of sleep deprivation on myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Krivenko, Anna; Eisenmann, Eric D; Bui, Albert D; Seeley, Sarah L; Fry, Megan E; Johnson, Brandon L; Rorabaugh, Boyd R

    2016-01-01

    Sleep deprivation is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction. However, it is unknown whether the effects of sleep deprivation are limited to increasing the likelihood of experiencing a myocardial infarction or if sleep deprivation also increases the extent of myocardial injury. In this study, rats were deprived of paradoxical sleep for 96 h using the platform-over-water method. Control rats were subjected to the same condition except the control platform was large enough for the rats to sleep. Hearts from sleep deprived and control rats were subjected to 20 min ischemia on a Langendorff isolated heart system. Infarct size and post ischemic recovery of contractile function were unaffected by sleep deprivation in male hearts. In contrast, hearts from sleep-deprived females exhibited significantly larger infarcts than hearts from control females. Post ischemic recovery of rate pressure product and + dP/dT were significantly attenuated by sleep deprivation in female hearts, and post ischemic recovery of end diastolic pressure was significantly elevated in hearts from sleep deprived females compared to control females, indicating that post ischemic recovery of both systolic and diastolic function were worsened by sleep deprivation. These data provide evidence that sleep deprivation increases the extent of ischemia-induced injury in a sex-dependent manner.

  16. Role of corticosterone on sleep homeostasis induced by REM sleep deprivation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Ricardo Borges; Tufik, Sergio; Suchecki, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Sleep is regulated by humoral and homeostatic processes. If on one hand chronic elevation of stress hormones impair sleep, on the other hand, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation induces elevation of glucocorticoids and time of REM sleep during the recovery period. In the present study we sought to examine whether manipulations of corticosterone levels during REM sleep deprivation would alter the subsequent sleep rebound. Adult male Wistar rats were fit with electrodes for sleep monitoring and submitted to four days of REM sleep deprivation under repeated corticosterone or metyrapone (an inhibitor of corticosterone synthesis) administration. Sleep parameters were continuously recorded throughout the sleep deprivation period and during 3 days of sleep recovery. Plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone were also evaluated. Metyrapone treatment prevented the elevation of corticosterone plasma levels induced by REM sleep deprivation, whereas corticosterone administration to REM sleep-deprived rats resulted in lower corticosterone levels than in non-sleep deprived rats. Nonetheless, both corticosterone and metyrapone administration led to several alterations on sleep homeostasis, including reductions in the amount of non-REM and REM sleep during the recovery period, although corticosterone increased delta activity (1.0-4.0 Hz) during REM sleep deprivation. Metyrapone treatment of REM sleep-deprived rats reduced the number of REM sleep episodes. In conclusion, reduction of corticosterone levels during REM sleep deprivation resulted in impairment of sleep rebound, suggesting that physiological elevation of corticosterone levels resulting from REM sleep deprivation is necessary for plentiful recovery of sleep after this stressful event.

  17. Antidepressant effects of sleep deprivation require astrocyte-dependent adenosine mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, D J; Schmitt, L I; Hines, R M; Moss, S J; Haydon, P G

    2013-01-15

    Major depressive disorder is a debilitating condition with a lifetime risk of ten percent. Most treatments take several weeks to achieve clinical efficacy, limiting the ability to bring instant relief needed in psychiatric emergencies. One intervention that rapidly alleviates depressive symptoms is sleep deprivation; however, its mechanism of action is unknown. Astrocytes regulate responses to sleep deprivation, raising the possibility that glial signaling mediates antidepressive-like actions of sleep deprivation. Here, we found that astrocytic signaling to adenosine (A1) receptors was required for the robust reduction of depressive-like behaviors following 12 hours of sleep deprivation. As sleep deprivation activates synaptic A1 receptors, we mimicked the effect of sleep deprivation on depression phenotypes by administration of the A1 agonist CCPA. These results provide the first mechanistic insight into how sleep deprivation impacts mood, and provide a novel pathway for rapid antidepressant development by modulation of glial signaling in the brain.

