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Sample records for brugia malayi larvae

  1. Infective Larvae of Brugia malayi Induce Polarization of Host Macrophages that Helps in Immune Evasion

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    Aditi Sharma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Filarial parasites suppress, divert, or polarize the host immune response to aid their survival. However, mechanisms that govern the polarization of host MΦs during early filarial infection are not completely understood. In this study, we infected BALB/c mice with infective larvae stage-3 of Brugia malayi (Bm-L3 and studied their effect on the polarization of splenic MΦs. Results showed that MΦs displayed M2-phenotype by day 3 p.i. characterized by upregulated IL-4, but reduced IL-12 and Prostaglandin-D2 secretion. Increased arginase activity, higher arginase-1 but reduced NOS2 expression and poor phagocytic and antigen processing capacity was also observed. M2 MΦs supported T-cell proliferation and characteristically upregulated p-ERK but downregulated NF-κB-p65 and NF-κB-p50/105. Notably, Bm-L3 synergized with host regulatory T-cells (Tregs and polarized M2 MΦs to regulatory MΦs (Mregs by day 7 p.i., which secreted copious amounts of IL-10 and prostaglandin-E2. Mregs also showed upregulated expression levels of MHC-II, CD80, and CD86 and exhibited increased antigen-processing capacity but displayed impaired activation of NF-κB-p65 and NF-κB-p50/105. Neutralization of Tregs by anti-GITR + anti-CD25 antibodies checked the polarization of M2 MΦs to Mregs, decreased accumulation of regulatory B cells and inflammatory monocytes, and reduced secretion of IL-10, but enhanced IL-4 production and percentages of eosinophils, which led to Bm-L3 killing. In summary, we report hitherto undocumented effects of early Bm-L3 infection on the polarization of splenic MΦs and show how infective larvae deftly utilize the functional plasticity of host MΦs to establish themselves inside the host.

  2. Nutritional factors and antimicrobials on development of infective larvae of subperiodic Brugia malayi (Nematoda: Filarioidea) in Anopheles quadrimaculatus and Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

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    Nayar, J K; Knight, J W

    1991-03-01

    The effects of nutritional factors and antimicrobials on the development of infective larvae of subperiodic Brugia malayi in susceptible Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say and Aedes aegypti (L.) were investigated. Larvae of both species of mosquitoes were reared on brewers yeast or a 1:1 brewers yeast-liver powder mixture. After emergence, one-half of the adults from each rearing condition were maintained on a 10% sucrose solution and the other half on a 10% sucrose solution containing 0.1% p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA). Females of both species of mosquitoes that fed on B. malayi-infected jirds showed a significant increase in the ineffective rate and intensity of infectiveness when the mosquito larvae were reared on the brewers yeast-liver powder diet. The addition of 0.1% PABA to the adult diet increased numbers of infective larvae of B. malayi that developed in Ae. aegypti but not in An. quadrimaculatus. The intensity of infectiveness of B. malayi was significantly greater when An. quadrimaculatus females were provided with a second blood meal from an uninfected jird and when females of both species were maintained on different concentrations of an antimicrobial solution.

  3. Susceptibility of the autogenous group of the Aedes scutellaris complex of mosquitoes to infection with Brugia malayi and Brugia pahangi.

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    Trpis, M

    1981-09-01

    Four species of mosquitoes which represent the Tonga group of the Aedes scutellaris complex (Ae. cooki, Ae. kesseli, Ae. tongae tabu and an undescribed Aedes sp. NUAOFO'OU) were tested for susceptibility to infection with Brugia malayi and B. pahangi. All tested strains were genetically fully (100%) susceptible to infection with both parasitic helminths. Higher survival of females harboring low quantities of infective larvae (1-9 L3/male) indicates a weak adaptation of the host to the parasite. Further analysis showed that in frequency distribution of infective larvae of B. malayi and B. pahangi, the most frequent category was 1-5 infective larvae per mosquito female. Distribution of te infective larvae into various parts of the mosquito body is a dynamic process. After development of L3 larvae in the thoracic muscles is completed, infective larvae migrate predominantly to the abdomen. From day 10 to 18 after an infective blood meal, L3 larvae migrate back to the thorax and head proboscis area. Low density of microfilariae in gerbils (5 mf/20 microliters) is sufficient for good infection in any of the tested mosquito species and strains. If a laboratory model with high susceptibility of mosquitoes to Brugia filarial worms is required, the autogenous group of mosquitoes of Tonga will serve as an excellent laboratory model. High susceptibility of the autogenous mosquito species to B. malayi and B. pahangi and absence of Brugian filariasis in the Polynesian region of the South Pacific is discussed.

  4. In vitro silencing of Brugia malayi trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase impairs embryogenesis and in vivo development of infective larvae in jirds.

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    Susheela Kushwaha

    Full Text Available The trehalose metabolic enzymes have been considered as potential targets for drug or vaccine in several organisms such as Mycobacterium, plant nematodes, insects and fungi due to crucial role of sugar trehalose in embryogenesis, glucose uptake and protection from stress. Trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP is one of the enzymes of trehalose biosynthesis that has not been reported in mammals. Silencing of tpp gene in Caenorhabditis elegans revealed an indispensable functional role of TPP in nematodes.In the present study, functional role of B. malayi tpp gene was investigated by siRNA mediated silencing which further validated this enzyme to be a putative antifilarial drug target. The silencing of tpp gene in adult female B. malayi brought about severe phenotypic deformities in the intrauterine stages such as distortion and embryonic development arrest. The motility of the parasites was significantly reduced and the microfilarial production as well as their in vitro release from the female worms was also drastically abridged. A majority of the microfilariae released in to the culture medium were found dead. B. malayi infective larvae which underwent tpp gene silencing showed 84.9% reduced adult worm establishment after inoculation into the peritoneal cavity of naïve jirds.The present findings suggest that B. malayi TPP plays an important role in the female worm embryogenesis, infectivity of the larvae and parasite viability. TPP enzyme of B. malayi therefore has the potential to be exploited as an antifilarial drug target.

  5. Molecular cloning, purification and characterization of Brugia malayi phosphoglycerate kinase.

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    Kumar, Ranjeet; Doharey, Pawan Kumar; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar; Rathaur, Sushma

    2017-04-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) is a glycolytic enzyme present in many parasites. It has been reported as a candidate molecule for drug and vaccine developments. In the present study, a full-length cDNA encoding the Brugia malayi 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (BmPGK) with an open reading frame of 1.3 kb was isolated and PCR amplified and cloned. The exact size of the BmPGK's ORF is 1377 bps. The BmPGK gene was subcloned into pET-28a (+) expression vector, the expressed enzyme was purified by affinity column and characterized. The SDS-PAGE analysis revealed native molecular weight of recombinant Brugia malayi 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (rBmPGK) to be ∼45 kDa. The enzyme was found sensitive to temperature and pH, it showed maximum activity at 25 °C and pH 8.5. The Km values for PGA and ATP were 1.77 and 0.967 mM, respectively. The PGK inhibitor, clorsulon and antifilarial drugs albendazole and ivermectin inhibited the enzyme. The specific inhibitor of PGK, clorsulon, competitively inhibited enzyme with Ki value 1.88 μM. Albendazole also inhibited PGK competitively with Ki value 35.39 μM. Further these inhibitory studies were confirmed by docking and molecular simulation of drugs with enzyme. Clorsulon interacted with substrate binding site with glutamine 37 as well as in hinge regions with aspartic acid 385 and valine 387 at ADP binding site. On the other hand albendazole interacted with asparagine 335 residues. These effects were in good association with binding interactions. Thus current study might help in designing and synthesis of effective inhibitors for this novel drug target and understanding their mode of interaction with the potent anthelmintic drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional analysis of putative operons in Brugia malayi.

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    Liu, Canhui; Oliveira, Ana; Chauhan, Chitra; Ghedin, Elodie; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2010-01-01

    Operons are a common mode of gene organization in Caenorhabditis elegans. Similar gene arrangements suggest that functional operons may exist in Brugia malayi. To definitively test this hypothesis, a bicistronic reporter vector consisting of an upstream firefly luciferase gene and a downstream renilla luciferase gene was constructed. The genome was then surveyed to identify 15 gene pairs that were likely to represent operons. Two of four domains upstream of the 5' gene from these clusters exhibited promoter activity. When constructs replicating the promoter and intergenic arrangement found in the native putative operon were transfected into embryos, both firefly and renilla activities were detected, while constructs with the promoter alone or intergenic region alone produced no activity from the downstream reporter. These data confirm that functional operons exist in B. malayi. Mutation of three U-rich element homologues present in one of the operons resulted in a decrease in downstream renilla reporter activity, suggesting that these were important in mRNA maturation. Hemi-nested reverse transcriptase-PCR assays demonstrated that while the mRNA encoding the native downstream open reading frame of one operon contained an SL1 spliced leader at its 5' end, the renilla gene mRNA produced from the corresponding transgenic construct did not. Copyright 2009 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Antifilarial activity of gum from Moringa oleifera Lam. on human lymphatic filaria Brugia malayi

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    V Kushwaha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Currently available antifilarial drugs diethylcarbamazine, ivermectin and albendazole and their combinations, are not able to control lymphatic filariasis. Therefore, a better antifilarial agent is urgently required for proper management of the disease. Materials and Methods: In this study, we evaluated the antifilarial activity of gum extract of plant Moringa oleifera Lam. against the human lymphatic filarial parasite Brugia malayi using adult worms and microfilariae (mf in two in vitro assays (motility and inhition in MTT reduction for viability and two animal models, primary (Meriones unguiculatus implanted with B. malayi adult worms in the peritoneal cavity and secondary (subcutaneous B. malayi infective larvae induced Mastomys coucha, the model closer to the natural human filarial infection screens. Results: The gum extract inhibited 100% motility (irreversible loss of motility of mf and inhibited more than 56% MTT reduction potential of the adult female worms. The extract was safe in cytotoxicity test using Vero cell line, therefore followed in vivo in primary and secondary screens. In primary screen, the extract (5×500 mg/kg caused 69% macrofilaricidal and 83% sterilization of female worms and 44% macrofilaricidal activity in secondary screen (5 × 1000 mg/kg by oral route. Conclusion: Thus, it is concluded that the gum of the plant is macrofilaricidal in both in vitro and in vivo and may provide valuable leads for design and development of new antifilarial agents. This is the first ever report on the antifilarial efficacy of M. oleifera.

  8. Ultrastructural comparison of extracellular and intracellular encapsulation of Brugia malayi in Anopheles quadrimaculatus.

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    Chikilian, M L; Bradley, T J; Nayar, J K; Knight, J W

    1994-02-01

    Ultrastructural aspects of extracellular humoral encapsulation of microfilariae of Brugia malayi in the hemocoel of Anopheles quadrimaculatus were compared with those of intracellular encapsulation of first-stage larvae (L1) of the same parasite species, in the thoracic muscle cells of the same species of mosquito. The results showed that extracellular humoral encapsulation of microfilarial sheaths, and sheathed and exsheathed microfilariae, in the hemocoel of mosquitoes occurs around the parasite within the first 6 hr postingestion, apparently without initial participation of hemocytes. Hemocytes and their remnants were observed near the parasite during the first 6 hr postingestion. Within the next 24 hr, hemocytes attach to the initial humoral capsule. By contrast, intracellular encapsulation of L1S is initiated by the accumulation of a dense cytoplasmic layer derived from the infected thoracic muscle cell. Melanin deposits accumulate in this layer adjacent to the parasite cuticle, again without visible participation of hemocytes.

  9. Sulfonamide chalcones: Synthesis and in vitro exploration for therapeutic potential against Brugia malayi.

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    Bahekar, Sandeep P; Hande, Sneha V; Agrawal, Nikita R; Chandak, Hemant S; Bhoj, Priyanka S; Goswami, Kalyan; Reddy, M V R

    2016-11-29

    Keeping in mind the immense biological potential of chalcones and sulfonamide scaffolds, a library of sulfonamide chalcones has been synthesized and evaluated for in vitro antifilarial assay against human lymphatic filarial parasite Brugia malayi. Experimental evidence showcased for the first time the potential of some sulfonamide chalcones as effective and safe antifilarial lead molecules against human lymphatic filarial parasite B. malayi. Sulfonamide chalcones 4d, 4p, 4q, 4t and 4aa displayed the significantly wide therapeutic window. Particularly chalcones with halogen substitution in aromatic ring proved to be potent antifilarial agents against Brugia malayi. Sulphonamide chalcones with lipophilic methyl moiety (4q and 4aa) at para position of terminal phenyl rings of compounds were found to have remarkable antifilarial activities with therapeutic efficacy. Observed preliminary evidence of apoptosis by effective chalcone derivatives envisaged its fair possibility to inhibit folate pathway with consequent defect in DNA synthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. The genome of Brugia malayi – all worms are not created equal

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    Scott, Alan; Ghedin, Elodie

    2008-01-01

    Filarial nematode parasites, the causative agents of elephantiasis and river blindness, undermine the livelihoods of over one hundred millions people in the developing world. Recently, the Filarial Genome Project reported the draft sequence of the ~95 Mb genome of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi - the first parasitic nematode genome to be sequenced. Comparative genome analysis with the prevailing model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans revealed similarities and differences in genome s...

  11. Diversity and Expression of MicroRNAs in the Filarial Parasite, Brugia malayi

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    Poole, Catherine B.; Gu, Weifeng; Kumar, Sanjay; Jin, Jingmin; Davis, Paul J.; Bauche, David; McReynolds, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Human filarial parasites infect an estimated 120 million people in 80 countries worldwide causing blindness and the gross disfigurement of limbs and genitals. An understanding of RNA-mediated regulatory pathways in these parasites may open new avenues for treatment. Toward this goal, small RNAs from Brugia malayi adult females, males and microfilariae were cloned for deep-sequencing. From ∼30 million sequencing reads, 145 miRNAs were identified in the B. malayi genome. Some microRNAs were validated using the p19 RNA binding protein and qPCR. B. malayi miRNAs segregate into 99 families each defined by a unique seed sequence. Sixty-one of the miRNA families are highly conserved with homologues in arthropods, vertebrates and helminths. Of those miRNAs not highly conserved, homologues of 20 B. malayi miRNA families were found in vertebrates. Nine B. malayi miRNA families appear to be filarial-specific as orthologues were not found in other organisms. The miR-2 family is the largest in B. malayi with 11 members. Analysis of the sequences shows that six members result from a recent expansion of the family. Library comparisons found that 1/3 of the B. malayi miRNAs are differentially expressed. For example, miR-71 is 5–7X more highly expressed in microfilariae than adults. Studies suggest that in C.elegans, miR-71 may enhance longevity by targeting the DAF-2 pathway. Characterization of B. malayi miRNAs and their targets will enhance our understanding of their regulatory pathways in filariads and aid in the search for novel therapeutics. PMID:24824352

  12. Diversity and expression of microRNAs in the filarial parasite, Brugia malayi.

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    Catherine B Poole

    Full Text Available Human filarial parasites infect an estimated 120 million people in 80 countries worldwide causing blindness and the gross disfigurement of limbs and genitals. An understanding of RNA-mediated regulatory pathways in these parasites may open new avenues for treatment. Toward this goal, small RNAs from Brugia malayi adult females, males and microfilariae were cloned for deep-sequencing. From ∼ 30 million sequencing reads, 145 miRNAs were identified in the B. malayi genome. Some microRNAs were validated using the p19 RNA binding protein and qPCR. B. malayi miRNAs segregate into 99 families each defined by a unique seed sequence. Sixty-one of the miRNA families are highly conserved with homologues in arthropods, vertebrates and helminths. Of those miRNAs not highly conserved, homologues of 20 B. malayi miRNA families were found in vertebrates. Nine B. malayi miRNA families appear to be filarial-specific as orthologues were not found in other organisms. The miR-2 family is the largest in B. malayi with 11 members. Analysis of the sequences shows that six members result from a recent expansion of the family. Library comparisons found that 1/3 of the B. malayi miRNAs are differentially expressed. For example, miR-71 is 5-7X more highly expressed in microfilariae than adults. Studies suggest that in C.elegans, miR-71 may enhance longevity by targeting the DAF-2 pathway. Characterization of B. malayi miRNAs and their targets will enhance our understanding of their regulatory pathways in filariads and aid in the search for novel therapeutics.

  13. Molecular evidence for a functional ecdysone signaling system in Brugia malayi.

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    George Tzertzinis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Filarial nematodes, including Brugia malayi, the causative agent of lymphatic filariasis, undergo molting in both arthropod and mammalian hosts to complete their life cycles. An understanding of how these parasites cross developmental checkpoints may reveal potential targets for intervention. Pharmacological evidence suggests that ecdysteroids play a role in parasitic nematode molting and fertility although their specific function remains unknown. In insects, ecdysone triggers molting through the activation of the ecdysone receptor: a heterodimer of EcR (ecdysone receptor and USP (Ultraspiracle.We report the cloning and characterization of a B. malayi EcR homologue (Bma-EcR. Bma-EcR dimerizes with insect and nematode USP/RXRs and binds to DNA encoding a canonical ecdysone response element (EcRE. In support of the existence of an active ecdysone receptor in Brugia we also cloned a Brugia rxr (retinoid X receptor homolog (Bma-RXR and demonstrate that Bma-EcR and Bma-RXR interact to form an active heterodimer using a mammalian two-hybrid activation assay. The Bma-EcR ligand-binding domain (LBD exhibits ligand-dependent transactivation via a GAL4 fusion protein combined with a chimeric RXR in mammalian cells treated with Ponasterone-A or a synthetic ecdysone agonist. Furthermore, we demonstrate specific up-regulation of reporter gene activity in transgenic B. malayi embryos transfected with a luciferase construct controlled by an EcRE engineered in a B. malayi promoter, in the presence of 20-hydroxy-ecdysone.Our study identifies and characterizes the two components (Bma-EcR and Bma-RXR necessary for constituting a functional ecdysteroid receptor in B. malayi. Importantly, the ligand binding domain of BmaEcR is shown to be capable of responding to ecdysteroid ligands, and conversely, ecdysteroids can activate transcription of genes downstream of an EcRE in live B. malayi embryos. These results together confirm that an ecdysone signaling system

  14. The Abundant Larval Transcript-1 and -2 Genes of Brugia malayi Encode Stage-Specific Candidate Vaccine Antigens for Filariasis

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    Gregory, William F.; Atmadja, Agnes K.; Allen, Judith E.; Maizels, Rick M.

    2000-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is a major tropical disease caused by the mosquito-borne nematodes Brugia and Wuchereria. About 120 million people are infected and at risk of lymphatic pathology such as acute lymphangitis and elephantiasis. Vaccines against filariasis must generate immunity to the infective mosquito-derived third-stage larva (L3) without accentuating immunopathogenic responses to lymphatic-dwelling adult parasites. We have identified two highly expressed genes, designated abundant larval transcript-1 and -2 (alt-1 and alt-2), from each of which mRNAs account for >1% of L3 cDNAs. ALT-1 and ALT-2 share 79% amino acid identity across 125 residues, including a putative signal sequence and a prominent acidic tract. Expression of alt-1 and alt-2 is initiated midway through development in the mosquito, peaking in the infective larva and declining sharply following entry into the host. Humans exposed to Brugia malayi show a high frequency of immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and IgG3 antibodies to ALT-1 and -2, distinguishing them from adult-stage antigens, which are targeted by the IgG4 isotype. Immunization of susceptible rodents (jirds) with ALT-1 elicited a 76% reduction in parasite survival, the highest reported for a single antigen from any filarial parasite. ALT-1 and the closely related ALT-2 are therefore strong candidates for a future vaccine against human filariasis. PMID:10858234

  15. Glucose and Glycogen Metabolism in Brugia malayi Is Associated with Wolbachia Symbiont Fitness.

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    Voronin, Denis; Bachu, Saheed; Shlossman, Michael; Unnasch, Thomas R; Ghedin, Elodie; Lustigman, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Wolbachia are endosymbiotic bacteria found in the majority of arthropods and filarial nematodes of medical and veterinary importance. They have evolved a wide range of symbiotic associations. In filarial nematodes that cause human lymphatic filariasis (Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi) or onchocerciasis (Onchocerca volvulus), Wolbachia are important for parasite development, reproduction and survival. The symbiotic bacteria rely in part on nutrients and energy sources provided by the host. Genomic analyses suggest that the strain of Wolbachia found in B. malayi (wBm) lacks the genes for two glycolytic enzymes--6-phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase--and is thus potentially unable to convert glucose into pyruvate, an important substrate for energy generation. The Wolbachia surface protein, wBm00432, is complexed to six B. malayi glycolytic enzymes, including aldolase. In this study we characterized two B. malayi aldolase isozymes and found that their expression is dependent on Wolbachia fitness and number. We confirmed by immuno-transmission electron microscopy that aldolase is associated with the Wolbachia surface. RNAi experiments suggested that aldolase-2 plays a significant role in both Wolbachia survival and embryogenesis in B. malayi. Treatment with doxycycline reduced Wolbachia fitness and increased the amount of both glucose and glycogen detected in the filarial parasite, indicating that glucose metabolism and glycogen storage in B. malayi are associated with Wolbachia fitness. This metabolic co-dependency between Wolbachia and its filarial nematode indicates that glycolysis could be a shared metabolic pathway between the bacteria and B. malayi, and thus a potential new target for anti-filarial therapy.

  16. Expression of the microfilarial sheath protein 2 (shp2) of the filarial parasites Litomosoides sigmodontis and Brugia malayi.

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    Conraths, F J; Hirzmann, J; Hobom, G; Zahner, H

    1997-03-01

    The microfilarial sheaths of the filarial parasites Brugia malayi, Brugia pahangi, and Litomosoides sigmodontis consist of several parasite proteins, probably ranging between 7 and 10. The gene encoding sheath protein 2 (shp2), which is the object of this study, is transcribed in embryos and in the uterine epithelium; at least in B. malayi, it is translated in both tissues. Apparently, shp2 is synthesized as a monomer, exported by the respective cells, and integrated into the microfilarial sheath. In the sheath, it exists as a highly polymerized molecule cross-linked by cysteine formation and other covalent bonds, presumably epsilon-(gamma-glutamyl)-lysine links.

  17. Identification of tgh-2, a Filarial Nematode Homolog of Caenorhabditis elegans daf-7 and Human Transforming Growth Factor β, Expressed in Microfilarial and Adult Stages of Brugia malayi

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    Gomez-Escobar, Natalia; Gregory, William F.; Maizels, Rick M.

    2000-01-01

    A novel member of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family has been identified in the filarial nematode parasite Brugia malayi by searching the recently developed Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) database produced by the Filarial Genome Project. Designated tgh-2, this new gene shows most similarity to a key product regulating dauer larva formation in Caenorhabditis elegans (DAF-7) and to the human down-modulatory cytokine TGF-β. Homology to DAF-7 extends throughout the length of the 349-am...

  18. Suppression of Brugia malayi (sub-periodic larval development in Aedes aegypti (Liverpool strain fed on blood of animals immunized with microfilariae

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    K Athisaya Mary

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary studies were carried out to investigate the role of filarial specific antibodies, raised in an animal model against the filarial parasite, Brugia malayi (sub-periodic, in blocking their early development in an experimental mosquito host, Aedes aegypti (Liverpool strain. In order to generate filarial specific antibodies, Mongolian gerbils, Meriones unguiculatus, were immunized either with live microfilariae (mf of B. malayi or their homogenate. Mf were harvested from the peritoneal cavity of Mongolian gerbils with patent infection of B. malayi and fed to A. aegypti along with the blood from immunized animals. Development of the parasite in infected mosquitoes was monitored until they reached infective stage larvae (L3. Fewer number of parasites developed to first stage (L1 and subsequently to L2 and L3 in mosquitoes fed with blood of immunized animals, when compared to those fed with blood of control animals. The results thus indicated that filarial parasite specific antibodies present in the blood of the immunized animals resulted in the reduction of number of larvae of B. malayi developing in the mosquito host.

  19. Transcriptomes and pathways associated with infectivity, survival and immunogenicity in Brugia malayi L3

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    Spiro David

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filarial nematode parasites cause serious diseases such as elephantiasis and river blindness in humans, and heartworm infections in dogs. Third stage filarial larvae (L3 are a critical stage in the life cycle of filarial parasites, because this is the stage that is transmitted by arthropod vectors to initiate infections in mammals. Improved understanding of molecular mechanisms associated with this transition may provide important leads for development of new therapies and vaccines to prevent filarial infections. This study explores changes in gene expression associated with the transition of Brugia malayi third stage larvae (BmL3 from mosquitoes into mammalian hosts and how these changes are affected by radiation. Radiation effects are especially interesting because irradiated L3 induce partial immunity to filarial infections. The underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the efficacy of such vaccines are unkown. Results Expression profiles were obtained using a new filarial microarray with 18, 104 64-mer elements. 771 genes were identified as differentially expressed in two-way comparative analyses of the three L3 types. 353 genes were up-regulated in mosquito L3 (L3i relative to cultured L3 (L3c. These genes are important for establishment of filarial infections in mammalian hosts. Other genes were up-regulated in L3c relative to L3i (234 or irradiated L3 (L3ir (22. These culture-induced transcripts include key molecules required for growth and development. 165 genes were up-regulated in L3ir relative to L3c; these genes encode highly immunogenic proteins and proteins involved in radiation repair. L3ir and L3i have similar transcription profiles for genes that encode highly immunogenic proteins, antioxidants and cuticle components. Conclusion Changes in gene expression that normally occur during culture under conditions that support L3 development and molting are prevented or delayed by radiation. This may explain

  20. Yeast-Based High-Throughput Screens to Identify Novel Compounds Active against Brugia malayi.

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    Elizabeth Bilsland

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis is caused by the parasitic worms Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi or B. timori, which are transmitted via the bites from infected mosquitoes. Once in the human body, the parasites develop into adult worms in the lymphatic vessels, causing severe damage and swelling of the affected tissues. According to the World Health Organization, over 1.2 billion people in 58 countries are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis. Very few drugs are available to treat patients infected with these parasites, and these have low efficacy against the adult stages of the worms, which can live for 7-15 years in the human body. The requirement for annual treatment increases the risk of drug-resistant worms emerging, making it imperative to develop new drugs against these devastating diseases.We have developed a yeast-based, high-throughput screening system whereby essential yeast genes are replaced with their filarial or human counterparts. These strains are labeled with different fluorescent proteins to allow the simultaneous monitoring of strains with parasite or human genes in competition, and hence the identification of compounds that inhibit the parasite target without affecting its human ortholog. We constructed yeast strains expressing eight different Brugia malayi drug targets (as well as seven of their human counterparts, and performed medium-throughput drug screens for compounds that specifically inhibit the parasite enzymes. Using the Malaria Box collection (400 compounds, we identified nine filarial specific inhibitors and confirmed the antifilarial activity of five of these using in vitro assays against Brugia pahangi.We were able to functionally complement yeast deletions with eight different Brugia malayi enzymes that represent potential drug targets. We demonstrated that our yeast-based screening platform is efficient in identifying compounds that can discriminate between human and filarial enzymes. Hence, we are confident

  1. Yeast-Based High-Throughput Screens to Identify Novel Compounds Active against Brugia malayi.

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    Bilsland, Elizabeth; Bean, Daniel M; Devaney, Eileen; Oliver, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is caused by the parasitic worms Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi or B. timori, which are transmitted via the bites from infected mosquitoes. Once in the human body, the parasites develop into adult worms in the lymphatic vessels, causing severe damage and swelling of the affected tissues. According to the World Health Organization, over 1.2 billion people in 58 countries are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis. Very few drugs are available to treat patients infected with these parasites, and these have low efficacy against the adult stages of the worms, which can live for 7-15 years in the human body. The requirement for annual treatment increases the risk of drug-resistant worms emerging, making it imperative to develop new drugs against these devastating diseases. We have developed a yeast-based, high-throughput screening system whereby essential yeast genes are replaced with their filarial or human counterparts. These strains are labeled with different fluorescent proteins to allow the simultaneous monitoring of strains with parasite or human genes in competition, and hence the identification of compounds that inhibit the parasite target without affecting its human ortholog. We constructed yeast strains expressing eight different Brugia malayi drug targets (as well as seven of their human counterparts), and performed medium-throughput drug screens for compounds that specifically inhibit the parasite enzymes. Using the Malaria Box collection (400 compounds), we identified nine filarial specific inhibitors and confirmed the antifilarial activity of five of these using in vitro assays against Brugia pahangi. We were able to functionally complement yeast deletions with eight different Brugia malayi enzymes that represent potential drug targets. We demonstrated that our yeast-based screening platform is efficient in identifying compounds that can discriminate between human and filarial enzymes. Hence, we are confident that we can

  2. Comparative analysis of ITS1 nucleotide sequence reveals distinct genetic difference between Brugia malayi from Northeast Borneo and Thailand.

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    Fong, Mun-Yik; Noordin, Rahmah; Lau, Yee-Ling; Cheong, Fei-Wen; Yunus, Muhammad Hafiznur; Idris, Zulkarnain Md

    2013-01-01

    Brugia malayi is one of the parasitic worms which causes lymphatic filariasis in humans. Its geographical distribution includes a large part of Asia. Despite its wide distribution, very little is known about the genetic variation and molecular epidemiology of this species. In this study, the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) nucleotide sequences of B. malayi from microfilaria-positive human blood samples in Northeast Borneo Island were determined, and compared with published ITS1 sequences of B. malayi isolated from cats and humans in Thailand. Multiple alignment analysis revealed that B. malayi ITS1 sequences from Northeast Borneo were more similar to each other than to those from Thailand. Phylogenetic trees inferred using Neighbour-Joining and Maximum Parsimony methods showed similar topology, with 2 distinct B. malayi clusters. The first cluster consisted of Northeast Borneo B. malayi isolates, whereas the second consisted of the Thailand isolates. The findings of this study suggest that B. malayi in Borneo Island has diverged significantly from those of mainland Asia, and this has implications for the diagnosis of B. malayi infection across the region using ITS1-based molecular techniques.

  3. Susceptibility of Anopheles quadrimaculatus (Diptera: Culicidae) to subperiodic Brugia malayi and Brugia pahangi (Nematoda: Filarioidea) adapted to nude mice and jirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, J K; Knight, J W; Vickery, A C

    1990-05-01

    Anopheles quadrimaculatus and Aedes aegypti (Black-eyed Liverpool strain) were fed on jirds and nude mice (jird-jird infection, jird-mouse infection, and mouse-jird infection) infected with subperiodic Brugia malayi and B. pahangi. Microfilariae of B. malayi from jird-mouse and mouse-jird infections developed normally in An. quadrimaculatus, whereas those from jird-jird infections did not develop. Microfilariae of both species from jirds and nude mice developed normally in Ae. aegypti and those of B. pahangi developed normally in An. quadrimaculatus. It is suggested that microfilariae from nude mice are modified physiologically, immunologically, or both so that they can develop in refractory An. quadrimaculatus, thus indicating that susceptibility and refractoriness of An. quadrimaculatus to B. malayi also is influenced by factors relating to the vertebrate host in addition to mosquito genetic factors.

  4. Brugia malayi excreted/secreted proteins at the host/parasite interface: stage- and gender-specific proteomic profiling.

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    Sasisekhar Bennuru

    Full Text Available Relatively little is known about the filarial proteins that interact with the human host. Although the filarial genome has recently been completed, protein profiles have been limited to only a few recombinants or purified proteins of interest. Here, we describe a large-scale proteomic analysis using microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry to identify the excretory-secretory (ES products of the L3, L3 to L4 molting ES, adult male, adult female, and microfilarial stages of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi. The analysis of the ES products from adult male, adult female, microfilariae (Mf, L3, and molting L3 larvae identified 852 proteins. Annotation suggests that the functional and component distribution was very similar across each of the stages studied; however, the Mf contributed a higher proportion to the total number of identified proteins than the other stages. Of the 852 proteins identified in the ES, only 229 had previous confirmatory expressed sequence tags (ESTs in the available databases. Moreover, this analysis was able to confirm the presence of 274 "hypothetical" proteins inferred from gene prediction algorithms applied to the B. malayi (Bm genome. Not surprisingly, the majority (160/274 of these "hypothetical" proteins were predicted to be secreted by Signal IP and/or SecretomeP 2.0 analysis. Of major interest is the abundance of previously characterized immunomodulatory proteins such as ES-62 (leucyl aminopeptidase, MIF-1, SERPIN, glutathione peroxidase, and galectin in the ES of microfilariae (and Mf-containing adult females compared to the adult males. In addition, searching the ES protein spectra against the Wolbachia database resulted in the identification of 90 Wolbachia-specific proteins, most of which were metabolic enzymes that have not been shown to be immunogenic. This proteomic analysis extends our knowledge of the ES and provides insight into the host-parasite interaction.

  5. Effect of Brugia malayi on the growth and proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, U R; Zometa, C S; Vickery, A C; Kwa, B H; Nayar, J K; Sutton, E T

    1996-08-01

    Athymic mice (C3H/HeN) parasitized by Brugia malayi develop massively dilated lymphatics. The lymphatic endothelial lining is perturbed, and numerous mononuclear and giant cells are closely apposed to the endothelium. The hyperplastic endothelial cells and low opening pressure of the lymphatics suggest abnormal multiplication of these cells may be important in the dilation. We studied the in vitro growth rate of human umbilical vein endothelial cells cultured with adult worms and microfilariae of B. malayi. The tetrazolium salt reduction assays were used to quantify possible direct mitogenic or inhibitory effects. The growth factor-induced proliferation of endothelial cells was significantly suppressed by 44-51% on day 1, 46-81% on day 3, and 45-79% on day 5 in cultures containing adult female worms, which had greater suppressor activity on endothelial cell proliferation than male worms, microfilariae, or soluble adult worm extract. Culture supernatant containing female worm excretory-secretory products significantly inhibited the growth and multiplication of cells, suggesting that adult female worms release antigens or proteins that have inhibitory activity on growth factors necessary for endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. Excess human recombinant epidermal growth factor and bovine brain extract partly reversed the inhibitory activity of worms in culture and restored the endothelial cell proliferation when incubated with worm culture supernatant. Indomethacin and BW 775Hcl failed to restore normal endothelial proliferation in the presence of female worms, suggesting that parasite-derived prostanoids and cyclooxygenase products did not cause the inhibition. Lymph from dilated lymphatics, but not serum from infected mice, increased the proliferation of cells in vitro. Together, these data demonstrate that excretory-secretory products of B. malayi parasites suppress vascular endothelial proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, increases in the number of these cells

  6. Rapid detection and identification of Brugia malayi, B. pahangi, and Dirofilaria immitis by high-resolution melting assay.

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    Wongkamchai, Sirichit; Monkong, Nuntiya; Mahannol, Pakpimom; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Loymak, Sumat; Foongladda, Suporn

    2013-01-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis is caused by filarial worms such as Brugia malayi for which the major reservoir is domestic cats. However, domestic cats or dogs also carry nonhuman filaria such as Brugia pahangi and Dirofilaria immitis. We have developed a single-tube, real-time PCR with a high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis assay for detection and identification of B. malayi, B. pahangi, and D. immitis in blood samples. The designated primer pair in the PCR can amplify a 114-bp region of mitochondrial 12S rRNA genes of these filarial worms. Subsequently, the HRM assay showed a specific melting temperature for each species. The assay showed the highest sensitivity and specificity in comparison with DNA sequences after assessment with 34 cat and 14 dog blood samples. This assay could be helpful for epidemiological studies of reservoirs and vectors.

  7. The heme biosynthetic pathway of the obligate Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi as a potential anti-filarial drug target.

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    Bo Wu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Filarial parasites (e.g., Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, and Wuchereria bancrofti are causative agents of lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, which are among the most disabling of neglected tropical diseases. There is an urgent need to develop macro-filaricidal drugs, as current anti-filarial chemotherapy (e.g., diethylcarbamazine [DEC], ivermectin and albendazole can interrupt transmission predominantly by killing microfilariae (mf larvae, but is less effective on adult worms, which can live for decades in the human host. All medically relevant human filarial parasites appear to contain an obligate endosymbiotic bacterium, Wolbachia. This alpha-proteobacterial mutualist has been recognized as a potential target for filarial nematode life cycle intervention, as antibiotic treatments of filarial worms harboring Wolbachia result in the loss of worm fertility and viability upon antibiotic treatments both in vitro and in vivo. Human trials have confirmed this approach, although the length of treatments, high doses required and medical counter-indications for young children and pregnant women warrant the identification of additional anti-Wolbachia drugs.Genome sequence analysis indicated that enzymes involved in heme biosynthesis might constitute a potential anti-Wolbachia target set. We tested different heme biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in ex vivo B. malayi viability assays and report a specific effect of N-methyl mesoporphyrin (NMMP, which targets ferrochelatase (FC, the last step. Our phylogenetic analysis indicates evolutionarily significant divergence between Wolbachia heme genes and their human homologues. We therefore undertook the cloning, overexpression and analysis of several enzymes of this pathway alongside their human homologues, and prepared proteins for drug targeting. In vitro enzyme assays revealed a approximately 600-fold difference in drug sensitivities to succinyl acetone (SA between Wolbachia and human 5

  8. A Proteomic Analysis of the Body Wall, Digestive Tract, and Reproductive Tract of Brugia malayi.

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    C Paul Morris

    Full Text Available Filarial worms are parasitic nematodes that cause devastating diseases such as lymphatic filariasis (LF and onchocerciasis. Filariae are nematodes with complex anatomy including fully developed digestive tracts and reproductive organs. To better understand the basic biology of filarial parasites and to provide insights into drug targets and vaccine design, we conducted a proteomic analysis of different anatomic fractions of Brugia malayi, a causative agent of LF. Approximately 500 adult female B. malayi worms were dissected, and three anatomical fractions (body wall, digestive tract, and reproductive tract were obtained. Proteins from each anatomical fraction were extracted, desalted, trypsinized, and analyzed by microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry. In total, we identified 4,785 B. malayi proteins. While 1,894 were identified in all three anatomic fractions, 396 were positively identified only within the digestive tract, 114 only within the body wall, and 1,011 only within the reproductive tract. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed a bias for transporters to be present within the digestive tract, suggesting that the intestine of adult filariae is functional and important for nutrient uptake or waste removal. As expected, the body wall exhibited increased frequencies of cytoskeletal proteins, and the reproductive tract had increased frequencies of proteins involved in nuclear regulation and transcription. In assessing for possible vaccine candidates, we focused on proteins sequestered within the digestive tract, as these could possibly represent "hidden antigens" with low risk of prior allergic sensitization. We identified 106 proteins that are enriched in the digestive tract and are predicted to localize to the surface of cells in the the digestive tract. It is possible that some of these proteins are on the luminal surface and may be accessible by antibodies ingested by the worm. A subset of 27 of these

  9. Homologs of the Caenorhabditis elegans masculinizing gene her-1 in C. briggsae and the filarial parasite Brugia malayi.

    OpenAIRE

    Streit, A; Li, W; Robertson, B; Schein, J; Kamal, I H; Marra, M; Wood, W B

    1999-01-01

    The masculinizing gene her-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans (Ce-her-1) encodes a novel protein, HER-1A, which is required for male development. To identify conserved elements in her-1 we have cloned and characterized two homologous nematode genes: one by synteny from the closely related free-living species C. briggsae (Cb-her-1) and the other, starting with a fortuitously identified expressed sequence tag, from the distantly related parasite Brugia malayi (Bm-her-1). The overall sequence identitie...

  10. Production of Brugia malayi BmSXP Recombinant Protein Expressed in Escherichia coli

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    Khoo, T. K.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid antibody detection test is very useful for detection of lymphatic filariasis, especially for certification and surveillance of post-mass drug administration. One such kit, panLF RapidTM (commercialized by Malaysian BioDiagnostic Research Sdn. Bhd. had been developed in our laboratory for the detection of all species of filarial infections. It is based on the detection of anti-filarial IgG4 antibodies that react with recombinant Brugia malayi antigens, BmR1 and BmSXP. In this study, the growth of recombinant bacteria that produce BmSXP was optimized under shake flask fermentation for high yield of the recombinant antigen. The optimizations involved selection of suitable growth medium, IPTG concentration and induction time. The medium that yielded the highest biomass as well as total protein was Terrific Broth (TB medium, which is an undefined medium. Initiation of induction of protein expression was found to be best at mid-log phase (OD600 = 1.5, with IPTG concentration of 1.0 mM, and harvest time at 9 h post-induction. This study showed that under the optimized conditions, the shake flask culture produced 4 g/L biomass (dry cell weight of recombinant Escherichia coli BmSXP/pPROEXHTa/TOP10F’, which yielded 2.42 mg/L of purified BmSXP recombinant antigen. The purified antigen was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and the antigenicity of protein was confirmed by Western blot.

  11. Stage- and gender-specific proteomic analysis of Brugia malayi excretory-secretory products.

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    Yovany Moreno

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: While we lack a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which parasites establish and achieve protection from host immune responses, it is accepted that many of these processes are mediated by products, primarily proteins, released from the parasite. Parasitic nematodes occur in different life stages and anatomical compartments within the host. Little is known about the composition and variability of products released at different developmental stages and their contribution to parasite survival and progression of the infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To gain a deeper understanding on these aspects, we collected and analyzed through 1D-SDS PAGE and LC-MS/MS the Excretory-Secretory Products (ESP of adult female, adult male and microfilariae of the filarial nematode Brugia malayi, one of the etiological agents of human lymphatic filariasis. This proteomic analysis led to the identification of 228 proteins. The list includes 76 proteins with unknown function as well as also proteins with potential immunoregulatory properties, such as protease inhibitors, cytokine homologues and carbohydrate-binding proteins. Larval and adult ESP differed in composition. Only 32 proteins were shared between all three stages/genders. Consistent with this observation, different gene ontology profiles were associated with the different ESP. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A comparative analysis of the proteins released in vitro by different forms of a parasitic nematode dwelling in the same host is presented. The catalog of secreted proteins reflects different stage- and gender-specific related processes and different strategies of immune evasion, providing valuable insights on the contribution of each form of the parasite for establishing the host-parasite interaction.

  12. Lectin binding to extracellularly melanized microfilariae of Brugia malayi from the hemocoel of Anopheles quadrimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, J K; Mikarts, L L; Chikilian, M L; Knight, J W; Bradley, T J

    1995-11-01

    Binding patterns of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)- and gold-conjugated lectins to extracellularly melanized sheathed and exsheathed microfilariae of subperiodic Brugia malayi, isolated from and in situ in the abdominal hemocoel of Anopheles quadrimaculatus 72-hr postinfection, were examined. Five FITC-conjugated lectins [Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Arachis hypogaea (peanut agglutinin-PNA), Triticum vulgaris (wheat germ agglutinin-WGA), Lens culinaris (lentil-LCH), and Concanavalin A (Con A)] with specificities for different carbohydrate moieties were tested for binding to isolated melanized microfilariae and observed with transmitted light and fluorescence microscopy. All five FITC-lectins bound strongly to the acellular material accompanying the melanin deposits on the surface of isolated melanized microfilariae. Significant inhibition of FITC-lectin binding occurred when lectins were preincubated with their complementary carbohydrates before testing. H. pomatia agglutinin binding was totally inhibited by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. Other lectins were partially inhibited, such as PNA by galactose and lactose; WGA by N-acetylneuraminic acid; LCH by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, mannose, glucose, and methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside; and Con A by mannose and methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside. Three gold-conjugated lectins (HPA, PNA, and Con A), examined by using transmission electron microscopy, bound to the outer surface of the acellular material associated with the melanin deposits on isolated melanized microfilarial sheaths and melanized microfilariae and to the remnants of lysed hemocytes found in the proximity of the melanized deposits. Con A in the presence of gold-labeled horseradish peroxidase, examined by using transmission electron microscopy, showed random binding within the melanized capsule formed around the microfilarial sheath in situ. These results indicate that the acellular material accompanying melanin deposits on melanized

  13. Potential involvement of Brugia malayi cysteine proteases in the maintenance of the endosymbiotic relationship with Wolbachia

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    Sara Lustigman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Brugia malayi, a parasitic nematode that causes lymphatic filariasis, harbors endosymbiotic intracellular bacteria, Wolbachia, that are required for the development and reproduction of the worm. The essential nature of this endosymbiosis led to the development of anti-Wolbachia chemotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of human filarial infections. Our study is aimed at identifying specific proteins that play a critical role in this endosymbiotic relationship leading to the identification of potential targets in the adult worms. Filarial cysteine proteases are known to be involved in molting and embryogenesis, processes shown to also be Wolbachia dependent. Based on the observation that cysteine protease transcripts are differentially regulated in response to tetracycline treatment, we focused on defining their role in symbiosis. We observe a bimodal regulation pattern of transcripts encoding cysteine proteases when in vitro tetracycline treated worms were examined. Using tetracycline-treated infertile female worms and purified embryos we established that the first peak of the bimodal pattern corresponds to embryonic transcripts while the second takes place within the hypodermis of the adult worms. Localization studies of the native proteins corresponding to Bm-cpl-3 and Bm-cpl-6 indicate that they are present in the area surrounding Wolbachia, and, in some cases, the proteins appear localized within the bacteria. Both proteins were also found in the inner bodies of microfilariae. The possible role of these cysteine proteases during development and endosymbiosis was further characterized using RNAi. Reduction in Bm-cpl-3 and Bm-cpl-6 transcript levels was accompanied by hindered microfilarial development and release, and reduced Wolbachia DNA levels, making these enzymes strong drug target candidates.

  14. Tissue and stage-specific distribution of Wolbachia in Brugia malayi.

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    Kerstin Fischer

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most filarial parasite species contain Wolbachia, obligatory bacterial endosymbionts that are crucial for filarial development and reproduction. They are targets for alternative chemotherapy, but their role in the biology of filarial nematodes is not well understood. Light microscopy provides important information on morphology, localization and potential function of these bacteria. Surprisingly, immunohistology and in situ hybridization techniques have not been widely used to monitor Wolbachia distribution during the filarial life cycle. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A monoclonal antibody directed against Wolbachia surface protein and in situ hybridization targeting Wolbachia 16S rRNA were used to monitor Wolbachia during the life cycle of B. malayi. In microfilariae and vector stage larvae only a few cells contain Wolbachia. In contrast, large numbers of Wolbachia were detected in the lateral chords of L4 larvae, but no endobacteria were detected in the genital primordium. In young adult worms (5 weeks p.i., a massive expansion of Wolbachia was observed in the lateral chords adjacent to ovaries or testis, but no endobacteria were detected in the growth zone of the ovaries, uterus, the growth zone of the testis or the vas deferens. Confocal laser scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that numerous Wolbachia are aligned towards the developing ovaries and single endobacteria were detected in the germline. In inseminated females (8 weeks p.i. Wolbachia were observed in the ovaries, embryos and in decreasing numbers in the lateral chords. In young males Wolbachia were found in distinct zones of the testis and in large numbers in the lateral chords in the vicinity of testicular tissue but never in mature spermatids or spermatozoa. CONCLUSIONS: Immunohistology and in situ hybridization show distinct tissue and stage specific distribution patterns for Wolbachia in B. malayi. Extensive multiplication of Wolbachia occurs in the

  15. Comparison of an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a radioallergosorbent test (RAST) for detection of IgE antibodies to Brugia malayi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahyuni, Sitti; van Ree, Ronald; Mangali, Andarias; Supali, Taniawati; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Sartono, Erliyani

    2003-01-01

    The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for specific IgE antibodies to Brugia malayi was compared with the radioallergosorbent test (RAST) for use in immunoepidemiological studies of lymphatic filariasis. Sera used were from individuals (aged 5-82 years) living in an area endemic for lymphatic

  16. Immunization of Mastomys coucha with Brugia malayi recombinant trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase results in significant protection against homologous challenge infection.

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    Susheela Kushwaha

    Full Text Available Development of a vaccine to prevent or reduce parasite development in lymphatic filariasis would be a complementary approach to existing chemotherapeutic tools. Trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase of Brugia malayi (Bm-TPP represents an attractive vaccine target due to its absence in mammals, prevalence in the major life stages of the parasite and immunoreactivity with human bancroftian antibodies, especially from endemic normal subjects. We have recently reported on the cloning, expression, purification and biochemical characterization of this vital enzyme of B. malayi. In the present study, immunoprophylactic evaluation of Bm-TPP was carried out against B. malayi larval challenge in a susceptible host Mastomys coucha and the protective ability of the recombinant protein was evaluated by observing the adverse effects on microfilarial density and adult worm establishment. Immunization caused 78.4% decrease in microfilaremia and 71.04% reduction in the adult worm establishment along with sterilization of 70.06% of the recovered live females. The recombinant protein elicited a mixed Th1/Th2 type of protective immune response as evidenced by the generation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4 and an increased production of antibody isotypes IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgA. Thus immunization with Bm-TPP conferred considerable protection against B. malayi establishment by engendering a long-lasting effective immune response and therefore emerges as a potential vaccine candidate against lymphatic filariasis (LF.

  17. The role of local secondary structure in the function of the trans-splicing motif of Brugia malayi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Canhui; Chauhan, Chitra; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2010-02-01

    A 7-nt motif (the trans-splicing motif or TSM) was previously shown to be necessary and sufficient to direct trans-splicing of transgenic mRNAs in transgenic Brugia malayi embryos. Insertion of the TSM into two genes lacking a TSM homologue resulted in trans-splicing of transgenic mRNAs from one transgene but not the other, suggesting that local sequence context might affect TSM function. To test this hypothesis, constructs inserting the TSM into different positions of two B. malayi genes were tested for their ability to support trans-splicing of transgenic mRNAs. Transgenic mRNAs derived from constructs in which the insertion of the TSM did not result in a perturbation of the local predicted secondary structure were trans-spliced, while those in which the TSM perturbed the local secondary structure were not. These data suggest that local secondary structure plays a role in the ability of the TSM to direct trans-splicing.

  18. Inflammatory responses induced by the filarial nematode Brugia malayi are mediated by lipopolysaccharide-like activity from endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M J; Cross, H F; Bilo, K

    2000-04-17

    The pathogenesis of filarial disease is characterized by acute and chronic inflammation. Inflammatory responses are thought to be generated by either the parasite, the immune response, or opportunistic infection. We show that soluble extracts of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi can induce potent inflammatory responses, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and nitric oxide (NO) from macrophages. The active component is heat stable, reacts positively in the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay, and can be inhibited by polymyxin B. TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and NO responses were not induced in macrophages from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-nonresponsive C3H/HeJ mice. The production of TNF-alpha after chemotherapy of microfilariae was also only detected in LPS-responsive C3H/HeN mice, suggesting that signaling through the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is necessary for these responses. We also show that CD14 is required for optimal TNF-alpha responses at low concentrations. Together, these results suggest that extracts of B. malayi contain bacterial LPS. Extracts from the rodent filaria, Acanthocheilonema viteae, which is not infected with the endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria found in the majority of filarial parasites, failed to induce any inflammatory responses from macrophages, suggesting that the source of bacterial LPS in extracts of B. malayi is the Wolbachia endosymbiont. Wolbachia extracts derived from a mosquito cell line induced similar LPS-dependent TNF-alpha and NO responses from C3H/HeN macrophages, which were eliminated after tetracycline treatment of the bacteria. Thus, Wolbachia LPS may be one of the major mediators of inflammatory pathogenesis in filarial nematode disease.

  19. Vaccination of Gerbils with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 Concurrently or as a Fusion Protein Confers Consistent and Improved Protection against Brugia malayi Infection.

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    Sridhar Arumugam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Brugia malayi Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 proteins are orthologous to Onchocerca volvulus Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2, and which were selected as the best candidates for the development of an O. volvulus vaccine. The B. malayi gerbil model was used to confirm the efficacy of these Ov vaccine candidates on adult worms and to determine whether their combination is more efficacious.Vaccine efficacy of recombinant Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 administered individually, concurrently or as a fusion protein were tested in gerbils using alum as adjuvant. Vaccination with Bm-103 resulted in worm reductions of 39%, 34% and 22% on 42, 120 and 150 days post infection (dpi, respectively, and vaccination with Bm-RAL-2 resulted in worm reductions of 42%, 22% and 46% on 42, 120 and 150 dpi, respectively. Vaccination with a fusion protein comprised of Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 resulted in improved efficacy with significant reduction of worm burden of 51% and 49% at 90 dpi, as did the concurrent vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2, with worm reduction of 61% and 56% at 90 dpi. Vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 as a fusion protein or concurrently not only induced a significant worm reduction of 61% and 42%, respectively, at 150 dpi, but also significantly reduced the fecundity of female worms as determined by embryograms. Elevated levels of antigen-specific IgG were observed in all vaccinated gerbils. Serum from gerbils vaccinated with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 individually, concurrently or as a fusion protein killed third stage larvae in vitro when combined with peritoneal exudate cells.Although vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 individually conferred protection against B. malayi infection in gerbils, a more consistent and enhanced protection was induced by vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 fusion protein and when they were used concurrently. Further characterization and optimization of these filarial vaccines are warranted.

  20. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jyoti; Pathak, Manisha; Misra, Sweta; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2015-01-01

    We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo) of Brugia malayi (B. malayi) in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo) and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo) in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+) and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32) against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23) and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45). In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC) to B. malayi infective larvae (L3). pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of providing

  1. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Gupta

    Full Text Available We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo of Brugia malayi (B. malayi in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+ and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32 against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23 and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45. In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC to B. malayi infective larvae (L3. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10 cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of

  2. Structure of the trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase from Brugia malayi reveals key design principles for anthelmintic drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah D Farelli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic nematodes are responsible for devastating illnesses that plague many of the world's poorest populations indigenous to the tropical areas of developing nations. Among these diseases is lymphatic filariasis, a major cause of permanent and long-term disability. Proteins essential to nematodes that do not have mammalian counterparts represent targets for therapeutic inhibitor discovery. One promising target is trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (T6PP from Brugia malayi. In the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, T6PP is essential for survival due to the toxic effect(s of the accumulation of trehalose 6-phosphate. T6PP has also been shown to be essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of T6PP from B. malayi. The protein structure revealed a stabilizing N-terminal MIT-like domain and a catalytic C-terminal C2B-type HAD phosphatase fold. Structure-guided mutagenesis, combined with kinetic analyses using a designed competitive inhibitor, trehalose 6-sulfate, identified five residues important for binding and catalysis. This structure-function analysis along with computational mapping provided the basis for the proposed model of the T6PP-trehalose 6-phosphate complex. The model indicates a substrate-binding mode wherein shape complementarity and van der Waals interactions drive recognition. The mode of binding is in sharp contrast to the homolog sucrose-6-phosphate phosphatase where extensive hydrogen-bond interactions are made to the substrate. Together these results suggest that high-affinity inhibitors will be bi-dentate, taking advantage of substrate-like binding to the phosphoryl-binding pocket while simultaneously utilizing non-native binding to the trehalose pocket. The conservation of the key residues that enforce the shape of the substrate pocket in T6PP enzymes suggest that development of broad-range anthelmintic and antibacterial therapeutics employing this platform may be possible.

  3. Comparison of migration and encapsulation of Brugia malayi microfilariae from the midgut to the hemocoel between Anopheles quadrimaculatus and Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, J K; Knight, J W

    1995-05-01

    Comparisons were made of migration and encapsulation of ingested sheathed microfilariae of Brugia malayi from the midgut into the hemocoel between Anopheles quadrimaculatus (refractory and susceptible strains to B. malayi) and Aedes aegypti (Black-eyed, Liverpool strain susceptible to B. malayi). Encapsulation and melanization of microfilarial sheaths and microfilariae occurred in both strains of An. quadrimaculatus and in Ae. aegypti. In both strains of An. quadrimaculatus, by 4 hr and by 24 hr after the ingestion of sheathed microfilariae of B. malayi in the infected bloodmeal, significantly more sheathed microfilariae penetrated the midgut and reached the hemocoel and thoracic muscles compared with those in Ae. aegypti. During the same time periods significantly more encapsulated and melanized microfilarial sheaths and a larger percentage of encapsulated and melanized microfilariae were observed in the hemocoel of both strains of An. quadrimaculatus than in Ae. aegypti. The results suggest that differences observed in the numbers of encapsulated and melanized microfilarial sheaths and percentages of melanized microfilariae between An. quadrimaculatus (both strains) and Ae. aegypti are due to different rates of penetration of the sheathed microfilariae from the midgut to the hemocoel.

  4. Brugia malayi Microfilariae Induce a Regulatory Monocyte/Macrophage Phenotype That Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Gopinath; Rao, Gopala B.; Lucius, Richard; Srikantam, Aparna; Hartmann, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Background Monocytes and macrophages contribute to the dysfunction of immune responses in human filariasis. During patent infection monocytes encounter microfilariae in the blood, an event that occurs in asymptomatically infected filariasis patients that are immunologically hyporeactive. Aim To determine whether blood microfilariae directly act on blood monocytes and in vitro generated macrophages to induce a regulatory phenotype that interferes with innate and adaptive responses. Methodology and principal findings Monocytes and in vitro generated macrophages from filaria non-endemic normal donors were stimulated in vitro with Brugia malayi microfilarial (Mf) lysate. We could show that monocytes stimulated with Mf lysate develop a defined regulatory phenotype, characterised by expression of the immunoregulatory markers IL-10 and PD-L1. Significantly, this regulatory phenotype was recapitulated in monocytes from Wuchereria bancrofti asymptomatically infected patients but not patients with pathology or endemic normals. Monocytes from non-endemic donors stimulated with Mf lysate directly inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation and cytokine production (IFN-γ, IL-13 and IL-10). IFN-γ responses were restored by neutralising IL-10 or PD-1. Furthermore, macrophages stimulated with Mf lysate expressed high levels of IL-10 and had suppressed phagocytic abilities. Finally Mf lysate applied during the differentiation of macrophages in vitro interfered with macrophage abilities to respond to subsequent LPS stimulation in a selective manner. Conclusions and significance Conclusively, our study demonstrates that Mf lysate stimulation of monocytes from healthy donors in vitro induces a regulatory phenotype, characterized by expression of PD-L1 and IL-10. This phenotype is directly reflected in monocytes from filarial patients with asymptomatic infection but not patients with pathology or endemic normals. We suggest that suppression of T cell functions typically seen in lymphatic

  5. Homologs of the Caenorhabditis elegans masculinizing gene her-1 in C. briggsae and the filarial parasite Brugia malayi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, A; Li, W; Robertson, B; Schein, J; Kamal, I H; Marra, M; Wood, W B

    1999-08-01

    The masculinizing gene her-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans (Ce-her-1) encodes a novel protein, HER-1A, which is required for male development. To identify conserved elements in her-1 we have cloned and characterized two homologous nematode genes: one by synteny from the closely related free-living species C. briggsae (Cb-her-1) and the other, starting with a fortuitously identified expressed sequence tag, from the distantly related parasite Brugia malayi (Bm-her-1). The overall sequence identities of the predicted gene products with Ce-HER-1A are only 57% for Cb-HER-1, which is considerably lower than has been found for most homologous briggsae genes, and 35% for Bm-HER-1. However, conserved residues are found throughout both proteins, and like Ce-HER-1A, both have putative N-terminal signal sequences. Ce-her-1 produces a larger masculinizing transcript (her-1a) and a smaller transcript of unknown function (her-1b); both are present essentially only in males. By contrast, Cb-her-1 appears to produce only one transcript, corresponding to her-1a; it is enriched in males but present also in hermaphrodites. Injection of dsRNA transcribed from Cb-her-1 into C. briggsae hermaphrodites (RNA interference) caused XO animals to develop into partially fertile hermaphrodites. Introducing a Cb-her-1 construct as a transgene under control of the C. elegans unc-54 myosin heavy chain promoter caused strong masculinization of both C. briggsae and C. elegans hermaphrodites. Introduction of a similar Bm-her-1 construct into C. elegans caused only very weak, if any, masculinization. We conclude that in spite of considerable divergence the Cb gene is likely to be a functional ortholog of Ce-her-1, while the function of the distantly related Bm gene remains uncertain.

