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Sample records for bsh toxicity issues

  1. Borocaptate sodium (BSH) toxicity issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ISU's Center for Toxicology Research has been conducting toxicity testing of borocaptate sodium (BSH) to aid in assessing if proposed human studies of BSH are likely to be acceptably safe. This report describes BSH interactions with other biological agents

  2. Borocaptate sodium (BSH) toxicity issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaHann, T.

    1995-11-01

    ISU`s Center for Toxicology Research has been conducting toxicity testing of borocaptate sodium (BSH) to aid in assessing if proposed human studies of BSH are likely to be acceptably safe. This report describes BSH interactions with other biological agents.

  3. Boron biodistribution for BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model: Combined administration of BSH and BPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH) is being investigated clinically for BNCT. We examined the biodistribution of BSH and BPA administered jointly in different proportions in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. The 3 assayed protocols were non-toxic, and showed preferential tumor boron uptake versus precancerous and normal tissue and therapeutic tumor boron concentration values (70–85 ppm). All 3 protocols warrant assessment in BNCT studies to contribute to the knowledge of (BSH+BPA)-BNCT radiobiology for head and neck cancer and optimize therapeutic efficacy. - Highlights: • We study the biodistribution of BPA+BSH for BNCT in experimental oral cancer. • The 3 BPA+BSH protocols assayed are potentially therapeutic. • Different proportions of B compounds with different CBE factors will affect response

  4. BNCT - Quality of BPA and BSH

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kříž, Otomar; Mandel, M.

    Pisa : OERTC, 2003, s. 41. [International workshop on Neutron Capture Therapy State of the Art . Pisa (IT), 28.11.2003] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : BPA * BSH * Good manufactory practice Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  5. Cellular and subcellular distribution of BSH in human glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular and subcellular distribution of mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (BSH) in seven glioblastoma multiforme tissue sections of six patients having received BSH prior to surgery was investigated by light, fluorescence and electron microscopy. With use of specific antibodies against BSH its localization could be found in tissue sections predominantly (approx. 90%) in the cytoplasm of GFAP-positive cells of all but one patient. The latter was significantly younger (33 years in contrast of 46-71 (mean 60) years). In none of the tissue sections BSH could be found to a significant amount in the cell nuclei. In contrast, electron microscopy studies show BSH as well associated with the cell membrane as with the chromatin in the nucleus. (author)

  6. BPA and BSH accumulation in experimental tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accumulation of boronated compounds into tumors is a critical component to the success of BNCT. To date, great variability has been demonstrated in the tumor:blood ratio achieved in samples both from different patients and within samples taken from the same patient. The factors that probably influence the level of uptake include the vascular perfusion within the tumor, the permeability of these vessels and the viability of the tumor cells themselves. These experiments were designed to measure these various factors in different experimental tumor models and to relate these measurements to the uptake of both BPA (Boronophenylalanine) and BSH (Sodiumborocaptate). They demonstrate that within different tumors there can be wide variations in the vascular parameters. In addition, the viability of the tumor cells may also be an important determinant of tumor uptake. (author)

  7. Toxicity of nanomaterials; an undermined issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogharabi, Mehdi; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are employed in extensive variety of commercial products such as electronic components, cosmetics, food, sports equipment, biomedical applications, and medicine. With the increasing utilization of engineered nanomaterials, the potential exposure of human to nanoparticles is rapidly increasing. Nowadays when new nanomaterials with new applications are introduced, mostly good and positive effects are mentioned whereas possible hazards arising from nanosize of the compounds are undermined. Toxicology studies of nanomaterials demonstrate some adverse effects in some human organs such as central nerve system, immune system, and lung. There is lack of complete information about human toxicity and environmental waste of nanomaterials. We aimed to highlight current toxicological concerns of potentially useful nanomaterials which are now used in pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences. PMID:25123555

  8. Biodistribution study with combined administration of BPA and BSH for BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously proved the therapeutic potential of the chemically non-selective boron compound decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) as a stand-alone boron carrier for BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model with no toxic effects in normal or precancerous tissue. Although GB-10 is not taken up selectively by oral tumor tissue, selective tumor lethality would result from selective aberrant tumor blood vessel damage. Furthermore, BNCT efficacy was enhanced when GB-10 and boronophenylalanine (BPA) were administered jointly. The fact that sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH) is being investigated clinically as a stand-alone boron agent for BNCT of brain tumors and in combination with BPA for recurrent head and neck malignancies makes it a particularly interesting boron compound to explore. Based on the working hypothesis that BSH would conceivably behave similarly to GB-10 in oral cancer, we previously performed biodistribution studies with BSH alone in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. The aim of the present study was to perform biodistribution studies of BSH + BPA administered jointly in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model as a starting point to contribute to the knowledge of (BSH+BPA)-BNCT radiobiology and optimize therapeutic efficacy. The right cheek pouch of Syrian hamsters was subjected to topical administration of a carcinogen twice a week for 12 weeks. Once the exophytic tumors, i.e. squamous cell carcinomas, had developed, the animals were used for biodistribution studies with BSH + BPA. Three administration protocols with different proportions of each of the compounds were assessed: 1. BSH, 50 mg 10B/kg, iv + BPA, 15.5 mg 10B/kg, ip; 2. BSH, 34.5 mg 10B/kg, iv + BPA, 31 mg 10B/kg, ip; 3. BSH, 20 mg 10B/kg, iv + BPA, 46.5 mg 10B/kg, ip. Groups of animals were euthanized 4 h after the administration of BSH and 3 h after the administration of BPA. Samples of blood, tumor, precancerous and normal pouch and other tissues with clinical

  9. Sodium borocaptate (BSH) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model: boron biodistribution at 9 post administration time-points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The therapeutic success of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) depends centrally on boron concentration in tumor and healthy tissue. We previously demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of boronophenylalanine (BPA) and sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) as boron carriers for BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Given the clinical relevance of sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH) as a boron carrier, the aim of the present study was to expand the ongoing BSH biodistribution studies in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. In particular, we studied 3 additional post-administration time-points and increased the sample size corresponding to the time-points evaluated previously, to select more accurately the post-administration time at which neutron irradiation would potentially confer the greatest therapeutic advantage. BSH was dissolved in saline solution in anaerobic conditions to avoid the formation of the dimer BSSB and its oxides which are toxic. The solution was injected intravenously at a dose of 50 mg 10 B/kg (88 mg BSH / kg). Different groups of animals were killed humanely at 7, 8, and 10 h after administration of BSH. The sample size corresponding to the time-points 3, 4, 6, 9 and 12 h was increased. Samples of blood, tumor, precancerous tissue, normal pouch tissue, cheek mucosa, parotid gland, palate, skin, tongue, spinal cord marrow, brain, liver, kidney, spleen and lung were processed for boron measurement by Optic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Boron concentration in tumor peaked to 24-34 ppm, 3-10 h post-administration of BSH, with a spread in values that resembled that previously reported in other experimental models and human subjects. The boron concentration ratios tumor/normal pouch tissue and tumor/blood ranged from 1.3 to 1.8. No selective tumor uptake was observed at any of the time points evaluated. The times post-administration of BSH that would be therapeutically most useful would be 5, 7 and 9 h. The

  10. Characterization of BshA, bacillithiol glycosyltransferase from Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Upton, Heather; Newton, Gerald L.; Gushiken, Melissa; Lo, Kelly; Holden, D; Fahey, Robert C.; Rawat, Mamta

    2012-01-01

    The first step during bacillithiol (BSH) biosynthesis involves the formation of N-acetylglucosaminylmalate from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine and L-malate and is catalyzed by a GT4 class glycosyltransferase enzyme (BshA). Recombinant Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis BshA were highly specific and active with L-malate but the former showed low activity with D-glyceric acid and the latter with D-malate. We show that BshA is inhibited by BSH and similarly that MshA (first enzyme of mycothiol...

  11. Monoclonal antibody against boron carriers of BNCT. Part 1. Preparation and characterization of anti mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate antibody (anti-BSH MAb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monoclonal antibody against mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (BSH) was prepared, which recognized specifically the icosahedral boron cluster moiety and named 'anti-BSH MAb'. The dissociation constant of anti-BSH MAb against BSH was determined, and the cross reactivity was also clarified by using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, the amino acid sequences of the antigen-binding site in the variable region of heavy and light chains were partly determined and characterized upon protein database. Furthermore, a highly specific, rapid and practical immunoassay for BSH including quantitative determination of the BSH concentrations in blood by the competitive ELISA system using anti-BSH MAb has been explored. (author)

  12. Electroporation increases the effect of borocaptate (10B-BSH) in neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The cell membrane permeability of borocaptate (10B-BSH) and its extent of accumulation in cells are controversial. This study was performed to elucidate these points. Methods and Materials: Two different treatments were applied to SCCVII tumor cells. The first group of tumor cells was incubated in culture medium with 10B-BSH or 10B-enriched boric acid, and was exposed to neutrons from the heavy water facility of the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). More than 99% of neutrons were thermal neutrons at flux base. The second group was pretreated by electroporation in combination with 10B-BSH, and thereafter the cells were irradiated with neutrons. The cell killing effects of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using BSH were investigated by colony formation assay. Results: Surviving cell fraction decreased exponentially with neutron fluence, and addition of BSH significantly enhanced the cell killing effect of neutron capture therapy (NCT) depending on 10B concentration. The effect of BSH-BNCT also increased with preincubation time of cells in the medium containing BSH. The electroporation of cells with BSH at 10 ppm 10B markedly enhanced BSH-BNCT effects in comparison with that of preincubation alone. The effect of BSH-BNCT with electroporation was equal to that of BNCT using 10B-boric acid at a same 10B concentration (10 ppm). Conclusions: BSH is suggested to penetrate the cells slowly and remained after washing. Electroporation can introduce BSH into the cells very efficiently, and BSH stays in the cells and is not lost by washing. Therefore, if electroporation is applied to tumors after BSH injection, 10B remains in tumors but is cleared from normal tissues, and selective accumulation of 10B in tumors will be achieved after an adequate waiting time

  13. Pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine enhanced uptake and retention of BSH in brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the influence of buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) on boron biodistribution after sulfhydryl borane (BSH) administration for boron neutron capture therapy, the effectiveness of the combination of BSO with sulfhydril- (BSH) and non-sulfhydril (B12H12 and BNH3) boron compounds, and the interval between BSO and BSH administration, the retention of boron in tissues have been evaluated using a 9L rat tumor model. Simultaneous administration of BSH and BSO showed significantly higher boron accumulation compared to that without BSO, however there was no difference in tissue boron level between B12H12 and BNH3 administration with BSO or without BSO. The longer interval (6 h) between BSH and BSO administration related to the highest boron concentration in the brain and subcutaneous tumors compared to shorter intervals (0.5, 3 h). Boron concentration in subcutaneous and brain tumors was maintained for 6 and 12 h after the administration of BSH following BSO pretreatment. - Highlights: • Coadministration of BSH and BSO showed higher tumor boron uptake than BSH only. • Higher boron uptake was not observed after B12H12 or BNH3 administration. • The increase in tumor boron accumulation might be related to SH-groups. • BSO injection 6 h before BSH showed further increase in tumor boron uptake. • High boron concentration maintained for 6 and 12 h after BSH with BSO administration

  14. Dosimetry implications of BSH biodistribution study at OSU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A BSH biodistribution study was performed at Ohio State University, where tumor, normal brain, and blood boron concentrations of patients undergoing tumor debulking surgery were acquired. The results of this biodistribution study are subjects of other presentations in this meeting. In this paper, we present an overview of the dosimetry implications of this biodistribution data. The analysis for this paper assumed that the tumor boron RBE was factor of two higher than the normal brain boron RBE. Our conclusions from this analysis were that with the tumor/blood ratios observed in our patients for times of up to 14 hours post commencement of boron infusion, one could not successfully treat patients with BNCT using BSH. (author)

  15. Toxicity of building materials : a key issue in sustainable construction

    OpenAIRE

    Torgal, Fernando Pacheco; Jalali, Said

    2010-01-01

    Avoiding the use of toxic building materials is one of the principles of sustainable construction. Current residential buildings frequently contain many toxic materials, some of which are even compliant with legal regulations in Europe and Portugal. Part of the problem is due to the fact that architects and civil engineers receive no education on the toxicity of building materials. Another problem is related to the fact that the regulations about toxicity thresholds are influenced by economic...

  16. 76 FR 17639 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Notice of Petition for Waiver of BSH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... granted by DOE. (75 FR 62127, Oct. 7, 2010). BSH states that the water used in the regeneration process is... determined that BSH's application for interim waiver does not provide sufficient market, equipment price..., Haier America, Indesit Company Sa, KuppersbuschUSA, LG Electronics USA, Miele, Inc., Samsung...

  17. Sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH), a boron carrier that merits more attention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittig, Andrea, E-mail: wittig@med.uni-marburg.de [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Philipps-University Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35043 Marburg (Germany); Stecher-Rasmussen, Finn [NCT Physics, Nassaulaan 12, 1815 GK Alkmaar (Netherlands); Hilger, Ralf A. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Duisburg-Essen, University Hospital Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Rassow, Juergen [NCTeam, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Mauri, Pierluigi [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Tecnologie, Biomediche (CNR-ITB), Via Fratelli Cervi, 93, I-20090 Segrate (Italy); Sauerwein, Wolfgang [NCTeam, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45122 Essen (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Boron neutron capture therapy relies on the preferential delivery of a {sup 10}B-compound to tumor cells. The BSH-biodistribution was investigated in nu/nu mice and human patients. The boron concentration was measured with prompt gamma ray spectroscopy. BSH accumulates to a very low extent not only in brain, but also in fat tissue, bone and muscle, which makes BSH an interesting drug not only for brain lesions but also for tumors located at the extremities. The differential uptake in different organs indicates a complex mechanism.

  18. Uptake of BSH in M2R melanoma cells monitored by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accumulation ratio of BSH, relative to that of boric acid, in M2R mouse melanoma cells, was measured using 11B NMR of the cell extracts. The cells were incubated in growth medium for up to 24 h, in the presence of 0.8 mM boric acid and 0.25-1.5 mM BSH. The aqueous phase of the cellular extracts was re-suspended for NMR spectroscopy. The relative accumulation ratio of BSH/boric acid determined from 9 separate experiments was 0.45±0.09. (author)

  19. Sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH), a boron carrier that merits more attention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron neutron capture therapy relies on the preferential delivery of a 10B-compound to tumor cells. The BSH-biodistribution was investigated in nu/nu mice and human patients. The boron concentration was measured with prompt gamma ray spectroscopy. BSH accumulates to a very low extent not only in brain, but also in fat tissue, bone and muscle, which makes BSH an interesting drug not only for brain lesions but also for tumors located at the extremities. The differential uptake in different organs indicates a complex mechanism.

  20. Is cardiac toxicity a relevant issue in the radiation treatment of esophageal cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In recent years several papers have been published on radiation-induced cardiac toxicity, especially in breast cancer patients. However, in esophageal cancer patients the radiation dose to the heart is usually markedly higher. To determine whether radiation-induced cardiac toxicity is also a relevant issue for this group, we conducted a review of the current literature. Methods: A literature search was performed in Medline for papers concerning cardiac toxicity in esophageal cancer patients treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Results: The overall crude incidence of symptomatic cardiac toxicity was as high as 10.8%. Toxicities corresponded with several dose–volume parameters of the heart. The most frequently reported complications were pericardial effusion, ischemic heart disease and heart failure. Conclusion: Cardiac toxicity is a relevant issue in the treatment of esophageal cancer. However, valid Normal Tissue Complication Probability models for esophageal cancer are not available at present

  1. Plasmid DNA damage by neutron and γ-ray in the presence of BSH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the extent of plasmid DNA damage was observed according to concentration of BSH(Boron Sulfhydry1 Hydride) and irradiation doses of neutron and γ-ray. The plasmid used was both pBR 322 (2870 bp) and φX174 RF(5386 bp) DNA. Plasmid DNA damage by irradiation in the presence of BSH was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. In the neutron experiment, DNA damage of both plasmid DNAs was increased according to increasing the concentration of BSH and neutron doses. But in the γ-ray experiment, there appeared no dose dependency as compared to the neutron experiment. The extent of the plasmid DNA damage in the presence of BSH was somewhat different according to irradiation by neutron or γ-ray

  2. Air toxic issues for the electric utility industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improved control devices, advances in fuel stack measurements and ambient sampling techniques have clarified some of the issues associated with the release of trace substance emissions into the atmosphere, particularly mercury emissions, from electric utilities. It has been determined that mercury emissions to the atmosphere from all sources globally, including utilities, has an approximate lifetime of 1-2 years before deposition, but 30 -70 per cent of mercury emissions are deposited locally within hours to days. Recent and continual field studies are being conducted to determine how much mercury is actually emitted from background sources and how this mercury enters general atmospheric circulations. The issue of how much mercury deposits locally versus being transported regionally or globally is also under study along with how mercury enters the food chain for fish in lakes and ultimately the consumer. Current health effects studies have indicated that there are slight differences in some of the earlier estimates of mercury's health effects. More studies are underway to help determine the degree of health threat to U.S. consumers of fish and to determine if mercury emissions are carried beyond U.S. borders to global dispersion. Some studies have also indicated a net reduction of mercury in clouds

  3. Intracellular targeting of mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (BSH) to malignant glioma by transferrin-PEG liposomes for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant glioma is one of the most difficult tumor to control with usual therapies. In our institute, we select boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as an adjuvant radiation therapy after surgical resection. This therapy requires the selective delivery of high concentration of 10B to malignant tumor tissue. In this study, we focused on a tumor-targeting 10B delivery system (BDS) for BNCT that uses transferrin-conjugated polyethylene-glycol liposome encapsulating BSH (TF-PEG liposome-BSH) and compared 10B uptake of the tumor among BSH, PEG liposome-BSH and TF-PEG liposome-BSH. In vitro, we analyzed 10B concentration of the cultured human U87Δ glioma cells incubated in medium containing 20 μg 10B/ml derived from each BDS by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In vivo, human U87Δ glioma-bearing nude mice were administered with each BDS (35mg 10B/kg) intravenously. We analyzed 10B concentration of tumor, normal brain and blood by ICP-AES. The TF-PEG liposome-BSH showed higher absolute concentration more than the other BDS. Moreover, TF-PEG liposome-BSH decreased 10B concentration in blood and normal tissue while it maintained high 10B concentration in tumor tissue for a couple of days. This showed the TF-PEG liposome-BSH caused the selective delivery of high concentration of 10B to malignant tumor tissue. The TF-PEG liposome-BSH is more potent BDS for BNCT to obtain absolute high 10B concentration and good contrast between tumor and normal tissue than BSH and PEG liposome-BSH. (author)

  4. The Epidemiology of Lead Toxicity in Adults: Measuring Dose and Consideration of Other Methodologic Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Howard; Shih, Regina; Rothenberg, Stephen; Schwartz, Brian S.

    2006-01-01

    We review several issues of broad relevance to the interpretation of epidemiologic evidence concerning the toxicity of lead in adults, particularly regarding cognitive function and the cardiovascular system, which are the subjects of two systematic reviews that are also part of this mini-monograph. Chief among the recent developments in methodologic advances has been the refinement of concepts and methods for measuring individual lead dose in terms of appreciating distinctions between recent ...

  5. UPRAVLJANJE NEPREKINJENEGA POSLOVANJA IT V PODJETJU BSH HIŠNI APARATI D.O.O.

    OpenAIRE

    Skaza, Tomaž

    2015-01-01

    V diplomskem delu je predstavljeno teoretično ozadje neprekinjenega poslovanja ter standardi in dobre prakse na tem področju. Predstavljena je družba BSH Hišni aparati, d. o. o., ter njeni ključni IT procesi, v katerih smo na praktičnem primeru upravljali neprekinjeno poslovanje informacijske tehnologije. Vpeljano rešitev smo nato ovrednotili s priporočili COBIT 5.

  6. Dendrimers in drug delivery and targeting: Drug-dendrimer interactions and toxicity issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanika Madaan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendrimers are the emerging polymeric architectures that are known for their defined structures, versatility in drug delivery and high functionality whose properties resemble with biomolecules. These nanostructured macromolecules have shown their potential abilities in entrapping and/or conjugating the high molecular weight hydrophilic/hydrophobic entities by host-guest interactions and covalent bonding (prodrug approach respectively. Moreover, high ratio of surface groups to molecular volume has made them a promising synthetic vector for gene delivery. Owing to these properties dendrimers have fascinated the researchers in the development of new drug carriers and they have been implicated in many therapeutic and biomedical applications. Despite of their extensive applications, their use in biological systems is limited due to toxicity issues associated with them. Considering this, the present review has focused on the different strategies of their synthesis, drug delivery and targeting, gene delivery and other biomedical applications, interactions involved in formation of drug-dendrimer complex along with characterization techniques employed for their evaluation, toxicity problems and associated approaches to alleviate their inherent toxicity.

  7. Clinical results of BNCT for malignant gliomas using BSH and BPA simultaneously

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 2002 to 2006, we applied BNCT for 41 cases of malignant gliomas. We used 3 different protocols. In each protocol, we used BSH and BPA simultaneously. In protocol 1, BSH 5g/body and BPA 250 mg/kg were used for consecutive 13 cases. Median survival time (MST) of newly diagnosed 4 cases of GB was 23 months after diagnosis. 2 cases were still alive. All cases including recurrent ones showed radiographic improvement. Eight out of 12 cases showed more than 50% mass reduction on images. Major cause of death was CSF dissemination. In protocol 2, BNCT were applied for 4 patients, two times with one to 2 week-interval. MST after BNCT was 13.3 months. In protocol 3, BPA 700 mg/kg were used with 20 to 30 Gy XRT after BNCT. XRT boost was applied especially for deeper part of the tumor. In protocol 3, 6 newly diagnosed GB patients were observed more than 16 months. 3 were dead and 3 were still alive on the preparation of this abstract. MST of these 6 patients was 17.3 months after diagnosis. In each protocol, radiation necrosis was the problem for recurrent cases, while removal of the necrosis prolonged the survival and recovered the neurological deficits. (author)

  8. A special issue on reviews in biomedical applications of nanomaterials, tissue engineering, stem cells, bioimaging, and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalwa, Hari Singh

    2014-10-01

    This second special issue of the Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology in a series contains another 30 state-of-the-art reviews focused on the biomedical applications of nanomaterials, biosensors, bone tissue engineering, MRI and bioimaging, single-cell detection, stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, toxicity and biosafety of nanodrugs, nanoparticle-based new therapeutic approaches for cancer, hepatic and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25992404

  9. Evaluation and interpretation of maternal toxicity in Segment II studies: Issues, some answers, and data needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biologically rational regulatory policies with regards to developmental toxicity are often based on the extrapolation of standard laboratory rodent bioassay results to the human population. Significantly contributing to the difficulty of this task is the possibility that general toxic effects on the maternal organism may affect the developing conceptus. This review examines maternal factors which may bear directly or indirectly upon developmental outcome, with emphasis on those of greatest relevance to the hazard assessment process. Standard teratology testing protocols call for top dosage levels that induce overt maternal toxicity, and the developmental effects of this toxicity (both alone, and with concurrent embryo/fetal insult) continue to present regulators with considerable interpretive difficulties. In response to these problems, there have been both research and literature review efforts dealing with the relationship of maternal and developmental toxicity. Maternally mediated developmental toxicity occurs with a number of agents, and toxicant-induced alterations in maternal physiology may affect the conceptus at dosages not causing overt maternal toxicity. Relevant studies are reviewed here, and suggestions for avenues of future research are offered including the identification of any syndromes of developmental effects occurring at maternally toxic levels irrespective of the causative agent, and experimental approaches for the characterization of maternal toxicity

  10. 78 FR 53448 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to BSH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Efficiency, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Decision and Order In the Matter of: BSH Home Appliances... test procedures that are reasonably designed to produce results which measure energy efficiency, energy... for Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy BILLING CODE 6450-01-P...

  11. Mechanisms of cholesterol-lowering effects of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria strains as potential probiotics with their bsh gene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öner, Özer; Aslim, Belma; Aydaş, Selcen Babaoğlu

    2014-01-01

    The bile salt hydrolase (BSH) enzyme activities of human-derived lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria were evaluated. The highest enzyme activity was identified as 1.76 ± 0.23 U/mg protein for Bifidobacterium breve A26 and 1.42 ± 0.11 U/mg protein for Lactobacillus plantarum LA3. The bile salt deconjugation ability of the 6 isolates representing the highest BSH enzyme activity was calculated as the release of cholic acid and was between the range of 2.03 ± 0.22 and 1.05 ± 0.25 mM. The strains with high BSH enzyme activity also showed high deconjugation ability (p bacteria and their cholesterol removal abilities based on cholesterol precipitation were determined. Cholesterol removal in control medium was between 22.6 ± 0.4 and 26.5 ± 0.4%. The highest value was recorded at a 0.2% bile concentration. As the biliary concentration increased, a decrease in cholesterol removal and viability of the bacteria was noted in all strains. The percent of similarity of the bsh gene region between different genes was specified. The results may throw some light on proving the ability of these probiotics either as a novel alternative or as adjuvants to chemical drugs in treating hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24158048

  12. Biodistribution of BPA and BSH after single, repeated and simultaneous administrations for neutron-capture therapy of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, H. [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Cooperative Research Center of Life Sciences, Kobe Gakuin University, 1-1-3 Minatojima, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan)], E-mail: ichikawa@pharm.kobegakuin.ac.jp; Taniguchi, E. [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Cooperative Research Center of Life Sciences, Kobe Gakuin University, 1-1-3 Minatojima, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan); Fujimoto, T. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi 673-0021 (Japan); Fukumori, Y. [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Cooperative Research Center of Life Sciences, Kobe Gakuin University, 1-1-3 Minatojima, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    The effect of administration mode of L-BPA and BSH on the biodistribution in the melanoma-bearing hamsters was investigated. In single intravenous (i.v.) administration, BSH (100 mg BSH/kg) showed no significant retention of {sup 10}B in all the tissues, including tumors, while long-term retention of {sup 10}B in the tumor, muscle and brain was observed with L-BPA (500 mg BPA/kg). The dose escalation of L-BPA and the simultaneous single administration of L-BPA and BSH were not so effective at increasing boron accumulation in tumor after bolus i.v. injection. The boron concentration in tumor was 41 {mu}g B/g after single bolus i.v. injection even at the dose of 1000 mg BPA/kg. In contrast, two sequential bolus i.v. injections of L-BPA with the dose of 500 mg BPA/kg each was found to be effective at increasing {sup 10}B accumulation in the tumor; the maximum {sup 10}B concentration in the tumor reached 52 {mu}g B/g at 3 h after the second i.v. injection.

  13. Pilot clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent hepatic cancer involving the intra-arterial injection of a (10)BSH-containing WOW emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagie, Hironobu; Higashi, Syushi; Seguchi, Koji; Ikushima, Ichiro; Fujihara, Mituteru; Nonaka, Yasumasa; Oyama, Kazuyuki; Maruyama, Syoji; Hatae, Ryo; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Kinashi, Tomoko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Kajiyama, Tetsuya; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Eriguchi, Masazumi

    2014-06-01

    A 63-year-old man with multiple HCC in his left liver lobe was enrolled as the first patient in a pilot study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) involving the selective intra-arterial infusion of a (10)BSH-containing water-in-oil-in-water emulsion ((10)BSH-WOW). The size of the tumorous region remained stable during the 3 months after the BNCT. No adverse effects of the BNCT were observed. The present results show that (10)BSH-WOW can be used as novel intra-arterial boron carriers during BNCT for HCC. PMID:24559940

  14. Is cardiac toxicity a relevant issue in the radiation treatment of esophageal cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukema, Jannet C; van Luijk, Peter; Widder, Joachim; Langendijk, Johannes A; Muijs, Christina T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In recent years several papers have been published on radiation-induced cardiac toxicity, especially in breast cancer patients. However, in esophageal cancer patients the radiation dose to the heart is usually markedly higher. To determine whether radiation-induced cardiac toxicity is also

  15. STUDIES ON BIOREMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS: BIOAVAILABILITY, BIODEGRADABILITY, AND TOXICITY ISSUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The widespread contamination of aquatic sediments by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has created a need for cost-effective bioremediation processes, on which the bioavailability and the toxicity of PAHs often have a significant impact. This research investigated the biode...

  16. Selected issues related to the toxicity of ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudłak, Błażej; Owczarek, Katarzyna; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2015-08-01

    Green Chemistry plays a more and more important role in implementing rules of sustainable development to prevent environmental pollution caused by technological processes, while simultaneously increasing the production yield. Ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents (DESs) constitute a very broad group of substances. Apart from many imperfections, ILs and DESs have been the most promising discoveries in the world of Green Chemistry in recent years. The main advantage of ILs is their unique physicochemical properties-they are very desirable from the technological point of view, but apart from these benefits, ILs appear to be highly toxic towards organisms from different trophic levels. DES areas of usage are very spread, because they cover organic synthesis, extraction processes, electrochemistry, enzymatic reactions and many others. Moreover, DESs seem to be a less toxic alternative to ionic liquids. New possibilities of applications and future development trends are sought and presented, including such important solutions of life branches as pharmaceuticals' production and medicine. PMID:26040266

  17. Treatment process and toxicities assessment of wastewater issued from anaerobic digestion of household wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djelal, Hayet; Tahrani, Leyla; Fathallah, Salem; Cabrol, Audrey; Mansour, Hedi Ben

    2014-02-01

    Modern society grapples with large amounts of household waste. The anaerobic digestion of this waste offers a promising source for energy-rich biogas production but generates high toxic effluents that require treatment before reuse or disposal into the environment. This study aimed to investigate three techniques, namely coagulation/flocculation, electro-coagulation, and activated sludge, in terms of efficiency in the treatment of these effluents. It also aimed to assess their toxicity effects on the germination and growth of durum wheat Triticum aestivum L. seeds before and after 6 days of treatment. Activated sludge was most efficient in reducing chemical oxygen demand, turbidity, and conductivity (95.7 %, 15.8 %, and 37.5 %, respectively). The effluent treated with this technique induced a marked delay in germination (low mean time of germination) and a significant reduction in the percentages of seed germination and root and leaf growths. It was also noted to strongly induce lipid peroxidation in roots and leaves, which presumably explained the germination/growth inhibition of the wheat seeds. The effluent also induced marked lipid peroxidation effects and strongly inhibited the activities of butyrylcholinesterase in mice bone marrows. The effluent shows a high ability to inhibit the growth of three microalgae; these endpoints are useful tools to biomonitor the physico-chemical quality of this wastewater. Overall, while no significant alterations were observed in terms of animal and vegetable toxicities when the effluent was treated by coagulation/flocculation, activated sludge treatment proved efficient in reducing the toxicities induced by the untreated effluents. The results indicate that the application of this technique is promising with regards to attaining efficient, eco-friendly, and cost-effective strategies for the management and treatment of household waste. PMID:24072641

  18. Treatment of advanced Hodgkin lymphomas in adolescents and young adults: efficacy and toxicity issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Larina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL is highly sensitive to chemo- and radiotherapy. Long-term tumor-free survival in patients with early stages is close to 95–98 %. Therapy results in patients with advanced stages is worse that requires an intensification of treatment and creates the issuesof late toxicity prevention. These problems are especially relevant in young adults with a life expectancy of 40 years or more. Escalated BEACOPP protocol developed by the German study group allows to achieve cure the majority of patients with advanced-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma, but this regime has significant toxicity. It causes infertility in almost all patients. BEACOPP-14 with comparable activity contains less cumulative doses of potentially gonadotoxic alkylating agents. Efficacy and toxicity of this regime has been analyzed in 29 patients with prognostically unfavorable stages of HL (m – 13, f – 16 received 8 courses BEACOPP-14 without a dose reduction of cytostatics. The median age of patients was 24 (20–35 years. With a median follow-up of 32.8 (4–66 months, event-free survival was 92.8 %, disease-free – 96.2 %, and overall survival – 95.2 %. Of the 16 women included in the study, the menstrual cycle was restored in 14 patients during 3–6 months. 2 patients were not evaluated because of switch to more intensive chemotherapy in the early stages of treatment. Of the remaining 14 patients pregnancy occurred in 3 (18.7 %, delivery – in 2, abortion – in 1. Delivery was term, children born healthy. Most of the patients according to the doctors’ recommendations protects and continues to avoid pregnancy for 2 years after treatment. The data indicate a potentially less reproductive damaging of BEACOPP-14 in females retaining high anti-tumor efficacy.

  19. Treatment of advanced Hodgkin lymphomas in adolescents and young adults: efficacy and toxicity issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Larina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL is highly sensitive to chemo- and radiotherapy. Long-term tumor-free survival in patients with early stages is close to 95–98 %. Therapy results in patients with advanced stages is worse that requires an intensification of treatment and creates the issuesof late toxicity prevention. These problems are especially relevant in young adults with a life expectancy of 40 years or more. Escalated BEACOPP protocol developed by the German study group allows to achieve cure the majority of patients with advanced-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma, but this regime has significant toxicity. It causes infertility in almost all patients. BEACOPP-14 with comparable activity contains less cumulative doses of potentially gonadotoxic alkylating agents. Efficacy and toxicity of this regime has been analyzed in 29 patients with prognostically unfavorable stages of HL (m – 13, f – 16 received 8 courses BEACOPP-14 without a dose reduction of cytostatics. The median age of patients was 24 (20–35 years. With a median follow-up of 32.8 (4–66 months, event-free survival was 92.8 %, disease-free – 96.2 %, and overall survival – 95.2 %. Of the 16 women included in the study, the menstrual cycle was restored in 14 patients during 3–6 months. 2 patients were not evaluated because of switch to more intensive chemotherapy in the early stages of treatment. Of the remaining 14 patients pregnancy occurred in 3 (18.7 %, delivery – in 2, abortion – in 1. Delivery was term, children born healthy. Most of the patients according to the doctors’ recommendations protects and continues to avoid pregnancy for 2 years after treatment. The data indicate a potentially less reproductive damaging of BEACOPP-14 in females retaining high anti-tumor efficacy.

  20. Single and 2-week repeated intravenous dose toxicity studies of disodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH) is a boron compound used in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for malignant brain tumors. Intravenous single and 2-week repeated dose toxicity studies of BSH were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats. In the single-dose study, BSH was administered at doses of 100, 300 or 600 mg/kg. Death occurred within 10 min (acute type) or from 5 hr to 2 days (delayed type) after dosing in the 600 mg/kg group. No differences in mortality by sex and dosing speed were observed. Major causes of death were considered to be circulatory disorder in acute death and renal injury in delayed death. The renal injury was observed in the 300 and 600 mg/kg groups. In the 2-week repeated dose study, BSH was administered at doses of 30, 100 or 300 mg/kg/day for 14 days. Body weight gain was suppressed in the 100 and 300 mg/kg groups. One male in the 300 mg/kg group died due to renal and pulmonary lesions at day 8. Slight anemia was observed in the 300 mg/kg group. Pathologically, the kidney showed tubular regeneration with increase of weight in the 300 mg/kg. From these results, the NOAEL of BSH is 30 mg/kg/day. (author)

  1. Safety Issues of HG and PB as IFE Target Materials: Radiological Versus Chemical Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Cadwallader, L C; Moir, R W; Rio, G. D; Sanz, J

    2002-11-11

    We have performed a safety assessment of mercury and lead as possible hohlraum materials for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) targets, including for the first time a comparative analysis of the radiological and toxicological consequences of an accidental release. In order to calculate accident doses to the public, we have distinguished between accidents at the target fabrication facility and accidents at other areas of the power plant. Regarding the chemical toxicity assessment, we have used the USDOE regulations to determine the maximum allowable release in order to protect the public from adverse health effects. Opposite to common belief, it has been found that the chemical safety requirements for these materials appear to be more stringent than the concentrations that would result in an acceptable radiological dose.

  2. Gonadal toxicity of Hodgkin lymphoma treatment in adolescents and young males: issue relevance and ways of solve (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Vinokurov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hodgkin`s Lymphoma (HL is one of the most curable cancer disease. A half of all patients are young males under 35 years old. Gonadal toxicity is one of the most frequent late effects of HL therapy and associated with significant decrease in patient’s quality of life. In present article frequency and risk factors of gonadal toxicity in males with HL were summarized. It was shown that chemotherapy with alkylating agents and radiotherapy may lead to gonadal toxicity in significant number of patients. Current possibilities of semen cryopreservation before start of the treatment are discussed.

  3. Gonadal toxicity of Hodgkin lymphoma treatment in adolescents and young males: issue relevance and ways of solve (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Vinokurov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hodgkin`s Lymphoma (HL is one of the most curable cancer disease. A half of all patients are young males under 35 years old. Gonadal toxicity is one of the most frequent late effects of HL therapy and associated with significant decrease in patient’s quality of life. In present article frequency and risk factors of gonadal toxicity in males with HL were summarized. It was shown that chemotherapy with alkylating agents and radiotherapy may lead to gonadal toxicity in significant number of patients. Current possibilities of semen cryopreservation before start of the treatment are discussed.

  4. Contribution of Three Bile-Associated Loci, bsh, pva, and btlB, to Gastrointestinal Persistence and Bile Tolerance of Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Begley, Máire; Sleator, Roy D.; Gahan, Cormac G. M.; Hill, Colin

    2005-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes must resist the deleterious actions of bile in order to infect and subsequently colonize the human gastrointestinal tract. The molecular mechanisms used by the bacterium to resist bile and the influence of bile on pathogenesis are as yet largely unexplored. This study describes the analysis of three genes—bsh, pva, and btlB—previously annotated as bile-associated loci in the sequenced L. monocytogenes EGDe genome (lmo2067, lmo0446, and lmo0754, respectively). Analysis o...

  5. Application of SCGE assay, classical cytogenetics and FISH for studying in vitro californium-252 neutrons irradiations and BSH pretreatment on human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, there has been observed a tendency to apply various energy neutrons for tumor therapy and particularly low energy neutrons from various sources, including californium-252 source, for cancer radiotherapy based on the neutron capture. In this study peripheral blood lymphocytes were used as a model for human cells and three methods were applied to assess the effectiveness of californium-252 neutrons irradiations in vitro in normal cells or pre-treated with compound enriched in B-10 ion. Human blood samples or isolated lymphocytes were irradiated with neutrons from isotopic 252Cf source at the Faculty of Nuclear Physics and Technics at University of Mining and Metallurgy (both neutron source and samples were placed in polyethylene block). Chemical pretreatment with BSH (Na210B12H11SH) was done to introduce boron-10 ion into cells in order to check any enhancement effect due to the process of boron neutron capture. Comet assay was done to investigate the DNA damage. Classical cytogenetics was applied to assess the frequencies of unstable aberrations (dicentrics and rings). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with probes for chromosomes 1, 4 (14.3% of whole genome) and pancentromeric probe was performed to evaluate the frequencies of stable aberrations. Linear (or close to linear) increase of DNA damage and aberration frequency was observed with dose of radiation both for lymphocytes untreated or pre-treated with BSH. Very little differences (statistically insignificant) due to radiation dose and BSH pretreatment were observed in the frequencies of SCEs detected in the second mitosis. There is no significant difference between boron pre-treated and not treated cells, and even slightly higher effects were observed in case of the highest dose without BSH pretreatment. The level of translocations observed is comparable with the frequencies of dicentrics and rings. (author)

  6. Pilot clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent hepatic cancer involving the intra-arterial injection of a 10BSH-containing WOW emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 63-year-old man with multiple HCC in his left liver lobe was enrolled as the first patient in a pilot study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) involving the selective intra-arterial infusion of a 10BSH-containing water-in-oil-in-water emulsion (10BSH-WOW). The size of the tumorous region remained stable during the 3 months after the BNCT. No adverse effects of the BNCT were observed. The present results show that 10BSH-WOW can be used as novel intra-arterial boron carriers during BNCT for HCC. - Highlights: • We started the pilot clinical study of BNCT to recurrence hepatic cancer. • The tumor size was remained stable during 3 months after BNCT(SD). • No adverse effect as a result of BNCT was observed during follow-up period. • 10B-containing WOW emulsion can be applied as a novel intra-arterial boron carrier for BNCT for HCC

  7. New approach for the detection of BSH and its metabolites using capillary electrophoresis and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Pier Luigi; Basilico, Fabrizio; Pietta, Pier Giorgio; Pasini, Erica; Monti, Diego; Sauerwein, Wolfgang

    2003-05-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy is a promising binary treatment for cancer. It is based on the nuclear fission that occurs when non-radioactive 10B absorbs thermal neutrons. One of the two boron compounds currently used in clinical trials for this therapy is BSH. To ensure differentiated retention in the tumour versus normal tissue prior to treatment, routine analytical methods to determine pharmacokinetics must be available. For this purpose we have developed a new, easy and time saving approach, in which the separation of boron derivatives is performed by means of capillary electrophoresis (CE). The CE method allows analyses to be performed in short times (less than 18 min), sensitively (LOD 8 pg loaded on the capillary) quantitatively (LOQ 5 microg/ml) and with a high efficiency of separation. Moreover it is simpler than HPLC and more reproducible (intra- and inter-day values were +/-1% and +/-3%, respectively), and does not require a specific column of derivatization. Mass spectrometry analysis of boron derivatives in different samples was also performed to ensure correct attribution of the CE peaks. PMID:12668066

  8. Biosafety issues of eutropicated sources of drinking-water supply in relation to the risk of mass development of toxic cyanobacteria: model of stability factors of zooplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Nosov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The main issues of biosafety of eutrophicated water reservoirs, which are used as drinking-water sources, are related with the risk of mass development of toxic cyanobacteria. The factor of this risk is, in particular, a character of feedbacks in zooplankton, some species of which in the course of their nutrition eliminate repre-sentatives of phytoplankton. In turn, these representatives are the competitors to cyanobacteria and saturate water with the products of their metabolism – nutrients for phytoplankton. The authors describe the relations for these species, which open the new approaches to the prediction of the risk of mass development of cyanobacteria in eutrophicated hydrobiocoenoses.

  9. Critical issues in benzene toxicity and metabolism: The effect of interactions with other organic chemicals on risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medinsky, M.A.; Schlosser, P.M.; Bond, J.A. [Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene are well documented and include aplastic anemia and pancytopenia. Some individuals exposed repeatedly to cytotoxic concentrations of benzene develop acute myeloblastic anemia. It has been hypothesized that metabolism of benzene is required for its toxicity, although administration of no single benzene metabolite duplicates the toxicity of benzene. Several investigators have demonstrated that a combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol, for example) is necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene. Enzymes implicated in the metabolic activation of benzene and its metabolites include the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and myeloperoxidase. Since benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. Other organic molecules that are substrates for cytochrome P450 can inhibit the metabolism of benzene. For example, toluene has been shown to inhibit the oxidation of benzene in a noncompetitive manner. Enzyme inducers, such as ethanol, can alter the target tissue dosimetry of benzene metabolites by inducing enzymes responsible for oxidation reactions involved in benzene metabolism. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Biodistribution of the compounds BSH and BPA used for BNCT in four different tumor entities in relation to blood and normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) relies on the selective delivery of a boronated compound to tumour cells. The compounds BSH and BPA are in use as experimental drugs in clinical trials, demonstrating some ability to target glioblastoma and melanoma. The aim of this study is to identify other tumor entities apart from melanoma and glioblastoma that may obtain benefit from BNCT using the 2 available drugs. The potential of applying both compounds subsequently to obtain a favourable absolute 10B concentration in the tumour and an optimised 10B-ratio between tumor, blood and healthy tissue was also evaluated. For the investigations different human tumours (glioblastoma (U87), melanoma (MV3), sarcoma (S3) and adenocarcinoma (PC-3) were transplanted subcutaneously at the right chest wall in nu/nu mice. Animals received either BSH (200 mg/kg) or BPA (700 mg/kg) or both compounds subsequently as intraperitoneal injection. The boron concentration in tissues was measured by prompt gamma ray spectroscopy. For all tissues evaluated but especially for tumor samples the measured values showed quite high standard deviations even under the very controlled experimental conditions applied in these experiments. Therefore, a considerable amount of analyses are necessary for a statistically reliable analysis. Preliminary results show significant differences in the accumulation of both compounds in the different tumour entities and in the different organs evaluated. After the application of BSH high boron concentrations have especially been found in the kidneys and liver, after application of BPA high concentrations were also found in the kidneys and the liver but also quite high values in the skin and the lung. The application of both drugs leads to higher absolute values that are however lower as expected assuming an additive increase of uptake

  11. Reporting v spoločnosti BSH domácí spotřebiče s.r.o.

    OpenAIRE

    Cinkaničová, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Diploma thesis is focused on reporting process in the sale company BSH domácí spotřebiče s.r.o. In the beginning it explains differences between management, financial and tax accounting. There is the aim to emphasize the importance of management accounting in the broader sense, in the process of strategic, tactic and operative cost controlling. The source of information for cost accounting is controlling. Controller, in retrospect to content of diploma thesis, intermediate the results through...