  18. Enhancement of cysteine catabolism into taurine impacts glutathione homeostasis in rats challenged with ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Chul Won; Kwon, Do Young; Jun, Doo Sung; Lee, Yoo Min; Kim, Young Chul

    2015-06-01

    We determined the alterations in metabolic conversion of cysteine into glutathione and taurine in liver of rats treated with ethanol acutely. Ethanol treatment reduced cysteine as well as glutathione levels in liver for 24 h. However, cysteine dioxygenase was up-regulated rapidly, and hypotaurine/taurine levels were significantly higher than those found in the saline-treated rats. It is therefore suggested that enhancement of cysteine catabolism into taurine contributes to the depletion of hepatic glutathione, which could exacerbate the ethanol-induced oxidative liver injury.

  19. A simple colorimetric assay for specific detection of glutathione-S transferase activity associated with DDT resistance in mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Morou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insecticide-based methods represent the most effective means of blocking the transmission of vector borne diseases. However, insecticide resistance poses a serious threat and there is a need for tools, such as diagnostic tests for resistance detection, that will improve the sustainability of control interventions. The development of such tools for metabolism-based resistance in mosquito vectors lags behind those for target site resistance mutations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed and validated a simple colorimetric assay for the detection of Epsilon class Glutathione transferases (GST-based DDT resistance in mosquito species, such as Aedes aegypti, the major vector of dengue and yellow fever worldwide. The colorimetric assay is based on the specific alkyl transferase activity of Epsilon GSTs for the haloalkene substrate iodoethane, which produces a dark blue colour highly correlated with AaGSTE2-2-overexpression in individual mosquitoes. The colour can be measured visually and spectrophotometrically. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The novel assay is substantially more sensitive compared to the gold standard CDNB assay and allows the discrimination of moderate resistance phenotypes. We anticipate that it will have direct application in routine vector monitoring as a resistance indicator and possibly an important impact on disease vector control.

  20. A simple colorimetric assay for specific detection of glutathione-S transferase activity associated with DDT resistance in mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morou, Evangelia; Dowd, Andrew J; Rajatileka, Shavanti; Steven, Andrew; Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Paine, Mark; Vontas, John

    2010-08-31

    Insecticide-based methods represent the most effective means of blocking the transmission of vector borne diseases. However, insecticide resistance poses a serious threat and there is a need for tools, such as diagnostic tests for resistance detection, that will improve the sustainability of control interventions. The development of such tools for metabolism-based resistance in mosquito vectors lags behind those for target site resistance mutations. We have developed and validated a simple colorimetric assay for the detection of Epsilon class Glutathione transferases (GST)-based DDT resistance in mosquito species, such as Aedes aegypti, the major vector of dengue and yellow fever worldwide. The colorimetric assay is based on the specific alkyl transferase activity of Epsilon GSTs for the haloalkene substrate iodoethane, which produces a dark blue colour highly correlated with AaGSTE2-2-overexpression in individual mosquitoes. The colour can be measured visually and spectrophotometrically. The novel assay is substantially more sensitive compared to the gold standard CDNB assay and allows the discrimination of moderate resistance phenotypes. We anticipate that it will have direct application in routine vector monitoring as a resistance indicator and possibly an important impact on disease vector control.

  1. Preparation and characterization of microparticles of β-cyclodextrin/glutathione and chitosan/glutathione obtained by spray-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Vanessa; de Siqueira Ferreira, Daniel; Barreto, Pedro Luis Manique; Weiss-Angeli, Valeria; Vanderlinde, Regina