  6. Real-time PCR detection of the HhaI tandem DNA repeat in pre- and post-patent Brugia malayi infections: a study in Indonesian transmigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis caused by Wuchereria bancrofti or Brugia spp. is a public health problem in developing countries. To monitor bancroftian filariasis infections, Circulating Filarial Antigen (CFA) test is commonly used, but for brugian infections only microfilariae (Mf) microscopy and indirect IgG4 antibody analyses are available. Improved diagnostics for detecting latent infections are required. Methods An optimized real-time PCR targeting the brugian HhaI repeat was validated with plasma from microfilariae negative Mongolian gerbils (jirds) infected with B. malayi. Plasma samples from microfilaremic patients infected with B. malayi or W. bancrofti were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. PCR results of plasma samples from a transmigrant population in a B. malayi endemic area were compared to those of life-long residents in the same endemic area; and to IgG4 serology results from the same population. To discriminate between active infections and larval exposure a threshold was determined by correlation and Receiver-Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve analyses. Results The PCR detected HhaI in pre-patent (56 dpi) B. malayi infected jirds and B. malayi Mf-positive patients from Central Sulawesi, Indonesia. HhaI was also detected in 9/9 elephantiasis patients. In South Sulawesi 87.4% of the transmigrants and life-long residents (94% Mf-negative) were HhaI PCR positive. Based on ROC-curve analysis a threshold for active infections was set to >53 HhaI copies/μl (AUC: 0.854). Conclusions The results demonstrate that the HhaI PCR detects brugian infections with greater sensitivity than the IgG4 test, most notably in Mf-negative patients (i.e. pre-patent or latent infections). PMID:24685183

  7. A potential role for the interaction of Wolbachia surface proteins with the Brugia malayi glycolytic enzymes and cytoskeleton in maintenance of endosymbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikow, Elena; Xu, Shulin; Liu, Jing; Bell, Aaron J; Ghedin, Elodie; Unnasch, Thomas R; Lustigman, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The human filarial parasite Brugia malayi harbors an endosymbiotic bacterium of the genus Wolbachia. The Wolbachia represent an attractive target for the control of filarial induced disease as elimination of the bacteria affects molting, reproduction and survival of the worms. The molecular basis for the symbiotic relationship between Wolbachia and their filarial hosts has yet to be elucidated. To identify proteins involved in this process, we focused on the Wolbachia surface proteins (WSPs), which are known to be involved in bacteria-host interactions in other bacterial systems. Two WSP-like proteins (wBm0152 and wBm0432) were localized to various host tissues of the B. malayi female adult worms and are present in the excretory/secretory products of the worms. We provide evidence that both of these proteins bind specifically to B. malayi crude protein extracts and to individual filarial proteins to create functional complexes. The wBm0432 interacts with several key enzymes involved in the host glycolytic pathway, including aldolase and enolase. The wBm0152 interacts with the host cytoskeletal proteins actin and tubulin. We also show these interactions in vitro and have verified that wBm0432 and B. malayi aldolase, as well as wBm0152 and B. malayi actin, co-localize to the vacuole surrounding Wolbachia. We propose that both WSP protein complexes interact with each other via the aldolase-actin link and/or via the possible interaction between the host's enolase and the cytoskeleton, and play a role in Wolbachia distribution during worm growth and embryogenesis.

  8. Rapid detection and identification of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, B. pahangi, and Dirofilaria immitis in mosquito vectors and blood samples by high resolution melting real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Intapan, Pewpan M; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Chungpivat, Sudchit; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Kaewkong, Worasak; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Choochote, Wej; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-12-01

    A simple, rapid, and high-throughput method for detection and identification of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, Brugia pahangi, and Dirofilaria immitis in mosquito vectors and blood samples was developed using a real-time PCR combined with high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. Amplicons of the 4 filarial species were generated from 5S rRNA and spliced leader sequences by the real-time PCR and their melting temperatures were determined by the HRM method. Melting of amplicons from W. bancrofti, B. malayi, D. immitis, and B. pahangi peaked at 81.5±0.2℃, 79.0±0.3℃, 76.8±0.1℃, and 79.9±0.1℃, respectively. This assay is relatively cheap since it does not require synthesis of hybridization probes. Its sensitivity and specificity were 100%. It is a rapid and technically simple approach, and an important tool for population surveys as well as molecular xenomonitoring of parasites in vectors.

  9. Hemagglutinins in Anopheles quadrimaculatus, strains susceptible and refractory to Brugia malayi, and their role in the immune response to filarial parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, J K; Knight, J W

    1997-01-01

    Hemagglutinins in the salivary gland extract and in the body fluid from strains of the mosquito, Anopheles quadrimaculatus, susceptible and refractory to the filarial parasite, Brugia malayi, had higher titers against Human A+, B- and O+, and sheep erythrocytes than against rabbit and jird erythrocytes. Hemagglutination activity in the body fluid was low in newly emerged females but increased and stabilized as they became older. Hemagglutination activity of the body fluid was not reduced by freezing at -20 degrees C, but it was destroyed following heating the body fluid to 60 degrees C and 100 degrees C for 45 min, indicating that the hemagglutinins are heat labile, and they are proteins or glycoproteins. Hemagglutinins in the salivary glands exhibited specificities for a broader range of carbohydrate moieties on the surface of Human A+ and sheep erythrocytes than those in the body fluid. Injections of specific carbohydrates in saline solution into B. malayi-infected females of the refractory strain of An. quadrimaculatus 24 hr after the infective blood meal showed that galactose, N-acetyl-D-galacto-samine, sorbose and mannose inhibited the increase in encapsulation (melanization) of L1 of B. malayi in the thoracic muscles of An. quadrimaculatus females when compared to those females injected with saline and other carbohydrates. The results suggest that hemagglutinins are present in the salivary gland extract and the body fluid of both strains of An. quadrimaculatus females and they may be involved in the immune response (encapsulation) to filarial parasites in An. quadrimaculatus.

  10. Chemical constituents and antifilarial activity of Lantana camara against human lymphatic filariid Brugia malayi and rodent filariid Acanthocheilonema viteae maintained in rodent hosts.

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    Misra, Namita; Sharma, Mithilesh; Raj, Kanwal; Dangi, Anil; Srivastava, Sudhir; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2007-02-01

    Lymphatic filariasis continues to be a major health problem in tropical and subtropical countries. A macrofilaricidal agent capable of eliminating adult filarial parasites is urgently needed. In the present study, we report the antifilarial activity in the extract of stem portion of the plant Lantana camara. The crude extract at 1 g/kg for 5 days by oral route killed 43.05% of the adult Brugia malayi parasites and sterilized 76% of surviving female worms in the rodent model Mastomys coucha. A 34.5% adulticidal activity along with sterilization of 66% of female worms could be demonstrated in the chloroform fraction. Remarkable antifilarial activity was observed in the adult B. malayi transplanted gerbil model where up to 80% of the adult worms could be killed at the same dose and all the surviving female parasites were found sterilized. The extract was also found effective against a subcutaneous rodent filariid Acanthocheilonema viteae maintained in Mastomys coucha, where it exerted strong microfilaricidal (95.04%) and sterilization (60.66%) efficacy with mild macrofilaricidal action. Two compounds, oleanonic acid and oleanolic acid, isolated from hexane and chloroform fractions showed LC100 at 31.25 and 62.5 mug/ml, respectively, on B. malayi in vitro. This is the first ever report on the antifilarial efficacy of Lantana camara.

  11. Wolbachia lipoproteins: abundance, localisation and serology of Wolbachia peptidoglycan associated lipoprotein and the Type IV Secretion System component, VirB6 from Brugia malayi and Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, Denis; Guimarães, Ana F; Molyneux, Gemma R; Johnston, Kelly L; Ford, Louise; Taylor, Mark J

    2014-10-06

    Lipoproteins are the major agonists of Wolbachia-dependent inflammatory pathogenesis in filariasis and a validated target for drug discovery. Here we characterise the abundance, localisation and serology of the Wolbachia lipoproteins: Wolbachia peptidoglycan associated lipoprotein and the Type IV Secretion System component, VirB6. We used proteomics to confirm lipoprotein presence and relative abundance; fractionation, immunoblotting and confocal and electron immuno-microscopy for localisation and ELISA for serological analysis. Proteomic analysis of Brugia malayi adult female protein extracts confirmed the presence of two lipoproteins, previously predicted through bioinformatics: Wolbachia peptidoglycan associated lipoprotein (wBmPAL) and the Type IV Secretion System component, VirB6 (wBmVirB6). wBmPAL was among the most abundant Wolbachia proteins present in an extract of adult female worms with wBmVirB6 only detected at a much lower abundance. This differential abundance was reflected in the immunogold-labelling, which showed wBmPAL localised at numerous sites within the bacterial membranes, whereas wBmVirB6 was present as a single cluster on each bacterial cell and also located within the bacterial membranes. Immunoblotting of fractionated extracts confirmed the localisation of wBmPAL to membranes and its absence from cytosolic fractions of C6/36 mosquito cells infected with wAlbB. In whole worm mounts, antibody labelling of both lipoproteins were associated with Wolbachia. Serological analysis showed that both proteins were immunogenic and raised antibody responses in the majority of individuals infected with Wuchereria bancrofti. Two Wolbachia lipoproteins, wBmPAL and wBmVirB6, are present in extracts of Brugia malayi with wBmPAL among the most abundant of Wolbachia proteins. Both lipoproteins localised to bacterial membranes with wBmVirB6 present as a single cluster suggesting a single Type IV Secretory System on each Wolbachia cell.

  12. Construction of bacterial artificial chromosome libraries from the parasitic nematode Brugia malayi and physical mapping of the genome of its Wolbachia endosymbiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jeremy M; Kumar, Sanjay; Ganatra, Mehul B; Kamal, Ibrahim H; Ware, Jennifer; Ingram, Jessica; Pope-Chappell, Jesse; Guiliano, David; Whitton, Claire; Daub, Jennifer; Blaxter, Mark L; Slatko, Barton E

    2004-05-01

    The parasitic nematode, Brugia malayi, causes lymphatic filariasis in humans, which in severe cases leads to the condition known as elephantiasis. The parasite contains an endosymbiotic alpha-proteobacterium of the genus Wolbachia that is required for normal worm development and fecundity and is also implicated in the pathology associated with infections by these filarial nematodes. Bacterial artificial chromosome libraries were constructed from B. malayi DNA and provide over 11-fold coverage of the nematode genome. Wolbachia genomic fragments were simultaneously cloned into the libraries giving over 5-fold coverage of the 1.1 Mb bacterial genome. A physical framework for the Wolbachia genome was developed by construction of a plasmid library enriched for Wolbachia DNA as a source of sequences to hybridise to high-density bacterial artificial chromosome colony filters. Bacterial artificial chromosome end sequencing provided additional Wolbachia probe sequences to facilitate assembly of a contig that spanned the entire genome. The Wolbachia sequences provided a marker approximately every 10 kb. Four rare-cutting restriction endonucleases were used to restriction map the genome to a resolution of approximately 60 kb and demonstrate concordance between the bacterial artificial chromosome clones and native Wolbachia genomic DNA. Comparison of Wolbachia sequences to public databases using BLAST algorithms under stringent conditions allowed confident prediction of 69 Wolbachia peptide functions and two rRNA genes. Comparison to closely related complete genomes revealed that while most sequences had orthologs in the genome of the Wolbachia endosymbiont from Drosophila melanogaster, there was no evidence for long-range synteny. Rather, there were a few cases of short-range conservation of gene order extending over regions of less than 10 kb. The molecular scaffold produced for the genome of the Wolbachia from B. malayi forms the basis of a genomic sequencing effort for

  13. Exome and Transcriptome Sequencing of Aedes aegypti Identifies a Locus That Confers Resistance to Brugia malayi and Alters the Immune Response

    KAUST Repository

    Juneja, Punita

    2015-03-27

    Many mosquito species are naturally polymorphic for their abilities to transmit parasites, a feature which is of great interest for controlling vector-borne disease. Aedes aegypti, the primary vector of dengue and yellow fever and a laboratory model for studying lymphatic filariasis, is genetically variable for its capacity to harbor the filarial nematode Brugia malayi. The genome of Ae. aegypti is large and repetitive, making genome resequencing difficult and expensive. We designed exome captures to target protein-coding regions of the genome, and used association mapping in a wild Kenyan population to identify a single, dominant, sex-linked locus underlying resistance. This falls in a region of the genome where a resistance locus was previously mapped in a line established in 1936, suggesting that this polymorphism has been maintained in the wild for the at least 80 years. We then crossed resistant and susceptible mosquitoes to place both alleles of the gene into a common genetic background, and used RNA-seq to measure the effect of this locus on gene expression. We found evidence for Toll, IMD, and JAK-STAT pathway activity in response to early stages of B. malayi infection when the parasites are beginning to die in the resistant genotype. We also found that resistant mosquitoes express anti-microbial peptides at the time of parasite-killing, and that this expression is suppressed in susceptible mosquitoes. Together, we have found that a single resistance locus leads to a higher immune response in resistant mosquitoes, and we identify genes in this region that may be responsible for this trait.

  14. Comparison of an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a radioallergosorbent test (RAST) for detection of IgE antibodies to Brugia malayi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyuni, Sitti; Van Ree, Ronald; Mangali, Andarias; Supali, Taniawati; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Sartono, Erliyani

    2003-01-01

    The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for specific IgE antibodies to Brugia malayi was compared with the radioallergosorbent test (RAST) for use in immunoepidemiological studies of lymphatic filariasis. Sera used were from individuals (aged 5-82 years) living in an area endemic for lymphatic filariasis in South Sulawesi, Indonesia. The percentage of positive IgE ELISA reactions (52.6%) among the population was lower than the percentage of positive RAST (94.5%). Although an overall significant concordance was found between the two assays (P RAST result were negative in the ELISA, whereas only 6 (0.8%) subjects were positive by ELISA, yet negative by RAST. When the population was divided into those with active infection (positive for anti-filarial IgG4) and those not infected (mf-negative and negative for anti-filarial IgG4), the correlation between the two tests was higher in the IgG4-positive (rho = 0.70) than in the IgG4-negative (rho = 0.52) group. These results indicate that in assessment of B. malayi specific IgE antibody, RAST is superior to ELISA. However, given the use of radioactivity in the RAST method and given our results obtained in subjects with high anti-filarial IgG4, one could consider using the IgE-ELISA in areas with high endemicity for filariasis. In areas with low endemicity or where control programs are implemented, sera will have to be tested by RAST.

  15. The TLR2/6 ligand PAM2CSK4 is a Th2 polarizing adjuvant in Leishmania major and Brugia malayi murine vaccine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Alice; Turner, Joseph D; Guimarães, Ana; Bates, Paul A; Taylor, Mark J

    2016-02-20

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in the innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens, and are the target of new vaccine adjuvants. TLR2 plays a role in parasite recognition and activation of immune responses during cutaneous leishmaniasis infection, suggesting that TLR2 could be targeted by adjuvants for use in Leishmania vaccines. We therefore explored using Pam2CSK4 (Pam2) and Pam3CSK4 (Pam3) lipopeptide adjuvants, which activate TLR2/6 and TLR2/1 heterodimers respectively, in vaccine models for parasitic infections. The use of lipopeptide adjuvants was explored using two vaccine models. For cutaneous leishmaniasis, the lipopeptide adjuvants Pam2 and Pam3 were compared to that of the Th1-driving double-stranded DNA TLR9 agonist CpG for their ability to improve the efficacy of the autoclaved Leishmania major (ALM) vaccine to protect against L. major infection. The ability of Pam2 to enhance the efficacy of a soluble Brugia malayi microfilariae extract (BmMfE) vaccine to protect against filarial infection was also assessed in a peritoneal infection model of B. malayi filariasis. Parasite antigen-specific cellular and humoral immune responses were assessed post-challenge. The use of lipopeptides in ALM-containing vaccines did not provide any protection upon infection with L. major, and Pam2 exacerbated the disease severity in vaccinated mice post-challenge. Pam2, and to a lesser extent Pam3, were able to elevate antigen-specific immune responses post-challenge in this model, but these responses displayed a skewed Th2 phenotype as characterised by elevated levels of IgG1. In the B. malayi vaccine model, the use of Pam2 as an adjuvant with BmMfE induced significant protective immunity to the same level as inclusion of an Alum adjuvant. Here, both Pam2 and Alum were found to enhance antigen-specific antibody production post-challenge, and Pam2 significantly elevated levels of antigen-specific IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 produced by splenocytes. These

  16. The role of local secondary structure in the function of the trans splicing motif of Brugia malayi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Canhui; Chauhan, Chitra; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    A 7nt motif (the trans-splicing motif or TSM) was previously shown to be necessary and sufficient to direct trans-splicing of transgenic mRNAs in transgenic B. malayi embryos. Insertion of the TSM into two genes lacking a TSM homologue resulted in-trans splicing of transgenic mRNAs from one transgene but not the other, suggesting that local sequence context might affect TSM function. To test this hypothesis, constructs inserting the TSM into different positions of two B. malayi genes were tested for their ability to support trans-splicing of transgenic mRNAs. Transgenic mRNAs derived from constructs in which the insertion of the TSM did not result in a perturbation of the local predicted secondary structure were trans-spliced, while those in which the TSM perturbed the local secondary structure were not. These data suggest that local secondary structure plays a role in the ability of the TSM to direct trans-splicing. PMID:19852985

  17. PENENTUAN JENIS NYAMUK MansoniaSEBAGAI TERSANGKA VEKTOR FILARIASIS Brugia malayi DAN HEWAN ZOONOSIS DI KABUPATEN MUARO JAMBI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoso Santoso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakFilariasis merupakan penyakit yang tidak mudah menular. Filariasis adalah penyakit yang ditularkan oleh nyamuk sebagai vector. Jenis nyamuk yang dapat berperan sebagai vector filariasis dipengaruhi oleh jenis cacing penyebab filaria. Brugia spp. umumnya ditularkan oleh nyamuk Mansonia spp dan Anopheles spp. Vektor dan hewan zoonosis merupakan salah satu factor yang dapat perlu mendapat perhatian dalam pengendalian filariasis. Penelitian terhadap vector dan hewan zoonosis telah dilakukan di Kabupaten Muaro Jambi untuk mengidentifikasi bionomik vektor dan kemungkinan adanya hewan zoonosis yang berperan sebagai penular filariasis. Desain penelitian adalah observasi, yaitu dengan melakukan penangkapan nyamuk dan pemeriksaan darah terhadap kucing. Jumlah kucing yang diperiksa sebanyak 18 ekor. Kucing yang positif microfilaria sebanyak 1 ekor. Jumlah nyamuk Mansonia spp. tertangkap sebanyak 1,167 ekor yang terdiri dari 6 species. Spesies nyamuk tertangkap paling banyak adalah Mansonia uniformis sebanyak 1.010 ekor dengan angka kekerapan 1,0. Berdasarkan hasil tersebut, maka diperlukan peran serta masyarakat untuk mengurangi kepadatan nyamuk dengan membersihkan genangan air dan mencegah gigitan nyamuk. Selain itu diperlukan juga penanganan terhadap hewan yang bertindak sebagai zoonosis dengan memberikan pengobatan terhadap kucing agar tidak menjadi sumber infeksi.Keywords : filariasis, Mansonia, vektor, zoonosis, Muaro Jambi.AbstractFilariasisis noteasily transmitted diseases. Filariasisis transmitted by mosquito vectors. Various types of mosquitoes can act as vectors of filariasis, depending on the type of microfilaria. Brugia spp. are generally transmitted by Mansonia spp and Anopheles spp. Vector and zoonotic animal are the factors that can transmit filariasis and need to have attention for controlling filariasis. Research on vector and zoonotic had been done in Muaro Jambi to determine bionomic vector and the possibility of animals can

  18. Intracellular melanization in the mosquito Anopheles quadrimaculatus (Diptera: Culicidae) against the filarial nematodes, Brugia spp. (Nematoda: Filarioidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, J K; Knight, J W; Vickery, A C

    1989-05-01

    Intracellular melanization responses to developing larvae of Brugia species (B. malayi (Buckley), B. pahangi (Buckley and Edeson), and B. patei (Buckley, Nelson, and Heisch] in the thoracic muscle fibers of eight strains of Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say were first observed 48 to 72 h after an infective blood meal. Three to 4 d later, large numbers of melanized first-stage larvae were found within the thoracic muscle fibers. These intracellular responses were in addition to the extracellular responses to microfilariae and microfilarial sheaths of B. pahangi in the abdominal hemocoel of An. quadrimaculatus described in literature. Simultaneously, normal development of larvae of the three Brugia species also was observed in all eight strains of An. quadrimaculatus. Comparisons of melanized first-stage larvae and normally developing larvae of the three Brugia species in the thoracic muscle fibers of the eight strains of An. quadrimaculatus showed that there were distinct variations in numbers of melanized and developing larvae and percentage of females with melanized and developing larvae in different strains. Numbers of melanized first-stage larvae reflected the extent of refractoriness of An. quadrimaculatus strains. Fully melanized larvae showed no abnormalities in parasite organelles, indicating that refractoriness is due to an enhanced ability of the host to recognize the living parasite. Further comparison among the strains suggested that the mutants, Yellow Larvae and Vero Beach Colony were significantly more susceptible, and Red Stripe was the most refractory to all three Brugia species. Thus, the gene(s) controlling susceptibility and refractoriness to all three Brugia species probably occurs on the same autosomal chromosome as the mutations in these strains. The significance of intracellular melanization of filarial larvae is discussed with reference to the melanization responses to different parasites in other mosquitoes.

  19. Genomes of parasitic nematodes (Meloidogyne hapla, Meloidogyne incognita, Ascaris suum and Brugia malayi) have a reduced complement of small RNA interference pathway genes: knockdown can reduce host infectivity of M. incognita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Sadia; Fosu-Nyarko, John; Jones, Michael G K

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) as an endogenous mechanism of gene regulation in a range of eukaryotes has resulted in its extensive use as a tool for functional genomic studies. It is important to study the mechanisms which underlie this phenomenon in different organisms, and in particular to understand details of the effectors that modulate its effectiveness. The aim of this study was to identify and compare genomic sequences encoding genes involved in the RNAi pathway of four parasitic nematodes: the plant parasites Meloidogyne hapla and Meloidogyne incognita and the animal parasites Ascaris suum and Brugia malayi because full genomic sequences were available-in relation to those of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The data generated was then used to identify some potential targets for control of the root knot nematode, M. incognita. Of the 84 RNAi pathway genes of C. elegans used as model in this study, there was a 42-53 % reduction in the number of effectors in the parasitic nematodes indicating substantial differences in the pathway between species. A gene each from six functional groups of the RNAi pathway of M. incognita was downregulated using in vitro RNAi, and depending on the gene (drh-3, tsn-1, rrf-1, xrn-2, mut-2 and alg-1), subsequent plant infection was reduced by up to 44 % and knockdown of some genes (i.e. drh-3, mut-2) also resulted in abnormal nematode development. The information generated here will contribute to defining targets for more robust nematode control using the RNAi technology.

  20. Brugia malayi Antigen (BmA Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection but Neither BmA nor ES-62 Alter HIV-1 Infectivity of DC Induced CD4+ Th-Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily E I M Mouser

    Full Text Available One of the hallmarks of HIV-1 disease is the association of heightened CD4+ T-cell activation with HIV-1 replication. Parasitic helminths including filarial nematodes have evolved numerous and complex mechanisms to skew, dampen and evade human immune responses suggesting that HIV-1 infection may be modulated in co-infected individuals. Here we studied the effects of two filarial nematode products, adult worm antigen from Brugia malayi (BmA and excretory-secretory product 62 (ES-62 from Acanthocheilonema viteae on HIV-1 infection in vitro. Neither BmA nor ES-62 influenced HIV-1 replication in CD4+ enriched T-cells, with either a CCR5- or CXCR4-using virus. BmA, but not ES-62, had the capacity to bind the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN thereby inhibiting HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ enriched T-cells. As for their effect on DCs, neither BmA nor ES-62 could enhance or inhibit DC maturation as determined by CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression, or the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α. As expected, due to the unaltered DC phenotype, no differences were found in CD4+ T helper (Th cell phenotypes induced by DCs treated with either BmA or ES-62. Moreover, the HIV-1 susceptibility of the Th-cell populations induced by BmA or ES-62 exposed DCs was unaffected for both CCR5- and CXCR4-using HIV-1 viruses. In conclusion, although BmA has the potential capacity to interfere with HIV-1 transmission or initial viral dissemination through preventing the virus from interacting with DCs, no differences in the Th-cell polarizing capacity of DCs exposed to BmA or ES-62 were observed. Neither antigenic source demonstrated beneficial or detrimental effects on the HIV-1 susceptibility of CD4+ Th-cells induced by exposed DCs.

  1. Cloning and expression analysis of two mucin-like genes encoding microfilarial sheath surface proteins of the parasitic nematodes Brugia and Litomosoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirzmann, Jörg; Hintz, Martin; Kasper, Martin; Shresta, Tilak R; Taubert, Anja; Conraths, Franz J; Geyer, Rudolf; Stirm, Stephan; Zahner, Horst; Hobom, Gerd

    2002-12-06

    In several filarial genera the first stage larvae (microfilariae) are enclosed by an eggshell-derived sheath that provides a major interface between the parasite and the host immune system. Analysis of the polypeptide constituents of the microfilarial sheath from the cotton rat filaria Litomosoides sigmodontis identified two abundant surface glycoproteins: Shp3a and Shp3. The corresponding genes and the orthologues of the human parasite Brugia malayi and the rodent filaria Brugia pahangi were cloned and sequenced. They encode secreted, mucin-like proteins with N-terminal Ser/Thr-rich repeats and a C-terminal anchor domain rich in aromatic amino acids. About 75% of the protein molecular masses result from post-translational modifications. The Ser/Thr-rich motifs are supposed to serve as targets for dimethylaminoethanol-phosphate substitutions. These modifications were detected only on the sheaths of the late developmental stage of stretched microfilariae, corresponding with the expression of the proteins in the epithelium of the distal part of the uterus and the specific transcription of shp3 and shp3a in the anterior female worm segment. Genomic analysis of all three species demonstrated a conserved linkage of the two genes. Their transcripts undergo cis- and trans-splicing. The transcription start sites of the primary transcripts were determined for the L. sigmodontis genes. The core promoter regions are remarkably conserved between the paralogue genes Ls-shp3a and Ls-shp3 and their orthologues in Brugia, implicating conserved regulatory elements.

  2. A FIELD STUDY USING THE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (PCR TO SCREEN FOR BRUGIA MICROFILARIAE IN HUMAN AND ANIMAL BLOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Glover

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Blood samples from 43 humans and 14 cats positive with Brugia microfilariae were analyzed in a field study in Tanjung Pinang, Indonesia. The study used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR to compare the sensitivity of radioactive and biotinylated species-specific oligonuleotide probes. The cloning char­acterization of the Hha I repeat DNA family found in filarial parasites of the genus Brugia, and the development of species-specific probes for B.malayi and B.pahangi based on these repeats has been described elsewhere (PNAS USA 83: 797-801; Mol.Biochem. Parasitol. 2$: 163-170. The use of radioisotopes for labelling DNA probes is both expensive and inconvenient. To replace these probes, biotinylated DNA probes have been designed for non- radioactive detection of B.malayi and B.pahangi. These oligonucleotide probes have long tails of biotinylated uridine residues added to their 5' end. As little as 100 pg of Brugia DNA can be detected on dot blot with these probes. Detection of the probes is based on an avidin-alkaline phosphatase colorimetric assay. In order to distinguish between infected from uninfected individuals, it is necessary to detect the amount of DNA in one microfilaria (about 60 pg. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR is a procedure in which a small amount of DNA can be amplified up to 1 million-fold. A part of each sample in this study was PCR amplified and compared with the unamplified portion using both the radioactive and biotinylated DNA probe. The PCR amplified samples were accurately identified by both the radioactive and biotinylated B.malayi and B.pahangi probes. Even samples with as few as two microfilariae per lOOul of blood were easily detected. The samples that were not PCR amplified were accurately identified after only long exposures (greater than one week to the radioactive probes. The biotinylated probes, were not sensitive enough for accurate identification of the non-PCR amplified samples. The polymerase chain

  3. Brugia spp. and Litomosoides carinii: identification of a covalently cross-linked microfilarial sheath matrix protein (shp2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirzmann, J; Schnaufer, A; Hintz, M; Conraths, F; Stirm, S; Zahner, H; Hobom, G

    1995-03-01

    A microfilarial sheath protein gene (shp2) coding for the major constituent of the insoluble, cross-linked sheath remnant (SR) from Brugia malayi, Brugia pahangi and Litomosoides carinii has been cloned and sequenced, based on peptide partial amino-acid sequences. All three closely related single-copy shp2 genes in the two genera carry a single intron in identical position; shp2 mRNAs are post-transcriptionally modified by both cis-splicing and trans-splicing. In accordance with their extracellular destinations the encoded proteins include signal peptide sequences; molecular masses of approx. 23 kDa are hence predicted for the mature secreted polypeptides. In their structures sheath matrix proteins shp2 may be regarded as extreme cases of a modular constitution, since these proteins largely consist of two different segments of multiple sequence repetitions, PAA and QYPQAP (or QYPQ), separated by elements of unique sequence. Extreme insolubility and cross-linking are likely to originate from these repetitive sequences within shp2, and to constitute the basic properties of a microfilarial matrix largely consisting of an shp2 network.

  4. Gene : CBRC-GGOR-01-0587 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available etical protein [Brugia malayi] gb|EDP38806.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Brugia malayi] 2e-19 32% MAWLAGWLGRLGWLAGLAGLVGWLAW...MAWLAGWLGWLGWQAFSAGLAGLAGRVAWLAWLAGWLGWLGWLGGLAGLAGWLAWLAGSRGWLPGLAGLAVWLAWVAWLAWLAGWLA...GLAGWVAGWLGWLGGFARLAVWAAWLPWVAGWLGWLGWLGWPAGLAGLAGLAGLAGRLAWLAWLAAWLGWLGWMASWLAWLAVWLGWLRWLAGLAGLGGSLAW

  5. Repeat region of Brugia malayi sheath protein (Shp-1) carries Dominant B epitopes recognized in filarial endemic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawaharlal, Jeya Prita Parasurama; Madhumathi, Jayaprakasam; Prince, Rajaiah Prabhu; Kaliraj, Perumal

    2014-09-01

    Transmission of lymphatic filariasis is mediated through microfilariae (L1 stage of the parasite) which is encased in an eggshell called sheath. The sheath protein Shp-1 stabilizes the structure due to the unique repeat region with Met-Pro-Pro-Gln-Gly sequences. Microfilarial proteins could be used as transmission blocking vaccines. Since the repeat region of Shp-1 was predicted to carry putative B epitopes, this region was used to analyze its reactivity with clinical samples towards construction of peptide vaccine. In silico analysis of Shp-1 showed the presence of B epitopes in the region 49-107. The polypeptide epitopic region Shp-149-107 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Antibody reactivity of the Shp-149-107 construct was evaluated in filarial endemic population by ELISA. Putatively immune endemic normals (EN) showed significantly high reactivity (P similar to that of whole protein proving that this region carries B epitopes responsible for its humoral response in humans. Thus this can be employed for inducing anti-microfilarial immunity in the infected population that may lead to reduction in transmission intensity and also it could be used along with other epitopes from different stages of the parasite in order to manage the disease effectively.

  6. Life cycle of Brugia pahangi (Nematoda) in nude mice, C3H/HeN (nu/nu).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, A L; Vickery, A C; Winters, A; Sodeman, W A

    1982-08-01

    The development of Brugia pahangi (Nematoda: Filarioidea) was studied in nude (congenitally athymic) mice C3H/HeN (nu/nu) and in their phenotypically normal littermates (nu/+). Nude mice were highly susceptible to this parasite. As in the natural host (the cat), the nematodes' third molt in nude mice occurred at 7 to 10 days. The final molt occurred at about 24 days for male worms and 33 days for female worms. Adult worms were smaller than those from other hosts, such as the cat. After inoculation of various numbers of infective larvae, recoveries of adult worms averaged about 15% of the inoculum. In long-term infections initiated with 100 larvae, about 75% of the worms localized in the heart or lungs. Patent infections were seen as early as day 50 PI. Microfilaremia developed in most nude mice given 100, 50, or 25 infective larvae, but was less frequent in those given only 10. Mean filaremias generally rose during the first 6 mo, but in individuals usually did not exceed 500-600/20 mm3 of blood. As in the Mongolian jird, intraperitoneal inoculations yielded large quantities of worms and microfilariae. Few worms could be recovered from normal mice after day 40, even when large (1,000 larvae) inocula were used. Microfilaremia was not detected in normal mice. Although recoveries of adult worms from some nude females were not as high as those from nude males, neither nude nor normal mice showed consistent evidence of a differential susceptibility based on sex. Given the strong, consistent dichotomy of response to B. pahangi between nude and normal mice, this system may be useful in studies of protective immune responses in filariasis.

  7. Dicty_cDB: FC-AL11 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AW179914 |AW179914.1 SWYD25CAU05D03SK Brugia malayi young adult day 25 cDNA (SAW99MLW-BmYD25) Brugia malayi...BE132434 |BE132434.1 SWYACAL09G02SK Brugia malayi young adult cDNA (SAW99MLW-BmYA) Brugia malayi cDNA clone

  8. Exsheathment of microfilariae of Brugia pahangi in Anopheles quadrimaculatus and Culex quinquefasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, C M; Chen, C C

    1987-12-01

    In order to determine whether the exsheathment patterns described in our previous study occurred in other microfilaria-mosquito systems, exsheathment of microfilariae of Brugia pahangi was studied in two species of mosquitoes. The results of the quantitative observation revealed that the microfilariae of Brugia pahangi tend to carry their sheaths into the haemocoel of Anopheles quadrimaculatus and Culex quinquefasciatus within 4 hr after infected blood meals. The percentage of the sheathed microfilariae in the haemocoel progressively decreased to 0% at 24 hr post-ingestion. Microfilariae remaining in the midgut of both species of mosquitoes were recorded most frequently casting off their sheaths in the midgut 2 hr post-ingestion. The percentage of microfilariae exsheathed in the midgut progressively increased to about 100% and 40% 24 hr post-ingestion in Anopheles quadrimaculatus and Culex quinquefasciatus respectively. These results confirm that exsheathment of microfilariae of Brugia pahangi occurs both in the haemocoel and in the midgut of two species of mosquitoes.

  9. Disease: H01086 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available fti Brugia malayi [GN:bmy] Brugia timori ... Diethylcarbamazine [DG:DG01024] Ivermectin [DR:D00804] Albendazo...20 million infected, especially in tropical regions. Wuchereria bancrofti accounts for 91% of the cases whil...e Brugia malayi and B. timori (which has a distribution restricted to South and S

  10. Visceral larva migrans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasite infection - visceral larva migrans; VLM; Toxocariasis; Ocular larva migrans; Larva migrans visceralis ... Saunders; 2016:chap 39. Nash TE. Visceral larvae migrans and other uncommon helminth infections. In: Bennett JE, ...

  11. Human infection with sub-periodic Brugia spp. in Gampaha District, Sri Lanka: a threat to filariasis elimination status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallawarachchi, Chandana H; Nilmini Chandrasena, T G A; Premaratna, Ranjan; Mallawarachchi, S M N S M; de Silva, Nilanthi R

    2018-01-29

    Post-mass drug administration (MDA) surveillance during the lymphatic filariasis (LF) elimination program in Sri Lanka, revealed the re-emergence of brugian filariasis after four decades. This study was done with the objectives of investigating the epidemiology and age-specific vulnerability to infection. Surveillance was done using night blood smears (NBS) and the Brugia rapid test (BRT), to detect microfilaria (MF) and anti-Brugia IgG4 antibodies in blood samples collected from an age-stratified population enrolled from two high-risk study areas (SA)s, Pubudugama and Wedamulla in the Gampaha District. The periodicity of the re-emergent Brugia spp. was characterized by quantitative estimation of MF in blood collected periodically over 24 h using nucleopore-membrane filtration method. Of 994 participants [Pubudugama 467 (47.9%) and Wedamulla 527 (53%)] screened by NBS, two and zero cases were positive for MF at Pubudugama (MF rate, 0.43) and Wedamulla (MF rate, 0), respectively, with an overall MF rate of 0.2. Of the two MF positives, one participant had a W. bancrofti while the other had a Brugia spp. infection. Of 984 valid BRT test readings [Pubudugama (n = 461) and Wedamulla (n = 523)], two and seven were positive for anti-brugia antibodies by BRT at Pubudugama (antibody rate 0.43) and Wedamulla (antibody rate 1.34), respectively, with an overall antibody rate of 0.91. Both MF positives detected from SAs and two of three other Brugia spp. MF positives detected at routine surveillance by the National Anti-Filariasis Campaign (AFC) tested negative by the BRT. Association of Brugia spp. infections with age were not evident due to the low case numbers. MF was observed in the peripheral circulation throughout the day (subperiodic) with peak counts occurring at 21 h indicating nocturnal sub-periodicity. There is the low-level persistence of bancroftian filariasis and re-emergence of brugian filariasis in the Gampaha District, Sri Lanka. The periodicity

  12. Dicty_cDB: SHG115 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DV316421 |DV316421.1 NABOI60TF Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABOI60...DV316420 |DV316420.1 NABOI60T1O Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABOI60...DV298771 |DV298771.1 NABPS65TR Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABPS65

  13. Dicty_cDB: SHD538 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DV316421 |DV316421.1 NABOI60TF Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABOI60...DV316420 |DV316420.1 NABOI60T1O Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABOI60...DV298771 |DV298771.1 NABPS65TR Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABPS65...DV298769 |DV298769.1 NABPS65TF Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABPS65

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_006833 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available chia ... endosymbiont strain TRS of Brugia malayi] ... Length = 74 ... Query: 12 DIEAKIKKIVLEHISKD...VEKFNNSSKLSEHGADSLDAVEIIMAAEEEFGIEIPDEDAQKM 71 ... DIEAKIKKIVLEHISKDVEKFNNS...SKLSEHGADSLDAVEIIMAAEEEFGIEIPDEDAQKM Sbjct: 1 ... DIEAKIKKIVLEHISKDVEKFNNSSKLSEHGADSLDAVEIIMAAEEEFGIEIPDEDAQKM 60 ...

  15. GAMBARAN PERKEMBANGAN ANTIBODI TERHADAP KOMPONEN PROTEIN CACING MIKROFILARIA MALAYI DARI TRANSMIGRAN DI SULAWESI TENGGARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basundari Sri Utami

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The immune response to microfilarial antigen in malayan filariasis was found more prominent in ami-crofilaremic individuals than in the micro filaremics. It has been shown that in amicrofilaremic individuals antibody plays a role in reducing micro filaremiae. The targets antigens of antibody (IgG were shown to be protein components of microfilariae with molecular weight of 75, 70 and 25 Kd. This prospective study was aimed at detecting IgG against microfilariae in transmigrats, who had settled into an filarial endemic area. Sera of 10 individuals at 8, 13, 26, 39 and 52 moths after settling, were examined by ELISA and Wes­tern Blott against microfilaria of B. malayi. Four out of 10 transmigrants showed IgG that recognized the protein components of 77, 70 and 31 Kd and were shown at 39, 52 and 8 months after settling respectively, The IgG against components of 77 and 70 Kd were revealed later than the one against 31 Kd.

  16. A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF MALAYAN FILARIASIS IN PUDING VILLAGE, JAMBI PROVINCE (SUMATERA, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudomo M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Beberapa daerah di Propinsi Jambi akan dikembangkan menjadi daerah transmigrasi, satu di antara­nya adalah daerah Kumpeh yang terletak berdekatan dengan daerah endemik filariasis malayi. Desa yang paling dekat dengan lokasi transmigrasi tersebut adalah desa Puding. Penelitian pendahuluan tentang penyakit filariasis telah dikerjakan di desa Puding untuk mengetahui tingkat endemisitas, periodisitas B. malayi, fauna nyamuk, jenis nyamuk yang potensial menjadi vektor filariasis, hospes reservoir dan keadaan sosial-ekonomi-budaya penduduk setempat. Mf rate pada penduduk desa Puding adalah 18,7% dan dari B. malayi jenis subperiodiknokturna. Nyamuk yang tertangkap terdiri dari enam genera yaitu genus Anopheles, Aedes, Culex, Coquilletidia, Mansonia dan Tripteroides. Dari enam genera tersebut yang potensial untuk menjadi vektor filariasis adalah genus Mansonia dan ini didukung dengan diketemukannyd larva stadium L3 (infektif Brugia sp di tubuh nyamuk tersebut. Keadaan sosial-ekonomi-budaya, khususnya menyangkut adat istiadat dan kebiasaan penduduk setempat, telah dipelajari.

  17. Mosquito infection responses to developing filarial worms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M Erickson

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Human lymphatic filariasis is a mosquito-vectored disease caused by the nematode parasites Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori. These are relatively large roundworms that can cause considerable damage in compatible mosquito vectors. In order to assess how mosquitoes respond to infection in compatible mosquito-filarial worm associations, microarray analysis was used to evaluate transcriptome changes in Aedes aegypti at various times during B. malayi development. Changes in transcript abundance in response to the different stages of B. malayi infection were diverse. At the early stages of midgut and thoracic muscle cell penetration, a greater number of genes were repressed compared to those that were induced (20 vs. 8. The non-feeding, intracellular first-stage larvae elicited few differences, with 4 transcripts showing an increased and 9 a decreased abundance relative to controls. Several cecropin transcripts increased in abundance after parasites molted to second-stage larvae. However, the greatest number of transcripts changed in abundance after larvae molted to third-stage larvae and migrated to the head and proboscis (120 induced, 38 repressed, including a large number of putative, immunity-related genes (approximately 13% of genes with predicted functions. To test whether the innate immune system of mosquitoes was capable of modulating permissiveness to the parasite, we activated the Toll and Imd pathway controlled rel family transcription factors Rel1 and Rel2 (by RNA interference knockdown of the pathway's negative regulators Cactus and Caspar during the early stages of infection with B. malayi. The activation of either of these immune signaling pathways, or knockdown of the Toll pathway, did not affect B. malayi in Ae. aegypti. The possibility of LF parasites evading mosquito immune responses during successful development is discussed.

  18. Dicty_cDB: SHA714 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 48 0.17 1 AY330618 |AY330618.1 Brugia malayi independent phosphoglycerate mutase isoform 2 (iPGM) mRNA...48 0.17 1 AY330617 |AY330617.1 Brugia malayi independent phosphoglycerate mutase isoform 1 (iPGM) mRNA

  19. Dicty_cDB: SHF327 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 48 0.25 1 AY330618 |AY330618.1 Brugia malayi independent phosphoglycerate mutase isoform 2 (iPGM) mRNA...48 0.25 1 AY330617 |AY330617.1 Brugia malayi independent phosphoglycerate mutase isoform 1 (iPGM) mRNA

  20. Dicty_cDB: VHC573 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DV363639 |DV363639.1 NACAR32TR Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NACAR32...DV363638 |DV363638.1 NACAR32TF Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NACAR32

  1. Dicty_cDB: VHB787 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DV363639 |DV363639.1 NACAR32TR Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NACAR32...DV363638 |DV363638.1 NACAR32TF Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NACAR32

  2. Larvae for layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lotte; Fischer, Christian Holst; Nordentoft, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Companies and researchers are in close collaboration developing a container- based system for cultivating fly larvae at organic poultry farms. In a one week process, manure will be converted to compost and the live larvae will be harvested and used for feeding laying hens. The larvae are expected...... to have a beneficial effect on the growth performance, intestinal health and on animal behavior in flocks....

  3. Perreyia flavipes larvae toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djeison L. Raymundo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Fresh or thawed Perreyia flavipes larvae were ground and mixed with water and orally ad ministered to sheep. At 5mg/kg, neither clinical nor enzymatic changes were observed. Unique do ses of 7.5 and 10mg/kg induced characteristic clinical signs of Perreyia sp. larvae poisoning, increased GGT and AST values, and decreased glycemic curves. However, doses of 5, 10, and 15mg/kg repeated at 30 or 15 days intervals caused no disease and mild disease followed by death, respectively. These fin dings indicate that these animals probably developed some degree of tolerance to the toxins in P. flavipes larvae. Ultrastru ctural examination of liver revealed proliferation of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum in the hepatocytes, which may be associated with an increased ability to metabolize toxins and could consequently lead to the tolerance observed in the present study. Further investigations may elucidate whether such tolerance effects could be applied as a control measure for P. flavipes poioning or other hepatotoxic diseases. In addition, clinicopathological findings were discussed.

  4. Berbagai Cara Pengendalian Larva Nyamuk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nungki Hapsari Suryaningtyas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tindakan pencegahan dengan memberantas sarang nyamuk dan membunuh larva serta nyamuk dewasa terus digalakkan. Stadium pradewasa atau larva dapat dikontrol secara biologi maupun kimiawi.1 Berikut adalah beberapa cara pengendalian larva nyamuk.Pengendalian secara biologi Beberapa organisme yang efektif untuk mengendalikan larva secara biologi diantaranya adalah Ikan (larvavivorous fish,Aplocheilus panchax (ikan kepala timah, Ctenops vittatus (ikan cupang,Oreochromis (Tilapia mossambicus (ikan nila dan Cyprinus carpio (ikan tombro, larva nyamuk dari genus Toxorhynchites, Capung (Dragonflies/Labellula . Kelompok Udang (Cyclopoid copepods Jenis Copepoda yang tersebar sebagai plankton dan bentos ini bersifat predator yang efektif untuk mengendalikan stadium pradewasa nyamuk instar satu dan instar dua. Pada suatu penelitian di Polynesia Perancis terbukti bahwa M. aspericornis pengaruhnya tidak konsisten terhadap larva Ae. aegypti yang ditemukan berada di tangki air, drum dan sumur yang tertutup. Keadaan tersebut tampaknya bergantung pada tersedianya mikrofauna di tempat perkembangbiakannya yang dibutuhkan untuk pertumbuhan Copepoda tersebut

  5. No evidence of Wolbachia endosymbiosis with Loa loa and Mansonella perstans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grobusch, M. P.; Kombila, M.; Autenrieth, I.; Mehlhorn, H.; Kremsner, P. G.

    2003-01-01

    Endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria from different filarial species, including major pathogens of humans such as Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Onchocerca volvulus, seem to play an important role in the development, viability and fertility of these worms. Wolbachia trigger inflammatory host

  6. Dicty_cDB: VHC396 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 DW189601 |DW189601.1 EST05871 Larval Stage 1 Aedes aegypti cDNA clone AEMR-LS1-006-D08-U.AB1 5', mRNA...DV299090 |DV299090.1 NABNN04TF Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABNN04...DV299012 |DV299012.1 NABNN04TRB Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABNN04

  7. Cutaneous larva migrans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Wieczorek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM is a tropical zoonosis, caused by parasites, usually Ancylostoma braziliense. Humans are an accidental host. Polish patients with CLM are usually tourists visiting tropical and subtropical countries. The first symptoms do not always appear as creeping eruptions, which complicates the diagnosis. Objective. To present the case of a man with CLM after returning from Thailand to Poland and associated diagnostic difficulties. Case report. We present a case of a 28-year-old man who returned to Poland from Thailand. The first symptoms appeared as disseminated pruritic papules. No improvement after treatment with corticosteroids and antihistamines was observed. The diagnosis was established after the appearance of serpentine erythemas and improvement after albendazole therapy. Conclusions. In the case of returnees from exotic countries suffering from raised, pruritic rashes, and no improvement after treatment with corticosteroids and antihistamines, parasitic etiology should be considered.

  8. Desiccation resistance of Chironomid larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Frouz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to desiccation in larvae of eight species of aquatic, semiaquatic and terrestrial chironomids (Pseudodiamesa branickii, Macropelopia sp., Prodiamesa olivacea, Micropsectra sp., Chironomus riparius, Chironomus dorsalis, Metriocnemus martini and Camptocladius stercorarius was studied. The larvae were desiccated in exicator at constant conditions (15 °C, 80% RH and changes in moisture and body water content was recorded. The LD-50 for loss of body water was calculated. The lowest resistance to loss of body water was found in larvae from subfamilies Tanypodinae and Diamesinae Macropelopia sp. and P. branickii. They survived loss of 49.7 and 56.6% of original water content (presented values are LD-50. On the other hand the highest resistance to water loss was found in C. dorsalis. M. martini and C. stercorarius. The larvae of these species may survive loss of 67.4, 76.6 and 84.2% of original water content. Nevertheless the survival time under experimental conditions depends more closely on larval size than on lethal level of water loss. The smaller larvae desiccated faster and perished sooner than large ones despite they tolerate higher loss of body water.

  9. Repurposing auranofin as a lead candidate for treatment of lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A Bulman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Two major human diseases caused by filariid nematodes are onchocerciasis, or river blindness, and lymphatic filariasis, which can lead to elephantiasis. The drugs ivermectin, diethylcarbamazine (DEC, and albendazole are used in control programs for these diseases, but are mainly effective against the microfilarial stage and have minimal or no effect on adult worms. Adult Onchocerca volvulus and Brugia malayi worms (macrofilariae can live for up to 15 years, reproducing and allowing the infection to persist in a population. Therefore, to support control or elimination of these two diseases, effective macrofilaricidal drugs are necessary, in addition to current drugs. In an effort to identify macrofilaricidal drugs, we screened an FDA-approved library with adult worms of Brugia spp. and Onchocerca ochengi, third-stage larvae (L3s of Onchocerca volvulus, and the microfilariae of both O. ochengi and Loa loa. We found that auranofin, a gold-containing drug used for rheumatoid arthritis, was effective in vitro in killing both Brugia spp. and O. ochengi adult worms and in inhibiting the molting of L3s of O. volvulus with IC50 values in the low micromolar to nanomolar range. Auranofin had an approximately 43-fold higher IC50 against the microfilariae of L. loa compared with the IC50 for adult female O. ochengi, which may be beneficial if used in areas where Onchocerca and Brugia are co-endemic with L. loa, to prevent severe adverse reactions to the drug-induced death of L. loa microfilariae. Further testing indicated that auranofin is also effective in reducing Brugia adult worm burden in infected gerbils and that auranofin may be targeting the thioredoxin reductase in this nematode.

  10. Workbook on the Identification of Mosquito Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Harry D.; And Others

    This self-instructional booklet is designed to enable public health workers identify larvae of some important North American mosquito species. The morphological features of larvae of the various genera and species are illustrated in a programed booklet, which also contains illustrated taxonomic keys to the larvae of 11 North American genera and to…

  11. Coral larvae move toward reef sounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, M.J.A.; Marhaver, K.L.; Huijbers, C.M.; Nagelkerken, I.; Simpson, S.D.

    2010-01-01

    Free-swimming larvae of tropical corals go through a critical life-phase when they return from the open ocean to select a suitable settlement substrate. During the planktonic phase of their life cycle, the behaviours of small coral larvae (<1 mm) that influence settlement success are difficult to

  12. [Cutaneous larva migrans in travelers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, S; Ruiz, L; Gascón, J; Corachán, M

    1992-02-15

    Fifteen cases of cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) diagnosed in transcontinental travellers over a period of 4 years in the Department of Tropical Medicine in Hospital Clinic i Provincial of Barcelona were reviewed. The frequency of this disease as an imported pathology is on the increase and is related to the greater mobility of travellers today. Tourism is the main motive of the traveller and the geographic origin of the cases is cosmopolitan. The use of open footwear in 14 of the 15 patients is pointed out. The single lesion on the foot was the most frequent site. Thiabendazole was effective in 14 patients as was albendazole used in one patient. The secondary effects of thiabendazole, principally gastrointestinal disorders, headache, and dizziness are underlined.

  13. Paenibacillus larvae enolase as a virulence factor in honeybee larvae infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antúnez, Karina; Anido, Matilde; Arredondo, Daniela; Evans, Jay D; Zunino, Pablo

    2011-01-10

    Paenibacillus larvae is a gram-positive spore-forming bacteria, causative agent of American Foulbrood (AFB), a severe disease affecting larvae of the honeybee Apis mellifera. In an attempt to detect potential virulence factors secreted by P. larvae, we identified an enolase among different secreted proteins. Although this protein is a cytosolic enzyme involved in glycolytic pathways, it has been related to virulence. The aim of the present work was to evaluate its role during the infection of honeybee larvae. Toxicity assays showed that enolase was highly toxic and immunogenic to honeybee larvae. Its production was detected inside P. larvae vegetative cells, on the surface of P. larvae spores and secreted to the external growth medium. P. larvae enolase production was also confirmed in vivo, during the infection of honeybee larvae. This protein was able to hydrolyze milk proteins as described for P. larvae, suggesting that could be involved in larval degradation, maybe through the plasmin(ogen) system. These results suggest that P. larvae enolase may have a role in virulence and could contribute to a general insight about insect-pathogen interaction mechanisms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Feeding for larvae of catfish Pangasionodon sp. larvae in different ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Agus Suprayudi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Sludge worm (Tubifex sp. as natural feed on catfish (Pangasionodon sp. larvae rearing is available in limited amount especially during rainy season. It becomes a constraint factor for larvae rearing sector. This research was conducted to evaluate the appropriate initial age of catfish larvae to get artificial feed as sludge worm replacement. Evaluation was conducted on the growth and survival of catfish larvae in 14 days of culture. There were four treatments of feeding in triplicates i.e. larvae were given natural feed without artificial feed, given artificial feed started from d3, d6, and d9 with three replications. The results showed that larvae fed on artificial feed on d3 had the lowest growth compared to the other treatments, whereas the survival was not significantly different (P>0.05 among the treatments. As a conclusion, artificial feed could be used to replace natural feed for catfish larvae started at the age of nine days. Keywords: sludge worm, catfish larvae, artificial feed  ABSTRAK Cacing sutra (Tubifex sp. tersedia dalam jumlah terbatas terutama pada musim penghujan sebagai pakan alami dalam usaha pembenihan ikan patin (Pangasionodon sp.. Ini menjadi kendala dalam usaha pembenihan. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengevaluasi umur larva ikan patin yang tepat untuk mulai diberi pakan buatan menggantikan cacing sutra. Evaluasi dilakukan pada pertumbuhan dan kelangsungan hidup larva ikan patin umur 14 hari. Selama pemeliharaan, larva diberi pakan dengan empat perlakuan; pemberian pakan alami tanpa pakan buatan, pemberian pakan buatan mulai d3, d6, dan d9 dengan tiga ulangan untuk masing-masing perlakuan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa perlakuan pemberian pakan buatan mulai d3 memiliki pertumbuhan panjang yang terkecil dibandingkan perlakuan lain, sedangkan tingkat kelangsungan hidup larva tidak berbeda nyata (P>0,05 antarperlakuan. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian, dapat disimpulkan bahwa pakan buatan dapat digunakan

  15. Dicty_cDB: CHR293 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |DV396246.1 NADDZ32TR Aedes aegypti infected with Dengue virus Pool library Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NADDZ32...DV362177 |DV362177.1 NACAI42TF Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NACAI42...DV362149 |DV362149.1 NACAI42TR Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NACAI42...DV306367 |DV306367.1 NABMX90TF Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABMX90...|DV329097.1 NABTE46TF Aedes aegypti infected with Plasmodium gallinaceum Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABTE46

  16. Directional flow sensing by passively stable larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Heidi L; Christman, Adam J; Gerbi, Gregory P; Hunter, Elias J; Diez, F Javier

    2015-09-01

    Mollusk larvae have a stable, velum-up orientation that may influence how they sense and react to hydrodynamic signals applied in different directions. Directional sensing abilities and responses could affect how a larva interacts with anisotropic fluid motions, including those in feeding currents and in boundary layers encountered during settlement. Oyster larvae (Crassostrea virginica) were exposed to simple shear in a Couette device and to solid-body rotation in a single rotating cylinder. Both devices were operated in two different orientations, one with the axis of rotation parallel to the gravity vector, and one with the axis perpendicular. Larvae and flow were observed simultaneously with near-infrared particle-image velocimetry, and behavior was quantified as a response to strain rate, vorticity and centripetal acceleration. Only flows rotating about a horizontal axis elicited the diving response observed previously for oyster larvae in turbulence. The results provide strong evidence that the turbulence-sensing mechanism relies on gravity-detecting organs (statocysts) rather than mechanosensors (cilia). Flow sensing with statocysts sets oyster larvae apart from zooplankters such as copepods and protists that use external mechanosensors in sensing spatial velocity gradients generated by prey or predators. Sensing flow-induced changes in orientation, rather than flow deformation, would enable more efficient control of vertical movements. Statocysts provide larvae with a mechanism of maintaining their upward swimming when rotated by vortices and initiating dives toward the seabed in response to the strong turbulence associated with adult habitats. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. CalCOFI Larvae Counts Positive Tows

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for eggs captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  18. Rearing Chrysoperla externa Larvae on Artificial Diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, C E S; Amaral, B B; Souza, B

    2017-02-01

    We tested three artificial diets for rearing larvae of Chrysoperla externa (Hagen) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), aiming at reducing the production costs of this predator. Two of the diets come from studies with other species of lacewings, and the third is a modification described in this paper. All diets were based on animal protein and were supplied to 2nd and 3rd instar larvae, whereas 1st instar larvae received eggs of Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). We evaluated the preimaginal duration and survival, adult size, longevity and fecundity, egg hatchability, and predatory capacity of larvae produced. The performance of the diets was followed for seven generations. The diet we describe showed to be the best among the artificial diets tested. Our results show that C. externa can be successfully reared on artificial diets during second and third instars, reducing in 90% the dependency on eggs of A. kuehniella.

  19. Extreme morphologies of mantis shrimp larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haug, Carolin; Ahyong, Shane T.; Wiethase, Joris H.

    2016-01-01

    Larvae of stomatopods (mantis shrimps) are generally categorized into four larval types: antizoea, pseudozoea (both representing early larval stages), alima and erichthus (the latt er two representing later larval stages). These categories, however, do not refl ect the existing morphological...... diversity of stomatopod larvae, which is largely unstudied. We describe here four previously unknown larval types with extreme morphologies. All specimens were found in the collections of the Zoological Museum, University of Copenhagen and were collected during the Danish Dana Expedition round the world...... 1928–30. These new larval types all represent erichthus-type larvae, especially diff ering in their shield morphologies. Th e shield morphology ranges from almost spherical to rather disc-like, with sometimes extremely elongated spines, but only a general systematic assignment of the larvae...

  20. Activity of R(+ limonene against Anisakis larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Giarratana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to evaluate the activity of R(+ limonene of against Anisakidae larvae. Its effectiveness was tested in vitro. The results obtained showing a significant activity of the compound against Anisakis larvae, suggesting further investigation on its potential use in the industrial marinating process. In this regard, the use of R(+ limonene in seafood products could be interesting, also due the sensory attributes resulting from its use and its relatively safe status.

  1. Dicty_cDB: CHQ580 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |DV406802.1 NADV458TR Aedes aegypti infected with Dengue virus Pool library Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NADV458...|DV406800.1 NADV458TF Aedes aegypti infected with Dengue virus Pool library Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NADV458...DV305807 |DV305807.1 NABMV02TRB Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABMV02...DV305761 |DV305761.1 NABMV01TF Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABMV01

  2. Coral larvae move toward reef sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J A Vermeij

    Full Text Available Free-swimming larvae of tropical corals go through a critical life-phase when they return from the open ocean to select a suitable settlement substrate. During the planktonic phase of their life cycle, the behaviours of small coral larvae (<1 mm that influence settlement success are difficult to observe in situ and are therefore largely unknown. Here, we show that coral larvae respond to acoustic cues that may facilitate detection of habitat from large distances and from upcurrent of preferred settlement locations. Using in situ choice chambers, we found that settling coral larvae were attracted to reef sounds, produced mainly by fish and crustaceans, which we broadcast underwater using loudspeakers. Our discovery that coral larvae can detect and respond to sound is the first description of an auditory response in the invertebrate phylum Cnidaria, which includes jellyfish, anemones, and hydroids as well as corals. If, like settlement-stage reef fish and crustaceans, coral larvae use reef noise as a cue for orientation, the alleviation of noise pollution in the marine environment may gain further urgency.

  3. Extreme morphologies of mantis shrimp larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Haug

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Larvae of stomatopods (mantis shrimps are generally categorized into four larval types: antizoea, pseudozoea (both representing early larval stages, alima and erichthus (the latter two representing later larval stages. These categories, however, do not reflect the existing morphological diversity of stomatopod larvae, which is largely unstudied. We describe here four previously unknown larval types with extreme morphologies. All specimens were found in the collections of the Zoological Museum, University of Copenhagen and were collected during the Danish Dana Expedition round the world 1928-30. These new larval types all represent erichthus-type larvae, especially differing in their shield morphologies. The shield morphology ranges from almost spherical to rather disc-like, with sometimes extremely elongated spines, but only a general systematic assignment of the larvae was possible. Further investigations of these larvae are crucial to understand their life habits and ecological impact, especially as stomatopod and other crustacean larvae might have a much more important position in the marine ecosystems than their corresponding adults.