  12. Introducing Toxics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Bellinger

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available With this inaugural issue, Toxics begins its life as a peer-reviewed, open access journal focusing on all aspects of toxic chemicals. We are interested in publishing papers that present a wide range of perspectives on toxicants and naturally occurring toxins, including exposure, biomarkers, kinetics, biological effects, fate and transport, treatment, and remediation. Toxics differs from many other journals in the absence of a page or word limit on contributions, permitting authors to present their work in as much detail as they wish. Toxics will publish original research papers, conventional reviews, meta-analyses, short communications, theoretical papers, case reports, commentaries and policy perspectives, and book reviews (Book reviews will be solicited and should not be submitted without invitation. Toxins and toxicants concern individuals from a wide range of disciplines, and Toxics is interested in receiving papers that represent the full range of approaches applied to their study, including in vitro studies, studies that use experimental animal or non-animal models, studies of humans or other biological populations, and mathematical modeling. We are excited to get underway and look forward to working with authors in the scientific and medical communities and providing them with a novel venue for sharing their work. [...

  13. Biological Efficiency of Californium-252 Source Evaluated by Comet Assay, Classical Cytogenetics and FISH in Human Lymphocytes Irradiated without and with BSH Pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological effectiveness of californium-252 source was evaluated after irradiations in vitro of normal or pre-treated with compound enriched in B-10 ion cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were used as a model for human cells. DNA and chromosomal damage were studied to compare biological effectiveness of irradiation. Human blood samples or isolated lymphocytes were irradiated with the isotopic source of 252Cf, at the Faculty of Physics and Nuclear Techniques at the University of Mining and Metallurgy (both neutron source and samples were placed in ''infinite'' polyethylene block). Chemical pretreatment with Na210B12H11SH (BSH) was performed to introduce boron-10 ion into cells in order to check any enhancement effect due to the process of boron neutron capture. Single cell gel electrophoresis also known as the Comet assay was done to investigate the DNA damage. Classical cytogenetic analysis was applied to assess the frequencies of unstable aberrations (dicentrics, rings and a centric fragments). To evaluate the frequencies of stable aberrations the fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with probes for chromosomes 1, 4 (14.3% of the whole genome) was performed. Linear (or close to linear) increase with radiation dose were observed for the DNA damage and aberration frequencies in lymphocytes both untreated or pre-treated with BSH. Levels of translocations evaluated for the whole genome were comparable with the frequencies of dicentrics and rings. No significant differences were detected due to radiation dose in the frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) detected in the second mitosis. No statistically significant differences were observed in various biological end-points between normal or boron pre-treated cells. (author)

  14. Scientific evidence and the toxic tort. A socio-legal study of the issues, expert evidence and judgement in Reay and Hope v. British Nuclear Fuels plc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Providing a socio-legal analysis of the issues, expert evidence and judgment in Reay and Hope v BNFL plc., the thesis offers an insight into the complexity of the toxic tort. Starting with an overview of the history of Sellafield, the thesis reflects on the scientific and epidemiological concerns surrounding the link between childhood cancer and nuclear installations. Drawing on scientific knowledge and epistemological considerations, the thesis moves on to the difficulties of verifying causation in science and the problems of establishing causation in law. Outlining the role of the expert witness and scientific expert evidence, the thesis proceeds with a case analysis, before broaching the thorny issue of judicial decision making and in particular, the difference between the 'discovery' and 'justification' process. Moving on to the Judgment in Reay and Hope, attention is given to the potential application of probability theory to the judicial decision making process. Lasting just short of one hundred days and including the testimony of numerous scientific experts, Reay and Hope marked new ground in a number of ways; it was the first personal injury claim to test the concept of genetic damage from radiation; the only time that a Queen's Bench Division Judge had been allocated a full-time judicial assistant, and one of the first trials to endorse a satellite video link for examination of international expert witnesses. As far as judicial management is concerned, the case was a forerunner in having Counsels' Opening Statements in writing in advance of the trial, as well as having written daily submissions of key issues from plaintiffs and defendants upon conclusion of oral evidence. The circumstances that led to the trial relate to events in excess of thirty to forty years ago when the fathers of Dorothy Reay and Vivien Hope were employed by the Defendants and their predecessors (the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority) as fitters for the Sellafield Plant

  15. Toxic neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra Usha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic neuropathies generally result in length dependent axonal neuropathy with the exception of diphtheria and a few toxic neuropathies. In spite of occurrence of diphtheria in India there is paucity of published reports on diphtheritic neuropathy. Arsenic neuropathy commonly occurs in Bengal and Bangladesh because of ground water contamination whereas in Punjab it is due to contamination of opium. Lead neuropathy is rare and has been reported in battery workers and silver refining workers. It produces motor neuropathy resulting in foot drop and wrist drop. Organophosphates are used as pesticides, industrial chemicals and food adulterant. Certain organophosphates such as triorthocresyl phosphate used for or oil adulteration inhibit neurotoxic esterase and result in a delayed type of axonal neuropathy. Alcohol related neuropathy is a controversial issue whether it is due to alcohol related toxicity or due to nutritional deficiencies. Indian studies have revealed that neuropathy occurs both in alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhosis. Hexane neuropathy is reported in screen printers and these cases highlight the need for better preventive and occupational measures. Iatrogenic toxic neuropathies have been reported with cisplatin and vincristine. Because of geographical, occupational and health related conditions toxic neuropathies are likely to be more common than reported and greater awareness is needed.

  16. 一步法定点突变技术快速构建bsh基因突变启动子%Construction of bsh Promoter Mutants by Rapid One-step Site-directed Mutagenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯莹颖; 张强; 周青春; 罗勤; 张晓莉; 秦龙娟

    2009-01-01

    目的:建立一种高效便捷的定点突变方法,为基因表达调控以及蛋白质结构和功能的研究提供技术支撑.方法:以构建单核细胞增生李斯特菌(Listeria monocytogenes)中编码胆碱水解酶(bile salt hydrolase,BSH)的bsh基因突变启动子为例,采用一对完全互补并带有突变位点的引物扩增携带bsh基因启动子的重组质粒DNA全序列,通过Dpn Ⅰ消化PCR产物中剩余的甲基化的模板DNA,酶切后的PCR产物直接转化大肠杆菌,从而获得含有突变启动子的重组质粒.结果:通过一步法定点突变技术成功构建了bsh基因的三种突变启动子.结论:该方法简单高效,只要把握好对引物设计,高保真的DNA聚合酶、模板DNA的浓度以及PCR扩增程序的选择,突变成功率可以达到100%.%Objective: A convenient and rapid site-directed mutagenesis method was established for study regulation of gene expression as well as relationship between protein structure and function.Method:The construction of bsh(encoding bile salt hydrolase in Listeria monocytogenes) promoter mutants was used as a sample in this study.A pair of completely complementary primers with mutation sites in the middle was used to amplify the total recombinant plasmid DNA sequences.After digestion of residual methylated template DNA in the PCR products by DpnⅠ,PCR products without purification were directly transformed into E.coli to contain mutations of the recombinant plasmid.Result: Three bsh promoter mutants were successfully constructed by the one-step site-directed mutagenesis technology.Conclusion: The method used in this study is robust and fast.As long as primer design,high-fidelity DNA polymerase,template DNA concentration,and PCR amplification procedure are optimized,the successful rate of mutation could reach 100%.

  17. Toxic action/toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathway, D E

    2000-02-01

    Some six or so physiological systems, essential to normal mammalian life, are involved in poisoning; an intoxication that causes severe injury to any one of them could be life threatening. Reversible chemical reactions showing Scatchard-type binding are exemplified by CO, CN- and cyclodiene neurotoxin insecticide intoxications, and by antigen-antibody complex formation. Haemoglobin (Hb) molecular biology accounts for the allosteric co-operativity and other characteristics of CO poisoning, CN- acts as a powerful cytochrome oxidase inhibitor, and antigen binding in a deep antibody cleft between two domains equipped with epitopes for antigen-binding groups explains hapten-specific immune reactions. Covalent chemical reactions with second-order (SN2) kinetics characterize Hg and Cd poisonings, the reactions of organophosphates and phosphonates with acetylcholinesterase and neurotoxic esterase and the reaction sequence whereby Paraquat accepts electrons and generates superoxide under aerobic conditions. Indirect carcinogens require cytochrome P450 activation to form DNA adducts in target-organ DNA and cause cancer, but a battery of detoxifying enzymes clustered with the P450 system must be overcome. Thus, S-metabolism competes ineffectively with target DNA for reactive vinyl chloride (VC) metabolites, epoxide hydrolase is important to the metabolism and carcinogenicity of alfatoxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene, etc.), and the non-toxic 2-naphthylhydroxylamine N-glucuronide acts as a transport form in 2-naphthylamine bladder cancer. VC liver-cancer pathogenesis is explicable in terms of the presence of the glutathione S-transferase detoxifying system in hepatocytes and its absence from the fibroblastic elements, and of the VC concentrations reaching the liver by different administrative routes. In VC carcinogenicity, chemical reactions give imidazo-cyclization products with nucleoside residues of target DNA, and in benzene leukaemia, Z

  18. Toxicity of nanomaterials; an undermined issue

    OpenAIRE

    Mogharabi, Mehdi; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are employed in extensive variety of commercial products such as electronic components, cosmetics, food, sports equipment, biomedical applications, and medicine. With the increasing utilization of engineered nanomaterials, the potential exposure of human to nanoparticles is rapidly increasing. Nowadays when new nanomaterials with new applications are introduced, mostly good and positive effects are mentioned whereas possible hazards arising from nanosize of the compounds are und...

  19. Beryllium Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Favorites Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Yahoo MyWeb Beryllium Toxicity Patient Education Care Instruction Sheet ... Favorites Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Yahoo MyWeb Page last reviewed: May 23, 2008 Page ...

  20. Antimony Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sundar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The major toxic side-effects of antimonials as a result of therapy are cardiotoxicity (~9% of patients and pancreatitis, which is seen commonly in HIV and visceral leishmaniasis co-infections. Quality control of each batch of drugs produced and regular monitoring for toxicity is required when antimonials are used therapeutically.

  1. Flecainide toxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, G A; Martin, R P

    1989-01-01

    Flecainide toxicity occurred in an infant being treated for refractory atrioventricular re-entry tachycardia. Ventricular tachycardia developed when dextrose was substituted for milk feeds. We believe that milk was interfering with the absorption of flecainide, and so a high serum concentration developed when milk feeds were stopped.

  2. Human Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews the human toxicological impacts of chemicals and how to assess these impacts in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA), in order to identify key processes and pollutants. The complete cause-effect pathway – from emissions of toxic substances up to damages on human health...... characterisation factors means that results should by default be reported and interpreted in log scales when comparing scenarios or substance contribution! We conclude by outlining future trends in human toxicity modelling for LCIA, with promising developments for (a) better estimates of degradation halflives, (b......) the inclusion of ionization of chemicals in human exposure including bioaccumulation, (c) metal speciation, (d) spatialised models to differentiate the variability associated with spatialisation from the uncertainty, and (e) the assessment of chemical exposure via consumer products and occupational...

  3. The price function of toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Mark D; Dranitsaris, George

    2009-03-01

    The high and accelerating price of new anticancer drugs is giving rise to increased concern. However, monetary price is not the only way to value chemotherapy. Toxic effects can also be seen as a form of payment in which "units" of wellbeing are exchanged for "units" of efficacy. Although this trading analogy is not perfect, a proposal can be made that toxicity is a type of price, and that one of its functions is to signal valuation, similar to the crucial signalling function of monetary price in the real economy. This price function of toxicity, to the extent where there is transparency about the real amounts of toxicity, can have two important and helpful consequences: acting as a brake on the increasing monetary price of new drugs, via a damping effect on demand; and assisting individual patients in the informed contemplation of chemotherapy decisions. However, there are two problems that currently impede the effective dissemination of this highly desirable toxicity information. First, a prediction of toxicity in individual patients is difficult. Second, the vast database of real toxic effects in community practice is rarely made available for public scrutiny. Both of these problems, which together constitute a form of hidden cost, are potentially resolvable at least to some extent. In the absence of accurate information on toxic effects, it is easy for monetary price to progressively diverge from true value. We believe that improved transparency with respect to toxic effects, and better toxicity prediction, offer a better and more genuinely market-orientated solution to the issue of price distortions than the bureaucratic imposition of price controls. PMID:19261259

  4. BIOEQUIVALENCE APPROACH FOR WHOLE EFFLUENT TOXICITY TESTING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased use of whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests in the regulatory arena has brought increased concern over the statistical analysis of WET test data and the determination of toxicity. One concern is the issue of statistical power. A number of WET tests may pass the current...

  5. Emotional Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Care for Duchenne / Emotional Issues Print Email Emotional Issues Duchenne’s emotional toll on a child can manifest in a ... important things you can provide to ensure the emotional health of your child. Parents of a child ...

  6. NST Quarterly - July 1997 issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NST Quarterly reports current development in Nuclear Science and Technology in Malaysia. In this issue it highlights MINT activities in incineration and thermal treatment technology of radioactive and toxic wastes. MINT celebrates it's Silver Jubilee celebration this year (1997). In this issue, it announces the programmes outlined for this memorable year include a series of talks and lectures by distinguished guest speakers, international conference, essay and quiz contests for schools

  7. Distributed Structure Searchable Toxicity

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Distributed Structure Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) online resource provides high quality chemical structures and annotations in association with toxicity data....

  8. Radioactive waste storage issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state's boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected

  9. Radioactive waste storage issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, D.E.

    1994-08-15

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

  10. Polish Toxic Currency Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Gontarski

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxic currency options are defined on the basis of the opposition to the nature (essence of an option contract, which is justified in terms of norms founded on the general law clause of characteristics (nature of a relation (which represents an independent premise for imposing restrictions on the freedom of contracts. So-understood toxic currency options are unlawful. Indeed they contravene iuris cogentis regulations. These include for instance option contracts, which are concluded with a bank, if the bank has not informed about option risk before concluding the contract; or the barrier options, which focus only on the protection of bank’s interests. Therefore, such options may appear to be invalid. Therefore, performing contracts for toxic currency options may be qualified as a criminal mismanagement. For the sake of security, the manager should then take into consideration filing a claim for stating invalidity (which can be made in a court verdict. At the same time, if the supervisory board member in a commercial company, who can also be a subject to mismanagement offences, commits an omission involving lack of reaction (for example, if he/she fails to notify of the suspected offence committed by the management board members acting to the company’s detriment when the management board makes the company conclude option contracts which are charged with absolute invalidity the supervisory board member so acting may be considered to act to the company’s detriment. In the most recent Polish jurisprudence and judicature the standard of a “good host” is treated to be the last resort for determining whether the manager’s powers resulting from criminal regulations were performed. The manager of the exporter should not, as a rule, issue any options. Issuing options always means assuming an obligation. In the case of currency put options it is an absolute obligation to purchase a given amount in euro at exchange rate set in advance. On the

  11. Disability Issues are Women's Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Mijoo Kim

    2009-01-01

    Mijoo Kim from Women with Disabilities Arts and Culture Network, Korea, speaks on behalf of women with disabilities when she underlines that disability issues are women's issues. She asks why women with disabilities have been invisible in the women's movement, based on her work over the past 15 years in the movement of women with disabilities in Korea and internationally. Development (2009) 52, 230–232. doi:10.1057/dev.2009.10

  12. Emerging issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some formal and informal mechanisms were implemented at the Ontario Ministry of the Environment that allow the identification of emerging environmental issues. The early warning is most often provided through the expertise of the personnel and their contacts. The Ministry commissioned a study to review the process, learn from the processes in place in other organizations, and implement the appropriate changes into its emerging issues procedure. The team conducting the review answered four specific questions. The first question was: What are the necessary elements of an emerging issues tool? The second question was: What are some of the best practices in other jurisdictions? It was followed by the question: How do those jurisdictions implement emerging issues models? The final question was: What implementation is appropriate for the Ontario Ministry of the Environment? The approach involved reviewing the appropriate literature and reviewing the best practices in place in other jurisdictions, both in the United States and in Europe. Senior officials in Canada and the United States were interviewed, and the procedure was identified and described. A case study concerning the acid rain problem in the 1960s and 1970s was used to test the developed procedure retroactively. This procedure involves a variation of the top-down, bottom-up input procedure at the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), with a formal issues scanning process, and the prioritizing and analysis of the steps. It was noted that if the procedure had been in place in the late 1960s in Ontario, it would have been possible to identify one or more impacts from the acid rain situation ten years earlier. Preventive and remedial action could have been implemented, leading to environmental and economic benefits for the province of Ontario. The broad involvement of stakeholders is required for an open and systematic prioritization of the issues. The authors concluded the study by identifying

  13. Sanskrit Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Barbara Stoler, Ed.

    1971-01-01

    This issue of "Mahfil" is devoted to Sanskrit literature and contains a note on Sanskrit pronunciation and selections of Sanskrit literature. It also contains articles analyzing and discussing various aspects of the literature, including "Sanskrit Rhetoric and Poetic,""The Creative Role of the Goddess Vac in the 'Rgveda,'""Vedic and Epic…

  14. Paradigm Shift in Toxicity Testing and Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hongmao; Xia, Menghang; Austin, Christopher P.; Huang, Ruili

    2012-01-01

    The limitations of traditional toxicity testing characterized by high-cost animal models with low-throughput readouts, inconsistent responses, ethical issues, and extrapolability to humans call for alternative strategies for chemical risk assessment. A new strategy using in vitro human cell-based assays has been designed to identify key toxicity pathways and molecular mechanisms leading to the prediction of an in vivo response. The emergence of quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) te...

  15. Preventing Toxic Behaviour through Game Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Fahlström, Josefine; Matson, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Toxic Behaviour, the phenomena where a person behaves in a way meant to intimidate or belittle another person, is an influential issue spreading across the virtual spaces that is online gaming communities. In this thesis we explore the possible correlations between Toxic Behaviour and game mechanics in online multi-player games by analyzing League of Legends (Riot Games, 2009), one of the most prominent online games currently dominating the market (Statista, 2014). We have analysed the game u...

  16. Theoretical Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2007-04-01

    The theoretical issues in the interpretation of the precision measurements of the nucleon-to-Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes are highlighted. The results of these measurements are confronted with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD, and QCD-inspired models. The link of the nucleon-to-Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs) is also discussed.

  17. Miscellaneous issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The New Brunswick Market Design Committee has examined several issues regarding the restructuring of the province's electricity sector. This report presents issues that require guidance for implementation, with particular focus on options available for their resolutions. The issues include: (1) rate principles for stranded offer service (SOS) supply, (2) the ability of contestable customers to return to SOS after having left it, (3) whether loads embedded in distribution systems are eligible to participate in the bilateral contract market, (4) whether generators or suppliers can offer capacity and energy to SOS suppliers in competition with the SOS supplier, and (5) details for the balancing market, including pricing, bidding protocols, settlements and how intermittent power sources can participate in the market. A section on pricing for SOS explains pricing principles, the use of export profits, pricing for SOS capacity, and time of use pricing. The Committee has made recommendations for the electricity system in the province to have an energy imbalance service that can move towards a market in order to develop an efficient and effective service. This report also explains pricing in the balancing market, penalties, and settlements. 7 refs

  18. Transmission issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This session on transmission issues focused on the role that transmission plays in electricity markets and the importance of getting the market structure right in terms of generation divestiture with buy back contracts, demand side responsive programs, transmission upgrades and long term contracts. The difficulties of distinguishing between market power and scarcity were examined along with some of the complications that ensue if transmission experiences congestion, as exemplified by the August 2003 blackout in eastern North America. The presentations described the best ways to handle transmission issues, and debated whether transmission should be deregulated or follow market forces. Issues of interconnections and reliability of connections were also debated along with the attempt to integrate renewables into the grid. Some presentations identified what new transmission must be built and what must be done to ensure that transmission gets built. The challenges and business opportunities for transmission in Alberta were discussed with reference to plans to invest in new infrastructure, where it is going outside of the province and how it works with other jurisdictions. Manitoba's Conawapa Hydro Project and its 2000 MW tie line to Ontario was also discussed. Some examples of non-optimal use of interconnections in Europe were also discussed in an effort to learn from these mistakes and avoid them in Canada. tabs., figs

  19. Undergrounding issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a general review of British Columbia Hydro's rights-of-way policies, a task group was formed to explore and assess the technical, social, environmental, and economic issues related to the provision of suitable underground rights-of-way for distribution and transmission lines. Issues considered were: evaluations of undergrounding; designation of service areas as underground areas; the BC Hydro fund to assist municipalities in beautifying selected areas by placing existing overhead lines underground; community funding of undergrounding; underground options to transmission and distribution requirements; and long-range underground row planning. Key findings are as follows. Undergrounding is technically feasible and available for all BC Hydro operating voltages, but initial construction costs of undergrounding continue to exceed equivalent overhead by a significant margin. Undergrounding can contribute to the optimization of existing rights-of-way. Public safety is improved with undergrounding and long-term benefits to BC Hydro and society are provided by undergrounding, compared to overhead options. Customers have shown some willingness to contribute to the cost of undergrounding, and it is generally agreed that those communities that want undergrounding should pay for it. Policy recommendations are made under each of the issue areas, and justifications for the recommendations are given along with implementation costs and alternative options

  20. Xenobiotics and toxic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mglinets, A.I.; Katserikova, N.V.

    2003-07-01

    This literature review focuses on health issues associated with the intake into the human body of xenobiotics (foreign substances) and toxic substances in foods, water and air. Toxicity is defined as being the ability of a substance to cause harm to a living organism. Of the factors that determine the action of xenobiotics on the human body, the most important are daily dose, duration of intake, route and conditions of intake, and the ability of specific substances to act, either at the time of consumption or at a later time. Hygiene regulations require experimental validation of maximum permissible concentrations of foreign compounds in different environments. In food hygiene, the emphasis is on the acceptable daily intake. It is necessary to determine the maximum levels at which substances can be present in a food without causing any harm to human health or to the sensory properties of the food or adversely affecting technological processes. Ways in which harmful chemical compounds (e.g.heavy metals) may arise in foods are discussed. These include corrosion of metals in equipment and vessels used in food preparation. Where aluminium vessels or foil is used in food preparation, this can lead to an accumulation of aluminium in the human body; this has been associated with the development of Alzheimer's Disease. For this reason the use of stainless steel vessels and equipment is recommended for food processing. The process of smoking food - in particular cold smoking of fish - can result in high levels of heavy metal contamination in smoked foods, particularly where poor-quality wood or coal is used. Ways of minimizing levels of heavy metals in smoked foods are briefly considered. 17 refs.

  1. The politics of toxic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toxic waste, and the public policy that deals with it, is a complex issue. Much of the complexity stems from the science and technology embedded in the topic, but a great deal also results from the intricate interactions between the social organizations and institutions involved. The politics of toxic waste plays out within three key aspects of this complexity. The first of these is the nature of the intergovernmental relations involved. For toxic waste issues, these intergovernmental relations can be between sovereign states or between a nation and an international governing organization, or they may be restricted to a domestic context. If the later is the case, the relationship can be between federal, state, and local governments or between different bureaus, departments, or agencies within the same level of government. A second feature of this complexity can be seen in the consequences of divergent organizational or institutional interests. When conflicting organizational or institutional perspectives, positions, or concerns arise, public policy outcomes are affected.The tug and pull of competing actors move policy in the direction favored by the winner. This may or may not be the most rational alternative. A third aspect of this interorganizational puzzle involves the question of where the locus of authority for decisionmaking resides and to what extent stakeholders, who do not possess direct authority, can influence policy outcomes

  2. Toxicity alarm: Case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In late fall 1991, the Novacor petrochemical plant near Joffre, Alberta experienced a toxicity alarm, the first since its startup 14 years ago. Fish exposed to a normal toxicity test were stressed within 2 h and showed 100% mortality after 24 h. A history of the events leading up to, during, and after the toxicity alarm is presented. The major effluent sources were three cooling water systems. Although these sources are well characterized, the event causes were not immediately clear. Initial toxic screening indicated that one was very toxic, another moderately toxic, and the third not toxic at all. All three systems utilized the same chemical treatment program to avoid fouling: stabilized phosphates with minor variants. The most toxic of the cooling systems operated at 10-12 cycles, had three chemicals for biocide control, and had three makeup streams. Toxic and nontoxic system characteristics were compared. An in-depth modified toxicity identification and evaluation program was then performed to identify and evaluate the cause of the toxicity alarm for future prevention. The most probable causes of toxicity were identified by elimination. The combination of high numbers of cycles, hydrocarbons in the makeup water, and bromine added as an antifoulant resulted in formation of aromatic bromamines which are capable of causing the toxic condition experienced. 2 tabs

  3. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a toxin produced by some types of Staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock-like syndrome (TSLS), can be caused by Streptococcal bacteria. Not all staph or strep infections cause toxic ...

  4. Toxic Amblyopia (Nutritional Amblyopia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sugar Control Helps Fight Diabetic Eye Disease Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety? ALL NEWS > Resources First ... exposure to toxic substances or take nutritional supplements. Causes Toxic amblyopia may be caused by a nutritional ...

  5. General Issue

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    ORDERING INFORMATION The issue can be ordered by contacting at the Presses Universitaires d'Angers. It will be online in Spring 2015. CONTENTS Linda Collinge-Germain Foreword Mathilde La Cassagnère Heavy nothings in Virginia Woolf’s “Kew Gardens" Daniel Thomières Being and Time in Ernest Hemingway’s “Cat in the Rain” Stella Deen E.H. Young’s “The Stream,” Good Housekeeping, and the Cultivation of Active Readers Alice Clark-Wehinger The p...

  6. The toxic effects, GSH depletion and radiosensitivity by BSO on retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular malignant tumor in children. Previous investigations have reported that buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) can deplete intracellular glutathione (GSH) by the specific inhibition and increase cellular radiosensitivity. The toxic effects, GSH depletion and radiosensitivity of BSO on retinoblastoma were reported. GSH content of retinoblastoma cell lines Y-79, So-Rb50 and retinoblastoma xenograft is (2.7 +- 1.3) x 10-12 mmol/cell, (1.4 +- 0.2) x 10-12 mmol/cell, and 2.8 +- 1.2 μmol/g respectively. The ID50 of BSO on Y-79 and So-Rb50 in air for 3h exposure is 2.5 mM and 0.2 mM respectively. GSH depletion by 0.1 mM BSO for 24h on Y-79 cells and 0.01 mM BSO for 24 h on So-Rb50 cells is 16.35%, and 4.7% of control. GSH depletion in tumor and other organ tissues in retinoblastoma bearing nude mice after BSO administration is differential. BSH depletion after BSO exposure in Y-79 cells in vitro decrease the D0 value of retinoblastoma cells. The SER of 0.01 mM and 0.05 mM BSO for 24 h under the hypoxic condition is 1.21 and 1.36 respectively. Based on these observations, the authors conclude that BSO toxicity on retinoblastoma cells depends on the characteristics of cell line and BSO can increase hypoxic retinoblastoma cells radiosensitivity in vitro. Further study of BSO radiosensitization on retinoblastoma in vivo using nude mouse xenograft is needed

  7. Phenytoin toxicity presenting as acute meningo-encephalitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenytoin can produce significant dose-related toxicity because of its zero order pharmacokinetics and is an important issue in pediatric emergency medicine. It is important to differentiate phenytoin toxicity manifesting with symptoms like fever, vomiting, seizures, ataxia masquerading as acute meningo-encephalitic illness, more so at centers where facilities to measure serum phenytoin levels are not available. Here we describe two children with phenytoin toxicity, presenting to the emergency department with features suggestive of acute meningo-encephalitis.

  8. Toxicity of lunar dust

    OpenAIRE

    Linnarsson, Dag; Carpenter, James; Fubini, Bice; Gerde, Per; Karlsson, Lars L.; Loftus, David J.; Prisk, G. Kim; Staufer, Urs; Tranfield, Erin M.; van Westrenen, Wim

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of substantial research efforts, lunar dust properties, and therefore lunar dust toxicity may differ substantially. In this contribution, past and ongoing work on dust toxicity is reviewed, and major knowle...

  9. CHEMICAL TOXICITY OF URANIUM

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Uranium, occurs naturally in the earth’s crust, is an alpha emitter radioactive element from the actinide group. For this reason, U-235 and U-238, are uranium isotopes with long half lives, have got radiological toxicity. But, for natural-isotopic-composition uranium (NatU), there is greater risk from chemical toxicity than radiological toxicity. When uranium is get into the body with anyway, also its chemical toxicity must be thought. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000): 215-220

  10. CHEMICAL TOXICITY OF URANIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Cam

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Uranium, occurs naturally in the earth’s crust, is an alpha emitter radioactive element from the actinide group. For this reason, U-235 and U-238, are uranium isotopes with long half lives, have got radiological toxicity. But, for natural-isotopic-composition uranium (NatU, there is greater risk from chemical toxicity than radiological toxicity. When uranium is get into the body with anyway, also its chemical toxicity must be thought. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000: 215-220

  11. Toxicity. Chapter 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toxicological studies of radioprotective substances are reviewed. Some variations in reported results are ascribed to differences in the initial purity of the compounds tested, to the use of different strains of animals, and to the deterioration of stocks and thiols on storage despite all protective measures. Consideration is first given to the toxicity of various sulphydryl compounds when separately administered. The most active sulphur-containing radioprotective chemicals are toxic to all living systems and particularly to mammals; the range between the active and the toxic dose is narrow. Deleterious effects occur at cellular, tissue and general levels, and cellular toxicity appears to be the responsible factor for the protective power, at least in mammals. Studies have been made of the acute and subacute toxicity, the LD50 and tolerated doses, long-term and embryonic toxicity, the cumulative toxicity of repeated injections and the effects of continuous feeding. Mixtures of chemical protective agents have been used to increase protection against radiation damage, while decreasing some of the general toxic effects, but these potent mixtures may have side effects not seen with single compounds. Attempts have been made to diminish the toxicity of protective compounds by giving substances counteracting their generally deleterious effects. Further investigations are necessary before these radioprotective substances may be tried in man. (U.K.)

  12. Low toxicity corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the design and testing of low toxicity corrosion inhibitors. New chemistries have been investigated with respect to corrosion protection and impact on the marine environment. The resulting chemicals, while they are effective corrosion inhibitors, present significant improvements in terms of environmental properties over current products. The discussion includes results of the corrosion inhibition, toxicity, biodegradability and partitioning studies

  13. Mechanisms of Phosphine Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisa S. Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fumigation with phosphine gas is by far the most widely used treatment for the protection of stored grain against insect pests. The development of high-level resistance in insects now threatens its continued use. As there is no suitable chemical to replace phosphine, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of phosphine toxicity to increase the effectiveness of resistance management. Because phosphine is such a simple molecule (PH3, the chemistry of phosphorus is central to its toxicity. The elements above and below phosphorus in the periodic table are nitrogen (N and arsenic (As, which also produce toxic hydrides, namely, NH3 and AsH3. The three hydrides cause related symptoms and similar changes to cellular and organismal physiology, including disruption of the sympathetic nervous system, suppressed energy metabolism and toxic changes to the redox state of the cell. We propose that these three effects are interdependent contributors to phosphine toxicity.

  14. Assessing Nanoparticle Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Sara A.; Maurer-Jones, Melissa A.; Thompson, John W.; Lin, Yu-Shen; Haynes, Christy L.

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticle toxicology, an emergent field, works toward establishing the hazard of nanoparticles, and therefore their potential risk, in light of the increased use and likelihood of exposure. Analytical chemists can provide an essential tool kit for the advancement of this field by exploiting expertise in sample complexity and preparation as well as method and technology development. Herein, we discuss experimental considerations for performing in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies, with a focus on nanoparticle characterization, relevant model cell systems, and toxicity assay choices. Additionally, we present three case studies (of silver, titanium dioxide, and carbon nanotube toxicity) to highlight the important toxicological considerations of these commonly used nanoparticles.

  15. Contact Lens Solution Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Contact Lens Solution Toxicity Information for adults A A A This image shows a reaction to contact lens solution. The prominent blood vessels and redness ...

  16. Toxic Substances Portal- Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Favorites Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Yahoo MyWeb Page last reviewed: February 12, 2013 Page ... Favorites Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Yahoo MyWeb Contact Us: Agency for Toxic Substances and ...

  17. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  18. Toxicity Reference Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB) contains approximately 30 years and $2 billion worth of animal studies. ToxRefDB allows scientists and the interested...

  19. Toxicity of lunar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Linnarsson, Dag; Fubini, Bice; Gerde, Per; Karlsson, Lars L; Loftus, David J; Prisk, G Kim; Staufer, Urs; Tranfield, Erin M; van Westrenen, Wim

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of substantial research efforts, lunar dust properties, and therefore lunar dust toxicity may differ substantially. In this contribution, past and ongoing work on dust toxicity is reviewed, and major knowledge gaps that prevent an accurate assessment of lunar dust toxicity are identified. Finally, a range of studies using ground-based, low-gravity, and in situ measurements is recommended to address the identified knowledge gaps. Because none of the curated lunar samples exist in a pristine state that preserves the surface reactive chemical aspects thought to be present on the lunar surface, studies using this material carry with them considerable uncertainty in terms of fidelity. As a consequence, in situ data on lunar dust...

  20. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella presented roughly 2-4 weeks later with a clinical syndrome highly suggestive of toxic shock syndrome. Characteristics, complications and therapy. It is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, chills, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches and rash. It can rapidly progress to severe and intractable hypotension and multisystem dysfunction. Almost every organ system can be involved. Complications of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome may include kidney failure, liver failure and even death. Crystalloids and inotropic agents are used to treat the hypovolemic shock aggressively, with close monitoring of the patient’s mean arterial pressure and central venous pressure. An immediate and aggressive management of hypovolemic shock is essential in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Targeted antibiotics are indicated; penicillin or a betalactam antibiotic is used for treating group A streptococci, and clindamycin has emerged as a key portion of the standard treatment.

  1. Neurobehavioral aspects of developmental toxicity testing.

    OpenAIRE

    Ulbrich, B; Palmer, A K

    1996-01-01

    Tests for detection of neurobehavioral changes in the offspring have been a regulatory requirement in developmental toxicity testing of drugs for almost 20 years. Keeping their purpose of hazard identification and risk assessment for humans in mind, investigators and agency reviewers have become deeply ingrained with some stereotyped behaviors with respect to such relevant issues as choice of animal species and data evaluation. Other problematic areas of study design and conduct, selection of...

  2. Oil sands tailings leachability and toxicity evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine tailings disposal and reclamation is a major issue facing the oil sands mining and extraction industry. Government regulations dictate that reclamation must return the site to a level of self-sustaining biological capability which approximates the natural condition. A two-phase laboratory program has been completed to investigate the suitability of alternative reclamation materials. For the first phase of the study, chemical and toxicological analyses were carried out on 13 different reclamation and reference materials (solid phase and extractions). Seedling emergence, nematode maturation, algal growth and bacterial luminescence for leachate samples showed a range of sensitivities in response to the tested materials, although phytotoxicity tests were generally the most sensitive. With the exception of one test material, high toxicity ratings were consistent with that expected from the chemical data. The second phase of the study focused on the evaluation of chemical and toxicological conditions in leachate water generated using bench-scale column percolation tests. Leachate water equivalent to 10 pore volume replacements was generated and temporal variations in toxicity and chemistry monitored. Similar to phase 1 findings, phytotoxicity tests were the most sensitive tests to leachate waters. For most materials tested, most toxicity was removed after 2--3 porewater replacements. More persistent toxicity was noted for samples containing bitumen (e.g., fine tails and oil sands). No clear correspondence was noted between chemical concentrations and toxicity in leachate waters

  3. Air issues update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    A government sponsored poll revealed that the primary environmental concern for Ontarians in 2000 was air pollution. While scientists tend to focus on smog episodes, greenhouse gas emissions, acid rain or emissions of toxic pollutants, the public shows concern in more practical terms such as the overall impact of poor air quality on people and the ecosystem, and how this will affect future life on earth. It was emphasized that policy makers should try to apply this holistic approach to the complex issues associated with air quality. Climate change, acid rain and ultraviolet radiation are some examples of how air emissions impact on ecosystems. Other examples include elevated levels of mercury in otters in Ontario. Climate change has also been linked with the re-acidification of lakes, as droughts typically occur in years following an El Nino cycle which has been pronounced as a possible consequence of greenhouse gas emissions. The Environmental Commissioner of Ontario (ECO) has reviewed the efforts of the Ontario Ministry of the Environment (MOE) regarding the regulation of air quality. The MOE has proposed several initiatives, including newer air dispersion models into legislation, establishing a new consultation process for applying new air quality standards to emission sources, an expansion of the Drive Clean Program, and a discussion paper on a proposed emission cap and trade system. This paper presents ECO's review of these initiatives and provides updates on other air quality issues such as control of emissions from Ontario's transportation, industrial and electricity sectors. It also described policy proposals related to standard-setting for air pollutants, as well as the newly adopted Canada-wide Standards for Particulate Matter and Ozone. A progress report on Ontario's Anti-Smog Action Plan (ASAP) confirms that major reductions in NO{sub x} expected from Ontario's coal-fired power plants never materialized. Emissions of nitrogen oxide

  4. Iron toxicity in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśnicka, R; Krzepiłko, A; Wawryn, J; Biliński, T

    1997-01-01

    It has been found that yeast cells are sensitive to iron overload only when grown on glucose as a carbon source. Effective concentration of ferrous iron is much higher than that found in natural environments. Effects of ferrous iron are strictly oxygen dependent, what suggest that the formation of hydroxyl radicals in the Fenton reaction is a cause of the toxicity. Respiratory deficiency and pretreatment of cells with antimycin A prevent toxic effects in the late exponential phase of growth, whereas uncouplers and 2mM magnesium salts completely protect even the most vulnerable exponential cells. Generally, toxic effects correlate with the ability of cells to take up this metal. The results presented suggest that during ferrous iron overload iron is transported through the unspecific divalent cation uptake system which is known in fungi. The data suggest that recently described high and low affinity systems of iron uptake in yeast are the only source of iron in natural environments. PMID:9516981

  5. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in drug-induced toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Foufelle, Fabienne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    International audience Drug-induced toxicity is a key issue for public health because some side effects can be severe and life-threatening. These adverse effects can also be a major concern for the pharmaceutical companies since significant toxicity can lead to the interruption of clinical trials, or the withdrawal of the incriminated drugs from the market. Recent studies suggested that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress could be an important event involved in drug liability, in addition to...

  6. Toxic and Metabolic Myelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Joana; Nunes, Renato Hoffmann; da Rocha, Antonio José; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-10-01

    Myelopathy describes any neurologic deficit related to the spinal cord. It is most commonly caused by its compression by neoplasms, degenerative disc disease, trauma, or infection. Less common causes of myelopathy include spinal cord tumors, infection, inflammatory, neurodegenerative, vascular, toxic, and metabolic disorders. Conditions affecting the spinal cord must be recognized as early as possible to prevent progression that may lead to permanent disability. Biopsy is rarely performed, thus the diagnosis and management rely on patient׳s history, physical examination, laboratory results, and imaging findings. Here we review the clinical presentations, pathophysiological mechanisms, and magnetic resonance imaging findings of myelopathies related to metabolic or toxic etiologies. PMID:27616316

  7. Psychostimulant toxicity in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozalp Ekinci

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Methylphenidate is used for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children above the age of 6 with a high safety and tolerability. When used above the recommended dosage, methylphenidate has been reported to cause toxicity symptoms including neuro-psychiatric and cardiac adverse reactions. In this overview paper, the available literature on psyhcostimulant toxicity in children and the clinical symptoms and follow-up of a 4-year-old child who accidentally used high dose of methylphenidate will be discussed. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 184-193

  8. Emerging health issues of cyanobacterial blooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Manganelli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes emerging issue related to cyanobacterial dynamics and toxicity and human health risks. Data show an increasing cyanobacteria expansion and dominance in many environments. However there are still few information on the toxic species fitness, or on the effects of specific drivers on toxin production. Open research fields are related to new exposure scenario (cyanotoxins in water used for haemodialysis and in food supplements; to new patterns of co-exposure between cyanotoxins and algal toxins and/or anthropogenic chemicals; to dynamics affecting toxicity and production of different cyanotoxin variants under environmental stress; to the accumulation of cyanotoxins in the food web. In addition, many data gaps exist in the characterization of the toxicological profiles, especially about long term effects.

  9. Health safety issues of synthetic food colorants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amchova, Petra; Kotolova, Hana; Ruda-Kucerova, Jana

    2015-12-01

    Increasing attention has been recently paid to the toxicity of additives used in food. The European Parliament and the Council published the REGULATION (EC) No. 1333/2008 on food additives establishing that the toxicity of food additives evaluated before 20th January 2009 must be re-evaluated by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). The aim of this review is to survey current knowledge specifically on the toxicity issues of synthetic food colorants using official reports published by the EFSA and other available studies published since the respective report. Synthetic colorants described are Tartrazine, Quinoline Yellow, Sunset Yellow, Azorubine, Ponceau 4R, Erythrosine, Allura Red, Patent Blue, Indigo Carmine, Brilliant Blue FCF, Green S, Brilliant Black and Brown HT. Moreover, a summary of evidence on possible detrimental effects of colorant mixes on children's behaviour is provided and future research directions are outlined. PMID:26404013

  10. NEW HAVEN TOXICS INVENTORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA will be working with the New Haven Department of Health to collect data and create an inventory of toxic air pollutants in the New Haven area. Under section 112 of the Clean Air Act, EPA and cities and states are required to reduce cancer and non-cancer health risks in urb...