    2018-03-01

    Reduced glutathione (GSH) is an efficient antioxidant on limitation of browning, of the loss of aromas and off-flavor formation in white wines. The encapsulation of GSH in a polymer system to be added in white wines may prolong its antioxidant action. The aim of this work was to prepare and characterize spray-dried microparticles using β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) or chitosan as polymers for encapsulation of GSH for its addition to wine to prevent oxidation. The microparticles obtained after the drying process were characterized regarding morphology, chemical interaction between GSH and polymers, thermal stability, microstructure, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro GSH release. SEM showed spherical microparticles, with wrinkled surfaces for β-CD/GSH and smooth surfaces for chitosan/GSH. A wide distribution of particle size was observed. In general, β-CD/GSH showed an average diameter smaller than the chitosan/GSH microparticles. FT-IR showed a possible interaction between GSH and both polymers. DSC and DRX showed that encapsulation process produced a marked decrease in GSH crystallinity. The encapsulation efficiency was 25.0% for chitosan/GSH and 62.4% for β-CD/GSH microparticles. The GSH release profiles from microparticles showed that β-CD can control the release behaviors of GSH better than chitosan in a model wine. Cumulative release data were fitted to an empirical equation to compute diffusional exponent (n), which indicates a trend the non-Fickian release of GSH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Health-Risk Behaviour in Deprived Neighbourhoods Compared with Non-Deprived Neighbourhoods: A Systematic Literature Review of Quantitative Observational Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Holst Algren

    Full Text Available There has been increasing interest in neighbourhoods' influence on individuals' health-risk behaviours, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity and diet. The aim of this review was to systematically review recent studies on health-risk behaviour among adults who live in deprived neighbourhoods compared with those who live in non-deprived neighbourhoods and to summarise what kind of operationalisations of neighbourhood deprivation that were used in the studies.PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews were followed. Systematic searches were performed in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Sociological Abstracts using relevant search terms, Boolean operators, and truncation, and reference lists were scanned. Quantitative observational studies that examined health-risk behaviour in deprived neighbourhoods compared with non-deprived neighbourhoods were eligible for inclusion.The inclusion criteria were met by 22 studies. The available literature showed a positive association between smoking and physical inactivity and living in deprived neighbourhoods compared with non-deprived neighbourhoods. In regard to low fruit and vegetable consumption and alcohol consumption, the results were ambiguous, and no clear differences were found. Numerous different operationalisations of neighbourhood deprivation were used in the studies.Substantial evidence indicates that future health interventions in deprived neighbourhoods should focus on smoking and physical inactivity. We suggest that alcohol interventions should be population based rather than based on the specific needs of deprived neighbourhoods. More research is needed on fruit and vegetable consumption. In future studies, the lack of a uniform operationalisation of neighbourhood deprivation must be addressed.

  3. Genetic and transcriptional study of glutathione metabolism in Oenococcus oeni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalef-Català, Mar; Araque, Isabel; Bordons, Albert; Reguant, Cristina

    2017-02-02

    Although Oenococcus oeni is the main species that is responsible for malolactic fermentation (MLF), harsh wine conditions can limit its performance. Although several mechanisms underlying the response to stress have been studied in this species, little is known regarding the cellular systems that protect against oxidative stress in other bacteria, such as glutathione (GSH). O. oeni cannot synthesize GSH but contains several genes related to its utilization. In this study, the relative expression (RE) of the seven genes involved in the GSH redox system found in O. oeni PSU-1 (gshR, gpo, three glutaredoxin-like genes and two subunits of an hypothetical transporter) has been measured. The study was performed using three strains, with each exhibiting a different GSH uptake capacity. The strains were grown in a stress-adaptation medium supplemented with 5mM GSH and under different adaptation stress conditions (pH4 and 6% ethanol). The RE showed that only some of these genes, including one for a possible glutaredoxin (OEOE_RS04215) and cydC for a subunit of a putative GSH transporter (OEOE_RS1995), responded to the addition of GSH. The presence of ethanol had a relevant effect on gene expression. Among the studied genes, the one for a NrdH-redoxin (OEOE_RS00645) showed a common response to ethanol in the strains, being over-expressed when grown with GSH. In most cases, the transcriptional changes were more evident for the strain with a higher capacity of GSH uptake. Malolactic performance of the three strains after pre-adaptation was evaluated in wine-like media (12% ethanol and pH3.4). It was observed that the addition of GSH during pre-adaptation growth had a protective role in the cells exposed to low pH and ethanol, resulting in a quicker MLF. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. The evolution of glutathione metabolism in phototrophic microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, R. C.; Buschbacher, R. M.; Newton, G. L.