  4. Predatory activity of Rhantus sikkimensis and larvae of Toxorhynchites splendens on mosquito larvae in Darjeeling, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditya, Gautam; Ash, Anirban; Saha, Goutam K

    2006-06-01

    Predation potential of the dytiscid beetle, Rhantus sikkimensis Regimbart 1899 and the larvae of Toxorhynchites splendens Wiedemann 1819 occurring along with the larval stages of the mosquitoes in the annual lentic water bodies of Darjeeling was evaluated using the larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus Say 1823 as preys, in the laboratory under simulated natural conditions. Field collected R. sikkimensis and larvae of Tx. splendens were offered IV instar larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus to observe the rate of predation, at varying prey and predator densities. Based on the data obtained on the predation for a period of three consecutive days, two indices of predation, predatory impact (PI) and clearance rate (CR) values were estimated, and compared between the predator species. The rate of predation of IV instar Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae by R. sikkimensis ranged between 21.56 and 86.89 larvae per day, depending on the prey and predator densities. The PI value remained between 18.67 and 35.33 larvae/day depending on prey densities, while the CR ranged between 2.21 and 2.23 larvae litres/day/predator. Compared to these, the Tx. splendens larvae consumed the prey larvae at the rate of 0.67 to 34.22 larvae per day, depending on the prey and predator densities. The PI value ranged between 7.67 and 11.33 larvae/day, and the CR value ranged between 1.41 and 1.76 larvae litres/day/predator. The rate of predation, CR values and PI values of R. sikkimensis and Tx. splendens varied significantly. Both the predators R. sikkimensis and larvae of Tx. splendens can consume a good number of mosquito larvae, though the rate of consumption between the two predators vary owing to the difference in the life history traits and features. It can be assumed that these predators play an important role in larval population regulation of mosquitoes and thereby impart an effect on species composition and interactions in the aquatic insect communities of Darjeeling Hills, India.

  5. The nematode parasite Onchocerca volvulus generates the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korten, Simone; Büttner, Dietrich W; Schmetz, Christel; Hoerauf, Achim; Mand, Sabine; Brattig, Norbert

    2009-09-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is a highly conserved cytokine that has a well-known regulatory role in immunity, but also in organ development of most animal species including helminths. Homologous tgf-b genes and mRNA have been detected in the filaria Brugia malayi. The in situ protein expression is unknown for filariae. Therefore, we examined several filariae for the expression and localization of latent (stable) TGF-beta in adult and larval stages. A specific goat anti-human latency associated protein (LAP, TGF-beta 1) antibody, purified by affinity chromatography, was used for light and electron microscopic immunohistochemistry. Adult Onchocerca volvulus, Onchocerca gibsoni, Onchocerca ochengi, Onchocerca armillata, Onchocerca fasciata, Onchocerca flexuosa, Wuchereria bancrofti, Dirofilaria sp., B. malayi, and infective larvae of W. bancrofti reacted with the antibody. Labeling of worm tissues varied between negative and all degrees of positive reactions. Latent TGF-beta was strongly expressed adjacent to the cell membranes of the hypodermis, epithelia, and muscles and adjacent to many nuclei in all organs. TGF-beta was well expressed in worms without Wolbachia endobacteria eliminated by doxycycline treatment. Pleomorphic neoplasms in O. volvulus were also labeled. We conclude that latent TGF-beta protein is expressed by filariae independently of Wolbachia, possibly regulating worm tissue homeostasis.

  6. Chironomidae bloodworms larvae as aquatic amphibian food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fard, Mojdeh Sharifian; Pasmans, Frank; Adriaensen, Connie; Laing, Gijs Du; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Martel, An

    2014-01-01

    Different species of chironomids larvae (Diptera: Chironomidae) so-called bloodworms are widely distributed in the sediments of all types of freshwater habitats and considered as an important food source for amphibians. In our study, three species of Chironomidae (Baeotendipes noctivagus, Benthalia dissidens, and Chironomus riparius) were identified in 23 samples of larvae from Belgium, Poland, Russia, and Ukraine provided by a distributor in Belgium. We evaluated the suitability of these samples as amphibian food based on four different aspects: the likelihood of amphibian pathogens spreading, risk of heavy metal accumulation in amphibians, nutritive value, and risk of spreading of zoonotic bacteria (Salmonella, Campylobacter, and ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae). We found neither zoonotic bacteria nor the amphibian pathogens Ranavirus and Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in these samples. Our data showed that among the five heavy metals tested (Hg, Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn), the excess level of Pb in two samples and low content of Zn in four samples implicated potential risk of Pb accumulation and Zn inadequacy. Proximate nutritional analysis revealed that, chironomidae larvae are consistently high in protein but more variable in lipid content. Accordingly, variations in the lipid: protein ratio can affect the amount and pathway of energy supply to the amphibians. Our study indicated although environmentally-collected chironomids larvae may not be vectors of specific pathogens, they can be associated with nutritional imbalances and may also result in Pb bioaccumulation and Zn inadequacy in amphibians. Chironomidae larvae may thus not be recommended as single diet item for amphibians. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Odor-taste learning in Drosophila larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Annekathrin; Eichler, Katharina; Selcho, Mareike; Thum, Andreas S; Pauls, Dennis

    2017-08-18

    The Drosophila larva is an attractive model system to study fundamental questions in the field of neuroscience. Like the adult fly, the larva offers a seemingly unlimited genetic toolbox, which allows one to visualize, silence or activate neurons down to the single cell level. This, combined with its simplicity in terms of cell numbers, offers a useful system to study the neuronal correlates of complex processes including associative odor-taste learning and memory formation. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about odor-taste learning and memory at the behavioral level and integrate the recent progress on the larval connectome to shed light on the sub-circuits that allow Drosophila larvae to integrate present sensory input in the context of past experience and to elicit an appropriate behavioral response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Suppressing bullfrog larvae with carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jackson A.; Ray, Andrew; Sepulveda, Adam J.; Watten, Barnaby J.; Densmore, Christine L.; Layhee, Megan J.; Mark Abbey-Lambert,; ,

    2014-01-01

    Current management strategies for the control and suppression of the American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus = Rana catesbeiana Shaw) and other invasive amphibians have had minimal effect on their abundance and distribution. This study evaluates the effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) on pre- and prometamorphic Bullfrog larvae. Bullfrogs are a model organism for evaluating potential suppression agents because they are a successful invader worldwide. From experimental trials we estimated that the 24-h 50% and 99% lethal concentration (LC50 and LC99) values for Bullfrog larvae were 371 and 549 mg CO2/L, respectively. Overall, larvae that succumbed to experimental conditions had a lower body condition index than those that survived. We also documented sublethal changes in blood chemistry during prolonged exposure to elevated CO2. Specifically, blood pH decreased by more than 0.5 pH units after 9 h of exposure and both blood partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and blood glucose increased. These findings suggest that CO2 treatments can be lethal to Bullfrog larvae under controlled laboratory conditions. We believe this work represents the necessary foundation for further consideration of CO2 as a potential suppression agent for one of the most harmful invaders to freshwater ecosystems.

  9. Evolution of foraging behavior in Drosophilid larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Alba, Marta; Kabra, Mayank; Branson, Kristin; Mirth, Christen

    2015-03-01

    Drosophilids, like other insects, go through a larval phase before metamorphosing into adults. Larvae increase their body weight by several orders of magnitude in a few days. We therefore hypothesized that foraging behavior is under strong evolutionary pressure to best fit the larval environment. To test our hypothesis we used a multidisciplinary approach to analyze foraging behavior across species and larval stages. First, we recorded several videos of larvae foraging for each of 47 Drosophilid species. Then, using a supervised machine learning approach, we automatically annotated the video collection for the foraging sub-behaviors, including crawling, turning, head casting or burrowing. We also computed over 100 features to describe the posture and dynamics of each animal in each video frame. From these data, we fit models to the behavior of each species. The models each had the same parametric form, but differed in the exact parameters. By simulating larva behavior in virtual arenas we can infer which properties of the environments are better for each species. Comparisons between these inferred environments and the actual environments where these animals live will give us a deeper understanding about the evolution of foraging behavior in Drosophilid larvae.

  10. (Herklotsichthys quadrimaculatus) Larvae on Sofala Bank ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande,. 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal. * Present address: Departamento de Biologia and CESAM – Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal. Keywords: fish larvae, diel vertical migration, ...

  11. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names C to CE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  12. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names EV to GN

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  13. PEMELIHARAAN LARVA KEPITING BAKAU, Scylla olivacea DENGAN PENAMBAHAN BIOFLOK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunarto Gunarto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak lengkap dapat dilihat pada Full PDF   Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui efek penambahan bioflok pada pemeliharaan larva kepiting bakau Scylla olivacea terutaman pada sintasan dan perkembangan larva hingga mencapai stadia krablet.

  14. Decapod larvae from the nearshore waters of Karwar

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.; Paulinose, V.T.

    Abundance of decapod larvae at three stations in Binge Bay, Karwar has been reported based on surface collections taken during the period October 1975 to September 1976. The larvae were very common in the Bay and the postmonsoon months sustained...

  15. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names SJ to ST

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  16. Bothid larvae (Pleuronectiformes-Pisces) of the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devi, C.B.L.

    the Indian Ocean, their regional, seasonal as well as diurnal variations. Engyprosopon grandisquamis dominated contributing to 23.2% of the total larvae. Numerically the incidence of bothid larvae suggested a uniform pattern of distribution during the two...

  17. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names CP to DE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  18. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names HB to HI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  19. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names SU to TE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  20. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names PP to PZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  1. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names SD to SI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  2. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names TF to U

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  3. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names PL to PO

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  4. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names OM to OX

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  5. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names HJ to ID

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  6. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names OY to PI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  7. ISOLASI BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS DARI LARVA DAN PENGUJIAN PATOGENISITASNYA TERHADAP LARVA NYAMUK VEKTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blondine Ch. P.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A study to evaluate pathogenic organisms as cause of mosquito larvae death was conducted at Wonokerto and Pabelan villages, Salatiga Luar Kota subdistrict, Semarang regency in Central Java from May 1991 through December 1991. Bacterial isolation from dead larvae showed that 31 B. thuringicnsis isolates were obtained from 31 larvae samples collected from 2 location e.g Wonokerto village (3 samples, Pabelan village (28 samples. Nineteen isolates (61,3% showed a pathogenicity of more than 50% to third toward instar larvae of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus respectively 24 hours after exposure. This study shows the possible use of B. thuringiensis for biologic control of mosquitoes which can act as vectors for human diseases.

  8. Lagrangian Observations and Modeling of Marine Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Claire B.; Irisson, Jean-Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Just within the past two decades, studies on the early-life history stages of marine organisms have led to new paradigms in population dynamics. Unlike passive plant seeds that are transported by the wind or by animals, marine larvae have motor and sensory capabilities. As a result, marine larvae have a tremendous capacity to actively influence their dispersal. This is continuously revealed as we develop new techniques to observe larvae in their natural environment and begin to understand their ability to detect cues throughout ontogeny, process the information, and use it to ride ocean currents and navigate their way back home, or to a place like home. We present innovative in situ and numerical modeling approaches developed to understand the underlying mechanisms of larval transport in the ocean. We describe a novel concept of a Lagrangian platform, the Drifting In Situ Chamber (DISC), designed to observe and quantify complex larval behaviors and their interactions with the pelagic environment. We give a brief history of larval ecology research with the DISC, showing that swimming is directional in most species, guided by cues as diverse as the position of the sun or the underwater soundscape, and even that (unlike humans!) larvae orient better and swim faster when moving as a group. The observed Lagrangian behavior of individual larvae are directly implemented in the Connectivity Modeling System (CMS), an open source Lagrangian tracking application. Simulations help demonstrate the impact that larval behavior has compared to passive Lagrangian trajectories. These methodologies are already the base of exciting findings and are promising tools for documenting and simulating the behavior of other small pelagic organisms, forecasting their migration in a changing ocean.

  9. An Introduction to the Identification of Chironomid Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, William T., Jr.

    This publication is an introductory guide to the identification of Chironomid (Midge) larvae. The larvae of these small flies are an important link in the food chain between algae and microinvertebrates. As a family, the larvae exhibit a wide range of tolerance to environmental factors such as amounts and types of pollutants. Much of this…

  10. Does vertical migratory behaviour retain fish larvae onshore in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Model outputs showed coarse-scale horizontal distribution patterns of larvae by age/size class that are similar to field observations for early, small larvae but not for large larvae and pre-recruits. ... Keywords: anchovy; individual-based model; larval vertical migration; recruitment; southern Benguela; transport; upwelling

  11. Lethal infection thresholds of Paenibacillus larvae for honeybee drone and worker larvae (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Dieter; Forsgren, Eva; Fries, Ingemar; Moritz, Robin F A

    2010-10-01

    We compared the mortality of honeybee (Apis mellifera) drone and worker larvae from a single queen under controlled in vitro conditions following infection with Paenibacillus larvae, a bacterium causing the brood disease American Foulbrood (AFB). We also determined absolute P. larvae cell numbers and lethal titres in deceased individuals of both sexes up to 8 days post infection using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Our results show that in drones the onset of infection induced mortality is delayed by 1 day, the cumulative mortality is reduced by 10% and P. larvae cell numbers are higher than in worker larvae. Since differences in bacterial cell titres between sexes can be explained by differences in body size, larval size appears to be a key parameter for a lethal threshold in AFB tolerance. Both means and variances for lethal thresholds are similar for drone and worker larvae suggesting that drone resistance phenotypes resemble those of related workers. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Larva migrans visceral: relato de caso Visceral larva migrans: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Bortoli Machado

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Larva migrans visceral é doença infecciosa, adquirida por ingestão de ovos provenientes dos vermes Toxocara canis e/ou Toxocara cati que infestam cães e gatos; as larvas penetram a parede intestinal e migram através dos tecidos levando a alterações diversas, conseqüentes a uma resposta inflamatória imune.¹ Os autores descrevem um caso clínico de larva migrans visceral com apresentação clínica atípica.Visceral larva migrans is an infectious human disease that occurs following ingestion of eggs from the environment originating from roundworms which commonly infect dogs and cats, Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati. The larvae penetrate the gut wall and migrate through the tissues causing disorders consequent to an inflammatory immune response¹. The authors describe a clinical case of visceral larva migrans with an unusual clinical presentation and also its clinical aspects, diagnosis and treatment are reviewed.

  13. Nutritional condition and vertical distribution of Baltic cod larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønkjær, P.; Clemmesen, C.; St. John, Michael

    1997-01-01

    aged 2-25 days (median 10 days) ranged from 0.4 to 6.2, corresponding to levels exhibited by starving and fast growing larvae in laboratory calibration studies (starvation, protein growth rate, G(pi)=-12.2% day(-1); fast-growing larvae, G(pi)=14.1% day(-1)) respectively. Seventy per cent of the field...... caught larvae had RNA/DNA ratios between the mean values found for starving and fed laboratory larvae. Only larvae aged 8-11 days had higher mean RNA/DNA ratios above 45 m than below (t-test, P...

  14. Larva of Palaemnema brasiliensis Machado (Odonata: Platystictidae), from Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiss, Ulisses Gaspar; Hamada, Neusa

    2016-02-09

    The larva of Palaemnema brasiliensis Machado, 2009 is described and illustrated based on last-instar larvae and exuviae of reared larvae collected in a blackwater stream in Barcelos and Presidente Figueiredo municipalities, Amazonas state, Brazil. The larva of P. brasiliensis can be distinguished from the two South American species of the genus with described larvae (P. clementia Selys and P. mutans Calvert), mainly by presence of a single obtuse cusp on the labial palp, the presence and configuration of setae in the caudal lamellae, and the proportional length of terminal filaments of the caudal lamellae. The family is recorded here for the first time in Brazilian state of Amazonas.

  15. AcEST: DK949163 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 36 2.3 tr|A8P3K7|A8P3K7_BRUMA Retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator-lik... 35 3.... 92 FGGGGN 97 >tr|A8P3K7|A8P3K7_BRUMA Retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator-like protein OS=Brugia malayi GN

  16. Mammographic parasitic calcifications in South West Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Introduction: Lymphatic filariasis caused by nematode parasite Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia Malayi is endemic in the tropics. In Nigeria, 25% of the population is infected. Lymph edema and elephantiasis are the predominant manifestations. Its infrequent manifestation is in the breast. This paper discusses the ...

  17. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13233-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ( AC229965 ) Choloepus hoffmanni clone CH281-86B11, WORKING DR... 48 1.2 1 ( AC22...nis familiaris STS g... 48 1.2 1 ( AJ508355 ) Brugia malayi ORF1, ORF2, ORF3 and ORF4 DNA and a... 48 1.2 1

  18. Predatory cannibalism in Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijendravarma, Roshan K; Narasimha, Sunitha; Kawecki, Tadeusz J

    2013-01-01

    Hunting live prey is risky and thought to require specialized adaptations. Therefore, observations of predatory cannibalism in otherwise non-carnivorous animals raise questions about its function, adaptive significance and evolutionary potential. Here we document predatory cannibalism on larger conspecifics in Drosophila melanogaster larvae and address its evolutionary significance. We found that under crowded laboratory conditions younger larvae regularly attack and consume 'wandering-stage' conspecifics, forming aggregations mediated by chemical cues from the attacked victim. Nutrition gained this way can be significant: an exclusively cannibalistic diet was sufficient for normal development from eggs to fertile adults. Cannibalistic diet also induced plasticity of larval mouth parts. Finally, during 118 generations of experimental evolution, replicated populations maintained under larval malnutrition evolved enhanced propensity towards cannibalism. These results suggest that, at least under laboratory conditions, predation on conspecifics in Drosophila is a functional, adaptive behaviour, which can rapidly evolve in response to nutritional conditions.

  19. POLA PEMANGSAAN LARVA IKAN KAKAP MERAH, Lutjanus sebae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Melianawati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pola pemangsaan dari larva ikan kakap merah, L. sebae umur 5 dan 10 hari yang dipelihara dengan kondisi pencahayaan alami. Pengambilan sampel dilakukan setiap satu jam pada masing-masing umur tersebut. Hasil pengamatan menunjukkan bahwa secara alami pola pemangsaan larva L. sebae tergantung pada kondisi pencahayaan, di mana aktivitas pemangsaan berlangsung secara maksimal pada saat tersedia pencahayaan dengan intensitas yang mencukupi untuk larva menangkap mangsanya. Intensitas cahaya minimal yang diperlukan oleh larva L. sebae untuk melakukan pemangsaan berada pada kisaran 400—600 lux. Maksimal pemangsaan satu larva pada umur 5 dan 10 hari adalah 6,2 dan 25,3 individu rotifer. Lama waktu pencernaan larva umur 5 dan 10 hari adalah 4 dan 5 jam, sedangkan laju cerna larva pada masing-masing umur tersebut adalah 1,50 dan 2,76 individu rotifer per jam. The aim of this research was to get the information about the feeding pattern of emperor snapper L. sebae larvae at 5 and 10 days olds reared under natural light intensity. Larvae samples were taken every hour from each age. The result showed that naturally, feeding pattern of emperor snapper larvae depend on the light intensity condition, feeding activity would be done when the light intensity was enough available for supporting larvae to feed. Minimum light intensity that needed by the larvae for feeding activity was range between 400—600 lux. Maximum feeding per larvae at 5 and 10 days olds were 6.2 and 25.3 individual rotifers. Digestion time of larvae at those ages was 4 and 5 hours, while digestion rate were 1.50 and 2.76 individual rotifers per hour.

  20. Caffeine taste signaling in Drosophila larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthi A Apostolopoulou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Drosophila larva has a simple peripheral nervous system with a comparably small number of sensory neurons located externally at the head or internally along the pharynx to assess its chemical environment. It is assumed that larval taste coding occurs mainly via external organs (the dorsal, terminal and ventral organ. However, the contribution of the internal pharyngeal sensory organs has not been explored. Here we find that larvae require a single pharyngeal gustatory receptor neuron pair called D1, which is located in the dorsal pharyngeal sensilla, in order to avoid caffeine and to associate an odor with caffeine punishment. In contrast, caffeine-driven reduction in feeding in non-choice situations does not require D1. Hence, this work provides data on taste coding via different receptor neurons, depending on the behavioral context. Furthermore, we show that the larval pharyngeal system is involved in bitter tasting. Using ectopic expressions, we show that the caffeine receptor in neuron D1 requires the function of at least four receptor genes: the putative coreceptors Gr33a, Gr66a, the putative caffeine-specific receptor Gr93a, and yet unknown additional molecular component(s. This suggests that larval taste perception is more complex than previously assumed already at the sensory level. Taste information from different sensory organs located outside at the head or inside along the pharynx of the larva is assembled to trigger taste guided behaviours.

  1. Drosophila larvae: Thermal ecology in changing environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, George

    Temperature affects almost all aspects of life. Although much work has been done to assess the impact of temperature on organismal performance, relatively little is known about how organisms behaviorally regulate temperature, how these behaviors effect population fitness, or how changing climate may interact with these behaviors. I explore these questions with the model system Drosophila larvae. Larvae are small, with a low thermal mass and limited capacity for physiological thermoregulation. Mortality is generally high in larvae, with large potential impacts on population growth rate. Thus behavioral thermoregulation in larvae should be of critical selective importance. I present a review of the current knowledge of Drosophila thermal preference. I describe quantifiable thermoregulatory behaviors ( TMV and TW) unique to larvae. I show interspecific variation of these behaviors in Drosophila melanogaster and several close relatives, and intraspecific variation between populations collected from different environments. I also investigate these behaviors in two mutant lines, ssa and biz, to investigate the genetic basis of these behaviors. I show that larval thermoregulatory systems are independent of those of adults. Further these thermoregulatory behaviors differ between two sister species, D. yakuba and D. santomea. Although these two species readily hybridize in laboratory conditions, very few hybrids are observed in the field. The surprising result that hybrids of D. yakuba and D. santomea seem to inherit TMV from D. yakuba suggests a novel extrinsic isolation mechanism between the two species. I explore how fitness is the result of the interaction between genetics and the environment. I utilize Monte Carlo simulation to show how non-linear norms of reaction generate variation in populations even in the absence of behavior or epigenetic evolutionary mechanisms. Finally I investigate the global distribution of temperatures in which these organisms exist using

  2. The Identification of Congeners and Aliens by Drosophila Larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Del Pino

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of Drosophila larva olfactory system in identification of congeners and aliens. We discuss the importance of these activities in larva navigation across substrates, and the implications for allocation of space and food among species of similar ecologies. Wild type larvae of cosmopolitan D. melanogaster and endemic D. pavani, which cohabit the same breeding sites, used species-specific volatiles to identify conspecifics and aliens moving toward larvae of their species. D. gaucha larvae, a sibling species of D. pavani that is ecologically isolated from D. melanogaster, did not respond to melanogaster odor cues. Similar to D. pavani larvae, the navigation of pavani female x gaucha male hybrids was influenced by conspecific and alien odors, whereas gaucha female x pavani male hybrid larvae exhibited behavior similar to the D. gaucha parent. The two sibling species exhibited substantial evolutionary divergence in processing the odor inputs necessary to identify conspecifics. Orco (Or83b mutant larvae of D. melanogaster, which exhibit a loss of sense of smell, did not distinguish conspecific from alien larvae, instead moving across the substrate. Syn97CS and rut larvae of D. melanogaster, which are unable to learn but can smell, moved across the substrate as well. The Orco (Or83b, Syn97CS and rut loci are necessary to orient navigation by D. melanogaster larvae. Individuals of the Trana strain of D. melanogaster did not respond to conspecific and alien larval volatiles and therefore navigated randomly across the substrate. By contrast, larvae of the Til-Til strain used larval volatiles to orient their movement. Natural populations of D. melanogaster may exhibit differences in identification of conspecific and alien larvae. Larval locomotion was not affected by the volatiles.

  3. Fate of pharmaceuticals and pesticides in fly larvae composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalander, C; Senecal, J; Gros Calvo, M; Ahrens, L; Josefsson, S; Wiberg, K; Vinnerås, B

    2016-09-15

    A novel and efficient organic waste management strategy currently gaining great attention is fly larvae composting. High resource recovery efficiency can be achieved in this closed-looped system, but pharmaceuticals and pesticides in waste could potentially accumulate in every loop of the treatment system and spread to the environment. This study evaluated the fate of three pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine, roxithromycin, trimethoprim) and two pesticides (azoxystrobin, propiconazole) in a fly larvae composting system and in a control treatment with no larvae. It was found that the half-life of all five substances was shorter in the fly larvae compost (<10% of control) and no bioaccumulation was detected in the larvae. Fly larvae composting could thus impede the spread of pharmaceuticals and pesticides into the environment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Learning and memory in zebrafish larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Adam C.; Bill, Brent R.; Glanzman, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Larval zebrafish possess several experimental advantages for investigating the molecular and neural bases of learning and memory. Despite this, neuroscientists have only recently begun to use these animals to study memory. However, in a relatively short period of time a number of forms of learning have been described in zebrafish larvae, and significant progress has been made toward their understanding. Here we provide a comprehensive review of this progress; we also describe several promising new experimental technologies currently being used in larval zebrafish that are likely to contribute major insights into the processes that underlie learning and memory. PMID:23935566

  5. Reproduction: widespread cloning in echinoderm larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaves, Alexandra A; Palmer, A Richard

    2003-09-11

    Asexual reproduction by free-living invertebrate larvae is a rare and enigmatic phenomenon and, although it is known to occur in sea stars and brittle stars, it has not been detected in other echinoderms despite more than a century of intensive study. Here we describe spontaneous larval cloning in three species from two more echinoderm classes: a sea cucumber (Holothuroidea), a sand dollar and a sea urchin (Echinoidea). Larval cloning may therefore be an ancient ability of echinoderms and possibly of deutero-stomes - the group that includes echinoderms, acorn worms, sea squirts and vertebrates.

  6. Recovery of Toxocara canis larvae from mouse tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cáris Maroni Nunes

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Two techniques, peptic digestion and homogenization, were tested for the recovering of Toxocara canis larvae from mice tissue. Twenty mice were fed 1.000 embryonated eggs, and after 44-46 hours the animals were euthanised and liver and lungs were evaluated for the presence of larvae. Recovery rate from liver was greater than from lungs. Homogenization technique resulted in better percentage of larvae recovered, regardless of the organ evaluated.

  7. Biofilms and Marine Invertebrate Larvae: What Bacteria Produce That Larvae Use to Choose Settlement Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Communities of microorganisms form thin coats across solid surfaces in the sea. Larvae of many marine invertebrates use biofilm components as cues to appropriate settlement sites. Research on the tube-dwelling polychaete worm Hydroides elegans, a globally common member of biofouling communities, is described to exemplify approaches to understanding biofilm bacteria as a source of settlement cues and larvae as bearers of receptors for bacterial cues. The association of species of the bacterial genus Pseudoalteromonas with larval settlement in many phyla is described, and the question of whether cues are soluble or surface-bound is reviewed, concluding that most evidence points to surface-bound cues. Seemingly contradictory data for stimulation of barnacle settlement are discussed; possibly both explanations are true. Paleontological evidence reveals a relationship between metazoans and biofilms very early in metazoan evolution, and thus the receptors for bacterial cues of invertebrate larvae are very old and possibly unique. Finally, despite more than 60 years of intense investigation, we still know very little about either the bacterial ligands that stimulate larval settlement or the cellular basis of their detection by larvae.

  8. Effect of gut bacterial isolates from Apis mellifera jemenitica on Paenibacillus larvae infected bee larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Al-Ghamdi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The probiotic effects of seven newly isolated gut bacteria, from the indegenous honey bees of Saudi Arabia were investigated. In vivo bioassays were used to investigate the effects of each gut bacterium namely, Fructobacillus fructosus (T1, Proteus mirabilis (T2, Bacillus licheniformis (T3, Lactobacillus kunkeei (T4, Bacillus subtilis (T5, Enterobacter kobei (T6, and Morganella morganii (T7 on mortality percentage of honey bee larvae infected with P. larvae spores along with negative control (normal diet and positive control (normal diet spiked with P. larvae spores. Addition of gut bacteria to the normal diet significantly reduced the mortality percentage of the treated groups. Mortality percentage in all treated groups ranged from 56.67% up to 86.67%. T6 treated group exhibited the highest mortality (86.67%, whereas T4 group showed the lowest mortality (56.67%. Among the seven gut bacterial treatments, T4 and T3 decreased the mortality 56.67% and 66.67%, respectively, whereas, for T2, T6, and T7 the mortality percentage was equal to that of the positive control (86.67%. Mortality percentages in infected larval groups treated with T1, and T5 were 78.33% and 73.33% respectively. Most of the mortality occurred in the treated larvae during days 2 and 3. Treatments T3 and T4 treatments showed positive effects and reduced mortality.

  9. Toxicity of phenol on Macrobrachium rosenbergii (de Man) eggs, larvae, and post-larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, A.T.; Yeo, M.E. [Universiti Kolej Terengganu (UPM), Darul Iman (Malaysia)

    1997-03-01

    Literature on the toxicities of phenol on aquatic organisms is very limited. USEPA reported that the acute and chronic toxicities of phenol to freshwater aquatic life occur at concentrations as low as 10.2 mg/L and 2.56 mg/L, respectively. While for the saltwater aquatic life the acute toxicity occurs at concentrations as low as 5.8 mg/L. No data are available for the chronic toxicity of phenol to saltwater aquatic life. Sublethal concentrations of phenol have significant effects on the physiological and histological processes of the aquatic organisms: such as gill necrosis; destruction of erythrocyte cells; inhibition of sexual activities; suppression on growth and reduction of resistance to diseases. Macrobrachium rosenbergii(de Man) is the sole freshwater prawn cultured in Malaysia. Occasionally, the hatcheries are unable to produce the post-larvae because of undefined pollutants present in the water supplies. It has been observed that the use of cracked fiberglass tanks for larvae rearing is correlated with high mortality. This high mortality is probably due to the toxicity of the phenolic compounds which are leached out from the fiber glass tank into the water. This study was undertaken to evaluate the toxicity of phenol on eggs, larvae and post-larvae of M. rosenbergii and to set the water quality criteria of phenol for the said species. 16 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Distribution and abundance of Pleuronectiformes larvae off Southeastern Brazil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garbini, Camilla Nunes; Zani-Teixeira, Maria de Lourdes; Ohkawara, Márcio Hidekazu; Katsuragawa, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was the description of the composition, abundance and density in horizontal and vertical distribution of Pleuronectiformes larvae on the southeastern Brazilian continental shelf...

  11. A Madurella mycetomatis Grain Model in Galleria mellonella Larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Kloezen

    Full Text Available Eumycetoma is a chronic granulomatous subcutaneous infectious disease, endemic in tropical and subtropical regions and most commonly caused by the fungus Madurella mycetomatis. Interestingly, although grain formation is key in mycetoma, its formation process and its susceptibility towards antifungal agents are not well understood. This is because grain formation cannot be induced in vitro; a mammalian host is necessary to induce its formation. Until now, invertebrate hosts were never used to study grain formation in M. mycetomatis. In this study we determined if larvae of the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella could be used to induce grain formation when infected with M. mycetomatis. Three different M. mycetomatis strains were selected and three different inocula for each strain were used to infect G. mellonella larvae, ranging from 0.04 mg/larvae to 4 mg/larvae. Larvae were monitored for 10 days. It appeared that most larvae survived the lowest inoculum, but at the highest inoculum all larvae died within the 10 day observation period. At all inocula tested, grains were formed within 4 hours after infection. The grains produced in the larvae resembled those formed in human and in mammalian hosts. In conclusion, the M. mycetomatis grain model in G. mellonella larvae described here could serve as a useful model to study the grain formation and therapeutic responses towards antifungal agents in the future.

  12. A Madurella mycetomatis Grain Model in Galleria mellonella Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloezen, Wendy; van Helvert-van Poppel, Marilyn; Fahal, Ahmed H.; van de Sande, Wendy W. J.

    2015-01-01

    Eumycetoma is a chronic granulomatous subcutaneous infectious disease, endemic in tropical and subtropical regions and most commonly caused by the fungus Madurella mycetomatis. Interestingly, although grain formation is key in mycetoma, its formation process and its susceptibility towards antifungal agents are not well understood. This is because grain formation cannot be induced in vitro; a mammalian host is necessary to induce its formation. Until now, invertebrate hosts were never used to study grain formation in M. mycetomatis. In this study we determined if larvae of the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella could be used to induce grain formation when infected with M. mycetomatis. Three different M. mycetomatis strains were selected and three different inocula for each strain were used to infect G. mellonella larvae, ranging from 0.04 mg/larvae to 4 mg/larvae. Larvae were monitored for 10 days. It appeared that most larvae survived the lowest inoculum, but at the highest inoculum all larvae died within the 10 day observation period. At all inocula tested, grains were formed within 4 hours after infection. The grains produced in the larvae resembled those formed in human and in mammalian hosts. In conclusion, the M. mycetomatis grain model in G. mellonella larvae described here could serve as a useful model to study the grain formation and therapeutic responses towards antifungal agents in the future. PMID:26173126

  13. Imaging of cutaneous larva migrans by optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, Hanan; Mogensen, Mette; Thomsen, Jakob; Thrane, Lars; Andersen, Peter E; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2007-07-01

    Cutaneous larva migrans is a parasitic skin eruption caused by migration of larvae of various nematodes. Diagnosis of cutaneous larva migrans is currently based on the clinical signs of the creeping eruption. We are investigating a new diagnostic technology called optical coherence tomography (OCT) , which is potentially able to visualize structures in the skin with an 8 microm resolution. This technology could therefore potentially allow rapid, non-invasive, in vivo diagnosis of infestations. Clinical cases of cutaneous larva migrans (n=3) were studied. All patients had a characteristic itching, serpinginous eruption typical of cutaneous larva migrans. The parasites were acquired on beach holidays in Thailand and Malaysia. All skin lesions were imaged by an OCT system developed at Risoe National Laboratory, Denmark. Two out of three patients showed a round to oval structure (diameter 0.3-0.5mm) in the epidermis, Thus distinct OCT morphology in skin areas affected by cutaneous larva migrans was demonstrated. The larvae were not visualized in any of the patients. This study demonstrates that OCT a novel optical imaging technology, can image the larva tunnel in the skin with adequate spatial resolution, but not the larvae itself. OCT has a potential in imaging of skin infestations.

  14. Fate of pharmaceuticals and pesticides in fly larvae composting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalander, C., E-mail: cecilia.lalander@slu.se [Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden); Senecal, J.; Gros Calvo, M. [Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden); Ahrens, L.; Josefsson, S.; Wiberg, K. [Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden); Vinnerås, B. [Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden)

    2016-09-15

    A novel and efficient organic waste management strategy currently gaining great attention is fly larvae composting. High resource recovery efficiency can be achieved in this closed-looped system, but pharmaceuticals and pesticides in waste could potentially accumulate in every loop of the treatment system and spread to the environment. This study evaluated the fate of three pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine, roxithromycin, trimethoprim) and two pesticides (azoxystrobin, propiconazole) in a fly larvae composting system and in a control treatment with no larvae. It was found that the half-life of all five substances was shorter in the fly larvae compost (< 10% of control) and no bioaccumulation was detected in the larvae. Fly larvae composting could thus impede the spread of pharmaceuticals and pesticides into the environment. - Highlights: • Degradation of pharmaceuticals and pesticides in fly larvae composting (FLC). • Half-life considerably shorter in FLC than in control with no larvae. • Half-life of carbamazepine was less than two days in FLC. • No bioaccumulation in larvae detected. • FLC could impede the spreading of pharmaceuticals and pesticide in the environment.

  15. Reindeer warble fly larvae found in red deer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Nilssen

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available Seven third instar larvae of the reindeer warble fly (Hypoderma (=Oedemagena tarandi were found in a 2-3 year old male red deer {Cervus elaphus shot on 14 November 1985 at Todalen, western Norway. This it, the first report of H. tarandi from red deer. In reindeer third instar larvae are found from February to June, and the unusual date of this record indicates a delayed development of the larvae due to abnormal host reactions. Warble fly larvae, probably H. tarandi, are also reported from moose {Alces alces in northern Norway.

  16. Reindeer warble fly larvae found in red deer

    OpenAIRE

    Nilssen, A C; Gjershaug, J.O.

    1988-01-01

    Seven third instar larvae of the reindeer warble fly (Hypoderma (=Oedemagena) tarandi) were found in a 2-3 year old male red deer {Cervus elaphus) shot on 14 November 1985 at Todalen, western Norway. This it, the first report of H. tarandi from red deer. In reindeer third instar larvae are found from February to June, and the unusual date of this record indicates a delayed development of the larvae due to abnormal host reactions. Warble fly larvae, probably H. tarandi, are also reported from ...

  17. Copepod predation on Anopheles quadrimaculatus larvae in rice fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marten, G G; Nguyen, M; Ngo, G

    2000-06-01

    Cyclopoid copepods and mosquito larvae were surveyed in southwestern Louisiana rice fields. Almost every rice field had a natural population of Mesocyclops ruttneri, Acanthocylops vernalis, or Macrocyclops albidus. Judging from the abundance of pupae, 29% of the fields were responsible for virtually all Anopheles quadrimaculatus production, apparently because larval mortality suppressed production in the other fields. Mesocyclops ruttneri had the strongest negative association of naturally occurring copepod populations with An. quadrimaculatus larvae, though a few fields with M. ruttneri had substantial Anopheles production. Macrocyclops albidus, M. ruttneri, Mesocyclops edax, and Mesocyclops longisetus were introduced to experimental rice field plots. It took two months for the introduced copepods to build up their numbers; Anopheles larvae then disappeared from all treated plots while larvae continued to be present in the adjacent control field. Copepods were observed to kill the following number of first instar An. quadrimaculatus larvae in the laboratory: Mesocyclops ruttneri (36 larvae/day), Macrocyclops albidus (23 larvae/day), Mesocyclops longisetus (24 larvae/day), and Acanthocyclops vernalis (15 larvae/day). It is concluded that introducing select species of copepods and encouraging their populations offer possibilities for contributing to Anopheles control in rice fields.

  18. Experimental Infection of Sheep using Infective Larvae (L3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experimental Infection of Sheep using Infective Larvae (L3) harvested from the Faeces of Naturally Infected Swayne's Hartebeest ( Alcelaphus buselaphus swaynei ) at Senkele Swayne's Hartebeest Sanctuary, Ethiopia.

  19. PERKEMBANGAN ENZIM PENCERNAAN LARVA IKAN PATIN, Pangasius hypophthalmus sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irzal Effendi

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Development of digestive enzymes; protease, lipase and amylase were observed in patin catfish, Pangasius hypophthalmus, larvae.  The 1 day old larvae (day after hatching, with 3,37-3,97 mm length and 0,62-0,79 mg weight, were reared in aquarium 60x50x40 cm with stocking  density of 20 fish/l.  Larvae were fed  Artemia dan tubificid worms 2-8 dan 7-15 days after hatching (dAH,  respectively (schedule I;  2-6 and  5-15 dAH (schedule II; and 2-4 and 5-15 dAH (schedule III.  Chlorella was ready to eat by larvae at the entirely rearing.  For enzyme assay, larvae were sampled from each aquarium at stages of 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 15 dAH.    Protease and lipase activity were detected in digestive tract of  1 dAH larvae.   Digestive enzymes development have a similar pattern in larvae for all feeding schedules.  Protease activity  decreased with the increasing of age until 3 dAH, then increased  until the larvae reached 7 dAH, and sharply decreased until 10 dAH and then slowly decreased thereafter. Lipase activity tended to increase slowly with age up to 3 dAH, and increased sharply until 5 dAH, and then decreased sharply until 7 dAH  before decreased again up to the end of rearing.  Amylase activity in larvae increased slowly with the increasing of age up to 5 dAH, then increased sharply until 7 dAH, and decreased thereafter.  In dimly lighted larvae, amylase activity decreased before increased up to 12 d AH, then decreased thereafter.  The amount of food organisms in larval gut, body weight and length, and survival rate of larvae were also measured and discussed.Key Words:  Digestive enzymes, development, larvae, patin catfish, Pangasius hypophthalmus ABSTRAKPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui perkembangan enzim protease, lipase dan amilase saluran pencernaan larva ikan patin akibat perubahan skedul pemberian pakan.  Larva ikan patin (panjang 3,77–3,97 mm dan bobot 0,62-0,79 mg berumur 1 hari dipelihara di akuarium 60x

  20. Fish larvae from the Gulf of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Aceves-Medina

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic composition of fish larvae was analysed from 464 plankton samples obtained during 10 oceanographic surveys in the Gulf of California between 1984 and 1988. We identified 283 taxa: 173 species, 57 genera, and 53 families. Tropical and subtropical species predominated except during the winter, when temperate-subarctic species were dominant. The most abundant species were the mesopelagic Benthosema panamense, Triphoturus mexicanus and Vinciguerria lucetia, but the coastal pelagic species Engraulis mordax, Opisthonema spp., Sardinops caeruleus and Scomber japonicus were also prominent. The taxonomic composition of the ichthyoplankton shows the seasonality of the Gulf as well as environmental changes that occurred between the 1984-1987 warm period and the 1956-1957 cool period previously reported. The presence of E. mordax larvae as one of the most abundant species in the Gulf provides evidence of the reproduction of this species two years before the development of the northern anchovy fishery and the decline of the sardine fishery in the Gulf of California.

  1. A Model of Drosophila Larva Chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Davies

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Detailed observations of larval Drosophila chemotaxis have characterised the relationship between the odour gradient and the runs, head casts and turns made by the animal. We use a computational model to test whether hypothesised sensorimotor control mechanisms are sufficient to account for larval behaviour. The model combines three mechanisms based on simple transformations of the recent history of odour intensity at the head location. The first is an increased probability of terminating runs in response to gradually decreasing concentration, the second an increased probability of terminating head casts in response to rapidly increasing concentration, and the third a biasing of run directions up concentration gradients through modulation of small head casts. We show that this model can be tuned to produce behavioural statistics comparable to those reported for the larva, and that this tuning results in similar chemotaxis performance to the larva. We demonstrate that each mechanism can enable odour approach but the combination of mechanisms is most effective, and investigate how these low-level control mechanisms relate to behavioural measures such as the preference indices used to investigate larval learning behaviour in group assays.

  2. A Model of Drosophila Larva Chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Alex; Louis, Matthieu; Webb, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Detailed observations of larval Drosophila chemotaxis have characterised the relationship between the odour gradient and the runs, head casts and turns made by the animal. We use a computational model to test whether hypothesised sensorimotor control mechanisms are sufficient to account for larval behaviour. The model combines three mechanisms based on simple transformations of the recent history of odour intensity at the head location. The first is an increased probability of terminating runs in response to gradually decreasing concentration, the second an increased probability of terminating head casts in response to rapidly increasing concentration, and the third a biasing of run directions up concentration gradients through modulation of small head casts. We show that this model can be tuned to produce behavioural statistics comparable to those reported for the larva, and that this tuning results in similar chemotaxis performance to the larva. We demonstrate that each mechanism can enable odour approach but the combination of mechanisms is most effective, and investigate how these low-level control mechanisms relate to behavioural measures such as the preference indices used to investigate larval learning behaviour in group assays. PMID:26600460

  3. Efektivitas Bacillus thuringiensis dalam Pengendalian Larva Nyamuk Anopheles sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citra Inneke Wibowo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nyamuk Anopheles sp adalah vektor penyakit malaria. Pengendalian vektor penyakit malaria dapat dilakukan secara biologis yaitu dengan menggunakan Bacillus thuringiensis. Tujuan penelitian adalah untuk mengetahui efektivitas konsentrasi Bacillus thuringiensis dalam pengendalian larva nyamuk Anopheles sp.Penelitian ini dilakukan secara eksperimental menggunakan Rancangan Acak Lengkap Faktorial (RAL Faktorial yang terdiri atas dua faktor yaitu konsentrasi Bacillus thuringiensis dan stadia larva Anopheles dengan pengulangan tiga kali.Perlakuan yang dicobakan adalahkonsentrasi Bacillus thuringiensis (A yang terdiri atas 5 taraf:A0: konsentrasi B.thuringiensis 0 CFU.mL-1, A1: konsentrasi B.thuringiensis 102 CFU.mL-1, A2: konsentrasi B.thuringiensis 104 CFU.mL-1, A3: konsentrasi B.thuringiensis 106CFU.mL-1, A4: konsentrasi B.thuringiensis 108CFU.mL-1. Perlakuan tahapan instar larva Anopheles sp. (B adalah sebagai berikut:B1: stadia larva instar I, B2: stadia larva instar II, B3: stadia larva instar III, B4: stadia larva instar IVsehingga terdapat 60 satuan percobaan. Hasil penelitian  menunjukkan konsentrasi B. thuringiensis isolat CK dan IPB CC yang paling berpengaruh dalam pengendalian larva Anopheles sp adalah 108 CFU.mL-1 . Instar larva yang paling peka terhadap B. thuringiensis isolat IPB CC adalah instar I dan II sedangkan instar yang peka terhadap isolat CK adalah instar II, Perlakuan konsentrasi isolat B. thuringiensis dan tingkat instar larva yang paling baik dalam pengendalian larva Anopheles sp. adalah 108 CFU.mL-1, dan instar I dan II.

  4. Observations on the seasonal dynamics of Caddisfly larvae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Trichoptera fauna in the water body consisted of two genera, Cheumatopsyche and Amphipsyche, which closely associated with the moss, Fontinalis (Bryophyta). The density of larvae increased with the occurrence and bloom of moss. The changes in density of larvae are discussed with reference to the resources ...

  5. Odour avoidance learning in the larva of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Aceves-Pina and Quinn also described aversive learning with electric shock in normal and mutant larvae and Tully ... Drosophila larvae can be trained to avoid odours associated with electric shock. We describe here, an improved method of ..... The key observation is that the half lives of STM and LTM do not change during ...

  6. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado: Colorado River: III. Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, S.J.; Holley, K.M.; Buhl, K.J.; Bullard, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    Razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) larvae from adults exposed to selenium at three sites near Grand Junction, Colorado, for 9 months were used in a 30-day waterborne and dietary selenium study. Selenium concentrations in water averaged brine shrimp, 5.6 ??g/g in zooplankton from Horsethief east wetland, 20 ??g/g in zooplankton from Adobe Creek, and 39 ??g/g in zooplankton from North Pond. The lowest survival occurred in larvae fed zooplankton rather than brine shrimp. Survival of larvae at Adobe Creek and North Pond was lower in site water than in reference water. Survival of brood stock larvae was higher than Horsethief larvae even though they received the same water and dietary treatments. Arsenic concentrations in brine shrimp may have resulted in an antagonistic interaction with selenium and reduced adverse effects in larvae. Deformities in larvae from North Pond were similar to those reported for selenium-induced teratogenic deformities in other fish species. Selenium concentrations of ???4.6 ??g/g in food resulted in rapid mortality of larvae from Horsethief, Adobe Creek, and North Pond, and suggested that selenium toxicity in the Colorado River could limit recovery of this endangered fish.

  7. Cytological basis of photoresponsive behavior in a sponge larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leys, S P; Degnan, B M

    2001-12-01

    Ontogenetic changes in the photoresponse of larvae from the demosponge Reneira sp. were studied by analyzing the swimming paths of individual larvae exposed to diffuse white light. Larvae swam upward upon release from the adult, but were negatively phototactic until at least 12 hours after release. The larval photoreceptors are presumed to be a posterior ring of columnar monociliated epithelial cells that possess 120-microm-long cilia and pigment-filled protrusions. A sudden increase in light intensity caused these cilia to become rigidly straight. If the light intensity remained high, the cilia gradually bent over the pigmented vesicles in the adjacent cytoplasm, and thus covered one entire pole of the larva. The response was reversed upon a sudden decrease in light intensity. The ciliated cells were sensitive to changes in light intensity in larvae of all ages. This response is similar to the shadow response in tunicate larvae or the shading of the photoreceptor in Euglena and is postulated to allow the larvae to steer away from brighter light to darker areas, such as under coral rubble-the preferred site of the adult sponge on the reef flat. In the absence of a coordinating system in cellular sponges, the spatial organization and autonomous behavior of the pigmented posterior cells control the rapid responses to light shown by these larvae.

  8. Cutaneous larva migrans: a bad souvenir from the vacation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; Belda, Walter; Vasconcellos, Cidia; Silva, Cristiana Silveira

    2012-06-15

    Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) is a common endemic disease in tropical and subtropical countries. This condition is caused by skin-penetrating larvae of nematodes, mainly of the hookworm Ancylostoma braziliense and other nematodes of the family Ancylostomidae. We report three cases of CLM acquired during vacations in different regions of Brazil.

  9. Occurrence of digenean larvae in freshwater snails in the Ruvu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occurrence of digenean larvae in freshwater snails in the Ruvu basin, Tanzania. G Nkwengulila, ESP Kigadye. Abstract. A survey was carried out on digenean larvae infecting freshwater snails in five habitats in Dar es Salaam, Ruvu and Morogoro. 9424 snails belonging to 12 species from five families were examined for ...

  10. Nutritional condition of fish larvae in South African estuaries: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is concluded that the individual RNA/DNA ratio can provide a reliable, sensitive and cost-effective method to assess the immediate effects of environmental changes on the nutritional condition of estuarine fish larvae. Keywords: estuarine ecology, Gilchristella aestuaria larvae, lipid content, protein content, RNA/DNA ratio, ...

  11. Shrinkage Rates In Newly Hatched Larvae Of Macrobrachium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of formalin/sea-water solution (2% and 4% formalin conc. buffered with borax) on the total lengths of preserved samples of newly hatched Macrobrachium vollenhovenii larvae was investigated. The influence of an aesthesia on larvae in 2% and 4% formal in was also studied to determine the combine influence of ...

  12. Temporal dynamics of Chaoborus larvae (Diptera : Chaoboridae) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chaoborus larvae are voracious predators of zooplankton able to change their specific composition and size structure. Thus they appear as competitors of fish. They also represent food for planktophage fish. The temporal dynamics of Chaoborus larvae was studied (from january to october 1997) in the fishery of Bakro ...

  13. Survival and growth of Clarias gariepinus larvae fed with freshwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Survival and growth performance of Clarias gariepinus larvae fed with freshwater zooplankton was compared to those fed with Artémia salina. Clarias gariepinus larvae at the end of yolk sac resorption with 2.8 ± 0.1 mg initial weight were fed ad libitum to live zooplankton for 08 days in concrete basins (without water ...

  14. Larvicidal effects of lemon peels on mosquito larvae | ANYANWU ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanol extract of the dry peels of the common edible plant, Citrus limon (family, Rutaceae), was obtained using a Soxhlet extractor and its larviciding effect evaluated against the larvae of two household mosquitoes: Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus. Each batch of larvae (20-30) were treated with 3.90, 15.63, ...

  15. Activity of Bacillis thuringiensis toxins against cocoa pod borer larvae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santoso, D.; Chaidamsari, T.; Wiryadiputra, S.; Maagd, de R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Twelve Cry proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner were tested in bioassays on cacao plantations in Indonesia for activity against the larvae of cocoa pod borer (Conopomorpha cramerella (Snellen)), an insect pest of the cacao tree. Through the damage caused by their feeding, the larvae of

  16. Rapid bioassay to screen potential biopesticides in Tenebrio molitor larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simplified assay was devised to evaluate the response of Tenebrio molitor larvae to potential insect control products. The assay incorporates punched disks of flattened whole-grain bread placed in 96-well plates, with treatments applied topically, and neonate larvae added to each well. To evalua...

  17. Habitat selection by marine larvae in changing chemical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecchini, D; Dixson, D L; Lecellier, G; Roux, N; Frédérich, B; Besson, M; Tanaka, Y; Banaigs, B; Nakamura, Y

    2017-01-15

    The replenishment and persistence of marine species is contingent on dispersing larvae locating suitable habitat and surviving to a reproductive stage. Pelagic larvae rely on environmental cues to make behavioural decisions with chemical information being important for habitat selection at settlement. We explored the sensory world of crustaceans and fishes focusing on the impact anthropogenic alterations (ocean acidification, red soil, pesticide) have on conspecific chemical signals used by larvae for habitat selection. Crustacean (Stenopus hispidus) and fish (Chromis viridis) larvae recognized their conspecifics via chemical signals under control conditions. In the presence of acidified water, red soil or pesticide, the ability of larvae to chemically recognize conspecific cues was altered. Our study highlights that recruitment potential on coral reefs may decrease due to anthropogenic stressors. If so, populations of fishes and crustaceans will continue their rapid decline; larval recruitment will not replace and sustain the adult populations on degraded reefs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Freshly squeezed: anaphylaxis caused by drone larvae juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoevesandt, J; Trautmann, A

    2017-11-30

    Drone larvae are mostly considered a by-product of beekeeping, but have recently been advo-cated as a high-protein source of food. There are as yet no data concerning their allergenic po-tential. We report on a 29-year old bee keeper who experienced an anaphylactic reaction following the consumption of a freshly prepared beverage from raw drone larvae. Larvae-specific sensitization was confirmed by prick-to-prick and basophil activation testing. Bee stings and classical bee products including honey and royal jelly were tolerated. This is the hitherto first report on IgE-mediated allergy to drone larvae. We suggest that a certain awareness towards the allergenicity of bee larvae is required.

  19. External Ophthalmomyiasis Caused by Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Challiphoride Larva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghayeh NOROUZI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is an animal or human pathogenic condition initiated by parasitic dipterous fly larvae feeding in the host’s necrotic or living tissue. Here we report a case of external ophthalmomyiasis caused by Lucilia sericata in a 78-yr-old with a vascular tumor of the retina and surgery history, from Bijar City of Kurdistan Province, Iran in 2015. Associated symptoms included right eye pain with mucoid ocular discharge, headache, sensing the presence of a foreign body in the eye and itching. Examination revealed a L. sericata Larva in his right eye. Infestation of ocular tissue by fly larvae (ophthalmomyiasis progresses after retinal surgery and can destroy orbital tissues within days, especially in patient with poor hygienic conditions. Treatment consists of removal of the larvae and surgical debridement. Following removal of larva, the symptoms completely resolved within a few hours and remained asymptomatic several weeks later.

  20. External Ophthalmomyiasis Caused by Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Challiphoride) Larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, Roghayeh; Manochehri, Arman; Zarrin, Saman

    2017-01-01

    Myiasis is an animal or human pathogenic condition initiated by parasitic dipterous fly larvae feeding in the host's necrotic or living tissue. Here we report a case of external ophthalmomyiasis caused by Lucilia sericata in a 78-yr-old with a vascular tumor of the retina and surgery history, from Bijar City of Kurdistan Province, Iran in 2015. Associated symptoms included right eye pain with mucoid ocular discharge, headache, sensing the presence of a foreign body in the eye and itching. Examination revealed a L. sericata Larva in his right eye. Infestation of ocular tissue by fly larvae (ophthalmomyiasis) progresses after retinal surgery and can destroy orbital tissues within days, especially in patient with poor hygienic conditions. Treatment consists of removal of the larvae and surgical debridement. Following removal of larva, the symptoms completely resolved within a few hours and remained asymptomatic several weeks later.

  1. Description and key to larvae of Curculio spp. of eastern United States and Canada (coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester P. Gibson

    1985-01-01

    A general description of Curculio larvae is given. Ke y characters are presented to separate 15 of the 16 described species of eastern North America. A brief key for separating Curculio larvae from Conotrachelus and lepidopterous larvae is presented.

  2. Neuromechanics of crawling in D. melanogaster larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlevan, Cengiz; Paoletti, Paolo; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-03-01

    Nervous system, body and environment interact in non-trivial ways to generate locomotion and thence behavior in an organism. Here we present a minimal integrative mathematical model to describe the simple behavior of forward crawling in Drosophila larvae. Our model couples the excitation-inhibition circuits in the nervous system to force production in the muscles and body movement in a frictional environment, which in turn leads to a proprioceptive signal that feeds back to the nervous system. Our results explain the basic observed phenomenology of crawling with or without proprioception, and elucidate the stabilizing role of proprioception in crawling with respect to external and internal perturbations. Our integrated approach allows us to make testable predictions on the effect of changing body-environment interactions on crawling, and serves as a substrate for the development of hierarchical models linking cellular processes to behavior.

  3. The other gastropod larvae: larval morphogenesis in a marine neritimorph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Louise R; Ferguson, Samuel J

    2013-04-01

    Two of the three major gastropod clades with feeding larvae are sister groups and larval morphogenesis for members of these clades, the Caenogastropoda and Heterobranchia, has been well studied. The third clade, the Neritimorpha, has an unstable phylogenetic position and little is known about development of their planktotrophic larvae. Information about larval morphology of neritimorphs and resolution of their controversial phylogenetic placement is critically important for understanding evolution of larval feeding within the Gastropoda. We describe larval morphogenesis to metamorphic competence for laboratory-reared larvae of Nerita melanotragus (Smith, 1884) (Neritimorpha: Neritidae). Preliminary observations suggest that prehatch larvae are capable of delayed hatching, possibly by entering a diapause state. Our description of larval morphogenesis, as based on tissue sections for light and transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, three-dimensional-reconstructions of sectioned tissue, and labeling of muscles with fluorphore-tagged phalloidin, revealed four features that are unprecedented among both feeding and nonfeeding gastropod larvae. Larvae of N. melanotragus have muscles on the left and right side that both meet current criteria of a larval retractor muscle; shell-anchored muscles with oblique striations that project inside the visceral nerve loop to insert mainly on the velar lobes. They also have left and right digestive glands of similar size and a left and right hypobranchial gland. A larval "heart" is absent, but water circulation through the mantle cavity may be facilitated by large circular orifices, lined by patches of motile cilia, leading in and out of the mantle cavity. Comparison of larval traits among all three groups of gastropods with feeding larvae indicates that larvae of N. melanotragus have many unique characteristics, but they show more similarities to caenogastropod than to heterobranch larvae. These results are a

  4. Iodine nutrition and toxicity in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penglase, S; Harboe, T; Sæle, Ø; Helland, S; Nordgreen, A

    2013-01-01

    Copepods as feed promote better growth and development in marine fish larvae than rotifers. However, unlike rotifers, copepods contain several minerals such as iodine (I), at potentially toxic levels. Iodine is an essential trace element and both under and over supply of I can inhibit the production of the I containing thyroid hormones. It is unknown whether marine fish larvae require copepod levels of I or if mechanisms are present that prevent I toxicity. In this study, larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were fed rotifers enriched to intermediate (26 mg I kg-1 dry weight; MI group) or copepod (129 mg I kg-1 DW; HI group) I levels and compared to cod larvae fed control rotifers (0.6 mg I kg-1 DW). Larval I concentrations were increased by 3 (MI) and 7 (HI) fold compared to controls during the rotifer feeding period. No differences in growth were observed, but the HI diet increased thyroid follicle colloid to epithelium ratios, and affected the essential element concentrations of larvae compared to the other groups. The thyroid follicle morphology in the HI larvae is typical of colloid goitre, a condition resulting from excessive I intake, even though whole body I levels were below those found previously in copepod fed cod larvae. This is the first observation of dietary induced I toxicity in fish, and suggests I toxicity may be determined to a greater extent by bioavailability and nutrient interactions than by total body I concentrations in fish larvae. Rotifers with 0.6 mg I kg-1 DW appeared sufficient to prevent gross signs of I deficiency in cod larvae reared with continuous water exchange, while modelling of cod larvae versus rotifer I levels suggests that optimum I levels in rotifers for cod larvae is 3.5 mg I kg-1 DW. PMID:23638355

  5. Iodine nutrition and toxicity in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Penglase

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Copepods as feed promote better growth and development in marine fish larvae than rotifers. However, unlike rotifers, copepods contain several minerals such as iodine (I, at potentially toxic levels. Iodine is an essential trace element and both under and over supply of I can inhibit the production of the I containing thyroid hormones. It is unknown whether marine fish larvae require copepod levels of I or if mechanisms are present that prevent I toxicity. In this study, larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua were fed rotifers enriched to intermediate (26 mg I kg-1 dry weight; MI group or copepod (129 mg I kg-1 DW; HI group I levels and compared to cod larvae fed control rotifers (0.6 mg I kg-1 DW. Larval I concentrations were increased by 3 (MI and 7 (HI fold compared to controls during the rotifer feeding period. No differences in growth were observed, but the HI diet increased thyroid follicle colloid to epithelium ratios, and affected the essential element concentrations of larvae compared to the other groups. The thyroid follicle morphology in the HI larvae is typical of colloid goitre, a condition resulting from excessive I intake, even though whole body I levels were below those found previously in copepod fed cod larvae. This is the first observation of dietary induced I toxicity in fish, and suggests I toxicity may be determined to a greater extent by bioavailability and nutrient interactions than by total body I concentrations in fish larvae. Rotifers with 0.6 mg I kg-1 DW appeared sufficient to prevent gross signs of I deficiency in cod larvae reared with continuous water exchange, while modelling of cod larvae versus rotifer I levels suggests that optimum I levels in rotifers for cod larvae is 3.5 mg I kg-1 DW.