  11. Quebec's Toxic Pollution Concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingie, Walter

    The best solution to the problems of increased pollution of Quebec lakes and rivers with toxic wastes and increased incidence of pollution related diseases is to educate children, to make them aware of the environment and man's interrelationship with it. Attitudes of concern, based on knowledge, must be developed so that as adults, they will take…

  12. Uranium: biokinetics and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was achieved as a part of a collaboration with the Fuel Cycle Direction. Its aim was to give the state of the art about: the behaviour of uranium in the human organism (biokinetics) after ingestion, its toxicity (mainly renal) and the current regulation about its incorporation. Both in the upstream and in the downstream of the fuel cycle, uranium remains, quantitatively, the first element in the cycle which is, at the present time, temporarily disposed or recycled. Such a considerable quantity of uranium sets the problem of its risk on the health. In the long term, the biosphere may be affected and consequently the public may ingest water or food contaminated with uranium. In this way, radiological and chemical toxicity risk may be activated. This report emphasizes: the necessity of confirming some experimental and epidemiological biokinetic data used or not in the ICRP models. Unsolved questions remain about the gastrointestinal absorption according to chemical form (valency state, mixtures...), mass and individual variations (age, disease) further a chronic ingestion of uranium. It is well established that uranium is mainly deposited in the skeleton and the kidney. But the skeleton kinetics following a chronic ingestion and especially in some diseases has to be more elucidated; the necessity of taking into account uranium at first as a chemical toxic, essentially in the kidney and determining the threshold of functional lesion. In this way, it is important to look for some specific markers; the problem of not considering chemical toxicity of uranium in the texts regulating its incorporation

  13. Hydroxychloroquine-related retinal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui Jen; Denniston, Alastair K; Rao, Vijay K; Gordon, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    HCQ is widely used for the treatment of rheumatic diseases, particularly lupus and RA. It is generally well tolerated, but retinopathy is a concern. Retinopathy is rare, but is sight threatening, generally irreversible and may progress even after cessation of therapy. Damage may be subclinical. Although a number of risk factors have been proposed (such as duration of therapy and cumulative dose), the many exceptions (e.g. retinopathy on low-dose HCQ, or no retinopathy after a very large cumulative dose of HCQ) highlight our limited understanding of the disease process. Novel technologies such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) may provide the earliest structural and functional evidence of toxicity in these stages. Along with the well-established technique of central visual field testing (10-2 visual fields), these modalities are increasingly being used as part of screening programmes. The ideal single test with high sensitivity and high specificity for HCQ retinopathy has still not been achieved. Screening for HCQ retinopathy remains an area of considerable debate, including issues of when, who and how to screen. Commonly accepted risk factors include receiving >6.5 mg/kg/day or a cumulative dose of >1000 g of HCQ, being on treatment for >5 years, having renal or liver dysfunction, having pre-existing retinopathy and being elderly. HCQ continues to be a valuable drug in treating rheumatic disease, but clinicians need to be aware of the associated risks and to have arrangements in place that would enable early detection of toxicity. PMID:26428520

  14. Acute toxicity of oil sands wastewater: A toxic balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to identify and determine the relative importance of the acutely toxic fractions of wastewater from oil sands extraction using a bioassay directed toxicity identification evaluation (TIE), to use these data to construct a toxic balance, and to determine whether the same fractions were acutely toxic to Microtox, Daphnia, and rainbow trout. Samples of extraction wastewater were obtained from the Mildred Lake tailings pond in Alberta during summer 1991 and 1992. The samples were centrifuged to remove suspended solids and the toxicity of the supernatant was evaluated. Seven manipulations, each of which was designed to remove a different class of compounds, was performed on the supernatant samples. A complete TIE was performed using the Microtox bacterial bioassay. All acute toxicity of the surface tailings pond water to Microtox was removed by precipitation of organic acids or by removal of nonpolar organics. These results suggest that the main toxic fraction was a surfactant. In the interstitial water of the fine tails, volatiles accounted for 15% of the acute toxicity. However, all the acute toxicity of interstitial water was removed by precipitation of organic acids or by removal of nonpolar organics. Organic acids accounted for all the acute toxicity of tailings pond water to Daphnia and rainbow trout. Differences in relative sensitivity of test organisms to the toxic fraction demonstrate the importance of using more than one test organism to evaluate acute toxicity. Daphnia was 0.4 times less sensitive and rainbow trout 3 times more sensitive than Microtox. 20 refs., 6 tabs

  15. Management of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes with regard to their chemical toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary overview is provided of management options for low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) with regard to its chemical toxicity. In particular, the following issues are identified and described associated with the management and safe disposal of chemically toxic materials in LILW: the origin and characteristics; the regulatory approaches; the pre-disposal management; the disposal; the safety assessment. Also included are: regulatory framework for chemically toxic low level wastes in the USA; pre-disposal processing options for LILW containing chemically toxic components; example treatment technologies for LILW containing chemically toxic components and safety assessment case studies for Germany, Belgium, France and Sweden

  16. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Widget

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) widget allows users to identify facilities in a user-specified area of interest that have toxic releases as reported by the...

  17. Toxic waste liquor disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toxic waste liquors, especially radio active liquors, are disposed in a sub-zone by feeding down a bore hole a first liquid, then a buffer liquid (e.g. water), then the toxic liquors. Pressure variations are applied to the sub-zone to mix the first liquid and liquors to form gels or solids which inhibit further mixing and form a barrier between the sub-zone and the natural waters in the environment of the sub-zone. In another example the location of the sub-zone is selected so that the environement reacts with the liquors to produce a barrier around the zone. Blind bore holes are used to monitor the sub-zone profile. Materials may be added to the liquor to enhance barrier formation. (author)

  18. Stillwater Megasite : Contaminants issues

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a partial response to questions regarding toxics at Stillwater Wildlife Management Area. Adverse effects of agricultural drain water on fish,...

  19. Portable, accurate toxicity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ever tightening environmental regulations, severe penalties for non-compliance, and expensive remediation costs have stimulated development of methods to detect and measure toxins. Most of these methods are bioassays that must be performed in the laboratory; none previously devised has been truly portable. The US Army, through the Small Business Innovative Research program, has developed a hand-held, field deployable unit for testing toxicity of battlefield water supplies. This patented system employs the measurable quenching, in the presence of toxins, of the natural bioluminescence produced by the marine dinoflagellate alga Pyrocystis lunula. The procedure's inventor used it for years to measure toxicity concentrations of chemical warfare agents actually, their simulants, primarily in the form of pesticides and herbicides plus assorted toxic reagents, waterbottom samples, drilling fluids, even blood. While the procedure is more precise, cheaper, and faster than most bioassays, until recently it was immobile. Now it is deployable in the field. The laboratory apparatus has been proven to be sensitive to toxins in concentrations as low as a few parts per billion, repeatable within a variation of 10% or less, and unlike some other bioassays effective in turbid or colored media. The laboratory apparatus and the hand-held tester have been calibrated with the EPA protocol that uses the shrimplike Mysidopsis bahia. The test organism tolerates transportation well, but must be rested a few hours at the test site for regeneration of its light-producing powers. Toxicity now can be measured confidently in soils, water columns, discharge points, and many other media in situ. Most significant to the oil industry is that drilling fluids can be monitored continuously on the rig

  20. Bats and toxic pollutants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zukal, Jan; Pikula, J.; Bandouchová, H.

    Granollers: Museum of Natural Sciences, 2012 - (Flaquer, C.; Montserrat, X.), s. 75-79 ISBN 978-84-87790-69-0. [International Symposium on the Importance of Bats as Bioindicators. Granollers (ES), 05.12.2012-09.12.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP506/12/1064 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : bats * toxic pollutants * bioindication Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  1. Toxic Substances Control Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  2. Manganese toxicity upon overexposure

    OpenAIRE

    Crossgrove, Janelle; Zheng, Wei

    2004-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a required element and a metabolic byproduct of the contrast agent mangafodipir trisodium (MnDPDP). The Mn released from MnDPDP is initially sequestered by the liver for first-pass elimination, which allows an enhanced contrast for diagnostic imaging. The administration of intravenous Mn impacts its homeostatic balance in the human body and can lead to toxicity. Human Mn deficiency has been reported in patients on parenteral nutrition and in micronutrient studies. Mn toxicit...

  3. Thyroid cancer in toxic and non-toxic multinodular goiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerci C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Many authors have claimed that hyperthyroidism protects against thyroid cancer and believed that the incidence of malignancy is lower in patients with toxic multinodular goiter (TMG than in those with non-toxic multinodular goiter. But in recent studies, it was reported that the incidence of malignancy with TMG is not as low as previously thought. Aim : To compare the thyroid cancer incidence in patients with toxic and non-toxic multinodular goiter. Settings and Design : Histology reports of patients treated surgically with a preoperative diagnosis of toxic and non-toxic multinodular goiter were reviewed to identify the thyroid cancer incidence. Patients having a history of neck irradiation or radioactive iodine therapy were excluded from the study. Materials and Methods : We reviewed 294 patients operated between 2001-2005 from toxic and non-toxic multinodular goiter. One hundred and twenty-four of them were toxic and 170 were non-toxic. Hyperthyroidism was diagnosed by elevated tri-iodothyroinine / thyroxine ratios and low thyroid-stimulating hormone with clinical signs and symptoms. All patients were evaluated with ultrasonography and scintigraphy and fine needle aspiration biopsy. Statistical Analysis Used : Significance of the various parameters was calculated by using ANOVA test. Results : The incidence of malignancy was 9% in the toxic and 10.58% in the non-toxic multinodular goiter group. Any significant difference in the incidence of cancer and tumor size between the two groups could not be detected. Conclusions : The incidence of malignancy in toxic multinodular goiter is not very low as thought earlier and is nearly the same in non-toxic multinodular goiter.

  4. Sleep Issues and Sundowning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... We will not sell or share your name. Sleep Issues and Sundowning Tweet Bookmark this page | Email | ... Sleep Changes Back to top Coping strategies for sleep issues and sundowning If the person is awake ...

  5. Emotional and Social Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Epinephrine Emotional & Social Issues Find a Support Group Bullying Prevention Spread the Word True Stories Stay Informed Newsletters ... Epinephrine Emotional & Social Issues Find a Support Group Bullying Prevention Spread the Word True Stories Stay Informed Newsletters ...

  6. Post-Adolescent Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search COPING & HEALING CARING FOR A CHILD: POST-ADOLESCENT ISSUES As your child reaches adulthood, there will ... intake. New issues that you and your post adolescent child may want to discus together with his/ ...

  7. Issues in Data Labelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cowie, Roddy; Cox, Cate; Martin, Jeam-Claude; Batliner, Anton; Heylen, Dirk; Karpouzis, Kostas; Cowie, Roddy; Pelachaud, Catherine; Petta, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Labelling emotion databases is not a purely technical matter. It is bound up with theoretical issues. Different issues affect labelling of emotional content, labelling of the signs that convey emotion, and labelling of the relevant context. Linked to these are representational issues, involving time

  8. Uranium and nuclear issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This seminar focussed on the major issues affecting the future of the entire nuclear fuel cycle. In particular it covered issues bearing on the formation of public policy in relation to the use of uranium as an energy source: economic risk, industrial risks, health effects, site selection, environmental issues, and public acceptance

  9. Composition and Toxicity of Biodiesel versus Conventional Diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing production of biodiesel (BD) fuel at the local, national, and global levels raise important issues related to the impact and potential adverse health outcome related to BD exposures. Studies on the toxicity of BD combustion emissions are very limited. Emission co...

  10. Integration of generic issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NRC has recognized the need to integrate generic issues (GIs). The GI process includes a number of phases, all of which should recognize the potential for overlap and conflict among related issues. In addition to the issues themselves, other related NRC and industry programs and activities need to be factored into the GI process. Integration has taken place, or is taking place, for a number of GIs. Each case of integration involves a specific set of circumstances and, as a result, the way in which integration proceeds can vary. This paper discusses the integration of issues in the generic issue process and provides a number of examples

  11. Metal metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research focuses on the role of pregnancy and lactation in susceptibility to the toxic effects of cadmium and lead. Responses under investigation include lead-induced changes in pathways for vitamin D and calcium metabolism and cadmium-induced alterations in kidney function and skeletal structure. The second area focuses on the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium and other actinide elements. Studies currently being conducted in nonhuman primates to develop a procedure to determine GI absorption values of uranium and plutonium that does not require sacrifice of the animal. 6 refs

  12. Control of air toxics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For more than 10 years, Argonne National Laboratory has supported the US DOE's Flue Gas Cleanup Program objective by developing new or improved environmental controls for industries that use fossil fuels. Argonne's pollutant emissions research has ranged from experiments in the basic chemistry of pollution-control systems, through laboratory-scale process development and testing, to pilot-scale field tests of several technologies. The work on air toxics is currently divided into two components: Investigating measures to improve the removal of mercury in existing pollution-control systems applied to coal combustion; and, Developing sensors and control techniques for emissions found in the textile industry

  13. Herbal toxicity in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyazema, N Z

    1986-01-01

    Indigenous natural drugs are in common use in Zimbabwe because modern life-saving drugs are beyond the reach of nearly 85% of the population. These natural drugs have caused a number of poisoning cases. In a study of the records of four hospitals from 1971 to 1982, carried out to see how many people had been poisoned with herbal remedies, it was found that the number had increased since 1971. 50 traditional healers were questioned about record-keeping and knowledge of toxicity and Health Assistants were also interviewed. PMID:3798540

  14. The toxicity of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among radionuclides of importance in atomic energy, 3H has relatively low toxicity. There is concern, however, because very large amounts are involved in nuclear fission and fusion, impressive quantities are released to the environment and tritium in its preferred state, water, has free access to living cells and organisms. The main health and environmental worry is the possibility that significant biological effects may follow from protracted exposure to low concentrations in water. To examine this possible hazard and measure toxicity at low tritium concentrations, chronic exposure studies were done on mice and monkeys. During vulnerable developmental periods animals were exposed to 3HOH and mice were exposed also to 60Co gamma irradiation and energy-related chemical agents. The biological endpoint measured was the irreversible loss of female germ cells. Effects from tritium were observed at surprisingly low concentrations where 3H was found more damaging than previously thought. Comparisons between tritium and gamma radiation showed the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) to be greater than 1 and to reach approximately 3 at very low exposures. For perspective, other comparisons were made: between radiation and chemical agents, which revealed parallels in action on germ cells; and between pre- and postnatal exposure, which warn of possible special hazard to the foetus from both classes of energy-related byproducts. (author)

  15. Management of thalidomide toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobrial, Irene M; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2003-01-01

    Thalidomide has re-emerged as a novel antineoplastic agent with immunomodulatory and antiangiogenic activities. In the early sixties, it was withdrawn from the market after its infamous association with congenital abnormalities that left about 10,000 children affected world-wide. With strict regulations and precautions, thalidomide is now approved by the FDA for the treatment of erythema nodosum leprosum. Its role in cancer therapy is promising, with clinical trials in the past 5 years showing significant activity in multiple myeloma. Several trials are ongoing in other malignancies, such as myelodysplastic syndrome, agnogenic myeloid metaplasia, renal cell carcinoma, and prostate cancer. The major toxicities of thalidomide are birth defects, sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy, somnolence, rash, fatigue, and constipation. Less common side effects include deep venous thrombosis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, elevated liver enzymes, malaise, and peripheral edema. The incidence and severity of adverse events are related to dose and duration of therapy. Doses of the drug of 200 mg/day or less are usually well tolerated. In this review, we will discuss the incidence and management of the side effects of thalidomide and the precautions and interventions needed to minimize the toxicities of this drug. PMID:15334875

  16. Toxic compounds in honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Nazmul; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Islam, Md Asiful; Gan, Siew Hua

    2014-07-01

    There is a wealth of information about the nutritional and medicinal properties of honey. However, honey may contain compounds that may lead to toxicity. A compound not naturally present in honey, named 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), may be formed during the heating or preservation processes of honey. HMF has gained much interest, as it is commonly detected in honey samples, especially samples that have been stored for a long time. HMF is a compound that may be mutagenic, carcinogenic and cytotoxic. It has also been reported that honey can be contaminated with heavy metals such as lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium. Honey produced from the nectar of Rhododendron ponticum contains alkaloids that can be poisonous to humans, while honey collected from Andromeda flowers contains grayanotoxins, which can cause paralysis of limbs in humans and eventually leads to death. In addition, Melicope ternata and Coriaria arborea from New Zealand produce toxic honey that can be fatal. There are reports that honey is not safe to be consumed when it is collected from Datura plants (from Mexico and Hungary), belladonna flowers and Hyoscamus niger plants (from Hungary), Serjania lethalis (from Brazil), Gelsemium sempervirens (from the American Southwest), Kalmia latifolia, Tripetalia paniculata and Ledum palustre. Although the symptoms of poisoning due to honey consumption may differ depending on the source of toxins, most common symptoms generally include dizziness, nausea, vomiting, convulsions, headache, palpitations or even death. It has been suggested that honey should not be considered a completely safe food. PMID:24214851

  17. Assessing mistletoe toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, A H; Spoerke, D G; Rumack, B H

    1986-11-01

    To assess the potential toxicity of mistletoe ingestion, data were collected on 14 cases of ingestion of one to three berries or one or two leaves of American mistletoe (Phoradendron sp) from 1982 to 1985. Eleven patients ingested berries and three ingested leaves; none became symptomatic. Nine patients were observed at home without intervention except poison center telephone follow-up. Five had induced emesis, including two who were referred to emergency departments for evaluation, where no findings other than ipecac-induced vomiting were noted. Also reviewed were data on a total of 318 cases of mistletoe ingestion reported to the Food and Drug Administration Poison Control case reporting system between 1978 and 1983 (n = 177) and the American Association of Poison Control Centers national data collection system (n = 141) in 1984. The majority remained asymptomatic and no deaths were recorded. These data allow the conclusion that ingestion of one to three mistletoe berries or one or two leaves is unlikely to produce serious toxicity. PMID:2877602

  18. Application of TIE's in assessing toxicity associated with oil sands process waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hot water digestion process which separates bitumen from oil sands produces large volumes of process-affected waters which are extremely toxic to aquatic organisms. At Syncrude Canada's northeastern Alberta plant, the toxic waters are contained on the site and none are discharged. Organic acids, hydrocarbons and salts are leached into the tailings waters. A toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) test was used to confirm the main contributors to the acute toxicity in these waters. A battery bioassay approach as well as field and laboratory testing was used to understand the source, pathway and duration of the toxicity. Bioassays helped in developing ways in which to mitigate toxicity issues in both reclamation and operational waters. It was demonstrated that natural bioremediation of process-affected waters can reduce acute and chronic toxicity. The long term reclamation impacts of these waters has yet to be determined

  19. Bioequivalence approach for whole effluent toxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, R.; Wang, Q.; Fulk, F.; Deng, C.; Denton, D.

    2000-01-01

    Increased use of whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests in the regulatory arena has brought increased concern over the statistical analysis of WET test data and the determination of toxicity. One concern is the issue of statistical power. A number of WET tests may pass the current hypothesis test approach because they lack statistical power to detect relevant toxic effects because of large within-test variability. Additionally, a number of WET tests may fail the current approach because they possess excessive statistical power, as a result of small within-test variability, and detect small differences that may not be biologically relevant. The strengths and limitations of both the traditional hypothesis test approach and the bioequivalence approach for use in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System program were evaluated. Data from 5,213 single-concentration, short-term chronic WET tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia provided the database for analysis. Comparison of results between the current approach and the bioequivalence approach indicates that the current approach to WET testing is generally sound but that adopting the proposed bioequivalence approach resolves concerns of statistical power. Specifically, within this data set, applying the bioequivalence approach resulted in failure for tests with relatively large test variability and a pass for tests with relatively small within-test variability.

  20. Volume 4, Issue 1

    OpenAIRE

    Karen Nelson; John Clarke; Tracy Creagh

    2013-01-01

    This issue showcases a rich variety of first year issues reported from an assortment of national and international settings.  In the Feature, Professor Phil Long (University of Queensland) and Associate Professor Shane Dawson (University of South Australia) share their views about the issues and challenges associated with learning analytics.  Reflecting the adage from last century that successful student engagement is the result of a combination of warmth and challenge the articles ...

  1. Aviation Safety Issues Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Samuel A.; Ricks, Wendell R.

    2009-01-01

    The aviation safety issues database was instrumental in the refinement and substantiation of the National Aviation Safety Strategic Plan (NASSP). The issues database is a comprehensive set of issues from an extremely broad base of aviation functions, personnel, and vehicle categories, both nationally and internationally. Several aviation safety stakeholders such as the Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) have already used the database. This broader interest was the genesis to making the database publically accessible and writing this report.

  2. Current issues and actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the progress that has been made toward achieving full regulatory compliance at the Hanford Site. Ongoing compliance self-assessments, implementation of the Tri-Party Agreement, and public meetings continue to identify environmental compliance issues. These issues are discussed openly with the regulatory agencies and with the public to ensure that all environmental compliance issues are addressed

  3. Czech Republic; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1999-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper on the Czech Republic discusses issues relating to the enterprise sector and corporate governance. This includes an overview and assessment of enterprise performance along with a discussion of the concept of corporate governance and its application in the Czech Republic, including how corporate governance practices compare in an international context. The paper discusses issues related to financial sector performance and restructuring. It also takes stock of banking...

  4. Current issues and actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the progress that has been made toward achieving full regulatory compliance at the Hanford Site. Ongoing compliance self-assessments, implementation of the Tri-Party Agreement, and public meetings continue to identify environmental compliance issues. These issues are discussed openly with the regulatory agencies and with the public to ensure that all environmental compliance issues are addressed.

  5. EMERGING MYCOTOXIN ISSUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fungus Fusarium graminearum contaminates cereal grain with 8-keto trichothecene mycotoxins, mainly nivalenol and 4-deoxynivalenol. In most animal studies to date, nivalenol has proven more toxic than deoxynivalenol, and is thus of added concern for food safety. DNA sequence analysis indicates ...

  6. Deoxynivalenol and its toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrova, Pavlina; Adam, Vojtech; Vasatkova, Anna; Beklova, Miroslava; Zeman, Ladislav; Kizek, Rene

    2010-09-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of several mycotoxins produced by certain Fusarium species that frequently infect corn, wheat, oats, barley, rice, and other grains in the field or during storage. The exposure risk to human is directly through foods of plant origin (cereal grains) or indirectly through foods of animal origin (kidney, liver, milk, eggs). It has been detected in buckwheat, popcorn, sorgum, triticale, and other food products including flour, bread, breakfast cereals, noodles, infant foods, pancakes, malt and beer. DON affects animal and human health causing acute temporary nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, headache, dizziness, and fever. This review briefly summarizes toxicities of this mycotoxin as well as effects on reproduction and their antagonistic and synergic actions. PMID:21217881

  7. Coaching the toxic leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Manfred F R Kets

    2014-04-01

    In his work as an executive coach, psychotherapist Kets de Vries sometimes comes across bosses with mental demons. The four kinds he encounters most frequently are pathological narcissists, who are selfish and entitled, have grandiose fantasies, and pursue power at all costs; manic-depressives, who can leave a trail of emotional blazes behind them; passive-aggressives, who shy away from confrontation but are obstructive and under-handed; and the emotionally disconnected--literal-minded people who cannot describe or even recognize their feelings. Left unchecked, these personalities can warp the interactions, plans, and systems of entire organizations. But with appropriate coaching, toxic bosses can learn to manage their conditions and become effective mentors and leaders. This article describes how to recognize each pathology and, step by step, guide people who suffer from it toward healthier and more-productive interactions. PMID:24830286

  8. Rethinking guideline toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghir, Shakil Ahmed

    2015-07-01

    The guidelines for risk assessment of plant protection products (PPPs) and other non-pharmaceuticals were developed over three decades ago and have generally not been updated to incorporate advancements in toxicology and exposure sciences. These guidelines recommend using maximum-tolerated-dose (MTD) even when human relevance of such high doses is mostly limited due to orders of magnitude margin-of-exposure. Conducting animal studies at such high doses often requires further mode-of-action (MoA) studies elucidating human relevance. In order to improve data, ILSI/HESI-ACSA technical committee proposed a tiered approach with emphasis on determining systemic dose of parent and/or metabolite(s) in test animals as biological effects are reflective of systemic rather than administered dose. Any deviation from linearity in systemic dose (saturation of absorption or elimination) in animal studies may have profound toxic effect(s) not expected to occur in likely human exposure scenarios and should be avoided. Toxicity studies should ideally be conducted at kinetically linear doses or slightly above the point of departure from linearity or kinetically-derived maximum dose (KMD) as the systemic dose nonlinearity is a more sensitive parameter occurring much earlier than the MTD endpoints. Therefore, determining systemic dose, especially KMD, in study animals is an improvement to hazard assessment of PPPs and other non-pharmaceuticals allowing toxicologists to better understand findings in animals at systemically linear as well as nonlinear doses to likely human exposures which can easily be accomplished using core study animals as outlined below. Determining systemic dose in studies will also increase the understanding of initial potential MoA of a PPPs and other non-pharmaceuticals and reduce the use of animals by avoiding unnecessary additional MoA studies. PMID:25980640

  9. Children's Ability to Recognise Toxic and Non-Toxic Fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    Children's ability to identify common plants is a necessary prerequisite for learning botany. However, recent work has shown that children lack positive attitudes toward plants and are unable to identify them. We examined children's (aged 10-17) ability to discriminate between common toxic and non-toxic plants and their mature fruits presented in…

  10. Toxicity data informatics: supporting a new paradigm for toxicity prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Ann M; Yang, Chihae; Judson, Richard S

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chemical toxicity data at all levels of description, from treatment-level dose response data to a high-level summarized toxicity "endpoint," effectively circumscribe, enable, and limit predictive toxicology approaches and capabilities. Several new and evolving public data initiatives focused on the world of chemical toxicity information-as represented here by ToxML (Toxicology XML standard), DSSTox (Distributed Structure-Searchable Toxicity Database Network), and ACToR (Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource)-are contributing to the creation of a more unified, mineable, and modelable landscape of public toxicity data. These projects address different layers in the spectrum of toxicological data representation and detail and, additionally, span diverse domains of toxicology and chemistry in relation to industry and environmental regulatory concerns. For each of the three projects, data standards are the key to enabling "read-across" in relation to toxicity data and chemical-indexed information. In turn, "read-across" capability enables flexible data mining, as well as meaningful aggregation of lower levels of toxicity information to summarized, modelable endpoints spanning sufficient areas of chemical space for building predictive models. By means of shared data standards and transparent and flexible rules for data aggregation, these and related public data initiatives are effectively spanning the divides among experimental toxicologists, computational modelers, and the world of chemically indexed, publicly available toxicity information. PMID:20020908

  11. Seven Issues Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Whitehead, Jim; De Bra, Paul;

    2002-01-01

    It has been 15 years since the original presentation by Frank Halasz at Hypertext'87 on seven issues for the next generation of hypertext systems. These issues are: Search and Query Composites Virtual Structures Computation in/over hypertext network Versioning Collaborative Work Extensibility and...

  12. BWR internal cracking issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulatory issues associated with cracking of boiling water reactor (BWR) internals is being addressed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and is the subject of a voluntary industry initiative. The lessons learned from this effort will be applied to pressurized water reactor (PWR) internals cracking issues

  13. Issue Brief on Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Division on Developmental Disabilities, Council for Exceptional Children (NJ1), 2013

    2013-01-01

    During the past year, the Diversity Committee of the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) Board worked with the Board and the Issues Committee Chair to develop an issue brief addressing diversity, its impact on the membership and the wider community that is served by the work of DDD, resulting in recommendations that will influence policy…

  14. Identifying the cause of toxicity in an algal whole effluent toxicity study - an unanticipated toxicant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddy, Rami B; Tapp, Kelly; Rehner, Anita B; Pillard, David A; Schrage, Laura

    2011-10-01

    Toxicity was observed in whole effluent toxicity (WET) studies with the freshwater alga, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, in three consecutive monthly studies, (NOEC=50-75%). Toxicity was not observed to Ceriodaphnia dubia or the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas in concurrent studies. Selected toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) tests were conducted in a tiered approach to eliminate possible toxicants and progressively identify the causative agent. Filtration following alkaline adjustment (pH 10 or 11) was effective in eliminating significant growth effects and also reduced phosphate concentration. The TIE studies confirmed that the observed effluent toxicity was caused by excess ortho-phosphate in the effluent not by overstimulation or related to unfavorable N:P ratios; but due to direct toxicity. The 96-h 25% inhibition concentration (IC25) of ortho-phosphate to P. subcapitata was 3.4 mg L⁻¹ while the maximum acceptable toxicant concentration was 4.8 mg L⁻¹. This study illustrates the value of multi-species testing and also provides an example of an effective TIE using algae identifying an unanticipated toxicant. PMID:21840029

  15. ELEKTRONSKO ARHIVIRANJE RAČUNOV V PODJETJU BSH, NAZARJE

    OpenAIRE

    Dobovičnik, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Elektronsko poslovanje je pomembna sestavina gospodarskega razvoja in vse več podjetij prihaja do spoznanja, da je poslovni proces v papirni obliki manj učinkovit in predrag in neprimeren za sodelovanje med poslovnimi partnerji. Pojav elektronskega poslovanja sega desetletje nazaj, ko je bila prvič uporabljena računalniška tehnologija in se je začelo z računalniško izmenjavo podatkov med podjetji. Ta način poslovanja se je dosegel z razvojem računalniških omrežij-predvsem interneta, ki predst...

  16. Navigating "thorny" issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Kashema; Gilbert, Aderinsola; Malyukova, Anna

    2016-08-01

    In their article Mindfulness and discussing `thorny' issues in the classroom Konstantinos Alexakos et al. (Cult Stud Sci Educ, 2016. doi: 10.1007/s11422-015-9718-0) describe "thorny" issues as "difficult topics to discuss because they are more personal to some perhaps even cause pain and violence." As women from different backgrounds, we engage in a metalogue, which expands on our thoughts and emotions the thorny issues evoked. Our discussion is grounded in theoretical frameworks of mindfulness, wellness, and safe space for learning. We also reflect on our experiences of facing some of the thorny issues in our academic and personal lives. Having trust and respect for one another and being aware of thorny issues allows for a meaningful conversation about the complexity and nuances involved in discussing difficult topics in a classroom setting.

  17. Toxic risks of inappropriate therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, M J

    1990-02-01

    Drug therapy may produce toxicity. Patient individuality or drug interactions account for many cases of poisoning, but other factors such as genetic predisposition, drug contamination or human error are also known causes. Examples of various types of drug poisoning are given, illustrating the role of the clinical chemist in minimizing or studying drug toxicity. PMID:2184960

  18. The toxicity of X material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferry, J.L.

    1943-12-31

    This report addresses toxicity (largely chemical) of Manhattan Project materials from the point of worker protection. Known chemical toxicities of X material (uranium), nitrous fumes, fluorine, vanadium, magnesium, and lime are described followed by safe exposure levels, symptoms of exposure, and treatment recommendations. The report closes with an overview of general policy in a question and answer format.

  19. Toxicology Selective Toxicity dan Test

    OpenAIRE

    Mansyur

    2002-01-01

    Toxicology adalah pemahaman-pemahaman mengenai effek-effek bahan kimia yang merugikan bagi organisme. Dari definisi tersebut, jelas terdapat unsur-unsur bahan kimia dan organisme, dimana didalam kedua unsur-unsur ini terdapat istilah-istilah toksisitas dan animal test-test. Tulisan ini bermaskud membicarakan mengenai selective toxicity dan animal toxicity tetst. kedokteran-mansyur5

  20. Design considerations for laboratory robotics systems handling toxic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses design issues pertinent to development of reliable robotic systems for handling toxic substances, using examples from Midwest Research Institute's experience with the full range of materials selected by the federal government for toxicology testing. This includes laboratory work with substances known to have adverse toxicological effects (e.g., known carcinogens) as well as chemicals selected for evaluation of their toxic potential. Chemicals under evaluation include pharmaceuticals, industrial chemicals, solvents, pesticides, and a variety of other chemicals, solvents, pesticides, and a variety of other chemicals to which the populace is exposed in the workplace or in their daily lives

  1. VARIATIONS IN REPRODUCTIVE TOXICANT IDENTIFICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, F

    2008-05-13

    Reproductive toxicants are a very important class of compounds. They present unique hazards to those of child bearing ages, perform their 'dirty work' using a wide variety of mechanisms on a number of different organs, and are regulatorily important. Because of all of this, properly identifying reproductive toxicants is important, but fraught with difficulty. In this paper we will describe types or reproductive toxicants, their importance, and both mistakes and good practices that people who are not experts in reproductive toxicology may use in their attempts to identify them. Additionally, this paper will focus on chemical reproductive toxicants and will not address biological agents that could affect reproductive toxicity although many principles outlined here could be applied to that endeavor.

  2. Variants of P Systems with Toxic Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Alhazov, Artiom; Freund, Rudolf; Ivanov, Sergiu; Research Group on Natural Computing (Universidad de Sevilla) (Coordinador)

    2015-01-01

    Toxic objects have been introduced to avoid trap rules, especially in (purely) catalytic P systems. No toxic object is allowed to stay idle during a valid derivation in a P system with toxic objects. In this paper we consider special variants of toxic P systems where the set of toxic objects is prede ned { either by requiring all objects to be toxic or all catalysts to be toxic or all objects except the catalysts to be toxic. With all objects staying inside and being toxic, pur...

  3. [Toxic anterior segment syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornut, P-L; Chiquet, C

    2011-01-01

    Toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS) is a general term used to describe acute, sterile postoperative inflammation due to a non-infectious substance that accidentally enters the anterior segment at the time of surgery and mimics infectious endophthalmitis. TASS most commonly occurs acutely following anterior segment surgery, typically 12-72h after cataract extraction. Anterior segment inflammation is usually quite severe with hypopyon. Endothelial cell damage is common, resulting in diffuse corneal edema. No bacterium is isolated from ocular samples. The causes of TASS are numerous and difficult to isolate. Any device or substance used during the surgery or in the immediate postoperative period may be implicated. The major known causes include: preservatives in ophthalmic solutions, denatured ophthalmic viscosurgical devices, bacterial endotoxin, and intraocular lens-induced inflammation. Clinical features of infectious and non-infectious inflammation are initially indistinguishable and TASS is usually diagnosed and treated as acute endophthalmitis. It usually improves with local steroid treatment but may result in chronic elevation of intraocular pressure or irreversible corneal edema due to permanent damage of trabecular meshwork or endothelial cells. PMID:21176994

  4. Understanding Pregnancy and Birth Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Pregnancy and Birth Issues Past Issues / Winter 2008 Table ... turn Javascript on. What is a High-Risk Pregnancy? All pregnancies involve a certain degree of risk ...

  5. Fusion Canada issue 23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue TdeV tokamak updates, fusion research in Korea, CCFM program review, TdeV divertor plasma, and CFFTP program review. 4 figs

  6. Fusion Canada issue 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue ITER reactor siting, a major upgrade for TdeV tokamak, Ceramic Breeders: new tritium mapping technique and Joint Fusion Symposium. 2 figs

  7. Medicaid Issue Briefs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MS, in collaboration with Mathematica, has started the MAX Medicaid policy issue brief series, which highlights the essential role MAX data can play in analyzing...

  8. Ethical issues in immunisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, David; Kilham, Henry; Leask, Julie; Tobin, Bernadette

    2009-01-29

    Discussions about current and future immunisation programmes raise novel questions about familiar ethical issues. Two sets of ethical issues dominate these discussions. The first is the issue of compulsory immunisation: what should be done about parents who fail to immunise their children? The second is: given competing demands on health care budgets, how should principles of justice in access and distribution inform vaccination programmes? This paper considers these two issues in the light of traditional ethical principles. With respect to the first, we argue that compulsion is justified only in cases in which we know with practical certainty that parental failure to immunise puts their own child or other children at high risk of severe illness. We also argue that the state should compensate those who suffer vaccine-related injury. With respect to the second, we claim that allocating resources according to health care need requires establishing priorities between public health programmes such as immunisation and other treatment programmes. PMID:19026706

  9. Fusion Canada issue 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion Canada's publication of the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is the CFFTP Industrial Impact Study, CCFM/TdeV Update:helium pumping, research funds, and deuterium in beryllium - high temperature behaviour. 3 figs

  10. Fusion Canada issue 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a funding report for CFFTP, a technical update for Tokamak de Varennes and a network for university research by the National Fusion Program. 4 figs

  11. Vietnam; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1999-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper for Vietnam reports that the framework for policy lending in Vietnam, in conjunction with the active consideration of proposals to enhance the operational autonomy of policy-lending institutions, poses significant risks. The current framework does not adequately address common governance issues related to state involvement in investment decisions, and is insufficient to ensure the quality of investment. Recommended policy actions include removing residual policy len...

  12. Hungary; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2003-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper examines the external sector issues in Hungary. It looks at some traditional indicators of external competitiveness, and provides basic background on key macroeconomic developments, including the current account and its financing. The paper examines various measures of the real effective exchange rate, the labor market considerations, and actual export performance. The paper concludes that although external competitiveness of the Hungarian economy has not been perma...

  13. Mexico; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2006-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper is a wide-ranging survey of the conditions for, and obstacles to, the growth in Mexico. It frames the issue of Mexico’s growth record, and presents the paper’s prior assumptions and approach. It highlights the main observations and conclusions emerging from the survey of growth conditions in Mexico. It also presents an overview of remittances in Mexico, motivated by their recent increase and possible macroeconomic implications.

  14. Volume 5, Issue 1

    OpenAIRE

    Karen Nelson; John Clarke; Tracy Creagh

    2014-01-01

    The Feature in this issue is a conversation with Richard James, a highly respected Australian academic with extensive experience in research and policy development on the First Year Experience. Richard discusses the inevitability of universal participation in tertiary education and its impact on the style of participation, student diversity, the shifting focus of decision-making on standards and credentialism; and addresses the challenges posed by these and related issues for universities and...

  15. National Air Toxic Assessments (NATA) Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Air Toxics Assessment was conducted by EPA in 2002 to assess air toxics emissions in order to identify and prioritize air toxics, emission source types...

  16. Toxicity of Uranium Adsorbent Materials using the Microtox Toxicity Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jiyeon [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jeters, Robert T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, Gary A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bonheyo, George T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the toxicity of a diverse range of natural and synthetic materials used to extract uranium from seawater. The uranium adsorbent materials are being developed as part of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Resources Program. The goal of this effort was to identify whether deployment of a farm of these materials into the marine environment would have any toxic effects on marine organisms.

  17. Acute Methylenedioxypyrovalerone Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froberg, Blake A; Levine, Michael; Beuhler, Michael C; Judge, Bryan S; Moore, Philip W; Engebretsen, Kristin M; Mckeown, Nathanael J; Rosenbaum, Christopher D; Young, Amy C; Rusyniak, Daniel E

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the acute clinical effects, laboratory findings, complications, and disposition of patients presenting to the hospital after abusing synthetic cathinone. We conducted a retrospective multicenter case series of patients with synthetic cathinone abuse by searching for the terms bath salts, MDPV, methylenedioxypyrovalerone, mephedrone, methcathinone, methylone, methedrone, and cathinone within the "agent" field of a national clinical toxicology database (ToxIC). The medical records of these patients were obtained and abstracted by investigators at each study site. Patients with confirmatory testing that identified a synthetic cathinone in either blood or urine were included in the series. Patients who had either an undetectable synthetic cathinone test or no confirmatory testing were excluded. A data abstraction sheet was used to obtain information on each patient. We entered data into an Excel spreadsheet and calculated descriptive statistics. We identified 23 patients with confirmed synthetic cathinone exposure--all were positive for methylenedioxyprovalerone (MDPV). Eighty-three percent were male and 74 % had recreational intent. The most common reported clinical effects were tachycardia (74 %), agitation (65 %), and sympathomimetic syndrome (65 %). Acidosis was the most common laboratory abnormality (43 %). Seventy-eight percent of patients were treated with benzodiazepines and 30 % were intubated. Ninety-six percent of patients were hospitalized and 87 % were admitted to the ICU. The majority (61 %) of patients was discharged home but 30 % required inpatient psychiatric care. There was one death in our series. The majority of patients presenting to the hospital after abusing MDPV have severe sympathomimetic findings requiring hospitalization. A number of these patients require inpatient psychiatric care after their acute presentation. PMID:25468313

  18. Multidrug toxicity involving sumatriptan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittel, Jessica L; Vorce, Shawn P; Levine, Barry; Hughes, Rhome L; Bosy, Thomas Z

    2015-01-01

    A multidrug fatality involving sumatriptan is reported. Sumatriptan is a tryptamine derivative that acts at 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors and is used for the treatment of migraines. The decedent was a 21-year-old white female found dead in bed by her spouse. No signs of physical trauma were observed and a large number of prescription medications were discovered at the scene. Toxicological analysis of the central blood revealed sumatriptan at a concentration of 1.03 mg/L. Following therapeutic dosing guidelines, sumatriptan concentrations do not exceed 0.095 mg/L. Sumatriptan was isolated by solid-phase extraction and analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring mode. A tissue distribution study was completed with the following concentrations measured: 0.61 mg/L in femoral blood, 0.56 mg/L in iliac blood, 5.01 mg/L in urine, 0.51 mg/kg in liver, 3.66 mg/kg in kidney, 0.09 mg/kg in heart, 0.32 mg/kg in spleen, 0.01 mg/kg in brain, 15.99 mg/kg in lung and 78.54 mg/45 mL in the stomach contents. Carisoprodol, meprobamate, fluoxetine, doxylamine, orphenadrine, dextromethorphan and hydroxyzine were also present in the blood at the following concentrations: 3.35, 2.36, 0.63, 0.19, 0.06, 0.55 and 0.16 mg/L. The medical examiner ruled the cause of death as acute mixed drug toxicity and the manner of death as accident. PMID:25324526

  19. Analysis of Ammonia Toxicity in Landfill Leachates

    OpenAIRE

    Takuya Osada; Keisuke Nemoto; Hiroki Nakanishi; Ayumi Hatano; Ryo Shoji; Tomohiro Naruoka; Masato Yamada

    2011-01-01

    Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) phase I manipulations and toxicity test with D. magna were conducted on leachates from an industrial waste landfill site in Japan. Physicochemical analysis detected heavy metals at concentrations insufficient to account for the observed acute toxicity. The graduated pH and aeration manipulations identified the prominent toxicity of ammonia. Based on joint toxicity with additive effects of unionized ammonia and ammonium ions, the unionized ammonia toxic...

  20. Non-Toxic HAN Monopropellant Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Non-toxic monopropellants have been developed that provide better performance than toxic hydrazine. Formulations based on hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) have...

  1. Technical considerations regarding toxicity testing of commercial bioremediation agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toxicological evaluation of commercial bioremediation agents (CBAs) for use on oil spills is under consideration by the USEPA. Currently, acute and chronic bioassays are conducted with the CBA alone and with CBA that has been diluted with the water soluble fraction (WSF) of a crude oil. Endpoints are expressed as a concentration of the CBA. This approach may not address the toxicological issue of CBA use since it (1) does not determine if the CBA affects toxicity of the oil itself, and (2) does not consider temporal aspects associated with byproducts of oil degradation. The present study was conducted to address these issues. A CBA was mixed with unweathered crude oil from 1 to 42 days. The WSF of the mixture was then drawn off and acute bioassays were conducted with silverside minnows, Menidia beryllina, and mysid shrimp, Mysidopsis bahia. For silversides, 96-hr LC50 values ranged from 42.7% WSF after 1 day mixing to 10.5% after 42 days. Toxicity increased sharply between days 4 and 7 when the 96-hr LC50 dropped from 39.0 to 18.2% WSF. A similar trend occurred for mysid shrimp. The presence of the CBA caused a more rapid increase in the toxicity of the oil as compared to bioassays in which oil was mixed alone and then tested. These data indicate that the interaction of CBAs with oil, and associated temporal trends in toxicity, are important aspects to consider in hazard evaluation of these products. The current proposed CBA toxicity testing protocol does not effectively address these issues

  2. Toxicity testing (Stormwater mitigation effectiveness)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Numerous low impact development (LID; green infrastructure) technologies are being developed and implemented to reduce the impacts of toxic stormwater runoff on...

  3. 2011 NATA - Air Toxics Monitors

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset includes annual (2005 - 2013) statistics of measured ambient air toxics concentrations (in micrograms per cubic meter) and associated risk estimates...

  4. Toxicity of PAMAM dendrimers to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent decades, a new class of polymeric materials, PAMAM dendrimers, has attracted marked interest owing to their unique nanoscopic architecture and their hopeful perspectives in nanomedicine and therapeutics. However, the potential release of dendrimers into the aquatic environment raises the issue about their toxicity on aquatic organisms. Our investigation sought to estimate the toxicity of cationic PAMAM dendrimers on the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Algal cultures were exposed to different concentrations (0.3-10 mg L-1) of low dendrimer generations (G2, G4 and G5) for 72 h. Potential adverse effects on Chlamydomonas were assessed using esterase activity (cell viability), photosynthetic O2 evolution, pigments content and chlorophyll a fluorescence transient. According to the median inhibitory concentration (IC50) appraised from esterase activity, toxicity on cell viability decreased with dendrimer generation number (2, 3 and 5 mg L-1 for G2, G4 and G5 dendrimers, respectively). Moreover, the three generations of dendrimers did not induce the same changes in the photosynthetic metabolism of the green alga. O2 evolution was stimulated in cultures exposed to the lowest generations tested (i.e. G2 and G4) whereas no significant effects were observed with G5. In addition, total chlorophyll content was increased after G2 treatment at 2.5 mg L-1. Finally, G2 and G4 had positive effects on photosystem II (PSII): the amount of active PSII reaction centers, the primary charge separation and the electron transport between QA and QB were all increased inducing activation of the photosynthetic electron transport chain. These changes resulted in stimulation of full photosynthetic performance.