    1987-01-01

    Of the many roles ascribed to glutathione (GSH) the one most clearly established is its role in the protection of higher eucaryotes against oxygen toxicity through destruction of thiol-reactive oxygen byproducts. If this is the primary function of GSH then GSH metabolism should have evolved during or after the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. That many bacteria do not produce GSH is consistent with this view. In the present study we have examined the low-molecular-weight thiol composition of a variety of phototrophic microorganisms to ascertain how evolution of GSH production is related to evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cells were extracted in the presence of monobromobimane (mBBr) to convert thiols to fluorescent derivatives, which were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Significant levels of GSH were not found in the green bacteria (Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum and Chloroflexus aurantiacus). Substantial levels of GSH were present in the purple bacteria (Chromatium vinosum, Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and Rhodocyclus gelatinosa), the cyanobacteria [Anacystis nidulans, Microcoleus chthonoplastes S.G., Nostoc muscorum, Oscillatoria amphigranulata, Oscillatoria limnetica, Oscillatoria sp. (Stinky Spring, Utah), Oscillatoria terebriformis, Plectonema boryanum, and Synechococcus lividus], and eucaryotic algae (Chlorella pyrenoidsa, Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena gracilis, Scenedesmus obliquus, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii). Other thiols measured included cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine, thiosulfate, coenzyme A, and sulfide; several unidentified thiols were also detected. Many of the organisms examined also exhibited a marked ability to reduce mBBr to syn-(methyl,methyl)bimane, an ability that was quenched by treatment with 2-pyridyl disulfide or 5,5'-bisdithio-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) prior to reaction with mBBr. These observations indicate the presence of a reducing system capable of electron transfer to mBBr and reduction of

  5. The evolution of glutathione metabolism in phototrophic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, R C; Buschbacher, R M; Newton, G L

    1987-01-01

    Of the many roles ascribed to glutathione (GSH) the one most clearly established is its role in the protection of higher eucaryotes against oxygen toxicity through destruction of thiol-reactive oxygen byproducts. If this is the primary function of GSH then GSH metabolism should have evolved during or after the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. That many bacteria do not produce GSH is consistent with this view. In the present study we have examined the low-molecular-weight thiol composition of a variety of phototrophic microorganisms to ascertain how evolution of GSH production is related to evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cells were extracted in the presence of monobromobimane (mBBr) to convert thiols to fluorescent derivatives, which were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Significant levels of GSH were not found in the green bacteria (Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum and Chloroflexus aurantiacus). Substantial levels of GSH were present in the purple bacteria (Chromatium vinosum, Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and Rhodocyclus gelatinosa), the cyanobacteria [Anacystis nidulans, Microcoleus chthonoplastes S.G., Nostoc muscorum, Oscillatoria amphigranulata, Oscillatoria limnetica, Oscillatoria sp. (Stinky Spring, Utah), Oscillatoria terebriformis, Plectonema boryanum, and Synechococcus lividus], and eucaryotic algae (Chlorella pyrenoidsa, Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena gracilis, Scenedesmus obliquus, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii). Other thiols measured included cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine, thiosulfate, coenzyme A, and sulfide; several unidentified thiols were also detected. Many of the organisms examined also exhibited a marked ability to reduce mBBr to syn-(methyl,methyl)bimane, an ability that was quenched by treatment with 2-pyridyl disulfide or 5,5'-bisdithio-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) prior to reaction with mBBr. These observations indicate the presence of a reducing system capable of electron transfer to mBBr and reduction of

  6. Mitochondrial Thioredoxin-Glutathione Reductase from Larval Taenia crassiceps (Cysticerci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Guevara-Flores