  6. Iodine nutrition and toxicity in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penglase, S; Harboe, T; Sæle, O; Helland, S; Nordgreen, A; Hamre, K

    2013-01-01

    Copepods as feed promote better growth and development in marine fish larvae than rotifers. However, unlike rotifers, copepods contain several minerals such as iodine (I), at potentially toxic levels. Iodine is an essential trace element and both under and over supply of I can inhibit the production of the I containing thyroid hormones. It is unknown whether marine fish larvae require copepod levels of I or if mechanisms are present that prevent I toxicity. In this study, larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were fed rotifers enriched to intermediate (26 mg I kg(-1) dry weight; MI group) or copepod (129 mg I kg(-1) DW; HI group) I levels and compared to cod larvae fed control rotifers (0.6 mg I kg(-1) DW). Larval I concentrations were increased by 3 (MI) and 7 (HI) fold compared to controls during the rotifer feeding period. No differences in growth were observed, but the HI diet increased thyroid follicle colloid to epithelium ratios, and affected the essential element concentrations of larvae compared to the other groups. The thyroid follicle morphology in the HI larvae is typical of colloid goitre, a condition resulting from excessive I intake, even though whole body I levels were below those found previously in copepod fed cod larvae. This is the first observation of dietary induced I toxicity in fish, and suggests I toxicity may be determined to a greater extent by bioavailability and nutrient interactions than by total body I concentrations in fish larvae. Rotifers with 0.6 mg I kg(-1) DW appeared sufficient to prevent gross signs of I deficiency in cod larvae reared with continuous water exchange, while modelling of cod larvae versus rotifer I levels suggests that optimum I levels in rotifers for cod larvae is 3.5 mg I kg(-1) DW.

  7. Large extracellular loop of tetraspanin as a potential vaccine candidate for filariasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajalakshmi Dakshinamoorthy

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis affects nearly 120 million people worldwide and mass preventive chemotherapy is currently used as a strategy to control this infection. This has substantially reduced the incidence of the infection in several parts of the world. However, a prophylactic vaccine would be more effective in preventing future infections and will supplement the mass chemotherapy efforts. Unfortunately, there is no licensed vaccine available currently to prevent this infection. Molecules expressed on the surface of the parasite are potential candidates for vaccine development as they are exposed to the host immune system. In this study we show that the large extracellular loop of tetraspanin (TSP LEL, a protein expressed on the cuticle of Brugia malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti is a potential vaccine candidate. Our results showed that BmTSP LEL is expressed on the surface of B. malayi infective third stage larvae (L3 and sera from human subjects who are putatively immune to lymphatic filariasis carry high titer of IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies against BmTSP LEL and WbTSP LEL. We also showed that these antibodies in the sera of human subjects can participate in the killing of B. malayi L3 in an antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity mechanism. Vaccination trials in mice showed that close to 64% protection were achieved against challenge infections with B. malayi L3. Immunized animals showed high titer of anti-WbTSP LEL IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b antibodies in the sera and IFN-γ secreting cells in the spleen. Onchocerca volvulus another filarial parasite also expresses TSP LEL. Cross-reactivity studies showed that IgG1 antibody in the sera of endemic normal subjects, recognize OvTSP LEL. Similarly, anti-OvTSP LEL antibodies in the sera of subjects who are immune to O. volvulus were also shown to cross-react with rWbTSP LEL and rBmTSP LEL. These findings thus suggested that rTSP LEL can be developed as a potential vaccine candidate against multiple

  8. Screening of the ‘Open Scaffolds’ collection from Compounds Australia identifies a new chemical entity with anthelmintic activities against different developmental stages of the barber's pole worm and other parasitic nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Preston

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and development of novel anthelmintic classes is essential to sustain the control of socioeconomically important parasitic worms of humans and animals. With the aim of offering novel, lead-like scaffolds for drug discovery, Compounds Australia released the ‘Open Scaffolds’ collection containing 33,999 compounds, with extensive information available on the physicochemical properties of these chemicals. In the present study, we screened 14,464 prioritised compounds from the ‘Open Scaffolds’ collection against the exsheathed third-stage larvae (xL3s of Haemonchus contortus using recently developed whole-organism screening assays. We identified a hit compound, called SN00797439, which was shown to reproducibly reduce xL3 motility by ≥ 70%; this compound induced a characteristic, “coiled” xL3 phenotype (IC50 = 3.46–5.93 μM, inhibited motility of fourth-stage larvae (L4s; IC50 = 0.31–12.5 μM and caused considerable cuticular damage to L4s in vitro. When tested on other parasitic nematodes in vitro, SN00797439 was shown to inhibit (IC50 = 3–50 μM adults of Ancylostoma ceylanicum (hookworm and first-stage larvae of Trichuris muris (whipworm and eventually kill (>90% these stages. Furthermore, this compound completely inhibited the motility of female and male adults of Brugia malayi (50–100 μM as well as microfilariae of both B. malayi and Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm. Overall, these results show that SN00797439 acts against genetically (evolutionarily distant parasitic nematodes i.e. H. contortus and A. ceylanicum [strongyloids] vs. B. malayi and D. immitis [filarioids] vs. T. muris [enoplid], and, thus, might offer a novel, lead-like scaffold for the development of a relatively broad-spectrum anthelmintic. Our future work will focus on assessing the activity of SN00797439 against other pathogens that cause neglected

  9. Screening of the 'Open Scaffolds' collection from Compounds Australia identifies a new chemical entity with anthelmintic activities against different developmental stages of the barber's pole worm and other parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Sarah; Jiao, Yaqing; Baell, Jonathan B; Keiser, Jennifer; Crawford, Simon; Koehler, Anson V; Wang, Tao; Simpson, Moana M; Kaplan, Ray M; Cowley, Karla J; Simpson, Kaylene J; Hofmann, Andreas; Jabbar, Abdul; Gasser, Robin B

    2017-12-01

    The discovery and development of novel anthelmintic classes is essential to sustain the control of socioeconomically important parasitic worms of humans and animals. With the aim of offering novel, lead-like scaffolds for drug discovery, Compounds Australia released the 'Open Scaffolds' collection containing 33,999 compounds, with extensive information available on the physicochemical properties of these chemicals. In the present study, we screened 14,464 prioritised compounds from the 'Open Scaffolds' collection against the exsheathed third-stage larvae (xL3s) of Haemonchus contortus using recently developed whole-organism screening assays. We identified a hit compound, called SN00797439, which was shown to reproducibly reduce xL3 motility by ≥ 70%; this compound induced a characteristic, "coiled" xL3 phenotype (IC50 = 3.46-5.93 μM), inhibited motility of fourth-stage larvae (L4s; IC50 = 0.31-12.5 μM) and caused considerable cuticular damage to L4s in vitro. When tested on other parasitic nematodes in vitro, SN00797439 was shown to inhibit (IC50 = 3-50 μM) adults of Ancylostoma ceylanicum (hookworm) and first-stage larvae of Trichuris muris (whipworm) and eventually kill (>90%) these stages. Furthermore, this compound completely inhibited the motility of female and male adults of Brugia malayi (50-100 μM) as well as microfilariae of both B. malayi and Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm). Overall, these results show that SN00797439 acts against genetically (evolutionarily) distant parasitic nematodes i.e. H. contortus and A. ceylanicum [strongyloids] vs. B. malayi and D. immitis [filarioids] vs. T. muris [enoplid], and, thus, might offer a novel, lead-like scaffold for the development of a relatively broad-spectrum anthelmintic. Our future work will focus on assessing the activity of SN00797439 against other pathogens that cause neglected tropical diseases, optimising analogs with improved biological activities and characterising their targets

  10. Effects of various diets on the calcium and phosphorus composition of mealworms (Tenebrio molitor larvae) and superworms (Zophobas morio larvae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latney, La'Toya V; Toddes, Barbara D; Wyre, Nicole R; Brown, Dorothy C; Michel, Kathryn E; Briscoe, Johanna A

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether the nutritive quality of Tenebrio molitor larvae and Zophobas morio larvae, which are commonly cultured as live food sources, is influenced by 4 commercially available diets used as nutritional substrates; identify which diet best improved calcium content of larvae; and identify the feeding time interval that assured the highest calcium intake by larvae. ANIMALS 2,000 Zophobas morio larvae (ie, superworms) and 7,500 Tenebrio molitor larvae (ie, mealworms). PROCEDURES Larvae were placed in control and diet treatment groups for 2-, 7-, and 10-day intervals. Treatment diets were as follows: wheat millings, avian hand feeding formula, organic avian mash diet, and a high-calcium cricket feed. Control groups received water only. After treatment, larvae were flash-frozen live with liquid nitrogen in preparation for complete proximate and mineral analyses. Analyses for the 2-day treatment group were performed in triplicate. RESULTS The nutrient composition of the high-calcium cricket feed groups had significant changes in calcium content, phosphorus content, and metabolizable energy at the 2-day interval, compared with other treatment groups, for both mealworms and superworms. Calcium content and calcium-to-phosphorus ratios for larvae in the high-calcium cricket feed group were the highest among the diet treatments for all treatment intervals and for both larval species. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A 2-day interval with the high-calcium cricket feed achieved a larval nutrient composition sufficient to meet National Research Council dietary calcium recommendations for nonlactating rats. Mealworm calcium composition reached 2,420 g/1,000 kcal at 48 hours, and superworm calcium composition reached 2,070g/1,000 kcal at 48 hours. These findings may enable pet owners, veterinarians, insect breeders, and zoo curators to optimize nutritive content of larvae fed to insectivorous animals.

  11. Larvas migrans ganglionar: Presentación de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen Luis Álvarez

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Las larvas migrans visceral cuya causa radica en la infestación con larvas de toxocara canis o cati, ocurre más frecuentemente en niños menores de 10 años. Se presenta el caso de un niño de 8 años de edad en el cual se diagnosticó larvas migrans ganglionar. Se comentan aspectos etioepidemiológicos de la enfermedad, su cuadro clínico y evolución. Se hace énfasis en las medidas higiénicas sanitarias de control y manipulación de excretas de animales domésticos, en este caso de perros y gatos.Visceral larvae migrans caused by the infestation with larvae of toxocara canis or cati are more frequent among children under 10. The case of an 8-year-old boy who was diagnosed ganglionar larva migrans is presented. Comments are made on some etioepidemiological aspects of the disease, as well as on his clinical picture and evolution. Emphasis is made on the hygienic and sanitary measures of control and manipulation of stools from pegs as dogs and cats. Las larvas migrans visceral cuya causa radica en la infestación con larvas de toxocara canis o cati, ocurre más frecuentemente en niños menores de 10 años. Se presenta el caso de un niño de 8 años de edad en el cual se diagnosticó larvas migrans ganglionar. Se comentan aspectos etioepidemiológicos de la enfermedad, su cuadro clínico y evolución. se hace énfasis en las medidas higiénicas sanitarias de control y manipulación de excretas de animales domésticos, en este caso de perros y gatos.

  12. Structure and occurrence of cyphonautes larvae (Bryozoa, Ectoprocta)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus; Worsaae, Katrine

    2010-01-01

    of fewer fibers. The H. malayensis larva lacks the anterior and posterior intervalve cilia. Its pyriform organ is unciliated with only a small central depression. The adhesive epithelium is not invaginated as an adhesive sac and lacks the large muscles interpreted as adhesive sac muscles in the M...... configuration of muscles, nerves, and cilia of the two larvae are identical. However, the larva of H. malayensis is much smaller than that of M. membranacea, which may explain most of the differences observed. Although all major nerves and muscle strands are present in H. malayensis, they are generally composed...

  13. MORPHOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT OF Napoleon WRASSE, Cheilinus undulatus LARVAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon Harianto Hutapea

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available To improve the survival rate, napoleon wrasse larval rearing trial was conducted at Research Institute for Mariculture, Gondol-Bali in 2003. The trial aims at assessing initial feed for larvae, food habit, and morphological development from early larval stage to juvenile. The results showed that chicken egg yolk could be applied as initial feed and followed by rotifer, Artemia and mysid (Mesophodopsis sp.. Three swimming behavior of larvae were observed, drifting, free swimming and hiding on the substrate as larvae develop. Digestive system development, simple tube like, transition stage and coiled where digestive system could be distinguished between stomach, intestine and rectum.

  14. REARING CARP LARVAE (Cyprinus carpio) IN CLOSED RECIRCULATORY SYSTEM (RAS)

    OpenAIRE

    Anđelko Opačak; Jurica Jug Dujaković; Siniša Ozimec; Ivan Stević; Dinko Jelkić; Roman Safner

    2012-01-01

    Postembryonic rearing of carp larvae in closed recirculatory system was conducted in 2009 at the fish farm Ribnjak LLC, Donji Miholjac, Croatia. The research was conducted in two test groups (A and B with three iterations in each) with a control group (C). Test group A (3 tanks x 250 l) consisted of 150 000 larvae (density of 200 larvae•l-1), test group B (3 tanks x 500 l) consisted of 600 000 larvae (density of 400 larvae•l-1), and the control group (C) was a mud fish pond T-6 which was stoc...

  15. Accelerated larvae development of Ascaris lumbricoides eggs with ultraviolet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aladawi, M.A. [Syrian Atomic Energy Commission, Radiation Technology Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)]. E-mail: Scientific@aec.org.sy; Albarodi, H. [Syrian Atomic Energy Commission, Radiation Technology Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Hammoudeh, A. [Syrian Atomic Energy Commission, Radiation Technology Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Shamma, M. [Syrian Atomic Energy Commission, Radiation Technology Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Sharabi, N. [Syrian Atomic Energy Commission, Radiation Technology Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2006-01-15

    In order to investigate the effect of UV radiation on the development of Ascaris lumbricoides larvae, eggs were exposed to increasing UV doses. Filtered wastewater from the secondary effluent taken from the Damascus wastewater treatment plant (DWTP) was used as irradiation and incubation medium. The progressive and accelerated embryonation stages were microscopically observed and the percentages of completely developed larvae were determined weekly. Results indicated that the UV radiation accelerated the development of larvae with increasing UV dose. Preliminary information about the relationship between the UV radiation dose and rate of embryonation is also presented.

  16. Foraging strategy switching in an antlion larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Yu-Jen; Okuyama, Toshinori

    2012-09-01

    Antlion larvae are typically considered as trap-building predators, but some species of antlions always forage without using pits or only sometimes use pits to capture prey; they can ambush prey without pits. This study examined a species that switches its strategy between pit-trapping and ambushing and asked the mechanism behind the switching behaviour. A dynamic optimization model incorporating tradeoffs between the two strategies was built. The tradeoffs were prey capture success and predation risk (both are higher when pit-trapping). The model predicted that antlions should use the trap-building strategy when their energy status is low and should use the ambush strategy when their energy status is high. These predictions as well as an assumption (i.e., predation risk associated with pit-trapping is higher than that associated with ambushing) of the model were empirically confirmed. The results suggest that antlions flexibly switch between pit-trapping and ambushing to maximize their fitness by balancing the costs and benefits of the two strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Commercially important penaeid shrimp larvae in the estuaries of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Achuthankutty, C.T.

    Larval stages of the penaeid shrimps, Metapenaeus dobsoni (Miers), M. affinis (Milne - Edwards) and Penaeus merguiensis De Man were mostly distributed at the lower reaches of Mandovi and Zuari estuaries. While larvae of M. dobsoni and M. affinis...

  18. Spatial habitat for eel larva at Cimandiri estuary, West Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarina, N. D.; Supriatna

    2017-07-01

    The estuarine ecosystem is known as suitable breeding sites for fishes because this particular habitat is receiving continuous organic matters from river ways and constant sunlight due to its depth that allows sunlight penetration. Cimandiri estuary is one of the estuaries located in the south of Java Island close to the Indian Ocean and known as a suitable habitat for eel larva that routinely collected by local people. Eel habitat has a relationship with the dynamic of space. This dynamic influenced by season, water flow, tide, bathymetry, salinity and dissolved oxygen (DO). The geographic information system is an approach in studying habitat dynamic, through modeling. Furthermore, the spatial model for eel larva habitat is required for land use planning that aimed to achieve sustainable eels larva rearing and conserve estuarine habitat as well. The aim of this research was to investigate dynamics on spatial habitat of eel larva at Cimandiri estuary, West Java.

  19. Preliminary notes on the decapod larvae of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menon, M.K.; Menon, P.G.; Paulinose, V.T.

    The note presents some general facts regarding the distribution of some of the larger groups of decapod larvae in the Arabian Sea Their relative numbers and the families and subfamilies, so far as can be recognized, represented within each group...

  20. Ophthalmomyiasis caused by the reindeer warble fly larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, M S; Nilssen, A C; Lyslo, A; Syrdalen, P; Dannevig, L

    1991-04-01

    Two boys with ophthalmomyiasis caused by the first instar larva of the reindeer warble fly Hypoderma tarandi are reported. Both were 9 years old and came from the coast of northern Norway. One had ophthalmomyiasis interna posterior and one eye had been removed because of progressive pain and blindness. Histological examination showed the remains of a fly larva. The second boy had ophthalmomyiasis externa with a tumour in the upper eyelid, and histological examination showed a warble with a well preserved larva. Identification of the parasite in the histological material was based on the finding of cuticular spines and parts of the cephalopharyngeal skeleton identical with those of the first instar larva of H tarandi.

  1. Automated high-throughput behavioral analyses in zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richendrfer, Holly; Créton, Robbert

    2013-07-04

    We have created a novel high-throughput imaging system for the analysis of behavior in 7-day-old zebrafish larvae in multi-lane plates. This system measures spontaneous behaviors and the response to an aversive stimulus, which is shown to the larvae via a PowerPoint presentation. The recorded images are analyzed with an ImageJ macro, which automatically splits the color channels, subtracts the background, and applies a threshold to identify individual larvae placement in the lanes. We can then import the coordinates into an Excel sheet to quantify swim speed, preference for edge or side of the lane, resting behavior, thigmotaxis, distance between larvae, and avoidance behavior. Subtle changes in behavior are easily detected using our system, making it useful for behavioral analyses after exposure to environmental toxicants or pharmaceuticals.

  2. Microbial interference with hatch and survival of European eel larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sune Riis; Lauesen; Tomkiewicz, Jonna

    Recent research has significantly improved our knowledge and capabilities in the field of in vitro production of yolk sac larvae from European eel (Anguilla anguilla). Female broodstock European eels are matured by weekly administration of pituitary extract and male eels with hCG (human chorionic...... gonadotropin), which afford gametes for in vitro fertilization studies. The maturing process may lead to mass hatchings of up to ½ million larvae of which some survive the entire yolk sac phase. However, the rearing of larvae suffers from high larval mortalities, and water quality might be a crucial factor...... for larval survival in rearing systems. By applying antibiotic treatment as a research tool, it was possible to determine the extent of microbial interference in the production of high numbers of good quality larvae. By controlling microbiota during egg and larval incubation, the egg hatching success...

  3. Fish larvae from the Canary region in autumn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Rodríguez

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the taxonomic composition of the fish larvae community in the Canary region in autumn 1991 is presented. In total, 8699 larvae belonging to 58 fish families were studied. 176 taxonomic groups were identified, 149 at species level and the rest were identified at a higher level. The most numerous family and the one that presented the greatest number of species was Myctophidae. The most frequently caught species was Cyclothone braueri. The taxonomic composition (at family level of the fish larvae community, dominated by four mesopelagic families, was typical of oceanic regions of warm waters. The most remarkable feature of the fish larvae community was its high specific diversity.

  4. What do barnacle larvae feed on ? Implications in biofouling ecology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaonkar, C.; Anil, A.C.

    .22µm filtered seawater. The number of defecated pellets by a larva after 12 hours of incubation at room temperature and the proportion of the larvae defecating was quantified. After the observations, pellets were preserved in Ethanol for Scanning... Electron Microscope (SEM) photography to find the signatures of food. Ethanol preserved samples were filtered on to 0.22 µm polycarbonate membrane filters, rinsed with deionised water to remove salt and ethanol and then air dried. Filters were...

  5. The use of fly larvae for organic waste treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čičková, Helena; Newton, G Larry; Lacy, R Curt; Kozánek, Milan

    2015-01-01

    The idea of using fly larvae for processing of organic waste was proposed almost 100 years ago. Since then, numerous laboratory studies have shown that several fly species are well suited for biodegradation of organic waste, with the house fly (Musca domestica L.) and the black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens L.) being the most extensively studied insects for this purpose. House fly larvae develop well in manure of animals fed a mixed diet, while black soldier fly larvae accept a greater variety of decaying organic matter. Blow fly and flesh fly maggots are better suited for biodegradation of meat processing waste. The larvae of these insects have been successfully used to reduce mass of animal manure, fecal sludge, municipal waste, food scrapes, restaurant and market waste, as well as plant residues left after oil extraction. Higher yields of larvae are produced on nutrient-rich wastes (meat processing waste, food waste) than on manure or plant residues. Larvae may be used as animal feed or for production of secondary products (biodiesel, biologically active substances). Waste residue becomes valuable fertilizer. During biodegradation the temperature of the substrate rises, pH changes from neutral to alkaline, ammonia release increases, and moisture decreases. Microbial load of some pathogens can be substantially reduced. Both larvae and digested residue may require further treatment to eliminate pathogens. Facilities utilizing natural fly populations, as well as pilot and full-scale plants with laboratory-reared fly populations have been shown to be effective and economically feasible. The major obstacles associated with the production of fly larvae from organic waste on an industrial scale seem to be technological aspects of scaling-up the production capacity, insufficient knowledge of fly biology necessary to produce large amounts of eggs, and current legislation. Technological innovations could greatly improve performance of the biodegradation facilities and

  6. Larval structure of Passalus gravelyiand sexual dimorphism in Passalid larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Mattos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The adults and larvae of Passalidae are subsocial insects commonly found in tropical forests, living in decaying wood gallery systems constructed by adults. Currently, few repots on the larvae of Neotropical Passalidae have been published and information is scarce. In this study, the Passalus (Pertinax gravelyiMoreira, 1922 larvae is described for the first time, based on ten larval specimens 1 (1° instar, 4 (2° instar, and 5 (3° instar associated with three adults collected from a single colony at the Parque Nacional do Itatiaia (Itatiaia, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The description was carried out based on electronic and digital photographs of diagnostic structures, with some details on the systematic of the species. The larvae of Passalus gravelyihas the general setal 'Pertinax' pattern and differed from others by 16 to 18 setae on the anal ring, the other larvae data from Brazilian species show the anal ring with 10 to 12 setae. A discussion on the presence of sexual dimorphism in 62 species of two and three instars of Passalidae larvae is provided for the first time. Besides, a description of the terminal ampullapresent as a cuticular structure found in the medial-ventral area of the 9th abdominal sternite in males is also given. The terminal ampullawas only observed in the Passalidae male larvae and was not visible in female larvae. The terminal ampullaare acknowledged now in males of 64 passalid species, that are taxonomically distributed in world tropical forests, at the Oriental and Australian subfamily Aulacocyclinae (Aulacocyclini & Ceracupini and the cosmotropical subfamily Passalinae (Solenocyclini, Macrolinini, Passalini, & Proculini.

  7. Characterization of secreted proteases of Paenibacillus larvae, potential virulence factors in honeybee larval infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American Foulbrood (AFB), the most severe bacterial disease that affects honeybee larvae. AFB causes a significant decrease in the honeybee population affecting the beekeeping industry and agricultural production. After infection of larvae, P. larvae se...

  8. Size-specific predation on marine invertebrate larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jonathan D

    2008-02-01

    Predation on planktonic larval stages is frequently a major source of mortality for the offspring of benthic marine invertebrates. Mortality rate likely varies with larval size and developmental stage, but few experiments have measured how these factors affect predation rates. I used experimental reductions in egg size to test how variation in larval size affects the likelihood of predation during planktonic development. Blastomeres of the sand dollar Dendraster excentricus were separated at the two-cell stage to produce half-sized zygotes. Larvae resulting from this manipulation were tested for their susceptibility to predation relative to whole-sized siblings at four ages. Individuals from each size class were simultaneously presented as prey items to five predators (crab zoeae, crab megalopae, chaetognaths, solitary tunicates, and postlarval fish) in the laboratory. Four predators consumed significantly more half-sized larvae than whole-sized larvae, but one predator type (postlarval fish) consumed more whole-sized larvae. Predators that consumed more half-sized larvae also preferentially consumed younger larvae. In contrast, postlarval fish showed no significant prey preference based on larval age. These results suggest that assumptions of constant mortality rates during development should be modified to account for the effects of larval size and age.

  9. Observations of the sound producing organs in achelate lobster larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Fornshell

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Achelata, lobsters lacking claws and having a phyllosoma larva, are divided into two families, the Palinuridae or spiny lobsters and the Scyllaridae or slipper lobsters. Within the Palinuridae adults of two groups were identified by Parker (1884, the Stridentesthat are capable of producing sounds, and the Silentesthat are not known to produce sounds. The Stridentes employ a file-like structure on the dorsal surface of the cephalon and a plectrum consisting of a series of ridges on the proximal segment of the second antenna to produce their sounds. All species of Achelata hatch as an unpigmented thin phyllosoma larva. The phyllosoma larva of the Stridentes have a presumptive file-like structure on the dorsal cephalon. A similar file-like structure is found on the cephalon of one species of Silentes, Palinurellus wienckki, and some but not all of the phyllosoma larvae of the Scyllaridae. No presumptive plectrum is found on the second antenna of any of the phyllosoma larvae. Presence of a presumptive file-like structure on phyllosoma larvae of Silentes and Scyllaridae suggests that the ability to produce sounds may have been lost secondarily in the Silentes and Scyllaridae.

  10. Abscisic acid enhances cold tolerance in honeybee larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Leonor; Negri, Pedro; Sturla, Laura; Guida, Lucrezia; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Maggi, Matías; Eguaras, Martín; Zocchi, Elena; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2017-04-12

    The natural composition of nutrients present in food is a key factor determining the immune function and stress responses in the honeybee ( Apis mellifera ). We previously demonstrated that a supplement of abscisic acid (ABA), a natural component of nectar, pollen, and honey, increases honeybee colony survival overwinter. Here we further explored the role of ABA in in vitro -reared larvae exposed to low temperatures. Four-day-old larvae (L4) exposed to 25°C for 3 days showed lower survival rates and delayed development compared to individuals growing at a standard temperature (34°C). Cold-stressed larvae maintained higher levels of ABA for longer than do larvae reared at 34°C, suggesting a biological significance for ABA. Larvae fed with an ABA-supplemented diet completely prevent the low survival rate due to cold stress and accelerate adult emergence. ABA modulates the expression of genes involved in metabolic adjustments and stress responses: Hexamerin 70b, Insulin Receptor Substrate, Vitellogenin , and Heat Shock Proteins 70. AmLANCL2, the honeybee ABA receptor, is also regulated by cold stress and ABA. These results support a role for ABA increasing the tolerance of honeybee larvae to low temperatures through priming effects. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Guppies as predators of common mosquito larvae in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleeza, S N R; Norma-Rashid, Y; Sofian-Azirun, M

    2014-03-01

    Observation on predation activities of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) on the larvae of three species of mosquito, namely Aedes albopictus, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus was carried out under laboratory conditions. Male and female guppies were used as predators for predation experiments on the 4th instars of mosquito larvae. The daily feeding rates comparing male and female guppies on mosquito larvae were different; the female guppies consumed more mosquito larvae than male guppies did. The daily feeding rates of female guppies were 121.3 for Ae. aegypti, 105.6 for Ae. albopictus, and 72.3 for Cx. quinquefasciatus. The daily feeding rates of male guppies were 98.6 for Ae. aegypti, 73.6 for Ae. albopictus, and 47.6 for Cx. quinquefasciatus. In terms of prey preference, there was greater preference towards mosquito larvae of Ae. aegypti, followed by Ae. albopictus, and the least preferred was Cx. quinquefasciatus. Male and female guppies consumed more mosquito larvae during lights on (day time) compared with lights off (night time). The water volume, prey species, number of fish predators available, prey densities, and prey's sex also influenced the predation activities.

  12. A fly larva (Syrphidae: Ocyptamus that preys on adult flies

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    Onanchi Ureña

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Predatory syrphid larvae feed on relatively immobile prey, but here we report the first case (as far as we are aware of obligatory predation on very mobile prey. Larvae of an undescribed species of Ocyptamus (Diptera: Syrphidae were found in whitefly (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae aggregations on the undersides of citrus leaves. However, instead of preying on the whitefly nymphs (as would be expected, the larvae preyed on adult flies (Diptera that were attracted to the honeydew. In the laboratory, larvae captured significantly more flies on whitefly infested leaves than on washed leaves, and generally abandoned leaves that lacked whiteflies. Most cases of successful prey capture involved flies that probed the anterior part of the larva’s body with its proboscis (as if it were honeydew. The syrphid larva lashed out at the fly and entangled it in sticky oral secretion. The prey did not recover when they were removed from the larva, suggesting that this new predatory species also employs venom to subdue its prey. Although the larvae consumed some honeydew, they were unable to complete their development on this diet. Two parasitoids were reared from Ocyptamus puparia, Proaspicera sp. (Hymenoptera: Figitidae and Paracarotomus sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, both of which are endoparasitic koinobionts. Rev. Biol. Trop. 58 (4: 1157-1163. Epub 2010 December 01.Las larvas depredadoras de Syrphidae se alimentan de presas relativamente inmóviles, pero aquí reportamos el primer caso (hasta ahora conocido de la depredación obligatoria en presas muy móviles. Se encontraron las larvas de una especie no descrita de Ocyptamus (Diptera: Syrphidae juntas con ninfas de mosca blanca (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae en el envés de las hojas de cítricos. Sin embargo, en vez de alimentarse de las ninfas de mosca blanca (como debería esperarse, las larvas se alimentaron de moscas adultas (Diptera que fueron atraídas a las excreciones azucaradas de la mosca blanca. En el

  13. Loss of surface coat by Strongyloides ratti infective larvae during skin penetration: evidence using larvae radiolabelled with /sup 67/gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grove, D.I.; Northern, C.; Warwick, A.; Lovegrove, F.T.

    1984-10-01

    The optimal conditions for labelling infective larvae of Strongyloides ratti with /sup 67/Ga citrate were determined. Radiolabelled larvae were injected s.c. into normal and previously infected rats. The distribution of radioactivity in these animals was compared with that in rats infected subcutaneously with a similar dose of free /sup 67/Ga by using a gamma camera linked to a computer system. Whereas free /sup 67/Ga was distributed throughout the body and excreted via the hepatobiliary system, the bulk of radioactivity in rats injected with radiolabelled larvae remained at the injection sites. Direct microscopical examination of these sites, however, revealed only minimal numbers of worms. When rats were infected percutaneously with radiolabelled larvae, it was found that most radioactivity remained at the surface, despite penetration of worms. When infective larvae were exposed to CO/sub 2/ in vitro and examined carefully by light microscopy, loss of an outer coat was observed. It was concluded that infective larvae lose an outer coat on skin penetration.

  14. First record of larvae of Chironomidae (Insecta, Diptera as prey of Temnocephala sp. (Platyhelminthes, Temnocephalidae, an ectosymbiont on larvae of Corydalidae (Megaloptera

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    Susana Trivinho-Strixino

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available First record of larvae of Chironomidae (Insecta, Diptera as prey of Temnocephala sp. (Platyhelminthes, Temnocephalidae, an ectosymbiont on larvae of Corydalidae (Megaloptera. This study constitutes the first record of Temnocephala Blanchard, an ectosymbiont on Corydalidae, as a possible predator of chironomid larvae. Twenty-eight Corydalidae larvae (Corydalus and Protochauliodes were examined under stereomicroscopic in search for Temnocephala and Chironomidae larvae, of which five megalopteran larvae had 24 Temnocephala sp. associated. Furthermore, eight of these Temnocephala worms had chironomid larvae in their gut contents, an interaction previously unknown. Gut content analyses revealed Corynoneura as the commonest chironomid, but larvae of Larsia, Rheotanytarsus and Tanytarsus were recorded as well. This study included Corydalus and Protochauliodes as hosts for Temnocephala, which might be important for this worm dispersion and population dynamics.

  15. Pyrosequencing Using SL and 5S rRNA as Molecular Markers for Identifying Zoonotic Filarial Nematodes in Blood Samples and Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanpool, Oranuch; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Janwan, Penchom; Intapan, Pewpan M; Rodpai, Rutchanee; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2016-05-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is principally caused by Wuchereria bancrofti, and Brugia malayi. The other two filarial nematode species, Brugia pahangi and Dirofilaria immitis, possibly cause human zoonotic diseases. We propose the development of a PCR assay linked with DNA pyrosequencing as a rapid tool to identify W. bancrofti, B. malayi, B. pahangi, and D. immitis in blood samples and mosquitoes. Primers targeting the fragment of the 5S ribosomal RNA and spliced leader sequences were newly designed and developed to identify these four filarial nematodes. Analytical sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Pyrosequencing determination of nucleotide variations within 36 nucleotides for B. malayi and B. pahangi, and 32 nucleotides for W. bancrofti and D. immitis is sufficient for differentiation of those filarial nematodes, and for detection of intraspecies genetic variation of B. malayi. This analysis could detect a single B. malayi, B. pahangi, W. bancrofti, and D. immitis microfilaria in blood samples. Overall, the PCR-linked pyrosequencing-based method was faster than direct sequencing and less expensive than real-time PCR or direct sequencing. This is the possibility of choice that can be applied in a high-throughput platform for identification and surveillance of reservoirs and vectors infected with lymphatic filaria in endemic areas.

  16. Utilization of computer processed high definition video imaging for measuring motility of microscopic nematode stages on a quantitative scale: “The Worminator”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Bob; Marcellino, Chris; Miller, Melissa; Maclean, Mary; Mostafa, Eman; Howell, Sue; Sakanari, Judy; Wolstenholme, Adrian; Kaplan, Ray

    2014-01-01

    A major hindrance to evaluating nematode populations for anthelmintic resistance, as well as for screening existing drugs, new compounds, or bioactive plant extracts for anthelmintic properties, is the lack of an efficient, objective, and reproducible in vitro assay that is adaptable to multiple life stages and parasite genera. To address this need we have developed the “Worminator” system, which objectively and quantitatively measures the motility of microscopic stages of parasitic nematodes. The system is built around the computer application “WormAssay”, developed at the Center for Discovery and Innovation in Parasitic Diseases at the University of California, San Francisco. WormAssay was designed to assess motility of macroscopic parasites for the purpose of high throughput screening of potential anthelmintic compounds, utilizing high definition video as an input to assess motion of adult stage (macroscopic) parasites (e.g. Brugia malayi). We adapted this assay for use with microscopic parasites by modifying the software to support a full frame analysis mode that applies the motion algorithm to the entire video frame. Thus, the motility of all parasites in a given well are recorded and measured simultaneously. Assays performed on third-stage larvae (L3) of the bovine intestinal nematode Cooperia spp., as well as microfilariae (mf) of the filarioid nematodes B. malayi and Dirofilaria immitis, yielded reproducible dose responses using the macrocyclic lactones ivermectin, doramectin, and moxidectin, as well as the nicotinic agonists, pyrantel, oxantel, morantel, and tribendimidine. This new computer based-assay is simple to use, requires minimal new investment in equipment, is robust across nematode genera and developmental stage, and does not require subjective scoring of motility by an observer. Thus, the “Worminator” provides a relatively low-cost platform for developing genera- and stage-specific assays with high efficiency and reproducibility, low

  17. Utilization of computer processed high definition video imaging for measuring motility of microscopic nematode stages on a quantitative scale: “The Worminator”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Storey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A major hindrance to evaluating nematode populations for anthelmintic resistance, as well as for screening existing drugs, new compounds, or bioactive plant extracts for anthelmintic properties, is the lack of an efficient, objective, and reproducible in vitro assay that is adaptable to multiple life stages and parasite genera. To address this need we have developed the “Worminator” system, which objectively and quantitatively measures the motility of microscopic stages of parasitic nematodes. The system is built around the computer application “WormAssay”, developed at the Center for Discovery and Innovation in Parasitic Diseases at the University of California, San Francisco. WormAssay was designed to assess motility of macroscopic parasites for the purpose of high throughput screening of potential anthelmintic compounds, utilizing high definition video as an input to assess motion of adult stage (macroscopic parasites (e.g. Brugia malayi. We adapted this assay for use with microscopic parasites by modifying the software to support a full frame analysis mode that applies the motion algorithm to the entire video frame. Thus, the motility of all parasites in a given well are recorded and measured simultaneously. Assays performed on third-stage larvae (L3 of the bovine intestinal nematode Cooperia spp., as well as microfilariae (mf of the filarioid nematodes B. malayi and Dirofilaria immitis, yielded reproducible dose responses using the macrocyclic lactones ivermectin, doramectin, and moxidectin, as well as the nicotinic agonists, pyrantel, oxantel, morantel, and tribendimidine. This new computer based-assay is simple to use, requires minimal new investment in equipment, is robust across nematode genera and developmental stage, and does not require subjective scoring of motility by an observer. Thus, the “Worminator” provides a relatively low-cost platform for developing genera- and stage-specific assays with high efficiency and

  18. Amostragem por larva-única na vigilância de Aedes aegypti Single-larva sampling for Aedes aegypti surveillance

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    José Eduardo Bracco

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Com a finalidade de testar a metodologia de amostragem por larva-única na vigilância entomológica do Aedes aegypti, foram pesquisados domicílios do Município de Araraquara, SP (Brasil. Nos criadouros que continham larvas de Aedes uma delas foi coletada. Como controle, após a coleta da larva-única, todas as larvas foram coletadas para identificação posterior. Esse processo foi repetido no laboratório. Dos 447 domicílios visitados, apenas 12 foram considerados positivos e 20 criadouros foram identificados; destes, 13 continham larvas de Aedes; 5, larvas de Aedes e Culex e 2, larvas de Culex. Os resultados mostram o reconhecimento correto, no campo, de todos os criadouros, evidenciando que o método poderia ser utilizado na vigilância entomológica de municípios sem infestação domiciliar ou infestados apenas com uma única espécie de Aedes.Buildings in Araraquara city, Southeastern Brazil, were searched during a year for the presence of Aedes larvae using single larva sampling in order to check the single-larva methodology. In those breeding places in wich Aedes larvae were found, one of them was collected. As a control, after the single larva had been collected, all the larvae from the breeding place were collected for later identification. This process was repeated in the laboratory. Of the 447 domiciles searched, 12 were considered positive and 20 breeding places were found. Of the breeding places, 13 contained Aedes larvae, 5 both Aedes and Culex larvae and 2 Culex larvae only. The results show that all the breeding places in the field were properly recognited showing the method may be used for Aedes surveillance in cities infested with one species only or without any domiciliary infestation.

  19. Opposed ciliary bands in the feeding larvae of sabellariid annelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet, Bruno; Strathmann, Richard R

    2011-06-01

    The larvae of marine annelids capture food using an unusual diversity of suspension-feeding mechanisms. Many of the feeding mechanisms of larval annelids are poorly known despite the abundance and ecological significance of both larvae and adults of some annelid taxa. Here we show that larvae of two species of sabellariid annelids, Sabellaria cementarium and Phragmatopoma californica, bear prototrochal and metatrochal cilia that beat in opposition to each other. For larvae of S. cementarium, we provide evidence that these opposed bands of cilia are used to capture suspended particles. In video recordings, captured particles were overtaken by a prototrochal cilium and then moved with the cilium to the food groove, a band of cilia between the prototroch and metatroch. They were then transported by cilia of the food groove to the mouth. Lengths of the prototrochal cilia, lengths of the prototrochal ciliary band, size range of the particles captured, and estimated rates of clearance increased with larval age and body size. Confirmation of the presence of opposed bands in larvae of sabellariids extends their known occurrence in the annelids to members of 10 families. Opposed bands in these different taxa differ in the arrangements and spacing of prototrochal and metatrochal cilia, and in whether they are used in combination with other feeding mechanisms. Opposed bands appear to be particularly widespread among the larvae of sabellidan annelids (a clade that includes sabellariids, sabellids, and serpulids), even in some species whose larvae do not feed. A parsimony analysis suggests that opposed bands are ancestral in this clade of annelids.

  20. Unexpected high losses of Anopheles gambiae larvae due to rainfall.

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    Krijn P Paaijmans

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immature stages of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae experience high mortality, but its cause is poorly understood. Here we study the impact of rainfall, one of the abiotic factors to which the immatures are frequently exposed, on their mortality. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that rainfall significantly affected larval mosquitoes by flushing them out of their aquatic habitat and killing them. Outdoor experiments under natural conditions in Kenya revealed that the additional nightly loss of larvae caused by rainfall was on average 17.5% for the youngest (L1 larvae and 4.8% for the oldest (L4 larvae; an additional 10.5% (increase from 0.9 to 11.4% of the L1 larvae and 3.3% (from 0.1 to 3.4% of the L4 larvae were flushed away and larval mortality increased by 6.9% (from 4.6 to 11.5% and 1.5% (from 4.1 to 5.6% for L1 and L4 larvae, respectively, compared to nights without rain. On rainy nights, 1.3% and 0.7% of L1 and L4 larvae, respectively, were lost due to ejection from the breeding site. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that immature populations of malaria mosquitoes suffer high losses during rainfall events. As these populations are likely to experience several rain showers during their lifespan, rainfall will have a profound effect on the productivity of mosquito breeding sites and, as a result, on the transmission of malaria. These findings are discussed in the light of malaria risk and changing rainfall patterns in response to climate change.

  1. Descrição da larva de Diastatops obscura (Fabricius (Odonata, Libellulidae Description of the larva of Diastatops obscura (Fabricius (Odonata, Libellulidae

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    N.D. Santos

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The larva of Diastatops obscura (Fabricius, 1775 is described and figured based on exuviae of last instar of reared specimes collected on still waters in São João river, Silva Jardim (22º38' - 42º18', Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The relationship among the larva of D. obscura and larvae of Celithemis are discussed.

  2. REARING CARP LARVAE (Cyprinus carpio IN CLOSED RECIRCULATORY SYSTEM (RAS

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    Anđelko Opačak

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Postembryonic rearing of carp larvae in closed recirculatory system was conducted in 2009 at the fish farm Ribnjak LLC, Donji Miholjac, Croatia. The research was conducted in two test groups (A and B with three iterations in each with a control group (C. Test group A (3 tanks x 250 l consisted of 150 000 larvae (density of 200 larvae•l-1, test group B (3 tanks x 500 l consisted of 600 000 larvae (density of 400 larvae•l-1, and the control group (C was a mud fish pond T-6 which was stocked by 800 000 larvae•ha-1 under standard production conditions. In this research, basic physical and chemical water parameters were controlled (temperature, oxygen, pH, total ammonia and nitrites. Initial measuring of carp larvae total length (TL was conducted prior to their placement into tanks (N=120. On the fourth, sixth, eighth and tenth day of research 20 larvae (N=140 were taken out of every tank as well as out of control group and measured. Feeding with live feed began on the third day after hatching (larval TL 6.00±0.36 mm. Ten minutes after feeding live feed to larvae for the first time, 20 larvae (N=120 were taken out of every tank and a high portion of larvae that accepted live feed (89.17±3.76% was determined by a magnifying glass. Feeding artificial feed began on the seventh day after the hatching. After ten minutes, a high portion of larvae who accepted artificial feed (96.67±2.58% was determined. Since the end of the research, the determined length increment (ITL per day was 0.41±0.04 mm, a very high survival rate was established (group A: 96%, group B: 93%. Feeding frequency was four times a day in five-hour intervals (at 06:00, 11:00,16:00 and 21:00 hours. The research was terminated after ten feeding days due to deteriorating condition of zoohygienic filter. The total of 3807 g of live feed and 1080 g of artificial feed was used.

  3. Chemical spying in coral reef fish larvae at recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Natacha; Brooker, Rohan M; Lecellier, Gaël; Berthe, Cécile; Frédérich, Bruno; Banaigs, Bernard; Lecchini, David

    2015-10-01

    When fish larvae recruit back to a reef, chemical cues are often used to find suitable habitat or to find juvenile or adult conspecifics. We tested if the chemical information used by larvae was intentionally produced by juvenile and adult conspecifics already on the reef (communication process) or whether the cues used result from normal biochemical processes with no active involvement by conspecifics ("spying" behavior by larvae). Conspecific chemical cues attracted the majority of larvae (four out of the seven species tested); although while some species were equally attracted to cues from adults and juveniles (Chromis viridis, Apogon novemfasciatus), two exhibited greater sensitivity to adult cues (Pomacentrus pavo, Dascyllus aruanus). Our results indicate also that spying cues are those most commonly used by settling fishes (C. viridis, P. pavo, A. novemfasciatus). Only one species (D. aruanus) preferred the odour of conspecifics that had had visual contact with larvae (communication). Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Activity of Thymus vulgaris essential oil against Anisakis larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarratana, F; Muscolino, D; Beninati, C; Giuffrida, A; Panebianco, A

    2014-07-01

    Anisakiasis is an important food-borne disease especially in countries with high fish consumption. The increase of cases of human disease and the virtual absence of effective treatments have prompted the research on new active compounds against Anisakis larvae. As well known, the disease is related to the consumption of raw or almost raw seafood products, but also marinated and/or salted fishery products, if the processing is insufficient to destroy nematode larvae can represent a risks for the consumers. In the light of the biocidal efficacy against different pathogens demonstrated for various essential oils, the aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of Thymus vulgaris essential oil (TEO) against anisakidae larvae. The TEO at 10% and 5% concentration in oil sunflower seeds, caused in vitro the death of all larvae within 14 h, with cuticle and intestinal wall damages. The results obtained showing a significant activity against Anisakis larvae, suggest further investigation on TEO as a larvicidal agent and on its potential use in the industrial marinating process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. DNA barcoding: A molecular tool to identify Antarctic marine larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Karen E.; Barnes, David K. A.; Clark, Melody S.; Bowden, David A.

    2006-04-01

    To begin to understand overall patterns and processes influencing marine populations, communities and ecosystems, it is important to determine the timing, duration, mode and dispersal of larvae. However, few studies of the spatial and temporal variation in abundance of larvae have been undertaken at any locality, other than for a few commercially important species. In Antarctic seas the abundance and species-richness of marine larvae are key to a number of concepts (such as the validity of Thorson's rule and ecological versus evolutionary success of brooders compared to spawning species). Traditionally, marine larval identification (using microscopy), even to order level, is a time-consuming, labour-intensive and inexact process. Ontogenic changes during larval life make identification difficult and require high levels of expertise, and identification is generally confirmed only by laboratory spawning experiments. New molecular genetic methods enable faster direct identification of marine larvae to a higher resolution. Our preliminary results show that it is possible to identify larvae of Antarctic species using DNA barcoding techniques, but that the resolution is currently limited by the availability of comparative adult sequences in the DNA sequence databases.

  6. Microplastic ingestion in fish larvae in the western English Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Madeleine; Cole, Matthew; Thompson, Richard C; Lindeque, Penelope K

    2017-07-01

    Microplastics have been documented in marine environments worldwide, where they pose a potential risk to biota. Environmental interactions between microplastics and lower trophic organisms are poorly understood. Coastal shelf seas are rich in productivity but also experience high levels of microplastic pollution. In these habitats, fish have an important ecological and economic role. In their early life stages, planktonic fish larvae are vulnerable to pollution, environmental stress and predation. Here we assess the occurrence of microplastic ingestion in wild fish larvae. Fish larvae and water samples were taken across three sites (10, 19 and 35 km from shore) in the western English Channel from April to June 2016. We identified 2.9% of fish larvae (n = 347) had ingested microplastics, of which 66% were blue fibres; ingested microfibers closely resembled those identified within water samples. With distance from the coast, larval fish density increased significantly (P microplastic concentrations (P microplastics and the incidence of ingestion in fish larvae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Phylogenetics links monster larva to deep-sea shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken-Grissom, Heather D; Felder, Darryl L; Vollmer, Nicole L; Martin, Joel W; Crandall, Keith A

    2012-10-01

    Mid-water plankton collections commonly include bizarre and mysterious developmental stages that differ conspicuously from their adult counterparts in morphology and habitat. Unaware of the existence of planktonic larval stages, early zoologists often misidentified these unique morphologies as independent adult lineages. Many such mistakes have since been corrected by collecting larvae, raising them in the lab, and identifying the adult forms. However, challenges arise when the larva is remarkably rare in nature and relatively inaccessible due to its changing habitats over the course of ontogeny. The mid-water marine species Cerataspis monstrosa (Gray 1828) is an armored crustacean larva whose adult identity has remained a mystery for over 180 years. Our phylogenetic analyses, based in part on recent collections from the Gulf of Mexico, provide definitive evidence that the rare, yet broadly distributed larva, C. monstrosa, is an early developmental stage of the globally distributed deepwater aristeid shrimp, Plesiopenaeus armatus. Divergence estimates and phylogenetic relationships across five genes confirm the larva and adult are the same species. Our work demonstrates the diagnostic power of molecular systematics in instances where larval rearing seldom succeeds and morphology and habitat are not indicative of identity. Larval-adult linkages not only aid in our understanding of biodiversity, they provide insights into the life history, distribution, and ecology of an organism.

  8. Image enhancement for tracking the translucent larvae of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukant Khurana

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster larvae are model systems for studies of development, synaptic transmission, sensory physiology, locomotion, drug discovery, and learning and memory. A detailed behavioral understanding of larvae can advance all these fields of neuroscience. Automated tracking can expand fine-grained behavioral analysis, yet its full potential remains to be implemented for the larvae. All published methods are unable to track the larvae near high contrast objects, including the petri-dish edges encountered in many behavioral paradigms. To alleviate these issues, we enhanced the larval contrast to obtain complete tracks. Our method employed a dual approach of optical-contrast boosting and post-hoc image processing for contrast enhancement. We reared larvae on black food media to enhance their optical contrast through darkening of their digestive tracts. For image processing we performed Frame Averaging followed by Subtraction then Thresholding (FAST. This algorithm can remove all static objects from the movie, including petri-dish edges prior to processing by the image-tracking module. This dual approach for contrast enhancement also succeeded in overcoming fluctuations in illumination caused by the alternating current power source. Our tracking method yields complete tracks, including at the edges of the behavioral arena and is computationally fast, hence suitable for high-throughput fine-grained behavioral measurements.

  9. Lipid and fatty acid analysis of uninfected and granulosis virus-infected Plodia interpunctella larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri-Bhalla, K.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A comparative study on the lipid and fatty acid composition of the uninfected and GV-infected Plodia interpunctella larvae was performed. Higher levels of free fatty acids were found in GV-infected larvae compared to those of the uninfected larvae, while the latter had more triacylglycerol compared to the former. The known identified phospholipids were fewer in the GV-infected larvae compared to those in the uninfected larvae. However, an unidentified phospholipid was found to be approximately two times higher in GV-infected larvae. The total lipid of both larvae had palmitic, oleic, and linoleic as the major fatty acids. The fatty acid composition of the GV-infected larval phospholipid differed considerably compared to that of the uninfected larvae, in that the ratio of unsaturated fatty acid to saturated fatty acid was 3.5 times less in the GV-infected larvae.

  10. Are larvae of demersal fishes plankton or nekton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, Jeffrey M

    2006-01-01

    A pelagic larval stage is found in nearly all demersal marine teleost fishes, and it is during this pelagic stage that the geographic scale of dispersal is determined. Marine biologists have long made a simplifying assumption that behaviour of larvae--with the possible exception of vertical distribution--has negligible influence on larval dispersal. Because advection by currents can take place over huge scales during a pelagic larval stage that typically lasts for several days to several weeks, this simplifying assumption leads to the conclusion that populations of marine demersal fishes operate over, and are connected over, similar huge scales. This conclusion has major implications for our perception of how marine fish populations operate and for our management of them. Recent (and some older) behavioural research-reviewed here-reveals that for a substantial portion of the pelagic larval stage of perciform fishes, the simplifying assumption is invalid. Near settlement, and for a considerable portion of the pelagic stage prior to that, larvae of many fish species are capable of swimming at speeds faster than mean ambient currents over long periods, travelling tens of kilometres. Only the smallest larvae of perciform fishes swim in an energetically costly viscous hydrodynamic environment (i.e., low Reynolds number). Vertical distribution is under strong behavioural control from the time of hatching, if not before, and can have a decisive, if indirect, influence on dispersal trajectories. Larvae of some species avoid currents by occupying the epibenthic boundary layer. Larvae are able to swim directionally in the pelagic environment, with some species apparently orientating relative to the sun and others to settlement sites. These abilities develop relatively early, and ontogenetic changes in orientation are seemingly common. Larvae of some species can use sound to navigate, and others can use odour to find settlement habitat, at least over small scales. Other

  11. A simple visual system without neurons in jellyfish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Karin; Wallén, Rita; Seymour, Jamie; Nilsson, Dan

    2003-11-22

    Earlier detailed studies of cnidarian planula larvae have revealed a simple nervous system but no eyes or identifiable light sensing structures. Here, we describe the planula of a box jellyfish, Tripedalia cystophora, and report that these larvae have an extremely simple organization with no nervous system at all. Their only advanced feature is the presence of 10-15 pigment-cup ocelli, evenly spaced across the posterior half of the larval ectoderm. The ocelli are single cell structures containing a cup of screening pigment filled with presumably photosensory microvilli. These rhabdomeric photoreceptors have no neural connections to any other cells, but each has a well-developed motor-cilium, appearing to be the only means by which light can control the behaviour of the larva. The ocelli are thus self-contained sensory-motor entities, making a nervous system superfluous.

  12. CONTROLE DE LARVAS DE Diloboderus abderus COM INSETICIDAS EM TRIGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Mauro Tadeu Braga da

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A larva de Diloboderus abderus Sturm (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae é uma praga importante da cultura do trigo (Triticum aestivum L. em plantio direto na região Sul do Brasil. Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar diferentes inseticidas aplicados nas sementes (fipronil e tiametoxam e via pulverização do solo (clorpirifós e lambdacialotrina para o controle dessa praga. A eficiência dos inseticidas foi determinada através do número de larvas vivas no solo aos 30, 60 e 90 dias após a emergência das plantas (DAE, da massa seca da parte aérea das plantas aos 90 DAE e da produção de grãos. Foram observadas correlações negativas significativas entre a dose dos inseticidas fipronil e tiametoxam e o número de larvas, e correlações positivas significativas entre estes inseticidas e a massa seca da parte aérea e a produtividade de grãos. Infestações de larvas nas testemunhas não tratadas reduziram a produtividade em relação às áreas tratadas com inseticidas. A produtividade incrementou à medida que aumentou a eficiência de controle do inseto pelos inseticidas. Concluiu-se que clorpirifós (960 e 1200g i.a./ha e lambdacialotrina a 25g i.a./ha (formulação CE, aplicados em pulverização do solo, são eficientes para reduzir a população de larvas de D. abderus, garantindo a produtividade de grãos. Sugerem-se novos testes com os inseticidas fipronil, tiametoxam e lambdacialotrina (formulação SC para determinar doses técnica e economicamente adequadas para o controle de larvas de D. abderus em trigo.

  13. Drosophila melanogaster larvae as a model for blast lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Cameron R; Meyerhoff, Kevin P; Damon, Andrew M; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Salzar, Robert S; Rafaels, Karin A

    2010-07-01

    Primary blast injuries, specifically lung injuries, resulting from blast overpressure exposures are a major source of mortality for victims of blast events. However, existing pulmonary injury criteria are inappropriate for common exposure environments. This study uses Drosophila melanogaster larvae to develop a simple phenomenological model for human pulmonary injury from primary blast exposure. Drosophila larvae were exposed to blast overpressures generated by a 5.1-cm internal diameter shock tube and their mortality was observed after the exposure. To establish mortality thresholds, a survival analysis was conducted using survival data and peak incident pressures. In addition, a histologic analysis was performed on the larvae to establish the mechanisms of blast injury. The results of the survival analysis suggest that blast overpressure for 50% Drosophila survival is greater than human threshold lung injury and is similar to human 50% survival levels, in the range of overpressure durations tested (1-5 ms). A "parallel" analysis of the Bass et al. 50% human survival curves indicates that 50% Drosophila survival is equivalent to a human injury resulting in a 69% chance of survival. Histologic analysis of the blast-exposed larvae failed to demonstrate damage to the dorsal trunk of the tracheal system; however, the presence of flocculent material in the larvae body cavities and tracheas suggests tissue damage. This study shows that D. melanogaster survival can be correlated with large animal injury models to approximate a human blast lung injury tolerance. Within the range of durations tested, Drosophila larvae may be used as a simple model for blast injury.

  14. Reorientation and Swimming Stability in Sea Urchin Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J.; Chan, K. Y. K.; Anderson, E.; Helfrich, K. R.; Mullineaux, L. S.; Sengupta, A.; Stocker, R.

    2016-02-01

    Many benthic marine invertebrates have two-phase life histories, relying on planktonic larval stages for dispersal and exchange of individuals between adult populations. The dispersal of planktonic larvae is determined by two factors: passive advection by the ambient flow and active motility. By modifying dispersal and ultimately settlement, larval motility influences where and when individuals recruit into benthic communities. Despite its ecological relevance, our understanding of larval motility and behavior in the plankton remains limited, especially regarding the interactions of larval motility and ambient turbulence. As most larvae are smaller than the Kolmogorov scale, they experience ocean turbulence in part as a time-changing viscous torque produced by local fluid shear. This torque causes larval reorientation, impacting swimming direction and potentially dispersal at the macroscale. It is therefore paramount to understand the mechanisms of larval reorientation and the stability of larvae against reorientation. Here we report on the larval reorientation behavior of the sea urchins Arbacia punctulata and Heliocidaris crassispina. Both species have life histories characterized by ontogenetic changes to internal density structure and morphology, which we hypothesized to impact stability. To test this hypothesis, we performed "flip chamber" experiments, in which larvae swim freely in a small chamber that is intermittently inverted, mimicking the overturning experienced by larvae in turbulence. We investigated the role of larval age, body size, species, morphology (number of arms), and motility (live versus dead) on the reorientation dynamics. Our work contributes to a more mechanistic understanding of the role of hydrodynamics in the motility and transport of planktonic larvae.

  15. Infection of silkworm larvae by the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucineia de Fátima Chasko Ribeiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The isolate E9 of Metarhizium anisopliae was used in commercial hybrids of Bombyx mori larvae to evaluate its biological effect. Symptomatological analyses showed typical signs of fungal infection. Histopathology revealed the presence of large numbers of hemocytes in the hemocoel, and on the sixth dpi the bodies of the insects appeared to be colonised by the fungus. The isolate E9 is pathogenic to larvae B. mori and; therefore, death of the insects was caused by the colonization of fungus in the epidermal and mesodermal tissues.

  16. Acanthocephala Larvae parasitizing Ameiva ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758) (Squamata: Teiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Lilian Cristina; Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; Ávila-Pires, Teresa Cristina Sauer; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; Santos, Jeannie Nascimento Dos

    2016-03-11

    Knowledge concerning the taxonomy and biology of species of Acanthocephala, helminth parasites of the helminth species of the phylum Acanthocephala, parasites of lizards in Brazilian Amazonia, is still insufficient, but reports of Acanthocephala in reptiles are becoming increasingly common in the literature. Cystacanth-stage Acanthocephalan larvae have been found in the visceral peritoneum during necropsy of Ameiva ameiva ameivalizards from the "Osvaldo Rodrigues da Cunha" Herpetology Collection of the Emílio Goeldi Museum, Belém, Pará, Brazil. The aim of this study was to present the morphological study of the Acanthocephala larvae found in A. ameiva ameiva lizard.