  5. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Wayne Briner

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a c...

  6. Ethanol toxicity and oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Bondy, SC

    1992-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the toxicity of ethanol have been the subject of much study, but are not well understood. Unlike many selective pharmacological agents, ethanol clearly has several major loci of action. One deleterious factor in ethanol metabolism is the potential for generation of excess amounts of free radicals. The extent to which this activity accounts for the overall toxicity of ethanol is unknown. This review outlines the enzymic steps that have the capacity to generate reactiv...

  7. TOXIC AND DRUG INDUCED MYOPATHIES

    OpenAIRE

    Dalakas, Marinos C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Although the ?do no harm? dogma of Hippocrates is faithfully followed by all practitioners, drugs used for therapeutic interventions either alone or in combination, may sometimes cause unexpected toxicity to the muscles, resulting in a varying degree of symptomatology, from mild discomfort and inconvenience to permanent damage and disability. The clinician should suspect a toxic myopathy when a patient without a pre-existing muscle disease develops myalgia, fatigue, weakn...

  8. CAESAR models for developmental toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Piclin Nadège; Pintore Marco; Young Douglas; Martin Todd; Manganaro Alberto; Cassano Antonio; Bigoni Davide; Benfenati Emilio

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The new REACH legislation requires assessment of a large number of chemicals in the European market for several endpoints. Developmental toxicity is one of the most difficult endpoints to assess, on account of the complexity, length and costs of experiments. Following the encouragement of QSAR (in silico) methods provided in the REACH itself, the CAESAR project has developed several models. Results Two QSAR models for developmental toxicity have been developed, using diffe...

  9. Toxic femininity 4.0

    OpenAIRE

    Risam, Roopika

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines constructions of toxic femininity within fourth-wave feminism. Taking hashtag feminism as its focus, this article contends that charges of toxicity lobbed online reproduce divisive dynamics that have shaped earlier trends within feminist movements in the United States. It further suggests that Twitter, as a platform, amplifies deep discomfort with theories of intersectional feminism while shaping how normative gender is reproduced online.

  10. Biocompatibility and Toxicity of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Markides

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine is a pioneering field aimed at restoring and regenerating the function of damaged cells, organs and tissues in order to establish normal function. It demands the cross communication of disciplines to develop effective therapeutic stem cell based therapies. Nanotechnology has been instrumental in the development and translation of basic research to the clinically relevant therapies. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs have been applied to tag, track and activate stem cells offering an effective means of monitoring in vitro and in vivo behaviour. MNPs are comprised of an iron oxide core with a biocompatible biological polymer. Safety is an issue of constant concern and emphasises on the importance of investigating the issue of toxicity. Any indication of toxicity can ultimately limit the therapeutic efficiency of the therapy. Toxicity is highly dependent on the physical, chemical and structural properties of the MNP itself as well as dose and intended use. Few in vitro studies have reported adverse effects of MNP on cells at in vitro in therapeutic doses. However, long term in vivo studies have not been studied as extensively. This review aims to summarise current research in this topic highlighting commonly used toxicity assays to investigate this.

  11. The future challenge of lead toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Needleman, H.L. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Five decades ago, lead toxicity in childhood was thought in nonlethal cases to be without residual effect. This misconception was corrected in 1943 by Randolph Byers, who began the modern era of lead neurotoxicology by asserting that lead not only killed cells, but interfered with the normal development of central nervous system neurons. The human data from Byers forward is reviewed, with particular attention on methodological issues that have emerged. The papers on human neurotoxicology presented at the NIEHS lead conference held in Research Triangle Park, NC, in 1974 are examined to demonstrate the progress made over the last 15 years. Seven methodological solecisms have clouded judgment over the question of lead toxicity at low dose: worship of the sacrament of p = 0.05; inaccurate causal modeling;drawing conclusions from studies with inadequate power; positing phantom covariates; underestimating the importance of small effects; demanding proof of causality; and evaluating studies in isolation. The principles behind these errors are discussed. Lead exposure is associated with hyperactivity, and hyperactivity is a risk factor for antisocial behavior. The relationship between lead exposure and antisocial behavior is estimated. A plan for the effective removal of one major lead source, housing stock, is presented.

  12. The railroad perspective: Issues behind the issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rail transportation is a vital segment of DOE's spent fuel program. Most of the shipments from reactors to a repository or to a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility will be by rail, and essentially all of the shipments from an MRS to a repository. Casks must move economically and efficiently, while at the same time providing adequate safety to the public and transport workers, and meeting the legal/institutional constraints. Shippers are faced with the problem of procuring transportation services in a safe manner at a reasonable cost, trying to balance freight charges against cask inventory costs. Carriers are cautious about accepting potentially high hazard materials in routine service, and are worried about uninsured losses in case of accidents. Both shippers and carriers operate under different scheduling and operational criteria. Technical and institutional constraints add to the complexity of the operation. Standardization of shipping casks and rail car design will ease the resolution of the complex problems now existent. This paper discusses the economic, safety, operational, and legal issues surrounding rail transportation

  13. Volume 7 Issue 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Creagh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The continuing interest and commitment to improving the student experience in the tertiary sector was reflected in yet another successful Students, Transitions, Achievement, Retention and Success (STARS Conference recently held in Perth, Western Australia (June 29-July 2, 2016.  As is customary, this issue of the journal publishes the top research papers selected via a peer review process and the top Emerging Initiatives selected by the Conference Committee.  As well, a Good Practice Report was selected for this issue.  The Invited Feature in this issue republishes an article from Professor Sally Kift, President of the Australian Learning and Teaching Fellows (and one of the Editors of Student Success. The statement draws on and is representative of the national reaction to the closure of the OLT, highlighting the substantial role it has played in developing and disseminating innovation and good practice in tertiary teaching and learning.

  14. Year 2000 commercial issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratz, M.P.J.; Booth, R.T. [Bennett Jones, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1998-12-31

    This presentation focused on commercial aspects of the Y2K including: (1) special communication issues, (2) outsourcing transactions, (3) joint ventures and the significance for the oil and gas industry, and (4) contingency planning. Communication issues involve interaction with suppliers and vendors of critical systems, liability for Y2K communications (misrepresentation, defamation, promissory estoppel, statutory liability), securities disclosure (Canadian and US SEC requirements), protected communications, protection for Year 2000 statements. Outsourcing problems highlighted include resistance of suppliers to assume responsibility for Y2K problem remediation, factors which support and negate supplier responsibility, scope of suppliers` obligation, and warranties in respect of third party software. Regarding joint ventures, questions concerning limitations on liability, supply warranties, stand-by arrangements, stockpiling inventory, indemnities, confidentiality, operator compensation versus operator risk, and insurance were raised and addressed. Among contingency planning issues the questions of Y2K legal audit, and disclosure aspects of contingency planning were the featured concerns. figs.

  15. Volume 4, Issue 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Nelson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This issue showcases a rich variety of first year issues reported from an assortment of national and international settings.  In the Feature, Professor Phil Long (University of Queensland and Associate Professor Shane Dawson (University of South Australia share their views about the issues and challenges associated with learning analytics.  Reflecting the adage from last century that successful student engagement is the result of a combination of warmth and challenge the articles and practice reports focus on both the cognitive challenge  (e.g., assessment, forms of knowledge, distance learning, research skills, peer learning, etc. and the affective warmth (e.g., help-seeking, collaboration, identity development etc. aspects of student behaviour.

  16. Energy and environmental issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides an overview of the current energy-environmental issues. Firstly, the environmental problems associated with energy production and use are briefly described. Secondly, the paper reviews the availability of technological solutions to environmental problems, focussing particularly on atmospheric emission control. Finally, it moves on to look at recent policy developments in some parts of the world. Since the paper is written from the perspective of an industrialized country, emerging policy issues in Europe, Japan, and North America receive the greatest attention, with a particular focus on Europe where greenhouse gases and the proposed carbon tax have received a particularly high priority. The paper concludes with a discussion of some of the issues arising from the 1992 UNCED (UN Conference on Environment and Development) and implications for the diffusion of cleaner technologies from North to South. (author). 36 refs

  17. Volume 6, Issue 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Nelson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The International Journal of the First Year in Higher Education (Int J FYHE explores the transition experience of the first year student but this issue, Volume 6 Issue 1, has several unique characteristics. As a publication, it has a significant transition feature of its own: This issue is the last under this title and the current journal is to undergo a transformation, re-emerging with a new title and look in time for the inaugural STARS Conference in Melbourne, Australia in July 2015.   These are exciting times, not only for our editorial team, but also for prospective authors as the new journal will broaden the current First Year focus to that of enhancing students’ tertiary experiences across their entire learning journey in all its multiplicity and complexity.

  18. Year 2000 commercial issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation focused on commercial aspects of the Y2K including: (1) special communication issues, (2) outsourcing transactions, (3) joint ventures and the significance for the oil and gas industry, and (4) contingency planning. Communication issues involve interaction with suppliers and vendors of critical systems, liability for Y2K communications (misrepresentation, defamation, promissory estoppel, statutory liability), securities disclosure (Canadian and US SEC requirements), protected communications, protection for Year 2000 statements. Outsourcing problems highlighted include resistance of suppliers to assume responsibility for Y2K problem remediation, factors which support and negate supplier responsibility, scope of suppliers' obligation, and warranties in respect of third party software. Regarding joint ventures, questions concerning limitations on liability, supply warranties, stand-by arrangements, stockpiling inventory, indemnities, confidentiality, operator compensation versus operator risk, and insurance were raised and addressed. Among contingency planning issues the questions of Y2K legal audit, and disclosure aspects of contingency planning were the featured concerns. figs

  19. Regulatory and legal issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter focuses on the legal issues relating to the derivatives market in the USA, and analyses the Commodity Futures Trading Commission's (CFTCs) information on swaps and hybrid instruments. The law and regulation in the USA is examined and the jurisdictional reach of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), CFTC, and the Commodity Exchange Act (CEA) is described. The forward contract exclusion and the case of Transnor (Bermuda) Ltd. versus BP North America Petroleum, state laws, swap policy statement issues by the CFTC, the Futures Trading Practices Act of 1992, swaps exemptions, the exemption of hybrid instruments from the CEA, and energy contract exemption are discussed. Enforceability, derivatives, and issues before regulators are considered

  20. SPECIAL ISSUE EDITORIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amy J.C.TRAPPEY; Fataneh Taghaboni DUTTA; Kai-Ying CHEN

    2010-01-01

    @@ This special issue of Journal of Systems Science and Systems Engineering recognizes the contributions of authors and participants in the 16th ISPE International Conference on Concurrent Engineering (CE2009), 2009 ASME International Manufacturing - Science and Engineering Conference (MSEC) and 2009 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics. Among related papers presented in these conferences, the guest editors have selectively identified and invited the authors to re-write and extend their works to full-length papers for re-submission to the special issue.

  1. Volume 5, Issue 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Nelson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Feature in this issue is a conversation with Richard James, a highly respected Australian academic with extensive experience in research and policy development on the First Year Experience. Richard discusses the inevitability of universal participation in tertiary education and its impact on the style of participation, student diversity, the shifting focus of decision-making on standards and credentialism; and addresses the challenges posed by these and related issues for universities and the First Year Experience, along with possible solutions.

  2. Estimating Economic Health Costs of Not Controlling Toxic Water Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Easter, K. William; Konishi, Yoshifumi

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine what types of information may be important in determining the welfare benefits of preventing toxic water contamination when a given type of toxification occurs (or is likely to occur) in a given setting. It attempts to identify information and behavior issues that need to be considered when policy makers and others wish to obtain reasonable estimates of welfare benefits and weigh them against the economic costs of removing toxins. This paper also prov...

  3. Lead toxicity promotes autonomic dysfunction with increased chemoreceptor sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldes, Vera; Carvalho, Mafalda; Goncalves-Rosa, Nataniel; Tavares, Cristiano; Laranjo, Sérgio; Rocha, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    Mortality and morbidity by toxic metals is an important issue of occupational health. Lead is an ubiquitous heavy metal in our environment despite having no physiological role in biological systems. Being an homeostatic controller is expected that the autonomic nervous system would show a degree of impairment in lead toxicity. In fact, sympathoexcitation associated to high blood pressure and tachypnea has been described together with baroreflex dysfunction. However, the mechanisms underlying the autonomic dysfunction and the interplay between baro- and chemoreflex are not yet fully clarified. The angiotensinogenic PVN-NTS axis (paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus - nucleus tractus solitarius axis) is a particularly important neuronal pathway that could be responsible for the autonomic dysfunction and the cardiorespiratory impairment in lead toxicity. Within the current work, we addressed in vivo, baro- and chemoreceptor reflex behaviour, before and after central angiotensin inhibition, in order to better understand the cardiorespiratory autonomic mechanisms underlying the toxic effects of long-term lead exposure. For that, arterial pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, sympathetic and parasympathetic activity and baro- and chemoreceptor reflex profiles of anaesthetized young adult rats exposed to lead, from foetal period to adulthood, were evaluated. Results showed increased chemosensitivity together with baroreceptor reflex impairment, sympathetic over-excitation, hypertension and tachypnea. Chemosensitivity and sympathetic overexcitation were reversed towards normality values by NTS treatment with A-779, an angiotensin (1-7) antagonist. No parasympathetic changes were observed before and after A-799 treatment. In conclusion, angiotensin (1-7) at NTS level is involved in the autonomic dysfunction observed in lead toxicity. The increased sensitivity of chemoreceptor reflex expresses the clear impairment of autonomic outflow to the cardiovascular and

  4. OI Issues: Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that focuses on hearing loss and hearing issues. Miracle Ear Children’s Foundation P.O. Box 59261 Minneapolis, MN 55459-0261 (800) 234-5422 www.miracle-ear.com Miracle Ear Children’s Foundation provides free ...

  5. Career Issues in Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on career issues in organizations. "Learning During Downsizing: Stories from the Survivors" (Sharon J. Confessore) describes a study to demonstrate that survivors of corporate downsizings undertake learning activities and use many resources to accomplish the learning tasks. "Organizational Career…

  6. Automated conflict resolution issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wike, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    A discussion is presented of how conflicts for Space Network resources should be resolved in the ATDRSS era. The following topics are presented: a description of how resource conflicts are currently resolved; a description of issues associated with automated conflict resolution; present conflict resolution strategies; and topics for further discussion.

  7. Fusion Canada issue 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a technical update on Tokamak de Varennes, a report on the Beatrix II Breeding Materials Test Program, the Tritium glovebox system for UPM, Saudi Arabia, a broad update of the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project is also included. 1 fig

  8. Fusion Canada issue 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on a fusion cooperation agreement between Japan and Canada, an update at Tokamak de Varennes on plasma biasing experiments and boronization tests and a collaboration between Canada and the U.S. on a compact toroid fuelling gun. 4 figs

  9. Workplace Diversity Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This document contains three symposium papers on workplace diversity issues. "Expanding Theories of Career Development: Adding the Voices of African American Women in the White Academy" (Mary V. Alfred) questions the validity of existing career development models for women and minority groups and examines the professional development of five…

  10. Fusion Canada issue 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue the opening of the Garching ITER site, a CCFM/TdeV update,a tritium release field test, measuring radial profile of plasma current density on TdeV, power supplies for TdeV, 5th International Tritium Technology conference, and 1994 basic tritium course. 4 figs

  11. Product Category Management Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Żukowska, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present the issues related to category management. It includes the overview of category management definitions and the correct process of exercising it. Moreover, attention is paid to the advantages of brand management, the benefits the supplier and retailer may obtain in this way. The risk element related to this topics is also presented herein.

  12. Fusion Canada issue 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue are CFFTP highlights on the Karlsruhe Isotope Separation System, a report on ITER tritium process systems, an experimental update on Tokamak de Varennes and Canada-U.S. bilateral technical collaboration topics. 2 figs

  13. Advanced reactor licensing issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In July 1986 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a Policy Statement on the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants. As part of this policy advanced reactor designers were encouraged to interact with NRC early in the design process to obtain feedback regarding licensing requirements for advanced reactors. Accordingly, the staff has been interacting with the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors on the review of three advanced reactor conceptual designs: one modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) and two Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). As a result of these interactions certain safety issues associated with these advanced reactor designs have been identified as key to the licensability of the designs as proposed by DOE. The major issues in this regard are: (1) selection and treatment of accident scenarios; (2) selection of siting source term; (3) performance and reliability of reactor shutdown and decay heat removal systems; (4) need for conventional containment; (5) need for conventional emergency evacuation; (6) role of the operator; (7) treatment of balance of plant; and (8) modular approach. This paper provides a status of the NRC review effort, describes the above issues in more detail and provides the current status and approach to the development of licensing guidance on each

  14. Fusion Canada issue 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on the 1996 IAEA Fusion Conference site, operations at the Tokamak de Varennes including divertor pumping of impurities and pumping of carbon monoxide and methane, a discussion of the CFFTP and it's role. 1 fig

  15. Accelerating News Issue 5

    CERN Document Server

    Szeberenyi, A

    2013-01-01

    In this spring issue, we look at developments towards higher luminosity and higher energy colliders. We report on the technology developed for the remote powering of the LHC magnets and studies of diagnostics based on higher order mode port signals. We also inform you about the main outcome of the TIARA survey on market needs for accelerator scientists.

  16. Fusion Canada issue 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Ontario Hydro's contract for tritium supply from Germany, a CCFM update on plasma biasing, divertor operation, radiofrequency plasma current drive and the plasma heating system for the Tokamak de Varennes, and an agreement for ITER engineering design activities. 5 figs

  17. Fusion Canada issue 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue Europe proposes Canada's participation in ITER, tritium for JET, CCFM/TdeV-Tokamak helium pumping and TdeV update, ITER-related R and D at CFFTP, ITER Deputy Director visits Canada, NFP Director to Chair IFRC, Award for Akira Hirose. 3 figs

  18. Special Issue: Rural Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Elizabeth; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The issue discusses the role of the International Labour Office in the field of workers' education for rural workers and their organizations. Articles discuss labor conditions, child labor in agriculture, gender and equality training, trade unions, fair trade, and changing patterns of food production. Appendixes include information about…

  19. Fusion Canada issue 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue a bi-lateral meeting between Canada and Japan, water and hydrogen detritiation, in-situ tokamak surface analysis, an update of CCFM/TdeV and tritium accounting Industry guidance in Fusion, fast probe for plasma-surface interaction. 4 figs

  20. Compatible use issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a general review of rights-of-way policies at British Columbia Hydro, a task team was charged with examining issues related to compatible use, defined as any use of rights-of-way which does not compromise safety requirements, the security of BC Hydro plant and property rights, the ability to serve customers, and the ability to upgrade, modify, and maintain electric plant. The following issues were examined: modification of transmission works; preload activity on and adjacent to rights-of-way; Canadian Standards Association and BC Hydro standards and rights-of-way use; proactive right-of-way management; right-of-way use and future planning; right-of-way use administration; and transmission right-of-way identity. The task team was concerned about whether BC Hydro policy unnecessarily restricts land use, whether right-of-way policies are efficient, if policies on compatible uses of rights-of-way are well-developed and well-known, and if standards relative to right-of-way use are adequate. Each issue is described and recommendations are provided on policies, procedures, and guidelines. Each recommendation is supported by a justification statement and information on current practices and issue backgrounds. Alternative options are analyzed, and attention is given to cost effectiveness, internal and external goodwill, public opinion, and the implications for the future

  1. International Issues in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Kai; Diaz, Carmen; Kelley, Karl; Papousek, Ilona; Dempster, Martin; Hanna, Donncha

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety, negative attitudes, and attrition are all issues presented in the teaching of statistics to undergraduates in research-based degrees regardless of location. Previous works have looked at these obstacles, but none have consolidated a multilingual, multinational effort using a consistent method. Over 400 Spanish-, English-, and…

  2. New Cooperative Development Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Henehan, Brian M.; Hardesty, Shermain D.; Shultz, Madeline; Wells, John

    2011-01-01

    This article briefly reviews the increased interest in new cooperative development, factors for successful cooperative development, and strategies to improve the performance of new and emerging cooperatives. The article highlights issues identified by a panel of cooperative leaders, USDA specialists and academic experts

  3. Fusion Canada issue 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on the IAEA Plasma Biasing Meeting, the new IEA program -Nuclear Technology of Fusion reactors, TFTR tritium purification system, an update by CCFM on machine additions and modifications, and news of a new compact Toroid injector at the University of Saskatchewan. 1 fig

  4. Fusion Canada issue 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on the ITER agreement signed with the EDA, the robotic maintenance for NET, the CFFTP Fusion Pilot Study, the new IEA joint programs on environment, safety and economic aspects of fusion power, and a review by the CCFM advisory committee. 3 figs

  5. Fusion Canada issue 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on increased funding for the Canadian Fusion Program, news of the compact Toroid fuelling gun, an update on Tokamak de Varennes, the Canada - U.S. fusion meeting, measurements of plasma flow velocity, and replaceable Tokamak divertors. 4 figs

  6. Surviving (Even Thriving?) in a Toxic Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul E; Schoonover-Shoffner, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Anything toxic is poisonous and harmful-including a toxic workplace. Surveys of hundreds of individuals and organizations reveal three primary areas that are common in unhealthy work environments: sick systems, toxic leaders, and dysfunctional colleagues. This article draws from research and offers practical steps on how to survive, if not change and thrive, in toxic workplaces. PMID:27295230

  7. 40 CFR 129.4 - Toxic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toxic pollutants. 129.4 Section 129.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS TOXIC POLLUTANT EFFLUENT STANDARDS Toxic Pollutant Effluent Standards and Prohibitions § 129.4 Toxic pollutants. The following...

  8. An update on environmental, health, and safety issues of interest to the photovoltaic industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, P. D.; Viren, J.; Fthenakis, V. M.

    1992-12-01

    There is growing interest in the environmental, health, and safety issues related to new photovoltaic technologies as they approach commercialization. Such issues include potential toxicity of II-VI compounds; the impacts of new environmental regulations on module manufacturers; and, the need for recycling of spent modules and manufacturing wastes. This paper will review these topics.

  9. An update on environmental, health, and safety issues of interest to the photovoltaic industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is growing interest in the environmental, health, and safety issues related to new photovoltaic technologies as they approach commercialization. Such issues include potential toxicity of II-VI compounds; the impacts of new environmental regulations on module manufacturers; and, the need for recycling of spent modules and manufacturing wastes. This paper will review these topics

  10. Jatropha toxicity--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devappa, Rakshit K; Makkar, Harinder P S; Becker, Klaus

    2010-08-01

    Jatropha is a nonedible oil seed plant belonging to Euphorbiaceae family. Global awareness of sustainable and alternative energy resources has propelled research on Jatropha oil as a feedstock for biodiesel production. During the past two decades, several cultivation projects were undertaken to produce Jatropha oil. In future, the increased cultivation of toxic Jatropha plants and utilization of its agro-industrial by-products may raise the frequency of contact with humans, animals, and other organisms. An attempt was thus made to present known information on toxicity of Jatropha plants. The toxicity of Jatropha plant extracts from fruit, seed, oil, roots, latex, bark, and leaf to a number of species, from microorganisms to higher animals, is well established. Broadly, these extracts possess moluscicidal, piscicidal, insecticidal, rodenticidal, antimicrobial, and cytotoxic properties, and exert adverse effects on animals including rats, poultry, and ruminants. The toxicity attributed to these seeds due to their accidental consumption by children is also well documented. An attempt was also made to identify areas that need further study. The information provided in this review may aid in enhancing awareness in agroindustries involved in the cultivation, harvesting, and utilization of Jatropha plants and its products with respect to the potential toxicity of Jatropha, and consequently in application and enforcement of occupational safety measures. Data on the wide range of bioactivities of Jatropha and its products were collated and it is hoped will create new avenues for exploiting these chemicals by the phamaceutical industry to develop chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:20711929

  11. Gulf of Mexico mud toxicity limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, H.E.; Beardmore, D.H. (Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (USA)); Stewart, W.S. (Drilling Specialties Co. (US))

    1989-10-01

    Because of the Environmental Protection Agency's recent toxicity limits on drilling mud discharges for offshore Gulf of Mexico, Phillips Petroleum conducted a mud toxicity study based on both field and lab tests. The study, discussed in this article, found the polyanionic cellulose-sulfomethylated quebracho-chrome lignosulfonate mud Phillips had been using would comfortably pass the toxicity limitations. The study also found barite and thinners were of low toxicity, and hydrocarbons and surfactants were highly toxic.

  12. PREFACE: CEWQO Topical Issue CEWQO Topical Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozic, Mirjana; Man'ko, Margarita

    2009-09-01

    This topical issue of Physica Scripta collects selected peer-reviewed contributions based on invited and contributed talks and posters presented at the 15th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics (CEWQO) which took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu, cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community of the workshop, we thank the referees for their careful reading and useful suggestions which helped to improve all of the submitted papers. A brief description of CEWQO The Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics is a series of conferences started informally in Budapest in 1992. Sometimes small events transform into important conferences, as in the case of CEWQO. Professor Jozsef Janszky, from the Research Institute of Solid State Physics and Optics, is the founder of this series. Margarita Man'ko obtained the following information from Jozsef Janszky during her visit to Budapest, within the framework of cooperation between the Russian and Hungarian Academies of Sciences in 2005. He organized a small workshop on quantum optics in Budapest in 1992 with John Klauder as a main speaker. Then, bearing in mind that a year before Janszky himself was invited by Vladimir Buzek to give a seminar on the same topic in Bratislava, he decided to assign the name 'Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics', considering the seminar in Bratislava to be the first workshop and the one in Budapest the second. The third formal workshop took place in Bratislava in 1993 organized by Vladimir Buzek, then in 1994 (Budapest, by Jozsef Janszky), 1995 and 1996 (Budmerice, Slovakia, by Vladimir Buzek), 1997 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 1999 (Olomouc, Czech Republic, by Zdenek Hradil), 2000 (Balatonfüred, Hungary, by Jozsef Janszky ), 2001 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 2002 (Szeged, Hungary, by Mihaly Benedict), 2003 (Rostock,Germany, by Werner Vogel and

  13. Ethical issues in physiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Præstegaard, Jeanette; Gard, Gunvor

    2012-01-01

    as they are understood and experienced by Danish physiotherapists in outpatient, private practice. Methods: A qualitative approach was chosen and semistructured interviews with 21 physiotherapists were carried out twice and analyzed, using a phenomenological hermeneutic framework. Results: One main theme emerged...... in private practice is on a trajectory toward increased professionalism. Physiotherapists in private practice have many reflections on ethics and these reflections are primarily based on individual common sense arguments and on deontological understandings. As physiotherapy by condition is characterized...... by asymmetrical power encounters where the parties are in close physical and emotional contact, practiced physiotherapy has many ethical issues embedded. Some physiotherapists meet these issues in a professional manner, but others meet them in unconscious or unprofessional ways. An explicit ethical consciousness...

  14. Remediation issues and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States, like many other countries, faces new challenges as the result of the ending of the cold war and increased emphasis on cleaning up the legacy of the first 50 years of the nuclear age. This paper deals with some key management issues and discusses topics where special management emphasis needs to be placed if wastes are to be safely, economically, and expeditiously dealt with. These topics include the need for comprehensive planning of activities and potential costs; the need for a consistent approach to evaluating risks in prioritizing environmental management activities; the necessity of establishing the future uses of land to be reclaimed; and the implications of residual radionuclide contamination standards. Examples of how the Environmental Management program of the United States Department of Energy is dealing with these issues are discussed. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs, 4 tabs

  15. Teaching nuclear issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is based on the assumption that the nuclear debate, both globally and within Britain, is one of critical importance in the late twentieth century and that it should therefore, at some juncture, be explored as part of the school curriculum. An essential part of 'good education' in a democratic society is to teach young people how to think about such an issue, but not what to think about it. This paper attempts to set out some of the key issues and dilemmas in relation to what we may call 'nuclear education'. It perhaps asks more questions than it gives answers, but they are all essential questions which teachers must ask themselves if they are to teach sensitively about these matters. Some of these questions are given as examples. (author)

  16. Iceland; Selected Issues Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2012-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper examines implications of capital account liberalization in Iceland. Capital controls were critical in 2008 to avoid a more severe collapse of the Icelandic economy. Six years later, capital inflows have been liberalized, but most outflows remain restricted. Iceland has used the breathing room to reduce flow and stock vulnerabilities, strengthen institutions, and prepare for the lifting of capital controls. Simulations using the central bank’s Quarterly Macroeconom...

  17. France: Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2004-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper on France underlies public intervention in financial markets. Econometric analysis indicates that in the long term, consumption tracks disposable income closely but is also affected by wealth effects. A counterfactual exercise suggests that a lower return to experience could be responsible for lower early wage growth in France. Increased training could enhance the employment experience of the low-skilled young worker in France provided that its cost is shared betwee...

  18. Fusion Canada issue 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Canada's plans to participate in the Engineering Design Activities (EDA), bilateral meetings with Canada and the U.S., committee meeting with Canada-Europe, an update at Tokamak de Varennes on Plasma Biasing experiments and boronized graphite tests, fusion materials research at the University of Toronto using a dual beam accelerator and a review of the CFFTP and the CCFM. 2 figs

  19. Patch repair: compatibility issues

    OpenAIRE

    Garbacz, Andrzej; Courard, Luc; Bissonnette, Benoît; Głodkowska, W.

    2014-01-01

    Repair of any concrete structure results in formation of complex, at least two-component repair systems. Compatibility approach is treated as a basic requirement during selection of repair material. Recently, the understanding for compatibility requirements in repair systems approach is demonstrated in many papers. The aim of this paper is analyzing the compatibility between repair materials and concrete substrate in the case of patch repair. The compatibility issues were discussed in light o...

  20. Malaysia; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2014-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper on Malaysia highlights quantitative assessment of additional measures required during the medium term to achieve fiscal targets. The authorities aim to lower the budget deficit to about 3 percent of GDP by 2015, down from 4.0 percent in 2013, and to balance the budget by 2020. It suggests that ranking fiscal instruments under different fiscal policy goals can help policymakers identify the composition of fiscal adjustment based on their preferences. By combining ran...

  1. Italy; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2013-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper presents Italy’s economic growth through innovation and reforms. It highlights that Italy’s future competitiveness depends on the institutional and macroeconomic conditions that allow productive firms to innovate, expand, and attract inward foreign direct investment (FDI) that in turn will require the successful implementation of the authorities’ full structural- and institutional-reform agenda. The IMF report focuses on the enforcement of civil and commercial...

  2. Introduction to Special Issue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This special issue presents the Italian approach to planned interventions by the Government and public institutions to counteract disability and handicap.Analysis of the provisions and laws which have followed on in time highlight the diversity between two types of approach:one that only considers physical or mental disability and one that also takes into consideration,besides these limitations,aspects linked to the social participation and integration of people with disabilities.

  3. Sweden; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2012-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper discusses capital and liquidity regulations in Sweden. It recaps the recent debates on capital and liquidity buffers, and discusses a way to consider appropriate levels of capital and liquidity buffers in the case of Sweden. The paper estimates the government’s contingent liabilities from banks by different capital and liquidity levels. Also examined are options for Sweden in case the authorities face constraints to set buffers at their desirable levels.

  4. Paraguay; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2011-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper analyses Paraguay’s effective interest spreads using various methodologies. Operational costs, rising profits, and the need to cover credit and liquidity risks are the main factors behind Paraguay’s effective spreads. Improving data quality and mechanisms for sharing credit information could contribute to reduced spreads. The paper provides some background and stylized facts on the Paraguayan banking sector, and presents the methodology and results of interest r...

  5. Namibia: Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

    2014-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper explores the question of what kind of structural policies could boost productivity growth in small middle-income countries (SMICs), including Namibia. The findings suggest that although macroeconomic stability and trade openness are necessary for productivity growth, they are not sufficient. SMICs need to improve the quality of their public spending, most notably on education to minimize the skill mismatch in the labor market, reduce the regulatory burden on firms, ...

  6. Ethical issues in psychopharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    McHenry, L

    2006-01-01

    The marketing of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the psychopharmacological industry presents a serious moral problem for the corporate model of medicine. In this paper I examine ethical issues relating to the efficacy and safety of these drugs. Pharmaceutical companies have a moral obligation to disclose all information in their possession bearing on the true risks and benefits of their drugs. Only then can patients make fully informed decisions about their treatment.

  7. Netherlands; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1997-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper examines Netherlands’ experience with macroeconomic and structural reforms. The reforms, which were introduced gradually and in a consultative manner, were comprehensive in their coverage. They included a credible monetary policy, based on a tight link to the deutsche mark; expenditure-based fiscal consolidation, which allowed reduction of the tax burden as well as the fiscal deficit; and measures to stimulate both the supply and the demand side of the labor marke...

  8. Botswana; 2013 Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2013-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper examines fiscal policy implications for labor market and economic diversification in Botswana. The IMF report analyzes that large public employment significantly affect labor market outcomes in middle-income countries, including Botswana. It is noted that reforms aimed at reducing the rents and the size of the public sector is likely to significantly improve market outcomes in Botswana. As part of efforts to find new engines of growth and support sustainable long-te...

  9. Italy; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1998-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper describes stylized facts, institutions, and directions for reform in the Italian labor market. The paper examines developments in aggregate features of the labor market. It highlights that during the latest cyclical recovery, total employment has remained stagnant and the unemployment rate has not declined despite modest output growth. The paper examines different features of labor market developments from a longer-term perspective, reviewing developments in regiona...

  10. Spain; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1998-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper analyzes the sources of the persistence of geographical unemployment imbalances and low speed of adjustment to regional labor demand shocks in Spain. The paper argues that, under present labor market arrangements, these imbalances are unlikely to be corrected in the near future. In particular, the current wage bargaining system appears to be excessively centralized and to result in nationally set wages that are too high to reduce unemployment in high-unemployment ar...

  11. Spain; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2015-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper presents a preliminary assessment of recent labor market reforms in Spain, where the 2012 labor market reforms are making a difference. Wage moderation is contributing to a visible recovery in headline employment growth, and the reforms have made the labor market more resilient to shocks. Some evidence exists that the contribution of temporary contracts to employment growth has started to decrease. However, the reliance on temporary workers remains strong overall, a...

  12. Philippines: Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2007-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper for the Philippines has been prepared by a staff team of the International Monetary Fund as background documentation for the periodic consultation with the member country. Spillovers have been particularly prominent for countries with financial systems with high foreign bank participation, large exposures to ailing global financial institutions and structured products, and high external liabilities, including through wholesale funding. With a nascent capital market,...

  13. Canada; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1998-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper reviews the factors that may explain high and persistent unemployment in Canada, with particular emphasis on the role that a decline in the relative cost of capital may have had on trend unemployment. The analysis suggests that in Canada a declining trend in the cost of capital, associated with technological changes and innovations, has been an important factor in explaining the rise and persistence of unemployment. The paper also analyzes recent trends in personal ...

  14. The Contemporary Drug Issue

    OpenAIRE

    Mølvig, Jacob; Oberman, Froukje Lisa; Pedersen, Stefan Parsbæk; Blank, Elias; Svanholm, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This project will at first introduce the reader to a historical account of concepts such as capitalism, the three stages of liberalism, several essential regulation acts and their connection to terms such as: drugs, addiction, free will and freedom. All to build an understanding of how these philosophical concepts are related to the contemporary drug issue. Further on, the theories and ideas developed by the philosopher Paul-Michel Foucault, regarding the relationship betw...

  15. Issues of English Globalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫焕然

    2016-01-01

    In this essay, the complexity of the present situation of world Englishes, comments on the spread of the language, de-bate over standardized variants in English and the pedagogical implication relating to what types of English should be taught will be discussed. The expansion of English in China is then analyzed concerning issues such as attitudes towards local variety, desirable teaching models, and future adjustment.

  16. Mexico; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2014-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper analyzes the impact of Mexico’s energy reform on hydrocarbons production. These reforms aim to increase oil and gas production by eliminating the state oil company’s (PEMEX) monopoly on exploration and production of hydrocarbons, while retaining the prime directive that these resources are the property of the Mexican nation. This paper focuses on the nature of reforms and what problems these reforms are addressing. It presents illustrative production scenarios f...

  17. Canada; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2000-01-01

    The issue of productivity growth in Canada has received considerable attention reflecting its marked slowdown since the early 1970s and concerns about its implications for Canadian competitiveness. To better understand productivity developments in Canada, it is useful to decompose total factor productivity (TFP) into investment-specific productivity change (ISP) and technologically neutral productivity change (TNP). The gap in manufacturing productivity growth between Canada and the United St...

  18. Brazil: Selected Issues Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2012-01-01

    This Selected Issues Paper discusses the macroeconomic implications of pension reforms in Brazil. It assesses empirically the relationship between fiscal policy and the real effective exchange rate in emerging markets and draws policy implications. It reviews the current status of local capital markets in the country, the key challenges, and policy options for further development. The paper also provides a detailed description of consumer credit developments and analyzes recent indicators of ...

  19. Brazil; Selected Issues Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2015-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper examines infrastructure investment in Brazil. Brazil has inferior overall infrastructure quality relative to almost all its export competitors. Brazil’s infrastructure endowment ranks low by international standards, and its low quality affects productivity, market efficiency, and competitiveness. Areas in which Brazil’s competitiveness has lagged include, but are not limited to, education, innovation, governance, and justice. Brazil’s infrastructure gap has be...

  20. Governance Issues for SMEs

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Clarke; Alice Klettner

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on research into the corporate governance practices of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) listed on the Australian Securities Exchange. Interviews were conducted with the directors and/or company secretaries of 19 SMEs. The aim of the research was to explore not only SME corporate governance structures and processes but how SMEs had chosen to implement the Principles and the reasons for their choices. The paper addresses the issue of whether the ASX Corporate Governance Prin...

  1. Algeria: Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2005-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper explores the monetary policy transmission channels in Algeria and analyzes available options to strengthen monetary policy effectiveness. High liquidity has been the hallmark of the Algerian monetary policy framework for most of the 2000s. The paper assesses the impact of monetary policy changes on its final targets—growth and inflation, and outlines policy options to strengthen the efficacy of monetary policy. It takes stock of Algeria’s current fiscal framewor...

  2. Algeria: Selected Issues Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.

    2011-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper discusses the need to meet Algeria’s fiscal challenges. Although Algeria enjoys substantial fiscal savings, fiscal policy is currently on an unsustainable path. Under current projections, Algeria will deplete its financial savings in the long term, leaving future generations worse off. To restore fiscal sustainability and ensure intergenerational equity, Algeria will need to undertake significant and sustained fiscal consolidation in the coming years. Successful f...

  3. IPPs: The Real Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Anjum Siddiqui

    1998-01-01

    Since May 1998, an important issue facing Pakistan policy-makers has been whether independent power producers (IPPs) produce expensive electricity. It is contended that IPPs’ expensive power has rendered the state utility, Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA), bankrupt. It is also alleged that IPPs indulged in corruption and colluded with WAPDA officials to get their signatures on contracts which allowed procurement of expensive power by WAPDA and which it can ill afford now. This pa...

  4. Greece; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2013-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper provides updates on Greece’s financial stability framework. The paper highlights that the Bank of Greece (BoG) has strengthened the financial stability framework over recent years. In addition to the liquidity provided by the euro system through its regular refinancing operations and standing facilities, the BoG can provide emergency liquidity assistance (ELA) to financial institutions. In response to the global financial crisis, the authorities have assisted bank...

  5. Ergonomics Issues in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    H. S. Loo; Stanley Richardson

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: Ergonomics so far has had little impact in Malaysia. For most Malaysian managers, ergonomics is not considered to be associated with performance, but rather with occupational health and safety and legislation. Approach: This study reviews the development of ergonomics in Malaysia and the underlying issues related to national development. Results: Many changes need to be made within the ergonomics research, education and practice community by integrating concepts from the so...

  6. South Africa; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1998-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper highlights that cautious monetary and fiscal polices of South Africa during 1997 resulted in a return of financial investor confidence and capital inflows during 1997 and through April 1998. These policies helped the South African economy emerge successfully from the exchange market pressures of 1996 and weather the contagion from the East Asian crisis in the second half of 1997. Throughout 1997 and up until May 1998, inflation and market interest rates fell conside...

  7. Mexico; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2002-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper assesses the potential financial vulnerabilities of the corporate sector in Mexico. It provides an overview of salient features of the Mexican corporate sector. The paper also presents the formal stress tests that estimate the potential effects of some macroeconomic and financial shocks, such as a sharp depreciation of the exchange rate, a sustained increase in interest rates, a slowdown in demand, and a prolonged international market closure on the corporate sector.

  8. Mexico; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2009-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper on Mexico presents econometric investigation of the cyclical determinants of remittances to Mexico. The aggregate U.S. business cycle is not necessarily relevant for remittances. Remittances to Mexico do show a significant relationship with employment conditions in certain regions of the United States. Employment conditions in the U.S. construction sector seem to be especially important as well as remittances for certain regions of Mexico with high rates of emigrati...

  9. Mexico; Selected Issues Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2010-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper analyzes the global crisis and potential growth in Mexico. The paper uses two methodologies to assess to what extent the global crisis is likely to weigh on Mexico’s growth potential. The first approach is sectoral, examining the historical relationship between financial stress and growth in manufacturing industries. The second approach uses a growth-accounting framework to take a closer look at likely developments in the factors that drive potential growth. The p...

  10. Mexico; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2005-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper considers the “informal sector†in Mexico. In Mexico and many other countries, the informal sector represents a large share of total employment. The paper reviews the literature on informality, with special focus on findings for Mexico, and develops a theoretical model that highlights the importance of externalities and the distortion associated with the informal sector. The analysis provides insight into the kinds of policy measures that might sustainably reduce...

  11. Nigeria; Selected Issues Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2015-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper discusses promotion of economic transformation in Nigeria. Nigeria’s long-term potential is keyed on promoting economic transformation. This implies taking stock of initial conditions, assessing long-term financing capacity, and evaluating the policies and reforms to be implemented to meet the long term vision. The recent fall in prices has highlighted the challenging but compelling need to address remaining development challenges. This paper discusses some of the...

  12. Azerbaijan Republic; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2005-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper on Azerbaijan Republic reports that the government has made substantial progress in dealing with energy-related subsidies. The domestic market for oil products has been tightly regulated by the government since Azerbaijan gained independence. Azerbaijan is largely self-sufficient in oil products because of its substantial endowment of exhaustible mineral deposits and existing refining capacity. Although Azerbaijan is self-sufficient in oil products, it needs to impo...

  13. Indonesia; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2008-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper for Indonesia uses a small structural macroeconomics model of the Indonesian economy to analyze the inflation outlook and monetary policy challenges. The Bank of Indonesia (BI) introduced its Inflation Targeting Framework in July 2005 with the goal to reduce inflation in the medium term to 3 percent. BI’s official mandate is stability of the rupiah, both internal and external, and BI views the inflation targeting regime with a floating exchange rate as the best st...

  14. Indonesia; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2015-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper looks at links between Indonesia’s commodities sector and recent corporate sector and banking system performance. On the production side, oil and natural gas output has fallen since 2010, with existing fields in decline, while production of coal, palm oil, and rubber output has increased steadily. Recent trends in commodity exports have had a significant impact on corporate revenues and profits. For corporations operating in the nonrenewable commodities sector, li...

  15. Indonesia; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2007-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper assesses Indonesia’s trade integration relative to underlying country characteristics. The paper analyzes Indonesia’s vulnerabilities, especially compared with the eve of the crisis in 1997. Various indicators suggest that the underlying fundamentals are significantly stronger. The paper examines key features of the financial safety net (FSN) in view of international standards and concludes that the current system is capable of timely addressing bank problems. I...