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial thioredoxin-glutathione reductase was purified from larval Taenia crassiceps (cysticerci. The preparation showed NADPH-dependent reductase activity with either thioredoxin or GSSG, and was able to perform thiol/disulfide exchange reactions. At 25∘C specific activities were 437  ±  27 mU mg-1 and 840  ±  49 mU mg-1 with thioredoxin and GSSG, respectively. Apparent Km values were 0.87  ±  0.04  μM, 41  ±  6  μM and 19  ±  10  μM for thioredoxin, GSSG and NADPH, respectively. Thioredoxin from eukaryotic sources was accepted as substrate. The enzyme reduced H2O2 in a NADPH-dependent manner, although with low catalytic efficiency. In the presence of thioredoxin, mitochondrial TGR showed a thioredoxin peroxidase-like activity. All disulfide reductase activities were inhibited by auranofin, suggesting mTGR is dependent on selenocysteine. The reductase activity with GSSG showed a higher dependence on temperature as compared with the DTNB reductase activity. The variation of the GSSG- and DTNB reductase activities on pH was dependent on the disulfide substrate. Like the cytosolic isoform, mTGR showed a hysteretic kinetic behavior at moderate or high GSSG concentrations, but it was less sensitive to calcium. The enzyme was able to protect glutamine synthetase from oxidative inactivation, suggesting that mTGR is competent to contend with oxidative stress.

  7. Electrophilic properties of patulin. N-acetylcysteine and glutathione adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliege, R; Metzler, M

    2000-05-01

    In our studies on the electrophilic properties of the mycotoxin patulin (PAT), we have now investigated the nonenzymatic reaction of PAT with the thiol-containing tripeptide glutathione and its metabolic degradation product N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Adduct formation in aqueous phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) was studied by analytical HPLC/DAD, and most of the products were isolated by preparative HPLC. Structure elucidation was carried out mainly by means of high-resolution NMR experiments and comparison of the data with those previously obtained for PAT adducts formed with simple model nucleophiles such as 4-bromothiophenol and 2-mercaptoethanol [Fliege, R., and Metzler, M. (2000) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 13, 363-372]. The assigned structures were confirmed by UV spectroscopy, formation of daughter products from isolated adducts, and partly FAB-MS. The reaction pathways of PAT with NAC were qualitatively the same as those previously observed for the aliphatic thiol model compound 2-mercaptoethanol. Due to the chiral nature of NAC and the new chiral center generated during the reaction with PAT, two diastereomers of each adduct were formed and observed in HPLC analysis. The major products formed in the reaction of PAT with GSH were of the same structural type as obtained with NAC. In addition, three cyclic adducts were formed with GSH, arising from the nucleophilic activity of the alpha-amino groups of the glutamic acid and the cysteine residue. In contrast, free cysteine yielded a markedly different adduct pattern, possibly due to the preferred formation of mixed thiol/amine-type adducts involving the alpha-amino group.

  8. Sleep deprivation, pain and prematurity: a review study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Cristina Santos de Carvalho Bonan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to describe current reports in the scientific literature on sleep in the intensive care environment and sleep deprivation associated with painful experiences in premature infant. A systematic search was conducted for studies on sleep, pain, premature birth and care of the newborn. Web of Knowledge, MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, VHL and SciELO databases were consulted. The association between sleep deprivation and pain generates effects that are observed in the brain and the behavioral and physiological activity of preterm infants. Polysomnography in intensive care units and pain management in neonates allow comparison with the first year of life and term infants. We have found few references and evidence that neonatal care programs can influence sleep development and reduce the negative impact of the environment. This evidence is discussed from the perspective of how hospital intervention can improve the development of premature infants.

  9. Sleep, sleep deprivation, autonomic nervous system and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobaldini, Eleonora; Costantino, Giorgio; Solbiati, Monica; Cogliati, Chiara; Kara, Tomas; Nobili, Lino; Montano, Nicola

    2017-03-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has become a relevant health problem in modern societies. We can be sleep deprived due to lifestyle habits or due to sleep disorders, such as insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and neurological disorders. One of the common element of sleep disorders is the condition of chronic SD, which has complex biological consequences. SD is capable of inducing different biological effects, such as neural autonomic control changes, increased oxidative stress, altered inflammatory and coagulatory responses and accelerated atherosclerosis. All these mechanisms links SD and cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Epidemiological studies have shown that short sleep duration is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases, such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, arrhythmias, diabetes and obesity, after adjustment for socioeconomic and demographic risk factors and comorbidities. Thus, an early assessment of a condition of SD and its treatment is clinically relevant to prevent the harmful consequences of a very common condition in adult population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Extreme Sleep Deprivation on Human Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuan Tran; Kimberly R. Raddatz; Elizabeth T. Cady; Bradford Amstutz; Pete D. Elgin; Christopher Vowels; Gerald Deehan