  17. Histomorphogenesis of cranial nerves in Huso huso larvae

    OpenAIRE

    Tavighi, Sherma; Saadatfar, Zohreh; Shojaei, Bahador; Behnam Rassouli, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    In this study the cranial nerves development of H. huso are explained from 1 to 54-days-old (1, 3, 6, 15, 21 and 54 days). Despite all the researches on fish brain, there are no study on nerves evolution on H. huso during their larvae life. For this research 40 samples of larvae H. huso were obtained (from each age, about six samples were selected). The specimens were maintained in fiberglass tank, then histological samples were taken from tissues and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for ge...

  18. MENGENAL PARASIT FILARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Ramadhani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Filariasis atau kaki gajah adalah penyakit menular yang disebabkan karena infeksi cacing filaria yang hidup disaluran dan kelenjar getah bening (limfe serta menyebabkan gejala akut, kronis. Filariasis mulai dikenal di Indonesia tahun 1889 sejak Haga dan Van Eecke menemukan kasus pembesaran scrotum di Jakarta. Penyakit tersebut dapat menular kepada orang lain dengan perantara gigitan nyamuk. Seluruh wilayah Indonesia berpotensi untuk terjangkitnya penyakit tersebut, hal ini mengingat cacing sebagai penyebabnya dan nyamuk penularnya tersebar luas. Keadaan ini didukung oleh kerusakan lingkungan, seperti banjir, penebangan hutan dan lainnya yang memperluas tempat berkembangbiaknya nyamuk. Meskipun filariasis tidak mematikan secara langsung, dengan adanya demam dan bisul-bisul (abses yang hilang timbul, dan gejala menahun berupa pembesaran/elefantiasis yang merupakan cacat menetap akan sangat mengganggu. Secara ekonomis keadaan tersebut sangat merugikan, karena mengurangi produktivitas masyarakat, serta diperlukan biaya pengobatan dan perawatan yang tidak mudah dan tidak murah.Di Indonesia filariasis limfatik di sebabkan oleh tiga spesies cacing filaria yaitu Brugia malayi,B.timori dan Wuchereria bancrofti, yang terbagi lagi menjadi 6 tipe secara epidemiologi.Tiap parasit mempunyai siklus hidup yang kompleks dan infeksi pada manusia tidak akan berhasil kecuali jika terjadi pemaparan larva infektif untuk waktu yang lama. Setelah terjadi pemaparan, dibutuhkan waktu bertahun-tahun sebelum timbulnya perubahan patologis yang nyata pada manusia. Periodisitas dalam sirkulasi setiap mikrofilaria akan berbeda, tergantung dari spesiesnya.

  19. Evaluation of immune response elicited by inulin as an adjuvant with filarial antigens in mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalakshmi, N; Aparnaa, R; Kaliraj, P

    2014-10-01

    Filariasis caused by infectious parasitic nematodes has been identified as the second leading source of permanent and long-term disability in Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and Latin America. Several vaccine candidates were identified from infective third-stage larvae (L3) which involves in the critical transition from arthropod to human. Hitherto studies of these antigens in combination with alum adjuvant have shown to elicit its characteristic Th2 responses. Inulin is a safe, non-toxic adjuvant that principally stimulates the innate immune response through the alternative complement pathway. In the present study, the immune response elicited by inulin and alum as adjuvants were compared with filarial antigens from different aetiological agents: secreted larval acidic protein 1 (SLAP1) from Onchocerca volvulus and venom allergen homologue (VAH) from Brugia malayi as single or as cocktail vaccines in mice model. The study revealed that inulin can induce better humoral response against these antigens than alum adjuvant. Antibody isotyping disclosed inulin's ability to elevate the levels of IgG2a and IgG3 antibodies which mediates in complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), respectively, in mice. Splenocyte analysis showed that T cells prestimulated with inulin have higher stimulation index (P inulin formulation had induced higher cytotoxicity with filarial antigens (as single P inulin to deplete the levels of Treg and brought a balance in Th1/Th2 arms against filarial antigens in mice. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. First record of larvae of Chironomidae (Insecta, Diptera as prey of Temnocephala sp. (Platyhelminthes, Temnocephalidae, an ectosymbiont on larvae of Corydalidae (Megaloptera Primeiro registro de larvas de Chironomidae como presas de Temnocephala sp. (Platyhelminthes, Temnocephalidae, um ectosimbionte de larvas de Corydalidae (Maegaloptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Trivinho-Strixino

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available First record of larvae of Chironomidae (Insecta, Diptera as prey of Temnocephala sp. (Platyhelminthes, Temnocephalidae, an ectosymbiont on larvae of Corydalidae (Megaloptera. This study constitutes the first record of Temnocephala Blanchard, an ectosymbiont on Corydalidae, as a possible predator of chironomid larvae. Twenty-eight Corydalidae larvae (Corydalus and Protochauliodes were examined under stereomicroscopic in search for Temnocephala and Chironomidae larvae, of which five megalopteran larvae had 24 Temnocephala sp. associated. Furthermore, eight of these Temnocephala worms had chironomid larvae in their gut contents, an interaction previously unknown. Gut content analyses revealed Corynoneura as the commonest chironomid, but larvae of Larsia, Rheotanytarsus and Tanytarsus were recorded as well. This study included Corydalus and Protochauliodes as hosts for Temnocephala, which might be important for this worm dispersion and population dynamics.Primeiro registro de larvas de Chironomidae como presas de Temnocephala sp. (Platyhelminthes, Temnocephalidae, um ectosimbionte de larvas de Corydalidae (Maegaloptera. Este estudo constitui o primeiro registro de Temnocephala Blanchard (Platyhelminthes, Temnocephalidae, um ectosimbionte em larvas de Megaloptera, como um possível predador de larvas de Chironomidae. Vinte e oito larvas de Corydalidae (Corydalus e Protochauliodes foram examinadas sobre estereomicroscópio na busca por Temnocephala e larvas de Chironomidae, das quais cinco larvas de Megaloptera continham 24 Temnocephala sp. associadas. Além disso, oito Temnocephala possuíam em seu conteúdo estomacal larvas de Chironomidae, uma interação desconhecida anteriormente. A análise do conteúdo estomacal revelou Corynoneura como o quironomídeo mais abundante, e também algumas larvas de Larsia, Rheotanytarsus e Tanytarsus. Este estudo inclui Corydalus e Protochauliodes como hospedeiros de Temnocephala, os quais podem ser importantes

  1. Intraguild predation and cannibalism among larvae of detritivorous caddisflies in subalpine wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissinger, S.A.; Sparks, G.B.; Rouse, G.L.; Brown, W.S.; Steltzer, Heidi

    1996-01-01

    Comparative data from subalpine wetlands in Colorado indicate that larvae of the limnephilid caddisflies, Asynarchus nigriculus and Limnephilus externus, are reciprocally abundant among habitats - Limnephilus larvae dominate in permanent waters, whereas Asynarchus larvae dominate in temporary basins. The purpose of this paper is to report on field and laboratory experiments that link this pattern of abundance to biotic interactions among larvae. In the first field experiment, growth and survival were compared in single and mixed species treatments in littoral enclosures. Larvae, which eat mainly vascular plant detritus, grew at similar rates among treatments in both temporary and permanent habitats suggesting that exploitative competition is not important under natural food levels and caddisfly densities. However, the survival of Limnephilus larvae was reduced in the presence of Asynarchus larvae. Subsequent behavioral studies in laboratory arenas revealed that Asynarchus larvae are extremely aggressive predators on Limnephilus larvae. In a second field experiment we manipulated the relative sizes of larvae and found that Limnephilus larvae were preyed on only when Asynarchus larvae had the same size advantage observed in natural populations. Our data suggest that the dominance of Asynarchus larvae in temporary habitats is due to asymmetric intraguild predation (IGP) facilitated by a phenological head start in development. These data do not explain the dominance of Limnephilus larvae in permanent basins, which we show elsewhere to be an indirect effect of salamander predation. Behavioral observations also revealed that Asynarchus larvae are cannibalistic. In contrast to the IGP on Limnephilus larvae, Asynarchus cannibalism occurs among same-sized larvae and often involves the mobbing of one victim by several conspecifics. In a third field experiment, we found that Asynarchus cannibalism was not density-dependent and occurred even at low larval densities. We

  2. ASPEK ZOONOTIK PARASIT NEMATODA PADA KERA DAN BINATANG MENGERAT DI BENGKULU, SUMATERA. INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Untung S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Twentyfive monkeys and 481 rats were examined for parasitic nematodes in Bengkulu, nine species of nematode were found infecting these animals. Five of filarían nematodes, i.e. Brugia malayi, Brugia pahangi, Dirofilaria magnilarvatum and Edesonfilaria malayensis were infecting monkeys and one speciesTBreinlia booliati, was found infecting rats. Three species of gastrointestinal helminths, i.e. Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis and Oestophagomomum spp were found in monkeys; a lung worm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, was found in rats. The most important nematode species is B. malayi, which was found in Presbytis cristatus (36.8 % and in Macaca fascicularis (20.0 %. T. trichiura was found in R. cristatus (47.9 % and A. cantonensis in Rattus argentiventer (4.0 % and Rattus tiomanicus (2.9%.

  3. Dicty_cDB: SHI783 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DV318303 |DV318303.1 NABNX32TF Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABNX32...DV311931 |DV311931.1 NABOR34TF Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABOR34...DV288069 |DV288069.1 NAAHW80TF Aedes aegypti - Fat Bodies Normalized (NAFFB2) Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NAAHW80...DV284077 |DV284077.1 NAAG583TR Aedes aegypti - Fat Bodies Normalized (NAFFB2) Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NAAG583...DV284076 |DV284076.1 NAAG583TF Aedes aegypti - Fat Bodies Normalized (NAFFB2) Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NAAG583

  4. Dicty_cDB: SHB633 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |DV320266.1 NABRB33TF Aedes aegypti infected with Plasmodium gallinaceum Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABRB33...|DV427212.1 NADX646TF Aedes aegypti infected with Dengue virus Pool library Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NADX646...DV314546 |DV314546.1 NABOO34TF Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABOO34...|DV396885.1 NADE310TR Aedes aegypti infected with Dengue virus Pool library Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NADE310...DV312022 |DV312022.1 NABOR89TRB Aedes aegypti infected with Brugia Malayi Aedes aegypti cDNA clone NABOR89

  5. Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematode: Metastrongiloidea: in vitro cultivation of infective third-stage larvae to fourth-stage larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Jyh Lin

    Full Text Available The present study to attempt to cultivate Angiostrongylus cantonensis from third-stage larvae (AcL3 to fourth-stage larvae (AcL4 in vitro in defined complete culture medium that contained with Minimum Essential Medium Eagle (MEM, supplemented amino acid (AA, amine (AM, fatty acid (FA, carbohydrate (CA and 20% fetal calf serum (FCS was successful. When AcL3 were cultured in the defined complete culture medium at 37°C in a 5% CO2 atmosphere, the larvae began to develop to AcL4 after 30 days of cultivation, and were enclosed within the sheaths of the third molts of the life cycle. Under these conditions, the larvae developed uniformly and reached to the fourth-stage 36 days. The morphology of AcL3 develop to AcL4 were recording and analyzing. Then comparison of A. cantonensis larval morphology and development between in vitro cultivation in defined complete culture medium and in vivo cultivation in infective BALB/c mice. The larvae that had been cultivated in vitro were smaller than AcL4 of infective BALB/c mice. However the AcL3 that were cultured using defined incomplete culture medium (MEM plus 20% FCS with AA+AM, FA, CA, AA+AM+FA, FA+CA, CA+AA+AM or not did not adequately survive and develop. Accordingly, the inference is made that only the defined complete medium enable AcL3 develop to AcL4 in vitro. Some nematodes have been successfully cultured into mature worms but only a few researches have been made to cultivate A. cantonensis in vitro. The present study is the first to have succeeded in developing AcL3 to AcL4 by in vitro cultivation. Finally, the results of in vitro cultivation studies herein contribute to improving media for the effective development and growth of A. cantonensis. The gap in the A. cantonensis life cycle when the larvae are cultivated in vitro from third-stage larvae to fourth-stage larvae can thus be solved.

  6. Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematode: Metastrongiloidea): in vitro cultivation of infective third-stage larvae to fourth-stage larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Rong-Jyh; He, Jie-Wen; Chung, Li-Yu; Lee, June-Der; Wang, Jiun-Jye; Yen, Chuan-Min

    2013-01-01

    The present study to attempt to cultivate Angiostrongylus cantonensis from third-stage larvae (AcL3) to fourth-stage larvae (AcL4) in vitro in defined complete culture medium that contained with Minimum Essential Medium Eagle (MEM), supplemented amino acid (AA), amine (AM), fatty acid (FA), carbohydrate (CA) and 20% fetal calf serum (FCS) was successful. When AcL3 were cultured in the defined complete culture medium at 37°C in a 5% CO2 atmosphere, the larvae began to develop to AcL4 after 30 days of cultivation, and were enclosed within the sheaths of the third molts of the life cycle. Under these conditions, the larvae developed uniformly and reached to the fourth-stage 36 days. The morphology of AcL3 develop to AcL4 were recording and analyzing. Then comparison of A. cantonensis larval morphology and development between in vitro cultivation in defined complete culture medium and in vivo cultivation in infective BALB/c mice. The larvae that had been cultivated in vitro were smaller than AcL4 of infective BALB/c mice. However the AcL3 that were cultured using defined incomplete culture medium (MEM plus 20% FCS with AA+AM, FA, CA, AA+AM+FA, FA+CA, CA+AA+AM or not) did not adequately survive and develop. Accordingly, the inference is made that only the defined complete medium enable AcL3 develop to AcL4 in vitro. Some nematodes have been successfully cultured into mature worms but only a few researches have been made to cultivate A. cantonensis in vitro. The present study is the first to have succeeded in developing AcL3 to AcL4 by in vitro cultivation. Finally, the results of in vitro cultivation studies herein contribute to improving media for the effective development and growth of A. cantonensis. The gap in the A. cantonensis life cycle when the larvae are cultivated in vitro from third-stage larvae to fourth-stage larvae can thus be solved.

  7. Roasted maggots (Dipteran larvae) as a dietary protein source for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Roasted maggots (Dipteran larvae) as a dietary protein source for laboratory animals. ... African Journal of Applied Zoology and Environmental Biology ... One set were fed with the convectional feed (set G,) with Clarias fish as its protein portion while the other set (M) were fed with same diet with maggots from poultry wastes ...

  8. Growth and Survival of First Feeding Larvae of Clarias gariepinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was designed to evaluate the growth performance and survival of Clarias gariepinus larvae fed live Zooplankton (LZ), Frozen Zooplnakton (FZ), Dried Zooplankton (DZ) and a mixture of Live and Frozen Zooplankton (LFZ) as well as Live and Dried zooplankton (LDZ). The experiments were conducted in plastic ...

  9. Catching large herring larvae: Gear applicability and larval distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter

    1988-01-01

    A series of night hauls were made both along a transect from the Danish coast to the Dogger Bank and at a fixed position in the southern North Sea. The aim was to evaluate the suitability of two midwater trawls (IKMT and MIK) for catching large herring larvae (20-40 mm), with special attention...

  10. Aluminium chloride-induced toxicity in zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, A; Grimaldi, M C; Ferrandino, I

    2017-05-01

    Embryos at shield stage and larvae at protruding mouth stage were exposed to different concentrations of aluminium chloride (AlCl3 ) for 72 h with the purpose to analyse their phenotype and lethality. After 24, 48 and 72 h of treatment, higher toxicity of the metal was observed on larvae with minimal lethal concentration of 0.25, 0.20 and 0.08 mm, respectively, while for embryos the corresponding values were 40, 25 and 16 mm. We observed pericardial oedema and alteration of heart rate in 50% of larvae after 48 h of exposure to 100 μm. In larvae exposed to the same concentration, there was also a neurological injury at the level of glial cells, with the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells being significantly reduced. This study confirms the toxic nature of this metal and shows that aluminium could also interestingly represent a cardiotoxin in addition to its neurotoxic ability. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Susceptibility Of Mosquito Larvae To Conventional Insecticides In A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The susceptibility of 4th instar larvae of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus to dieldrin, dichlovos and cypermethrin were evaluated in laboratory. Larval mortality was assessed 24 hour afterexposure. The result showed that the LD50 values for Aedes aegypti exposed to dieldrin, dichlovos and cypermethrin were 0.48 ...

  12. Ingestion of Nanoplastics and Microplastics by Pacific Oyster Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew; Galloway, Tamara S

    2015-12-15

    Plastic debris is a prolific contaminant effecting freshwater and marine ecosystems across the globe. Of growing environmental concern are "microplastics"and "nanoplastics" encompassing tiny particles of plastic derived from manufacturing and macroplastic fragmentation. Pelagic zooplankton are susceptible to consuming microplastics, however the threat posed to larvae of commercially important bivalves is currently unknown. We exposed Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae (3-24 d.p.f.) to polystyrene particles spanning 70 nm-20 μm in size, including plastics with differing surface properties, and tested the impact of microplastics on larval feeding and growth. The frequency and magnitude of plastic ingestion over 24 h varied by larval age and size of polystyrene particle (ANOVA, P plastic, with aminated particles ingested and retained more frequently (ANOVA, P plastic consumption and plastic load per organism was identified (Spearmans, r = 0.95, P micro- and nanoplastics were readily ingested by oyster larvae, exposure to plastic concentrations exceeding those observed in the marine environment resulted in no measurable effects on the development or feeding capacity of the larvae over the duration of the study.

  13. Ingestion of microplastic has limited impact on a marine larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaposi, Katrina L; Mos, Benjamin; Kelaher, Brendan P; Dworjanyn, Symon A

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing concern about the impacts of microplastics (Microplastics may be mistaken for food items and ingested by a wide variety of organisms. While the effects of ingesting microplastic have been explored for some adult organisms, there is poor understanding of the effects of microplastic ingestion on marine larvae. Here, we investigated the ingestion of polyethylene microspheres by larvae of the sea urchin, Tripneustes gratilla. Ingestion rates scaled with the concentration of microspheres. Ingestion rates were, however, reduced by biological fouling of microplastic and in the presence of phytoplankton food. T. gratilla larvae were able to egest microspheres from their stomach within hours of ingestion. A microsphere concentration far exceeding those recorded in the marine environment had a small nondose dependent effect on larval growth, but there was no significant effect on survival. In contrast, environmentally realistic concentrations appeared to have little effect. Overall, these results suggest that current levels of microplastic pollution in the oceans only pose a limited threat to T. gratilla and other marine invertebrate larvae, but further research is required on a broad range of species, trophic levels, and polymer types.

  14. Acute Toxicity of Diazinon on Rotifers, Cyclops, Mosquito Larvae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    189.31pg/l tor rotifers, eyclops, mosquito larvae and fish respectively. The rotifers had the ... intermediate host or vector of some parasitic diseases. (Ukoli,l984). Diazinon .... Tropical Africa. John Wiley & Sons, Londod,. 464pp. Wade JW, Stirling HP (1999). Fertilization of ponds ll: Effects on plankton communitie, Journal of.

  15. Odour avoidance learning in the larva of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-12-11

    Dec 11, 2008 ... Drosophila larvae can be trained to avoid odours associated with electric shock. We describe here, an improved method of aversive conditioning and a procedure for decomposing learning retention curve that enables us to do a quantitative analysis of memory phases, short term (STM), middle term (MTM) ...

  16. Description and ecology of larvae of Glossogobius callidus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes the morphology and ecology of the larvae and early juveniles of two common gobiids in warm temperate South African estuaries. The early developmental stages of Glossogobius callidus and Redigobius dewaali were collected during plankton surveys in seven permanently open and five intermittently ...

  17. Defensive enrolment in mantis shrimp larvae (Malacostraca: Stomatopoda)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haug, C.; Haug, J.T.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a possible new defensive behaviour of larval stages of mantis shrimps (Stomatopoda). Mantis shrimp larvae are rarely observed in nature, thus the study is based on postures of museum material and functional morphological aspects. Specimens described here are tightly enrolled, their pleon

  18. Context‐dependent chemical communication: Alarm pheromones of thrips larvae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, P.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Thrips have several advantages that make them particularly suitable for the study of the evolution of alarm signalling. When in danger, thrips larvae defend themselves by the excretion of ‘anal droplets’: a predator touched by such a droplet interrupts the attack and switches to cleaning. These

  19. The larvae of decapods and fishes of Amba estuary, Maharashtra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paulinose, V.T.; Devi, C.B.L.; Govindan, K.; Gajbhiye, S.N.; Nair, V.R.

    larvae to the total zooplankton population were 3.63 and 0.03 respectively. In the assessment of larval stocks environmental parameters and the presence of adult fish caught in the area were considered. The estuarine area supported fairly high fishery...

  20. Anaphe venata larva extract-induced purposeless chewing in rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seasonal ataxia was reported in humans following the consumption of Anaphe venata larva as protein supplement in diet and altered motor function in rodents when the extract was administered intraperitoneally. In this study we investigated the effect of the crude aqueous and Phosphate Buffer Saline (PBS) extracts of this ...

  1. Bacteria and fungi isolated from housefly ( Musca domestica L.) larvae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Housefly larvae were cultured on fresh fish and collected for the isolation and identification of microorganisms associated with them. The microbes were cultured from both the gut and body surface of the maggot on nutrient agar (for bacteria) and potato dextrose agar (for fungi) and incubated at about 37°C for 48 h before ...

  2. Larva migrans in the oral mucosa: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damante, José Humberto; Chinellato, Luiz Eduardo Montenegro; Oliveira, Fernando Toledo de; Soares, Cleverson Teixeira; Fleury, Raul Negrão

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous Larva migrans is a very common disease in tropical regions. In the oral mucosa, the infection occurs in the same way as in the skin, but it is rarer. This report describes two cases of Larva migrans in the oral mucosa. The first case was in a 27-year-old woman who presented an erythematous plaque located on the buccal mucosa, extending to a posterior direction, following a linear pattern, to other areas of the mouth. After incisional biopsy of the anterior-most portion of the lesion, morphological details obtained in multiple examined sections suggested Necator or Ancylostoma braziliense larvae as the cause of infection. The second case was in a 35-year-old male who presented a fusiform erythematous plaque in the palatal mucosa. This area was removed and submitted to microscopic examination under a presumptive diagnosis of "parasite migratory stomatitis". The histological characteristics were suggestive of a larva pathway. In both cases the lesion disappeared after biopsy and the patients were symptom-free.

  3. Effect of Root Extracts of Lantana camara (Verbenaceae) on Larvae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Larvicidal activity of three solvent root (bark and wood) extracts of Lantana camara Linn. was investigated against first and fourth instars of Aedes aegypti larvae after 24 and 48 h post-treatment exposure to serial concentrations (0.1, 0.05, 0.01, 0.005, 0.001 %) of aqueous, ethanolic and acetone crude extracts. All extracts ...

  4. Temporal dynamics of Chaoborus larvae (Diptera : Chaoboridae) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pinto-Coelho, 2007). Nauplii which are know to be the food of Chaoborus larvae at stages I and II, are the zooplankton most likely affected by thunderstorms. Finally, predation by fish (Yan et al., 1985; Wissel et al., 2003; Kouamelan et al.,. 2006) and decline in trophic ressources linked to major rainfalls may be responsible ...

  5. Overwintering physiology of the rice stem borer larvae, Chilo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-08-16

    Aug 16, 2012 ... this study, we determined the supercooling points (SCPs), the contents of amino acids and low- molecular weight ... drates play a role in insect survival at subzero tem- peratures. .... Dynamic changes of the contents of whole body glycerol in the rice stem borer larvae during overwintering. Values labeled ...

  6. In vitro Evaluation of Benzimidazole Carbamates on Cystic Larvae of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro Evaluation of Benzimidazole Carbamates on Cystic Larvae of Three Cestode Parasite Models. K D Mwambete, F Ponco-Gordo, C Cuesta-Bandera. Abstract. Benzimidazole carbamates are broad-spectrum anthelmintics which have limited solubility and hence poor absorption following oral administration.

  7. Biological control agent for mosquito larvae: Review on the killifish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review attempts to give an account on the recent advances on the killifish Aphanius dispar dispar as a biological control agent for mosquito larvae. Thirty six (36) articles of literature (scientific papers, technical and workshop reports) on this subject covering the period between 1980 and 2009 were reviewed.

  8. Bacteria of living and dead larvae of Porthetria dispar (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    John D. Podgwaite; Benjamin J. Cosenza

    1966-01-01

    A preliminary study of the bacteria associated with living and dead larvae of the gypsy moth (Porthetria dispar (L.)) was undertaken to determine what types of micro-organisms may be associated with disease in this insect. Specific objectives of this study were to enumerate the types of aerobic bacteria, and if possible to further elucidate the role...

  9. Microbial Quality of Roasted Larvae of the Palm Weevil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean total viable bacterial and fungal counts were 6.24x104 and 4.1x104 cfu/g respectively. Although these larvae are rich sources of protein, their exposure to dust during hawking in motorized traffic is a major route of contamination with bacterial and fungal pathogens. Keyword: Rhyncophorus phoenicis, Microbial ...

  10. Metabolic alterations and molecular mechanism in silkworm larvae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Metabolic alterations and molecular mechanism in silkworm larvae during viral infection: A review. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... of sericulture largely and greatly depends on the metabolic modulations and molecular mechanism of silkworm, besides its genetic composition and immunological resistance. One of the ...

  11. Visceral larva migrans: migratory pattern of Toxocara canis in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helwigh, Birgitte; Lind, Peter; Nansen, Peter

    1999-01-01

    recovered from the brain on days 14 and 21, with a maximum on day 14 p.i. No larvae were found in the eyes. Severe pathological changes were observed in the liver and lungs, especially on day 14 p.i.; also, development of granulomas was observed in the kidneys. Finally, a strong specific antibody response...

  12. Distribution of two post-larvae species of commercial prawns ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The white prawn, Fenneropenaeus indicus, and the tiger prawn, Penaeus monodon, are of great commercial importance, and they are extensively farmed along the eastern coast of India. Post-larvae of these species coexist in great abundance in estuaries along the Bay of Bengal. In this investigation, field distribution, ...

  13. Enantiomerization and enantioselective bioaccumulation of metalaxyl in Tenebrio molitor larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yongxin; Wang, Huili; Qin, Fang; Xu, Peng; Lv, Xiaotian; Li, Jianzhong; Guo, Baoyuan

    2014-02-01

    The enantiomerization and enantioselective bioaccumulation of metalaxyl by a single dose of exposure to Tenebrio molitor larvae under laboratory condition were studied by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS/MS) based on a ChiralcelOD-3R [cellulosetris-tris-(3, 5-dichlorophenyl-carbamate)] column. Exposure of enantiopure R-metalaxyl and S-metalaxyl in Tenebrio molitor larvae exhibited significant enantiomerization, with formation of the R enantiomers from the S enantiomers, and vice versa, which might be attributed to the chiral pesticide catalyzed by a certain enzyme in Tenebrio molitor larvae. Enantiomerization was not observed in wheat bran during the period of 21 d. In addition, bioaccumulation of rac-metalaxyl in Tenebrio molitor larvae was enantioselective with a preferential accumulation of S-metalaxyl. These results showed that enantioselectivity was caused not only by actual degradation and metabolism but also by enantiomerization, which was an important process in the environmental fate and behavior of metalaxyl enantiomers. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Molecular characterization of Anisakis larvae from fish caught off Sardinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Mauro; Angelucci, Giulia; Merella, Paolo; Siddi, Rita; Deiana, Carlo; Orrù, Germano; Salati, Fulvio

    2011-10-01

    Anisakis spp. larvae are parasitic, and potentially zoonotic, nematodes transmitted by marine fish and cephalopods, which are the main intermediate hosts of the third larval stage. The accidental consumption of infected raw or poorly cooked fish may cause gastroenteric diseases and allergies in humans. The aim of the present study was to use polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) to define the occurrence, species variability, and host preferences of Anisakis spp. larvae in fish caught off the coast of Sardinia. Necropsy was used on 285 samples; 552 Anisakis spp. L3 larvae were isolated from 87 fish that tested positive for this nematode. Anisakis pegreffii was most frequently encountered (90.6%), with a primary preference for Scomber scombrus, Zeus faber, and Trachurus mediterraneus. In contrast, the prevalence of Anisakis physeteris was only 1.3%. A hybrid genotype of Anisakis simplex sensu stricto and Anisakis pegreffii was also observed, which confirms the results of previous studies carried out in the western Mediterranean. Interestingly, no Anisakis simplex s.s. larvae were recovered. These results indicate that the diversity of Anisakis species is low in Sardinia waters, probably because of its geographic position.

  15. Transport and dispersal of fish eggs and larvae are important ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    sume that fish with pelagic eggs and larvae will spawn in upwelling ... might be found in coastal indentations where wind- induced ... Field obser- ... Institute of Marine Research, P.O. Box 1870 Nordnes, N-5817 Bergen, Norway. ...... North America, 1946-71. .... plankton of the Southeast Atlantic (Benguela Current region).

  16. the occurrence of digenean larvae in freshwater snails at mbezi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    numbers and distribution (spatial and temporal) of snail hosts. Snails could be flushed out of their habitats, thus, affecting prevalence of digenean larvae (see. Jordan et al. 1980). Snail habitats could be obliterated by floods and increased velocity of water current might sweep away the infective stages (miracidia). 61 ...

  17. Growth and Survival of First Feeding Larvae of Clarias gariepinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The percentage increase in length by all the fish followed the same pattern above within a range of 55 – 63.63%. The average daily weight gain of 9.0mg by larvae fed on LZ is significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the weight gains on the rest feed treatments which were however not significantly different from one another.

  18. Gut fluorescence analysis of barnacle larvae: An approach to quantify the ingested food

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaonkar, C.A.; Anil, A.C.

    obtained during the pre-monsoon season indicated the ingestion of food sources other than autotrophs. Such differences observed in the feeding behaviour of larvae could be due to differential availability of food for the larvae during different seasons...

  19. Estimation of food limitation of bivalve larvae in coastal waters of north-western Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bos, O.G.; Hendriks, I.E.; Strasser, M.

    2006-01-01

    Marine invertebrate recruitment may be affected by food limitation during the pelagic larval life stages. In the present study, field data on abundance of bivalve larvae along with their prey (small phytoplankton) were examined to see whether they were consistent with predictions made...... degrees C indicated maintenance costs of a 200-mu m bivalve larva to be 1.9 x 10(-5) J larva(-1) d(-1), while the maximum assimilation rate, resulting in maximum growth, would amount to 6.2 x 10(-3) J larva(-1) d(-1). Calculation of potential assimilation rates of larvae in the field resulted in estimates...... between 10-5 and 10(-3) J larva(-1) d(-1). Maximum larval concentrations in the field occurred from May to September and ranged between 17 and 392 larvae dm(-3). Most larvae were able to cover their maintenance costs, but not to attain maximum growth rates. Between April and September, the potential...

  20. The method by which Cephenemyia trompe (Modeer larvae invade reindeer (Rangifer tarandus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Anderson

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory electrostimulated C. trompe (Modeer females forcefully expelled (sprayed larvae for 5-20 cm. The watery spray consisted of about 20 tiny droplets containing two to several larvae. Crawling first-instar larvae exhibited negative geotactic and phototropic responses; they were subject to rapid desiccation and became immobile as the tiny droplets dried within a few seconds. When 5-50 larvae from dissectedfemales were dropped in physiological saline onto different areas of the muzzle of restrained reindeer, only larvae placed deep within the nostrils and on the lips crawled out-of-sight down the nostril passage or into the mouth. Drops of larvae placed elsewhere quickly desiccated and the larvae became immobile. Larvae deposited by wild females onto a COz-baited reindeer model with the muzzle, lips and nostrils coated with insect trapping adhesive all were stuck only along the dorsal lip below the philtrum. All experimental evidence supports a natural per os mode of invasion.

  1. Aedes aegypti survival in the presence of Toxorhynchites violaceus (Diptera: Culicidae) fourth instar larvae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Albeny, Daniel S; Martins, Gustavo F; Andrade, Mateus R; Krüger, Rodrigo F; Vilela, Evaldo F

    2011-01-01

    ... of Toxorhynchites spp. larvae (FOCKS 2007). Toxorhynchites spp. larvae live in natural and artificial water containers and are predators of Culicidae, e.g. Aedes triseriatus (Say, 1823) and Aedes ...

  2. Development of Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana formulations for control of malaria mosquito larvae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukhari, S.T.; Takken, W.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana have demonstrated effectiveness against anopheline larvae in the laboratory. However, utilising these fungi for the control of anopheline larvae under field conditions, relies on development of effective means of

  3. GC-MS investigation of the chemical composition of honeybee drone and queen larvae homogenate

    OpenAIRE

    Isidorov Valery A.; Bakier Sławomir; Stocki Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Honeybee larva homogenate appears to be underrated and insufficiently explored but this homogenate is an exceptionally valuable honeybee product. Drone larva homogenate is very nutritional due to its high content of proteins, free amino acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Moreover, the biological characteristics of honeybee larvae indicate the presence of chemical substances that may be pharmacologically active. In spite of the above, the chemical composition of honeybee larva has not gained as...

  4. Interacting Effects of Temperature and Photoperiod on Diapause in Larvae of Monochamus alternatus (Coleoptera : Cerambycidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Katsumi, TOGASHI; Ishikawa Forest Experiment Station:(Present address)Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University

    1995-01-01

    Fourth-instar, diapause and prediapause Monochamus alternatus larvae were collected from dead Pinus thunbergii trees and their developmental responses to laboratory conditions were investigated in early October. In continuous darkness, diapause was maintained at 25℃, but on incubation at 25℃ after chilling for 121-122 days at 10℃, prediapause larvae averted diapause and diapause larvae terminated diapause. Under a photoperiod of 16L-8D at 25℃, some prediapause larvae averted diapause, and dia...

  5. The potential for ontogenetic vertical migration by larvae of bathyal echinoderms

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Cm; Devin, Mg; Jaeckle, Wb; Ekaratne, Suk; George, Sb

    1996-01-01

    Planktotrophy is a relatively common developmental mode among bathyal and abyssal echinoderms, but the sources of food used by deep-sea planktotrophic larvae remain generally unknown. Very few deep-sea echinoderm larvae have been collected in plankton samples, so we do not know whether larvae migrate to the euphotic zone to feed or if they rely on bacteria or detritus at greater depths. We approached this question indirectly by investigating whether larvae of bathyal echinoids can tolerate th...

  6. Starvation-Induced Dietary Behaviour in Drosophila melanogaster Larvae and Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Ahmad; Safee Ullah Chaudhary; Ahmed Jawaad Afzal; Muhammad Tariq

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster larvae are classified as herbivores and known to feed on non-carnivorous diet under normal conditions. However, when nutritionally challenged these larvae exhibit cannibalistic behaviour by consuming a diet composed of larger conspecifics. Herein, we report that cannibalism in Drosophila larvae is confined not only to scavenging on conspecifics that are larger in size, but also on their eggs. Moreover, such cannibalistic larvae develop as normally as those grown on sta...

  7. A molt timer is involved in the metamorphic molt in Manduca sexta larvae

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Yuichiro; Koyama, Takashi; Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Riddiford, Lynn M.; Truman, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Manduca sexta larvae are a model for growth control in insects, particularly for the demonstration of critical weight, a threshold weight that the larva must surpass before it can enter metamorphosis on a normal schedule, and the inhibitory action of juvenile hormone on this checkpoint. We examined the effects of nutrition on allatectomized (CAX) larvae that lack juvenile hormone to impose the critical weight checkpoint. Normal larvae respond to prolonged starvation at the start of the last l...

  8. Larval habitat diversity and ecology of anopheline larvae in Eritrea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shililu, Josephat; Ghebremeskel, Tewolde; Seulu, Fessahaye; Mengistu, Solomon; Fekadu, Helen; Zerom, Mehari; Ghebregziabiher, Asmelash; Sintasath, David; Bretas, Gustavo; Mbogo, Charles; Githure, John; Brantly, Eugene; Novak, Robert; Beier, John C

    2003-11-01

    Studies on the spatial distribution of anopheline mosquito larvae were conducted in 302 villages over two transmission seasons in Eritrea. Additional longitudinal studies were also conducted at eight villages over a 24-mo period to determine the seasonal variation in anopheline larval densities. Eight anopheline species were identified with Anopheles arabiensis predominating in most of the habitats. Other species collected included: An. cinereus, An. pretoriensis, An. d'thali, An. funestus, An. squamosus, An. adenensis, and An. demeilloni. An. arabiensis was found in five of the six aquatic habitats found positive for anopheline larvae during the survey. Anopheles larvae were sampled predominantly from stream edges and streambed pools, with samples from this habitat type representing 91.2% (n = 9481) of the total anopheline larval collection in the spatial distribution survey. Other important anopheline habitats included rain pools, ponds, dams, swamps, and drainage channels at communal water supply points. Anopheline larvae were abundant in habitats that were shallow, slow flowing and had clear water. The presence of vegetation, intensity of shade, and permanence of aquatic habitats were not significant determinants of larval distribution and abundance. Larval density was positively correlated with water temperature. Larval abundance increased during the wet season and decreased in the dry season but the timing of peak densities was variable among habitat types and zones. Anopheline larvae were collected all year round with the dry season larval production restricted mainly to artificial aquatic habitats such as drainage channels at communal water supply points. This study provides important information on seasonal patterns of anopheline larval production and larval habitat diversity on a countrywide scale that will be useful in guiding larval control operations in Eritrea.

  9. The Role of Drosophila Merlin in the Control of Mitosis Exit and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    genome.wus erm-like Brugia malayi merlin-like 316.m00022 http://www.tigr.or Schistosoma japonicum JF2 AAB49033 http://www.nhm.a Taenia saginata myosin-like...value of 100. Although the ERM-like proteins have been identified in Taenia saginata , Schistosoma japonicum, Echinococcus granu- losus, and...like proteins of parasites Taenia saginata , Echinococcus granulo- sus, and Echinococcus multilocularis contain an Arg76 resi- due, which is also a basic

  10. Short Course, High Dose Rifampicin Achieves Wolbachia Depletion Predictive of Curative Outcomes in Preclinical Models of Lymphatic\\ud Filariasis and Onchocerciasis

    OpenAIRE

    Aljayyoussi, Ghaith; Tyrer, Hayley; Ford, Louise; Sjoberg, Hanna; Pionnier, Nicolas; Waterhouse, David; Davies, Jill; Gamble, Joanne; Metugene, Haelly; Cook, Darren A. N.; Steven, Andrew; Sharma, Raman; Guimaraes, Ana F.; Clare, Rachel H.; Cassidy, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) and onchocerciasis are priority neglected tropical diseases targeted for elimination. The only safe drug treatment with substantial curative activity against the filarial nematodes responsible for LF (Brugia malayi, Wuchereria bancrofti) or onchocerciasis (Onchocerca volvulus) is doxycycline. The target of doxycycline is the essential endosymbiont, Wolbachia. Four to six weeks doxycycline therapy achieves >90% depletion of Wolbachia in worm tissues leading to blockad...

  11. Nutrition and related ontogenetic aspects in larvae of the African catfish, Clarias gariepinus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verreth, J.

    1994-01-01


    The absence of adequate techniques for rearing fish larvae constitutes a bottleneck for sustainable aquacultural growth. Important constraints are the tiny size of the larvae, the dependance on live food organisms and the developmental stage of the fish larvae. The development

  12. Distribution and seasonal abundance of carangid larvae in the Arabian sea and Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Peter, K.J.; Balachandran, T.

    Carangid larvae were recorded from 8.8% of the International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIOE) stations in the Arabian Sea and 13.2% in the Bay of Bengal. Their total contribution was 1.1% of the total larvae collected. The highest number of larvae...

  13. Predaceous diving beetle, Dytiscus sharpi sharpi (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) larvae avoid cannibalism by recognizing prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoda, Toshio

    2012-09-01

    Larvae of diving beetles such as the various Dytiscus species (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) are carnivorous and usually prey on other aquatic animals. Cannibalism among larvae of Dytiscus sharpi sharpi (Wehncke) was observed to begin when they were starved for more than two days under artificial breeding conditions. However, the 2-day starved larvae did not show cannibalism in the presence of intact, motionless, frozen tadpoles, or frozen shrimps. The beetle larvae attacked and captured intact tadpoles faster (15 sec) than other motionless and frozen tadpoles (120 sec), indicating that prey movement was an important factor in stimulating feeding behavior in larvae. Prey density does not have an effect on larval cannibalism. In cases in which preys are present at lower densities than that of larvae, a group of beetle larvae frequently fed on single prey. This feeding behavior, therefore, provides direct evidence of self-other recognition at the species level. Using two traps in one aquarium that allows the larvae to detect only prey smell, one containing tadpoles and another empty, the beetle larvae were attracted to the trap with tadpoles at high frequency, but not to the empty trap. In another experiment, the beetle larvae were not attracted to the trap containing a beetle larva. These results suggest that the larvae of D. sharpi sharpi are capable of recognizing prey scent, which enables the promotion of foraging behavior and the prevention of cannibalism.

  14. Description of the larva of Triaenodes sp. McLachlan, 1865 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... particular species is at best conjectural. Efforts are ongoing to breed out adult from larva for proper association and determination of the species. Larvae were found in a slow-flowing forested stream, where they were associated with leaf litter accumulations. Keywords: Trichoptera, Leptoceridae, Triaenodes, larva, Nigeria, ...

  15. Dietary potentials of the edible larvae of Cirina forda (westwood) as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted to determine the performance of broiler chicks to the replacement of fishmeal with the larvae of Cirina forda. Three diets, namely Diet A (100% C. forda larvae and 0% Fish meal); Diet B (50% C. forda larvae and 50% Fish meal); and Diet C, which was the control (100% Fish meal and 0% C.

  16. Software for pattern recognition of the larvae of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus Programa de computador para reconhecimento da larva de Aedes aegypti e Aedes albopictus

    OpenAIRE

    São Thiago André Iwersen de; Kupek Emil; Ferreira Neto Joaquim Alves; São Thiago Paulo de Tarso

    2002-01-01

    Software for pattern recognition of the larvae of mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, biological vectors of dengue and yellow fever, has been developed. Rapid field identification of larva using a digital camera linked to a laptop computer equipped with this software may greatly help prevention campaigns.Foi desenvolvido um programa de computador para reconhecimento da larva de Aedes aegypti e Aedes albopictus, vetores biológicos de dengue e febre amarela. O programa possibilita rá...

  17. KELIMPAHAN DAN SEBARAN LARVA UDANG PENAEID DI PERAIRAN PEMANGKAT DAN SEKITARNYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duranta Diandria Kembaren

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian tentang kelimpahan dan sebaran larva udang penaeid di perairan Pemangkat, Kalimantan Barat telah dilakukan pada bulan Mei, Juni, Agustus, Oktober dan Desember 2010. Larva udang ditangkap dengan menggunakan bongo net (larvae net. Berdasarkan hasil identifikasi diperoleh bahwa larva udang penaeid yang terdapat di perairan ini adalah genera Penaeus dan Metapenaeus dengan komposisi masing-masing secara berurutan sebesar 42% dan 58%. Kelimpahan larva udang penaeid ini dominan diperoleh pada bulan Oktober dan mencapai puncaknya pada bulan Desember, sehingga diduga puncak pemijahan udang penaeid di perairan ini terjadi pada bulan Nopember. Hasil sebaran larva udang penaeid menunjukkan bahwa kelimpahan larva udang penaeid paling dominan diperoleh di bagian utara muara sungai Sambas yang merupakan wilayah perairan Jawai. Berdasarkan hasil analisa statistik, diperoleh bahwa kelimpahan larva udang penaeid berkorelasi positif dengan kelimpahan fitoplankton, kecerahan, salinitas, dan pH, sedangkan dengan suhu dan oksigen terlarut berkorelasi negatif. A study on the distribution and abundance of penaeid larvae in Pemangkat waters, West Borneo was conducted on May, June, August, October, and December 2010. Larvae net (bongo net was used to collect the larvae. The result showed that the larvae was dominated by genera Penaeus and Metapenaeus, which the percentage of 42% and 58%, respectively. Penaeid larvae was in higher abundant in October and then reached its peak in December. Based on this result, the spawning peak season of Penaeid shrimps in Pemangkat waters was estimated in November. The distribution of Penaeid larvae was most abundant in the north side of the mouth of Sambas’s river (Jawai waters. The statistical analysis showed that the Penaeid larvae abundance has positive correlation to the phytoplankton abundance, light intensity, salinity, and pH, and has the negative correlation.to the temperature and dissolved oxygen.

  18. Studi Laju Umpan pada Proses Biokonversi Limbah Pengolahan Tuna menggunakan Larva Hermetia illucens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Rahman Hakim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Seiring dengan berkembangnya industri tuna, limbah pengolahan yang dihasilkan semakin meningkat. Namun demikian pemanfaatan limbah tersebut belum optimal. Biokonversi bahan organik limbah tuna menjadi biomassa larva sebagai bahan pakan diharapkan mampu mengatasi permasalahan tersebut. Biokonversi menggunakan larva Hermetia illucens atau Black Soldier Fly (BSF memiliki keunggulan dibandingkan proses konversi lain; di antaranya larva BSF mampu mengkonversi berbagai macam bahan organik, memiliki kandungan nutrisi tinggi serta bukan vektor penyakit. Tujuan penelitian ini ialah mempelajari laju umpan larva BSF dalam mengkonversi limbah tuna menjadi biomassa larva. Limbah tuna yang digunakan sebagai umpan larva BSF adalah kepala dan jeroan. Larva dipelihara selama 19 hari dengan pemberian umpan bervariasi (60, 80, 100 mg/larva/hari. Analisa dilakukan terhadap konsumsi umpan, indeks pengurangan limbah (waste reduction index/WRI, efisiensi konversi umpan tercerna (efficiency of conversion of digested-feed/ECD, tingkat kelulusan hidup (survival rates /SR, bobot larva, kandungan protein dan lemak larva. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan kepala dan jeroan tuna dapat digunakan sebagai pakan BSF, dengan nilai SR 41,33 – 98,33%. Laju umpan yang menghasilkan proses biokonversi paling optimum adalah umpan berupa kepala tuna sebesar 60 mg/larva/hari (K60. Nilai parameter pada perlakuan K60 adalah konsumsi umpan 77,09 %, WRI 4,06 % per hari, ECD 8,32 %, bobot larva 72,59 mg dan SR 98,33 %. Limbah berupa kepala tuna menghasilkan konsumsi umpan, WRI, ECD, bobot larva dan SR yang lebih tinggi dibandingkan limbah jeroan tuna. Penggunaan limbah kepala tuna dapat dimanfaatkan untuk mereduksi limbah sekaligus menghasilkan bahan pakan yang potensial. Kandungan larva BSF dengan umpan kepala tuna 60 mg/larva/hari meliputi protein 25,38 %, lemak 6,85 % dan air 62,81 %.

  19. Infestation of a bird and two cats by larvae of Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinckney, R D; Kanton, K; Foster, C N; Steinberg, H; Pellitteri, P

    2001-09-01

    The larvae of Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), commonly known as the Indian meal moth, often cause enormous losses in stored food supplies. We present three clinical case reports of accidental infestation by P. interpunctella larvae in two domestic cats and one parakeet. A larva gained entry into the avian host and subsequently migrated to the brain. It was alive, covered with "silk-like" fibers and confirmed to be a fourth instar. Plodia interpunctella larvae were excised with forceps from the subcutaneous tissues of the ear and neck of two cats in a different household. Previous reports of infestation by P. interpunctella larvae in vertebrates are unknown.

  20. Reduction of muscle larvae burden in rats experimentally infected with Trichinella spiralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machnicka-Rowinska B.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available In Wistar rats infected with 500 to 2,500 Trichinella spiralis larvae the muscle larvae intensity (larvae per gram-l.p.g. was measured from 20 to 180 day post infection (d.p.i. The l.p.g. increased to day 40-50 p.i. and decreased thereafter. The highest reduction took place between 6 0 and 120 d.p.i. with intermediate inoculum of T. spiralis larvae. The mechanism of the reduction of T. spiralis larvae in muscles is suggested to depend on pericapsular-intercapsular host cells infiltrations attracted by parasite antigens.

  1. MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION OF Pseudoterranova azarasi LARVAE IN COD (Gadus sp. SOLD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION IN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana MARIGO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Anisakiasis and Pseudoterranovosis are human diseases caused by the ingestion of live Anisakidae larvae in raw, undercooked or lightly marinated fish. Larvae were collected from one salted cod sold for human consumption in a Sao Paulo market in 2013. One section of one brownish larva was used for molecular analyses. The partial COX2 gene sequence from the larva had a nucleotide identity of 99.8 % with Pseudoterranova azarasi, which belongs to the Pseudoterranova decipiens species complex. The risk of allergy when consuming dead larvae in salted fish is not well known and should be considered.

  2. Description of the larva of Gynacantha millardi Selys, 1891 (Odonata: Aeshnidae) from Chhattisgarh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawn, Prosenjit; Chandra, Kailash

    2016-06-29

    The larva of Gynacantha millardi Selys is described here from female larvae and male and female exuviae collected from Chhattisgarh, India. Unlike other Gynacantha larvae known so far, G. millardi has 7 palpal setae almost equal in length; in other species, the palpal setae are of different lengths. The larvae lack a tooth on each side of the median cleft and have a distinct blunt tooth on the inner margin corner of each labial palp. The larvae were found in a semi-stagnant forest pool with enormous growth of aquatic vegetation.

  3. Comparative study of cultivation of feces in vermiculite or charcoal to obtain larvae of Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Steveen Rios; Maia, Caroline Ohnesorge; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima; Moreira, Narcisa Imaculada Brant

    2014-01-01

    We compared feces culturing in charcoal or vermiculite to obtain Strongyloides venezuelensis larvae. Feces (5 g) from infected rats was mixed with vermiculite (10 g) or coal (10 g) in plastic cups and incubated at 28°C for 48 h. Larvae were recovered using Baermann-Moraes method. Significantly higher number of positive larval cultures were recovered from vermiculite than from charcoal (15/17 and 4/17, respectively; p < 0.001; 990.6 ± 307.5 and 215 ± 78.1 larvae, p = 0.027). Vermiculite yields more larvae and provides cleaner pellets, improving larvae identification and facilitating their use for other purposes.

  4. Morphological and molecular characterization of Anisakis larvae (Nematoda: Anisakidae) in Beryx splendens from Japanese waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Rie; Suzuki, Jun; Sadamasu, Kenji; Kai, Akemi

    2011-06-01

    The third-stage (L3) larvae of Anisakis, which are the etiological agents of human anisakiasis, have been categorized morphologically into Anisakis Type I larvae and Anisakis Type II larvae. Genetic analysis has allowed easy identification of these larvae: Anisakis Type I larvae include the species Anisakis simplex sensu stricto, Anisakis pegreffii, Anisakis simplex C, Anisakis typica, Anisakis ziphidarum, and Anisakis nascettii, whereas Anisakis Type II larvae include the species Anisakis physeteris, Anisakis brevispiculata, and Anisakis paggiae. Since human consumption of raw fish and squid is common in Japan, we investigated Anisakis L3 larvae in 44 specimens of Beryx splendens from Japanese waters. A total of 730 Anisakis L3 larvae collected from B. splendens were divided morphologically into 4 types: Type I, Type II, and 2 other types that were similar to Anisakis Type III and Type IV described by Shiraki (1974). Anisakis Type II, Type III, and Type IV larvae all had a short ventriculus, but their tails were morphologically different. In addition, data from genetic analysis indicated that Anisakis Type II, Type III, and Type IV larvae could be identified as A. physeteris, A. brevispiculata, and A. paggiae, respectively. Therefore, A. physeteris, A. brevispiculata, and A. paggiae can be readily differentiated not only by genetic analysis but also by morphological characteristics of L3 larvae. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhanced ammonia content in compost leachate processed by black soldier fly larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Terrence R; Popa, Radu

    2012-03-01

    Black soldier fly (BSF) larvae (Hermetia illucens), feeding on leachate from decaying vegetable and food scrap waste, increase ammonia (NH (4) (+) ) concentration five- to sixfold relative to leachate unprocessed by larvae. NH (4) (+) in larva-processed leachate reached levels as high as ∼100 mM. Most of this NH (4) (+) appears to have come from organic nitrogen within the frass produced by the larvae as they fed on leachate. In nitrate-enriched solutions, BSF larvae also facilitate dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia. The markedly higher concentration of NH (4) (+) recovered in leachates processed with BSF larvae and concomitant diversion of nutrients into insect biomass (itself a valuable feedstock) indicate that the use of BSF larvae in processing leachate of decaying organic waste could be advantageous in offsetting capital and environmental costs incurred in composting.

  6. Microvascular system forming in skeletal muscle near trichinella larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berzentsev, Y.A.; Oksov, I.V.

    1986-09-01

    The fine structure and dynamics of formation of the microcirculatory system about the larvae of the two Trichinella species, providing for the rapid entry of nutrient substances to the larvae, were investigated in the muscles of white mice. Hitological, hitochemical, autoradiographic, and electron-microscopic methods were used in the investigation. At a certain period of the experiment, the greatest quantity of RNA was found in the endotheliocyte cytoplasm, tritium-thymidine label was incorporated into the nuclei, and mitoses were visible. The transition to tissue parasitism was accompanied by a complication of the relationships with the host and the formation of a more complex independent microcirculatory system, which ensures a more intensive influx of blood.

  7. Development of a two photon microscope for tracking Drosophila larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagyozov, Doycho; Mihovilovic Skanata, Mirna; Gershow, Marc

    Current in vivo methods for measuring neural activity in Drosophila larva require immobilization of the animal. Although we can record neural signals while stimulating the sensory organs, we cannot read the behavioral output because we have prevented the animal from moving. Many research questions cannot be answered without observation of neural activity in behaving (freely-moving) animals. We incorporated a Tunable Acoustic Gradient (TAG) lens into a two-photon microscope to achieve a 70kHz axial scan rate, enabling volumetric imaging at tens of hertz. We then implemented a tracking algorithm based on a Kalman filter to maintain the neurons of interest in the field of view and in focus during the rapid three dimensional motion of a free larva. Preliminary results show successful tracking of a neuron moving at speeds reaching 500 μm/s. NIH Grant 1DP2EB022359 and NSF Grant PHY-1455015.

  8. EFFICACY OF THAI NEEM OIL AGAINST AEDES AEGYPTI (L.) LARVAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silapanuntakul, Suthep; Keanjoom, Romnalin; Pandii, Wongdyan; Boonchuen, Supawadee; Sombatsiri, Kwanchai

    2016-05-01

    Trees with larvicidal activity may be found in Thailand. We conducted this study to evaluate the efficacy and length of efficacy of Thai neem (Azadirachta siamensis) oil emulsion and an alginate bead of Thai neem oil formulation against early fourth stage Aedes aegypti larvae using a dipping test. The Thai neem oil emulsion had significantly greater larvicidal activity than the alginate bead formulation at 12 to 60 hours post-exposure (p neem oil formulation resulted in 100% mortality among the early fourth stage Aedes aegypti larvae at 48 hours, while the alginate bead formulation resulted in 98% larval mortality at 84 hours and 100% mortality at 96 hours. The mean larval mortality using the Thai neem oil emulsion dropped to < 25% by 12 days and with the alginate beads dropped to < 25% by 15 days of exposure.

  9. Aquaculture and feeding ecology: Feeding behaviour in turbot larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruno, Eleonora

    capture success. This thesis is part of a large international project aimed at improving the rearing techniques of high value fish species larvae fed with calanoid copepods, their natural prey, to achieve high levels of survival and quality. In fact, fish aquaculture is becoming increasingly important......The period of first feeding, characterized by the shift from internal (yolk-sac) to external food sources, is considered particularly critical for the survival of marine fish, but the underlying causes are still unknown. The larval stage, characterized by high mortality rates, is particularly...... challenging for larval rearing. After the start of exogenous feeding, another intense and likely critical period of change occurs in the early life stages of fish. This stage is the metamorphosis, during which the larvae transform organs and body morphology to become juveniles. Compared to other teleosts...

  10. Citrus Seed Oils Efficacy against Larvae ofAedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Hazrat; Akram, Waseem; Hassan, Soaib Ali; Din, Sadrud

    2017-09-01

    Dengue fever is a serious public health issue in Pakistan for many years. Globally plants have been reported to contain compounds with insecticidal properties. These properties have been demonstrated more recently on the larval stages of mosquitoes. Therefore, Citrus cultivar seeds were evaluated for larvicidal potential against the primary dengue vector Aedes aegypti . Extraction of oil was done by a steam distillation method and oils were evaluated according to WHO guidelines for larvicides 2005 for evaluation of insecticidal properties of citrus seed extracts against mosquito larvae. Among the Citrus cultivar seed oil, rough lemon ( Citrus jambhiri ) had the lowest LC 50 value (200.79ppm), while musambi ( C. sinensis var musambi ) had the highest LC 50 value (457.30ppm) after 24 h of exposure. Citrus cultivars have some larvicidal potential but C. jambhiri had the greatest potential against A. aegypti larvae. Further small-scale field trials using the extracts of C. jambhiri will be conducted to determine operational feasibility.

  11. Bed bugs, leeches and hookworm larvae in the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heukelbach, Jorg; Hengge, Ulrich R

    2009-01-01

    Bed bugs, leeches, and hookworm-related cutaneous larva migrans are skin infestations that are usually considered of minor importance because they produce discomfort rather than cause or transmit disease. Bed bugs have been increasing tremendously in high-income countries in recent years, causing distress to affected individuals and economic loss. Infestation by land leeches causes mainly unpleasant skin reactions, whereas infestation by aquatic leeches may be more dangerous, leading to anemia and in severe cases, to death. Cutaneous larva migrans produces an intense pruritus that can be exasperating for the patient and cause sleep disturbance. An overview is given of these three infestations with a discussion of the causative agents, transmission, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment.

  12. Suscetibilidade de larvas de Culex quinquefasciatus a diferentes inseticidas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stênio Nunes Alves

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O presente estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a suscetibilidade de larvas de Culex quinquefasciatus a dois piretróides (Cipermetrina e Deltametrina, dois derivados da Avermectina (ivermectina e abamectina e a um organofosforado (Temefós. MÉTODOS: Larvas de 3º e 4º instares de C. quinquefasciatus foram expostas a diferentes concentrações destes (onze repetições seguindo o protocolo da Organização Mundial de Saúde. Uma hora após a exposição, as larvas foram lavadas em água desclorada, transferidas para recipientes plásticos contendo água sem cloro, alimentadas e observadas por períodos de 24h, até se transformarem em adultos. Para a determinação das concentrações letais, os valores foram submetidos à análise de regressão usando o modelo probit pelo programa Minitab 15. RESULTADOS: Diferenças entre as estimativas da CL50 e CL90 justificaram que a população de mosquitos testada apresenta heterogeneidade em resposta aos inseticidas, sendo a maior concentração utilizada para a CL50, a partir da análise de probit para o Temefós. Todos os inseticidas avaliados causaram mortalidade mais acentuada nas primeiras 24h exceto quando expostas à ivermectina. CONCLUSÕES: As larvas são suscetíveis a todos os inseticidas testados e há uma necessidade de um monitoramento dos inseticidas utilizados.