  16. Indonesia; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2011-01-01

    This study estimated Indonesia’s potential growth rate and examined its underlying determinants. Implementing a comprehensive program to address key influencing issues can improve the effectiveness of monetary policy, increase financial stability, and support capital market development. This paper also reviews the level and structure of tax revenues in Indonesia, estimates tax effort and tax efficiency, and discusses potential areas of revenue mobilization. Indonesia’s financial linkages ...

  17. ECMR’13 Special Issue

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade-Cetto, Juan; Frese, Udo; Moritz, Tenorth

    2015-01-01

    This special issue contains extended versions of the best papers from the 6th European Conference on Mobile Robots (ECMR). ECMR is a biennial European forum, internationally open, that allows roboticists throughout Europe to become acquainted with the latest research accomplishments and innovations in mobile robotics and mobile human–robot systems. ECMR covers most aspects of mobile robotics research and machine intelligence, including (but not limited to) the following topics: multi-sensor f...

  18. Cambodia; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2004-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper for Cambodia explores the implications for long-term sustainable growth from cross-country analysis of the sources of growth. Cambodia’s low labor productivity, inadequate and expensive infrastructure, and a cumbersome regulatory environment do not bode well for future sustainable growth. Favorable external conditions, including foreign aid flows and trade agreements, have helped propel growth. As with other transition economies, Cambodia lags in institutional and...

  19. GLOBALIZATION – ECONOMIC ISSUES

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Elzbieta Harach

    2011-01-01

    Globalization has brought new challenges and changes, in terms of both new risk and new opportunities. It is one of the key drivers of economic and environmental change. The impact can be both positive and negative. This paper explains the impact of globalization and the fundamental issues and current controversies related to globalization (trade, investment, the IMF and the World Bank, technology, media, culture, education, development, migration, health, the role of women, human rights). In...

  20. Jordan; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2008-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper investigates the macroeconomic impact of the Syria crisis on Jordan. It is indicated that the crisis: (1) had an overall negative impact on measured output growth—although anecdotal evidence suggests possibly a positive impact on output in the informal sector; (2) contributed to inflationary pressures, particularly on rents; and (3) strained labor markets, mostly in the informal sector as refugees compete with locals for jobs. Although the crisis has put a strain ...

  1. Issues in waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, Lennart; Robertson, Kerstin; Tullin, Claes [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden); Sundquist, Lena; Wrangensten, Lars [AaF-Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Blom, Elisabet [AaF-Processdesign AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-05-01

    The main purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art on research and development issues related to waste combustion with relevance for Swedish conditions. The review focuses on co-combustion in grate and fluidised bed furnaces. It is primarily literature searches in relevant databases of scientific publications with to material published after 1995. As a complement, findings published in different report series, have also been included. Since the area covered by this report is very wide, we do not claim to cover the issues included completely and it has not been possitile to evaluate the referred studies in depth. Basic knowledge about combustion issues is not included since such information can be found elsewhere in the literature. Rather, this review should be viewed as an overview of research and development in the waste-to-energy area and as such we hope that it will inspire scientists and others to further work in relevant areas.

  2. A dividing issue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamborg, Christian; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard; Sandøe, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Why are organised shoots involving birds that are farm-reared and subsequently released a dividing issue in several countries? As a contribution to answering this question the paper reports a national survey of landowners (n = 1207), hunters (n = 1130) and the general public (n = 1001) in Denmark......, and about hunting “culture” and regulatory measures, also informed the participants’ attitudes. The regulatory framework governing shooting based on the release of farm-reared birds could reflect a wider range of concerns than those hitherto acknowledged.......Why are organised shoots involving birds that are farm-reared and subsequently released a dividing issue in several countries? As a contribution to answering this question the paper reports a national survey of landowners (n = 1207), hunters (n = 1130) and the general public (n = 1001) in Denmark....... While there was broad agreement across all three groups that recreational hunting of naturally occurring “surplus” wildlife is acceptable, the release of farm-reared game birds for shooting was a dividing issue, both within the groups and between them. The majority of participants (51%) in the survey...

  3. Metallothionein protection of cadmium toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of the cadmium (Cd)-binding protein from horse kidney in 1957 marked the birth of research on this low-molecular weight, cysteine-rich protein called metallothionein (MT) in Cd toxicology. MT plays minimal roles in the gastrointestinal absorption of Cd, but MT plays important roles in Cd retention in tissues and dramatically decreases biliary excretion of Cd. Cd-bound to MT is responsible for Cd accumulation in tissues and the long biological half-life of Cd in the body. Induction of MT protects against acute Cd-induced lethality, as well as acute toxicity to the liver and lung. Intracellular MT also plays important roles in ameliorating Cd toxicity following prolonged exposures, particularly chronic Cd-induced nephrotoxicity, osteotoxicity, and toxicity to the lung, liver, and immune system. There is an association between human and rodent Cd exposure and prostate cancers, especially in the portions where MT is poorly expressed. MT expression in Cd-induced tumors varies depending on the type and the stage of tumor development. For instance, high levels of MT are detected in Cd-induced sarcomas at the injection site, whereas the sarcoma metastases are devoid of MT. The use of MT-transgenic and MT-null mice has greatly helped define the role of MT in Cd toxicology, with the MT-null mice being hypersensitive and MT-transgenic mice resistant to Cd toxicity. Thus, MT is critical for protecting human health from Cd toxicity. There are large individual variations in MT expression, which might in turn predispose some people to Cd toxicity.

  4. Occurrence of persistent toxic substances in soils, sediments, fishes and human breast milk in southern Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Ngoc Vinh

    2009-01-01

    Global contamination and toxic effects of persistent toxic substances (PTSs) have been an emerging environmental issue and have received considerable attention during the past four decades. The rapid agricultural and industrial growths as well as the expansion of urban areas in Hochiminh City and Mekong River Delta, two of the most densely populated areas in the world with about 26 million peoples, result in the widespread contamination of PTSs in southern Vietnam. Due to adverse effects to h...

  5. What are the Economic Health Costs of Non-Action in Controlling Toxic Water Pollution?

    OpenAIRE

    Easter, K. William; Konishi, Yoshifumi; Raggi, Meri; Viaggi, Davide

    2006-01-01

    This paper identifies information that may be important in determining the benefits of preventing toxic water contamination (or equivalently cost of nonaction) when a given toxification occurs. It attempts to identify information and behavior issues that need to be considered when we estimate benefits and weigh them against the costs of removing toxins. This paper also provides “scenarios” for three toxic pollutants that are found in water bodies. We make use of two alternatives--one for deve...

  6. Comparative toxicity of 24 manufactured nanoparticles in human alveolar epithelial and macrophage cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Boczkowski Jorge; Maillot-Marechal Emmanuelle; Dupont Aurélie; Rogerieux Françoise; Geys Jorina; Lanone Sophie; Lacroix Ghislaine; Hoet Peter

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background A critical issue with nanomaterials is the clear understanding of their potential toxicity. We evaluated the toxic effect of 24 nanoparticles of similar equivalent spherical diameter and various elemental compositions on 2 human pulmonary cell lines: A549 and THP-1. A secondary aim was to elaborate a generic experimental set-up that would allow the rapid screening of cytotoxic effect of nanoparticles. We therefore compared 2 cytotoxicity assays (MTT and Neutral Red) and an...

  7. Metronidazole-Induced Cerebellar Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Sabat, Shyam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy.

  8. Metronidazole-induced cerebellar toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agarwal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy.

  9. Engineered Nanoparticle (Eco)Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupi, Denisa

    -chemical characteristics. It is these unique physico-chemical properties that have raised concerns during the last decade regarding the potential risk nanomaterials pose towards human health and the environment. Similar to other chemicals, nanomaterials have to be tested and ranked in order to obtain information on hazard...... in stabilizing ZnO ENPs suspensions, it caused agglomeration in TiO2 ENP stock suspensions and an underestimation of toxicity for Ag ENPs. Likewise, aging only aided in the stability of ZnO ENPs. It was concluded that NOM can mitigate or eliminate toxicity of Ag ENPs and is not recommended for use. The ratio...

  10. Ceftriaxone-induced toxic hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erdal Peker; Eren Cagan; Murat Dogan

    2009-01-01

    Toxic hepatitis or drug-induced liver injury encompasses a spectrum of clinical disease ranging from mild biochemical abnormalities to acute liver failure. The advantages of a long half-life, wide spectrum, high tissue penetration rate, and a good safety profile,make ceftriaxone, a third-generation cephalosporin,a frequent choice in the treatment of childhood infections. Previous studies have reported a few cases of high aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels, along with three cases ofhepatitis caused by ceftriaxone. Here, we report a case of drug-induced toxic hepatitis in a patient who was treated with ceftriaxone for acute tonsillitis.

  11. [Towards an integrated approach to cardiovascular toxicities related to the treatments of breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanz, Rachid; Magne, Nicolas; Annede, Pierre; Mery, Benoite; Jacob, Julian; Bauduceau, Olivier; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Guichard, Jean-Baptiste; Meillan, Nicolas; Kirova, Youlia; Vedrine, Lionel; Chargari, Cyrus

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing number of therapeutic options in breast cancer management. While prognosis improves, the cardiac toxicity related to treatments remains a significant issue. This toxicity has several clinical presentations and can be explained by complex and diverse molecular mechanisms. Systemic treatments (anthracyclines, inhibitors of HER2 signaling pathway, hormone therapy, antiangiogenic agents) and radiotherapy have their own cardiac toxicity. However, the toxicities associated with these treatments may potentiate together and the existence of pre-existing cardiovascular risk factors should be taken into account. The assessment of cardiac hazard evolves toward a multifactorial approach. Several possibilities exist to minimize the incidence of cardiac complications. Those include pharmacological and technological innovations, but also a more accurate selection of patients and a growing involvement of practitioners in the field of cardiac toxicity, which is prerequisite for an early management of cardiac events. PMID:25091656

  12. Editorial, Volume 5, Issue 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristy L. Archuleta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Welcome to Volume 5, Issue 1 of the Journal of Financial Therapy! In this issue, four scholarly papers are presented along with two profiles and a book review. These four papers address very important issues, such as mental health therapists’ competency in working with financial issues, financial stress of college students, parental messages about money, and financial advice media.

  13. Ethical issues in nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florczyk, Stephen J; Saha, Subrata

    2007-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly developing area in science involved with manipulating matter at the atomic or molecular level. Nanotechnology is typically defined at a scale on the order of less than approximately 100 nm. Matter possesses unique properties at these size levels that are neither Newtonian nor quantum, but between the two regimes.These unique properties have created significant interest and excitement, sparking numerous research investigations. Nanotechnology is a very broad field with many current and potential applications. Some important examples of applications include battlefield activated dynamic armor clothing for soldiers, additives to sunscreens, and diagnostic laboratories on a chip to monitor general personal health. Groundbreaking capabilities often raise new questions. Any new scientific or technological development has the usual concomitant associated ethical issues, specifically regarding containment and regulation. These ethical issues are more pronounced with nanotechnology due to the sharp divide between those who see its great potential and opponents who express fears. Nanotechnology supporters believe that it has the potential to transform our lives dramatically, while opponents of nanotechnology fear that self-replicating "nanobots" could escape from laboratories and reduce all life on earth to "gray goo. "These fears have swayed generally uninformed public opinions via the media and sensational entertainment. A critical discussion of ethical issues surrounding nanotechnology, including the interaction of nanotechnology with the body and the environment--nanobiotechnology--and regulation of nanotechnology, is presented. We advocate strong, uniform regulations for nanotechnology, but only the use of regulations as needed. The limited use of regulations prevents the regulations from becoming burdensome and inhibiting research in the field. PMID:19023950

  14. Less-toxic corrosion inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1981-01-01

    Combinations of borates, nitrates, phosphates, silicates, and sodium MBT protect aluminum from corrosion in fresh water. Most effective combinations contained sodium phosphate and were alkaline. These inhibitors replace toxic chromates which are subject to governmental restrictions, but must be used in larger quantities. Experimental exposure times varied from 1 to 14 months depending upon nature of submersion solution.

  15. Baltimore Air Toxics Study (BATS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, D.A. [Sullivan Environmental Consulting, Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Baltimore Air Toxics Study is one of the three urban air toxics initiatives funded by EPA to support the development of the national air toxics strategy. As part of this project, the Air Quality Integrated Management System (AIMS) is under development. AIMS is designed to bring together the key components of urban air quality management into an integrated system, including emissions assessment, air quality modeling, and air quality monitoring. Urban area source emissions are computed for a wide range of pollutants and source categories, and are joined with existing point source emissions data. Measured air quality data are used to evaluate the adequacy of the emissions data and model treatments as a function of season, meteorological parameters, and daytime/nighttime conditions. Based on tested model performance, AIMS provides the potential to improve the ability to predict air quality benefits of alternative control options for criteria and toxic air pollutants. This paper describes the methods used to develop AIMS, and provides examples from its application in the Baltimore metropolitan area. The use of AIMS in the future to enhance environmental management of major industrial facilities also will be addressed in the paper.

  16. Sparfloxacin induced toxic epidermal necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh M

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN is a life-threatening cutaneous adverse drug reaction. TEN is known to occur with the fluoroquinolone class of antibiotics, but only four cases of sparfloxacin induced TEN have been reported to the WHO database. This is another case report of sparfloxacin induced TEN.

  17. Holiday plants with toxic misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evens, Zabrina N; Stellpflug, Samuel J

    2012-12-01

    Several plants are used for their decorative effect during winter holidays. This review explores the toxic reputation and proposed management for exposures to several of those, namely poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima), English holly (Ilex aquifolium), American holly (Ilex opaca), bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara), Jerusalem cherry (Solanum pseudocapsicum), American mistletoe (Phoradendron serotinum), and European mistletoe (Viscum album). PMID:23359840

  18. Holiday Plants with Toxic Misconceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Evens, Zabrina N.; Stellpflug, Samuel J.

    2012-01-01

    Several plants are used for their decorative effect during winter holidays. This review exploresthe toxic reputation and proposed management for exposures to several of those, namelypoinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima), English holly (Ilex aquifolium), American holly (Ilex opaca),bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara), Jerusalem cherry (Solanum pseudocapsicum), Americanmistletoe (Phoradendron serotinum), and European mistletoe (Viscum album). [West J Emerg Med.2012;13(6):538-542

  19. The World energy issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Power Point document proposes figures and data about the current world energy consumption, the various energy sources, the share of primary energy consumption by different sectors, and the levels of energy reserves. It addresses the issue of global warming (evolution of temperature, regional anomalies, the challenge of limitation of temperature, the greenhouse gas emissions), the strategic role of electricity (energy mix, heat production with electricity), energy savings, electricity production (key data on solar, wind, solar and biomass energy, possibilities of carbon capture, nuclear energy, costs of these different energies)

  20. Mexico; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2004-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper analyzes the sources of Mexico’s economic growth since the 1960s, and compares various decompositions of historical growth into trend and cyclical components. The role of the implied output gaps in the inflation process is assessed. The paper presents medium-term paths for GDP based on alternative productivity growth rates. The paper also describes the significant steps Mexico has taken to strengthen the structure of its public debt in recent years, both in terms ...

  1. [Organ allocation. Ethical issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattorini, P

    2010-01-01

    The criteria for allocating organs are one of the most debated ethical issue in the transplantation programs. The article examines some rules and principles followed by "Nord Italia Transplant program", summarized in its Principles' Charter and explained in a recent interdisciplinary book. General theories of justice and their application to individual clinical cases are commented and evaluated, in order to foster a public, democratic, transparent debate among professionals and citizens, scientific associations and customers' organizations. Some specific moral dilemmas are focused regarding the concepts of proportionate treatment, unselfish donation by living persons, promotion of local institutions efficiency. PMID:20677677

  2. Israel; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2015-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper examines labor productivity in Israel. Israel’s GDP per capita is low relative to the United States despite high labor input, as labor productivity is low. Catch-up of labor productivity to the United States stopped in the 1980s and relative labor productivity has since declined. Low labor productivity is the result of a low capital-to-labor ratio—kept low by high employment growth—and low total factor productivity growth. The latter may reflect lack of compet...

  3. Mexico; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2007-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper analyzes external shocks and business cycle fluctuations in Mexico. The paper examines the relative importance of U.S. demand shocks—and other foreign disturbances—in explaining Mexican output fluctuations. It identifies the dynamic response of Mexico’s output to those shocks. The paper investigates which U.S. variables are most relevant to explaining business cycles in Mexico. It analyses potential spillovers and channels of transmission underlying the linkag...

  4. Mexico; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2004-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper analyzes reserve adequacy in Mexico. Reserve adequacy has been of renewed interest, as the authorities have introduced a new rules-based mechanism of U.S. dollar sales to reduce the rate of reserve accumulation. The paper examines the recent experience with Mexico’s fiscal management tools in light of the need for further consolidation. It reviews evidence on the cyclical behavior of fiscal policy in Mexico, finding that it has generally been procyclical since the...

  5. Mexico; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2013-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper analyzes reforms to Mexico’s fiscal framework. Mexico’s resilient economic performance would be consolidated by increasing fiscal policy buffers and preparing for challenges associated with long-term budget pressures. In the short term, reducing public debt levels can create space to implement countercyclical fiscal policies and reduce exposure to high financing and hedging costs, which would protect Mexico’s credit rating at times of distress. The paper highl...

  6. Indonesia; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2009-01-01

    Indonesia’s external borrowing spreads increased by more than 1000 bps from mid-2007 to late 2008, before subsiding in recent months. The large increase in spreads prompted questions about whether the spreads adequately reflect the improvements in fundamentals made over the past few years. This Selected Issues paper examines the determinants of Indonesia’s spreads, and finds that fundamentals can explain both the level of and the increase in spreads. It uses a cross-country panel regressi...

  7. Indonesia; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2004-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper takes stock of the progress made in meeting the objectives under Indonesia’s Extended Arrangements (1998–2003) program. The paper addresses progress in achieving the programs’ core macroeconomic objectives, with an emphasis on how Indonesia’s economic recovery compares with those of the other major Asian “crisis†countries. A major conclusion of the paper is that, while significant progress has been made against many of the key objectives of the arrangeme...

  8. Kenya; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2008-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper on Kenya reviews Kenya’s external stability in a context where the exchange rate has strengthened and capital inflows are playing an increasingly important role. Kenya’s external current account deficit has widened, reflecting strong import volumes as well as rising import prices, particularly for oil, but external debt as a percent of GDP has declined steadily. Underlying these developments have been a steady increase in capital inflows and a remarkable rebound...

  9. Governance Issues for SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Clarke

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws on research into the corporate governance practices of small and medium enterprises (SMEs listed on the Australian Securities Exchange. Interviews were conducted with the directors and/or company secretaries of 19 SMEs. The aim of the research was to explore not only SME corporate governance structures and processes but how SMEs had chosen to implement the Principles and the reasons for their choices. The paper addresses the issue of whether the ASX Corporate Governance Principles and Recommendations were appropriate for SMEs. It describes the SME responses to the requirements, how these differ from those of larger companies, and how these differences impact on small companies.

  10. Zambia; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2008-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper presents an analysis of change in Zambia’s mining fiscal regime. Foreign investment has revived Zambia’s mining sector. However, its mining sector’s direct contribution to government revenues has been low. Reflecting persistent concerns about the low contribution of the mining sector to budget revenues, the government has amended the fiscal regime many times over the last seven years. The 2015 budget introduced major changes to the mining fiscal regime. The au...

  11. CLOUD COMPUTING SECURITY ISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin OGIGAU-NEAMTIU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “cloud computing” has been in the spotlights of IT specialists the last years because of its potential to transform this industry. The promised benefits have determined companies to invest great sums of money in researching and developing this domain and great steps have been made towards implementing this technology. Managers have traditionally viewed IT as difficult and expensive and the promise of cloud computing leads many to think that IT will now be easy and cheap. The reality is that cloud computing has simplified some technical aspects of building computer systems, but the myriad challenges facing IT environment still remain. Organizations which consider adopting cloud based services must also understand the many major problems of information policy, including issues of privacy, security, reliability, access, and regulation. The goal of this article is to identify the main security issues and to draw the attention of both decision makers and users to the potential risks of moving data into “the cloud”.

  12. Ethics issues in retrievability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We can isolate some issues, which should not be unresolved for a longer period of time. Disputes over well-defined waste management options fall in this category. The concept of retrievability has a possibility to invoke a series of questions in the minds of both specialists and non-specialists. It is intrinsically vague, in that it may refer to different phases in the repository's life, and to both open and closed repositories in the long time frame. Requirements for retrievability opens a series of issues, including open-ended philosophical question, which may give the impressions that things are not properly taken care of, since the experts differ in opinion. If such disputes cannot be resolved by consulting the existing legal framework, efforts should be made to put them to trial in the proper forum, i.e. parliament and national or local government or authorities, depending on the problem. In contrast, the value of institutional controls can easily be seen as an ethical value, whether included in the regulation of not. It has the potential to deter human intrusion and to allow remedial action by carrying information about a repository. (author)

  13. Environmental issues in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global concern about the environment is increasing, and the People's Republic of China (PRC) is not immune from such concerns. The Chinese face issues similar to those of many other developing nations. The US Department of Energy is particularly interested in national and world pollution issues, especially those that may infringe on other countries' economic growth and development. The DOE is also interested in any opportunities that might exist for US technical assistance and equipment in combating environmental problems. Our studies of articles in the China Daily, and English-language daily newspaper published by the Chinese government, show that population, pollution, and energy are major concerns of the Chinese Communist Party. Thus this report emphasizes the official Chinese government view. Supporting data were also obtained from other sources. Regardless of the severity of their various environmental problems, the Chinese will only try to remedy those problems with the greatest negative effects on its developing economy. They will be looking for foreign assistance, financial and informational, to help implement solutions. With the Chinese government seeking assistance, the United States has an opportunity to export basic technical information, especially in the areas of pollution control and monitoring, oil exploration methods, oil drilling technology, water and sewage treatment procedures, hazardous waste and nuclear waste handling techniques, and nuclear power plant safety procedures. In those areas the US has expertise and extensive technical experience, and by exporting the technologies the US would benefit both economically and politically. 59 refs., 3 figs

  14. Energy issues in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topic of the energy sector-and the petroleum sector in particular-in sub-Saharan Africa might well be considered an insignificant issue compared with many of the energy concerns which now command international attention. However, the World Bank believes that it is important for all those in international energy not to forget about the crucial problems facing Africa. They should become informed and concerned about these problems, and, hopefully, work together to bring about a satisfactory solution for an ongoing development dilemma. Simply put, the cost of imported energy to the African economy is exorbitantly high, sapping the resources needed to produce economic growth and social progress. This paper reports that, to address this issue, the World Bank is about to undertake a major initiative-two ground-breaking studies in the field of energy for sub-Saharan Africa. Both of these proposed studies are designed to find ways to reduce the burden of the cost of energy imports, mainly petroleum products, to this continent. One study will examine the design (and, subsequently, the implementation) of a rationalization scheme for the supply and distribution of petroleum products throughout sub-Saharan Africa. The other will consider the feasibility of transporting Nigeria's natural gas to neighbors to the west, all of which presently are importers of energy

  15. Reducing groundwater pollution by toxic substances: Procedures and policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterstone, Marvin

    1987-11-01

    One major source of water-related health problems is the improper disposal of toxic substances in the environment. Toxic materials leaching from unregulated and unlined pits, ponds, lagoons, and landfills have created a widespread environmental nightmare in the United States and many other parts of the world. At present, there are two major and interrelated components of this problem in the United States. The first is the issue of cleaning up abandoned disposal sites that pose actual or potential threats to water supplies. The second aspect of the problem concerns the necessity of siting proper management, treatment, or disposal facilities in the future. Priorities must be set to allow efficient, effective, and equitable allocation of the scarce resources that are available for accomplishing these tasks. This article examines a number of the issues involved in setting these priorities, and presents the results obtained from a study of risk estimation and evaluation in the context of groundwater contamination by toxic substances. The article introduces a new concept of risk estimation, which is shown to produce more accurate and credible risk analyses. Finally, the relationships between risk credibility and public perceptions of procedural fairness and equity are examined as these factors bear on the institutional aspects of implementing policies for site cleanup and/or facility siting.

  16. Proceedings of the 36. annual aquatic toxicity workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, L.; Triffault-Bouchet, G. [Centre d' expertise en analyse environnementale du Quebec, Quebec, PQ (Canada); Fournier, M. [Inst. national de la recherche scientifique, Laval, PQ (Canada). Inst. Armand Frappier; Berryman, D.; Guay, I. [Ministere du Developpement durable, de l' Environnement et des Parcs, Quebec, PQ (Canada); Campbell, P.G.C. [Quebec Univ., Quebec, PQ (Canada). Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique-Eau, Terre et Environnement; Lebeuf, M.; Couillard, C. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Mont-Joli, PQ (Canada). Inst. Maurice-Lamontagne; Parent, L. [Quebec Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada); Pellerin, J. [Quebec Univ., Rimouski, PQ (Canada). Institut des Sciences de la Mer de Rimouski; Benoit, P. [Ministere du Developpement durable, de l' Environnement et des Parcs du Quebec, Longueil, PQ (Canada); Lacroix, E. [Environment Canada, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Burridge, L.E. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, St. Andrews, NB (Canada)] (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    This workshop was held to discuss topics related to aquatic and environmental toxicology. Principles, issues, and recent innovations in aquatic toxicology were reviewed. New developments in environmental monitoring were discussed, as well as issues related to environmental regulation. The workshop was attended by a range of stakeholders from governments, universities, and industry. The sessions were entitled: legacy contaminants 1 organics; nanotoxicology; environmental effects monitoring; oil sands; BFR and other emerging contaminants; biomarkers; neuro and endocrine disrupting compounds; remediation of degraded aquatic environments; legacy contaminants 2 hydrocarbons; waterborne and diet-borne metals; water and sediment standards and criteria; pesticides; amphibians and wildlife toxicology; cyanobacteria; amphibians and wildlife toxicology 2; environmental risk assessment; genomics, protemics, and metabolomics; contamination in the Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine park; legacy contaminants 3 organics and metals; community level indicators; toxicity tests; toxicity mechanisms; areas of concern; general aquatic toxicology; general legacy contaminants; emerging contaminants; cyanobacteria; amphibians and wildlife toxicology 1; omics in aquatic ecotoxicology; organism or population level indicators; and toxicity tests. The workshop featured 250 presentations, of which 24 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs.

  17. Proceedings of the 36. annual aquatic toxicity workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This workshop was held to discuss topics related to aquatic and environmental toxicology. Principles, issues, and recent innovations in aquatic toxicology were reviewed. New developments in environmental monitoring were discussed, as well as issues related to environmental regulation. The workshop was attended by a range of stakeholders from governments, universities, and industry. The sessions were entitled: legacy contaminants 1 organics; nanotoxicology; environmental effects monitoring; oil sands; BFR and other emerging contaminants; biomarkers; neuro and endocrine disrupting compounds; remediation of degraded aquatic environments; legacy contaminants 2 hydrocarbons; waterborne and diet-borne metals; water and sediment standards and criteria; pesticides; amphibians and wildlife toxicology; cyanobacteria; amphibians and wildlife toxicology 2; environmental risk assessment; genomics, protemics, and metabolomics; contamination in the Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine park; legacy contaminants 3 organics and metals; community level indicators; toxicity tests; toxicity mechanisms; areas of concern; general aquatic toxicology; general legacy contaminants; emerging contaminants; cyanobacteria; amphibians and wildlife toxicology 1; omics in aquatic ecotoxicology; organism or population level indicators; and toxicity tests. The workshop featured 250 presentations, of which 24 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs.

  18. Emerging photovoltaic technologies: Environmental and health issues update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fthenakis, Vasilis M.; Moskowitz, Paul D.

    1997-02-01

    New photovoltaic (PV) technologies promise low-cost, reliable PV modules and have the potential for significant PV penetration into the energy market. These prospects for commercialization have attracted renewed interest in the advantageous environmental impact of using PV and also in the potential environmental, health and safety (EHS) burdens in PV manufacturing and decommissioning. In this paper, we highlight recent studies on EHS issues: a) An integrated energy-environmental-economic analysis which shows that large-scale use of PV can significantly contribute to alleviating the greenhouse effect; in the United States alone, it could displace 450 million tons of carbon emissions by the year 2030, b) Recycling of the spent modules and scarp is economically feasible; current research centers on improving the efficiency and economics of recycling CdTe and CIS modules, c) Toxicological studies conducted by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) compared the acute toxicity of CdTe, CIS, and CGS; CdTe was the most toxic, and CGS the least toxic of the three. Additional studies are now comparing the systemic toxicity of these compounds with the toxicity of their precursors.

  19. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in drug-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foufelle, Fabienne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Drug-induced toxicity is a key issue for public health because some side effects can be severe and life-threatening. These adverse effects can also be a major concern for the pharmaceutical companies since significant toxicity can lead to the interruption of clinical trials, or the withdrawal of the incriminated drugs from the market. Recent studies suggested that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress could be an important event involved in drug liability, in addition to other key mechanisms such as mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Indeed, drug-induced ER stress could lead to several deleterious effects within cells and tissues including accumulation of lipids, cell death, cytolysis, and inflammation. After recalling important information regarding drug-induced adverse reactions and ER stress in diverse pathophysiological situations, this review summarizes the main data pertaining to drug-induced ER stress and its potential involvement in different adverse effects. Drugs presented in this review are for instance acetaminophen (APAP), arsenic trioxide and other anticancer drugs, diclofenac, and different antiretroviral compounds. We also included data on tunicamycin (an antibiotic not used in human medicine because of its toxicity) and thapsigargin (a toxic compound of the Mediterranean plant Thapsia garganica) since both molecules are commonly used as prototypical toxins to induce ER stress in cellular and animal models. PMID:26977301

  20. Methods For Collecting , Culturing And Performing Toxicity Tests With Daphnia ambigua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, Winona L.

    2005-07-01

    Toxicity tests conducted on water collected from impacted locations in SRS streams often failed chronic toxicity tests and sometimes failed acute toxicity tests (Specht 1995). These findings prompted SRS to determine the cause of the failures. Some SRS NPDES outfalls were also failing chronic toxicity tests, even though no toxicant could be identified and when TIEs were performed, none of the TIE treatments removed the toxicity. Ultimately, it was determined that the failures were due to the low hardness of SRS surface waters, rather than to the presence of a toxicant. The species of cladoceran that the EPA recommends for toxicity testing, Ceriodaphnia dubia, is stressed by the very low hardness of SRS waters. SRS developed an alternate species toxicity test that is similar to the EPA test, but uses an indigenous cladoceran, Daphnia ambigua (Specht and Harmon, 1997; Harmon et al., 2003). In 2001, SCDHEC approved the use of D. ambigua for toxicity testing at SRS, contingent upon approval by EPA Region 4. In 2002, EPA Region 4 approved the use of this species for compliance toxicity testing at SRS. Ultimately, the use of this species demonstrated that SRS effluents were not toxic, and most toxicity testing requirements were removed from the NPDES permit that was issued in December 2003, with the exception of one round of chronic definitive testing on outfalls A-01, A-11, and G-10 just before the next NPDES permit application is submitted to SCDHEC. Although the alternate species test was developed at SRS (1996-1998), the culture was transferred to a contract toxicity testing lab (ETT Environmental) located in Greer, SC in 1998. ETT Environmental became certified by SCDHEC to perform toxicity tests using D. ambigua in 2002, and at this time is the only laboratory certified by SCDHEC to perform tests with this species. Because of the expense associated with maintaining the D. ambigua culture for several years when no toxicity testing is required, SRS decided to suspend

  1. Methylmercury risk assessment issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipfert, F.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Saroff, L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-07-01

    This paper reviews the general background of health risks associated with mercury (Hg), primarily methylmercury (MeHg), with a view towards application to advanced technologies that could reduce any contributions from coal combustion. The need for accurate assessment of such risks is discussed, since Hg is now widely dispersed in the environment and cannot easily be eliminated. The primary pathway of MeHg intake is through eating contaminated fish. The issues of concern include identification of critical health outcomes (various neurological indices) and their confounding factors, accurate assessment of MeHg intake rates, and appropriate use of dose-response functions. Ultimately, such information will be used to evaluate alternative coal combustion systems.

  2. Critical issues from SAFFIRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SAFFIRE signifies a Self-Sustained, Advanced-Fuel Field-REversed Configuration. It was devised in an earlier conceptual design study a D-He3 pilot unit to demonstrate on a near term scale the feasibility of burning advanced fuels / EPRI AP-1437, July 1980/. Topics covered in the design report include: equilibrium field and diamagnetic current contributions; fueling; plasma stability; SAFFIRE start-up; fusion product heating and transport; divertor design; blanket energy recovery systems; pilot unit; small size power reactor; cost estimate and economic plausibility of SAFFIRE; comparison of direct capital costs; SAFFIRE indirect costs and cell cost reduction. Critical issues from this work will be discussed with emphasis on problems related to steady-state operation. These include fueling and diamagnetic currents, ash build-up, and the gas blanket. Comments will also be given about the mass production concept and cost projections for a reactor version of SAFFIRE

  3. Ethical issues and addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Binta; Scheiner, Melissa; Campbell, Deborah

    2010-04-01

    The epidemic of substance abuse continues to pose a significant challenge to clinicians nationwide. Although there is a tendency to simply associate drug abuse with poverty, the problem affects every social stratum gender and race; and pregnant women are no exception. Caring for pregnant, substance-using women and their infants presents complex legal and ethical issues. Debate is ongoing about whether criminal penalties should be imposed on women based solely on their use of alcohol and other drugs during pregnancy. Furthermore, controversies persist about the rights and wishes of pregnant women versus the interests of their fetuses. For health professionals, conflict arises when the pregnant woman chooses behaviors that have the potential to harm the developing fetus. The ethical dilemma arises from competing autonomy-based and beneficence-based obligations to the maternal-fetal dyad. This chapter explores the ethics-based conflicts in the delivery of health care to drug abusing pregnant women. PMID:20407974

  4. Ergonomics Issues in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Loo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Ergonomics so far has had little impact in Malaysia. For most Malaysian managers, ergonomics is not considered to be associated with performance, but rather with occupational health and safety and legislation. Approach: This study reviews the development of ergonomics in Malaysia and the underlying issues related to national development. Results: Many changes need to be made within the ergonomics research, education and practice community by integrating concepts from the social sciences with technological advances into Malaysian culture to enhance productivity and sustainable improvements in the quality of life, while achieving essential health and safety goals. Conclusion/Recommendation: Ergonomics helps to improve performance besides enhancing workplace OSH. It is essential to promote ergonomics concepts and practice to various industries in Malaysia. More effort and skills are required to compensate for the lack of infrastructure in providing a framework within which ergonomics recommendations can be disseminated and realized.

  5. Utility customer issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Customer issues affected by the restructuring of the $250 billion US electric power industry were discussed. In the past the industry's vertically integrated utilities conducted their business in protected geographic markets. With deregulation and greater competition, that industry structure will change. This presentation highlighted the strategies that Unicom is using to react to the restructuring of the electric power industry. The underlying principle is for the utility to reinvent itself to change its market orientation and focus on customer services, such as reliability, responsiveness, custom tailored solutions, and guaranteed savings over time. Attempting to become total energy providers and delivering integrated solutions to meet the needs of large industrial and commercial consumers, intensive market research, improved service and installation, and sophisticated customer retention initiatives will also have to be high on the agenda

  6. Issues in energy finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokher, Zeigham Islam

    As opposed to the well developed and understood equity markets, the energy markets are still in their infancy. The explosion of contracts, of both the primary and derivative types, are testament both to the existing size and the untapped growth potential of this exciting industry. However, because of its relative youth many basic issues in the energy markets remain unresolved. This thesis introduces some interesting questions and provides insights into these issues. Thematically, the chapters of this thesis are linked by an emphasis on valuation and risk management decisions. A contribution of this thesis is to show that subtle differences between the endogenous price process in our general equilibrium setting and the exogenous processes considered in earlier papers can generate significant differences in both financial and real option values. In addition to these valuation concerns there has been much debate about the corporate risk management function. Finance theory suggests that a value maximizing corporation should either be indifferent to hedging or, in the presence of certain imperfections, it should completely hedge all exposures. Both these extremes contradict empirical evidence. We show that existing corporate hedging behaviour is best explained in light of both physical market imperfections and directional predictions on future prices. While these speculative motives may arise from corporate hubris or genuine informational advantages, we argue that it would be difficult to implement private information in the absence of noise traders. Related to the risk management decision is the existence of futures risk premia. These premia have been thought to be cause by covariance with priced factors or due to the hedging demands of consumers and producers. This thesis argues that inventories serve as a signal of available quantity, which coupled with consumers fears regarding stockouts can induce a positive relationship between premia and inventories. In

  7. Feminist issues in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antrobus, P

    1987-01-01

    The United Nations Decade for the Advancement of Women, from 1975 to 1985, leaves a legacy of a deeper understanding of the issues, and the emergence of new networks with the experience and commitment to work for further changes. However, the role and status of women did not improve. There is a new commitment to struggle for the ending of all oppression, injustice and violence of all kinds at all levels. Feminism is a consciousness of all forms of women's oppression and a commitment to work against them. Feminist critiques illuminate the larger structures that oppress both women and men. New development theories embracing feminism are necessary to understand how patriarchy and economic systems propogate oppression. The production-oriented approach to rural development is flawed n failing to address women's lack of access to land, credit, training and new technologies. Overwhelming household tasks, cultural norms, and traditional attitudes limit women's involvement in training programs and other development activities. The basic needs approach to rural development provides access to vital services to meet a family's basic needs for nutrition, housing and clothing, and allows people's participation in decision making. However, women have little actual role in decision making so their needs, concerns and perspectives are not taken into account. Women are treated as instruments to achieve goals without appreciating their perspective. Project-based approached emphasize short term goals rather than laying the foundation for longterm changes. Few projects address structural issues or empower women. Projects must include education to increase personal growth and self reliance. Development planning can be enormously enhanced by taking gender differences into account and recognizing that people, specially poor women, can promote their own devleopment. Longterm strategies that challenge existing structures, address the existing economic order, and, most of all, recognize

  8. Boron toxicity in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajaratnam, J.A.

    1973-01-01

    Potted oil palms were treated with fertilizer of borate-46 at several concentrations and the plants were observed for boron toxicity effects. Toxicity symptoms were apparent at high rates but not at rates equivalent to typical Malaysian soils.

  9. BEHAVIORAL TOXICITY OF TRIALKYLTIN COMPOUNDS: A REVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triethyltin (TET) and trimethyltin (TMT) are neurotoxic organotin compounds which produce different patterns of toxicity in adult animals. Exposure to TET produces behavioral toxicity (decreased motor activity, grip strength, operant response rate and startle response amplitude) ...

  10. Toxic Release Inventory Chemicals by Groupings

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) makes available information for more than 600 toxic chemicals that are being used, manufactured, treated, transported, or...

  11. Toxics Release Inventory Pollution Prevention Search Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a publicly available EPA database that contains information on toxic chemical releases and waste management and pollution...

  12. Drug Abuse on College Campuses: Emerging Issues. Issues in Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This "Issues in Prevention" focuses on emerging issues concerning drug abuse on college campuses. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Drug Abuse Trends; (2) Q&A With Jim Lange; (3) Bath Salts; (4) Refuse to Abuse; (5) Related Federal Resource; and (6) Higher Education Center Resources.

  13. Toxicity evaluation and hazard review Cold Smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.; Stocum, W.E.

    1993-12-01

    Cold Smoke is a dense white smoke produced by the reaction of titanium tetrachloride and aqueous ammonia aerosols. Early studies on the toxicity of this nonpyrotechnically generated smoke indicated that the smoke itself is essentially non-toxic (i.e. exhibits to systemic toxicity or organ damage due to exposure) under normal deployment conditions. The purpose of this evaluation was to review and summarize the recent literature data available on the toxicity of Cold Smoke, its chemical constituents, and its starting materials.

  14. The Historical Development of Animal Toxicity Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Gertler, N.

    1997-01-01

    This paper traces the historical development of animal toxicity testing, from its ancient origins through the period of standardization following World War II. It explores the roots of toxicity testing in physiology and experimental medicine, drug development, and the detection and identification of poisons. The discussion then turns to the shift in focus from acute to chronic toxicity which occurred around the turn of the century. The controversy over the potential toxicity of preservatives ...

  15. Unacceptable "occupational" exposure to toxic agents among children in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, R; Forastiere, F; Axelson, O

    1997-09-01

    To document the problem of child labor as a health issue, we report here three case-studies in Ecuador: exposure to mercury among gold washers, exposure to organophosphates and carbamates in the fruit-growing industry, and exposure to solvents among shoe cleaners. We measured the relevant biological indicators of exposure (mercury in urine, urinary levels of phenols, and acetylcholine esterase in erythrocytes) among selected samples of 10 children for each working place. In all the case studies, the values of the biological indicators showed elevated exposure to well-known toxicants, which are now rare in developed countries, even among adult workers. The findings meld with a previously reported case study of intoxication from inorganic lead among children employed in the manufacture of roof tiles in Ecuador. This study highlights the need to properly evaluate and control the potential health effects due to exposure to toxic substances among children employed in different occupations in several parts of the world. PMID:9219645

  16. Comparative Ochratoxin Toxicity: A Review of the Available Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra H. Heussner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ochratoxins are a group of mycotoxins produced by a variety of moulds. Ochratoxin A (OTA, the most prominent member of this toxin family, was first described by van der Merwe et al. in Nature in 1965. Dietary exposure to OTA represents a serious health issue and has been associated with several human and animal diseases including poultry ochratoxicosis, porcine nephropathy, human endemic nephropathies and urinary tract tumours in humans. More than 30 years ago, OTA was shown to be carcinogenic in rodents and since then extensive research has been performed in order to investigate its mode of action, however, this is still under debate. OTA is regarded as the most toxic family member, however, other ochratoxins or their metabolites and, in particular, ochratoxin mixtures or combinations with other mycotoxins may represent serious threats to human and animal health. This review summarises and evaluates current knowledge about the differential and comparative toxicity of the ochratoxin group.

  17. Mechanisms of Silver Nanoparticle Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldbjerg, Rasmus

    rendering them potentially more reactive than larger particles. Accordingly, there are strong indications that particle surface area and surface chemistry are responsible for observed responses in cell cultures and animals. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are among the most commonly utilized nanomaterials due...... environment. Specific concerns have been raised about the possible toxicity of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) supported by studies which indicated that NPs are more toxic than larger particles on a mass for mass basis. As a consequence of their small size, NPs have a very high surface to volume ratio...... profiling and 32P postlabeling. Several lines of evidence indicated that both Ag NPs and silver ions from silver nitrate were able to induce cell death by apoptosis in correlation to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The mechanism of cell death was related to loss of mitochondrial membrane...

  18. Toxic Anterior Segment Syndrome (TASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Öner

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS is a sterile intraocular inflammation caused by noninfectious substances, resulting in extensive toxic damage to the intraocular tissues. Possible etiologic factors of TASS include surgical trauma, bacterial endotoxin, intraocular solutions with inappropriate pH and osmolality, preservatives, denatured ophthalmic viscosurgical devices (OVD, inadequate sterilization, cleaning and rinsing of surgical devices, intraocular lenses, polishing and sterilizing compounds which are related to intraocular lenses. The characteristic signs and symptoms such as blurred vision, corneal edema, hypopyon and nonreactive pupil usually occur 24 hours after the cataract surgery. The differential diagnosis of TASS from infectious endophthalmitis is important. The main treatment for TASS formation is prevention. TASS is a cataract surgery complication that is more commonly seen nowadays. In this article, the possible underlying causes as well as treatment and prevention methods of TASS are summarized. (Turk J Oph thal mol 2011; 41: 407-13

  19. Salicylate toxicity model of tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eStolzberg

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Salicylate, the active component of the common drug aspirin, has mild analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory effects at moderate doses. At higher doses, however, salicylate temporarily induces moderate hearing loss and the perception of a high-pitch ringing in humans and animals. This phantom perception of sound known as tinnitus is qualitatively similar to the persistent subjective tinnitus induced by high-level noise exposure, ototoxic drugs or aging which affects ~14% of the general population. For over a quarter century, auditory scientists have used the salicylate toxicity model to investigate candidate biochemical and neurophysiological mechanisms underlying phantom sound perception. In this review, we summarize some of the intriguing biochemical and physiological effects associated with salicylate-induced tinnitus, some of which occur in the periphery and others in the central nervous system. The relevance and general utility of the salicylate toxicity model in understanding phantom sound perception in general are discussed.