    2007-04-01

    Sleep is a fundamental recuperative process for the nervous system. Disruption of this homeostatic drive can lead to severe impairments of the operator’s ability to perceive, recognize, and respond to emergencies and/or unanticipated events, putting the operator at risk. Therefore, establishing a comprehensive understanding of how sleep deprivation influences human performance is essential in order to counter fatigue or to develop mitigation strategies. The goal of the present study was to examine the psychological effects of prolonged sleep deprivation (approx. 75 hrs) over a four-day span on a general aviation pilot flying a fixed-based flight simulator. During the study, a series of tasks were employed every four hours in order to examine the pilot’s perceptual and higher level cognitive abilities. Overall, results suggest that the majority of cognitive and perceptual degradation occurs between 30-40 hours into the flight. Limitations and future research directions are also discussed.

  11. The relationship between deprivation and forensic opportunities with stolen vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lisa L; Bond, John W

    2009-09-01

    Collection and interpretation of forensic intelligence (primarily through DNA and fingerprint identifications) is an integral part of the investigation of criminal offenses ranging from burglary and vehicle crime to major crime. The forensic contribution depends not only on the successful recovery of material, but also the ability to identify potential offenders and apply this intelligence to solve the crime. This study examines burglary and vehicle crimes investigated by Northamptonshire Police (U.K.) by analyzing relationships between deprivation of a crime location and the recovery and identification of DNA and fingerprint material. The results show that, for stolen vehicles, although significantly more forensic material (both DNA and fingerprints) is recovered and identified in more deprived neighborhoods, this does not lead to a corresponding increase in solved cases. These findings are considered in relation to previous studies, which have advocated the prioritization of resources at crime scenes most likely to yield forensic material.

  12. Sleep deprivation, pain and prematurity: a review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, Kelly Cristina Santos de Carvalho; Pimentel Filho, João da Costa; Tristão, Rosana Maria; Jesus, José Alfredo Lacerda de; Campos Junior, Dioclécio

    2015-02-01

    The aim was to describe current reports in the scientific literature on sleep in the intensive care environment and sleep deprivation associated with painful experiences in premature infant. A systematic search was conducted for studies on sleep, pain, premature birth and care of the newborn. Web of Knowledge, MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, VHL and SciELO databases were consulted. The association between sleep deprivation and pain generates effects that are observed in the brain and the behavioral and physiological activity of preterm infants. Polysomnography in intensive care units and pain management in neonates allow comparison with the first year of life and term infants. We have found few references and evidence that neonatal care programs can influence sleep development and reduce the negative impact of the environment. This evidence is discussed from the perspective of how hospital intervention can improve the development of premature infants.

  13. [Disturbance of sports performance after partial sleep deprivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougin, F; Davenne, D; Simon-Rigaud, M L; Renaud, A; Garnier, A; Magnin, P

    1989-01-01

    The changes in cardiac and ventilatory responses were measured in 7 endurance athletes during physical exercise on a bicycle ergometer, taking place after a control night and after a night with partial sleep deprivation in the middle of the night. The results show that, despite the maximal work load was not modified with control, heart rate, ventilation and VE/VO2 ratio (ERO2) were greater at the submaximal (75% of the VO2 max) and maximal work load and oxygen consumption decreased at maximal work, after the night of partial sleep deprivation as compared to the control. These findings suggest that acute sleep loss may contribute to alter the endurance performance by impairment of aerobic pathways.