  13. Maya Index and Larva Density Aedes Aegypti Toward Dengue Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang G. Purnama

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available South Denpasar District was of there as with the highest dengue cases in Bali province. The number of mosquito breeding places and larvae density become risk factor that influenced the spreading of mosquitoes. Maya index was an indicator to measure the amount of waterreservoirs can be breeding places for mosquitoes. Knowing the relationship between maya index and density of larvae and pupae of Ae.aegypti toward dengue infection in South Denpasar District. The study was observational analytic with case-control design. Data was collected through interviews and field observations to 150 respondents. The survey entomologist with indicators maya index, house index (HI, container index (CI, breteau index (BI and pupa index (PI to see the density of larvae and pupae in survey area. Dengue transmission risk was categorized mild, moderate and severe based on density figure. Water storage containers inspected in 1215 containers that as many as 675 containers in the case and 540 containers in control. Water reservoirs (TPA that the most larvae was tub (29.27%, dispenser (18.29%, container tirta (10.98%, wells (10.98%. Maya index status was lower in the case (24% smaller thancontrols (37.33%. Value of HI = 23.33; CI=10.69; BI=55; PI=15.33. Based on HI and CI indicator South Denpasar District means have moderate the risk of transmission spread of dengue disease. Based on the BI, have a high risk of transmission to the spread of dengue disease. Based on the maya index showed house cases have highest risk as breeding place compare than control house. House index, Breteau index, container index, pupa index and maya index have correlation with dengue infection. Kind of breeding place have the high risk is bath tub

  14. The larvae of some blowflies of medical and veterinary importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erzinclioglu, Y Z

    1987-04-01

    Diagnostic features are described as a series of couplets that enable separation of the third instar larvae of the following pairs of closely related forms of blowflies of medical and veterinary importance: Chrysomya chloropyga (Wiedemann) and Ch.putoria (Wiedemann), Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann) and Ch.rufifacies (Macquart), Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) and Co.macellaria (Fabricius), Lucilia sericata (Mergen) and L. cuprina (Wiedemann), Calliphora augur (Fabricius) and C. stygia (Fabricius).

  15. Salinity tolerance of larvae of African catfish Clarias gariepinus ( ) X ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fourteen and twenty one day larvae were exposed to abrupt stepwise change in salinity (2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 ppt) for 96 hours to determine mortality, median lethal mortality, MLS and median lethal time, MLT. The fourteen day-old fry that were exposed to 0 – 6 ppt recorded 90%, 87.5% 77.5% and 10% survival at the end of ...

  16. Cockchafer larvae smell host root scents in soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Weissteiner

    Full Text Available In many insect species olfaction is a key sensory modality. However, examination of the chemical ecology of insects has focussed up to now on insects living above ground. Evidence for behavioral responses to chemical cues in the soil other than CO(2 is scarce and the role played by olfaction in the process of finding host roots below ground is not yet understood. The question of whether soil-dwelling beetle larvae can smell their host plant roots has been under debate, but proof is as yet lacking that olfactory perception of volatile compounds released by damaged host plants, as is known for insects living above ground, occurs. Here we show that soil-dwelling larvae of Melolontha hippocastani are well equipped for olfactory perception and respond electrophysiologically and behaviorally to volatiles released by damaged host-plant roots. An olfactory apparatus consisting of pore plates at the antennae and about 70 glomeruli as primary olfactory processing units indicates a highly developed olfactory system. Damage induced host plant volatiles released by oak roots such as eucalyptol and anisol are detected by larval antennae down to 5 ppbv in soil air and elicit directed movement of the larvae in natural soil towards the odor source. Our results demonstrate that plant-root volatiles are likely to be perceived by the larval olfactory system and to guide soil-dwelling white grubs through the dark below ground to their host plants. Thus, to find below-ground host plants cockchafer larvae employ mechanisms that are similar to those employed by the adult beetles flying above ground, despite strikingly different physicochemical conditions in the soil.

  17. Tropical dermatology: cutaneous larva migrans, gnathostomiasis, cutaneous amebiasis and trombiculiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelmann, Kristian; Tomecki, Kenneth J; Martínez, José Darío

    2014-09-01

    In today's world, many people can travel easily and quickly around the globe. Most travel travel-related illnesses include fever, diarrhea, and skin disease, which are relatively uncommon in returning travelers. We review four of the most common emerging infestations and skin infections in the Americas, which are important to the clinical dermatologist, focusing on the clinical presentation and treatment of cutaneous larva migrans, gnathostomiasis, cutaneous amebiasis, and trombiculiasis.

  18. Using black soldier fly larvae for processing organic leachates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Radu; Green, Terrence R

    2012-04-01

    A large number of biodegradable byproducts including alcohols, soluble saccharides, volatile organic acids, and amines accumulate in the liquid fraction (leachate) produced as vegetal and food scrap waste decomposes. Untreated leachate, because it is rich in nutrients and organic byproducts, has a high chemical oxygen demand and is normally cleared of soluble organic byproducts by mineralization before its discharge into waterways. Mineralizing leachates using chemical and microbial biotechnologies is, however, a lengthy and costly process. We report here that the larvae of the black soldier fly Hermetia illucens (L.) (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), an insect rich in protein and lipids, and having significant commercial value, while feeding and growing off of compost leachate, lowers its chemical oxygen demand relative to that of leachate unexposed to larvae, neutralizes its acidity, and clears it of volatile organic acids, amines, and alcohols. These observations demonstrate that black soldier fly larvae could be used to help offset the cost and clean up of organic solutes in leachate waste streams while recycling carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate into usable and commercially valuable biomass.

  19. Macroevolutionary interplay between planktic larvae and benthic predators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kevin J.

    2005-12-01

    Many marine invertebrates have a complex life cycle in which the egg develops into an intermediate planktic larval form rather than developing directly to the benthic juvenile stage. Because of the evolutionary and ecological complexity of pelagic-benthic life cycles, the reasons behind the origin of larvae and their subsequent maintenance over geological time are not well understood. Using both a molecular clock and the fossil record, I show that the initial exploitation of the predator-free pelagic realm by lecithotrophic larvae was achieved independently multiple times by the end of the Early Cambrian, and that the convergent evolution of planktotrophy from lecithotrophic ancestors evolved between the latest Cambrian and Middle Ordovician at least four, and possibly as many as eight, times. Both the exploitation of the pelagic realm by nonfeeding larvae and the acquisition of planktotrophy correlate in time with novel modes of benthic predation, including the dramatic rise in the number and type of epifaunal suspension feeders in the Early Ordovician.

  20. Observations of cocooned Hydrobaenus (Diptera: Chironomidae) larvae in Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Taaja R.; Hudson, Patrick L.; Riley, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Larvae of the family Chironomidae have developed a variety of ways to tolerate environmental stress, including the formation of cocoons, which allows larvae to avoid unfavorable temperature conditions, drought, or competition with other chironomids. Summer cocoon formation by younger instars of the genus Hydrobaenus Fries allows persistence through increased temperatures and/or intermittent dry periods in arid regions or temporary habitats, but this behavior was not observed in the Great Lakes until the current study. Cocoon-aestivating Hydrobaenus sp. larvae were found in benthic grab samples collected in 2010–2013 near Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore in northern Lake Michigan with densities up to 7329/m2. The aestivating species was identified as Hydrobaenus johannseni (Sublette, 1967), and the associated chironomid community was typical for an oligotrophic nearshore system. Hydrobaenus cocoon formation in the Great Lakes was likely previously unnoticed due to the discrepancies between the genus' life history and typical benthos sampling procedures which has consequences for describing chironomid communities where Hydrobaenus is present.

  1. Riceland mosquito management practices for Anopheles quadrimaculatus larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, R A; Wilkes, W W; Lewis, C N; Meisch, M V

    2008-12-01

    Two separate but related studies were conducted regarding management of Anopheles quadrimaculatus larval populations in commercial rice fields near Cleveland, MS, in 2004. Study 1 was to evaluate the effectiveness of 2 treatments of aerially applied ultra-low volume applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) against An. quadrimaculatus larvae in dense, high-canopy mid- to late-season rice crop. Study 2 was to investigate the effect of preflood treatments of lambda-cyhalothrin (Karate), which is commonly used against rice water weevil (Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus), on An. quadrimaculatus larvae. Excellent initial, but short residual control (>99% control 1 day after treatment) was observed in the Bti-treated fields in both mid- and late-season rice. Little or no effect on mosquito larvae was observed in the lambda-cyhalothrin-treated fields. Results indicate that Bti can be effectively used by mosquito management personnel to control larval populations of An. quadrimaculatus in late-season rice fields; however, lambda-cyhalothrin did not effectively control larval An. quadrimaculatus when applied preflood to rice fields.

  2. Diagnosis of brugian filariasis by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine B Poole

    Full Text Available In this study we developed and evaluated a Brugia Hha I repeat loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay for the rapid detection of Brugia genomic DNA. Amplification was detected using turbidity or fluorescence as readouts. Reactions generated a turbidity threshold value or a clear visual positive within 30 minutes using purified genomic DNA equivalent to one microfilaria. Similar results were obtained using DNA isolated from blood samples containing B. malayi microfilariae. Amplification was specific to B. malayi and B. timori, as no turbidity was observed using DNA from the related filarial parasites Wuchereria bancrofti, Onchocerca volvulus or Dirofilaria immitis, or from human or mosquito. Furthermore, the assay was most robust using a new strand-displacing DNA polymerase termed Bst 2.0 compared to wild-type Bst DNA polymerase, large fragment. The results indicate that the Brugia Hha I repeat LAMP assay is rapid, sensitive and Brugia-specific with the potential to be developed further as a field tool for diagnosis and mapping of brugian filariasis.

  3. Development and functional morphology of the mouthparts and foregut in larvae and post-larvae of Macrobrachium jelskii (Decapoda: Palaemonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Cristina Pantoja; Souza, Adelson Silva de; Maciel, Murilo; Maciel, Cristiana R; Abrunhosa, Fernando Araújo

    2016-05-01

    The morphology of the mouthparts and foregut of the larvae and post-larvae of Macrobrachium jelskii was investigated to determine their functional roles in feeding, in order to understand the larval feeding behaviour and the changes that occur during its development. The mouthparts and foregut of the zoea I and II are morphologically similar, rudimentary and non-functional in feeding. Only in the final larval stage, zoea III, do the external mouthparts and foregut become structurally more complex and thus likely to play a potential role in feeding. Two behavioral trials (point of no return, point of reserve saturation) evaluated the resistance to starvation in zoea I, II, and III. The results indicate that they have sufficient nutritional reserves to permit them to complete metamorphosis without feeding. Overall, our results suggest that the zoea I and II of Macrobrachium jelskii engage in obligate lecithotrophy and zoea III in facultative lecithotrophy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fish larvae at fronts: Horizontal and vertical distributions of gadoid fish larvae across a frontal zone at the Norwegian Trench

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The reproduction and early life history of many fish species are linked to the physical and biological characteristics of fronts. In order to ascertain linkages between frontal physics and fish larvae, we investigated distributional differences among gadoid fish larvae comparing these to both...... horizontal and vertical variability in hydrography and abundances of potential copepod prey The investigation was carried out at a frontal zone along the Norwegian Trench in the northern North Sea, and was based on a series of cross-bathymetric sampling transects. Tows with a large ring net and an opening......-closing net were used for describing fish larval horizontal and vertical distributions, while a submersible pump was used for describing vertical distributions of copepods. Hydrographic profiles and current velocity measurements were used to outline variability in temperature, salinity and current structure...

  5. Mananoligossacarídeo em dietas para larvas de tilápia Mannanoligosaccharides in diets for tilapia larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Kalko Schwarz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Este experimento foi realizado para avaliar níveis crescentes de mananoligossacarídeo (MOS na dieta de larvas de tilápias-do-nilo (linhagem Supreme® na fase de reversão sexual durante 30 dias. Larvas de tilápia-do-nilo (n=1500, P=0,01 g ± 0,001 g foram distribuídas aleatoriamente em 30 tanques de 100 litros. Os peixes foram distribuídos em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, composto por seis tratamentos e cinco repetições. A dieta controle (isenta de MOS foi elaborada para conter aproximadamente 35% de proteína bruta e 3.100 kcal de ED/kg. As demais foram suplementadas com 0; 0,15; 0,30; 0,45; 0,60 e 0,75% de MOS em substituição ao milho da dieta controle. Com o aumento nos níveis de MOS nas dietas, foi observado aumento linear sobre o comprimento do intestino, a altura das vilosidades intestinais e a densidade dos vilos. Não houve diferença na composição corporal, no ganho em peso, no peso final, no comprimento final, no fator de condição, na taxa de sobrevivência e no número de células caliciformes do intestino das larvas. Os níveis de MOS tiveram efeito quadrático sobre a conversão alimentar, cujos melhores resultados foram obtidos com 0,34% de MOS. A utilização de MOS no nível de 0,34% em dietas para larvas de tilápia-do-nilo melhora a conversão alimentar e promove aumento do comprimento do intestino, da altura das vilosidades e da densidade de vilos intestinal.This experiment was conducted to evaluate increasing levels of mannanoligosaccharides (MOS in the diet of Nile tilapia larvae (Supreme® at the sex reversal stage for 30 days. Nile tilapia larvae (n = 1500, p = 0.01 ± 0.001 g, were randomly distributed in 30 tanks of 100 liters each, for 30 days. The fish were distributed in a randomized design with six treatments and five replicates. The control diet (no MOS was elaborated to contain approximately 35% of crude protein and 3,100 kcal DE/kg. Mannanoligosaccharides were included in the other diets

  6. Morphological and behavioral development of the piracanjuba larvae Desenvolvimento morfológico e comportamental de larvas de piracanjuba

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    Cláudia Maria Reis Raposo Maciel

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the morphologic development and the swimming and feeding behaviors of piracanjuba larvae, Brycon orbignyanus Valenciennes (1849 (Characiformes, Characidae, Bryconinae, during the period from zero to 172 hours after hatching (standard length = 3.62 - 11.94 mm. The morphological analyses were accomplished by using a trinocular stereo microscope, while the behavioral analyses were performed through periodic observations. In 28 hours after hatching, the larvae (standard length = 6.25 ± 0.13 mm showed the following structural and behavioral characteristics that made them become active predators able to overcome a larval critical phase, the beginning of exogenous feeding: presence of pigmented eyes, terminal and wide mouth, developed oral dentition, developing digestive tube, yolk sac reduction, fins and swim bladder formation, horizontal swimming, cannibalism, and predation. Intense cannibalism among larvae was verified from 26 to 72 hours. At the end of the metamorphosis - 172 hours after hatching - the larvae measuring 11.94 + 0.80 mm in standard length presented a flexed notochord, caudal fin bifurcation, dorsal and anal fin formation, synchronized movements, and formation of shoals, characteristics that together allow enhanced perception and locomotio in exploration of the environment, determining the best moment for transfering to the fishponds. New studies can contribute to commercial fish farming by improving feeding management, performance, survival, and productivity of this species.Objetivou-se estudar o desenvolvimento morfológico e os comportamentos natatório e alimentar de larvas de piracanjuba, Brycon orbignyanus Valenciennes (1849 (Characiformes, Characidae, Bryconinae no período de 0 a 172 horas após a eclosão (comprimento-padrão = 3,62 - 11,94 mm. As análises morfológicas foram realizadas com auxílio de um microscópio estereoscópico trinocular e as comportamentais, por meio de

  7. Transcriptional responses in Honey Bee larvae infected with chalkbrood fungus

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    Murray Keith D

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diseases and other stress factors working synergistically weaken honey bee health and may play a major role in the losses of bee populations in recent years. Among a large number of bee diseases, chalkbrood has been on the rise. We present here the experimental identification of honey bee genes that are differentially expressed in response to infection of honey bee larvae with the chalkbrood fungus, Ascosphaera apis. Results We used cDNA-AFLP ®Technology to profile transcripts in infected and uninfected bee larvae. From 64 primer combinations, over 7,400 transcriptionally-derived fragments were obtained A total of 98 reproducible polymorphic cDNA-AFLP fragments were excised and sequenced, followed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR analysis of these and additional samples. We have identified a number of differentially-regulated transcripts that are implicated in general mechanisms of stress adaptation, including energy metabolism and protein transport. One of the most interesting differentially-regulated transcripts is for a chitinase-like enzyme that may be linked to anti-fungal activities in the honey bee larvae, similarly to gut and fat-body specific chitinases found in mosquitoes and the red flour beetle. Surprisingly, we did not find many components of the well-characterized NF-κB intracellular signaling pathways to be differentially-regulated using the cDNA-AFLP approach. Therefore, utilizing qRT-PCR, we probed some of the immune related genes to determine whether the lack of up-regulation of their transcripts in our analysis can be attributed to lack of immune activation or to limitations of the cDNA-AFLP approach. Conclusions Using a combination of cDNA-AFLP and qRT-PCR analyses, we were able to determine several key transcriptional events that constitute the overall effort in the honey bee larvae to fight natural fungal infection. Honey bee transcripts identified in this study are involved in critical

  8. Transcriptional responses in honey bee larvae infected with chalkbrood fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronstein, Katherine A; Murray, Keith D; Saldivar, Eduardo

    2010-06-21

    Diseases and other stress factors working synergistically weaken honey bee health and may play a major role in the losses of bee populations in recent years. Among a large number of bee diseases, chalkbrood has been on the rise. We present here the experimental identification of honey bee genes that are differentially expressed in response to infection of honey bee larvae with the chalkbrood fungus, Ascosphaera apis. We used cDNA-AFLP Technology to profile transcripts in infected and uninfected bee larvae. From 64 primer combinations, over 7,400 transcriptionally-derived fragments were obtained A total of 98 reproducible polymorphic cDNA-AFLP fragments were excised and sequenced, followed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of these and additional samples.We have identified a number of differentially-regulated transcripts that are implicated in general mechanisms of stress adaptation, including energy metabolism and protein transport. One of the most interesting differentially-regulated transcripts is for a chitinase-like enzyme that may be linked to anti-fungal activities in the honey bee larvae, similarly to gut and fat-body specific chitinases found in mosquitoes and the red flour beetle. Surprisingly, we did not find many components of the well-characterized NF-kappaB intracellular signaling pathways to be differentially-regulated using the cDNA-AFLP approach. Therefore, utilizing qRT-PCR, we probed some of the immune related genes to determine whether the lack of up-regulation of their transcripts in our analysis can be attributed to lack of immune activation or to limitations of the cDNA-AFLP approach. Using a combination of cDNA-AFLP and qRT-PCR analyses, we were able to determine several key transcriptional events that constitute the overall effort in the honey bee larvae to fight natural fungal infection. Honey bee transcripts identified in this study are involved in critical functions related to transcriptional regulation, apoptotic

  9. Radiolabeling of infective third-stage larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis by feeding ( sup 75 Se)selenomethionine-labeled Escherichia coli to first- and second-stage larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aikens, L.M.; Schad, G.A. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (USA))

    1989-10-01

    A technique is described for radiolabeling Strongyloides stercoralis larvae with ({sup 75}Se)selenomethionine. Cultures of an auxotrophic methionine-dependent stain of Escherichia coli were grown in a medium containing Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 5% nutrient broth, amino acids, and ({sup 75}Se)selenomethionine. When the {sup 75}Se-labeled bacterial populations were in the stationary phase of growth, cultures were harvested and the bacteria dispersed on agar plates to serve as food for S. stercoralis larvae. Use of nondividing bacteria is important for successful labeling because the isotope is not diluted by cell division and death of larvae attributable to overgrowth by bacteria is prevented. First-stage S. stercoralis larvae were recovered from feces of infected dogs and reared in humid air at 30 C on agar plates seeded with bacteria. After 7 days, infective third-stage larvae were harvested. The mean specific activity of 6 different batches of larvae ranged from 75 to 330 counts per min/larva with 91.8 +/- 9.5% of the population labeled sufficiently to produce an autoradiographic focus during a practicable, 6-wk period of exposure. Labeled infective larvae penetrated the skin of 10-day-old puppies and migrated to the small intestine, where the developed to adulthood.

  10. Alimentação e comportamento de larvas de pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus (Holmberg, 1887 Feeding and behavior of pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus (Holmberg, 1887 larvae

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    Eduardo Lopes Beerli

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Conduziu-se este trabalho com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito da utilização de dietas naturais e artificiais sobre o desempenho e comportamento de larvas de pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus, entre o 2º e o 10º dia de vida. Foram utilizadas 30 caixas plásticas, cada uma com 30 litros de água e renovação contínua, onde as larvas foram mantidas durante o período experimental. Cada caixa recebeu 10 larvas por litro, totalizando 300 larvas/caixa. Foram testados 6 tratamentos, cada qual com 5 repetições. Os tratamentos foram: T1-ração, T2-plâncton, T3-artêmia, T4-plâncton + ração, T5-artêmia + ração e T6-artêmia + plâncton. As larvas foram alimentadas 6 vezes ao dia, nos horários de 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 e 24 horas. A temperatura da água foi mantida constante a 27ºC, o oxigênio dissolvido permaneceu na faixa de 6,16 ± 0,34 e o pH, entre 7,16 ± 0,22. Aos 2, 4, 6, 8 e 10 dias de vida, foram coletadas amostras de 30 larvas para determinação do comprimento total e peso. No final do experimento (10º dia, as larvas que receberam artêmia + plâncton (T6 alcançaram os maiores valores de comprimento total (8,35 mm e peso corporal (3518 µg, em relação a todas as outras dietas testadas. As larvas devem permanecer em laboratório por um período de 6 dias após a eclosão, recebendo alimento do terceiro ao sexto dia. A partir do sexto dia, as larvas estão com a vesícula gasosa completamente inflada e apresentam nado contínuo.The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of natural and artificial diets on the development and behavior of pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus larvae, between the 2nd and 10th day post hatch. The larvaes were kept in 30L - plastic boxes (n = 30 boxes, in constant flow-through. The larvae density was 10 post-larvae/L (300 larvae/box. Six diets with 4 sampling days (4, 6, 8 and 10 days post-hatch, n = 30 larvae using 5 repetitions were tested. The diets were: T1- commercial feed, T2- plancton, T3

  11. Skin penetration of infective hookworm larvae. II. The path of migration of infective larvae of Ancylostoma braziliense in the metacarpal foot pads of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, J C; van der Linden, M E

    1977-11-10

    The hairless metacarpal foot pads of six hookworm-free puppies were exposed to infective larvae of Ancylostoma braziliense. Serial sections of the biopts stained with Harris' haematoxylin and eosin showed that the infective larvae are able to penetrate the toughest region of canine skin. Pores of eccrine sweat glands did not seem to constitute sites of entry and no larvae were detected in these glands. Larvae were only observed in the epidermis. The histopathology of the infected skin of the foot pads of the puppies was similar to that in human skin with "creeping eruption" as described by Fülleborn (1927). The biopts appeared to consist of hairy skin as well. In the unexposed adjacent hairy skin of the foot pads, larvae were also observed. They were found in the epidermis, hair follicle systems and dermis, suggesting that the migration from the epidermis into deeper tissue depends on the presence of the hair follicle systems.

  12. PREVALENCE OF ANISAKID NEMATODE LARVAE INFECTING SOME MARINE FISHES FROM THE LIBYAN COAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Hamed H; Bowashi, Salem Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    This study examined eight hundred ninety six marine fishes belonging to nine different fish species; Synodus saurus; Merluccius merluccius; Trachurus mediterraneus; Serranus cabrilla; Mullus surmuletus; Diplodus annularis; Spicara maena; Siganus rirulatus and Liza ramada. The fishes were bought from fish markets at five different sites on Libyan coast, from January to December 2013, for study the anisakids larvae among them. The results showed that 344/896 fishes (38.4%) were infected with Anisakids larvae. S. saurus was the highly infected (80.9%), followed by T mediterraneus (77.5%) but, S. cabrilla, S. maena, M merluccius, M surmuletus, and D. annularis were least anisakid infected showed rates of 58.2%, 53.8%, 43.7%, 36.7% & 3.6%, respectively. No parasites were in S. rirulatus and L, ramada. Ten species of Anisakids larvae was detected during the present study. Two Pseudoterranova sp. Larvae, two types of Anisakis larvae, Anisakis simplex larva and Anisakis sp. Larva, two types of Contracaecum sp. Larvae and four Hysterothylacium larvae. Females showed higher prevalence than males. The number of anisakid larvae varied according to body length and weight of infected fish, without significant difference between prevalence and seasons, but, a significant difference was between prevalence and regions.

  13. Seasonality of larvae of Brachyura and Anomura (Crustacea Decapoda in the Beagle Channel, Argentina

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    Gustavo A. Lovrich

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the first study in the Beagle Channel that reports the larval seasonal distribution, abundance and duration of the larval stages of Anomura and Brachyura, on the basis of a fortnightly sampling programme. An identification key to the specific level of zoeal stages is included. Between September 1987 and March 1989, 304 plankton samples were taken by means of oblique hauls from the bottom to the sea-surface. Eighty-five percent of the samples were taken shallower than 60 m depth. Decapod larvae occurred only in spring and summer. All but two taxa showed a single cohort of larvae which emerge at the beginning of the spring. A second cohort of Munida spp. and Halicarcinus planatus also occurred during summer. The most abundant taxa were Munida spp. (312 larvae ? 10 m-3, Peltarion spinosulum (288 larvae ? 10 m-3,, H. planatus (143 larvae ? 10 m-3, and Pagurus spp. (79 larvae ? 10 m-3, which represented 97% of the total larvae collected. Larvae of Pinnotheridae, Eurypodius latreillii, Libidoclaea granaria, and Paralomis granulosa were about an order of magnitude less abundant. Relative abundances of larvae correspond to relative abundances of the respective benthic stages. The absence of certain larval stages or of certain species (Acanthocyclus albatrossis and Lithodes santolla probably indicates their differential distribution within the Beagle Channel. Particularly, lithodid larvae may have benthic or epibenthic habits.

  14. Transmission of a Gammabaculovirus within Cohorts of Balsam Fir Sawfly (Neodiprion abietis Larvae

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    Christopher J. Lucarotti

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPV: Gammabaculovirus: Baculoviridae of diprionid sawflies (Diprionidae: Hymenoptera are highly host specific and only infect the midgut epithelium. While still alive, infected sawfly larvae excrete NPV-laden diarrhea that contaminates food sources. The diarrhea can then be consumed by conspecific larvae, resulting in rapid horizontal transmission of the virus. To better understand the efficacy of Gammabaculovirus-based biological control products, the horizontal spread of such a virus (NeabNPV within cohorts of balsam fir sawfly (Neodiprion abietis larvae was studied by introducing NeabNPV-treated larvae into single-cohort groups at densities similar to those observed during the increasing (field study and peak (laboratory study phases of an outbreak. In field studies (~200 N. abietis larvae/m2 of balsam fir (Abies balsamea foliage, NeabNPV-induced mortality increased positively in a density-dependent manner, from 23% (in control groups to 51% with the addition of one first-instar NeabNPV-treated larva, to 84% with 10 first–instar-treated larvae. Mortality was 60% and 63% when one or 10 NeabNPV-treated third-instar larva(e, respectively, were introduced into groups. Slightly higher levels of NeabNPV-induced mortality occurring when NeabNPV-treated larvae were introduced into first- rather than third-instar cohorts suggests that early instars are more susceptible to the virus. In the laboratory (~1330 N. abietis larvae/ m2 of foliage, NeabNPV-caused mortality increased from 20% in control groups to over 80% with the introduction of one, five or 10 NeabNPV-treated larvae into treatment groups of first-instar larvae.

  15. Predatory efficiency of the sewage drain inhabiting larvae of Toxorhynchites splendens Wiedemann on Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Armigeres subalbatus (Coquillett) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditya, Gautam; Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Kundu, Niloy; Kar, Pradip Kumar; Saha, Goutam Kumar

    2007-09-01

    The rate of predation by stage IV instar Toxorhynchites splendens larvae on the equivalent instar stage larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus and Armigeres subalbatus, co-occurring in sewage drains, were noted for a period of three consecutive days in the laboratory using different prey densities and combinations. The rate of predation varied by age of the predator, density of prey, and prey type. The number of Ar. subalbatus larvae consumed by a single Tx. splendens larva ranged between 0.50 +/- 0.71 and 16.40 +/- 2.01; while for Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae, the number consumed ranged from 0.20 +/- 0.42 to 20.40 +/- 1.43 per day. The pupation rates of the prey species varied in respect to control, with a minimum of 0.20 +/- 0.42 pupa/day to a maximum of 12.20 +/- 2.30 pupa/day in the presence of Tx. splendens. The values for the controls were 1.00 +/- 0.87 and 14.44 +/- 2.83 pupa/day, respectively. Irrespective of prey densities and combinations, a single Tx. splendens fourth instar larvae was found to consume on average 10.07 larvae on the first day 16.57 larvae on the second day and 4.38 larvae on the third day, killing a total of 17.70 to 45.10 larvae, in three days. In the presence of Tx. splendens, the cumulative pupation, irrespective of prey, remained between 12.20 and 45.10, and differed significantly from control where the values were between 13.90 and 54.70. The results indicate that Tx. splendens can significantly reduce immature numbers and lower the rate of pupation of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ar. subalbatus. Tx. splendens may be a potential biological resource in the control of mosquitoes inhabiting sewage drains.

  16. Description of the third instar larva of Megadytes latus (Fabricius (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, with an identification key for described larvae of the genus Descrição da larva de terceiro ínstar de Megadytes latus (Fabricius (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae

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    Nelson Ferreira-Jr

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The last instar larva of M. latus (Fabricius, 1801 is described and figured, based on reared specimens from Serra dos Órgãos, Teresópolis, state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some notes on the biotope are provided.A larva de terceiro ínstar de M. latus (Fabricius, 1801 é descrita e ilustrada, baseado em espécimes criados da Serra dos Órgãos, Teresópolis, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. Algumas notas acerca do biótopo onde as larvas foram coletadas são incluídas.

  17. Nematode larvae infecting Priacanthus arenatus Cuvier, 1829 (Pisces: Teleostei in Brazil

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    BIANCA P. KURAIEM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available From July to December, 2013, thirty Priacanthus arenatus specimens commercialized in the cities of Niterói and Rio de Janeiro, State of Rio de Janeiro, were acquired. The fish were necropsied and filleted to investigate the presence of nematode larvae. Twenty fish (66.7% out of the total were parasitized by nematode larvae. A total of 2024 larvae were collected; among them, 30 third-instar larvae of Anisakis sp. showed prevalence (P = 20%, mean abundance (MA = 1, and the mean intensity (MI = 5, and infection sites (IS = caecum, stomach, liver, and mesentery; and 1,994 third-instar larvae (1,757 encysted and 237 free of Hysterothylacium deardorffoverstreetorum with P = 66.7%, MA = 66.5, and MI = 99.7, and IS = spleen, caecum, stomach, liver, mesentery, and abdominal muscle. This is the first study to report H. deardorffoverstreetorum and Anisakis sp. larvae parasitizing P. arenatus.

  18. Molecular Identification of Onchocerca spp. Larvae in Simulium damnosum sensu lato Collected in Northern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verocai, Guilherme G; Hassan, Hassan K; Lakwo, Thomson; Habomugisha, Peace; Katabarwa, Moses N; Begumisa, Stephen; Clouds, Philbert; Katamanywa, James; Nahabwe, Christine; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the presence of larvae of other filarial species in Simulium damnosum sensu lato can distort estimates of transmission potential for Onchocerca volvulus in West Africa. However, studies conducted in foci of onchocerciasis in West Central Uganda indicated that larvae other than O. volvulus were not common in vectors collected there. Recent data collected in Northern Uganda revealed a striking discordance between estimates of the prevalence of flies carrying O. volvulus infective larvae obtained from molecular pool screening and dissection methods. To resolve this discrepancy, sequences from three mitochondrially encoded genes were analyzed from the larvae collected by dissection. All larvae analyzed were Onchocerca ochengi v. Siisa, a parasite of cattle, or Onchocerca ramachandrini, a parasite of warthogs. These results suggest that nonhuman parasite larvae are common in vectors in Northern Uganda, underscoring the necessity for molecular identification methods to accurately estimate O. volvulus transmission.

  19. Histological and immunological reaction of cattle skin to first-instar larvae of Dermatobia hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Sequeira, T C; Sequeira, J L; Schmitt, F L; De Lello, E

    1996-10-01

    Six cattle that had earlier exposure to Dermatobia hominis were infested experimentally with first-instar larvae of the parasite. Skin biopsies taken at intervals were studied in wax and in plastic sections. The avidin-biotin-peroxidase method was used to detect the presence and localization of host immunoglobulins (Igs) G and M and antigens of first and second instar larvae of Dermatobia hominis. The larvae penetrated actively through the skin and migrated towards the subcutaneous tissues. The great numbers of eosinophils suggest that they are the most important cell in mediating damage to D. hominis larvae. The immunoglobulins bound only to dead or moulting larvae in which access to binding sites may have been altered. This could represent a morphological manifestation of a mechanism that protects larvae from the host immune response. Large amounts of soluble antigens detected along the fistulous tract may be important in the maintenance of this tract by distributing the normal cicatrization process.

  20. Coral larvae settle at a higher frequency on red surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, B.; Beard, M.; Miller, M. W.

    2011-09-01

    Although chemical cues serve as the primary determinants of larval settlement and metamorphosis, light is also known to influence the behavior and the settlement of coral planulae. For example, Porites astreoides planulae settle preferentially on unconditioned red substrata. In order to test whether this behavior was a response to color and whether other species also demonstrate color preference, settlement choice experiments were conducted with P. astreoides and Acropora palmata. In these experiments, larvae were offered various types of plastic substrata representing three to seven different color choices. Both species consistently settled on red (or red and orange) substrata at a higher frequency than other colors. In one experiment, P. astreoides settled on 100% of red, plastic cable ties but failed to settle on green or white substrata. In a second experiment, 24% of larvae settled on red buttons, more than settled on six other colors combined. A. palmata settled on 80% of red and of orange cables ties but failed to settle on blue in one experiment and settled on a greater proportion of red acrylic squares than on four other colors or limestone controls in a second experiment. The consistency of the response across a variety of plastic materials suggests the response is related to long-wavelength photosensitivity. Fluorescence and reflectance spectra of experimental substrata demonstrated that the preferred substrata had spectra dominated by wavelengths greater than 550 nm with little or no reflection or emission of shorter wavelengths. These results suggest that some species of coral larvae may use spectral cues for fine-scale habitat selection during settlement. This behavior may be an adaptation to promote settlement in crustose coralline algae (CCA)-dominated habitats facilitating juvenile survival.

  1. Ontogeny of redox regulation in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamre, Kristin; Penglase, Samuel J; Rasinger, Josef D; Skjærven, Kaja H; Olsvik, Pål A

    2014-08-01

    The reduction potential of a cell is related to its fate. Proliferating cells are more reduced than those that are differentiating, whereas apoptotic cells are generally the most oxidized. Glutathione is considered the most important cellular redox buffer and the average reduction potential (Eh) of a cell or organism can be calculated from the concentrations of glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG). In this study, triplicate groups of cod larvae at various stages of development (3 to 63 days post-hatch; dph) were sampled for analyses of GSSG/2GSH concentrations, together with activities of antioxidant enzymes and expression of genes encoding proteins involved in redox metabolism. The concentration of total GSH (GSH+GSSG) increased from 610 ± 100 to 1260 ± 150 μmol/kg between 7 and 14 dph and was then constant until 49 dph, after which it decreased to 810 ± 100 μmol/kg by 63 dph. The 14- to 49-dph period, when total GSH concentrations were stable, coincides with the proposed period of metamorphosis in cod larvae. The concentration of GSSG comprised approximately 1% of the total GSH concentration and was stable throughout the sampling series. This resulted in a decreasing Eh from -239 ± 1 to -262 ± 7 mV between 7 and 14 dph, after which it remained constant until 63 dph. The changes in GSH and Eh were accompanied by changes in the expression of several genes involved in redox balance and signaling, as well as changes in activities of antioxidant enzymes, with the most dynamic responses occurring in the early phase of cod larval development. It is hypothesized that metamorphosis in cod larvae starts with the onset of mosaic hyperplasia in the skeletal muscle at approximately 20 dph (6.8mm standard length (SL)) and ends with differentiation of the stomach and disappearance of the larval finfold at 40 to 50 dph (10-15 mm SL). Thus, metamorphosis in cod larvae seems to coincide with high and stable total concentrations of GSH. Copyright © 2014 The

  2. [Cutaneous larva migrans in Turkey: an imported case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmezer, Meliha Çağla; Erdinç, Şebnem; Tülek, Necla; Babür, Cahit; Büyükdemirci, Ayşe; İlgar, Tuba; Ertem, Günay

    2017-01-01

    Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) is a parasitic infection most commonly found in tropical and subtropical areas. However, with the ease and increase of foreign travel to many countries around the world, the infection is not limited to these areas. CLM is an erythematous, serpiginous infection with skin eruption caused by percutaneous penetration of the larvae to the skin. In this report, a case diagnosed as imported CLM after an Amazon trip and treated with albendazole was presented. A 36 year-old male patient admitted to infectious diseases clinic with intense itching, erythematous, raised, streaklike serpiginious eruptionand some redness at bilateral foot especially at the right foot for about one week. The patient was living in Turkey, and travelled to Brazil for an Amazon trip three months ago and the lesions began immediately after this occasion. CLM was diagnosed with the typical lesions in the patient and oral albendazole treatment 2 x 400 mg/day for 3 consecutive days was carried out with oral amoxicillin/clavulanat 3 x 1 g/day for the secondary bacterial infection. The patient responded very well to oral albendazole treatment with a result of a rapid improvementof pruritus in days and no side effect was observed during the treatment period.After discharge, during his controlit was seenthat the lesions were regressed with leaving hyperpigmentation. In cases with cutaneous larva migrans, diagnosis is often made by the presence of pruritic typical lesions and tunnels, travel story to endemic regions, the story of barefoot contact with sand and soil in these regions, and the sun tanning story on the beach. The lesions are often seen in the lower extremities, especially in the dorsal and plantar surface of the foot. Laboratory findings are not specific. Temporary peripheral eosinophilia can be seen and biopsy can be done to confirm the diagnosis but usually no parasite is seen in the histopathological examination. Contact dermatitis, bacterial and fungal skin

  3. Sex Reversal on Congo Tetra Fish (Micraleptus intterruptus Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harton Arfah

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTExperiment was performed to assess the effect of 17a-methyltestosterone (MT treatment on Congo tetra fish larvae.  To evaluate the optimal pattern of MT treatment, three different treatments were administrated.  Three months old larvae were submerged in three different doses of MT; 1, 2 and 4 mg/l.  These studies showed that the highest percentage of male fish was obtained by 4 mg/l MT treatment, 87,17%.  The 2 mg/l and 1 mg/l MT treatments obtained 77,53% and 69,86% male respectively, two times higher than control, 38,96%.  On the other hand, the 4 mg/l MT treatment also resulted the highest percentage of hermaphrodite fishes, 17,58%.  The highest survival rate was shown by 1 mg/l MT treatment, 62,77% and the lowest was shown by the 4 mg/l MT treatment, 47,20%.  The highest rate of fish length and weight was shown by the 4 mg/l MT treatment, 4,4 cm and 1,65 gram respectively.  These findings suggest that MT treatment offers an advantage in growth of  tetra Congo larvae. Key word :  Sex reversal, methyltestosterone, Congo tetra fish, Micraleptus intterruptus. ABSTRAKPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh perendaman larva di dalam larutan hormon 17a-metiltestosteron pada dosis 1, 2 dan 4 mg/l larutan.  Persentase tertinggi ikan jantan dihasilkan  oleh perlakuan 4 mg/l, yaitu 87,17%.  Perlakuan 2 mg/l dan 1 mg/l masing-masing menghasilkan 77,53% dan 69,86% sedangkan kontrol menghasilkan 38,96% jantan.  Efek lain dari perlakuan MT ini adalah hermafroditisme.  Perlakuan 4 mg/l menghasilkan persentase hermafrodit tertinggi yaitu 17,58%, sedangkan pada kontrol kelangsungan hidup tertinggi diperoleh pada perlakuan 1 mg/l (62,77% dan terendah pada perlakuan 4 mg/l (47,20%.  Hasil tersebut menunjukkan adanya pengaruh dosis hormon terhadap kelangsungan hidup ikan.  Pengukuran bobot dan panjang ikan pada setiap perlakuan menunjukkan nilai tertinggi dihasilkan oleh perlakuan 4 mg/l  yaitu 1,65 gram dan 4,40 cm.  Hal

  4. Development to metamorphosis of the nemertean pilidium larva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maslakova Svetlana A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nemertean pilidium is one of the most notable planktotrophic larval types among marine invertebrates. The juvenile forms inside the larva from a series of isolated rudiments, called the imaginal discs. The development culminates in catastrophic metamorphosis, in which the larval body is consumed by the juvenile worm. Although the pilidium was first described in 1847, and is commonly found among marine plankton, there is not a single complete description of its development. The few published studies of pilidial development are based on observations of typically unidentified larvae opportunistically collected from plankton at various developmental stages. Results The development of Micrura alaskensis, a common Northwest Pacific coast intertidal nemertean, is described from fertilization to metamorphosis. A staging scheme is proposed based on characteristic developmental milestones. Three pairs of imaginal discs develop as invaginations of larval epidermis. The cephalic discs invaginate from the larval epidermis above the ciliated band, while the cerebral organ discs and the trunk discs invaginate below the ciliated band. All paired imaginal disc invaginations are closely associated with different portions of the larval ciliated band. In addition, two unpaired rudiments contribute to the juvenile - the proboscis rudiment and the dorsal rudiment, which do not develop as invaginations. A pair of thick-walled esophageal pouches previously thought to represent nephridial rudiments give rise to the juvenile foregut. Branched rudiments of protonephridia, and their efferent ducts are also described. Larval and juvenile serotonergic nervous systems are briefly described. Development of the juvenile is completed by 5-8 weeks at 11-15 degrees C. During the rapid metamorphosis the juvenile emerges from and devours the larva. Conclusions This study is the first description of pilidial development from fertilization to metamorphosis in a

  5. Description of Larva and redescription of Pupa and Adult of Palpomyia guarani (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    OpenAIRE

    María M Ronderos; Spinelli,Gustavo R; Florentina Díaz

    2004-01-01

    The larva of Palpomyia guarani Lane, 1946 is described and illustrated by using a phase-contrast and Scanning Electron Microscope, and pupa and adult redescribed by using a phase-contrast stereoscope. Immatures were collected breeding in a tree hole in Bella Vista, Paraguay. Larvae have character states typical of carnivorous larvae. The species is compared with its similar congener Palpomyia columbiana Kieffer, and this record constitutes the first one from Paraguay.Se describe e ilustra la ...

  6. Descrição da larva de Erythemis mithroides (Brauer e notas sobre outras larvas conhecidas do gênero (Odonata, Libellulidae Description of the larva of Erythemis mithroides (Brauer and notes on other known larvae of the genus (Odonata, Libellulidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Costa

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The last instar larva of Erythemis mithroides (Brauer, 1900 is described and figured based on exuviae of reared specimens. A comparative analysis of this immature stage and the known larvae of the genus are furnished according to the data available in the literature and of specimens of E credula (Hagen, 1861 and E. vesiculosa (Fab., 1775 permiting a diagnose for the larvae of the genus Erylhemis Hagen, 1861.

  7. Insecticidal activity of some essential oils against larvae of Spodoptera littoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavela, Roman

    2005-12-01

    Thirty-four essential oils were tested for insecticidal activity (fumigation or topical application) against larvae Spodoptera littoralis. Twenty essential oils applied by fumigation were highly toxic to the third instar of S. littoralis larvae. Two essential oils Nepeta cataria and Thuja occidentalis were highly toxic, with LC50cataria, S. sclarea, O. vulgare, O. compactum, Melissa officinalis, T. mastichina, and Lavandula angustifolia were highly toxic with LD50 < or =0.05 microl/larvae.

  8. Gastrointestinal symptoms resembling ulcerative proctitis caused by larvae of the drone fly Eristalis tenax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Gaillard, Julien; Borée-Moreau, Diane; Bailly, Éric; Andres, Christian R; Chandenier, Jacques

    2014-04-01

    We report a case of facultative intestinal myiasis due to larvae of the drone fly Eristalis tenax, also named the rat-tailed maggots. The development of larvae in the lower bowel was responsible for non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms that resembled ulcerative proctitis. The diagnosis was established upon the observation of four spontaneously excreted mobile larvae. The definite identification of the E. tenax species was made possible by scanning electron microscopy. The clinical outcome was satisfactory.

  9. Effects of Foodstuffs on Intestinal Length in Larvae of Rhacophorus arboreus (Anura: Rhacophoridae) : Developmental Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Shinri, Horiuchi; Yutaka, Koshida; Department of Biology, College of General Education, Osaka University

    1989-01-01

    Correlation between foodstuffs and intestinal length was examined in larvae of Rhacophorus arboreus (Anura: Rhacophoridae). The larva, being heterophagous, has a tube-like intestine provided with neither epithelial outfoldings nor villi, and intestinal length is found to be a good morphological index of digestive and absorptive functions of the intestine. The results obtained were summarized as follows: The grown larva fed on boiled spinach had an intestine more than 1.5 times as long as that...

  10. Infection of North Sea cod, Gadus morhua L., larvae with the parasitic nematode Hysterothylacium aduncum Rudolphi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Alf; Bahlool, Qusay Z. M.; Munk, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of 2197 cod larvae and post-larvae collected in the North Sea revealed high prevalence of infection with a parasitic anisakid nematode identified morphologically and genetically as Hysterothylacium aduncum. Nematodes were third stage larvae and were almost exclusively found in the b...... in the body cavity and they were never encapsulated. Prevalence increased significantly from 1992 to 2001 concomitantly with increased sea temperature. The possibility that the extent of parasitism is influenced by temperature change is discussed....

  11. Discontinuous foraging behavior of necrophagous Lucilia sericata (Meigen 1826) (Diptera Calliphoridae) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charabidze, Damien; Hedouin, Valery; Gosset, Didier

    2013-03-01

    Larvae of the necrophagous Blowfly Lucilia sericata (Diptera Calliphoridae) live on vertebrate cadavers. Although continuously feeding was previously assumed for this species, we hypothesized that larvae do not feed constantly. According to this hypothesis, their crop should not always be full, which should be reflected in crop surfaces. We dissected and measured the crops of larvae of the same age and bred in the same conditions. Crop surfaces of 117 larvae just removed from the food ranged from 0 to 16.6 mm(2) (mean=5.325±2.84 mm(2)). The distribution of these crop surfaces indicates a continuous variation of satiation/feeding activity in the population. Starving experiments showed a quite long digestive process. After 90 min of starving, the decrease in crop surfaces became obvious, but 150 min were necessary to observe more than a half of the population with an empty crop (less than 2 mm(2)). No more differences were observed after 150, 180 and 240 min of starving. We finally used starved larvae to observe the kinetic of food absorption and the duration of the food-intake phase. Our results indicates that larvae can ingest faster than they digest. After 5 min spent in the food, 70% of the larvae had a crop surface larger or equal to 8 mm(2). We observed for the first time an over-feeding of the larvae, with high crop surfaces overrepresented compared to larvae never starved (control). Together, these results indicate that larvae do not feed continuously, and regulate their foraging behavior. We propose that the foraging behavior of the larvae creates a permanent movement inside the larval masses. This turnover/scramble competition may be linked to the larval-mass effect, i.e. the local temperature increase observed in large necrophagous larvae aggregates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prey Selection by African Catfish Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822) Larvae Fed Different Feeding Regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Yilmaz, Erdal; Bozkurt, Ahmet; GÖKÇEK, Kaya

    2006-01-01

    Live prey selection by African catfish, Clarias gariepinus, larvae was examined under laboratory conditions. Larvae were offered plankton, plankton + trout starter (TS) and plankton + betaine supplemented trout diet (BTS) for 7 days after exogenous feeding. Five larvae were sampled to determine their gut contents and selectivity index for each treatment 15 min after the feeding. It was observed that dry diets (TS and BTS) improved the growth (P < 0.05), but did not significantly influe...

  13. House fly oviposition inhibition by larvae ofHermetia illucens, the black soldier fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, S W; Sheppard, D C

    1984-06-01

    Wild populations of house flies were inhibited from ovipositing into poultry manure containing larvae of the black soldier fly,Hermetia illucens (L.). A laboratory strain of house fly responded differently, readily ovipositing into manure with lower densities of soldier fly larvae, but avoiding the higher densities tested. The amount of timeH. illucens larvae occupy the manure prior to an oviposition test influences ovipositional responses of house flies. Manure conditioned byH. illucens larvae for 4-5 days did not significantly inhibit house fly oviposition. We suggest that some type of interspecific chemical communication (allomone) is present.

  14. Vertical migrations of herring, Clupea harengus, larvae in relation to light and prey distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter; Kiørboe, Thomas; Christensen, Villy

    1989-01-01

    The influence of light and prey abundance on the vertical distribution of herring larvae was evaluated by three investigations made under calm weather conditions in the North Sea off the Scottish coast. The investigations took place at different time after hatching and the vertical distributions...... towards the surface at dawn larvae stayed in the upper water column during the day. The observations suggest that the daytime vertical distribution of larvae in calm weather is mainly determined by feeding conditions: the larvae move to depths were light is sufficient for feeding, and refinement within...

  15. RNAi-mediated silencing of a novel Ascaris suum gene expression in infective larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, M J; Chen, N; Song, H Q; Lin, R Q; Huang, C Q; Yuan, Z G; Zhu, X Q

    2010-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of RNA interference (RNAi) as a gene silencing tool and the resultant effects on Ascaris suum larval development was examined by targeting a gene (represented by the EST 06G09) specifically expressed in the infective larvae of A. suum. BALB/c mice were infected with RNAi-treated larvae. The results showed that the target gene was silenced after soaking for 72 h, and the survival rate of the RNAi-treated larvae was reduced by 17.25% (Psuum larvae.

  16. Fused embryos and pre-metamorphic conjoined larvae in a broadcast spawning reef coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Lei, Xin-Ming; Liu, Sheng; Huang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of embryos or larvae prior to metamorphosis is rarely known to date in colonial marine organisms. Here, we document for the first time that the embryos of the broadcast spawning coral Platygyra daedalea could fuse during blastulation and further develop into conjoined larvae, and the settlement of conjoined larvae immediately resulted in inborn juvenile colonies. Fusion of embryos might be an adaptive strategy to form pre-metamorphic chimeric larvae and larger recruits, thereby promoting early survival. However, future studies are needed to explore whether and to what extent fusion of coral embryos occurs in the field, and fully evaluate its implications.

  17. Axenic growth in vitro of Ancylostoma duodenale to the filariform (resting) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Naggar, H M; Abou-Zakham, A A; Romia, S M; Hegazi, M M; el-Khouly, E S

    1991-04-01

    Large numbers of free-living stages of Ancylostoma duodenale can be grown in vitro on formalin-killed Escherichia coli supplemented with cholesterol and Dulbecco's minimum essential medium (DMEN). Eggs at 28 degrees C hatched and released first-stage larvae in 24 hr. First-stage larvae molted in 36 hr. at 28 degrees C. Second-stage larvae, molted in 2-3 days at 28 degrees C, but retained the old cuticle. Third-stage larvae characterized by the presence of a buccal cap capsule; sheath; filariform esophagus and absence of lips. Lateral alae were observed in all free-living stages.

  18. Description of the third instar larvae of five species of Cyclocephala (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Dynastinae from Mexico

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    Miguel A. Morón

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Description of the third instar larvae of five species of Cyclocephala (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Dynastinae from Mexico. Larvae of four species of Cyclocephala are described for the first time based on specimens collected in Mexican localities: C. barrerai Martínez, 1969 from Puebla, C. sinaloae Howden & Endrödi, 1966 from Sinaloa, C. fasciolata Bates, 1888 from Veracruz, and C. jalapensis Casey, 1915 from Hidalgo. Larva of C. lunulata Burmeister, 1847, is redescribed based on specimens from the Mexican states of Morelos, Puebla, and Veracruz. Diagnostic structures are illustrated and the differences and similarities of each species with other previously described larvae of the genus are commented.

  19. Cutaneous larva migrans in northern climates. A souvenir of your dream vacation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelglass, J W; Douglass, M C; Stiefler, R; Tessler, M

    1982-09-01

    Three young women recently returned to the metropolitan Detroit area with cutaneous larva migrans. All three had vacationed at a popular club resort on the Caribbean island of Martinique. Cutaneous larva migrans is frequently seen in the southern United States, Central and South America, and other subtropical areas but rarely in northern climates. Several organisms can cause cutaneous larva migrans, or creeping eruption. The larvae of the nematode Ancylostoma braziliense are most often the causative organisms. Travel habits of Americans make it necessary for practitioners in northern climates to be familiar with diseases contracted primarily in warmer locations. The life cycle of causative organisms and current therapy are reviewed.

  20. The use of morphological and histological features as nutritional condition indices of Pagrus pagrus larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Vera Diaz

    Full Text Available Morphometrical and histological techniques were employed to characterize Pagrus pagrus larvae nutritional condition. Larvae were reared in laboratory under controlled conditions with the main objective of testing whether these methodologies allowed finding differences between larvae from different feeding treatments. Once yolk was consumed (three days after hatching larvae were assigned to a feeding treatment: starved during the whole experiment; delayed feeding, starved during three days; fed during the entire experiment. Algae (Nannochloropsis oculata and rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis were provided to larvae for feed treatments. Larvae were fixed daily; for morphometrical purposes in 5% formaldehyde solution, and in Bouin for histological sections. Results herein obtained showed that both methodologies are sensitive enough to distinguish larvae characterized by different nutritional condition states obtained from the feeding treatments. Consequently, these methodologies could be employed in wild red porgy larvae in order to asses their nutritional condition. These techniques could also be employed to check larval quality obtained with aquaculture purposes to estimate the effects of changes in rearing protocols or kind of food supply and thus, to guaranty a higher survival of early developmental stages of reared larvae.

  1. Description of the final stadium larva of Heliocypha perforata perforata (Percheron), with discussion of the taxonomic characters of the larvae of the genus Heliocypha Fraser (Odonata: Zygoptera: Chlorocyphidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi-Han

    2015-03-04

    The final stadium larva of Heliocypha perforata perforata is described and illustrated for the first time. It is characterized by having a row of filiform setae present laterally on distal half of prementum, 6-7 setae on the outer side of palpal lobe, very long lateral gills and distinct abdominal color pattern. The taxonomic characters of the larvae of the genus Heliocypha Fraser are discussed and summarized. Heliocypha larvae share a high similarity with Rhinocypha in general appearance and cannot be clearly distinguished from the latter in structure.

  2. Surto de larva migrans cutnea em uma creche de belo horizonte, minas gerais (Brasil Outbreak of cutaneous Larva migrans in a private nursery in Belo Horizonte, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Dos Santos Lima

    1984-04-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho relata a ocorrência de um surto de Larva migrans cutânea, em 17 crianças de uma creche em Belo Horizonte, MG. As crianças adquiriram esta dermatose quando brincavam em uma caixa de areia contaminada com larvas infectantes de ancilostomídeos de cão.An outbreak of cutaneous Larva migrans in six months to four years old children in a private nursery in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, is reported. The source of infection was a sand box contaminated with dog faeces.

  3. Redescripción de la Larva y la Pupa de Toxorhynchites ( Lynchiella guadeloupensis (Diptera: Culicidae Redescription of the larva and pupa of Toxorhynchites ( Lynchiella guadeloupensis (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucrecia M. Augier

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de la presente contribución es redescribir, en forma completa, la quetotaxia de larva y pupa de Toxorhynchites guadeloupensis (Dyar & Knab. Además se describe por primera vez el aparato bucal de la larva. El material estudiado procede de la provincia de Tucumán en el noroeste argentino.The objetive of the present contribution is to redescribe the quetotaxia of the larva and the pupa of Toxorhynchites guadeloupensis (Dyar & Knab. The larval mouthpart is described for the first time. The material examined is from Tucumán province in the Argentina northwestern.

  4. Iodine binding in the endostyle of larvae Branchiostoma lanceolatum (Cephalochordata)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredriksson, G.; Ericson, L.E.; Olsson, R.

    1984-11-01

    The asymmetrical endostyle of Branchiostoma larvae contains two different zones of mucus-producing cells which metamorphose to the paired zones 2 and 4 respectively in the endostyle of the adult. In both the larva and the adult these zones are parts of the food-trapping mechanism. An endostyle zone, which has a position corresponding to that of the paired iodinating zones in the endostyle of the adult, binds iodine selectively. The ultrastructure and labeling pattern indicate that the labeled cells in the larval endostyle belong to functionally different types. In one region of the iodinating zone iodine is mainly bound extracellularly at the apical cell surface. Also in the second region grains are located at the apical cell surface as well as over the cytoplasm and extracellularly at the basal plasma membrane. It is possible that iodination takes place in the lumen close to cells in the first region and that the labeled product is taken up and eventually released by cells of the second region. Our observations show that this primitive endostyle already has iodinating capacity and may synthesize and release thyroid hormones.

  5. The hemolymph proteome of fed and starved Drosophila larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Handke

    Full Text Available The co-operation of specialized organ systems in complex multicellular organisms depends on effective chemical communication. Thus, body fluids (like blood, lymph or intraspinal fluid contain myriads of signaling mediators apart from metabolites. Moreover, these fluids are also of crucial importance for immune and wound responses. Compositional analyses of human body fluids are therefore of paramount diagnostic importance. Further improving their comprehensiveness should increase our understanding of inter-organ communication. In arthropods, which have trachea for gas exchange and an open circulatory system, the single dominating interstitial fluid is the hemolymph. Accordingly, a detailed analysis of hemolymph composition should provide an especially comprehensive picture of chemical communication and defense in animals. Therefore we used an extensive protein fractionation workflow in combination with a discovery-driven proteomic approach to map out the detectable protein composition of hemolymph isolated from Drosophila larvae. Combined mass spectrometric analysis revealed more than 700 proteins extending far beyond the previously known Drosophila hemolymph proteome. Moreover, by comparing hemolymph isolated from either fed or starved larvae, we provide initial provisional insights concerning compositional changes in response to nutritional state. Storage proteins in particular were observed to be strongly reduced by starvation. Our hemolymph proteome catalog provides a rich basis for data mining, as exemplified by our identification of potential novel cytokines, as well as for future quantitative analyses by targeted proteomics.

  6. Decapod larvae dynamics on Berlengas Biosphere Reserve (UNESCO - Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lénia Da Fonseca Alexandre Rato

    2014-05-01

    Total decapoda abundance ranged from 0,06 ind.m-3 in May 2011 to 64,28ind.m-3 in August 2012, and significantly different between summer/winter and winter/spring months (P(perm≤0,05. The data obtained on this study revealed that Infraorders Brachyura, Anomura and Caridea are the most common. All three are significantly different between months (P(perm≤0,05 but not between sampling stations (P(perm>0,05. Brachyuran abundance was significantly affected by the Oceanograhic Conditions (P(perm≤0,05. Abundances were higher in spring and summer months, when Chlorophyl a values (mg.m-3, Temperature (ºC and Salinity (ppt were also higher. Decapoda community is directly affected by the surrounding environmental conditions in Berlengas Biosphere Reserve and abundance might also be related with specific larvae release throughout the year. Each sampling station was considered a replica from the study area. The ecological importance of Berlengas was also verified by the presence of non-frequent larvae of Achelata and Stomatopoda.

  7. Cranial features of dendrobatid larvae (Amphibia: Anura: Dendrobatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, A

    1995-06-01

    The larval neurocranium and visceral arches of seven dendrobatid species representing four genera are described, based on cleared-and-stained and serially sectioned specimens. A variety of characters is shared by all seven species. Larval features do not substantiate the assumption of close ranoid affinities of the Dendrobatidae. Instead dendrobatid larvae share features such as the special quadripartite cartilago suprarostralis, the lack of the larval processus oticus, the presence of three foramina acustica, and the lack of a foramen perilymphaticum accessorius with many bufonoid larvae. The first of these characters is unique to bufonids, hylids, dendrobatids, and some New World leptodactylids; the other characters also occur in pelobatids and are presumably plesiomorphic for the Neobatrachia. The free proximal ends of Ceratobranchialia II and III are an autapomorphy of the Dendrobatidae supporting the monophyly of the family. Some features of the cranium are paedomorphic: low cartilago orbitalis, lack of connection between cartilage orbitalis and otic capsule (most species), and vestigal taeniae tecti. New anatomical terms are introduced.