  20. Methylmercury toxicity and functional programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Adverse health effects of developmental toxicants may induce abnormal functional programming that leads to lasting functional deficits. This notion is considered from epidemiological evidence using developmental methylmercury neurotoxicity as an example. MOST IMPORTANT FINDINGS......: Accumulating evidence indicates that adverse effects may occur even at low-level methylmercury exposures from seafood and freshwater fish. Neurobehavioral outcomes are usually non-specific, and imprecise exposure assessment results in a bias toward the null. Essential nutrients may promote the development of...

  1. Metabolism and toxicity of californium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolism of californium can be compared with that of other transplutonium elements. The most important points are as follows: a fast blood clearance and fast bone uptake more important than liver uptake, a relatively high urinary excretion and kidney retention. Blood clearance of californium can be compared with that of americium. Distribution of californium 252 nitrate after intramuscular injection in rats was studied. There are very few experimental data on acute or long term toxicity of californium. (28 references)

  2. Acute and chronic arsenic toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Ratnaike, R.

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic toxicity is a global health problem affecting many millions of people. Contamination is caused by arsenic from natural geological sources leaching into aquifers, contaminating drinking water and may also occur from mining and other industrial processes. Arsenic is present as a contaminant in many traditional remedies. Arsenic trioxide is now used to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia. Absorption occurs predominantly from ingestion from the small intestine, though minimal absorption o...

  3. 40 CFR 401.15 - Toxic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .../Dieldrin 1 1 Effluent standard promulgated (40 CFR part 129). 5. Antimony and compounds 2 2 The term... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Toxic pollutants. 401.15 Section 401.15... GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.15 Toxic pollutants. The following comprise the list of toxic...

  4. Recent regulatory issues in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents general regulatory issues from Finland since the last WWER Regulators Forum meeting in Odessa 11-13 October 2000. More specific issues concerning Loviisa NPP are described in the Annex of this paper. (author)

  5. Stock Issues in Aristotle's Rhetoric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpine, Bill

    1977-01-01

    Defines "stock issue" by the manner in which they function in Aristotle's theory, reviews examples of modern theories of stock issues, examines previous investigations of the "Rhetoric," and analyzes Aristotle's approach to this aspect of argumentation. (MH)

  6. Pulmonary Toxicity Associated with Gemcitabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Gemcitabine (2’,2’-difluoro-s’-deoxycytidine; Gemzar®, Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN, USA, a pyrimidine nucleoside analogue similar to cytarabine, inhibits DNA synthesis both by halting DNA replication through the incorporation of its active form into DNA and also by inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase and deoxycytidine monophosphate deaminase [1, 2]. It is administered as a prodrug that becomes phosphorylated by deoxycytidine kinase to the active diphosphate and triphosphate forms [3]. Gemcitabine has been used to treat cancers including non-small cell lung, pancreatic, urothelial, breast, and ovarian cancer [1, 3]. Common side effects include nausea and vomiting, rash, fever, reversible elevation of liver transaminases, flu-like symptoms, and peripheral edema [3, 4]. Myelosuppression is the most common dose-limiting toxicity [3]. Overall, gemcitabine is relatively well tolerated. However, reports describing gemcitabine-induced lung toxicity are increasing [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]. Recently, this toxicity was reported in patient with pancreatic cancer [2, 8, 9]. We reported a 68-year-old man being treated for stage IIa pancreatic cancer after pancreaticoduodenectomy developed hypoxemic respiratory distress after the second dose of gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m2 [10]. The radiographic findings on computed tomography scans evolved from ground glass opacities to findings suggestive of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia over the course of two weeks. He was treated with antibiotics, steroids, nebulizers and oxygen. A follow-up computed tomography scan of chest four weeks after presentation showed complete resolution of pneumonitis [10].

  7. E-Security Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Arora

    2012-10-01

    gamut of new age crimes that are addressed by the Information Technology Act, 2000. In this paper, I have covered the e-security issues such as elements of e-security, security threats or cyber crimes, tools for e-security, precautions for secure e-commerce and various studies regarding e-security issues.

  8. Use of liver volatile compounds as markers of animal exposure to toxic contaminants

    OpenAIRE

    Bouhlel, Jihene; Ratel, Jérémy; Abou El Karam, Said; Baeza, Elisabeth; Jondreville, Catherine; Rutledge, Douglas; Engel, Erwan

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, the control of the contamination of the food chain by toxic xenobiotics became a major safety issue given the strong relationships pointed out between chronic exposure to contaminants and pathologies such as cancers. This issue is particularly critical for animal-derived food products. The current methods operated to ensure this control are expensive, difficult to set up and unsuitable with frequent, regular and large-scale controls required to guarantee effectively the chemical saf...

  9. Reagan issues mineral policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Materials and Minerals Program plan and report that President Reagan sent to Congress on April 5 aims to ‘decrease America's minerals vulnerability’ while reducing future dependence on potentially unstable foreign sources of minerals. These goals would be accomplished by taking inventory of federal lands to determine mineral potential; by meeting the stockpile goals set by the Strategic and Critical Material Stockpiling Act; and by establishing a business and political climate that would encourage private-sector research and development on minerals.Now that the Administration has issued its plan, the Subcommittee on Mines and Mining of the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs will consider the National Minerals Security Act (NMSA), which was introduced 1 year ago by subcommittee chairman Jim Santini (D-Nev.) [Eos, May 19, 1981, p. 497]. The bill calls for establishing a three-member White-House-level council to coordinate the development of a national minerals policy; amending tax laws to assist the mining industry to make capital investments to locate and produce strategic materials; and creating a revolving fund for the sale and purchase of strategic minerals. In addition, the NMSA bill would allow the secretary of the interior to make previously withdrawn public lands available for mineral development. The subcommittee will hold a hearing on the Administration's plan on May 11. Interior Secretary James Watt has been invited to testify.

  10. Technical issues: logistics. AAMC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, P L

    1993-06-01

    The author states that she became interested in standardized patients (SPs) around 20 years ago as a means of developing a more uniform and effective way to provide instruction and evaluation of basic clinical skills. She reflects upon in detail: (1) the logistics of using SPs in teaching; (2) how SPs are used in assessment; (3) what aspects of performance SPs can be trained to record and evaluate; (4) issues concerning checklists; (5) evaluation of interviewing skills; (6) evaluation of written communication skills; (7) importance of defining what is being tested; (8) various kinds and uses of inter-station exercises and problems of scoring them; (9) case development and the various sources for case material; (10) ways to generate scores; (11) selecting and training SPs; (12) role of the faculty and primary importance of bedside training with real patients; and (13) pros and cons of national versus single-school efforts to use SPs. She concludes by cautioning that further research must be done before SPs can be used for high-stakes certifying and licensing examinations. PMID:8507311

  11. Year 2000 disclosure issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The legal dilemma that the year 2000 (Y2K) problem presents with regard to disclosure requirements is examined. In particular, this paper reviews the complexities involved for customers, suppliers and business partners to communicate about Y2K issues. The review prominently features the many levels of statutory, regulatory and legal overlay that must be considered before any communication takes place . One of the major barriers to disclosure is the threat that any statements made by one company or individual to another may give rise to various forms of liability, including limitation, defamation, misrepresentation, detrimental reliance, collateral contracts and warranties or representations. The paper also describes recent Canadian and U.S. Y2K disclosure requirements for public companies. While the legislation is intended to promote the voluntary sharing of Y2K information, it also sets out conditions limiting the extent to which Y2K statements can be used as the basis for liability. Canadian regulatory bodies also have several policies in effect that compel issuers of new securities to emphasize uncertainties which are likely to be factors in Y2K, and public companies to discuss and analyze risks, events and uncertainties within the management discussion and analysis section of their annual reports that would cause reported financial information to be not necessarily indicative of future operating results or conditions, should those uncertainties materialize. 8 refs

  12. Year 2000 disclosure issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, N.; Kratz, M.P.J. [Bennett Jones, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1998-12-31

    The legal dilemma that the year 2000 (Y2K) problem presents with regard to disclosure requirements is examined. In particular, this paper reviews the complexities involved for customers, suppliers and business partners to communicate about Y2K issues. The review prominently features the many levels of statutory, regulatory and legal overlay that must be considered before any communication takes place . One of the major barriers to disclosure is the threat that any statements made by one company or individual to another may give rise to various forms of liability, including limitation, defamation, misrepresentation, detrimental reliance, collateral contracts and warranties or representations. The paper also describes recent Canadian and U.S. Y2K disclosure requirements for public companies. While the legislation is intended to promote the voluntary sharing of Y2K information, it also sets out conditions limiting the extent to which Y2K statements can be used as the basis for liability. Canadian regulatory bodies also have several policies in effect that compel issuers of new securities to emphasize uncertainties which are likely to be factors in Y2K, and public companies to discuss and analyze risks, events and uncertainties within the management discussion and analysis section of their annual reports that would cause reported financial information to be not necessarily indicative of future operating results or conditions, should those uncertainties materialize. 8 refs.

  13. Beam screen issues

    CERN Document Server

    Métral, E

    2011-01-01

    In the High Energy LHC (HE-LHC), a beam energy of about 16.5 TeV is currently contemplated. The beam screen issues linked to the use of 20 T dipole magnets instead of 8.33 T are discussed, with a particular emphasis on two mechanisms, the magneto-resistance and the anomalous skin effect, assuming the nominal machine and beam parameters. The magneto-resistance effect always leads to an increase of the material resistivity (as the mean free path in the presence of a transverse magnetic field becomes smaller). As concerns the anomalous skin effect, the anomalous increase of surface resistance of metals at low temperatures and high frequencies is attributed to the long mean free path of the conduction electrons: when the skin depth becomes much smaller than the mean free path, only a fraction of the conduction electrons moving almost parallel to the metal surface is effective in carrying the current and the classical theory breaks down.

  14. Issue 17: Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Kenny

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of material culture is a central component of the study of archaeology. This issue brings together papers that illustrate and advance both the process of artefact study and the interpretation of material culture. The e-Monograph by Steven Willis represents the culmination of many years of work undertaken with the support of English Heritage. The objective of the study was to examine the chronology of samian in Britain and to investigate its occurrence. This paper is the second phase of the project and brings together Willis' synthesis and analysis of the data that he has collected. Willis gives us an examination of samian dating and chronology in detail but he also gives us much more: A discussion of samian supply to Roman Britain, the role of samian as a social indicator of status, samian in use and samian as part of burial ritual. Other approaches to artefact study are taken here too, an analysis of the spatial distribution, the role of samian on religous sites and of course the place of samian in broader artefact assemblages.

  15. Acknowledgment - Issue 60

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Executive Editor

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Biblios wish to acknowledge the support of the following professionals who participated in the review process of submissions for our issue 60.ReviewersAndré Ancona Lopez (Universidade de Brasília - UnB, BrasilGildenir Carolino Santos (Universidade Estadual de Campinas - UNICAMP, BrasilJacira Gil Bernardes (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul - UFRGS, BrasilRodrigo Donoso Vegas (Universidad de Chile - UCHILE, ChileSaúl Hiram Souto Fuentes (Universidad de Monterrey - UDEM, MéxicoReviewers invitedAlejandro Uribe Tirado (Universidad de Antioquia - UDEA, ColombiaFernanda Passini Moreno (Universidade de Brasília - UnB, BrasilJosé Bernal Rivas Fernández (Universidad de Costa Rica - UCR, Costa RicaMarta Lígia Pomim Valentim (Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP, BrasilOrlando Corzo Cauracurí (Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos - UNMSM, PerúTerezinha Elisabeth da Silva (Universidade Estadual de Londrina - UEL, BrasilZaira Regina Zafalon (Universidade Federal de São Carlos - UFSCAR, BrasilIn the same way our acknowledge to University Library System (University of Pittsburgh - PITTS, USA by constant technical support and advice for our journal.

  16. In This Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Composing the Curriculum For your summer reading pleasure this month's issue provides a wide range of subjects and activities. Our lead article is a tribute to a chemist-composer, Lejaren A. Hiller, Jr., as well as an examination of the interesting relationship between chemistry (and science) and music. Like Hiller, Wamser and Wamser (page 601) love both chemistry and music, and this comes through loud and clear in their historical perspective on Hiller's work. Much of the rest of the issue impinges on the chemistry curriculum in one form or another. Rettich, Bailey, Frank, and Frick (page 638) describe an integrated first- and second-year curriculum being developed at Illinois Wesleyan University that includes all subdisciplines of chemistry. They describe ways to teach topics such as acids and bases so that the perspectives of (for example) organic and inorganic chemistry are integrated and contemporaneous. Those contemplating a popular reform, group work or cooperative learning, will be interested in Birk and Kurtz's program (page 615) for training teaching assistants using cooperative learning. Surely TAs who have participated in cooperative groups to develop their own techniques for handling discussion and lab sessions will be able to use group learning to better advantage. Several years ago the ACS Division of Chemical Education set up a Task Force on the General Chemistry Curriculum. With support from the National Science Foundation and others, the task force has been quite active. In addition to the summative reports published here (pages 617-636) on four areas in which general chemistry teaching can be improved, they have contributed many Forum columns in earlier issues of the Journal and have published much of their work in New Directions for General Chemistry: A Resource for Curricular Change; Baird W. Lloyd, ed. Our current approach to teaching electron configurations of the atoms is largely based on quantum theory Because of the mathematics required

  17. Pulmonary toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebles, Brian Christopher

    Manufactured nanomaterials have become ubiquitous in science, industry, and medicine. Although electron microscopy and surface probe techniques have improved understanding of the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials, much less is known about what makes nanomaterials toxic. Particulate matter less than 2.5 mum in effective aerodynamic diameter is easily inhaled and taken deep into the lungs. The toxicity of inhaled particulate matter is related to its size and surface chemistry; for instance, the smaller the size of particles, the greater their specific surface area. The chemistry and toxicity of insoluble particles depends on their surface area, since chemical reactions may happen with the environment on the surface. Oxidation and reduction may occur on the surfaces of particles after they are produced. For instance, it is known that carbonaceous particles from vehicle exhaust and industrial emission may interact with reactive species like ozone in their ambient environment, altering the surface chemistry of the particles. Reaction with species in the environment may cause changes in the chemical functionality of the surface and change the toxic properties of the particles when they are inhaled. Furthermore, metals on the surface of inhalable particles can contribute to their toxicity. Much attention has been given to the presence of iron on the surfaces of inhalable particles in the environment. After particle inhalation, particles are endocytosed by alveolar macrophages in the immune response to foreign matter. They are exposed to hydrogen peroxide in the oxidative burst, which can cause the iron-mediated production of hydroxyl free radicals via the Fenton reaction, causing oxidative stress that leads to inflammation and cell death. The toxicity of particles that contain metals depends on the redox activity and bioavailability of the metals, the causes of thich have not yet been adequately explored. In this thesis, electron paramagnetic spectroscopy showed

  18. [Comprehensive Toxicity Evaluation and Toxicity Identification Used in Tannery and Textile Wastewaters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Chen, Wen-yan; Wan, Yu-shan; Zheng, Guo-juan; Zhao, Yuan; Cai, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    To better evaluate the toxicity of tannery and textile effluents from various emission stages, the research attempted battery of toxicological bioassays and toxicological indices. The bioassays employed Microtox test, zebra fish embryo-larval test and algae (Chlorella vulgaris) test. Meanwhile, toxicological indices including Toxicity Unit (TU), Average Toxicity (AvTx), Toxic Print (TxPr), Most Sensitive Test (MST) and Potential Ecotoxic Effects Probe (PEEP) were applied. The results illustrated that PEEP was the most comprehensive index to take account of the emissions and toxic potential of effluents. PEEP values showed that the reduction rates of toxicity in tannery and textile effluents were 36. 8% and 23. 2%, respectively. Finally, based on the Microtox toxicity test, toxicants in textile effluent were identified through the toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) studies. The results indicated that the main toxicant of textile effluent was non-polar organic pollutants, followed by filterable compounds, heavy metals, oxidizing substances and volatile components. PMID:26489331

  19. Discovering less toxic ionic liquids by using the Microtox® toxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Fernández, F J; Bayo, J; Pérez de los Ríos, A; Vicente, M A; Bernal, F J; Quesada-Medina, J

    2015-06-01

    New Microtox® toxicity data of 16 ionic liquids of different cationic and anionic composition were determined. The ionic liquids 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium trifluoromethanesulfonate, [BMPyr(+)][TFO(-)], 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium chloride, [BMPyr(+)][Cl(-)], hydroxypropylmethylimidazolium fluoroacetate, [HOPMIM(+)][FCH2COO(-)], and hydroxypropylmethylimidazolium glycolate [HOPMIM(+)][glycolate(-)] were found to be less toxic than conventional organic solvent such as chloroform or toluene, accoding the Microtox® toxicity assays. The toxicity of pyrrolidinium cation was lower than the imidazolium and pyridinium ones. It was found that the inclusion of an hydroxyl group in the alkyl chain length of the cation also reduce the toxicity of the ionic liquid. To sum up, the Microtox® toxicity assays can be used as screening tool to easily determined the toxicity of a wide range of ionic liquids and the toxicity data obtained could allow the obtention of structure-toxicity relationships to design less toxic ionic liquids. PMID:25748519

  20. Mars Surface Environmental Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John

    2002-01-01

    Planetary exploration by astronauts will require extended periods of habitation on a planet's surface, under the influence of environmental factors that are different from those of Earth and the spacecraft that delivered the crew to the planet. Human exploration of Mars, a possible near-term planetary objective, can be considered a challenging scenario. Mission scenarios currently under consideration call for surface habitation periods of from 1 to 18 months on even the earliest expeditions. Methods: Environmental issues associated with Mars exploration have been investigated by NASA and the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) as part of the Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap Project (see http ://criticalpath.jsc.nasa.gov). Results: Arrival on Mars will immediately expose the crew to gravity only 38% of that at Earth's surface in possibly the first prolonged exposure to gravity other than the 1G of Earth's surface and the zero G of weightless space flight, with yet unknown effects on crew physiology. The radiation at Mars' surface is not well documented, although the planet's bulk and even its thin atmosphere may moderate the influx of galactic cosmic radiation and energetic protons from solar flares. Secondary radiation from activated components of the soil must also be considered. Ultrafine and larger respirable and nonrespirable particles in Martian dust introduced into the habitat after surface excursions may induce pulmonary inflammation exacerbated by the additive reactive and oxidizing nature of the dust. Stringent decontamination cannot eliminate mechanical and corrosive effects of the dust on pressure suits and exposed machinery. The biohazard potential of putative indigenous Martian microorganisms may be assessed by comparison with analog environments on Earth. Even in their absence, human microorganisms, if not properly controlled, can be a threat to the crew's health. Conclusions: Mars' surface offers a substantial challenge to the

  1. In This Issue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    稀土是重要的稀有元素,资源有限,稀土催化材料是稀土资源尤其是高丰度轻稀土元素(镧、铈、镨等)重要的应用领域。为了反映稀土催化研究的新进展,推进稀土催化材料的发展,本期邀请了在稀土催化研究中比较活跃的课题组撰写了16篇文章组成稀土催化专刊,其中包括2篇综述、1篇快讯和13篇论文,内容主要涉及环境催化、石油化工和能源化工催化等过程。%Rare earths are very important precious resources that have limited supplies. The high efficiency and high quality application of rare earths, espe-cially the light rare earth elements (La, Ce, Pr, and so on) which are more abun-dant, as catalytic materials is a key requirement. To show the latest progress on rare earth catalysis and promote the development of the rare earth catalytic ma-terials, we are pleased to invite a number of scientists to present their recent work on rare earth catalysis. This special issue consists of 2 reviews, 1 commu-nication, and 13 articles, which described work related to environmental, organ-ic and energy catalysis, and density functional theory studies.

  2. Fusion Canada issue 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue Canada-Europe Accords: 5 year R and D collaboration for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) AECL is designated to arrange and implement the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) while EUROTAM is responsible for operating Europe's Fusion R and D programs plus MOU and EDA. The MOU includes tokamaks, plasma physics, fusion technology, fusion fuels and other approaches to fusion energy (as alternatives to tokamaks). STOR-M Tokamak was restarted at the University of Saskatchewan following upgrades to the plasma chamber to accommodate the Compact Toroid (CT) injector. The CT injector has a flexible attachment thus allowing for injection angle adjustments. Real-time video images of a single plasma discharge on TdeV showing that as the plasma density increases, in a linear ramp divertor, the plasma contact with the horizontal plate decreases while contact increases with the oblique plate. Damage-resistant diffractive optical elements (DOE) have been developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research by Gentac Inc. and the National Optics Institute, laser beam homogeniser and laser harmonic separator DOE can also be made using the same technology. Studies using TdeV indicate that a divertor will be able to pump helium from the tokamak with a detached-plasma divertor but helium extraction performance must first be improved, presently the deuterium:helium retention radio-indicates that in order to pump enough helium through a fusion reactor, too much deuterium-tritium fuel would be pumped out. 2 fig

  3. Issues in focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The issues worldwide that deserve attention pertain to international migration, the education of women, family planning, missing female children, and prevention and control of AIDS cases. Migration outside country borders has been increasing due to economic and social disparities, and uncounted and unrecognized refugees are fleeing environmental disasters. The educational status of women has increased over the past 30 years. For example, female illiteracy has declined among women aged 20-24 years from 19% to 8% in Latin America, from 38% to 12% in eastern and western Asia, and from 80% to 49% in Africa. These improvements are significant, but the problem remains, where, for instance in Africa, there is still extensive illiteracy (75% of females aged under 25 years). A 1993 Population Action International Report states that low female educational levels and weak family planning and health programs are related to large family size and high child death rates. During the 1980s family planning was linked with ecological concerns. Progress has been made in the increase in contraceptive users in developing countries from 14% to 53% during 1965-70. Fertility has declined from 6.1 children per woman in the 1950s to 3.7. Kenya is a good example of a country with high fertility that reduced fertility through its emphasis on family planning. Obstacles to increased prevalence of contraception still remain. In Mexico more than 50% of public birth control services are provided to women in secret due to fear of their husband's abuse. Population pressure can result in the loss of girl children through higher mortality, better nutrition, neglect, or gender preference in the early fetal stages. The challenge of AIDS will be in caring for the sick and adjusting to social changes due to the expected increases in orphaned children. PMID:12318864

  4. Geo Issue Tracking System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakpour, Mohammad; Paulik, Christoph; Hahn, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Communication about remote sensing data quality between data providers and users as well as between the users is often difficult. The users have a hard time figuring out if a product has known problems over their region of interest and data providers have to spend a lot of effort to make this information available, if it exists. Scientific publications are one tool for communicating with the users base but they are static and mostly one way. As a data provider it is also often difficult to make feedback, received from users, available to the complete user base. The Geo Issue Tracking System (GeoITS) is an Open Source Web Application which has been developed to mitigate these problems. GeoITS combines a mapping interface (Google Maps) with a simple wiki platform. It allows users to give region specific feedback on a remote sensing product by drawing a polygon on the map and describing the problems they had using the remote sensing product in this area. These geolocated wiki entries are then viewable by other users as well as the data providers which can modify and extend the entries. In this way the conversations between the users and the data provider are no longer hidden in e.g. emails but open for all users of the dataset. This new kind of communication platform can enable better cooperation between users and data providers. It will also provide data providers with the ability to track problems their dataset might have in certain areas and resolve them with new product releases. The source code is available via http://github.com/TUW-GEO/geoits_dev A running instance can be tried at https://geoits.herokuapp.com/

  5. Phytoextraction of toxic metals by sunflower and corn plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soudek, Petr; Petrová, Šárka; Benešová, Dagmar; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 8, 3-4 (2010), s. 383-390. ISSN 1459-0255 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08058; GA MŠk 1M06030; GA MŠk OC09082 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Toxic metals * lead * zinc Subject RIV: DK - Soil Contamination ; De-contamination incl. Pesticides Impact factor: 0.425, year: 2010 www.isfae.org/scientficjournal/2010/issue3/abstracts/abstract68.php

  6. In This Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Advanced Instrumentation in the Educational Laboratory The instruments that chemists use in their research have changed dramatically in the past decades. The explosion in new techniques and their instrumental counterparts has been made possible by two significant advances. The rapid propagation of computer chips and circuitry provides opportunities to collect more specialized and refined data than ever before. Computer-controlled instruments can detect events that a human researcher would never perceive and can record hundreds of data points in the time that a person could only observe one or two. Coupled with these advances in technology are advances in theory that allow more sophisticated interpretation of data. A hundred years ago a sophisticated instrument was a balance that could weigh minute quantities. Today a sophisticated instrument is one that can identify the composition of that minute sample, determine its molecular weight, or reveal a great deal about its energy states and bonding. This bonanza of new instruments is wonderful for the research chemist but a curricular headache for the chemistry teacher. It takes more time to learn how to run an NMR than to use a balance, and more sophistication on the part of the student is needed to interpret the data. And yet many courses that only a generation ago sported an expensive analytical balance as its prize instrument now require students to understand and operate a whole panoply of complex tools. Teachers faced with accommodating these curricular changes will find several articles in this issue helpful--either providing information on new techniques or descriptions of how to incorporate them into the classroom. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is one of the newest tools that has been added to the analytical arsenal. It is an extension of mass spectrometry that overcomes the old barrier that allowed only analysis of low molecular weight, volatile compounds. It is now possible to use MS for

  7. Combinatorial QSAR Modeling of Rat Acute Toxicity by Oral Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) toxicity models have become popular tools for identifying potential toxic compounds and prioritizing candidates for animal toxicity tests. However, few QSAR studies have successfully modeled large, diverse mammalian toxicity end...

  8. 76 FR 38170 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... issue of March 16, 2006 (71 FR 13708) (FRL-7335-2). Section 4(d) of TSCA (15 U.S.C. 2603(d)) requires... AGENCY Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces EPA's receipt of test data on...

  9. SEDIMENT TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATION (TIE)PHASE I,II,III GUIDANCE DOCUMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediment contamination in the United States has been amply documented and, in order to comply with the 1972 Clean Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency must address the issue of toxic sediments. Contaminated sediments from a number of freshwater and marine sites hav...

  10. Toxicity limitation on radioactive liquid waste discharge at OPG Nuclear Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the Municipal and Industrial Strategy for Abatement (MISA) regulation, which came into effect in 1995 in Ontario (Ontario Regulation 215/95 under the Environmental Protection Act). This imposed additional limitations on liquid discharges from power generating stations. The MISA regulation has divided discharges into non-event and event streams, which have to be monitored for the prescribed parameters and for toxicity. Radioactive Waste Management Systems fall into the category of non-event streams. Standard toxicity testing involves monitoring lethality of Daphnia Magna and Rainbow trout in the effluent. The new legislation has imposed a need to address several issues: acute toxicity, complying with the specific limits prescribed by the regulation and, in the long run chronic toxicity

  11. Lysophospholipase inhibition by organophosphorus toxicants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysophospholipases (LysoPLAs) are a large family of enzymes for removing lysophospholipids from cell membranes. Potent inhibitors are needed to define the importance of LysoPLAs as targets for toxicants and potential therapeutics. This study considers organophosphorus (OP) inhibitors with emphasis on mouse brain total LysoPLA activity relative to the mipafox-sensitive neuropathy target esterase (NTE)-LysoPLA recently established as 17% of the total activity and important in the action of OP delayed toxicants. The most potent inhibitors of total LysoPLA in mouse brain are isopropyl dodecylphosphonofluoridate (also for LysoPLA of Vibrio bacteria), ethyl octylphosphonofluoridate (EOPF), and two alkyl-benzodioxaphosphorin 2-oxides (BDPOs)[(S)-octyl and dodecyl] (IC50 2-8 nM). OP inhibitors acting in vitro and in vivo differentiate a more sensitive portion but not a distinct NTE-LysoPLA compared with total LysoPLA activity. For 10 active inhibitors, NTE-LysoPLA is 17-fold more sensitive than total LysoPLA, but structure-activity comparisons give a good correlation (r2 = 0.94) of IC50 values, suggesting active site structural similarity or identity. In mice 4 h after intraperitoneal treatment with discriminating doses, EOPF, tribufos (a plant defoliant), and dodecanesulfonyl fluoride inhibit 41-57% of the total brain LysoPLA and 85-99% of the NTE-LysoPLA activity. Total LysoPLA as well as NTE-LysoPLA is decreased in activity in Nte+/--haploinsufficient mice compared to their Nte+/+ littermates. The lysolecithin level of spinal cord but not brain is elevated significantly following EOPF treatment (3 mg/kg), thereby focusing attention on localized rather than general alterations in lysophospholipid metabolism in OP-induced hyperactivity and toxicity

  12. Dithiobiuret toxicity in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raising the daily dose of dithiobiuret (DTB) in male rats from 0.5 to 1 to 5 mg/kg shortened the latency to the onset of flaccid muscle tone and associated diminished performance in a treadmill test from 7 to 5 to 3 days, respectively. Concomitant with the development of flaccid muscle tone gastrocnemius muscle contractions elicited by high frequency motor nerve stimulation were lower in peak tension and tended to fade more rapidly in DTB-treated rats than in control rats. Remarkably, rats treated with highly daily doses (10-16 mg/kg) of DTB were resistant to the expected development of DTB-induced flaccid muscle tone, and tetanic contractile abnormalities but a corresponding refractoriness to body weight loss, decreased fed and water intake, diuresis, and depression in water balance was not present. This nonselectivity of the refractory responses supported the results of a histopathological study indicating that DTB-induced neuromuscular toxicity was unlikely to be secondary to effect on other organ systems. It is not known whether the ultimate neurotoxin is DTB or a metabolite. In this regard, two pathways for the metabolism of DTB were proposed based on the results of thin-layer chromatography of urine samples from rats treated with either 14C- or 35S-DTB. One pathway involved the reversible oxidation of DTB to the disulfide-containing compound thiuret, and the other involved the replacement of a sulfur atom with oxygen to form monothiobiuret. Thiuret, but not monothiobiuret, possessed comparable toxicity to STB. This further suggested that redox cycling between DTB and thiuret could be an important contributing factor to the toxicity of DTB

  13. Toxicity of Alpholate to Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M A

    1963-10-01

    Although Apholate is used as a sexual sterilant of both sexes of houseflies (Musca domestica L.) it can not be used for ;systemic' chemosterilization of the prehypodermic larvae of the warble flies Hypoderma bovis (L.) and H. lineatum (De Vill.) because of its high toxicity to 4- to 5-month-old calves. An intramuscular dose of 2.5 mg./Kg. killed the calves in 5 to 7 days. The pathognomonic clinical signs were impaction of the rumen, anorexia, depression, and general weakness. The hematopoietic system was affected. There was marked leukocytopenia characterized by lymphocytopenia within 24 hours of Apholate injections. PMID:17649464

  14. Phenytoin Toxicity from Cocaine Adulteration

    OpenAIRE

    Roldan, Carlos J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of phenytoin (PHT) as a cocaine adulterant was reported decades ago;that practice is still current. Ironically PHT has also been used for the treatment of cocaine dependence. A drug smuggler developed PHT toxicity after swallowing several rocks of crack. We investigated the current trends of PHT as a cocaine adulterant and its toxicological implications. We also reviewed the clinical use of PTH in relation to cocaine. The use of PHT as cocaine cut is a current practice. This may affec...

  15. Metabolism and toxicity of neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological behavior and toxicity of neptunium were studied. Neptunium was admimistered either intravenously or intramuscularly in rats. In contrast of other transuranium elements the distribution patterns of neptunium in case of intravenous injection is not dependent of the physico-chemical state. The urinary excretion is high. The distribution after intramuscular injection showed a rather fast migration from the injection site. 237Np excreted in urine was approximately equal to bone deposit. Neptunium behavior rather followed that of alkaline earths than that of transplutonium elements

  16. Metabolism and toxicity of neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological behaviour and toxicity of neptunium were studied. Neptunium was administered either intravenously or intramuscularly in rats. In contrast to other transuranium elements the distribution patterns of neptunium in the case of intravenous injection is not dependent on the physico-chemical state. Urinary excretion is high. The distribution after intramuscular injection showed a rather fast migration from the injection site. 237 Neptonium in urine was approximately equal to bone deposit. Neptunium behaviour followed that of alkaline earths rather than that of transplutonium elements

  17. Phenytoin Toxicity from Cocaine Adulteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan, Carlos J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of phenytoin (PHT) as a cocaine adulterant was reported decades ago; that practice is still current. Ironically PHT has also been used for the treatment of cocaine dependence. A drug smuggler developed PHT toxicity after swallowing several rocks of crack. We investigated the current trends of PHT as a cocaine adulterant and its toxicological implications. We also reviewed the clinical use of PTH in relation to cocaine. The use of PHT as cocaine cut is a current practice. This may affect the clinical manifestations and the management of the cocaine-related visits to the emergency department. PMID:24672596

  18. Toxicity assessment of hydrazine fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, W.C.

    1988-11-01

    The major health aspects of exposure to hydrazine propellants are reviewed. Toxic effects of hydrazine fuels on humans and animals as well as in vitro studies are discussed with emphasis on recent findings and USAF studies. Propellant hydrazines have been found to be genotoxic in in vitro studies and oncogenic in animal studies. Embryotoxicity has been demonstrated at very high exposures but not at occupationally encountered levels for hydrazine and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine. Epidemiologic evidence to support these findings is lacking; however, the results of animal and in vitro studies have resulted in lowering both the time-weighted average-threshold limit values and short-term exposure limits for these propellants.

  19. The hydrogen issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaroli, Nicola; Balzani, Vincenzo

    2011-01-17

    Hydrogen is often proposed as the fuel of the future, but the transformation from the present fossil fuel economy to a hydrogen economy will need the solution of numerous complex scientific and technological issues, which will require several decades to be accomplished. Hydrogen is not an alternative fuel, but an energy carrier that has to be produced by using energy, starting from hydrogen-rich compounds. Production from gasoline or natural gas does not offer any advantage over the direct use of such fuels. Production from coal by gasification techniques with capture and sequestration of CO₂ could be an interim solution. Water splitting by artificial photosynthesis, photobiological methods based on algae, and high temperatures obtained by nuclear or concentrated solar power plants are promising approaches, but still far from practical applications. In the next decades, the development of the hydrogen economy will most likely rely on water electrolysis by using enormous amounts of electric power, which in its turn has to be generated. Producing electricity by burning fossil fuels, of course, cannot be a rational solution. Hydroelectric power can give but a very modest contribution. Therefore, it will be necessary to generate large amounts of electric power by nuclear energy of by renewable energies. A hydrogen economy based on nuclear electricity would imply the construction of thousands of fission reactors, thereby magnifying all the problems related to the use of nuclear energy (e.g., safe disposal of radioactive waste, nuclear proliferation, plant decommissioning, uranium shortage). In principle, wind, photovoltaic, and concentrated solar power have the potential to produce enormous amounts of electric power, but, except for wind, such technologies are too underdeveloped and expensive to tackle such a big task in a short period of time. A full development of a hydrogen economy needs also improvement in hydrogen storage, transportation and distribution

  20. Mega-constellations Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastida Virgili, Benjamin; Krag, Holger

    2016-07-01

    increase drastically. In this study, we report the detected issues of such a mega-constellation traffic, and we analyse the response of the space object population to the introduction of a large constellation conforming to the post-mission disposal guideline with differing levels of success and with different disposal orbit options.

  1. Ethical issues in neuroprosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glannon, Walter

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Neuroprosthetics are artificial devices or systems designed to generate, restore or modulate a range of neurally mediated functions. These include sensorimotor, visual, auditory, cognitive affective and volitional functions that have been impaired or lost from congenital anomalies, traumatic brain injury, infection, amputation or neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Cochlear implants, visual prosthetics, deep brain stimulation, brain-computer interfaces, brain-to-brain interfaces and hippocampal prosthetics can bypass, replace or compensate for dysfunctional neural circuits, brain injury and limb loss. They can enable people with these conditions to gain or regain varying degrees of control of thought and behavior. These direct and indirect interventions in the brain raise general ethical questions about weighing the potential benefit of altering neural circuits against the potential harm from neurophysiological and psychological sequelae. Other ethical questions are more specific to the therapeutic goals of particular neuroprosthetics and the conditions for which they are indicated. These include informed consent, agency, autonomy (free will) and identity. Approach. This review is an analysis and discussion of these questions. It also includes consideration of social justice issues such as how to establish and implement fair selection criteria in providing access to neuroprosthetic research and balancing technological innovation with patients’ best interests. Main results. Neuroprosthetics can restore or improve motor and mental functions in bypassing areas of injury or modulating dysregulation in neural circuits. As enabling devices that integrate with these circuits, neuroprosthetics can restore varying degrees of autonomous agency for people affected by neurological and psychiatric disorders. They can also re-establish the connectedness and continuity of the psychological properties they had before injury or disease onset and thereby

  2. Comparative toxicity of 24 manufactured nanoparticles in human alveolar epithelial and macrophage cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boczkowski Jorge

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A critical issue with nanomaterials is the clear understanding of their potential toxicity. We evaluated the toxic effect of 24 nanoparticles of similar equivalent spherical diameter and various elemental compositions on 2 human pulmonary cell lines: A549 and THP-1. A secondary aim was to elaborate a generic experimental set-up that would allow the rapid screening of cytotoxic effect of nanoparticles. We therefore compared 2 cytotoxicity assays (MTT and Neutral Red and analyzed 2 time points (3 and 24 hours for each cell type and nanoparticle. When possible, TC50 (Toxic Concentration 50 i.e. nanoparticle concentration inducing 50% cell mortality was calculated. Results The use of MTT assay on THP-1 cells exposed for 24 hours appears to be the most sensitive experimental design to assess the cytotoxic effect of one nanoparticle. With this experimental set-up, Copper- and Zinc-based nanoparticles appear to be the most toxic. Titania, Alumina, Ceria and Zirconia-based nanoparticles show moderate toxicity, and no toxicity was observed for Tungsten Carbide. No correlation between cytotoxicity and equivalent spherical diameter or specific surface area was found. Conclusion Our study clearly highlights the difference of sensitivity between cell types and cytotoxicity assays that has to be carefully taken into account when assessing nanoparticles toxicity.

  3. In This Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Organic Chemistry--New Challenges Perhaps more than any other of the chemical subdisciplines, the scope and focus of organic chemistry has been changed by modern technology and theoretical advances, and these changes have had an equally striking effect on the undergraduate curriculum. The main challenge in organic chemistry classes has shifted, in less than a generation, from memorizing all the groups, naming conventions, and classes of reactions to understanding complex interactions at the structural and electronic orbital level. As biochemistry and polymer chemistry have grown from being the purview of a few specialists to full-blown disciplines of their own, they have also migrated from interesting, but optional, chapters at the back of the book to separate courses in the curriculum. The availability of inexpensive instrumentation means undergraduates routinely use NMR and mass spec instead of melting points to identify their products. And the changes are continuing: segments of biochemistry are metamorphizing into molecular biology and polymer chemistry is finding interconnections with materials science. In fact, as our understanding of chemical reactions at molecular and electronic levels expands, it becomes more and more difficult to decide on demarcations between the subdisciplines. Organic chemistry is an organizational construct that once was useful for segregating certain topics into a coherent two-semester introductory course. Today, it covers so much territory that no one who is an "organic chemist" can know even a small fraction of the territory and faces unique challenges when designing and teaching undergraduate courses. In a wide spectrum of articles in this issue that fall under the "organic" umbrella--from environmental chemistry to new polymer products--teachers share their specific experiences and creative solutions to these challenges, providing their colleagues with new ideas, processes, and pedagogic approaches. To start off, we can examine

  4. Toxicity of fluoride to aquatic species and evaluation of toxicity modifying factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearcy, Krysta; Elphick, James; Burnett-Seidel, Charlene

    2015-07-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the toxicity of fluoride to a variety of freshwater aquatic organisms and to establish whether water quality variables contribute substantively to modifying its toxicity. Water hardness, chloride, and alkalinity were tested as possible toxicity modifying factors for fluoride using acute toxicity tests with Hyalella azteca and Oncorhynchus mykiss. Chloride appeared to be the major toxicity modifying factor for fluoride in these acute toxicity tests. The chronic toxicity of fluoride was evaluated with a variety of species, including 3 fish (Pimephales promelas, O. mykiss, and Salvelinus namaycush), 3 invertebrates (Ceriodaphnia dubia, H. azteca, and Chironomus dilutus), 1 plant (Lemna minor), and 1 alga (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata). Hyalella azteca was the most sensitive species overall, and O. mykiss was the most sensitive species of fish. The role of chloride as a toxicity modifying factor was inconsistent between species in the chronic toxicity tests. PMID:25732700

  5. Photoinduced toxicity of engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Philip Scott

    Engineered nanomaterials including metal, metal oxide and carbon based nanomaterials are extensively used in a wide variety of applications to the extent that their presence in the environment is expected to increase dramatically over the next century. These nanomaterials may be photodegraded by solar radiation and thereby release metal ions into the environment that can produce cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. Photoinduced toxicity experiments are performed exposing human lung epithelial carcinoma cells [H1650] to engineered semiconductor nanoparticles such as CdSe quantum dots and ZnO nanoparticles after exposure to 3, 6, and 9 hours of solar simulated radiation. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the metal ions are evaluated using ZnSO4 and CdCl2 solutions for the MTT assay and Comet assay respectively. The objective of the dissertation is to obtain quantitative information about the environmental transformation of engineered nanomaterials and their mechanism of toxicity. This information is critical for addressing the environmental health and safety risks of engineered nanomaterials to workers, consumers and the environment.

  6. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolker, A.; Sarofim, A.F.; Palmer, C.A.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Lighty, J.; Veranth, J.; Helble, J.J.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Ames, M.R.; Finkelman, R.; Mamani-Paco, M.; Sterling, R.; Mroczkowsky, S.J.; Panagiotou, T.; Seames, W.

    1999-05-10

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environ-mental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the reporting period from 1 January 1999 to 31 March 1999. During this period, a full Program Review Meeting was held at the University of Arizona. At this meeting, the progress of each group was reviewed, plans for the following 9 month period were discussed, and action items (principally associated with the transfer of samples and reports among the various investigators) were identified.

  7. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Briner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Depleted uranium (DU is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a clear and defined set of symptoms. Chronic low-dose, or subacute, exposure to depleted uranium alters the appearance of milestones in developing organisms. Adult animals that were exposed to depleted uranium during development display persistent alterations in behavior, even after cessation of depleted uranium exposure. Adult animals exposed to depleted uranium demonstrate altered behaviors and a variety of alterations to brain chemistry. Despite its reduced level of radioactivity evidence continues to accumulate that depleted uranium, if ingested, may pose a radiologic hazard. The current state of knowledge concerning DU is discussed.

  8. Men's health issues in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Christopher C K; Tan, Hui Meng

    2013-09-01

    Men's health has gained prominence over the past few years but it is still not on par with the attention or funding that women and child health is getting. In Asia, this issue is even more conspicuous. With westernization of lifestyle, Asian men's problems emulate their Western counterparts but there are certain issues unique to Asian men due to cultural differences. This review will discuss the health issues affecting Asian men and suggest measures that can be taken to overcome them. PMID:23822757

  9. Strategic pricing of equity issues

    OpenAIRE

    Klaus Ritzberger; Frank Milne

    2002-01-01

    Consider a general equilibrium model where agents may behave strategically. Specifically, suppose some firm issues new shares. If the primary market price is controlled by the issuing institution and investors' expectations on future equity prices are constant in their share purchases, the share price on the primary market cannot exceed the secondary market share price. In certain cases this may imply strict underpricing of newly issued shares. If investors perceive an influence on future sha...