  14. Impact of Temporary Nitrogen Deprivation on Tomato Leaf Phenolics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Gautier

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Reducing the use of pesticides represents a major challenge of modern agriculture. Plants synthesize secondary metabolites such as polyphenols that participate in the resistance to parasites. The aim of this study was to test: (1 the impact of nitrogen deficiency on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum leaf composition and more particularly on two phenolic molecules (chlorogenic acid and rutin as well as on the general plant biomass; and (2 whether this effect continued after a return to normal nitrogen nutrition. Our results showed that plants deprived of nitrogen for 10 or 19 days contained higher levels of chlorogenic acid and rutin than control plants. In addition, this difference persisted when the plants were once again cultivated on a nitrogen-rich medium. These findings offer interesting perspectives on the use of a short period of deprivation to modulate the levels of compounds of interest in a plant.

  15. Sleep deprivation attenuates experimental stroke severity in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Constantinescu, Alexandra Oana; Balseanu, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Indirect epidemiological and experimental evidence suggest that the severity of injury during stroke is influenced by prior sleep history. The aim of our study was to test the effect of acute sleep deprivation on early outcome following experimental stroke. Young male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=20......) were subjected to focal cerebral ischemia by reversible right middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 90 min. In 10 rats, MCAO was performed just after 6-h of total sleep deprivation (TSD) by "gentle handling", whereas the other rats served as controls. Neurological function during the first week...... after stroke was monitored using a battery of behavioral tests investigating the asymmetry of sensorimotor deficit (tape removal test and cylinder test), bilateral sensorimotor coordination (rotor-rod and Inclined plane) and memory (T-maze and radial maze). Following MCAO, control rats had impaired...

  16. Cytochrome P-450 and glutathione: what is the significance of their interrelationship in lipid peroxidation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bast, A.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Both cytochrome P-450 and glutathione participate in the metabolism of xenobiotics. Their interrelationship is described here, as well as current findings indicating their mutual involvement in lipid peroxidation.

  17. Exercise training with ageing protects against ethanol induced myocardial glutathione homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakarla, Pushpalatha; Kesireddy, Sathyavelureddy; Christiaan, Leeuwenburgh

    2008-05-01

    Glutathione plays a central role in the maintenance of cellular antioxidant defense. The alterations in the glutathione and associated recyclic enzymes caused by both exercise training and ethanol are well documented; however, their interactive effects with age are not well understood. Therefore, the influence of ageing and the interactive effects of exercise training and ethanol on the myocardial glutathione system in 3 months and 18 months old rats were examined. The results showed a significant (pEthanol consumption significantly (pethanol consumption significantly (pethanol significantly (pethanol treated rats in both age groups, indicating the suppression of ethanol-induced oxidative stress by exercise training. In conclusion, there was a compensatory myocardial response lessening ethanol-induced oxidative stress by exercise training, which seemed to result from the higher activity of glutathione recycling and utilizing enzymes, which may be critical for preventing chronic oxidative damage to the myocardium during ageing and even due to ethanol consumption.

  18. Association of glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1)-313 A> G gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association of glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1)-313 A> G gene polymorphism and susceptibility to endometrial hyperplasia among Egyptian women. Afaf Elsaid, Wfaa Al-Kholy, Rana Ramadan, Rami Elshazli ...

  19. Glutathione suppresses the enzymatic and non-enzymatic browning in grape juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengjun

    2014-10-01

    Browning tends to occur in grape juice during processing and storage and decreases the commercial value of it. Thus, browning inhibition is an important objective for manufacturers. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of glutathione as a browning inhibitor for use on grape juice. Grape juice browning treated with glutathione was monitored during processing and accelerated browning. 0.04% of glutathione inhibited 99.4% of the polyphenoloxidase activity in the grape juice. Consequently, during processing at room temperature and accelerated browning at 80 °C, the browning in the grape juice treated with glutathione was significantly lower than that in the control (pbrowning inhibitor used in grape juice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetically separable nanoferrite-anchored glutathione: Aqueous homocoupling of arylboronic acids under microwave irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A highly active, stable and magnetically separable glutathione based organocatalyst provided good to excellent yields to symmetric biaryls in the homocoupling of arylboronic acids under microwave irradiation. Symmetrical biaryl motifs are present in a wide range of natural p...