  8. TEKNOLOGI PEMELIHARAAN LARVA KERAPU SUNU (Plectropomus leopardus SECARA MASSAL

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    Titiek Aslianti

    2016-12-01

    Seed production technology of leopard coral trout, Plectropomus leopardus by improving hatchery management had been conducted in order to increase survival rate and to produce seed continuity. The initial feeding can successfully support in larval rearing. Feed organism as rotifer, trochophore gonad, egg yolk emulsion, and artificial feed emulsion, had been used as an initial feed. The twelve of concrete tanks with 6 m3 capacity were stocked with coral trout eggs at density 100,000—150,000 eggs/tank. Artemia nauplii, artificial feed, and mysid as feed, start on larvae D20 up to juvenile stage (D45. Growth rate and survival rate were observed and calculated when the experiment was terminated. The data was analyzed by descriptive. Nutrition value of food was analyzed by proximate and fatty acid composition. The others parameters such as deformity and water quality were observed. The result showed that artificial feed emulsion and egg yolk emulsion as an initial feeding can be improve the growth rate and increase survival rate of larvae. The range of total length, body weight and survival rate of the seed i.e. 1.95—2.85 cm; 0.64—0.73 g, and 0.25%— 3.97% with the daily growth rate 3,9%—4,22%, respectively. No back bone deformity in the seed, that is 21—23 segments with interspaces of segments 0.030—0.036 mm.

  9. Histomorphogenesis of cranial nerves in Huso huso larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavighi, Sherma; Saadatfar, Zohreh; Shojaei, Bahador; Behnam Rassouli, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    In this study the cranial nerves development of H. huso are explained from 1 to 54-days-old (1, 3, 6, 15, 21 and 54 days). Despite all the researches on fish brain, there are no study on nerves evolution on H. huso during their larvae life. For this research 40 samples of larvae H. huso were obtained (from each age, about six samples were selected). The specimens were maintained in fiberglass tank, then histological samples were taken from tissues and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for general histological studies using light microscope. According to the results, on 1 and 3-days-old, no nerve was observed. The terminal nerve and their dendrites were observed around the nasal cavity and the axons projected to different areas in forebrain especially around olfactory bulb diffusely, on 6-day-old fish. Also, olfactory, optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, lateral line and vagus nerves were detected on 6-day-old fish, however two parts of lateral line nerve were separated on 54-day-old. Three nerves, profundus, facial and octaval were observed on 54-day-old, however, up to this age, epiphysial nerve was not observed.

  10. Otolith geochemistry does not reflect dispersal history of clownfish larvae

    KAUST Repository

    Berumen, Michael L.

    2010-07-01

    Natural geochemical signatures in calcified structures are commonly employed to retrospectively estimate dispersal pathways of larval fish and invertebrates. However, the accuracy of the approach is generally untested due to the absence of individuals with known dispersal histories. We used genetic parentage analysis (genotyping) to divide 110 new recruits of the orange clownfish, Amphiprion percula, from Kimbe Island, Papua New Guinea, into two groups: "self-recruiters" spawned by parents on Kimbe Island and "immigrants" that had dispersed from distant reefs (>10 km away). Analysis of daily increments in sagittal otoliths found no significant difference in PLDs or otolith growth rates between self-recruiting and immigrant larvae. We also quantified otolith Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios during the larval phase using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Again, we found no significant differences in larval profiles of either element between self-recruits and immigrants. Our results highlight the need for caution when interpreting otolith dispersal histories based on natural geochemical tags in the absence of water chemistry data or known-origin larvae with which to test the discriminatory ability of natural tags. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Citrus Seed Oils Efficacy against Larvae of Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazrat Bilal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dengue fever is a serious public health issue in Pakistan for many years. Globally plants have been reported to contain compounds with insecticidal properties. These properties have been demonstrated more recently on the larval stages of mosquitoes. Therefore, Citrus cultivar seeds were evaluated for larvicidal potential against the primary dengue vector Aedes aegypti.Methods: Extraction of oil was done by a steam distillation method and oils were evaluated according to WHO guidelines for larvicides 2005 for evaluation of insecticidal properties of citrus seed extracts against mosquito larvae.Result: Among the Citrus cultivar seed oil, rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri had the lowest LC50 value (200.79ppm, while musambi (C. sinensis var musambi had the highest LC50 value (457.30ppm after 24 h of exposure.Conclusion: Citrus cultivars have some larvicidal potential but C. jambhiri had the greatest potential against A. ae­gypti larvae. Further small-scale field trials using the extracts of C. jambhiri will be conducted to determine opera­tional feasibility.

  12. Defensive repertoire of Drosophila larvae in response to toxic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trienens, Monika; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Wertheim, Bregje

    2017-10-01

    Chemical warfare including insecticidal secondary metabolites is a well-known strategy for environmental microbes to monopolize a food source. Insects in turn have evolved behavioural and physiological defences to eradicate or neutralize the harmful microorganisms. We studied the defensive repertoire of insects in this interference competition by combining behavioural and developmental assays with whole-transcriptome time-series analysis. Confrontation with the toxic filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans severely reduced the survival of Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Nonetheless, the larvae did not behaviourally avoid the fungus, but aggregated at it. Confrontation with fungi strongly affected larval gene expression, including many genes involved in detoxification (e.g., CYP, GST and UGT genes) and the formation of the insect cuticle (e.g., Tweedle genes). The most strongly upregulated genes were several members of the insect-specific gene family Osiris, and CHK-kinase-like domains were over-represented. Immune responses were not activated, reflecting the competitive rather than pathogenic nature of the antagonistic interaction. While internal microbes are widely acknowledged as important, our study emphasizes the underappreciated role of environmental microbes as fierce competitors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Grading and quantification of dental fluorosis in zebrafish larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yutao; Zhang, Yanli; Zheng, Xueni; Xu, Rongchen; He, Huiming; Duan, Xiaohong

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis in primary teeth are different from permanent teeth. Previous animal models of dental fluorosis mainly focus on juvenile rats, mice and zebrafish. Our experiment aims to set a dental fluorosis model using zebrafish larva and explore the characteristics of the first generation teeth by fluoride treatment. After the zebrafish eggs were laid, they were exposed to excess fluoride (19ppm, 38ppm and 76ppm) for five days. The morphological characteristics of first generation teeth were examined by H&E staining, whole-mount alizarin red and alcian blue staining, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) technique. With whole-mount alizarin red and alcian blue staining, the tooth cusps presented red in normal control. 19ppm and 38ppmm fluoride resulted in extensive red staining from tooth cusps to the lower 1/3 of teeth. 76ppm fluoride caused malformed teeth with uneven red staining. H&E staining showed that excess fluoride caused cystic-like changes in 38ppm and 76ppm groups. SEM revealed the dose dependent pathological changes in zebrafish enameloid with fluoride treatment. Based on SEM findings, we set 0-4 dental fluorosis index (DFI) score to label the severity of dental fluorosis. Excess fluoride presented a dose dependent fluorosis changes in the teeth of zebrafish larva. The DFI scores in our experiment reflect dose dependent fluorosis changes in a good way and will benefit the future research of dental fluorosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Distribution and abundance of Pleuronectiformes larvae off Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Nunes Garbini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was the description of the composition, abundance and density in horizontal and vertical distribution of Pleuronectiformes larvae on the southeastern Brazilian continental shelf. The samples were collected with bongo nets and a Multi Plankton Sampler (MPS, both in summer and winter 2002. A total of 352 flatfishes larvae were collected in summer and 343 in winter, representing three families and a total of 13 taxa: Paralichthyidae (Citharichthys cornutus, C. spilopterus, Citharichthys sp., Cyclopsetta chittendeni, Syacium spp., Etropus spp. and Paralichthys spp., Bothidae (Bothus ocellatus and Monolene antillarum and Cynoglossidae (Symphurus trewavasae, S. jenynsi, S. plagusia and S. ginsburgi. The most abundant taxa were Etropus spp., Syacium spp. and Bothus ocellatus. Etropus spp. occurred mainly as far out as the 200 m isobath and Syacium spp. from 100 m. B. ocellatus was present mainly in the oceanic zone between Ubatuba and Rio de Janeiro as from the 200 m isobath. The greatest average densities of these species occurred in the strata from 0 to 20 m depth in summer and between 20 and 40 m in winter.

  15. Comparative analysis of hemolymph proteome maps in diapausing and non-diapausing larvae of Sesamia nonagrioides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Hedo Meritxell

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sesamia nonagrioides is a noctuid that feeds on maize, sugar cane and sorghum in North Africa and Southern Europe. Larvae reared under long day conditions pupate after 5 or 6 larval instars, whereas larvae reared under short day conditions enter diapause and undergo up to 12 molts before dying or pupating. To better understand the mechanism of larval development and diapause, we identified proteins with different expressions in the sixth instar of diapausing and non-diapausing larvae. Results A total of 52 differentially regulated proteins were detected in the hemolymph of the diapausing or non-diapausing larvae at the beginning or end of the sixth instar. From these proteins, 11 were identified by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS or MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS: 5 were upregulated in the hemolymph of non-diapausing larvae and 6 in the hemolymph of the diapausing larvae. Interestingly, some proteins were expressed only in non-diapausing larvae but none was expressed only in the hemolymph of diapausing larvae. The possible functions of some of these proteins related to diapause maintenance or to larval-pupal metamorphosis are discussed. Conclusions The 2-DE proteomic map of S. nonagrioides hemolymph shows differential protein expression in diapausing and non-diapausing larvae. Some proteins that showed higher expression in the diapausing larvae at the end of the sixth instar could be involved in JH level maintenance thus in the diapause status maintenance. On the contrary, other proteins that showed the highest expression or that were expressed only in the non-diapausing larvae could be involved in larval-pupal metamorphosis.

  16. Interactions between fish and salamander larvae : Costs of predator avoidance or competition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semlitsch, R D

    1987-07-01

    Two species of salamander larvae (Ambystoma talpoideum and A. maculatum) were reared separately in the presence and absence of a fish (Lepomis macrochirus) in artificial ponds to measure the effects of a predator on the growth, survival, diet, and activity of larvae. The presence of L. macrochirus reduced body sizes of larvae by 18% in A. talpoideum and by 16% in A. maculatum. L. macrochirus apparently preyed on the smallest individuals. Survival in the presence of L. macrochirus decreased by 61% in A. talpoideum and by 97% in A. maculatum compared with larvae reared alone. Species identity did not significantly effect body size or survival, but an interaction effect suggested that A. maculatum was more severely affected by predators than was A. talpodeum. Activity of larvae in the water column was dramatically reduced in the presence of L. macrochirus, when larvae were restricted to the leaf litter of the benthic zone. There was overlap in the diets of fish and salamander larvae. Larvae reared in the presence of fish, however, consumed different taxa of prey as well as reduced number of prey compared to larvae reared alone. A. talpoideum larvae were more nocturnal than diurnal in the absence of fish, whereas A. maculatum larvae were equally active day and night. This experiment suggests that predator-prey relationships can change with shifts in species attributes and potentially confound apparent costs of predator avoidance with competition. Measuring the long-term dynamics of the cost-benefit relationship will help elucidate how prey balance the demands of their life history with the demands of predators.

  17. Temporal and Spatial Distribution Patterns of Echinoderm Larvae in La Parguera, Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey M Williams

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study describes temporal and spatial abundance patterns of echinoderm larvae in La Parguera, Puerto Rico. For the temporal study, larvae were sampled by a series of monthly tows taken with a 64μm mesh net between the new and full moon from April 2005 to July 2006, September 2006 and August 2007. In order to measure spatial variation of echinoderm larval bundances, oblique tows were taken with 64 and 202μm mesh nets at seven different sites within the shelf, at the shelf-edge, and at a nearby oceanic stations during August 2007. Overall, Echinoidea (sea urchin exhibited the highest abundance with a total of 11 921 larvae, representing 52.5% of the total collection. Ophiuroidea (brittle star ranked second in abundance with 45.6% of the total larvae. Holothuroidea (sea cucumber and Asteroidea larvae (sea star accounted for less than 2% of the total echinoderm larval collection. Early larval stages (2-8 day old of Diadema antillarum represented 20% of the total Echinoidea larvae. There was no marked seasonal trend of echinoderm larval abundance; Echinoidea and Ophiuroidea larvae were present in all monthly samples indicating that reproduction occurs year-round. Peak abundances of later-stage Echinoidea larvae were observed during January, July and October and of later-stage Ophiuroidea larvae during June, August and October. The observed peaks of later-stage larval abundances may be indicative of higher recruitment activity during these months. There was a significant difference of echinoderm larval abundance between spatial stations, with higher abundances collected at the shelf-edge. Later-stage (~24 day old D. antillarum larvae were mostly collected at shelf-edge and oceanic locations. In addition, the 64mm mesh net was more efficient for collection of echinoderm larvae than the 202mm mesh net. Rev. Biol. Trop. 58 (Suppl. 3: 81-88. Epub 2010 October 01.

  18. Vulnerability of the mosquito larvae to the guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in the presence of alternative preys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Barnali; Aditya, Gautam; Banerjee, Samir

    2008-09-01

    The predatory potential of the larvivorous fishes can be affected by the presence of alternative preys. In the present study the predation pattern of the sewage dwelling Poecilia reticulata (Peters 1872) on the larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus Say 1823 (Diptera: Culicidae) was evaluated in the presence of alternative preys. The predation of Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae by different size groups of R. reticulata fishes was evaluated. In addition to this, the niche breadth (N) and diet breadth (B) were measured following Manly's selectivity index (Si) as an indicator of variation of such predation pattern in the presence of alternative prey types, like chironomid larvae and tubificid worms. The consumption of IV instar Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae by individual P. reticulata ranged between 65 and 84 in a 3 h feeding period and varied with the size of fish (F2,33 = 34.91; p < 0.001). The selectivity coefficient revealed a significantly low preference for the Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae (0.16, CL: 0.05-0.27; p < 0.05) compared to the chironomid larvae and tubificid worms, when all the three prey types were present. The niche breadth (N) and diet breadth (B) ranged from 0.77 to 0.92 and 0.69 to 0.93, respectively. The total consumption of all the prey types varied with the predator density, but the selectivity index for the mosquito larvae was significantly low in all the instances. P. reticulata can consume a good number of mosquito larvae, with the consumption rate varying with the body size. P. reticulata fishes exhibit low preference for mosquito larvae as prey in the presence of alternative controphic preys like chironomid larvae and tubificid worms. Though establishment and sustenance of P. reticulata in new habitats will be favoured by the presence of alternative preys, but vulnerability of mosquito larvae may be reduced with availability of multiple preys in natural conditions.

  19. Schinus terebinthifolius Leaf Extract Causes Midgut Damage, Interfering with Survival and Development of Aedes aegypti Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procópio, Thamara Figueiredo; Fernandes, Kenner Morais; Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Ximenes, Rafael Matos; de Oliveira, Aline Rafaella Cardoso; Souza, Carolina de Santana; Melo, Ana Maria Mendonça de Albuquerque; Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a leaf extract from Schinus terebinthifolius was evaluated for effects on survival, development, and midgut of A. aegypti fourth instar larvae (L4), as well as for toxic effect on Artemia salina. Leaf extract was obtained using 0.15 M NaCl and evaluated for phytochemical composition and lectin activity. Early L4 larvae were incubated with the extract (0.3–1.35%, w/v) for 8 days, in presence or absence of food. Polymeric proanthocyanidins, hydrolysable tannins, heterosid and aglycone flavonoids, cinnamic acid derivatives, traces of steroids, and lectin activity were detected in the extract, which killed the larvae at an LC50 of 0.62% (unfed larvae) and 1.03% (fed larvae). Further, the larvae incubated with the extract reacted by eliminating the gut content. No larvae reached the pupal stage in treatments at concentrations between 0.5% and 1.35%, while in the control (fed larvae), 61.7% of individuals emerged as adults. The extract (1.0%) promoted intense disorganization of larval midgut epithelium, including deformation and hypertrophy of cells, disruption of microvilli, and vacuolization of cytoplasms, affecting digestive, enteroendocrine, regenerative, and proliferating cells. In addition, cells with fragmented DNA were observed. Separation of extract components by solid phase extraction revealed that cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids are involved in larvicidal effect of the extract, being the first most efficient in a short time after larvae treatment. The lectin present in the extract was isolated, but did not show deleterious effects on larvae. The extract and cinnamic acid derivatives were toxic to A. salina nauplii, while the flavonoids showed low toxicity. S. terebinthifolius leaf extract caused damage to the midgut of A. aegypti larvae, interfering with survival and development. The larvicidal effect of the extract can be attributed to cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. The data obtained using A. salina indicates that caution

  20. Cutaneous larva migrans in an eleven-year-old boy in an urban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cutaneous larva migrans is a tropical infectious disease that is usually acquired from contact with soil contaminated with larvae of nonhuman hookworms or Strongyloides usually from faeces of dogs and cats. ... There was a history of playing regular football in a field contaminated by dog\\'s urine and faeces.

  1. A complex of genes involved in adaptation of Leptinotarsa decemlineata larvae to induced potato defence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petek, M.; Turnšek, N.; Gašparic, M.B.; Novak, M.P.; Gruden, K.; Slapar, N.; Popovic, T.; Štrukelj, B.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    The Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) is the most important pest of potato in many areas of the world. One of the main reasons for its success lies in the ability of its larvae to counteract plant defense compounds. Larvae adapt to protease inhibitors (PIs) produced in potato leaves

  2. HEAVY METALS IN THE HOST-PARASITE SYSTEM LEPIDOPUS CAUDATUS- ANISAKIS LARVAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ruolo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Authors have investigated on the relationship between pollution in the host parasite-system Lepidopus caudatus-Anisakis larvae. Lead, mercury and cadmium concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry in the larvae and in the muscle of fish host. Hg concentrations were often higher in parasites than host muscles. Finally, some hygienic and inspective implications were discussed.

  3. Regression estimators for late-instar gypsy moth larvae at low pupulation densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.E. Wallnr; A.S. Devito; Stanley J. Zarnoch

    1989-01-01

    Two regression estimators were developed for determining densities of late-instar gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae), larvae from burlap band and pyrethrin spray counts on oak trees in Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New York. Studies were conducted by marking larvae on individual burlap banded trees within 15...

  4. The intestinal bacterial community in the food waste-reducing larvae of Hermetia illucens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hyunbum; Park, Soyoung; Choi, Jiyoung; Jeong, Gilsang; Lee, Sang-Beom; Choi, Youngcheol; Lee, Sung-Jae

    2011-05-01

    As it is known that food waste can be reduced by the larvae of Hermetia illucens (Black soldier fly, BSF), the scientific and commercial value of BSF larvae has increased recently. We hypothesised that the ability of catabolic degradation by BSF larvae might be due to intestinal microorganisms. Herein, we analysed the bacterial communities in the gut of BSF larvae by pyrosequencing of extracting intestinal metagenomic DNA from larvae that had been fed three different diets. The 16S rRNA sequencing results produced 9737, 9723 and 5985 PCR products from larval samples fed food waste, cooked rice and calf forage, respectively. A BLAST search using the EzTaxon program showed that the bacterial community in the gut of larvae fed three different diets was mainly composed of the four phyla with dissimilar proportions. Although the composition of the bacterial communities depended on the different nutrient sources, the identified bacterial strains in the gut of BSF larvae represented unique bacterial species that were unlike the intestinal microflora of other insects. Thus, our study analysed the structure of the bacterial communities in the gut of BSF larvae after three different feedings and assessed the application of particular bacteria for the efficient degradation of organic compounds.

  5. Ascaris suum: RNAi mediated silencing of enolase gene expression in infective larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ning; Xu, Min-Jun; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Huang, Cui-Qin; Lin, Rui-Qing; Yuan, Zi-Guo; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2011-01-01

    Ascaris suum is an important parasite of pigs that causes tremendous economic losses globally to agriculture and animal husbandry annually. RNA interference (RNAi) technology has been described as a successful and useful approach for the elucidation of gene function in parasitic nematodes. In the present study, RNAi was used to silence the expression of a gene encoding enolase in A. suum by soaking infective larvae in double-stranded RNA derived from an EST (representing As-enol-1) selected from an A. suum infective larvae-specific cDNA library. The mRNA levels of RNAi-treated larvae were examined by Reverse-Transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analysis. The survival of RNAi-treated larvae was compared with larvae treated with dsRNA-free culture medium. The effect of enolase depletion on the development of A. suum larvae was assessed by infecting BALB/c mice with RNAi-treated larvae. The results showed that enolase gene expression was silenced completely and the survival rate of the RNAi-treated nematodes was reduced by 20.11% (Psuum enolase mRNA led to significant shorter larvae, indicating that loss of enolase expression may cause delays in larval development. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Secreted and immunogenic proteins produced by the honey bee bacterial pathogen, Paenibacillus larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Foulbrood is a severe disease affecting larvae of honeybee Apis mellifera, causing significant decrease in the honeybee population, beekeeping industries and agricultural production. In spite of its importance, little is known about the virulence factors secreted by Paenibacillus larvae dur...

  7. Vertical distribution of small pelagic fish eggs and larvae on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vertical distributions of anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus and sardine Sardinops sagax eggs and larvae within the upper 50 m of the water column on the eastern Agulhas Bank, South Africa, were examined using discrete depth samples collected with a multiple, opening/closing plankton net. Eggs and larvae of sardine and ...

  8. Description of the larvae of Hydroporus ferrugineus Stephens and H-polaris fall (Coleoptera: Adephaga: Dytiscidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alarie, Y.; Wood, P.J.; Bruyn, de A.M.H.; Cuppen, J.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Description of structures of the larvae of Hydroporus ferrugineus Stephens and H. polaris Fall is provided including detailed chaetotaxal and porotaxal analyses. Larvae of H. ferrugineus are distinguished from all other species of Hydroporus Clairville by the presence of 1–2 secondary setae on

  9. PENGARUH PAKAN ALAMI Chaetoceros spp. TERHADAP PERKEMBANGAN DAN SINTASAN LARVA UDANG WINDU, Penaeus monodon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Lante

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pakan alami berupa mikroalga merupakan salah satu faktor pendukung dalam keberhasilan usaha pembenihan udang windu, Penaeus monodon. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui jenis pakan alami, Chaetoceros spp., yang dapat meningkatkan pertumbuhan dan sintasan larva udang windu. Penelitian ini menggunakan 15 buah bak fiber berukuran 60 cm x 40 cm x 50 cm dengan volume 120 liter yang disi air sebanyak 100 liter. Kepadatan naupli adalah 90 ekor/liter atau 9.000 ekor/bak dan lima jenis pakan alami Chaetoceros spp. yang diuji yaitu: Chaetoceros simplex, Chaetoceros ceratosporum, Chaetoceros calcitrans, Chaetoceros amami, dan Chaetoceros gracilis. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa aplikasi kelima jenis pakan alami memberikan laju perkembangan larva yang relatif sama sampai stadia PL-1. Aplikasi Chaetoceros gracilis memberikan sintasan larva udang windu tertinggi yaitu 41,48% dan dengan Chaetoceros simplex memberikan sintasan larva terendah (28,02%. Hasil penelitian ini mengindikasikan bahwa aplikasi Chaetoceros spp. yang berbeda pada pemeliharaan larva berpengaruh terhadap sintasan larva udang windu, namun tidak berpengaruh terhadap laju metamorfosis larva. Aplikasi Chaetoceros gracilis sebagai pakan alami adalah terbaik untuk sintasan larva udang windu.

  10. The larva of Tricholeon relictus Hölzel & Monserrat, 2002 a synanthropic antlion (Neuroptera, Myrmeleontidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Fernando; Badano, Davide; Monserrat, Víctor J

    2014-07-11

    The larva of Tricholeon relictus, a Spanish endemic antlion of Afrotropical affinities, is described and illustrated for the first time also providing a comparison with the only other European member of the tribe Dendroleontini, Dendroleon pantherinus. The larva of this species is synanthropic but probably originally lived in cave-like habitats.

  11. [Predatory capacity of Macrobrachium tenellum on Aedes aegypti larvae in lab conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Sahagún, Cecilia Catalina; Hernández-Sánchez, Judith Marissa; Vargas-Ceballos, Manuel Alejandro; Ruiz-González, Luis Eduardo; Espinosa-Chaurand, Luis Daniel; Nolasco-Soria, Héctor; Vega-Villasante, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    in the last few years, a lot of importance has been given to natural predators against Aedes aegypti. Several organisms have been studied both in lab and in the field so as to find out their capacity to devour mosquito larvae. High densities of Macrobrachium tenellum are found in natural conditions, it is not aggressive and may stand wide ranges of temperature, rates of salinity and oxygen concentrations. to evaluate the predatory capacity of Macrobrachium tenellum on Aedes aegypti larvae in lab conditions. very young Macrobrachium tenellum prawns measuring A(3.0-3.5cm) and B (4.5-5 cm) were used. The mosquito larvae were obtained after hatching of egss from adult females kept in entomological cages. Five, ten, fifteen and twenty Aedes aegypti larvae were placed per treatment per rank, whereas the second bioassays adjusted the number of larvae to 30, 40, 50 and 80 larvae per treatment per rank. Macrobrachium tenellum showed high rate of larval consumption for the two ranks and treatments. In the highest density (80 larvae), the consumption was 95% of larvae at 24 hours for rank A and 100% for rank B. Macrobrachium tenellum may be considered as a potential biological control agent, due to its abundant presence in natural conditions, its resistance to different environmental conditions and to its voraciousness seen in this study.

  12. Toxicity of cypermethrin on the embryo and larvae of Gangetic mystus, Mystus cavasius

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Md Haider; Sumon, Kizar Ahmed; Sultana, Marin; Rashid, Harunur

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the effects of cypermethrin on the embryo and the larvae of Gangetic mystus, Mystus cavasius. Therefore, fertilized eggs (n = 100) and 1-day-old larvae (n = 100) were exposed to six different concentrations of cypermethrin (0, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32

  13. First-feeding by European eel larvae: A step towards closing the life cycle in captivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butts, Ian; Sørensen, Sune Riis; Politis, Sebastian Nikitas

    2016-01-01

    First evidence of first-feeding European eel larvae that have been reared in captivity•Up to 50% of larvae ingested a diet composed of concentrated rotifer paste, with or without natural feeding stimulants•Documentation of a significant increase in feeding success under higher light intensities•R...

  14. Black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae reduce Escherichia coli in dairy manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiaolin; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Brady, Jeff A; Sanford, Michelle R; Yu, Ziniu

    2008-12-01

    Escherichia coli labeled with a green fluorescent protein was inoculated into sterile dairy manure at 7.0 log cfu/g. Approximately 125 black soldier fly larvae were placed in manure inoculated and homogenized with E. coli. Manure inoculated with E. coli but without black soldier fly larvae served as the control. For the first experiment, larvae were introduced into 50, 75, 100, or 125 g sterilized dairy manure inoculated and homogenized with E. coli and stored 72 h at 27 degrees C. Black soldier fly larvae significantly reduced E. coli counts in all treatments. However, varying the amount of manure provided the black soldier fly larvae significantly affected their weight gain and their ability to reduce E. coli populations present. For the second experiment, larvae were introduced into 50 g manure inoculated with E. coli and stored for 72 h at 23, 27, 31, or 35 degrees C. Minimal bacterial growth was recorded in the control held at 35 degrees C and was excluded from the analysis. Black soldier fly larvae significantly reduced E. coli counts in manure held at remaining temperatures. Accordingly, temperature significantly influenced the ability of black soldier fly larvae to develop and reduce E. coli counts with greatest suppression occurring at 27 degrees C.

  15. Blood feeding of Ornithodoros turicata larvae using an artificial membrane system

    Science.gov (United States)

    An artificial membrane system was adapted to feed Ornithodoros turicata larvae from a laboratory colony using defibrinated swine blood. Aspects related to larval feeding and molting to the 1st nymphal instar were evaluated. Fifty-five percent of all larvae exposed to the artificial membrane in two e...

  16. Acute toxicity of five pesticides to Apis mellifera larvae reared in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Pingli; Jack, Cameron J; Mortensen, Ashley N; Ellis, James D

    2017-11-01

    The reported high loss rates of managed honey bee colonies have been attributed to diverse stressors including pesticides. Honey bee larvae can be exposed to pesticides in contaminated nectar, pollen and wax. Due to the difficulties of rearing larvae in vitro, research focusing on adult bee exposure to pesticides is more common than that on larva exposure to pesticides. Herein, we aimed to assess the acute toxicity of five insecticides to honey bee larvae using an improved in vitro rearing method. LC 50 and LD 50 were calculated for larvae at 72 h following a single diet exposure administered when the larvae were 84 ± 12 h old. Solvent control larval mortalities were less than 15% at 72 h. The LC 50 values (mg L -1 ) for each tested pesticide were as follows: amitraz, 494.27; chlorpyrifos, 15.39; coumaphos, 90.01; fluvalinate, 27.69; and imidacloprid, 138.84. The LD 50 values in µg per larva were 14.83 (amitraz), 0.46 (chlorpyrifos), 2.70 (coumaphos), 0.83 (fluvalinate) and 4.17 (imidacloprid). The toxicity of the test pesticides to honey bee larvae from most to least toxic was chlorpyrifos > fluvalinate > coumaphos = imidacloprid > amitraz. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Weight changes and organ pathology in rats given edible larvae of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of oral administration of extracts of raw and processed larvae of Cirina forda (Westwood) on morphometry and histo pathology were studied in albino rats. Weights of rats in the control group and in the group that were fed the processed larvae were significantly higher (p<0.05) than those of the group that received ...

  18. Ontogenetic dietary shift in the larvae of Cybister japonicus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) in Japanese rice fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Shin-Ya

    2009-06-01

    A number of fragmentary reports suggest that the endangered diving beetle Cybister japonicus larvae feed on tadpoles, fish, and aquatic insects. However, no quantitative study on the feeding habits of C. japonicus larvae has been reported. In this study, field observations and rearing experiments were carried out to show the feeding ecology of C. japonicus larvae. Unlike previous commentaries, the first- and second-instar larvae of C. japonicus preyed on insects, mainly Odonata nymphs and Notonecta triguttata, irrespective of prey availability, but did not eat vertebrates such as tadpoles and fish in the field. On the contrary, the third-instar larvae fed on both insects and vertebrates. Rearing experiments showed that the number of Odonata nymphs consumed was significantly more than the number of tadpoles consumed by the first and second instars but third-instar larvae ate both the Odonata nymphs and tadpoles in the tadpole-Odonata nymph mixture experiment. The total body lengths of C. japonicus new adults in the Odonata nymph and tadpole-Odonata nymph mixture treatments were statistically equal. These results suggested that the first- and second-instar larvae of C. japonicus prey mainly on insects and do not eat vertebrate animals (insectivore), whereas the third-instar larvae fed on both insects and vertebrates (generalist).

  19. Surto de larva migrans cutnea em uma creche de belo horizonte, minas gerais (Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Dos Santos Lima

    1984-04-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho relata a ocorrência de um surto de Larva migrans cutânea, em 17 crianças de uma creche em Belo Horizonte, MG. As crianças adquiriram esta dermatose quando brincavam em uma caixa de areia contaminada com larvas infectantes de ancilostomídeos de cão.

  20. What can size distributions within cohorts tell us about ecological processes in fish larvae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arild Folkvord

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine fish larvae are subject to variable environments, which is probably reflected in their growth and survival rates. Mortality rates are generally high and size-dependent. At the species level, these mortality rates are usually accompanied by correspondingly high growth rates. Here we provide examples from experimental studies with Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua and Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus larvae, in which multiple cohorts were followed over time. Body size, prey concentrations, and temperature are shown to influence growth rates. We present a method based on cumulative size distributions (CSDs for visualizing variability of sizes within cohorts over time. Analysis of CSDs revealed size-selective mortality and variations among populations in size- and temperature-dependent growth throughout ontogeny. We found that cod larvae consistently exhibit higher growth rates than herring larvae. While cod larvae may have an advantage over herring larvae when food availability is high, herring were more able to survive at low food concentrations than cod. Cod and herring seem to represent two growth strategies: cod larvae are relatively small at hatching and a high growth rate appears to be a prerequisite for success, whereas herring larvae are initially large, but grow more slowly.

  1. Cotesia kariyai larvae need an anchor to emerge from the host Pseudaletia separata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakamatsu, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Harvey, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Mature larvae of the gregarious endoparasitoid Cotesia kariyai construct cocoons for pupation approximately 10 days after parasitization and emerge from their host Pseudaletia separata under a long day photo-regime (16L8D) at 25 ± 1°C. The parasitoid larvae make capsules in the host hemocoel just

  2. [Effect of feeding on different tissues on larva development of Lucilia sericata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Wan, Li-Hua; Li, Xue-Bo

    2013-04-01

    To observe the effect of feeding on different pig tissues on the development of Lucilia sericata larvae. Under a constant temperature of 25 degrees C, about 200 larvae each were reared on four different substrates, i.e. pig's brain, liver, muscle and a mixture of minced pork muscle and fat (6:4). Length and weight of larvae and pupae were measured at 12 h interval 16 h after eclosion. The time of development, mortality, sex ratio of adults were recorded. Compared to the other groups, the larvae of liver and mixture groups grew slower, time of reaching maximum length and weight was delayed for 12-24 h. The duration of larva development of liver group [(284.0 +/- 12.6) h] was longer than that of brain group [(257.0 +/- 11.9) h], muscle group [(258.0 +/- 10.2) h] and mixture group [(260.0 +/- 9.8) h] (P 0.05). The development duration of the larvae fed on liver tissue is longer than other groups, and the larvae body length and weight of liver group are less than other groups. The body length and weight of larvae and pupae fed on mixture diet are less than other groups with higher mortality.

  3. Utilidad de un colector para larvas y alevines de peces en zonas de rompiente

    OpenAIRE

    Parrales Vera, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    Utilidad de un colector para larvas y alevines de peces en zonas de rompiente El diseño del colector para larvas y alevines consiste en un sistema modificado de arrastre de fondo en forma de trineo para ser oprado en zonas de rompiente.

  4. A preliminary account on the distribution of decapod larvae in the Konkan waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Achuthankutty, C.T.; Nair, S.R.S.

    Decapod larval distribution in Konkan coastal waters was studied during the premonsoon season (March-April). Sergestid was the largest group forming 80.55% of the total decapod crustacean larvae. Penaeid larvae constituted only 0.65% and M. dobsoni...

  5. Notes on the first instar larvae of Ctenophora and Nephrotoma (Diptera, Tipulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podeniene, Virginija; Naseviciene, Nijole; Podenas, Sigitas

    2014-02-10

    1830 egg-larvae of 7 species belonging to long palped crane flies (Tipulidae): Ctenophora guttata Meigen, Nephrotoma pratensis Linnaeus, N. dorsalis Fabricius, N. scurra Meigen, N. flavescens Linnaeus, N. submaculosa Edwards and N. crocata Linnaeus were obtained from 22 females captured in Lithuania in 2011-2012. It took from five days to more than three weeks for eggs to hatch. Crane flies have four instars of larvae. Second, third and the last instar larvae are very similar, when the first instar or egg-larvae differs radically. Descriptions and illustrations of external morphology, chaetotaxy of abdominal segments, characters of head capsules and last abdominal segments are given for the previously unknown first instar larvae of Ct. guttata, N. crocata, N. dorsalis, N. flavescens, N. pratensis, N. scurra and poorly known N. submaculosa. It was found out that difference of head capsule and last abdominal segment among the first instar larvae of above mentioned species of genus Nephrotoma are more obvious than in last instar. During this study it was found, that such characters as shape of apical teeth of mandible, shape of basal segment of antenna and number of sensillae, shape of hypostomium and arrangement of sensory structures on labrum, differ among egg-larvae of Nephrotoma. It was found, that pads on frontal part of prothorax and shape of lateral plates of egg-larvae labrum of Nephrotoma differ significantly from that of Ctenophora and could be used as genus separating characters. 

  6. A rat model of intragastric infection with Anisakis spp. live larvae: histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuloaga, Jaime; Rodríguez-Bobada, Cruz; Corcuera, María Teresa; Gómez-Aguado, Fernando; González, Pablo; Rodríguez-Perez, Rosa; Arias-Díaz, Javier; Caballero, María Luisa

    2013-06-01

    Anisakiasis is a fish-borne parasitic disease caused by consumption of raw or undercooked fish or cephalopods parasited by Anisakis spp. third stage larvae. The pathological effects of the infection are the combined result of the mechanical action of the larva during tissue invasion, the direct tissue effects of the excretory/secretory products released by the parasite, and the complex interaction between the host immune system and the Anisakis antigens. The aim of this study was to develop an experimental model of infection with Anisakis spp. live larvae in rats, useful to study the acute and chronic histopathological effects of the Anisakis infection. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to esophageal catheterization to place larvae directly into the stomach. Reinfections at different intervals after the first infection were preformed. Live larvae were found anchored to the mucosa and passing through the wall of the stomach and showed a strong resistance being able to stay alive at different sites and at the different pH. Migration of larvae from the stomach to other organs out of the gastrointestinal tract was also observed. The histopathological study showed the acute inflammatory reaction, with predominance of polymorphonuclear eosinophils and a mild fibrotic reaction. The model of infection described is valid to study the behavior of the larvae inside the host body, the histopathological changes at the invasion site, and the effects of the repeated infections by ingestion of live larvae.

  7. A note on the record of Rastrelliger (Mackerel) larvae from the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Peter, K.J.

    from Gulf of Thailand and South China Sea They resemble the larvae of a scombrid relative, the Pacific mackerel Pneumatophorous diego, but differ in having less pigmentation and deeper body The larvae have a fairly stubby body, with 30 myomeres big eyes...

  8. Cystercercus Larva in the Anterior Chamber of the Eye of a 7- year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The case of a 7 year old Nigerian girl with features of traumatic uveitis which was later found to have anterior chamber cestode larva infestation is presented. Though uncommon, ocular cestode larva infestation should be considered when children present with features of ocular inflammation.

  9. Anopheles stephensi and Toxorhynchites amboinensis: aseptic rearing of mosquito larvae on cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munderloh, U G; Kurtti, T J; Maramorosch, K

    1982-12-01

    Aseptic larvae of Anopheles stephensi and Toxorhynchites amboinensis were reared on a continuous cell line (RU TAE 12 V) from the mosquito, T. amboinensis, that grew in suspension as multicellular vesicles. Surface-sterilized eggs were hatched in a 24-well plate containing 0.2 ml of Leibovitz's L-15 medium per well and incubated in a humidified atmosphere. Toxorhynchites amboinensis eggs of 36 hr or older were placed singly to assure hatching and avoid cannibalism. Hatching rates were over 80%. All larval instars were maintained in L-15 medium at 28 C with a 12-hr photoperiod. Anopheles stephensi larvae were reared in 25-cm2 tissue culture flasks containing 10 ml of L-15 medium with 30 to 50 first and second instar larvae or 10 third and fourth instar larvae per flask. Toxorhynchites amboinensis larvae remained in the 24-well plate in 1.5 ml of medium through the second instar; third instar larvae were kept in 12-well plates (3 ml of medium per well) and transferred to 25-cm2 flasks (10 ml per flask) when they reached the fourth instar. First and second instar A. stephensi larvae were fed cultured cells once, and third or fourth instar larvae twice a day. Toxorhynchites amboinensis larvae were fed vesicles once during the first 4 days after hatching, and every 1 or 2 days thereafter. Each A. stephensi larva consumed approximately 2 X 10(6) cells, and T. amboinensis larvae 10 times more cells before pupating. Anopheles stephensi pupated after 7 to 8 days and adults emerged during days 9 to 11. Pupation in T. amboinensis began on day 21 after hatching and adults emerged 5 days later. Cell lines isolated from A. stephensi larvae or embryos of the ticks Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Anocentor (Dermacentor) nitens supported only limited growth of A. stephensi larvae. Defibrinated hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) blood, though readily ingested, did not support the growth of A. stephensi whereas larvae reared on blood cells plus T. amboinensis cells showed limited growth.

  10. Uncommon Human Urinary Tract Myiasis Due to Psychoda Sp. Larvae, Kashan, Iran: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima RASTI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of human and animal body tissues with flies’ larvae and diptera cause myiasis. A 26 yr old female patient refers to Kashan Shahid Beheshti Hospital, central Iran because of urogenital infection, pain in the right part of stomach, smelly and reddish vaginal discharge and frequent urination. In the first checking, urine sample was taken. In the sample, active and alive larvae were seen. The live samples were taken to the Environmental Health Department Lab of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in clean glass jars. In the morphological survey, Psychoda sp larvae were identified. In Iran, this study is the first report of this species of larva that causes urinary myiasis. This fly larva is not carnivore or bloodsucker and feeds on bacterial agents. Observance of personal hygiene especially during defecation and urination is essential to prevent contamination of this type of myiasis.

  11. Composting poultry manure by fly larvae (Musca domestica) eliminates Campylobacter jejuni from the manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Steen; Hald, Birthe

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The common house fly, Musca domestica (Md) is an important carrier of zoonotic agents, and Campylobacter jejuni is one that may be transmitted between animals and humans by flies. Colonized animals shed the bacteria in feces where larval stages of Md flies develops. Aim of the present...... study To monitor fly larvae composting of poultry manure artificially contaminated with C. jejuni, and to investigate a possible transmission route of C. jejuni from the manure through the fly larvae to the adult fly. Conclusions The addition of fly larvae both accelerated the degradation of manure...... and C. jejuni. Pupae or newly hatched flies were not carriers of C. jejuni although larvae were grown in contaminated manure. Impact When composting poultry manure with Md fly larvae, it is possible both to reduce the amount of waste and to sanitize it from C. jejuni, thereby reducing the risk...

  12. Nematodes parasitic in fishes of cenotes (= sinkholes) of the Peninsula of Yucatan, Mexico. Part 2. Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, F; Vivas-Rodríguez, C; Scholz, T; Vargas-Vázquez, J; Mendoza-Franco, E; Schmitter-Soto, J J; González-Solís, D

    1995-01-01

    This paper comprises a systematic survey of larval nematodes collected from fishes from cenotes (= sinkholes) of the Peninsula of Yucatan, southern Mexico, in 1993-1994. Larvae of the following nine species were recorded: Physocephalus sexalatus, Acuariidae gen. sp., Spiroxys sp., Falcaustra sp., Hysterothylacium cenotae, Contracaecum sp. Type 1, Contracaecum sp. Type 2, Goezia sp., and Eustrongylides sp. Larvae of P. sexalatus are recorded from fishes (Rhamdia guatemalensis) for the first time. The larvae are briefly described and illustrated and problems concerning their morphology, taxonomy, hosts and geographical distribution are discussed. Adults of these larvae are parasitic in piscivorous fishes, reptiles, birds and mammals (definitive hosts). Fishes harbouring the larvae of these parasites serve as paratenic hosts, being mostly an important source of infection for the definitive hosts.

  13. Cannibalism among Myrmeleon brasiliensis larvae (Návas, 1914 (Neuroptera, Myrmeleontidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane do Nascimento Lima

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cannibalism is influenced by various intrinsic and extrinsic factors of the population, such as density, population structure, prey availability, habitat structure and famine. These factors acting either independently or in synergy determine the frequency of cannibalism. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the effect of density and food availability on the occurrence of cannibalism among Myrmeleon brasiliensis larvae (Neuroptera, Myrmeleontidae. In the present study, the occurrence of cannibalism among M. brasiliensis larvae was greater in the treatments that simulated an absence of food in situations of both high and low density. The search for food makes a larva move about to forage, thereby increasing the risk of falling into the trap of a neighboring larva. Thus, the cannibalistic behavior of M. brasiliensis larvae may be associated with opportunity rather than a direct attempt to pray on the same species.

  14. Ultrastructural characteristics of nurse cell-larva complex of four species of Trichinella in several hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacchi L.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The nurse cell-larva complex of nematodes of the genus Trichinella plays an Important role in the survival of the larva in decaying muscles, frequently favouring the transmission of the parasite in extreme environmental conditions. The ultrastructure of the nurse cell-larva complex in muscles from different hosts infected with T. nativa (a walrus and a polar bear, T. spiralis (horses and humans, T. pseudospiralis (a laboratory mouse and T. papuae (a laboratory mouse were examined. Analysis with transmission electron microscope showed that the typical nurse cell structure was present in all examined samples, irrespective of the species of larva, of the presence of a collagen capsule, of the age of infection and of the host species, suggesting that there exists a molecular mechanism that in the first stage of larva invasion is similar for encapsulated and non-encapsulated species.

  15. PERBANDINGAN KELIMPAHAN LARVA CHIRONOMIDAE DI DUA DANAU BERBEDA DI PROVINSI JAMBI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Anindita Farhani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted at two different lakes in Jambi Province (Lake Sipin and Lake Teluk to compare abundance of aquatic insect larvae (family: Chironomidae. Lake Sipin located close by the settlement and got many influences from anthropogenic activities. However, Lake Teluk got less anthropogenic disturbance. Both lakes have difference plants cover. The area around Lake Sipin was more open compared to Lake Teluk and it caused low transparency level in Lake Sipin. The transparency level of Lake Sipin was 58.62 cm whereas transparency level of Lake Teluk was 70.29 cm. The difference of this transparency level influenced Chironomidae Larvae abundance that was encountered. Larvae abundance which was found in Lake Sipin was 49 ind/m2, while larvae abundance of Lake Teluk was 374 ind/m2. The result showed that water transparency level, water colors and vegetation affected abundance of Chironomidae larvae.

  16. Scanning electron microscope observations of brine shrimp larvae from space shuttle experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBell, L.; Paulsen, A.; Spooner, B.

    1992-01-01

    Brine shrimp are encysted as gastrula stage embryos, and may remain dehydrated and encysted for years without compromising their viability. This aspect of brine shrimp biology is desirable for studying development of animals during space shuttle flight, as cysts placed aboard a spacecraft may be rehydrated at the convenience of an astronaut, guaranteeing that subsequent brine shrimp development occurs only on orbit and not on the pad during launch delays. Brine shrimp cysts placed in 5 ml syringes were rehydrated with salt water and hatched during a 9 day space shuttle mission. Subsequent larvae developed to the 8th larval stage in the sealed syringes. We studied the morphogenesis of the brine shrimp larvae and found the larvae from the space shuttle experiments similar in rate of growth and extent of development, to larvae grown in sealed syringes on the ground. Extensive differentiation and development of embryos and larvae can occur in a microgravity environment.

  17. Starvation-Induced Dietary Behaviour in Drosophila melanogaster Larvae and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muhammad; Chaudhary, Safee Ullah; Afzal, Ahmed Jawaad; Tariq, Muhammad

    2015-09-24

    Drosophila melanogaster larvae are classified as herbivores and known to feed on non-carnivorous diet under normal conditions. However, when nutritionally challenged these larvae exhibit cannibalistic behaviour by consuming a diet composed of larger conspecifics. Herein, we report that cannibalism in Drosophila larvae is confined not only to scavenging on conspecifics that are larger in size, but also on their eggs. Moreover, such cannibalistic larvae develop as normally as those grown on standard cornmeal medium. When stressed, Drosophila melanogaster larvae can also consume a carnivorous diet derived from carcasses of organisms belonging to diverse taxonomic groups, including Musca domestica, Apis mellifera, and Lycosidae sp. While adults are ill-equipped to devour conspecific carcasses, they selectively oviposit on them and also consume damaged cadavers of conspecifics. Thus, our results suggest that nutritionally stressed Drosophila show distinct as well as unusual feeding behaviours that can be classified as detritivorous, cannibalistic and/or carnivorous.

  18. Comparative study of cultivation of feces in vermiculite or charcoal to obtain larvae of Strongyloides venezuelensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steveen Rios Ribeiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction We compared feces culturing in charcoal or vermiculite to obtain Strongyloides venezuelensis larvae. Methods Feces (5g from infected rats was mixed with vermiculite (10g or coal (10g in plastic cups and incubated at 28°C for 48h. Larvae were recovered using Baermann-Moraes method. Results Significantly higher number of positive larval cultures were recovered from vermiculite than from charcoal (15/17 and 4/17, respectively; p < 0.001; 990.6 ± 307.5 and 215 ± 78.1 larvae, p = 0.027. Conclusions Vermiculite yields more larvae and provides cleaner pellets, improving larvae identification and facilitating their use for other purposes.

  19. Behavior on approach to surface prey by larvae of Toxorhynchites amboinensis and T. brevipalpis (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linley, J R

    1995-01-01

    Behavior of Toxorhynchites amboinensis (Doleschall) and Toxorhynchites brevipalpis (Theobald) larvae (starved 48 h) as they approach and capture surface prey is described quantitatively from videotaped records. Of 106 T. amboinensis and 82 T. brevipalpis larvae observed, 84.9 and 97.6%, respectively, responded to the presence of surface prey within 2 min (most Toxorhynchites larvae are able to assess both the angle to surface prey and its distance and that they interpolate this information to optimize the approach path. The degree of refinement in this behavior indicates that it is well adapted to take advantage of the important surface food source in nature. In this phase of their feeding, Toxorhynchites larvae are active hunters and are not entirely the passive ambush predators they have seemed to be from many studies that have used other mosquito larvae as (subsurface) prey.

  20. Efecto de la temperatura sobre la viabilidad de larvas de Trichinella spiralis Effect of temperature on the viability of Trichinella spiralis larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana R Randazzo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar el efecto de diferentes temperaturas sobre la viabilidad de larvas libres y enquistadas de Trichinella spiralis aisladas en el sudoeste de la provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina. Se trataron larvas libres y enquistadas a diferentes temperaturas (-30 °C, -20 °C, 4 °C, 20 °C, calentamiento gradual entre 0-100 °C. Se determinó el tiempo necesario para matar el 100 % de las larvas. Durante los primeros días, la mortalidad larvaria en todos los tratamientos con frío aumentó signifcativamente en función del tiempo. En todos los casos, las larvas libres sobrevivieron menor cantidad de días que las enquistadas. A -30 °C, -20 °C y 20 °C no se observaron diferencias signifcativas entre las curvas de mortalidad de cada estadio larvario, pero a 4 °C la mortalidad fue menos intensa entre las larvas enquistadas. El calentamiento disminuyó la viabilidad, sin observarse diferencias entre estadios larvarios. La totalidad de las larvas libres y enquistadas había muerto a los 61 y 95 días (-30 °C, a los 160 y 180 días (-20 °C, a los 280 y 330 días (4° C, y a los 460 y 590 días (20 °C, respectivamente. Fue necesaria una cocción durante 15 minutos a 90 °C para matar al 100 % de las larvas libres y a 100 °C para lograr igual mortalidad de las enquistadas. Nuestros resultados indican que la temperatura y los tiempos tradicionalmente utilizados para tratar productos cárnicos con potencial de transmisión de T. spiralis no serían los más efectivos para lograr la inactivación de la totalidad de larvas vivas de este parásito.The aim of this work was to study the effect of temperature on the viability of free and encysted larvae of Trichinella spiralis from southwest Buenos Aires province, Argentina. Larvae were treated at variable temperatures (-30 °C, -20 °C, 4 °C, 20 °C, gradual heating between 0-100 °C. The time necessary to kill 100 % of larvae was calculated. During the frst days of

  1. Eggs containing larvae of Enterobius vermicularis in vaginal smear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Jyothi B; Kulkarni, Dhanashri V; Prabhu, Vl

    2012-01-01

    Enterobius vermicularis also known commonly as pinworm is the most common intestinal parasite. It is a nematode that inhabits the human terminal ileum, colon and appendix. The fertilized female migrates to the perianal area where eggs are deposited but occasionally introduces itself into adjacent orifices, most commonly the female genitourinary tract. Thus the eggs can be seen in the vaginal smear as a result of contamination. We report a case wherein the patient presented with signs and symptoms of vulvovaginitis. In her vaginal smear there were eggs of Enterobius vermicularis which showed a coiled larva within it. In the background there were plenty of acute inflammatory cells. This patient responded favorably to antihelminthics. We report this case to highlight the morphology of the parasite and also to emphasize that such findings should not be neglected. Timely reporting and appropriate treatment of such cases will prevent further complications of this parasite including endometritis, salphingitis and peritonitis.

  2. Digenean larvae parasitizing Ruditapes decussatus (Bivalvia from Tunisianan coasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhrif E.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Eleven species of trematode larvae (sporocysts and cercariae of Bucephalus labracis Paggi et Orecchia, 1965 and Cercaria lata Lespes, 1857 and metacercariae of Acanthoparyphium sp. Dietz , 1909, Caecincola parvulus Marshall et Gilbert, 1905, Curtuteria australis Allison, 1979, Gymnophallus fossarum Bartoli, 1965, Gymnophallus rebecqui Bartoli, 1983, Lepocreadium pegorchis Stossich, 1901, Parazoogonus sp. Looss, 1901, Psilostomum brevicolle Creplin, 1829 and Robphildollfusium fractum Rudolphi, 1819 were found in the clam (Ruditapes decussatus from Tunisian coasts. A part from B. labracis and Cercaria lata, the other trematode species were recorded for the first time in Tunisia. The examination of the frequency of recorded parasites reveals some monthly variation. This variation is statistically significant by comparing the sampling sites. These results indicate that more frequent parasites (G. fossarum, Cercaria lata, Curtuteria australis and Acanthoparyphium sp. could be considered as biological indicators making it possible to predict the capture localities of the clams.

  3. Evaluation of Lethal Giant Larvae as a Schistosomiasis Vaccine Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufan Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease of humans, and it is considered to be the second most devastating parasitic disease after malaria. Eggs produced by normally developed female worms are important in the transmission of the parasite, and they responsible for the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis. The tumor suppressor gene lethal giant larvae (lgl has an essential function in establishing apical-basal cell polarity, cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue organization. In our earlier study, downregulation of the lgl gene induced a significant reduction in the egg hatching rate of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj eggs. In this study, the Sjlgl gene was used as a vaccine candidate against schistosomiasis, and vaccination achieved and maintained a stable reduction of the egg hatching rate, which is consistent with previous studies, in addition to reducing the worm burden and liver egg burden in some trials.

  4. Eggs containing larvae of Enterobius vermicularis in vaginal smear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothi B Shetty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterobius vermicularis also known commonly as pinworm is the most common intestinal parasite. It is a nematode that inhabits the human terminal ileum, colon and appendix. The fertilized female migrates to the perianal area where eggs are deposited but occasionally introduces itself into adjacent orifices, most commonly the female genitourinary tract. Thus the eggs can be seen in the vaginal smear as a result of contamination. We report a case wherein the patient presented with signs and symptoms of vulvovaginitis. In her vaginal smear there were eggs of Enterobius vermicularis which showed a coiled larva within it. In the background there were plenty of acute inflammatory cells. This patient responded favorably to antihelminthics. We report this case to highlight the morphology of the parasite and also to emphasize that such findings should not be neglected. Timely reporting and appropriate treatment of such cases will prevent further complications of this parasite including endometritis, salphingitis and peritonitis.

  5. Eggs containing larvae of Enterobius vermicularis in vaginal smear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Jyothi B; Kulkarni, Dhanashri V; Prabhu, VL

    2012-01-01

    Enterobius vermicularis also known commonly as pinworm is the most common intestinal parasite. It is a nematode that inhabits the human terminal ileum, colon and appendix. The fertilized female migrates to the perianal area where eggs are deposited but occasionally introduces itself into adjacent orifices, most commonly the female genitourinary tract. Thus the eggs can be seen in the vaginal smear as a result of contamination. We report a case wherein the patient presented with signs and symptoms of vulvovaginitis. In her vaginal smear there were eggs of Enterobius vermicularis which showed a coiled larva within it. In the background there were plenty of acute inflammatory cells. This patient responded favorably to antihelminthics. We report this case to highlight the morphology of the parasite and also to emphasize that such findings should not be neglected. Timely reporting and appropriate treatment of such cases will prevent further complications of this parasite including endometritis, salphingitis and peritonitis. PMID:22438633

  6. Composition of agarose substrate affects behavioral output of Drosophila larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthi Aristomenis Apostolopoulou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade the Drosophila larva has evolved into a simple model organism offering the opportunity to integrate molecular genetics with systems neuroscience. This led to a detailed understanding of the functional neuronal networks for a number of sensory functions and behaviors including olfaction, vision, gustation and learning and memory. Typically, behavioral assays in use exploit simple Petri dish setups with either agarose or agar as a substrate. However, neither the quality nor the concentration of the substrate is generally standardized across these experiments and there is no data available on how larval behavior is affected by such different substrates. Here, we have investigated the effects of different agarose concentrations on several larval behaviors. We demonstrate that agarose concentration is an important parameter, which affects all behaviors tested: preference, feeding, learning and locomotion. Larvae can discriminate between different agarose concentrations, they feed differently on them, they can learn to associate an agarose concentration with an odor stimulus and crawl faster on a substrate of higher agarose concentration. Additionally, we have investigated the effect of agarose concentration on three quinine based behaviors: preference, feeding and learning. We show that in all cases examined the behavioral output changes in an agarose concentration-dependent manner. Our results suggest that comparisons between experiments performed on substrates differing in agarose concentration should be done with caution. It should be taken into consideration that the agarose concentration can affect the behavioral output and thereby the experimental outcomes per se potentially due to an increased escape response on more rigid substrates.

  7. Immunological evaluation of some antigens of Lucilia sericata larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Hoda S; Fahmy, Magdy M; Attia, Marwa M; El Khateeb, Rabab M; Shalaby, Hatem A; Mohamed, Mai A

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to select an antigen of Lucilia sericata larvae showing both high antigenicity and cross-reactive binding abilities with other related antigens of L. sericata larvae for obtaining a promising candidate vaccine antigen. The ELISA results primary concluded that among the excretory secretory (ES) and midgut (MG) antigens of the different larval instars of L. sericata, MGL2 could be characterized as antigen which was able to reflect the highest level of antigenicity and cross-reactivity with the other tested L. sericata antigens. The results were extended to spot the light on the relation between different protein bands in MGL2 and rabbit hyper- immune sera (HIS) raised against the other tested antigens using SDS-PAGE and Western blot technique. Analysis by SDS-PAGE of ES and MG antigens of the different larval instars of L. sericata revealed common protein bands at molecular weights of about 10, 12, 16, 20, 28, 33 and 46 kDa. Western blotting of MGL2 antigen transferred to nitrocellulose sheet revealed reaction by MGL2 HIS to five polypeptide bands; 20, 28, 33, 46 and 63 kDa. Three bands of 28, 33 and 63 kDa were the most prominent bands detected whereas; there was a weak reaction with bands of 20 and 46 kDa. But what was apparent in Western blot was a strong reaction of all tested HIS with a polypeptide band of 63 kDa. This band might be considered to be the main cause of cross reactive binding ability of MGL2 antigen that had been recorded previously in ELISA technique.

  8. Impact of ultraviolet-B radiation on planktonic fish larvae: Alteration of the osmoregulatory function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sucre, Elliott, E-mail: elliott.sucre@univ-montp2.fr [AEO Team (Adaptation Ecophysiologique et Ontogenese), UMR 5119 Ecosym UM2, CNRS, IRD, Ifremer, UM1, Universite Montpellier 2, cc092, Pl. Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier, Cx 05 (France); Vidussi, Francesca [RESEAUX Team (Reseaux Planctoniques et Changement Environnemental), UMR 5119 Ecosym UM2, CNRS, IRD, Ifremer, UM1, Universite Montpellier 2, cc093, Pl. Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier, Cx 05 (France); Mostajir, Behzad [RESEAUX Team (Reseaux Planctoniques et Changement Environnemental), UMR 5119 Ecosym UM2, CNRS, IRD, Ifremer, UM1, Universite Montpellier 2, cc093, Pl. Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier, Cx 05 (France); Centre d' ecologie marine experimentale MEDIMEER (Mediterranean centre for Marine Ecosystem Experimental Research), Universite Montpellier 2-CNRS (UMS 3301), Station Mediterraneenne de l' Environnement Littoral, MEDIMEER, 2 Rue des Chantiers, 34200 Sete (France); Charmantier, Guy; Lorin-Nebel, Catherine [AEO Team (Adaptation Ecophysiologique et Ontogenese), UMR 5119 Ecosym UM2, CNRS, IRD, Ifremer, UM1, Universite Montpellier 2, cc092, Pl. Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier, Cx 05 (France)

    2012-03-15

    Coastal marine ecosystems are submitted to variations of several abiotic and biotic parameters, some of them related to global change. Among them the ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation (UVBR: 280-320 nm) may strongly impact planktonic fish larvae. The consequences of an increase of UVBR on the osmoregulatory function of Dicentrarchus labrax larvae have been investigated in this study. In young larvae of D. labrax, as in other teleosts, osmoregulation depends on tegumentary ion transporting cells, or ionocytes, mainly located on the skin of the trunk and of the yolk sac. As early D. labrax larvae passively drift in the top water column, ionocytes are exposed to solar radiation. The effect of UVBR on larval osmoregulation in seawater was evaluated through nanoosmometric measurements of the blood osmolality after exposure to different UV-B treatments. A loss of osmoregulatory capability occured in larvae after 2 days of low (50 {mu}W cm{sup -2}: 4 h L/20 h D) and medium (80 {mu}W cm{sup -2}: 4 h L/20 h D) UVBR exposure. Compared to control larvae kept in the darkness, a significant increase in blood osmolality, abnormal behavior and high mortalities were detected in larvae exposed to UVBR from 2 days on. At the cellular level, an important decrease in abundance of tegumentary ionocytes and mucous cells was observed after 2 days of exposure to UVBR. In the ionocytes, two major osmoeffectors were immunolocalized, the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase and the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}/2Cl{sup -} cotransporter. Compared to controls, the fluorescent immunostaining was lower in UVBR-exposed larvae. We hypothesize that the impaired osmoregulation in UVBR-exposed larvae originates from the lower number of tegumentary ionocytes and mucous cells. This alteration of the osmoregulatory function could negatively impact the survival of young larvae at the surface water exposed to UVBR.