  10. The nuclear controversy-what are the issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various issues raised by anti-nuclear groups are outlined and rebutted. Issues are grouped under four headingss - Economic; Technical; Social/Ethical/Moral; Political. Issues debated under economic aspects include conservation, unemployment resulting from energy use, use of alternative enrgy sources, high capital cost of nuclear power, high energy consumption in construction of plants, performance unreliability, depletion of uranium and excessive cost of decommissioning. Technically related issues, reactor safety, possibility of nuclear power plant explosion, waste managment, toxicity of plutonium, emission of radioactive material, thermal pollution and environmental effect of heavy water production are also discussed. Social/ethical/moral issues rebutted include radiation effects on health and genetic effects, deaths among uranium miners, morality of long-term waste storage, lack of faith in technical solutions and technical people, opposition to current life style, secrecy of information, nuclear proliferation and unsuitability of nuclear technology to the needs of developing countries. Political issues discussed are sabotage/terrorism possibilites, police state tactics in protection of nuclear facilities, misuse of technolgy by society, high energy society is capitalist and low energy society is Marxist, centralization of power, need for a great nuclear debate and the question of who pays for safety. Scientists and technical people are called upon to debate in their areas of specialty and are cautioned to be aware of tactics involved in meeting challengers head-on. (J.T.A.)

  11. Breast cancer. Selected legal issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynstra, N A

    1994-07-01

    Several legal and ethical issues may arise during the course of screening for and diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Among the most active legal areas are reimbursement for therapies deemed experimental by certain insurance companies, such as high dose chemotherapy/autologous bone marrow transplantation (HDCT/ABMT) and off-label drug use; these reimbursement issues are discussed. Legal issues in mammography screening and insurance coverage and legal issues relative to informed consent in breast cancer treatment also are discussed. PMID:8004625

  12. Special Issue on Robot Vision

    OpenAIRE

    Košecká, Jana; Marchand, Eric; Corke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    International audience The International Journal of Robotics Research (IJRR) has a long history of publishing the state-of-the-art in the field of robotic vision. This is the fourth special issue devoted to the topic. Previous special issues were published in. In a closely related field was the special issue on Visual Servoing published in IJRR, 2003 (Volume 22, Nos 10–11). These issues nicely summarize the highlights and progress of the past 12 years of research devoted to the use of visu...

  13. Policy issues in modern cartography

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, DRF

    1998-01-01

    Policy Issues in Modern Cartography contains the views of national mapping agencies, legal scholars, the library community, the private sector and academia on these and many other important issues. The book begins with perspectives from national mapping agencies in Britain, Canada and the United States followed by a survey of the situation in Asia. The next three chapters deal primarily with legal issues such as copyright and intellectual property from both North American and European perspectives. Chapter 8 presents an important perspective on the key issues by a representative of the privat

  14. Current issues with research support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, W.T.

    1996-03-01

    It would be difficult to condense current issues in nuclear reactor regulation to just a few minutes. So, let me start off by saying that I have not tried to give a comprehensive listing of issues that are currently facing the reactor program, but rather to select those that I thought were relevant as they relate to research activities. Use of probabilistic risk assessment in regulatory decisions; materials aging issues concerning steam generators and reactor vessels; high burnup fuels; accident management; and digital instrumentation and control, are just a sampling of the important issues that I want to talk about.

  15. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles against bacteria, yeast, and algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toxicity mechanism employed by silver nanoparticles against microorganisms has captivated scientists for nearly a decade and remains a debatable issue. The question most frequently asked is whether silver nanoparticles exert specific effects on microorganisms beyond the well-documented antimicrobial activity of Ag+. Here, we study the effects of citrate- (d = 17.5 ± 9.4 nm) and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (d = 38.8 ± 3.6 nm)-capped silver nanoparticles on microorganisms belonging to various genera. The antimicrobial effect of Ag+ was distinguished from that of nanosilver by monitoring microbial growth in the presence and absence of nanoparticles and by careful comparison of the responses of equimolar silver nitrate solution. The results show that when using equimolar silver solutions, silver nitrate has higher toxic potential on all microorganisms than both nanoparticles tested. Furthermore, some microorganisms are more susceptible to silver than others and the choice of capping agent is relevant in the toxicity. Atomic force microscopy disclosed that AgNO3 had a destructive effect on algae. The antimicrobial activity of nanosilver could be exploited to prevent microbial colonization of medical devices and to determine the fate of nanoparticles in the environment

  16. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles against bacteria, yeast, and algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorobantu, Loredana S., E-mail: loredana@ualberta.ca; Fallone, Clara [University of Alberta, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering (Canada); Noble, Adam J. [Trent University, Department of Biology (Canada); Veinot, Jonathan; Ma, Guibin [University of Alberta, Department of Chemistry (Canada); Goss, Greg G. [University of Alberta, Department of Biological Sciences (Canada); Burrell, Robert E. [University of Alberta, Department of Biomedical Engineering (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    The toxicity mechanism employed by silver nanoparticles against microorganisms has captivated scientists for nearly a decade and remains a debatable issue. The question most frequently asked is whether silver nanoparticles exert specific effects on microorganisms beyond the well-documented antimicrobial activity of Ag{sup +}. Here, we study the effects of citrate- (d = 17.5 ± 9.4 nm) and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (d = 38.8 ± 3.6 nm)-capped silver nanoparticles on microorganisms belonging to various genera. The antimicrobial effect of Ag{sup +} was distinguished from that of nanosilver by monitoring microbial growth in the presence and absence of nanoparticles and by careful comparison of the responses of equimolar silver nitrate solution. The results show that when using equimolar silver solutions, silver nitrate has higher toxic potential on all microorganisms than both nanoparticles tested. Furthermore, some microorganisms are more susceptible to silver than others and the choice of capping agent is relevant in the toxicity. Atomic force microscopy disclosed that AgNO{sub 3} had a destructive effect on algae. The antimicrobial activity of nanosilver could be exploited to prevent microbial colonization of medical devices and to determine the fate of nanoparticles in the environment.

  17. Toxicity and biodegradation of PCBs in contaminated sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PCBs represent a serious ecological problem due to their low degradability, high toxicity, and strong bioaccumulation. Because of many environmental and economical problems, there are efforts to develop bio-remediation technologies for decontamination of the PCB-polluted areas. PCB were used by storage of spent nuclear fuel in nuclear power plants Jaslovske Bohunice. In the locality of the former producer of PCB - Chemko Strazske a. s. - big amount of these substances is still persisting in sediments and soil. The goal of this study was to analyze the contaminated sediments from Strazsky canal and Zemplinska Sirava water reservoir from several points of view. The study of eco-toxicity confirmed that both sediments were toxic for various tested organisms. The genotoxicity test has not proved the mutagenic effect. The subsequent step included microbiological analysis of the contaminated sediments and isolation of pure bacterial cultures capable of degrading PCBs. In order to determine the genetic potential for their biodegradability, the gene bphA1 was identified using PCR technique in their genomes. This gene codes the enzyme biphenyl-dioxygenase, which is responsible for PCB degradation. The final goal was to perform aerobic biodegradation of PCBs in the sediments. The bacteria present in both sediments are able to degrade certain low chlorinated congeners. The issue of biodiversity is still open and has to be studied to reveal the real cooperation between bacteria. (authors)

  18. Adapting oecd aquatic toxicity tests for use with manufactured nanomaterials: key issues and consensus recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Elijah J.; Diamond, Stephen A.; Kennedy, Alan J.; Goss, Greg G.; Ho, Kay; Lead, Jamie; Hanna, Shannon K.; Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin; Mader, Brian; Manier, Nicolas; Pandard, Pascal; Salinas, Edward; Sayre, Phil

    2015-01-01

    The unique or enhanced properties of manufactured nanomaterials (MNs) suggest that their use in nano-enabled products will continue to increase. This will result in increased potential for human and environmental exposure to MNs, during manufacturing, use, and disposal of nano-enabled products...... participants that require specific guidance for MN testing: preparation of dispersions, dose metrics, the importance and challenges associated with maintaining and monitoring exposure levels, and the need for reliable methods to quantify MNs in complex media. To facilitate a scientific advance in the...

  19. Comparative Dietary Toxicities of Pesticides to Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, R.G.; Spann, J.W.; Hill, E.F.; Kreitzer, J.F.

    1972-01-01

    This report presents measurements of the lethal dietary toxicity of 89 pesticidal chemicals to young bowhites, Japanese quail, ring-necked pheasants, and mallards. Toxicity is expressed as the median lethal concentration (LC 50) of active chemical in a 5-day ad libitum diet. LC 50's and associated statistics are derived by methods of probit analysis. Endrin consistently was the most toxic chemical while aldrin and dieldrin were among the six most toxic chemicals of those tested on all species. In general, organophosphates were less toxic than aldrin or dieldrin and herbicides were of a low order of toxicity. There were obvious inconsistencies in the relative sensitivity of the four species to various chemicals.

  20. Current Issues in Cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These colloquium proceedings will be valuable, the blurb says, for graduate students and researchers in cosmology and theoretical astrophysics. Specifically, the book 'looks at both the strengths and weaknesses of the current big bang model in explaining certain puzzling data' and gives a 'comprehensive coverage of the expanding field of cosmology'. The reality is rather different. Conference proceedings rarely compare in value with a solid monograph or good review articles, and Current Issues in Cosmology is no exception. The colloquium was convened by the two editors, who have both long harboured doubts about the big bang, and was held in Paris in June 2004. The proceedings contain 19 presented papers and relatively brief summary comments by four panel speakers. The questions and answers at the end of each talk and a general discussion at the end were recorded and transcribed but contain little of interest. The nature of the colloquium is indicated by panellist Francesco Bertola's comment: 'While in the 1950s it was possible to speak of rival theories in cosmology, now the big-bang picture has no strong rivals. This is confirmed by the fact that out of 1500 members of the IAU Division VIII (Galaxies and the Universe) only a dozen, although bright people, devote their time to the heterodox views.' This was largely a platform for them to give their views. At least half of the dozen, all the 'usual suspects', were present: Geoffery and Margaret Burbidge, Jayant Narlikar, Halton Arp, Chandra Wickramasinghe and, in spirit only but playing a role somewhat like the ghost of Hamlet's father, the late Fred Hoyle. Doubters presented 12 of the 19 papers. Orthodoxy should certainly be challenged and the sociology of science questioned, but I found two main problems with this book. The papers putting the orthodox view are too short, even perfunctory. The most that a serious graduate student would get out of them is a reference to a far better review article or book on modern

  1. Current Issues in Cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbour, J B [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester (United States)

    2007-02-07

    These colloquium proceedings will be valuable, the blurb says, for graduate students and researchers in cosmology and theoretical astrophysics. Specifically, the book 'looks at both the strengths and weaknesses of the current big bang model in explaining certain puzzling data' and gives a 'comprehensive coverage of the expanding field of cosmology'. The reality is rather different. Conference proceedings rarely compare in value with a solid monograph or good review articles, and Current Issues in Cosmology is no exception. The colloquium was convened by the two editors, who have both long harboured doubts about the big bang, and was held in Paris in June 2004. The proceedings contain 19 presented papers and relatively brief summary comments by four panel speakers. The questions and answers at the end of each talk and a general discussion at the end were recorded and transcribed but contain little of interest. The nature of the colloquium is indicated by panellist Francesco Bertola's comment: 'While in the 1950s it was possible to speak of rival theories in cosmology, now the big-bang picture has no strong rivals. This is confirmed by the fact that out of 1500 members of the IAU Division VIII (Galaxies and the Universe) only a dozen, although bright people, devote their time to the heterodox views.' This was largely a platform for them to give their views. At least half of the dozen, all the 'usual suspects', were present: Geoffery and Margaret Burbidge, Jayant Narlikar, Halton Arp, Chandra Wickramasinghe and, in spirit only but playing a role somewhat like the ghost of Hamlet's father, the late Fred Hoyle. Doubters presented 12 of the 19 papers. Orthodoxy should certainly be challenged and the sociology of science questioned, but I found two main problems with this book. The papers putting the orthodox view are too short, even perfunctory. The most that a serious graduate student would get out of them is a reference

  2. Nanoparticles: Their potential toxicity, waste and environmental management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This literature review discusses specific issues related to handling of waste containing nanomaterials. The aims are (1) to highlight problems related to uncontrolled release of nanoparticles to the environment through waste disposal, and (2) to introduce the topics of nanowaste and nanotoxicology to the waste management community. Many nanoparticles used by industry contain heavy metals, thus toxicity and bioaccumulation of heavy metals contained in nanoparticles may become important environmental issues. Although bioavailability of heavy metals contained in nanoparticles can be lower than those present in soluble form, the toxicity resulting from their intrinsic nature (e.g. their size, shape or density) may be significant. An approach to the treatment of nanowaste requires understanding of all its properties - not only chemical, but also physical and biological. Progress in nanowaste management also requires studies of the environmental impact of the new materials. The authors believe Amara's law is applicable to the impact of nanotechnologies, and society might overestimate the short-term effects of these technologies, while underestimating the long-term effects. It is necessary to have basic information from companies about the level and nature of nanomaterials produced or emitted and about the expectation of the life cycle time of nanoproducts as a basis to estimate the level of nanowaste in the future. Without knowing how companies plan to use and store recycled and nonrecycled nanomaterials, development of regulations is difficult. Tagging of nanoproducts is proposed as a means to facilitate separation and recovery of nanomaterials.

  3. Distributed Structure-Searchable Toxicity Database Network

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Distributed Structure-Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) Database Network provides a public forum for search and publishing downloadable, structure-searchable,...

  4. Evaluation of methods for assessing toxicity of oil spill treating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumley, T.C.; Hollebone, B.P. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Harrison, S. [SAIC Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    The first counter-measure considered during an oil spill is the mechanical removal of the spilled oil, but this rarely collects more than 20 per cent of the spilled oil. When mechanical means are insufficient, it is advisable to use spill treating agents (STAs). The potential impact of STAs on the environment is estimated by assessing their in-vitro toxicity to sensitive or sentinel organisms. The typical endpoint in animal exposure models is acute lethality LC{sub 50}, which is the concentration that will be fatal to 50 per cent of the test population. The range of STAs include dispersants; shoreline washing agents; de-emulsifiers or emulsion inhibitors; herding agents; recovery agents; solidifiers or gelling agents; biodegradation agents; and, sinking agents. However, a thorough understanding of the overall toxicity of the agent to the environment must be determined along with the net environmental benefit. The agents must undergo rigorous toxicity evaluations to meet the requirements of the New Substances Notification or Significant New Activity Notification sections of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act of 1999. Environment Canada's guidelines for the use and acceptability of dispersants also address toxicity issues. In particular, emphasis has been on evaluating toxicity by the 96-hour rainbow trout lethality test. This paper presented challenges to the current test protocols and recommended that Environment Canada's guidelines for the use of oil STAs should be modified to include a broader definition of toxicity. The toxicity of a dispersant should be less than the toxicity of the water soluble fraction of an oil slick. However, sublethal effects of dispersant exposure, such as endocrine disruption, organ toxicity, mutagenicity and geotoxicity must be better understood. It was argued that testing on one fish species in an enclosed system does not adequately address a diverse marine environment. It was recommended that testing procedures

  5. Ethical Issues in Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bill; Simpson, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Teaching at a distance raises ethical issues particular to the distance context. When distance teaching is also online teaching, the situation is even more complex. Online teaching environments amplify the ethical issues faced by instructors and students. Online sites support complex discourses and multiple relationships; they cross physical,…

  6. Self-Advocacy. Feature Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Mary F., Ed.; Ward, Nancy, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This feature issue newsletter looks at issues the self-advocacy movement is raising and the contributions it is making to the lives of people with developmental disabilities. Articles by self-advocates and advisors to self-advocacy organizations talk about their self-advocacy experiences, barriers to self-advocacy, and ways to support it. Primary…

  7. Global strategies for environmental issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the 19th Annual NAEP conference proceedings, containing abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions. Broad areas covered include the following: Environmental Management; Biodiversity/sustainable development; Gulf Regional Issues; Environmental ethics/equity; NEPA workshop and symposium; International environmental issues; global Environmental Effects; Risk Assessment; and Environmental effects of nuclear waste management

  8. Concrete Masonry Designs: Educational Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, Randi, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This special journal issue addresses concrete masonry in educational facilities construction. The issue's feature articles are: (1) "It Takes a Village To Construct a Massachusetts Middle School," describing a middle school constructed almost entirely of concrete masonry and modeled after a typical small New England village; (2) "Lessons Learned,"…

  9. Teaching Gender Issues through Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClish, Glen

    The issues of empiricism and theory-building can be used in practical terms to discuss how literary texts can be used to elucidate gender issues in the classroom. For instance, two literary texts written early in this century--Thornton Wilder's "Our Town" and Ernest Hemingway's short story "Up in Michigan"--can illustrate important principles of…

  10. NST Quarterly. January 1996 issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NST Quarterly reports current development in Nuclear Science and Technology in Malaysia. In this issue it highlights MINT activities in nuclear medicine, healthcare products sterilization, industrial irradiation dosimetry and heavy metals determination in food. The Malaysian standard for food irradiation was discussed in this issue

  11. Phenytoin Toxicity from Cocaine Adulteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J. Roldan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of phenytoin (PHT as a cocaine adulterant was reported decades ago;that practice is still current. Ironically PHT has also been used for the treatment of cocaine dependence. A drug smuggler developed PHT toxicity after swallowing several rocks of crack. We investigated the current trends of PHT as a cocaine adulterant and its toxicological implications. We also reviewed the clinical use of PTH in relation to cocaine. The use of PHT as cocaine cut is a current practice. This may affect the clinical manifestations and the management of the cocaine-related visits to the emergency department. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(2:127–130.

  12. [Preclinical study of noopept toxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, L P; Smol'nikova, N M; Alekseeva, S V; Nemova, E P; Sorokina, A V; Miramedova, M G; Kurapova, S P; Sidorina, E I; Kulakova, A V; Daugel'-Dauge, N O

    2002-01-01

    Within the framework of a preclinical investigation, the new nootrope drug noopept (N-phenyl-acetyl-L-propyl-glycine ethylate) was tested for chronic toxicity upon peroral administration in a dose of 10 or 100 mg/kg over 6 months in both male and female rabbits. The results of observations showed that noopept administered in this dose range induced no irreversible pathologic changes in the organs and systems studied and exhibited no allergenic, immunotoxic, and mutagen activity. The drug affected neither the generative function nor the antenatal or postnatal progeny development. Noopept produced a dose-dependent suppression of inflammation reaction to concanavalin A and stimulated the cellular and humoral immune response in mice. PMID:12025790

  13. Hematologic toxicity of immunosuppressive treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesi, R; Del Tacca, M

    2004-04-01

    The administration of immunosuppressive agents may be associated with the occurrence of hematologic toxicity, such as anemia, due to bone marrow suppression or hemolysis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The administration of azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil is more frequently associated with bone marrow suppression, while hemolytic-uremic syndrome may occur after administration of cyclosporine, tacrolimus, or muromonab (OKT3) and may be associated with the loss of the allograft. Moreover, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia are rare, but potentially severe, complications of immunosuppressive treatment with tacrolimus and cyclosporine; they are characterized by intravascular hemolysis due to mechanical destruction of red cells as a result of pathological changes in small blood vessels. Viral infections (cytomegalovirus), administration of antiviral agents (gancyclovir), inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II receptor antagonists, antibacterial agents (sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim), and allopurinol may aggravate bone marrow suppression, particularly when administered with agents that interfere with purine biosynthesis, including azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil. PMID:15110637

  14. Toxic hazards of underground excavation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.; Chitnis, V.; Damasian, M.; Lemm, M.; Popplesdorf, N.; Ryan, T.; Saban, C.; Cohen, J.; Smith, C.; Ciminesi, F.

    1982-09-01

    Inadvertent intrusion into natural or man-made toxic or hazardous material deposits as a consequence of activities such as mining, excavation or tunnelling has resulted in numerous deaths and injuries in this country. This study is a preliminary investigation to identify and document instances of such fatal or injurious intrusion. An objective is to provide useful insights and information related to potential hazards due to future intrusion into underground radioactive-waste-disposal facilities. The methodology used in this study includes literature review and correspondence with appropriate government agencies and organizations. Key categories of intrusion hazards are asphyxiation, methane, hydrogen sulfide, silica and asbestos, naturally occurring radionuclides, and various mine or waste dump related hazards.

  15. Toxicity test: Fluorescent silicon nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujoka, K; Hoshino, A; Manome, Y [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Minatoku, Tokyo 105-8461 (Japan); Hanada, S; Kanaya, F; Yamamoto, K [Research Institute, National Centre for Global Health and Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8655 (Japan); Sato, K; Yokosuka, S; Takigami, Y; Hirakuri, K [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8457 (Japan); Shiohara, A; Tilley, R D [MacDiarmid Institute of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington (New Zealand); Manabe, N, E-mail: kfujioka@jikei.ac.jp [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advance Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-07-06

    Semiconductor nanoparticles ('quantum dots', QDs) are useful fluorescent materials because of their high fluorescent stability compared with existing organic fluorescent dyes. QDs were tested in many biochemical experiments, and the reported results suggested their advantages. However, when we consider their application at the clinical level, their large-scale use may be problematic because of their influence on the environment and the living body as a result of cadmium contained in existing mainstream QDs. Here we report on the characteristics of silicon particles (synthesised using the gas phase method and liquid phase method, currently in the development stage) as a substitute material, focusing on cell-level safety and the potential mechanisms of toxicity.

  16. Toxic hazards of underground excavation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inadvertent intrusion into natural or man-made toxic or hazardous material deposits as a consequence of activities such as mining, excavation or tunnelling has resulted in numerous deaths and injuries in this country. This study is a preliminary investigation to identify and document instances of such fatal or injurious intrusion. An objective is to provide useful insights and information related to potential hazards due to future intrusion into underground radioactive-waste-disposal facilities. The methodology used in this study includes literature review and correspondence with appropriate government agencies and organizations. Key categories of intrusion hazards are asphyxiation, methane, hydrogen sulfide, silica and asbestos, naturally occurring radionuclides, and various mine or waste dump related hazards

  17. Toxicity test: Fluorescent silicon nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semiconductor nanoparticles ('quantum dots', QDs) are useful fluorescent materials because of their high fluorescent stability compared with existing organic fluorescent dyes. QDs were tested in many biochemical experiments, and the reported results suggested their advantages. However, when we consider their application at the clinical level, their large-scale use may be problematic because of their influence on the environment and the living body as a result of cadmium contained in existing mainstream QDs. Here we report on the characteristics of silicon particles (synthesised using the gas phase method and liquid phase method, currently in the development stage) as a substitute material, focusing on cell-level safety and the potential mechanisms of toxicity.

  18. Endogenous thiols enhance thallium toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, Sergio; Rios, Camilo [Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia, ' ' Manuel Velasco Suarez' ' , Departamento de Neuroquimica, Mexico, D.F (Mexico); Soriano, Luz; Monroy-Noyola, Antonio [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Laboratorio de Neuroproteccion, Facultad de Farmacia, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2007-10-15

    Either L-methionine (L-met) or L-cysteine (L-cys), given alone and in combination with Prussian blue (PB) was characterized as treatment against acute thallium (Tl) toxicity in rats. Animals were intoxicated with 32 mg/kg Tl acetate corresponding to rat LD{sub 50}. Antidotal treatments were administered during 4 days, as follows: (1) vehicle, (2) L-met 100 mg/kg i.p. twice a day, (3) L-cys 100 mg/kg i.p. twice a day, (4) PB 50 mg/kg oral, twice a day, (5) L-met + PB and (6) L-cys + PB. Mortality was as follows: control 50%; L-met 80%; L-cys 80%; PB 20%; L-met + PB 90% and L-cys + PB 100%. In a different experiment, using 16 mg/kg of Tl, tissue levels of this metal were analyzed. PB treatment statistically diminished Tl content in body organs and brain regions (P < 0.01). Whereas, separate treatments of L-met and L-cys failed to decrease Tl content in organs and brain regions; while its administration in combination with PB (L-met + PB and L-cys + PB groups) lowered Tl levels in body organs in the same extent as PB group. Results indicate that L-met and L-cys administered alone or in combination with PB should not be considered suitable treatments against acute Tl toxic effects because this strategy failed to prevent mortality and Tl accumulation in brain. (orig.)

  19. Reproductive toxicity testing of vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccines play a major role in the prevention of human birth defects by protecting the pregnant woman from teratogenic or otherwise harmful infections. Until now, it has not been common practice to perform preclinical developmental toxicity tests for new vaccines. Despite the excellent safety record of vaccines, increased attention is now being given to the feasibility of screening new vaccines for developmental hazards in animals before their use in humans. Contrary to previous assumptions, many vaccines are now given to potentially pregnant women. Any new components of the vaccine formulation (adjuvants, excipients, stabilisers, preservatives, etc...) could also be tested for influences on development, although based on past experience the risks are limited by the very low dosages used. The conferred immunity following vaccination lasts for several years. Therefore, the developing conceptus may theoretically be exposed to the induced antibodies and/or sensitised T-cells, even if the pregnant woman was last vaccinated during childhood (particularly if she encounters the antigen during pregnancy through exposure to infection). However, it should be kept in mind that viral or bacterial infections represent a higher risk for a pregnant woman than the potential adverse effects related to vaccination or the associated immune response. Non-clinical safety studies may be employed as an aid for hazard identification. In these studies interactions of the vaccine with the maternal immune system or with the developmental systems of the offspring are considered. Post-natal examinations are necessary to detect all possible manifestations of developmental toxicity, such as effects on the immune system. Species selection for the preclinical studies is based on immunogenicity to the vaccine and the relative timing and rate of transfer of maternal antibodies to the offspring. A single study design is proposed for the pre- and post-natal developmental assessments of vaccines in

  20. Investigation of toxic metabolites during drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a significant human health problem. Any organ system can be affected, including the liver, skin and kidney. Drug-induced liver injury is the most frequent reason for the withdrawal of an approved drug from the market, and it also accounts for up to 50% of cases of acute liver failure. The clinical picture is often diverse, even for the same drug. Mild, asymptomatic effects occur at a relatively high frequency with a number of drugs. Idiosyncratic toxicity is rare but potentially life-threatening. Many serious ADRs that occur in man are unpredictable from routine pathology and clinical chemistry in laboratory animals and are therefore poorly understood. The drug metabolist can determine the propensity of a novel chemical entity to either accumulate in the hepatocyte or undergo bioactivation in numerous model systems, from expressed enzymes, genetically engineered cells to whole animals. Bioactivation can be measured using trapping experiments with model nucleophiles or by measurement of non-specific covalent binding. The chemistry of the process is defined and the medicinal chemist can address the issue by seeking a metabolically stable pharmacophore to replace the potential toxicophore. However, we require a more fundamental understanding of the role of drug chemistry and biochemistry in ADRs. This requires knowledge of the ultimate toxin, signalling in cell defense and the sequence of molecular events, which ultimately lead to cell and tissue damage. It is imperative that such studies have a clinical level, but then translated into laboratory-based molecular studies. This will provide a deeper understanding of potential toxicophores for drug design and define candidate genes for pharmacogenomic approaches to individualized medicines

  1. Task 23 - background report on subsurface environmental issues relating to natural gas sweetening and dehydration operations. Topical report, February 1, 1994--February 28, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    This report describes information pertaining to environmental issues, toxicity, environmental transport, and fate of alkanolamines and glycols associated with natural gas sweetening and dehydration operations. Waste management associated with the operations is also discussed.

  2. Direct toxicity assessment - Methods, evaluation, interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruiz, Katalin; Fekete-Kertész, Ildikó; Kunglné-Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Hajdu, Csilla; Feigl, Viktória; Vaszita, Emese; Molnár, Mónika

    2016-09-01

    Direct toxicity assessment (DTA) results provide the scale of the actual adverse effect of contaminated environmental samples. DTA results are used in environmental risk management of contaminated water, soil and waste, without explicitly translating the results into chemical concentration. The end points are the same as in environmental toxicology in general, i.e. inhibition rate, decrease in the growth rate or in yield and the 'no effect' or the 'lowest effect' measurement points of the sample dilution-response curve. The measurement unit cannot be a concentration, since the contaminants and their content in the sample is unknown. Thus toxicity is expressed as the sample proportion causing a certain scale of inhibition or no inhibition. Another option for characterizing the scale of toxicity of an environmental sample is equivalencing. Toxicity equivalencing represents an interpretation tool which enables toxicity of unknown mixtures of chemicals be converted into the concentration of an equivalently toxic reference substance. Toxicity equivalencing, (i.e. expressing the toxicity of unknown contaminants as the concentration of the reference) makes DTA results better understandable for non-ecotoxicologists and other professionals educated and thinking based on the chemical model. This paper describes and discusses the role, the principles, the methodology and the interpretation of direct toxicity assessment (DTA) with the aim to contribute to the understanding of the necessity to integrate DTA results into environmental management of contaminated soil and water. The paper also introduces the benefits of the toxicity equivalency method. The use of DTA is illustrated through two case studies. The first case study focuses on DTA of treated wastewater with the aim to characterize the treatment efficacy of a biological wastewater treatment plant by frequent bioassaying. The second case study applied DTA to investigate the cover layers of two bauxite residue (red mud

  3. Modern Issues in Food Safety-A Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James N Seiber

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There is much current interest worldwide in food safety.This results in large part from well publicized outbreaks due to foodborne pathogens,chemical food safety related to pesticides,and from persistent organic pollutants and other synthetic contaminants.Additionally,the melamine adulteration issue,acrylamide and other processing-induced toxicants in foods,petroleum hydrocarbons associated with oil spills in the oceans and seafood safety,mycotoxins and other natural contaminants in a variety of foods,and the perceived risks associated with foods improved by genetic modification or those protected by irradiation contribute to concerns over the safety of the food supply.

  4. Toxicity of Pesticides. Agrichemical Fact Sheet 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Winand K.

    This fact sheet gives the acute oral and dermal toxicity (LD 50) of over 250 pesticides in lab animals. The chemicals are categorized as fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, or miscellaneous compounds. One or more trade names are given for each pesticide. In addition, a brief explanation of toxicity determination is given. (BB)

  5. Late toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this study is to describe and classify chronic complications due to radiotherapy in breast cancer. Also the impact of radiotherapy on the quality of life of patients is evaluated. Materials and methods: 50 patients with breast cancer at early stages (78% in situ, 22% I and II) treated with radiotherapy in breast volume plus boost (45/50 Gy + 18/20 Gy) with a follow up over 5 years. Acute toxicities were found retrospectively and chronic toxicities were assessed though physical examination and review of complementary studies. To facilitate data collection, pre printed forms were used. Bibliographic searches were made. Results: 10% received chemotherapy and 64% tamoxifen. The predominant chronic toxicity were found in skin (66%), although grade I and II (hyperpigmentation 26%, dryness 22%, telangiectasia 10% fibrosis, 4%, other 4%). A 50% of the patients showed hypoesthesia in ipsilateral upper limb. The other toxicities were presented in low rate and magnitude: mastodynia 16%; actinic pneumonitis 4%, pyrosis 4%, Tachycardia 2%, among others. Of the patients with acute toxicity, only 30% were grade III. The 70% of the patients had a positive impact of radiotherapy on quality of life. Conclusions: We found low rates and degrees of late toxicity. It was noticed a relationship between acute and chronic toxicity, because those who presented adverse effects during treatment developed late effects. It reflects the importance of integrating monitoring as part of radiation treatment. It should be adopted a single score of late toxicity measurement to unify data from different series. (authors)

  6. Cadmium Toxicity to Ringed Seals (Phoca hispida)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Christian; Dietz, R.; Riget, F. F.;

    Cadmium concentrations in kidneys from ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from North West Greenland (Qaanaaq) are high. Concentrations range at level known to induce renal toxic effects (mainly tubulopathy) and demineralisation (osteopenia) of the skeletal system (Fanconi's Syndrome) in humans as well...... the absence of toxic effects of cadmium in ringed seal...

  7. Save the Bay's "Toxic Diet" Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Diana

    1994-01-01

    Although progress has been made in curbing industrial pollutants in larger communities, small, nonindustrial communities lack strategies for reducing unregulated toxic sources to the influent stream. This article outlines one environmental organization's model for reducing these toxic sources that can be used to help small communities nationwide.…

  8. Health risks associated with inhaled nasal toxicants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feron, V.J.; Arts, J.H.E.; Kuper, C.F.; Slootweg, P.J.; Woutersen, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Health risks of inhaled nasal toxicants were reviewed with emphasis on chemically induced nasal lesions in humans, sensory irritation, olfactory and trigeminal nerve toxicity, nasal immunopathology and carcinogenesis, nasal responses to chemical mixtures, in vitro models, and nasal dosimetry- and me

  9. 40 CFR 798.2250 - Dermal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., toxic effects. (7) Preparation of animal skin. (i) Shortly before testing, fur shall be clipped from the... (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Subchronic Exposure § 798.2250 Dermal toxicity. (a) Purpose. In... acute testing. The subchronic dermal study has been designed to permit the determination of the...

  10. National Toxic Substance Incidents Program (NTSIP)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-02-03

    This podcast gives an overview of the three components of the National Toxic Substance Incidents Program: state surveillance, national database, and response teams.  Created: 2/3/2011 by Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.   Date Released: 2/3/2011.

  11. Hypokalemia secondary to capecitabine: a hidden toxicity?

    OpenAIRE

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Fekrazad, Mohammad Houman; Ledbetter, Leslie; Diasio, Robert B

    2007-01-01

    Background Hyopkalemia is a listed toxicity in the capecitabine (Xeloda®; Roche, Nutley, NJ) package insert. However, the incidence and severity of this toxicity is not known. Methods We performed a retrospective evaluation of hypokalemia in 77 patients, who received capecitabine for gastrointestinal malignancies between April 2002 and November 2004. Hypokalemia was defined as K+ level

  12. Psychosis as Harbinger of Phenytoin Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borasi, Manish; Verma, R. Pravin; Gupta, Sumit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Psychosis with phenytoin use has earlier been reported only in the context of Vitamin B12 or folic acid deficiency. We report a rare case of phenytoin toxicity manifesting as psychosis in the absence of Vitamin deficiency. The importance of recognition of psychosis as a harbinger of phenytoin toxicity and implications for management are discussed. PMID:26862279

  13. Toxicity identification evaluation of cosmetics industry wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Elisa Dias; Mounteer, Ann H; Leão, Lucas Henrique de Souza; Bahia, Renata Cibele Barros; Campos, Izabella Maria Ferreira

    2013-01-15

    The cosmetics industry has shown steady growth in many developing countries over the past several years, yet little research exists on toxicity of wastewaters it generates. This study describes a toxicity identification evaluation conducted on wastewater from a small Brazilian hair care products manufacturing plant. Physicochemical and ecotoxicological analyses of three wastewater treatment plant inlet and outlet samples collected over a six month period revealed inefficient operation of the treatment system and thus treated wastewater organic matter, suspended solids and surfactants contents consistently exceeded discharge limits. Treated wastewater also presented high acute toxicity to Daphnia similis and chronic toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. This toxicity was associated with suspended solids, volatile or sublatable and non-polar to moderately polar organic compounds that could be recovered in filtration and aeration residues. Seven surfactants used in the largest quantities in the production process were highly toxic to P. subcapitata and D. similis. These results indicated that surfactants, important production raw materials, are a probable source of toxicity, although other possible sources, such as fragrances, should not be discarded. Improved treatment plant operational control may reduce toxicity and lower impact of wastewater discharge to receiving waters. PMID:23270957

  14. Streptococcus pyogenes toxic-shock syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes, R; Diogo, M; Carvalho, A; Pimentel, T.; Oliveira, J

    2011-01-01

    Recently there has been an exponential increase in invasive infections caused by Streptococcus ß hemolyticcus group A. In about one third of cases they are complicated by toxic shock syndrome, characterized by septic shock and multiorgan failure. The authors, by their rarity, report a case of bacteraemia caused by Streptococcus pyogenes complicated by toxic shock syndrome.

  15. Determination of toxic elements in Malaysian foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project is concentrating on the analysis of toxic elements content in seafoods including fishes, mussel, squid and prawn. Samples were collected from various places throughout Malay Peninsular. Samples were prepared according to RCA research protocol - nuclear techniques for toxic element in foodstuffs. Techniques used for elemental analysis were neutron activation analysis (instrumental and radiochemical) and anodic stripping voltametry. (author). 9 refs, 9 tabs

  16. Emerging Environmental Justice Issues in Nuclear Power and Radioactive Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Kyne

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear hazards, linked to both U.S. weapons programs and civilian nuclear power, pose substantial environment justice issues. Nuclear power plant (NPP reactors produce low-level ionizing radiation, high level nuclear waste, and are subject to catastrophic contamination events. Justice concerns include plant locations and the large potentially exposed populations, as well as issues in siting, nuclear safety, and barriers to public participation. Other justice issues relate to extensive contamination in the U.S. nuclear weapons complex, and the mining and processing industries that have supported it. To approach the topic, first we discuss distributional justice issues of NPP sites in the U.S. and related procedural injustices in siting, operation, and emergency preparedness. Then we discuss justice concerns involving the U.S. nuclear weapons complex and the ways that uranium mining, processing, and weapons development have affected those living downwind, including a substantial American Indian population. Next we examine the problem of high-level nuclear waste and the risk implications of the lack of secure long-term storage. The handling and deposition of toxic nuclear wastes pose new transgenerational justice issues of unprecedented duration, in comparison to any other industry. Finally, we discuss the persistent risks of nuclear technologies and renewable energy alternatives.

  17. Emerging Environmental Justice Issues in Nuclear Power and Radioactive Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyne, Dean; Bolin, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear hazards, linked to both U.S. weapons programs and civilian nuclear power, pose substantial environment justice issues. Nuclear power plant (NPP) reactors produce low-level ionizing radiation, high level nuclear waste, and are subject to catastrophic contamination events. Justice concerns include plant locations and the large potentially exposed populations, as well as issues in siting, nuclear safety, and barriers to public participation. Other justice issues relate to extensive contamination in the U.S. nuclear weapons complex, and the mining and processing industries that have supported it. To approach the topic, first we discuss distributional justice issues of NPP sites in the U.S. and related procedural injustices in siting, operation, and emergency preparedness. Then we discuss justice concerns involving the U.S. nuclear weapons complex and the ways that uranium mining, processing, and weapons development have affected those living downwind, including a substantial American Indian population. Next we examine the problem of high-level nuclear waste and the risk implications of the lack of secure long-term storage. The handling and deposition of toxic nuclear wastes pose new transgenerational justice issues of unprecedented duration, in comparison to any other industry. Finally, we discuss the persistent risks of nuclear technologies and renewable energy alternatives. PMID:27420080

  18. Emerging Environmental Justice Issues in Nuclear Power and Radioactive Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyne, Dean; Bolin, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear hazards, linked to both U.S. weapons programs and civilian nuclear power, pose substantial environment justice issues. Nuclear power plant (NPP) reactors produce low-level ionizing radiation, high level nuclear waste, and are subject to catastrophic contamination events. Justice concerns include plant locations and the large potentially exposed populations, as well as issues in siting, nuclear safety, and barriers to public participation. Other justice issues relate to extensive contamination in the U.S. nuclear weapons complex, and the mining and processing industries that have supported it. To approach the topic, first we discuss distributional justice issues of NPP sites in the U.S. and related procedural injustices in siting, operation, and emergency preparedness. Then we discuss justice concerns involving the U.S. nuclear weapons complex and the ways that uranium mining, processing, and weapons development have affected those living downwind, including a substantial American Indian population. Next we examine the problem of high-level nuclear waste and the risk implications of the lack of secure long-term storage. The handling and deposition of toxic nuclear wastes pose new transgenerational justice issues of unprecedented duration, in comparison to any other industry. Finally, we discuss the persistent risks of nuclear technologies and renewable energy alternatives. PMID:27420080

  19. Professional Emergence on Transnational Issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard; Tsingou, Eleni

    2015-01-01

    . These approaches are important in identifying the sources of what becomes established, but less geared to identifying interactions that are emergent. This article extends a linked ecologies approach to emergence, arguing that interaction on transnational issues should first be understood by how they are...... what are included and excluded. A linked ecologies approach provides a fruitful way of identifying actors and distinctions on issues that are emergent. These conceptual and methodological points are demonstrated through a study of how medical experts, demographers, and economists forge issue...

  20. Recent Water Issues in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The rapid urbanization process in China over the past thirty years has significantly improved the living standards of Chinese people. But it also poses severe environmental pressure on environment including water. This paper discusses the water issues like urban water supply, water pollution and water quality of water system in the context of the rapid urbanization process in China. It then proposes strategic measures to tackle those water issues and discusses the progress of providing safe drinking water and protecting water resources by new technologies in-cluding membrane technology. It concludes that water is a global issue and should be tackled by global community together.

  1. Toxicity of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Research strategies and implications for nanomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are one of the most versatile and safe nanoparticles in a wide variety of biomedical applications. In the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate the potential adverse biological effects and safety issues associated with SPIONs, which is essential for the development of next-generation SPIONs and for continued progress in translational research. In this mini review, we summarize recent developments in toxicity studies on SPIONs, focusing on the relationship between the physicochemical properties of SPIONs and their induced toxic biological responses for a better toxicological understanding of SPIONs. (topical review - magnetism, magnetic materials, and interdisciplinary research)

  2. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  3. Toxic Plant Resources in Panxi Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yun; SU Chunjiang; ZHENG Yuanchang

    2007-01-01

    Panxi Area is abundant in plant resources, among which toxic plants are of great value in terms of exploitation. This paper is an initiative study (via field as well as literature investigation) of the categories, distributions, and reserves of toxic plant resources in Panxi Area. The study reveals that there are 51 families (210 species) of toxic plants evenly distributed in Panxi Area, of which more than 40 species grow in all counties in the area, and more than 14 species total a reserve more than 1.0×105kg. These toxic plants are of great applications to medicine, gardening, biopesticide industry, environmental engineering, and oil manufacturing. Rhododendron molle, Anisodus acutangulus, Arisaema erubesocens, Stellera chamaejasme, Rhytolacca acinosa, Rheum officinale, and Azadiralta indica etc are the typical toxic plants with great value of exploitation in Panxi Area.

  4. Purified terephthalic acid wastewater biodegradation and toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xu-xiang; LUO Xiang; GU Ji-dong; WAN Yu-qiu; CHENG Shu-pei; SUN Shi-lei; ZHU Cheng-jun; LI Wei-xin; ZHANG Xiao-chun; WANG Gui-lin; LU Jian-hua

    2005-01-01

    The biodegradation and toxicity of the purified terephthalic acid(PTA) processing wastewater was researched at NJYZ pilot with the fusant strain Fhhh in the carrier activated sludge process(CASP). Sludge loading rate(SLR) for Fhhh to COD of the wastewater was 1.09 d-1 and to PTA in the wastewater was 0.29 d-1. The results of bioassay at the pilot and calculation with software Ebis3 showed that the 48h-LC50 (median lethal concentration) to Daphnia magna for the PTA concentration in the wastewater was only 1/10 of that for the chemical PTA. There were 5 kinds of benzoate pollutants and their toxicities existing in the wastewater at least. The toxicity parameter value of the pure chemical PTA cannot be used to predicate the PTA wastewater toxicity. The toxicity of the NJYZ PTA wastewater will be discussed in detail in this paper.

  5. Mitochondria as target of Quantum dots toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The present work investigated the toxicity of CdTe QDs on the function of mitochondria isolated from rat livers. → These results will help us learn more about QDs toxicity at subcellular (mitochondrial) level. → QDs toxicity on mitochondria indicates that the QDs require to be further improved before they can be safely used in clinic. - Abstract: Quantum dots (QDs) hold great promise in many biological applications, with the persistence of safety concerns about the environment and human health. The present work investigated the potential toxicity of CdTe QDs on the function of mitochondria isolated from rat livers by examining mitochondrial respiration, swelling, and lipid peroxidation. We observed that QDs can significantly affect the mitochondrial membrane properties, bioenergetics and induce mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). These results will help us learn more about QDs toxicity at subcellular (mitochondrial) level.

  6. High-Throughput Cell Toxicity Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, David; McWilliams, Lisa; Wigglesworth, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Understanding compound-driven cell toxicity is vitally important for all drug discovery approaches. With high-throughput screening (HTS) being the key strategy to find hit and lead compounds for drug discovery projects in the pharmaceutical industry [1], an understanding of the cell toxicity profile of hit molecules from HTS activities is fundamentally important. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in phenotypic drug discovery and these cell-based assays are now being run in HTS labs on ever increasing numbers of compounds. As the use of cell assays increases the ability to measure toxicity of compounds on a large scale becomes increasingly important to ensure that false hits are not progressed and that compounds do not carry forward a toxic liability that may cause them to fail at later stages of a project. Here we describe methods employed in the AstraZeneca HTS laboratory to carry out very large scale cell toxicity screening. PMID:27317000

  7. Mitochondria as target of Quantum dots toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiahan; Zhang, Yue; Xiao, Qi; Tian, Fangfang; Liu, Xiaorong; Li, Ran; Zhao, Guangyuan; Jiang, Fenglei [State Key Laboratory of Virology and Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Liu, Yi, E-mail: yiliuchem@whu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology and Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: {yields} The present work investigated the toxicity of CdTe QDs on the function of mitochondria isolated from rat livers. {yields} These results will help us learn more about QDs toxicity at subcellular (mitochondrial) level. {yields} QDs toxicity on mitochondria indicates that the QDs require to be further improved before they can be safely used in clinic. - Abstract: Quantum dots (QDs) hold great promise in many biological applications, with the persistence of safety concerns about the environment and human health. The present work investigated the potential toxicity of CdTe QDs on the function of mitochondria isolated from rat livers by examining mitochondrial respiration, swelling, and lipid peroxidation. We observed that QDs can significantly affect the mitochondrial membrane properties, bioenergetics and induce mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). These results will help us learn more about QDs toxicity at subcellular (mitochondrial) level.

  8. Radiation treatment of toxic chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were commercially produced from 1920s as complex mixtures containing multiple isomers for a variety of applications. They are very toxic, chemically stable and resist microbial, photochemical, chemical, and thermal degradation. The public, legal, and scientific concerns about PCBs arose from research indicating they were environmental contaminants that had a potential to adversely impact the environment, and, therefore, were undesirable as commercial products. Eventually, most producers reduced or stopped production of PCBs in the 1970s. Stockholm convention on POPs (Persistent Organic Pollutants), which was effective on May 2004 and 151 nations including Korea were joined on June 2005, asked to dispose of PCBs by 2028 with environmental friendly methods. Korean government also has declared to conduct by 2015. According to the Environmental law of Korea, over 2 ppm of PCBs has to be decomposed by legal methods of incineration and thermal destruction. But those are inapplicable owing to the environmental groups. KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) has recently developed a remarkable technology for radiation treatment of toxic chemicals including chlorides using an electron beam accelerator. Electron beam accelerator of 2.5 MeV energy and 100 kW power capacity was used to decompose of PCBs having been used as a commercial transformer oil for more than 30 years. The oil were irradiated with ∼ 0.1 percent of TEA (Triethyl Amin) to make chloride ion aparted off from the PCBs into precipitate at the conditions of normal temperature and pressure. The concentrations of PCBs were measured by GC (Gas Chromatography) with ECD (Electron Capture Detector) following the KS (Korean Standard) test procedure. Electron beam should be a useful tool for environmental conservation. Residual concentrations of PCBs after irradiation were depended on the absorption dose of electron beam energy. Advantages comparing to other methods such as

  9. Rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xu; Rong, Le; Ng, Wei Cheng; Ong, Cynthia; Baeg, Gyeong Hun; Zhang, Wenlin; Lee, Si Ni; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Dai, Yanjun; Tong, Yen Wah; Neoh, Koon Gee; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    The solid residues including bottom ashes and fly ashes produced by waste gasification technology could be reused as secondary raw materials. However, the applications and utilizations of these ashes are very often restricted by their toxicity. Therefore, toxicity screening of ash is the primary condition for reusing the ash. In this manuscript, we establish a standard for rapid screening of gasification ashes on the basis of in vitro and in vivo testing, and henceforth guide the proper disposal of the ashes. We used three different test models comprising human cell lines (liver and lung cells), Drosophila melanogaster and Daphnia magna to examine the toxicity of six different types of ashes. For each ash, different leachate concentrations were used to examine the toxicity, with C0 being the original extracted leachate concentration, while C/C0 being subsequent diluted concentrations. The IC50 for each leachate was also quantified for use as an index to classify toxicity levels. The results demonstrated that the toxicity evaluation of different types of ashes using different models is consistent with each other. As the different models show consistent qualitative results, we chose one or two of the models (liver cells or lung cells models) as the standard for rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes. We may classify the gasification ashes into three categories according to the IC50, 24h value on liver cells or lung cells models, namely "toxic level I" (IC50, 24h>C/C0=0.5), "toxic level II" (C/C0=0.05types of ashes generated in gasification plants every day. Subsequently, appropriate disposal methods can be recommended for each toxicity category. PMID:26923299

  10. NST Quarterly. October 1996 issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NST Quarterly reports current development in Nuclear Science and Technology in Malaysia. In this issue it highlights MINT activities in latex vulcanization (first RVNRL-based rubber gloves produced in Malaysia), tank floor scanning system (TAFLOSS), incineration and radiotherapeutic agent

  11. Professional Issues In Software Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Bott, Frank; Eaton, Jack; Rowland, Diane

    2000-01-01

    An comprehensive text covering all the issues that software engineers now have to take into account apart from the technical side of things. Includes information on the legal, professional and commercial context in which they work.

  12. SAT project introduction: management issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Management issues of introducing SAT Project include main objectives and expectations; SAT goal and management; major phases of SAT implementation; project quality assurance; SAT based training system and procedures; role of the project team qualifications

  13. Health Issues of Premature Babies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & Colic Diapers & Clothing Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Preemie > Health Issues ...

  14. Issues in Financing the Superfund

    OpenAIRE

    Brazell, David W.; Gerardi, Geraldine

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of Superfund financing sources and litigation costs, and review of design issues related to an insurer fee that would pay for proposed litigation reform. Benefits-received, ability-to-pay, and economic efficiency evaluations are included.

  15. Issues on Media and Entertainment

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Latre, F.J. (Francisco Javier)

    2006-01-01

    An account of some of the major issues faced by media and entertainment companies at the beginning of the 21st century, and their need to balance talent and creativity, business goals and social responsibility.

  16. Major Issues in School Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, William P.

    1969-01-01

    Interprets the contemporary issues in school finance as functions of three phenomena: (1) Educational needs of individuals and society, (2) governance, and (3) ecological characteristics of the population. (DE)

  17. NST Quarterly. July 1996 issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NST Quarterly reports current development in Nuclear Science and Technology in Malaysia. In this issue it highlights MINT activities in in-vitro mutagenesis of ornamental plants, soil erosion studies and animal feed production from agricultural waste

  18. Issue Professionals in Transnational Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Lasse Folke; Seabrooke, Leonard

    Professionals and organizations both seek to exploit and cooperate with each other. Professionals seek alliances in their own peer networks while organizations do the same. These networks carry not only information that inform incentives but norms about appropriate forms of governance and practices...... that guide how they actually work. In this paper we outline how professionals and organizations operate in two-level networks through a focus on issue control over issues of transnational governance. As such, this interdisciplinary paper brings together insights from Organization Studies and...... International Relations to discuss how professionals and organizations battle over issue control through the designation of tasks and the creation of overlapping networks. We outline the emergence of ‘issue professionals’ and how they attempt network management. We do so via a case on transnational...

  19. Commentary: Cultural Issues in Decisionmaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muaygil, Ruaim

    2016-04-01

    This case presents several fundamental ethical issues. The first issue is the patient's refusal of treatment (a nasogastric tube [NGT] insertion). Second, the patient's refusal of a seemingly beneficial treatment, combined with her medical history, ultimately necessitates an assessment of her decisionmaking capacity. Third, the sister's reluctance to participate in decisionmaking requires a discussion of appropriate surrogate decisionmakers. Finally, the main ethical component to this case is a cultural one, which should be addressed appropriately. PMID:26957460

  20. Ethical issues in physical therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare professionals can be confronted with a wide range of ethical and regulatory issues in today’s ever-changing practice environments. While achieving best practice standards, physical therapists may need to compromise what is best for patients due to fiscally driven rules, regulations, and limited benefits. Scenarios may surface where ethical issues and associated dilemmas become paramount between what is versus what should be. A challenge that should be in the forefront of profession...

  1. Current international issues in decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1999, the Italian Environmental Protection authorities (ANPA at that time) hosted in Rome a Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) meeting on the Regulatory Aspects of Decommissioning. This 'stock-taking' conference heard views from regulatory authorities, the decommissioning industry, waste management organisations and other relevant industrial sectors (e.g. the scrap metal industry) regarding the issues and aspects of decommissioning that should be further addressed, particularly at an international level. From this conference, six issues of relevance were identified which, since that time, have been addressed within the framework of the NEA. These issues are: - Decommissioning policies and strategies; - Waste management and materials reuse considerations; - Authorised release of sites and facilities; - Securing long-term funding and responsibility; - Framework for safety regulation of decommissioning; - Research and development in decommissioning. The NEA has focused on the international aspects of these issues, and on the roles of national governments in addressing the national and international aspects of these issues. This paper will present an overview of the NEA's findings in these areas. Realizing that these issues are important to the work of other international organisations, the NEA has tried to assess and use as appropriate the work of others in discussing these issues. As such, a brief review of relevant work at other international organisations will be presented. Based on its work, and in order to further advance these issues, the NEA is planning a second workshop on the Regulatory Aspects of Decommissioning, which will again be hosted by the Italian authorities in Rome, and will be held during the second half of 2004. (author)

  2. Editorial Volume 9, Issue 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monir Mir

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There are five excellent studies which are published in this issue of Australasian Accounting, Banking and Finance Journal (AABFJ. As summarised below, out of these five studies, four of the studies have investigated and explored various accounting, finance and accountability issues of emerging and developing economies. Although more needs to be done, it is encouraging to observe that researchers from developing and emerging economies have been making progress in disseminating their research findings to the interested global communities.

  3. Editorial Volume 9, Issue 2

    OpenAIRE

    Monir Mir

    2015-01-01

    There are five excellent studies which are published in this issue of Australasian Accounting, Banking and Finance Journal (AABFJ). As summarised below, out of these five studies, four of the studies have investigated and explored various accounting, finance and accountability issues of emerging and developing economies. Although more needs to be done, it is encouraging to observe that researchers from developing and emerging economies have been making progress in disseminating their research...

  4. Australian uranium - the environmental issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal theme of this paper is the changing pattern of issues which have dominated the environmental debate over uranium mining in Australia. These issues include the safeguards policy, a domestic energy policy, nuclear waste, economic development, particular environmental problems of the Alligator Rivers region and the social impact of uranium mining on the Aborigines. The special administrative arrangements which the Government has established for environmental protection in the Alligator Rivers region are outlined

  5. Issues in Modelling Monetary Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Malcolm Edey; John Romalis

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews issues in the econometric modelling of monetary policy in the light of recent experience and research. Two main sets of issues are covered: first, the operation of policy including the specification of the instrument and objectives; and second, the transmission of monetary policy effects to the wider economy. There is also a discussion of the inherent limitations on the ability to quantify the role of monetary policy in econometric models.

  6. DEATH PENALTY: HUMAN RIGHT ISSUES

    OpenAIRE

    Rokhvadze, R.

    2013-01-01

    The current paper is dedicated to the Interpretation issues of the USA death penalty law. It expends on the different approaches to the law and its understanding by the lawyers, lawmakers, citizens, jury and judges. The analysis of Law System in the USA is exemplified by the exploration of cases, where the rights of suspect and death penalty issues are concerned. Is the death sentence legal, does it contribute to the liberal democratic setting in the USA, is it constitutional? These and many ...

  7. Contemporary Issues In International Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, M T

    1984-01-01

    The proposition is made that a fundamental issue for many marketing-oriented companies is to formulate competitive strategies for entering and consolidating their foothold in international markets. This poses a challenge for academic researchers to also address themselves to strategic issues, if necessary by collaborative research programmes. The concept of marketing as a customer oriented, integrative and forward looking activity at the interface with the environment is applied to the design...

  8. Key issues in managed competition.

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, D W

    1994-01-01

    All managed competition proposals for health system reform must confront several key issues. The premiums paid to health care purchasing cooperatives will need to be subsidized for those who cannot pay full fare; the amount and sources of the subsidies are controversial political issues. The payments passed on by purchasing cooperatives to health plans must be risk adjusted to account for differences in the health care needs of their enrolled populations. This is essential to create a level p...

  9. YOUNG INVESTIGATOR SPECIAL ISSUE (Editorial)

    OpenAIRE

    Eric Eils; Jukka A. Salmi; Mustafa Atalay

    2004-01-01

    Welcome to the first Young Investigator Special Issue of the Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (JSSM). The JSSM family is proud to start this new service to the Sport Science community and to young researchers. The background in starting this issue was the observation that large amounts of high-quality research is conducted every year by students and young investigators, but often remains solely in local university libraries and never reaches the scientific community or databases. In ...

  10. Security issues affecting travel industry

    OpenAIRE

    Sadykova, Margarita

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the possible correlation between the security issues and travel industry with regards to political turbulences from the local to the global level as well as various forms of political instability. The hypothesis statement is that security issues, mainly political instability in a form of terrorism, civil unrest and wars, significantly deter tourist arrivals in a given destination. The first two chapters discuss the problem from the theoretical point of view...

  11. Business Ethics: Some Theoretical Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Lluka, Valon

    2010-01-01

    Ethics can be defined as a process of evaluating actions according to moral principal of values. Throughout the centuries people were trying to choose between profit and moral. Perhaps, some of them obtain both, but every time it could have roused ethical issues. Those issues concern fairness, justice, rightness or wrongness; as a result it can only be resolved according to ethical standards. Setting the ethical standards for the way of doing business in corporation is primarily task of m...

  12. Pesticide Toxicity Index: a tool for assessing potential toxicity of pesticide mixtures to freshwater aquatic organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Norman, Julia E.; Moran, Patrick W.; Martin, Jeffrey D.; Stone, Wesley W.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide mixtures are common in streams with agricultural or urban influence in the watershed. The Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) is a screening tool to assess potential aquatic toxicity of complex pesticide mixtures by combining measures of pesticide exposure and acute toxicity in an additive toxic-unit model. The PTI is determined separately for fish, cladocerans, and benthic invertebrates. This study expands the number of pesticides and degradates included in previous editions of the PTI from 124 to 492 pesticides and degradates, and includes two types of PTI for use in different applications, depending on study objectives. The Median-PTI was calculated from median toxicity values for individual pesticides, so is robust to outliers and is appropriate for comparing relative potential toxicity among samples, sites, or pesticides. The Sensitive-PTI uses the 5th percentile of available toxicity values, so is a more sensitive screening-level indicator of potential toxicity. PTI predictions of toxicity in environmental samples were tested using data aggregated from published field studies that measured pesticide concentrations and toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia in ambient stream water. C. dubia survival was reduced to ≤ 50% of controls in 44% of samples with Median-PTI values of 0.1–1, and to 0% in 96% of samples with Median-PTI values > 1. The PTI is a relative, but quantitative, indicator of potential toxicity that can be used to evaluate relationships between pesticide exposure and biological condition.

  13. The parenteral toxicity of Cyclofem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, K M

    1994-04-01

    The intraperitoneal median lethal dose of Cyclofem [Cyclo-Provera, C-P; depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (Depo-Provera, DMPA)+estradiol cypionate (EC)] in mice was greater than 2500 mg/kg. The subcutaneous median lethal dose in mice and rats was greater than 1000 mg/kg. The suspension containing 50 mg/ml DMPA and 10 mg/ml EC used in all toxicology studies was not irritating to rabbit muscle. Chronic parenteral toxicity studies of Cyclofem were conducted in mice, rats and monkeys for 18, 22 and 24 months, respectively. Monthly doses were 2.5, 7.5 and 25 mg/kg Cyclofem in all species, 25 mg/kg DMPA and 25 mg/kg EC. Cyclofem was nontoxic but produced hormonal effects in all species. Decreased survival noted in the rodent studies was likely due to excessive EC dose. Mammary gland adenocarcinomas and pituitary adenomas were increased in the chronic rat study. Literature indicates the tumors were likely the result of the excessive hormone dose and were specific to rodents. In monkeys, Cyclofem was nontoxic, hormonally active, and noncarcinogenic at all doses including 50 times the human dose. PMID:8013218

  14. Toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents recommendations of a subcommittee of the Westinghouse M ampersand 0 Nuclear Facility Safety Committee concerning toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria. Two sets of criteria have been developed, one for use in the hazard classification of facilities, and the second for use in comparing risks in DOE non-reactor nuclear facility Safety Analysis Reports. The Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG) values are intended to provide estimates of concentration ranges for specific chemicals above which exposure would be expected to lead to adverse heath effects of increasing severity for ERPG-1, -2, and -3s. The subcommittee recommends that criteria for hazard class or risk range be based on ERPGs for all chemicals. Probability-based Incremental Cancer Risk (ICR) criteria are recommended for additional analyses of risks from all known or suspected human carcinogens. Criteria are given for both on-site and off-site exposure. The subcommittee also recommends that the 5-minute peak concentration be compared with the relevant criterion with no adjustment for exposure time. Since ERPGs are available for only a limited number of chemicals, the subcommittee has developed a proposed hierarchy of concentration limit parameters for the different criteria

  15. Rapidly Developing Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Oline Barrios Poulsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe cutaneous reactions with potentially fatal outcomes can have many different causes. The Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN are rare. They are characterized by a low incidence but high mortality, and drugs are most commonly implicated. Urgent active therapy is required. Prompt recognition and withdrawal of suspect drug and rapid intervention can result in favourable outcome. No further international guidelines for treatment exist, and much of the treatment relies on old or experimental concepts with no scientific evidence. We report on a 54-year-old man experiencing rapidly developing drug-induced severe TEN and presented multiorgan failure involving the respiratory and circulatory system, coagulopathy, and renal insufficiency. Detachment counted 30% of total body surface area (TBSA. SCORTEN = 5, indicating a mortality rate >90%. The patient was sedated and mechanically ventilated, supported with fluids and inotropes to maintain a stable circulation. Component therapy was guided by thromboelastography (TEG. The patient received plasmapheresis, and shock reversal treatment was initiated. He was transferred to a specialized intensive care burn unit within 24 hours from admittance. The initial care was continued, and hemodialysis was started. Pulmonary, circulatory, and renal sequelae resolved with intensive care, and re-epithelialization progressed slowly. The patient was discharged home on hospital day 19.

  16. An assessment of whole effluent toxicity testing as a means of regulating waters produced by the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 500 million barrels of produced water are discharged to Wyoming's surface waters by the oil and gas industry. This discharges are of two types: direct and indirect. The direct discharges have been issued NPDES permits requiring whole effluent toxicity testing. Toxicity testing requirements have not been incorporated into permits written for indirect discharges because of the applicability of toxicity testing for regulating these waters has not been determined. Preliminary testing has shown that most produced waters are toxic at the point of discharge because of high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, but that the toxicity of an indirect discharge is often lost before it reaches a receiving stream. Thus, whole effluent toxicity testing of an indirect discharge may be overly stringent, resulting in treatment or reinjection of the water or closure of the well. Any of these options would have severe economic consequences for oil producers and the state's agricultural industry. The purpose of this study was to determine whether whole effluent toxicity testing actually predicts the in-stream effects of indirect discharges on water quality and benthic invertebrate populations. The authors will report the results of short-term ambient toxicity tests and in-stream bioassessments performed upstream and downstream of six indirect discharges located in four drainages in Wyoming

  17. Environmental interactions with the toxicity of plant essential oils to the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D R; Sparagano, O A E; Port, G; Okello, E; Shiel, R S; Guy, J H

    2010-03-01

    The toxicity of a range of plant essential oils to the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer) (Acari: Dermanyssidae), a serious ectoparasitic pest of laying hens throughout Europe and elsewhere, was assessed in the laboratory. Dermanyssus gallinae may cause losses in egg production, anaemia and, in extreme cases, death of hens. With changes in legislation and consumer demand, alternatives to synthetic acaricides are needed to manage this pest. Fifty plant essential oils were selected for their toxicity to arthropods reported in the literature. Twenty-four of these essential oils were found to kill > 75% of adult D. gallinae in contact toxicity tests over a 24-h period at a rate of 0.21 mg/cm(2). Subsequent testing at lower rates showed that the essential oils of cade, manuka and thyme were especially toxic to adult D. gallinae. The toxicity of the seven most acaricidal essential oils was found to be stable at different temperatures likely to be encountered in commercial poultry housing (15 degrees C, 22 degrees C and 29 degrees C), although results suggest that humidity and dust might influence the toxicity of some of the oils tested. The toxicity of clove bud essential oil to D. gallinae, for example, was increased at high humidity and dust levels compared with ambient levels. The results suggest that certain essential oils may make effective botanical pesticides for use against D. gallinae, although it is likely that issues relating to the consistency of the toxic effect of some oils will determine which oils will be most effective in practice. PMID:20377725

  18. Plasma pyrolysis of toxic waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutberg, Ph G.

    2003-06-01

    The comparison of technical economic indexes of different waste treatment methods and plasma pyrolysis is presented in the paper. It testifies that plasma technologies are economically expedient for these purposes. Physical prerequisites allowing realizing plasma technologies are presented. Reliable and economical (70-120 Euro per ton of treated product) plasma generation is the basic condition of the technology realization. In this connection, various types of powerful generators of dense plasma (plasmatrons) in the range from 100 kW to 3 MW and temperature of plasma jets from 2000 to 10 000 K, and also physical processes taking place in electric-discharge chambers are examined. Differences between AC and DC electric arc plasma generators are analysed. Temperature in arcs of plasma generators varies from 6000 to 20 000 K, electron concentration is ne~(1014-1019 cm-3). Specific ware of electrodes in various types of plasma generators intended for long-time operation modes is (10-7-10-4) g C-1. Physicochemical processes in plasma reactors intended for waste treatment and pyrolysis are described. Different types of technological processes on plasma treatment and pyrolysis of waste are analysed. Estimation of present situation of physical investigations and technological developments in this area and predictions for nearest future are included. This article was scheduled to appear in issue 5 of Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion. To access this Special issue please follow this link: http://www.iop.org/EJ/toc/0741-3335/45/5

  19. [Clarification of molecular targets of dioxin toxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohyama, Chiharu

    2014-01-01

    Health effects associated with exposure to various chemicals have been extensively studied. However, in most cases, the molecular basis of the underlying mechanism has been elusive. Dioxin toxicity, which has raised a significant concern in society, was discovered to be mediated by a high-affinity receptor, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), more than three decades ago. This receptor has been established to be essential for the manifestation of various toxicities, such as carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity, developmental neurotoxicity, and immunotoxicity. However, it has not been clarified how AhR mediates such a wide variety of dioxin toxicities through AhR-dependent mechanisms. In recent years, several lines of experimental evidence have provided clues for opening the "black box" that contains the molecular mechanisms of dioxin action. In this review, I focus on dioxin toxicity phenotypes for which downstream molecular targets have begun to be elucidated. The toxicity phenotypes include impaired prostate development and hydronephrosis in mouse fetuses and pups, respectively, as well as abnormality in organogenesis in zebrafish embryos and adults. As the molecular basis of the tissue-specific endpoints of dioxin toxicity, dysregulation of AhR downstream pathways, such as signaling of prostanoid synthesis, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and signaling by receptors for inflammatory cytokines, are discussed. The new findings on the molecular targets of dioxin may provide clues to the prospective discovery of new molecular events associated with the growth and development of organs and pathogenesis of diseases. PMID:24476589

  20. Toxic material advisory report - 2-mercaptoethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernholc, N. M.; White, O. Jr.; Baloyi, R. S.; Silverstein, B. D.

    1983-03-01

    A review of the animal toxicity data for 2-ME is presented. The results revealed that chronic inhalation exposures at a concentration of 6 mg/m/sup 3/ produced decreased oxygen consumption, lymphopenia, and neutrophilia. Comparison of acute toxicity data for 2-ME with data of structurally similar compounds suggests that 2-ME may be 2.3 times more toxic than butanethiol (TLV = 0.5 ppM), 6.5 times more toxic than ethanethiol, and 6 times more toxic than propanethiol (TLV = 0.5 ppM) via oral administration but may be comparable to propanethiol and less toxic than butanethiol and ethanethiol by the inhalation route of exposure. The TLVs for ethanethiol, methanethiol, and butanethiol were based on discomfort to human volunteers rather than toxicity. Since 2-ME has many effects similar to those of the thiols discussed and its odor threshold falls in the range of other thiols, by analogy the exposure limit for 2-ME should be comparable to the TLVs for butanethiol and ethanethiol. An interim exposure limit (IEL) of 0.5 ppM for a time-weighted average concentration during an 8-hour work shift is recommended. As with other thiols, a nuisance problem due to 2-ME odors and complaints of odor may serve as a primary reason for controlling workplace concentrations.

  1. Toxicity of common ions to marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Produced waters from oil and gas drilling operations are typically very saline, and these may cause acute toxicity to marine organisms due to osmotic imbalances as well as to an excess or deficiency of specific common ions. In order to better understand the relationship between toxicity and ion concentration, laboratory toxicity tests were conducted using mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia), sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus), and inland silverside (Menidia beryllina). For each species the ionic concentration of standard laboratory water was proportionally increased or decreased to produce test solutions with a range of salinities. Organisms were exposed for 48 hours. Individual ions (sodium, potassium, calcium, magnetsium, strontium, chloride, bromide, sulfate, bicarbonate, and borate) were also manipulated to examine individual ion toxicity. The three test species differ in their tolerance of salinity. Mysid shrimp show a marked decrease in survival at salinities less than approximately 5 ppt. Both fish species tolerated low salinity water, however, silversides were less tolerant of saline waters (salinity greater than 40 ppt). There were also significant differences in the responses of the organisms to different ions. The results show that the salinity of the test solution may play an important role in the responses of the organisms to the produced water effluent. Predictable toxicity/ion relationships developed in this study can be used to estimate whether toxicity in a produced water is a result of common ions, salinity, or some other unknown toxicant

  2. Earth Day 1990: Lesson Plan and Home Survey--7-12. Energy, Solid Waste/Recycling, Toxics, Transportation, and Water with Fact Sheets and Action Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm-Shuett, Amy; Shuett, Greg

    The purpose of this 7-12 curriculum is to provide teachers and other educators with classroom lessons and home surveys that are a starting point for understanding five significant environmental issues - water, toxics, energy, transportation, and solid waste/recycling. While each of these environmental issues is complex and has far-reaching…

  3. Automated Test Systems for Toxic Vapor Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, C. B.; Hammond, T. A.; Schwindt, C. J.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Toxic Vapor Detection Laboratory (TVDL) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has been using Personal Computer based Data Acquisition and Control Systems (PCDAS) for about nine years. These systems control the generation of toxic vapors of known concentrations under controlled conditions of temperature and humidity. The PCDAS also logs the test conditions and the test article responses in data files for analysis by standard spreadsheets or custom programs. The PCDAS was originally developed to perform standardized qualification and acceptance tests in a search for a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) toxic vapor detector to replace the hydrazine detectors for the Space Shuttle launch pad. It has since become standard test equipment for the TVDL and is indispensable in producing calibration standards for the new hydrazine monitors at the 10 part per billion (ppb) level. The standard TVDL PCDAS can control two toxic vapor generators (TVG's) with three channels each and two flow/ temperature / humidity (FTH) controllers and it can record data from up to six toxic vapor detectors (TVD's) under test and can deliver flows from 5 to 50 liters per minute (L/m) at temperatures from near zero to 50 degrees Celsius (C) using an environmental chamber to maintain the sample temperature. The concentration range for toxic vapors depends on the permeation source installed in the TVG. The PCDAS can provide closed loop control of temperature and humidity to two sample vessels, typically one for zero gas and one for the standard gas. This is required at very low toxic vapor concentrations to minimize the time required to passivate the sample delivery system. Recently, there have been several requests for information about the PCDAS by other laboratories with similar needs, both on and off KSC. The purpose of this paper is to inform the toxic vapor detection community of the current status and planned upgrades to the automated testing of toxic vapor detectors at the

  4. Bioremediation of toxic substances by mercury resistant marine bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    De, J.; Sarkar, A.; Ramaiah, N.

    Bioremediation of toxic substances includes microbe-mediated enzymatic transformation of toxicants to non-toxic, often assimilable, forms. Mercury-resistant marine bacteria are found to be very promising in dealing with mercury, and a host of other...

  5. Enhanced toxic cloud knockdown spray system for decontamination applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betty, Rita G.; Tucker, Mark D.; Brockmann, John E.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Levin, Bruce L.; Leonard, Jonathan

    2011-09-06

    Methods and systems for knockdown and neutralization of toxic clouds of aerosolized chemical or biological warfare (CBW) agents and toxic industrial chemicals using a non-toxic, non-corrosive aqueous decontamination formulation.

  6. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A KOLKER; AF SAROFIM; CL SENIOR; FE HUGGINS; GP HUFFMAN; I OLMEZ; J LIGHTY; JOL WENDT; JOSEPH J HELBLE; MR AMES; N YAP; R FINKELMAN; T PANAGIOTOU; W SEAMES

    1998-12-08

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, the Lignite Research Council, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NO combustion systems, and new power generation x plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the reporting period from 1 July 1998 through 30 September 1998. During this period distribution of all three Phase II coals was completed. Standard analyses for the whole coal samples were also completed. Mössbauer analysis of all project coals and fractions received to date has been completed in order to obtain details of the iron mineralogy. The analyses of arsenic XAFS data for two of the project coals and for some high arsenic coals have been completed. Duplicate splits of the Ohio 5,6,7 and North Dakota lignite samples were taken through all four steps of the selective leaching procedure. Leaching analysis of the Wyodak coal has recently commenced. Preparation of polished coal/epoxy pellets for probe/SEM studies is underway. Some exploratory mercury LIII XAFS work was

  7. In vivo toxicity study of Lantana camara

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Badakhshan Mahdi Pour; Sreenivasan Sasidharan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the toxicity of methanol extract of various parts (Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower and Fruit) of Lantana camara(L. Camara) in Artemia salina. Methods: The methanol extracts of L. camara were tested for in vivo brine shrimp lethality assay. Results: All the tested extract exhibited very low toxicity on brine shrimp larva. The results showed that the root extract was the most toxic part of L. camara and may have potential as anticancer agent. Conclusions:Methanolic extract of L. camara is relatively safe on short-term exposure.

  8. Toxicity of amphetamines: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Márcia; Carmo, Helena; Costa, Vera Marisa; Capela, João Paulo; Pontes, Helena; Remião, Fernando; Carvalho, Félix; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes

    2012-08-01

    Amphetamines represent a class of psychotropic compounds, widely abused for their stimulant, euphoric, anorectic, and, in some cases, emphathogenic, entactogenic, and hallucinogenic properties. These compounds derive from the β-phenylethylamine core structure and are kinetically and dynamically characterized by easily crossing the blood-brain barrier, to resist brain biotransformation and to release monoamine neurotransmitters from nerve endings. Although amphetamines are widely acknowledged as synthetic drugs, of which amphetamine, methamphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) are well-known examples, humans have used natural amphetamines for several millenniums, through the consumption of amphetamines produced in plants, namely cathinone (khat), obtained from the plant Catha edulis and ephedrine, obtained from various plants in the genus Ephedra. More recently, a wave of new amphetamines has emerged in the market, mainly constituted of cathinone derivatives, including mephedrone, methylone, methedrone, and buthylone, among others. Although intoxications by amphetamines continue to be common causes of emergency department and hospital admissions, it is frequent to find the sophism that amphetamine derivatives, namely those appearing more recently, are relatively safe. However, human intoxications by these drugs are increasingly being reported, with similar patterns compared to those previously seen with classical amphetamines. That is not surprising, considering the similar structures and mechanisms of action among the different amphetamines, conferring similar toxicokinetic and toxicological profiles to these compounds. The aim of the present review is to give an insight into the pharmacokinetics, general mechanisms of biological and toxicological actions, and the main target organs for the toxicity of amphetamines. Although there is still scarce knowledge from novel amphetamines to draw mechanistic insights, the long-studied classical

  9. Anticholinesterase Toxicity and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Milatovic

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticholinesterase compounds, organophosphates (OPs and carbamates (CMs are commonly used for a variety of purposes in agriculture and in human and veterinary medicine. They exert their toxicity in mammalian system primarily by virtue of acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibition at the synapses and neuromuscular junctions, leading into the signs of hypercholinergic preponderance. However, the mechanism(s involved in brain/muscle damage appear to be linked with alteration in antioxidant and the scavenging system leading to free radical-mediated injury. OPs and CMs cause excessive formation of F2-isoprostanes and F4-neuroprostanes, in vivo biomarkers of lipid peroxidation and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and of citrulline, a marker of NO/NOS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS generation. In addition, during the course of these excitatory processes and inhibition of AChE, a high rate of ATP consumption, coupled with the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, compromise the cell's ability to maintain its energy levels and excessive amounts of ROS and RNS may be generated. Pretreatment with N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist memantine, in combination with atropine sulfate, provides significant protection against inhibition of AChE, increases of ROS/RNS, and depletion of high-energy phosphates induced by DFP/carbofuran. Similar antioxidative effects are observed with a spin trapping agent, phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN or chain breaking antioxidant vitamin E. This review describes the mechanisms involved in anticholinesterase-induced oxidative/nitrosative injury in target organs of OPs/CMs, and protection by various agents.

  10. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G. [Geological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States); Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Mid-Continent Ecology Div.

    1998-11-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. The authors investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by {ge}70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  11. Revision of the ICH guideline on detection of toxicity to reproduction for medicinal products: SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Paul

    2016-09-01

    SWOT analysis was used to gain insights and perspectives into the revision of the ICH S5(R2) guideline on detection of toxicity to reproduction for medicinal products. The current ICH guideline was rapidly adopted worldwide and has an excellent safety record for more than 20 years. The revised guideline should aim to further improve reproductive and developmental (DART) safety testing for new drugs. Alternative methods to animal experiments should be used whenever possible. Modern technology should be used to obtain high quality data from fewer animals. Additions to the guideline should include considerations on the following: limit dose setting, maternal toxicity, biopharmaceuticals, vaccines, testing strategies by indication, developmental immunotoxicity, and male-mediated developmental toxicity. Emerging issues, such as epigenetics and the microbiome, will most likely pose challenges to DART testing in the future. It is hoped that the new guideline will be adopted even outside the ICH regions. PMID:27046733

  12. A New In Vivo Model System to Assess the Toxicity of Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Tino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the emerging area of nanotechnology, a key issue is related to the potential impacts of the novel nanomaterials on the environment and human health, so that this technology can be used with minimal risk. Specifically designed to combine on a single structure multipurpose tags and properties, smart nanomaterials need a comprehensive characterization of both chemicophysical properties and adequate toxicological evaluation, which is a challenging endeavour; the in vitro toxicity assays that are often employed for nanotoxicity assessments do not accurately predict in vivo response. To overcome these limitations and to evaluate toxicity characteristics of cadmium telluride quantum dots in relation to surface coatings, we have employed the freshwater polyp Hydra vulgaris as a model system. We assessed in vivo acute and sublethal toxicity by scoring for alteration of morphological traits, population growth rates, and influence on the regenerative capabilities providing new investigation clues for nanotoxicology purposes.

  13. Issues in Perspective. Critical Issues Papers 1-17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duttweiler, Patricia Cloud

    The papers in this collection are based on the document "Perspectives on Performance-Based Incentive Plans" and offer brief overviews of the following critical issues in education: (1) performance-based incentive plans; (2) needed organizational changes; (3) successful and unsuccessful teacher incentive plans; (4) compensation strategies and…

  14. Legal issues in radon affairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massuelle, M.H. [Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    1999-12-01

    In France, it was only recently that cases related to high radon concentrations in dwellings received substantial publicity. This irruption of radon as a public health issue came with the general progress of scientific knowledge and the availability of a research capacity in France able to develop expertise. We are interested here in the legal implications of issues that arise from the lag between the activity of expertsand the regulatory activity in the domain of radon. We use the term expertise very broadly, to cover the practical application of research findings, the relation of the researchers with the community, and finally the acts by which experts provide their knowledge to the community. We first examine the course by which science developed the radon issue and the way they organized to move from research to expertise; here we try to characterize the various needs for radon expertise. We then discuss the legal difficulties associated with radon expertise.

  15. Legal issues in radon affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In France, it was only recently that cases related to high radon concentrations in dwellings received substantial publicity. This irruption of radon as a public health issue came with the general progress of scientific knowledge and the availability of a research capacity in France able to develop expertise. We are interested here in the legal implications of issues that arise from the lag between the activity of experts and the regulatory activity in the domain of radon. We use the term expertise very broadly, to cover the practical application of research findings, the relation of the researchers with the community, and finally the acts by which experts provide their knowledge to the community. We first examine the course by which science developed the radon issue and the way they organized to move from research to expertise; here we try to characterize the various needs for radon expertise. We then discuss the legal difficulties associated with radon expertise

  16. Ruby on Rails Issue Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Juan Jared

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to detail the tasks accomplished as a NASA NIFS intern for the summer 2014 session. This internship opportunity is to develop an issue tracker Ruby on Rails web application to improve the communication of developmental anomalies between the Support Software Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI) teams, System Build and Information Architecture. As many may know software development is an arduous, time consuming, collaborative effort. It involves nearly as much work designing, planning, collaborating, discussing, and resolving issues as effort expended in actual development. This internship opportunity was put in place to help alleviate the amount of time spent discussing issues such as bugs, missing tests, new requirements, and usability concerns that arise during development and throughout the life cycle of software applications once in production.

  17. Cationized gelatin-HVJ envelope with sodium borocaptate improved the BNCT efficacy for liver tumors in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cell-selective radiation therapy that uses the alpha particles and lithium nuclei produced by the boron neutron capture reaction. BNCT is a relatively safe tool for treating multiple or diffuse malignant tumors with little injury to normal tissue. The success or failure of BNCT depends upon the 10B compound accumulation within tumor cells and the proximity of the tumor cells to the body surface. To extend the therapeutic use of BNCT from surface tumors to visceral tumors will require 10B compounds that accumulate strongly in tumor cells without significant accumulation in normal cells, and an appropriate delivery method for deeper tissues. Hemagglutinating Virus of Japan Envelope (HVJ-E) is used as a vehicle for gene delivery because of its high ability to fuse with cells. However, its strong hemagglutination activity makes HVJ-E unsuitable for systemic administration. In this study, we developed a novel vector for 10B (sodium borocaptate: BSH) delivery using HVJ-E and cationized gelatin for treating multiple liver tumors with BNCT without severe adverse events. We developed cationized gelatin conjugate HVJ-E combined with BSH (CG-HVJ-E-BSH), and evaluated its characteristics (toxicity, affinity for tumor cells, accumulation and retention in tumor cells, boron-carrying capacity to multiple liver tumors in vivo, and bio-distribution) and effectiveness in BNCT therapy in a murine model of multiple liver tumors. CG-HVJ-E reduced hemagglutination activity by half and was significantly less toxic in mice than HVJ-E. Higher 10B concentrations in murine osteosarcoma cells (LM8G5) were achieved with CG-HVJ-E-BSH than with BSH. When administered into mice bearing multiple LM8G5 liver tumors, the tumor/normal liver ratios of CG-HVJ-E-BSH were significantly higher than those of BSH for the first 48 hours (p < 0.05). In suppressing the spread of tumor cells in mice, BNCT treatment was as effective with CG-HVJ-E-BSH as with BSH

  18. Workplace bullying: an emergent issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essen, S Donovan; Esquivel, Cynthia; Jha, Pankaj

    2014-09-01

    All companies, including dentists, rely on their staff to represent their firms in the most positive and effective manner. Today's managers face a multitude of issues, and as such, they must walk a fine line of fostering a productive, harmonious and safe working environment for their employees. Over the last several decades it is apparent that on the- job sexual harassment is no longer the leading issue of employee complaints. Rather, the organization issue which was investigated is workplace bullying, also commonly referred to as employee harassment. Risk management is no longer limited to avoiding malpractice issues but also preventing litigation created by poor organizational behavior. The primary purpose of this paper is to explore the background of workplace bullying and how it affects today's managers and their employees, customers and suppliers. In other words, the scope of this paper will feature research on past studies, results and conclusions. Since workplace bullying affects all levels of a corporation, it must be stated that the concern and focus of this paper is for today's manager to understand the background and history of workplace bullying, and what they can do to foster a safe working environment and prevent the bully from creating mental and physical harm to their employees. This paper details the history of workplace bullying and how management, employees and suppliers deal with and address the issue. Lastly, this treatise looks at risk management from a manger/dentist's perspective, the assessment/conclusion summarizes the implications for managers regarding how they must handle the issue or risk harm to the employee and/or serious legal ramifications. PMID:25284567

  19. Characterization strategy report for the organic safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a logical approach to resolving potential safety issues resulting from the presence of organic components in hanford tank wastes. The approach uses a structured logic diagram (SLD) to provide a pathway for quantifying organic safety issue risk. The scope of the report is limited to selected organics (i.e., solvents and complexants) that were added to the tanks and their degradation products. The greatest concern is the potential exothermic reactions that can occur between these components and oxidants, such as sodium nitrate, that are present in the waste tanks. The organic safety issue is described in a conceptual model that depicts key modes of failure-event reaction processes in tank systems and phase domains (domains are regions of the tank that have similar contents) that are depicted with the SLD. Applying this approach to quantify risk requires knowing the composition and distribution of the organic and inorganic components to determine (1) how much energy the waste would release in the various domains, (2) the toxicity of the region associated with a disruptive event, and (3) the probability of an initiating reaction. Five different characterization options are described, each providing a different level of quality in calculating the risks involved with organic safety issues. Recommendations include processing existing data through the SLD to estimate risk, developing models needed to link more complex characterization information for the purpose of estimating risk, and examining correlations between the characterization approaches for optimizing information quality while minimizing cost in estimating risk

  20. Monitoring of heavy/toxic metals and halides in surface/ground water (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water is essential for maintaining physical and social life. Human and animal consumption is perhaps the most evident essential use of water. Water quality and quantity have become critical issues, affecting all life. The importance of water in our lives, combined with the threats, make water resources use a global problem. Among the different pollutants toxic metals, metalloids and halides have special significance. Industrial effluents and municipal wastewater are normally drained into water streams, rivers and other reservoirs thus polluting these significantly. Quality of our water resources especially is an issue, which continues to arouse the attention of concerned scientists, legislators and the general public. Among various pollutant chemicals, the heavy metals and metalloids are present at trace levels in various compartments of the environment. Some metals become toxic even at trace levels because of the important features that distinguishes metals from other pollutants is that they are not biodegradable. The halides like Cl, Br, and I from different sources can enter easily into water systems and then they make their way directly into the human body. The intake of toxic as wells as essential elements through water and other food items like vegetables, milk wheat flour etc. is significant. The abundance or deficiency of these meals as well as halides results in abnormal metabolic functions. Due to excessive demand for trace analysis in water and other materials a variety of techniques and instrumentation has been developed. Determination of heavy metals ions is of the highest interest in environmental analysis. Among the food materials water is most important because of their large consumption by man. Also toxic metals in water may be in dissolved ionic form, which directly go into human metabolism and start their toxic action. Presence of even small amounts of toxic metals in drinking water can produce serious health hazards. (author)