  9. Detection of larvae of Toxocara canis in milk: an experimental study in rabbits

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    Vamilton Alvares Santarém

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Toxocariasis, caused most commonly by Toxocara canis, is an important cosmopolitan zoonosis. Paratenic hosts have been employed to provide knowledge regard to the transmission of toxocariasis. Transmammary transmission in murine experimentally infected was observed based on the recovery of larvae from the tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of transmammary transmission of Toxocara canis in rabbits by detecting larvae directly in milk. Seventeen sexually mature virgin white New Zealand female rabbits were divided into two groups. Twelve animals were orally inoculated with 1,000 T. canis embryonated eggs (infected group, and five animals remained uninfected (control group. One month following the infection, the females were mated. Manual collection of 500 ?L of milk from each rabbit was performed on days +7, +14 and +21 of lactation for three consecutive lactations. The recovery of larvae was determined via a centrifuge-sedimentation technique using ether and formalin solutions. ELISA test was run to confirm the production of anti-T. canis antibodies (IgG by infected rabbits. The presence of larvae was observed in milk samples from 5 (41.7% of the 12 infected rabbits. The total number of recovered larvae was 20, ranging from 1 to 4 larvae per lactation/rabbit. Larvae were recovered exclusively on days 7 and 14 of lactation. Recovery was verified in different lactations. No significant difference was observed with respect to the number of larvae either in the same lactation period or in different lactation periods. Anti-T. canis antibodies were detected in all infected rabbits. In conclusion, the presence of larvae in rabbit milk samples suggests the possibility of galactogenic transmission of T. canis in paratenic hosts. Moreover, the technique employed in this study allows for the recovery of larvae directly from milk.

  10. Feeding of Marbled Goby, Oxyeleotris marmorata (Blkr., Larvae in the Two Weeks of Their Early Life

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    Irzal Effendi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe experiment was carried out at the Laboratory of Aquaculture System and Technology, Faculty of Fisheries, Institut Pertanian Bogor, Bogor. Factorial arrangement in randomised block design was used in this experiment with two factors: kind of feed and feed density for sand goby, Oxyeleotris marmorata (Blkr. larvae. There were 3 kinds of feed: rotifer, enriched-rotifer, and egg yolk-premix. Rotifer density of 20, 30, and 40 individuals/ml were maintained troughout the experiment. Egg yolk-premix were given per day in equivalent quantity as those rotifers in the treatment. Larvae of 40 individuals/l were kept in the 250 l plastic tanks, filled with 200 l of aerated ground water for 15 days indoor. Larvae fed rotifer showed better survival and growth rate than those fed egg yolk-premix. Increased rotifer density tended to increase survival and growth rate of larvae.Key words :  marbled goby, Oxyeleotris marmorata, larvae, feeding, rotifers ABSTRAKPercobaan ini dilakukan di Kolam Percobaan Babakan, Laboratorium Bogor, Bogor, dan dirancang berbentuk factorial dalam rancangan acak kelompok, dengan faktor: (1 jenis pakan dan (2 kepadatan pakan. Jenis pakan dibedakan menjadi: rotifera, rotifera-diperkaya, dan kuning telur-premiks, sedangkan kepadatan rotifera dibedakan menjadi : 20,30, dan 40 individu/ml, dipertahankan setiap hari. Kuning telur-premiks diberikan kepada larva ikan betutu, Oxyeleotris marmorata setiap hari yang setara dengan bobot rotifera setiap perlakuan, berdasarkan bobot kering keduanya. Larva sebanyak 40 ekor/l dipelihara dalam tangki plastik bervolume 250 l yang diisi air 200 l selama 15 hari dalam ruangan. Larva yang diberi rotifera cenderung memiliki kelangsungan hidup dan pertumbuhan lebih besar daripada kuning telur-premiks. Kepadatan rotifera yang semakin tinggi cenderung dapat meningkatkan kelangsungan hidup dan pertumbuhan larva.Kata kunci :  ikan betutu, Oxyeleotris marmorata, larva, pemberian pakan, rotifera

  11. Seasonal fluctuation in the distribution of eggs and larvae of flat fishes (Pleuronectiformes - Pisces) in the Cochin Backwater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devi, C.B.L.

    Attempts have been made to correlate the abundance of eggs and larvae of flat fishes belonging to families Cynoglossidae and Soleidae with the hydrographical parameters of the environment, particularly the salinity. The eggs and larvae were found...

  12. Description of the mature larva of Pseudopyrochroa depressa (Pic) (Coleoptera: Pyrochroidae: Pyrochroinae), with comparison to other Taiwanese Pseudopyrochroa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Daniel K; Hsiao, Yun

    2016-10-12

    Field collections and rearing has established an association between the larva and adult of the Taiwanese Pseudopyrochroa depressa. Larvae were collected from beneath bark of the exposed portions of a dead, decaying log in a mesic montane forest and successfully reared to the adult stage. The mature larva is described and salient features are illustrated and compared to other known pyrochroid larvae from Taiwan. Notes on larval habitats and natural history are also provided.

  13. Description of the final instar larva of Orthetrum borneense Kimmins, 1936 (Odonata, Libellulidae), using rearing and molecular methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, Philip O M; Butler, Stephen G; Dow, Rory A

    2016-02-18

    The final instar larva of Orthetrum borneense Kimmins, 1936, is described and figured for the first time based on exuviae from three male and six female larvae collected in Sarawak, Borneo (East Malaysia). It is compared with an early instar larva, which was matched to the adult O. borneense by DNA barcoding, and the known larvae of other species of this genus that occur in the region.

  14. UJI KETAHANAN LARVA UDANG GALAH DARI BEBERAPA SUMBER POPULASI TERHADAP BAKTERI Vibrio harveyi

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    Ikhsan Khasani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Salah satu penyakit yang sering menyerang udang di pembenihan adalah vibriosis, yang disebabkan oleh bakteri Vibrio harveyi. Penelitian bertujuan untuk mengetahui tingkat ketahanan beberapa strain larva udang galah, yaitu asal Sungai Ogan, Sumatera Selatan; Sungai Asahan, Sumatera Utara; Sungai Barito, Kalimantan Selatan; Sungai Ciasem, Jawa Barat; dan strain GIMacro terhadap infeksi bakteri Vibrio harveyi, sebagai dasar perakitan varietas unggul udang galah. Penelitian dilakukan dengan Rancangan Acak Lengkap (RAL dengan lima perlakuan, yaitu strain larva dan tiga ulangan. Larva udang galah stadia 4 dari 5 populasi berbeda, dengan panjang rata-rata 2,7±0,4 mm ditempatkan di stoples volume 3 L dengan padat penebaran  larva 100 ekor/L. Setiap wadah diisi 1 L air payau 10‰. Selanjutnya diinfeksi bakteri V. harveyi patogen berumur 24 jam dengan kepadatan 105 cfu/mL. Nauplii Artemia diberikan pada pagi dan sore hari. Parameter yang diamati meliputi pengamatan visual abnormalitas larva uji yang dilihat dari tingkah laku larva dan kondisi organ hepatopankreas, tingkat sintasan, kelimpahan total bakteri Vibrio sp. dan V. harveyi, identifikasi bakteri, dan parameter kualitas air. Selama 48 jam perlakuan sintasan larva yang berasal dari strain induk yang berbeda memberikan hasil berbeda nyata dengan tingkat sintasan tertinggi pada larva asal Barito, yaitu 75%; diikuti GIMacro 65%; Asahan 61,33%; Ciasem 53,66%; strain Ogan 20%. Vibriosis caused by Vibrio harveyi is a serious problem in intensive system hatcheries of freshwater prawn. This study was conducted to study the resistance of larvae from different locations i.e. Ogan River, South Sumatra; Asahan River, North Sumatra; Barito River, South Kalimantan; Ciasem River, West Java; and GIMacro, as part of breeding program to create superior prawn strain. Complete randomized design was used in this study, with 5 treatments, i.e. larvae source and 3 replications. 4th stage of freshwater prawn larvae from

  15. A case of human enteric myiasis due to larvae of Hermetia illucens (Family: Stratiomyiadae): first report in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H L; Chandrawathani, P; Wong, W Y; Tharam, S; Lim, W Y

    1995-12-01

    A case of true enteric myiasis in a 7-year-old girl is reported. Two larvae were obtained from the vomitus of the patient. After processing and identification, the larvae were found to be those of Hermetia illucens (Soldier Fly). This is the first case of true enteric myiasis due to these larvae in Malaysia.

  16. Effects of environmental factors on growth, survival, and metamorphosis of geoduck clam (Panopea japonica A. Adams, 1850 larvae

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    Zhongming Huo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of temperature, salinity, diet, and stocking density on the growth, survival, and metamorphosis of geoduck clam Panopea japonica larvae. The larvae all died at a temperature of 22 °C after day 12, suggesting that the larvae of P. japonica could not survive when the temperature was higher than 22 °C. P. japonica could be incubated at 19 °C for the fast growth, high survival and metamorphosis of larvae. The embryos all died when the salinity was below 25 ppt. The larvae showed poor survival when the salinity was below 25 ppt, with all larvae dying before day 12, suggesting that larvae are sensitive to low salinity. The optimum salinity for the growth, survival and metamorphosis of larvae was 32 ppt. The use of a mixture of Isochrysis galbana and Nitzschia closterium (1:1 as a food source for the P. japonica larvae improved their growth, survival, and metamorphosis. A density of 20 individuals/ml appeared to be optimal for normal D-larvae of Panopea japonica, and 3–9 larvae/ml was optimal for the growth and survival of the P. japonica larvae raised in the hatchery.

  17. Some aspects in early life stage of climbing perch, Anabas testudineus larvae

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    Ponpanom Promkaew

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The sexual maturity of female climbing perch, Anabas testudineus was studied by determining fecundity and gonadosomatic index (GSI. It was found that the size at sexual maturity of female climbing perch was 15.20±1.24 cm (mean±SD in total length and 61.10±17.32 g in body weight. The eggs were floating and rounded. The fertilized eggs had a diameter of 830±39 μm. The fecundity was 24,120.5±3,328.24 ova/ fish and gonadosomatic index (GSI was 10.4±2.5%. Newly hatched larvae of climbing perch were produced by induced spawning using chemical injection (Suprefact and Motilium. The sexually mature fishes were cultured in fiber-glass tank (water volume 300 liters with the ratio of male and female brooders 2:1. The fertilization rate, hatching out and hatching rate experiments were carried out using a 15-liter glass aquarium (water volume 10 liters containing 7,000-9,000 eggs. It was found that the eggs were floating and rounded. The fertilized eggs had a diameter of 830±39 μm. The average fertilization rate was 92.67%, hatching out was 20 hr 30 min and average hatching rate was 87.44% at a water temperature of 27.0-30.5ºC. Sampling of the newly-hatched larvae was done at 2-hour intervals, when 20 of them were randomly taken and preserved in 10% buffered formalin for later deter-mination of yolk absorption time. Observation using a microscope revealed that newly hatched larvae were 2.02±0.20 mm in total length and had yolk sacs of 111.33±46.19 mm3 in volume. The yolk sacs were completely absorbed within 92 hr after hatching at a water temperature of 27.0-30.5ºC. Up until full mouth development (start of feeding, 2-hourly samplings of twenty newly hatched larvae were taken from an aquarium for observation of the size of mouth opening. All the larvae had open mouths about 28 hr after hatching (2.95±0.59 mm TL, with the mouths measuring 328.42±32.23 mm in height. The feeding experiments were carried out using a 15-liter glass aquarium (water

  18. Mosquito transcriptome profiles and filarial worm susceptibility in Armigeres subalbatus.

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    Matthew T Aliota

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Armigeres subalbatus is a natural vector of the filarial worm Brugia pahangi, but it kills Brugia malayi microfilariae by melanotic encapsulation. Because B. malayi and B. pahangi are morphologically and biologically similar, comparing Ar. subalbatus-B. pahangi susceptibility and Ar. subalbatus-B. malayi refractoriness could provide significant insight into recognition mechanisms required to mount an effective anti-filarial worm immune response in the mosquito, as well as provide considerable detail into the molecular components involved in vector competence. Previously, we assessed the transcriptional response of Ar. subalbatus to B. malayi, and now we report transcriptome profiling studies of Ar. subalbatus in relation to filarial worm infection to provide information on the molecular components involved in B. pahangi susceptibility.Utilizing microarrays, comparisons were made between mosquitoes exposed to B. pahangi, B. malayi, and uninfected bloodmeals. The time course chosen facilitated an examination of key events in the development of the parasite, beginning with the very start of filarial worm infection and spanning to well after parasites had developed to the infective stage in the mosquito. At 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 h post infection and 2-3, 5-6, 8-9, and 13-14 days post challenge there were 31, 75, 113, 76, 54, 5, 3, 13, and 2 detectable transcripts, respectively, with significant differences in transcript abundance (increase or decrease as a result of parasite development.Herein, we demonstrate that filarial worm susceptibility in a laboratory strain of the natural vector Ar. subalbatus involves many factors of both known and unknown function that most likely are associated with filarial worm penetration through the midgut, invasion into thoracic muscle cells, and maintenance of homeostasis in the hemolymph environment. The data show that there are distinct and separate transcriptional patterns associated with filarial worm susceptibility

  19. GC-MS investigation of the chemical composition of honeybee drone and queen larvae homogenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidorov Valery A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Honeybee larva homogenate appears to be underrated and insufficiently explored but this homogenate is an exceptionally valuable honeybee product. Drone larva homogenate is very nutritional due to its high content of proteins, free amino acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Moreover, the biological characteristics of honeybee larvae indicate the presence of chemical substances that may be pharmacologically active. In spite of the above, the chemical composition of honeybee larva has not gained as much attention as that of other bee products. In this study, the chemical composition of honeybee brood homogenate has been investigated using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. As a result, it was possible to isolate as many as 115 extractive organic compounds from 6 samples of crude queen and 9 samples of drone homogenate. The main groups of substances extracted from either type of homogenate were composed of free amino acids and carbohydrates. The relative content of amino acids in queen homogenate as well as the share of essential amino acids were found to be higher than in the drone homogenate. Disaccharide trehalose was the dominant sugar in the queen larvae, whilst glucose prevailed in the drone larvae. Comparative chemical analyses of honeybee queen and drone larva homogenates have allowed us to make a preliminary inference about a higher overall value of the former.

  20. Localized search cues in corn roots for western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernklau, E J; Bjostad, L B; Meihls, L N; Coudron, T A; Lim, E; Hibbard, B E

    2009-04-01

    Cues that elicit a characteristic localized search behavior by neonate larvae of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), were extracted from living corn, Zea mays L., roots with acetone. Larvae were exposed to corn roots or to an acetone extract of corn roots and then transferred into a bioassay arena where their movements were tracked and recorded. After a 5-min exposure to live corn roots, larvae produced highly convoluted tracks that were indicative of a localized search behavior, and these distinctive tracks were also produced by larvae exposed to an acetone extract of corn roots. Larvae exposed to a filter paper control moved in relatively straight paths that were indicative of ranging behavior. Larval tracks were recorded by means of a videocamera and tracking software, and four parameters of movement were used to quantify the tracks: mean turn angle, mean meander, total distance, and maximum distance from origin. For every parameter measured, tracks resulting from exposure to the control were significantly different from tracks resulting from exposure to live corn roots and to all doses of the corn root extract. In a separate experiment, larvae exposed to corn root pieces or corn root juice exhibited the localized search behavior, but larvae exposed to oat root pieces and oat root juice (nonhost) exhibited ranging behavior.

  1. Diet affects the redox system in developing Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penglase, Samuel; Edvardsen, Rolf B; Furmanek, Tomasz; Rønnestad, Ivar; Karlsen, Ørjan; van der Meeren, Terje; Hamre, Kristin

    2015-08-01

    The growth and development of marine fish larvae fed copepods is superior to those fed rotifers, but the underlying molecular reasons for this are unclear. In the following study we compared the effects of such diets on redox regulation pathways during development of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae. Cod larvae were fed a control diet of copepods or the typical rotifer/Artemia diet commonly used in commercial marine fish hatcheries, from first feeding until after metamorphosis. The oxidised and reduced glutathione levels, the redox potential, and the mRNA expression of 100 genes in redox system pathways were then compared between treatments during larval development. We found that rotifer/Artemia-fed cod larvae had lower levels of oxidised glutathione, a more reduced redox potential, and altered expression of approximately half of the redox system genes when compared to copepod-fed larvae. This rotifer/Artemia diet-induced differential regulation of the redox system was greatest during periods of suboptimal growth. Upregulation of the oxidative stress response transcription factor, nrf2, and NRF2 target genes in rotifer/Artemia fed larvae suggest this diet induced an NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response. Overall, the data demonstrate that nutritional intake plays a role in regulating the redox system in developing fish larvae. This may be a factor in dietary-induced differences observed in larval growth. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Fish larvae retention linked to abrupt bathymetry at Mejillones Bay (northern Chile during coastal upwelling events

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    Pablo M Rojas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of oceanic circulation and bathymetry on the fish larvae retention inside Mejillones Bay, northern Chile, was examined. Fish larvae were collected during two coastal upwelling events in November 1999 and January 2000. An elevated fish larvae accumulation was found near an oceanic front and a zone of low-speed currents. Three groups of fish larvae were identified: the coastal species (Engraulis ringens and Sardinops sagax, associated with high chlorophyll-a levels; larvae from the families Phosichthyidae (Vinciguerria lucetia and Myctophidae (Diogenichthys laternatus and Triphoturus oculeus, associated with the thermocline (12°C, and finally, larvae of the families Myctophidae (Diogenichthys atlanticus and Bathylagidae (Bathylagus nigrigenys, associated with high values of temperature and salinity. The presence of a seamount and submarine canyon inside Mejillones Bay appears to play an important role in the circulation during seasonal upwelling events. We propose a conceptual model of circulation and particles retention into Mejillones Bay. The assumption is that during strong upwelling conditions the flows that move along the canyon emerge in the centre of Mejillones Bay, producing a fish larvae retention zone. Understanding the biophysical interactions responsible to trap and/or concentrate particles is essential to protect these fragile upwelling ecosystems.

  3. Pengaruh ukuran tubuh ikan Poecilia reticulata pada daya pemangsaannya terhadap larva Culex quinquefasciatus

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    Noer Moehammadi

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to know the influence of poecilia reticulata body size, in the feeding capacity on Culex quinquifasciatus larvae. The research was experimental method with Complete Random Design., each treatment with 5 replications. The taken body size of Poecilia reticulata were; 1,50 cm; 2.50 cm; and 3.50 cm. the size of fish €™s body was measured from the tip of snout up to the end of fin (cm. The feeding capacity was determined by subtracting the first amount of larvae which was given the rest of larvae after 24 hours. The result showed that the difference of size of Poecilia reticulate body was significantly different in the feeding capacity on Culex quinquifasciatus larvae. The fish whose body size was 1.50 cm had the lowest feeding capacity by eating 77.2 larvae for average, and the highest one was the fist which body size was 2.50 cm by eating 113.6 larvae for average, subsequently the feeding capacity decrease to the fish which body size was 3.50 cm because of eating 100,6 larvae for 24 hours.

  4. The Effect of Water Content of Medium Containing Oryctes rhinoceros Larvae on Metarhizium anisopliae Pathogenicity

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    Dyah Rini Indriyanti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff Sorokin (Ascomycota: Hypocrealeswould effectively infect the target host on the appropriate medium water content. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of water content of medium on the effectiveness of M. anisopliae fungus infection on O. rhinoceros larvae in the laboratory. Fifty healthy third instar larvae of O. rhinoceros were  obtained from field. The M. anisopliae obtained from Estate Crop Protection Board in Salatiga. The conidia density and viability of M. anisopliae were examined before used. The medium for maintaining the larva was the sawdust that had been sterilized. A total of 50 plastic cups were prepared to place 50 larvae (1 larva/cup. Each cup was filled with 100 g medium  of sawdust plus 2 g of M. anisopliae which was then stirred until mixed, with different water content: P1 (20%, P2 (40%, P3 (60%, P4 (80% and P5 (98%. The result indicated that  the water content of the medium affected the effectiveness of M. anisopliae fungus infection on O. rhinoceros larvae. The water content influenced the duration of larval mortality at each treatment. An important finding in this study is that controlling O. rhineceros larvae  with M. anisopliae can be done by manipulating the water content of medium. The benefit of this study may be used for the recommendation of O. rhinoceros pest control using M. anisopliae  with an effective water media content.

  5. Resistance Detection of Aedes aegypti Larvae to Cypermethrin from Endemic Area in Cimahi City West Java

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    Endang Puji Astuti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vector control programs using chemical insecticide e.g organochlorin, organophosphate, carbamate, and pyrethroid (cypermethrin. When those insecticides were applied continuously, it may lead to vector resistance. The aim of this research was to detect any resistance of Ae. aegypti to cypermethrin in endemic areas of Cimahi. This research is a laboratory study that used biochemical test which referred to Lee’s method. Larva samples were collected from 8 villages, which are endemic area. Samples of larvae were collected from 15 villages belonged to dengue endemic areas in town of Cimahi, however, villages that meet the availability of larvae were only 8 villages. To detect the activity of monooxygenase enzyme, a biochemical assay was used in this research by created a reaction between larvae homogenate and sodium acetate substrate. The results of reaction were read using ELISA reader with spectrophotometer wave length of 595 nm. Overall, the results showed that most of the larvae in eight villages of Cimahi is still susceptible to cypermethrin. However, larvae from Cibabat village were 4% resistant, 2% tolerant, and 94% susceptible. On the other hand, Cigugur village showed that 12.7% larvae were tolerant and 87.3% still susceptible. Other villages like Cimahi, Cibeureum, Melong, Baros, Cipageran, and Pasirkaliki still remains susceptible. Resistance detection using biochemical assay of cypermethrin insecticide for Ae.aegypti resulting data stated that in 6 villages were still susceptible but in 3 other villages were already tolerant and 1 village was already resistance.

  6. Diet affects the redox system in developing Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Penglase

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The growth and development of marine fish larvae fed copepods is superior to those fed rotifers, but the underlying molecular reasons for this are unclear. In the following study we compared the effects of such diets on redox regulation pathways during development of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua larvae. Cod larvae were fed a control diet of copepods or the typical rotifer/Artemia diet commonly used in commercial marine fish hatcheries, from first feeding until after metamorphosis. The oxidised and reduced glutathione levels, the redox potential, and the mRNA expression of 100 genes in redox system pathways were then compared between treatments during larval development. We found that rotifer/Artemia-fed cod larvae had lower levels of oxidised glutathione, a more reduced redox potential, and altered expression of approximately half of the redox system genes when compared to copepod-fed larvae. This rotifer/Artemia diet-induced differential regulation of the redox system was greatest during periods of suboptimal growth. Upregulation of the oxidative stress response transcription factor, nrf2, and NRF2 target genes in rotifer/Artemia fed larvae suggest this diet induced an NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response. Overall, the data demonstrate that nutritional intake plays a role in regulating the redox system in developing fish larvae. This may be a factor in dietary-induced differences observed in larval growth.

  7. Rain splash dispersal of third-stage larvae of Cooperia spp. (Trichostrongylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønvold, J

    1984-12-01

    Laboratory investigations were designed to study the distribution of splash droplets caused by splashes of water on the surface of a cow pat. Laboratory and field experiments were designed to evaluate the possibility of water splash dispersal of third-stage Cooperia spp. larvae from cow pats to the surroundings. One incident drop of water 5 mm in diameter falling 2.2 m on a cow pat produced approximately 1,000 splash droplets. In still air, more than 90% of the splash droplets were found within 60 cm from the point of impact, and only a few travelled beyond 90 cm. After a latent period, incident drops of water 5 mm in diameter falling 2.2 m on a cow pat of 500 g, containing 450 third-stage larvae of Cooperia spp. per g feces, resulted in splash dispersal of larvae to a maximum distance of 63 cm from the point of impact; the majority of larvae were found within 21 cm. A field experiment confirmed that lateral splash dispersal of third-stage Cooperia spp. larvae during a shower can be very effective. On one occasion there was a splash dispersal of 4,851 third-stage Cooperia spp. larvae in 45 minutes to an area from 1 to 15 cm around the periphery of a cow pat of 500 g containing 120 third-stage larvae per g of feces. This corresponds to a dispersal of 8% of total.

  8. PENGOLAHAN SAMPAH ORGANIK PERKOTAAN MENGGUNAKAN LARVA BLACK SOLDIER FLY (Hermetia illucens

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    Lena Monita

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Black soldier fly (BSF larvae (Hermetia illucens can be used as insect based municipal organic waste recycling technology. The purpose of this research was to examine the utilization of BSF larvae as bio-processors of organic waste in order to produce compost and nutritious larvae biomass. Larvae feeds as treatments of experiment consist of restaurant organic waste mixed with fish silage 6% as treatment A, restaurant organic waste with dairy blood waste 6% as treatment B, and restaurant organic waste as treatment C. The result of this research showed that the highest larvae growth according to its length, width and body weigth was resulted by treatment B, followed by treatments A and C. Total metamorphic development time from egg to imago was 35 days; comprised of as larvae, prepupa, pupa, and imago for 12-13, 6, 6, and 15 days, respectively. Proximate analysis showed that BSF larvae had protein content 33.31 to 33.88%, and fat content 30.07 to 34.39%. Final solid residues of the three treatments was ranged from 90.3-90.6% after 10-11 days of bio-processing.

  9. Inclusion of copepod Acartia tonsa nauplii in the feeding of Centropomus undecimalis larvae increases stress resistance

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    Wanessa de Melo-Costa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This research represents the first result of studies of the common snook Centropomus undecimalis larvae from broodstock matured in captivity in Brazil. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the inclusion of Acartia tonsa nauplii improves stress resistance of common snook larvae. The larvae were fed with: rotifers Brachionus plicatilis (10 to 15 mL-1; A. tonsa nauplii (0.25 to 0.5 mL-1 and rotifers (5 to 7.5 mL-1, and A. tonsa nauplii (0.12 to 0.25 mL-1. The average percentage of survival of the treatments was 11.9%. At 20 days of age, larvae were subjected to thermal stress. Subsequently, the stress resistance was evaluated. Common snook larvae fed B. plicatilis+A. tonsa reached a higher weight and length (7.5 ± 0.00 mg and 9.1 ± 0.23 mm, respectively and resisted more heat stress (87.4% than larvae fed other foods, indicating that the feed mixture is satisfactory as a starter diet for larvae of common snook. However, more research is needed to confirm these results.

  10. Morphological differentiation of Ixodes persulcatus and I. ricinus hybrid larvae in experiment and under natural conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugmyrin, Sergey V; Belova, Oxana A; Ieshko, Eugeniy P; Bespyatova, Liubov A; Karganova, Galina G

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was detection of hybrid larvae in Ixodes persulcatus and Ixodes ricinus cohabitation sites. To this end, the following three tasks were solved: interspecies crossing of ticks, evaluation of typical morphological signs of the hybrid larvae, and analysis of collected specimens from sites of sympatry. Under experimental conditions, hybrid larvae of I. persulcatus (female) and I. ricinus (male) were obtained that differed from the parental species by the size of setae on the scutum and alloscutum. Discriminant analysis yielded 87.5% classification accuracy for the priory set groups of I. persulcatus, I. ricinus, and hybrids. Of 88 hybrid larvae, 13 (15%) were classified as I. persulcatus and 4 (5%) as I. ricinus. We measured larvae of Ixodes ticks (n=141) collected from small mammals in 1950-1970 in Karelia in cohabitation sites of these species that were previously classified as I. persulcatus or I. ricinus. According to the results of discriminant analysis, 31 larvae (22%) were classified as hybrids with probability p≥0.52; for 10 larvae (7%), the probability of placement to the hybrid group was >0.95. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. [Effects of fermented cattle dung on the growth and development of Tenebrio molitor larvae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiang-Wei; Wang, Xia; Guo, Li-Yue; Zhan, Li-Jie; Bo, Wen-Jing; Li, Zhan; Wu, Guang-Lei; Jiang, Gao-Ming

    2012-07-01

    In order to make use of and industrialize the animal dung from large cattle farms, this paper explored the feasibility of using Tenebrio molitor to digest and utilize cattle dung. Cattle dung was mixed with the conventional feed (65% wheat bran, 30% corn flour, and 5% bean pulp) of T. molitor in definite proportions, and fermented with effective microorganisms (EM). The fermented products containing 60% and 80% of cattle dung (FD1 and FD2, respectively) were selected to feed T. molitor larvae, and the effects of the fermented products on the growth curve, death rate, pupation rate, and antioxidant system of the larvae were compared. Compared with CK (conventional deed), the FD1 made the developmental duration of the larvae prolonged by 10 days and the larvae's death rate upraised somewhat, but made the single larva's total food intake, average body mass, crude fat content, and ratio of unsaturated to saturated fat acids increased by 49%, 28%, 26%, and 32%, respectively (P molitor larvae had weak adaptability to FD2. Our findings suggested that using FD1 to feed the 3rd instar of T. molitor larvae would have good practical prospects in industrializing cattle dung.

  12. Capture of Large Particles by Suspension-Feeding Scaleworm Larvae (Polychaeta: Polynoidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, N E; Pernet, B

    1996-10-01

    Most of the polychaete larvae in which feeding mechanisms have been studied feed using an opposed-band mechanism, capturing particles with prototrochal and metatrochal ciliary bands and transporting them to the mouth via a food groove. However, many other planktotrophic polychaete larvae lack a metatroch and food groove and thus must feed in a different way. In this latter group are the larvae of polynoid polychaetes, which not only lack a metatroch and food groove but also bear a bundle of long cilia (the oral brush) attached near the left side of the mouth. In feeding experiments with polystyrene beads and plankton, larvae of the polynoid Arctonoe vittata ingested larger particles (up to 60 {mu}m in diameter) than those ingested by the opposed-band feeding larvae of the serpulid Serpula vermicularis (up to 12 μm in diameter). Videotaped images of feeding A. vittata larvae showed that capture behavior was elicited as particles in a feeding current driven by the prototroch approached or contacted the larval episphere. Particles on or very near the episphere were disengaged by a recoiling motion of the larva and were then moved to the mouth, probably by the oral brush. This feeding mechanism may be widespread in the polychaete superfamily Aphroditacea, which includes about 10% of extant polychaete species.

  13. Anisakis pegreffii Larvae in Sea Eels (Astroconger myriaster) from the South Sea, Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaeeun; Lim, Hyemi; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Shin, Eun-Hee; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2015-06-01

    Anisakis simplex sensu stricto (s.s.), Anisakis pegreffii, Anisakis berlandi (=A. simplex sp. C), and Anisakis typica are the 4 major species of Anisakis type I larvae. In the Republic of Korea (Korea), A. pegreffii, A. berlandi, and A. typica larvae in fish hosts has seldom been documented. In this study, molecular analysis was performed on Anisakis larvae from the sea eels (Astroconger myriaster), the major source of human anisakiasis in Korea, collected from Tongyeong City, a southern coastal area of Korea. All 20 sea eels examined were infected with Anisakis type I larvae (160 larvae; 8 per fish). Their species were analyzed using PCR-RFLP patterns and nucleotide sequences of internal transcribed spacers (ITS1, 5.8 subunit gene, and ITS2) and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 2 (cox2). Most (86.8%; 112/129) of the Anisakis type I larvae were A. pegreffii, and 7.8% (10/129) were A. typica. The remaining 5.4% (7/129) was not identified. Thus, A. pegreffii is the major species of anisakid larvae in sea eels of the southern coast of Korea.

  14. Reduced cannibalistic behavior of African catfish, Clarias gariepinus, larvae under dark and dim conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Yukinori; Sanudin, Noorsyarinah; Firdaus, Rian Freddie; Saad, Shahbudin

    2013-06-01

    In general, African catfish shows higher survival rates in the dark conditions than in the light conditions. In this study, larval behavior of African catfish was observed under 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 lx using a CCD camera to investigate the reason why African catfish larvae show higher survival rates in dark conditions. The larvae showed significantly higher swimming activity under 0, 0.01, and 0.1 lx than that under 10 and 100 lx. The larvae also showed significantly increased aggressive behavior under 10 and 100 lx; the swimming larvae attacked resting individuals more frequently under 10 and 100 lx than under 0, 0.01, and 0.1 lx. The aggressive behavior and sharp teeth of the attacking larvae appeared to induce skin surface lesions on injured larvae. Chemical substances were then generated from the injured skin surface, and these chemical stimuli triggered cannibalistic behavior in other fish near the injured fish. The results of this study demonstrate that the higher survival rates of African catfish larvae under dark conditions are a result of inactivity and subsequent increase in chemical releasing stimuli concentrations around inactive individuals that triggers feeding behavior in nearby active catfish. Therefore, we recommend larval rearing of African catfish in dark or dim conditions, as it improves catfish survival rates.

  15. The larva of Eustra (Coleoptera, Paussinae, Ozaenini: a facultative associate of ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Moore

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Larvae of the ground beetle genus Eustra Schmidt-Goebel are described and illustrated for the first time and some biological notes are reported. One specimen of an unknown Eustra species was collected while excavating a nest of the ant Pachycondyla javana Mayr, in Taiwan, which is the first report of a paussine associated with a member of the ant subfamily Ponerinae. Several larvae and adults of a second species, Eustra chinensis Bänninger, were collected in Shanghai under bark with no association with ants. First instar larvae of the latter species were also reared in the lab. The occurrence of larvae of the genus Eustra both inside and outside ant nests, together with a report of adults collected inside a nest in Taiwan, suggests that members of this genus may be facultative predators or facultative symbionts of ants, an attribute that has never been reported for this genus. The larvae of Eustra show several unique features, including a peculiar bidentate mandibular apex, an extremely long galea, one of two tarsal claws greatly reduced, abdominal setae (including those of terminal disk elongate and clavate at apex, urogomphi wide and flattened, and inflated sensilla S-I. Larvae were studied by both optical and scanning electron microscopy, their morphological features are compared with those of other described Paussinae larvae, and their potential phylogenetic and functional significance are discussed.

  16. The larva of Eustra (Coleoptera, Paussinae, Ozaenini):a facultative associate of ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Wendy; Song, Xiao-Bin; Di Giulio, Andrea

    2011-04-14

    Larvae of the ground beetle genus Eustra Schmidt-Goebel are described and illustrated for the first time and some biological notes are reported. One specimen of an unknown Eustra species was collected while excavating a nest of the ant Pachycondyla javana Mayr, in Taiwan, which is the first report of a paussine associated with a member of the ant subfamily Ponerinae. Several larvae and adults of a second species, Eustra chinensis Bänninger, were collected in Shanghai under bark with no association with ants. First instar larvae of the latter species were also reared in the lab. The occurrence of larvae of the genus Eustra both inside and outside ant nests, together with a report of adults collected inside a nest in Taiwan, suggests that members of this genus may be facultative predators or facultative symbionts of ants, an attribute that has never been reported for this genus. The larvae of Eustra show several unique features, including a peculiar bidentate mandibular apex, an extremely long galea, one of two tarsal claws greatly reduced, abdominal setae (including those of terminal disk) elongate and clavate at apex, urogomphi wide and flattened, and inflated sensilla S-I. Larvae were studied by both optical and scanning electron microscopy, their morphological features are compared with those of other described Paussinae larvae, and their potential phylogenetic and functional significance are discussed.

  17. Status of carbohydrate, protein and lipid profile in the mosquito larvae treated with certain phytoextracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Preeti; Mohan, Lalit; Dua, Kamal Kumar; Srivastava, Chand Narayan

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the impact of the most potent petroleum ether extract of Artemisia annua (A. annua) and Azadirachta indica (Az. indica) on total carbohydrate, lipid and protein level of Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Mosquito larvae were exposed to the extracts selected as per standard WHO procedure. Carbohydrate (glucose), total lipid and protein were estimated by the methods as Nelson, Bragdon and Lowry described, respectively. The glucose levels were increased to 27.87% and 46.8%, respectively in anopheline larval tissues after treatment with petroleum ether extract of A. annua and methanolic extract of Az. indica. In culicine larvae, glucose levels were reduced to 58.96% and 24.65%, respectively. After treatment with A. annua extract, lipid contents in anopheline and culicine larvae decreased by 28.57% and 25.0%, respectively and increased by 14.29% and 50.00% in the Anopheles and Culex larvae, respectively after treatment with methanolic extract of Az. indica. Total protein levels were reduced to 63.13% and 92.62% in anopheline and to 32.39% and 48.12% in culicine larvae after treatment with A. annua and Az. Indica extracts, respectively. Two extracts produce significant alterations in the biochemical profiles of anopheline and culicine larvae. Further, the impacting factors of extracts on carbohydrate, lipid and protein contents of larvae are species and specific extraction. It indicates the disturbed metabolic activity of the larvae. Copyright © 2011 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcripts analysis of infective larvae of an intestinal nematode, Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ayako; Nagayasu, Eiji; Nishimaki, Anna; Sawaguchi, Akira; Yanagawa, Sayaka; Maruyama, Haruhiko

    2011-01-01

    Free-living infective larvae of Strongyloides nematodes fulfill a number of requirements for the successful infection. They need to endure a long wait in harsh environmental conditions, like temperature, salinity, and pH, which might change drastically from time to time. Infective larvae also have to deal with pathogens and potentially hazardous free-living microbes in the environment. In addition, infective larvae must recognize the adequate host properly, and start skin penetration as quickly as possible. All these tasks are essentially important for the survival of Strongyloides nematodes, however, our knowledge is extremely limited in any one of these aspects. In order to understand how Strongyloides infective larvae meet these requirements, we examined transcripts of infective larvae by randomly sequencing cDNA clones constructed from S. venezuelensis infective larvae. After assembling successfully sequenced clones, we obtained 162 unique singletons and contigs, of which 84 had been significantly annotated. Annotated genes included those for respiratory enzymes, heat-shock proteins, neuromuscular proteins, proteases, and immunodominant antigens. Genes for lipase, small heat-shock protein, globin-like protein and cytochrome c oxidase were most abundantly transcribed, though genes of unknown functions were also abundantly transcribed. There were no hits found against NCBI or NEMABASE4 for 37 (22.3%) EST out of the total 162 EST. Although most of the transcripts were not infective larva-specific, the expression of respiration related proteins was most actively transcribed in the infective larva stage. The expression of astacin-like metalloprotease, small heat-shock protein, S. stercoralis L3Nie antigen homologue, and one unannotated and 2 novel genes was highly specific for the infective larva stage. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Responses of the metabolism of the larvae of Pocillopora damicornis to ocean acidification and warming.

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    Emily B Rivest

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification and warming are expected to threaten the persistence of tropical coral reef ecosystems. As coral reefs face multiple stressors, the distribution and abundance of corals will depend on the successful dispersal and settlement of coral larvae under changing environmental conditions. To explore this scenario, we used metabolic rate, at holobiont and molecular levels, as an index for assessing the physiological plasticity of Pocillopora damicornis larvae from this site to conditions of ocean acidity and warming. Larvae were incubated for 6 hours in seawater containing combinations of CO2 concentration (450 and 950 µatm and temperature (28 and 30°C. Rates of larval oxygen consumption were higher at elevated temperatures. In contrast, high CO2 levels elicited depressed metabolic rates, especially for larvae released later in the spawning period. Rates of citrate synthase, a rate-limiting enzyme in aerobic metabolism, suggested a biochemical limit for increasing oxidative capacity in coral larvae in a warming, acidifying ocean. Biological responses were also compared between larvae released from adult colonies on the same day (cohorts. The metabolic physiology of Pocillopora damicornis larvae varied significantly by day of release. Additionally, we used environmental data collected on a reef in Moorea, French Polynesia to provide information about what adult corals and larvae may currently experience in the field. An autonomous pH sensor provided a continuous time series of pH on the natal fringing reef. In February/March, 2011, pH values averaged 8.075 ± 0.023. Our results suggest that without adaptation or acclimatization, only a portion of naïve Pocillopora damicornis larvae may have suitable metabolic phenotypes for maintaining function and fitness in an end-of-the century ocean.

  20. Successful determination of larval dispersal distances and subsequent settlement for long-lived pelagic larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelayo Salinas-de-León

    Full Text Available Despite its importance, we still have a poor understanding of the level of connectivity between marine populations in most geographical locations. Taking advantage of the natural features of the southeast coast of New Zealand's North Island, we deployed a series of settlement stations and conducted plankton tows to capture recent settlers and planktonic larvae of the common intertidal gastropod Austrolittorina cincta (6-8 week larval period. Satellite image analysis and ground truthing surveys revealed the absence of suitable intertidal rocky shore habitat for A. cincta over a 100 km stretch of coastline between Kapiti Island to the south and Wanganui to the north. Fifteen settlement stations (3 replicates × 5 sites, which were used to mimic intertidal habitat suitable for A. cincta, were deployed for two months around and north of Kapiti Island (at 0.5, 1, 5, 15, 50 km. In addition, we also conducted plankton tows at each settlement station when the stations were first deployed to collect A. cincta larvae in the water column. On collection, all newly settled gastropods and larvae in the plankton samples were individually isolated, and a species-specific microsatellite marker was used to positively identify A. cincta individuals. Most of the positively identified A. cincta settlers and larvae were collected at the first three sampling stations (<5 km. However, low numbers of A. cincta settlers and larvae were also recorded at the two more distant locations (15 and 50 km. Dispersal curves modeled from our data suggested that <1% of gastropod larvae would travel more than 100 km. While our data show that most larvae are retained close to their natal populations (<5 km, a small proportion of larvae are able to travel much larger geographic distances. Our estimates of larval dispersal and subsequent settlement are one of only a few for marine species with a long-lived larva.

  1. Color variability and body size of larvae of two Epomis species (Coleoptera: Carabidae in Israel

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    Gil Wizen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Species identification using the characteristics of developmental stages is challenging. However, for insect taxonomy the coloration of larval stages can be an informative feature. The use of live specimens is recommended for this because the color fades in preserved specimens. In this study we examine the possibility of using variation in coloration and color pattern of larvae in order to distinguish between two ground beetles species Epomis dejeani Dejean, 1831 and E. circumscriptus Duftschmid, 1812. We present an atlas and describe the coloration and body size of the three larval stages of the above species based on live specimens. The first instar larvae of the two Epomis species can be easily distinguished based on their color. From the second instar on, the variability in coloration and color patterns increases, creating an overlap in these attributes between larvae of the two species. Except for minor differences in color of the antennae and the base of the mandibles, larvae of the two species are indistinguishable at the second and third larval stages. To the best of our knowledge this is the first attempt to use variation in coloration and color pattern in live larvae in order to identify coleopterans. The color atlas of the larvae enables simple separation of the two Epomis species without requiring sophisticated magnifying devices, although it is less straightforward at the second and third larval stages. We found similar body lengths between the two species for all developmental stages, except for third instar larvae prior to pupation. In the two species the difference in larval body length before pupation positively correlated with that of the adult beetles. More than 70% of the adults' length can be explained by the length of the late third-instar larva; i.e. the large larvae develop into large adults. The larger specimens are the females.

  2. Effects of drill cuttings on larvae of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järnegren, Johanna; Brooke, Sandra; Jensen, Henrik

    2017-03-01

    Fossil fuel consumption is predicted to dominate energy needs until at least 2040. To make up for reduced production from maturing fields, oil and gas exploration activities on the Norwegian continental shelf have greatly increased over the past several years. Strict emission controls have resulted in a substantial reduction in the release of hazardous chemicals. However, because of the increased exploration the discharges of water-based drill cuttings and muds have increased substantially, temporarily increasing water column sediment loads. The stony coral Lophelia pertusa is the most widely distributed and well-studied of the structure forming cold water corals (CWC) and it thrives in Norwegian waters where many reefs are located in the vicinity of oil platforms or exploration areas. This species provides habitat for a diverse and abundant assemblage of invertebrates and fishes, including commercially valuable species. High sediment loads are known to negatively affect adult corals, but impacts on the early life history stages are unknown. We investigated the effects of a range of drill cutting concentrations (0.5-640 ppm) on larvae of L. pertusa at ages five days and 15-20 days. One set of experiments was conducted in static experimental chambers that exposed larvae to decreasing concentrations over time, and the other maintained continuous drill cutting concentrations for the duration of the experiment (24 h). Increased sediment load for a duration of 24 h caused significant larval mortality, but there was an age-dependent difference in sensitivity of larvae. Younger larvae were significantly more susceptible to lower concentrations of drill cuttings than older larvae, while the older larvae were significantly more affected at higher concentrations. Five day old larvae were affected at treatment concentration 40 ppm. The larval cilia became clogged, preventing the larvae from swimming actively and ultimately causing mortality. Larvae of many species use cilia

  3. Feasibility study of biodiesel production using lipids of Hermetia illucens larva fed with organic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Siew Yoong; Kutty, Shamsul Rahman Mohamed; Malakahmad, Amirhossein; Tan, Chew Khun

    2016-01-01

    Hermetia illucens larvae by nature are a decomposer which fed on organic wastes. This study explores the potential of producing biodiesel using lipids from H. illucens larvae. Three types of organic wastes (sewage sludge, fruit waste and palm decanter cake from oil palm mill) were selected based on considerable generation and disposal concern in the area of study as well as lack of investigations as feed for Hermetia illucens larvae in current literatures. Growth rate of the larvae was determined with studying the changes in the biomass per day. H. illucens larvae fed with fruit waste and palm decanter cake have shown growth rates of 0.52±0.02 and 0.23±0.09 g d(-1), respectively. No positive sign of growth were observed in the larvae fed with treated sewage sludge (-0.04±0.01 g d(-1)). Biodiesel as fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) was synthesized by transesterification of the larvae lipid using sulphuric acid as catalyst in methanol. FAME produced was ascertained using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and GC-MS. The main compositions of fatty acid were found to be C12:0, C16:0 and C18:1n9c. Fatty acid composition of C12:0 fed with fruit waste, sewage sludge and palm decanter was found to be most abundant in the larvae lipid. The amount of C12:0 obtained was 76.13%, 58.31% and 48.06%, respectively. In addition, fatty acid of C16:0 was attained at 16.48% and 25.48% fed with sewage sludge and palm decanter, respectively. Based on the findings, FAME derived from larvae lipids is feasible to be used for biodiesel production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. PENGARUH AKTIVITAS ANTROPOGENIK DI SUNGAI CILIWUNG TERHADAP KOMUNITAS LARVA TRICHOPTERA (Effect of Anthropogenic Activities on Trichoptera Larvae Community in Ciliwung River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jojok Sudarso

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Sungai Ciliwung merupakan salah satu sungai besar di Propinsi Jawa Barat yang sekarang telah mengalami pencemaran organik dan kontaminasi oleh logam merkuri. Adanya pencemaran di Sungai Ciliwung dikhawatirkan dapat mengganggu keseimbangan ekologi dari larva serangga Trichoptera. Oleh sebab itu tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah mengungkap pengaruh aktivitas antropogenik pada Sungai Ciliwung terhadap komunitas larva Trichoptera. Pengambilan larva dilakukan dengan menggunakan jala surber dengan limakali ulangan setiap lokasi. Analisis korelasi pearson-product moment menunjukkan adanya korelasi yang kuat (r > 0,5 antara metrik biologi jumlah taksa, jumlah skor Stream Invertebrate Grade Number-Average level SIGNAL, % kelimpahan dominansi 3, dan indeks SIGNAL dengan variabel lingkungan: suhu air, coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM, kandungan oksigen terlarut (DO, konduktivitas, total padatan tersuspensi (TDS, C dan N dalam partikulat, nitrat, amonium, ortofosfat, COD, logam merkuri di air dan sedimen, indeks habitat, distribusi partikel, turbiditas, indeks kimia Kirchoff, dan indeks pencemaran logam merkuri di sedimen. Larva Trichoptera Helicopsyche, Apsilochorema, Caenota, Ulmerochorema, Chimarra, Antipodoecia, Diplectrona, Anisocentropus, Lepidostoma, Genus Hel.C cenderung dicirikan oleh tingkat pencemaran organik yang rendah, tingginya komposisi % kerikil dan CPOM, dan kondisi habitat yang minim mengalami gangguan. Sebaliknya Glososomatidae genus 1, Cheumatopsyche, Setodes, dan Tinodes cenderung lebih toleran terhadap polutan organik, rendahnya CPOM, tingginya variabel turbiditas, konsentrasi merkuri di sedimen, TDS, dan % clay.     ABSTRACT Ciliwung River is one of the major rivers in the area of West Java which is influenced by organic pollution and mercury contamination. The contamination may disrupt the ecological balance of Trichoptera insect larvae. Therefore, the aim of this study is to reveal the influence of anthropogenic

  5. Acute intestinal anisakiasis in Spain: a fourth-stage Anisakis simplex larva

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    Mª José Rosales

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available A case of acute intestinal anisakiasis has been reported; a nematode larva being found in the submucosa of the ileum of a woman in Jaén (Spain. The source of infection was the ingestion of raw Engraulis encrasicholus. On the basis of its morphology, the worm has been identified as a fourth-stage larva of Anisakis simplex. In Spain, this is the ninth report of human anisakiasis and also probably the first case of anisakiasis caused by a fourth-stage larva of A. simplex.

  6. Identification of entomopathogenic Bacillus isolated from Simulium (Diptera, Simuliidae larvae and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavados CFG

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Entomopathogenic bacteria isolated from Simulium larvae and adults from breeding sites in the states of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were identified as 18 strains of Bacillus thuringiensis and one of B. sphaericus. Most of these strains were serotyped according to their flagellar antigens. However, nine of the B. thuringiensis samples, could not be serotyped and were designated as "autoagglutinating"; they were also shown to be toxic in preliminary tests against Aedes aegypti larvae. Additionally, B. sphaericus was also shown to be toxic towards Culex quinquefasciatus larvae.

  7. Immune response of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) larvae to Yersinia ruckeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Kania, Per Walter; Raida, Martin Kristian

    of naive larvae were bath exposed for 1 h with different concentrations of ß-glucan from Euglena gracilis. Two days post infection, larvae showed typical signs of Yersinia infection with haemorrhages in mouth region and inflammation on the dorsal side of the body. However, no mortality was observed during...... of immune factors at the transcriptional level. It may be speculated that at this stage of life, larvae may combat invading pathogens by using armour consisting of different immune factors without regulating their expression....

  8. Annotated records of scombroid eggs and larvae distribution in northeastern Mediterranean waters

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    V. VASSILOPOULOU

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of eggs and larvae of scombroid fish in northeastern Greek waters were studied during the summer of three consecutive years(1992-1994 to determine spawning, time of spawning peaks, and the possible preferred spawning grounds. Among eggs only those of Xiphias gladius were successfully identified. Larvae of Thunnus alalunga, Euthynnus alleteratus, X. gladius and Auxis rochei were recorded, the latter species being encountered more frequently than the rest. Most scombroid larvae were collected in the Sporades Islands’ basin and their abundance, particularly that of A. rochei, was relatively increased at the end of the summer, possibly suggesting increased spawning activities during that period.

  9. A case report of cutaneous larva migrans in a Mexican population of high marginalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Aguirre Maldonadoa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The creeping verminous dermatitis or cutaneous larva migrans is a parasitosis caused by percutaneous penetration and migration of larval nematode parasites characterized by producing one or more serpiginous erythematous, indurated, raised and pruritic lesion. The most common cause of cutaneous larva migrans is the Ancylostoma braziliense located in warm climate zones. In the present study, authors reported a case of cutaneous larva migrans with a characteristic clinical picture: erythematous-papular and vesicular lesion and serpiginous path, with progressive, and pruritic growth and it shown that a living area with immigration, tropical weather conditions and poverty may lead to this common infection.

  10. Effects of soil moisture and temperature on overwintering survival of Curculio larvae (Coleoptera : Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricca, M.A.; Weckerly, F.W.; Semlitsch, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    Few studies to date have investigated factors, other than mast crop size, that influence the dynamics of Curculio populations.W e examined the effects of varying levels of soil moisture (0.35, 0.4 and 0.5 g water/g soil) and temperature (8, 14 and 20 C) on over wintering survival of Curculio larvae collected from Quercus michauxii acorns. Survival of larvae, analyzed using log-linear analysis, was adversely affected by soil moisture but not by soil temperature. Larvae that overwinter in drier soil may have higher probabilities of successfully metamorphosing.

  11. Effect of ivermectin on the larvae of Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derua, Yahya A.; Malongo, Bernard B.; Simonsen, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    . Methods: A total of 1800 laboratory reared mosquito larvae of each species were used in the bioassays. Twelve replicates were performed, each testing 6 concentrations of ivermectin (0.0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 parts per million (ppm)) against third instar larvae of An. gambiae and Cx...... to the different water strata occupied by the two species, with ivermectin adsorbed in food that sediment being more readily available to the bottom feeding Cx. quinquefasciatus than the surface feeding An. gambiae larvae....

  12. Habitat stability and occurrences of malaria vector larvae in western Kenya highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atieli Harrysone

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the occurrence of malaria vector larvae in the valleys of western Kenya highlands is well documented, knowledge of larval habitats in the uphill sites is lacking. Given that most inhabitants of the highlands actually dwell in the uphill regions, it is important to develop understanding of mosquito breeding habitat stability in these sites in order to determine their potential for larval control. Methods A total of 128 potential larval habitats were identified in hilltops and along the seasonal streams in the Sigalagala area of Kakamega district, western Kenya. Water availability in the habitats was followed up daily from August 3, 2006 to February 23, 2007. A habitat is defined as stable when it remains aquatic continuously for at least 12 d. Mosquito larvae were observed weekly. Frequencies of aquatic, stable and larvae positive habitats were compared between the hilltop and seasonal stream area using χ2-test. Factors affecting the presence/absence of Anopheles gambiae larvae in the highlands were determined using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results Topography significantly affected habitat availability and stability. The occurrence of aquatic habitats in the hilltop was more sporadic than in the stream area. The percentage of habitat occurrences that were classified as stable during the rainy season is 48.76% and 80.79% respectively for the hilltop and stream area. Corresponding frequencies of larvae positive habitats were 0% in the hilltop and 5.91% in the stream area. After the rainy season, only 23.42% of habitat occurrences were stable and 0.01% larvae positive habitats were found in the hilltops, whereas 89.75% of occurrences remained stable in the stream area resulting in a frequency of 12.21% larvae positive habitats. The logistic regression analysis confirmed the association between habitat stability and larval occurrence and indicated that habitat surface area was negatively affecting the

  13. A new mutant, White larva, of the mosquito Toxorhynchites splendens: genetics and cannibalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horio, M; Tsukamoto, M; Miyagi, I

    1990-09-01

    A strain of a new body-color mutant, white larva (wl), was established from a field-collected wild-type strain of Toxorhynchites splendens. The mutant can be distinguished from the wild type in both the larval and pupal stages, but not in the adult. Crossing experiments confirmed its mode of inheritance to be a single recessive system. This is the first visible mutant found in Tx. splendens. Larvae of the wl phenotype seem to be recognized as prey by other individuals in mass larvae rearing.

  14. Observations on first and second-instar larvae of Megaselia scalaris (Loew) (Diptera: Phoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonchu, Noppawan; Sukontason, Kom; Sukontason, Kabkaew L; Chaiwong, Tarinee; Piangjai, Somsak; Vogtsberger, Roy C

    2004-06-01

    The ultrastructure of the first and second-instar larvae of Megaselia scalaris (Loew) was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Significant changes in morphological features were observed in the anterior and posterior spiracles, but only minimal changes in the labium and mouthhooks were seen. The ultrastructure of M. scalaris larvae not only provides chronological transformation of their larval instars, but it can also be used to explain their feeding behavior and mode of respiration. In addition, morphological structures useful for specific identification of first or second-instar larvae collected from human corpses may be used in forensic investigations.

  15. Control of nitrous oxide emission from Chironomus plumosus larvae by nitrate and temperatur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Polerecky, Lubos; Poulsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    of the microcosm-incubated larvae were at least as high as in the water column. This suggests that N2O emission from C. plumosus larvae is controlled by NO3- availability in the water column, but is decoupled, by a hitherto unknown mechanism, from NO3- present in the immediate surroundings of the larva....... ventilation parameters and sedimentary O2 and NO3- turnover rates predicted that NO3- concentrations inside the burrow and in the sediment surrounding the burrow fluctuated and were on average lower than those in the water column. In contrast, NO3- concentrations measured in the gut and hemolymph...

  16. Descrição da larva de último estádio de Micrathyria pseudeximia Westfall (Odonata, Libellulidae

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    Marina Schmidt Dalzochio

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A larva de último estádio de Micrathyria pseudeximia Westfall, 1992 é descrita e ilustrada a partir de material procedente de Cascavel, Paraná, Brasil. A caracterização do gênero com base nas larvas é ampliada.Description of the Ultimate Stadium Larva of Micrathyria pseudeximia Westfall(Odonata, Libellulidae.Abstract. The larva of ultimate stadium of Micrathyria pseudeximia Westfall, 1992 is described and illustrated based on material collected in Cascavel Municipality, Paraná State, Brazil. The generic concept based on the larvae is amplified.

  17. Modulation of nutrient composition of black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens) larvae by feeding seaweed-enriched media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liland, Nina S; Biancarosa, Irene; Araujo, Pedro; Biemans, Daan; Bruckner, Christian G; Waagbø, Rune; Torstensen, Bente E; Lock, Erik-Jan

    2017-01-01

    Black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens) larvae are a promising source of protein and lipid for animal feeds. The nutritional composition of the BSF larvae depend partly on the composition of the feeding medium. The BSF lipid profile in part mimics the feeding media lipid profile, and micronutrients, like minerals and vitamins, can readily accumulate in black soldier fly larvae. However, investigative studies on bioconversion and accumulation of nutrients from media to black soldier fly larvae are scarce. Here we show that inclusion of the brown algae Ascophyllum nodosum in the substrate for black soldier fly larvae can introduce valuable nutrients, commonly associated with the marine environment, into the larvae. The omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3), iodine and vitamin E concentrations increased in the larvae when more seaweed was included in the diet. When the feeding media consisted of more than 50% seaweed, the larvae experienced poorer growth, lower nutrient retention and lower lipid levels, compared to a pure plant based feeding medium. Our results confirm the plasticity of the nutritional make-up of black soldier fly larvae, allowing it to accumulate both lipid- and water-soluble compounds. A broader understanding of the effect of the composition of the feeding media on the larvae composition can help to tailor black soldier fly larvae into a nutrient profile more suited for specific feed or food purposes.

  18. Modulation of nutrient composition of black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens larvae by feeding seaweed-enriched media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina S Liland

    Full Text Available Black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens larvae are a promising source of protein and lipid for animal feeds. The nutritional composition of the BSF larvae depend partly on the composition of the feeding medium. The BSF lipid profile in part mimics the feeding media lipid profile, and micronutrients, like minerals and vitamins, can readily accumulate in black soldier fly larvae. However, investigative studies on bioconversion and accumulation of nutrients from media to black soldier fly larvae are scarce. Here we show that inclusion of the brown algae Ascophyllum nodosum in the substrate for black soldier fly larvae can introduce valuable nutrients, commonly associated with the marine environment, into the larvae. The omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, iodine and vitamin E concentrations increased in the larvae when more seaweed was included in the diet. When the feeding media consisted of more than 50% seaweed, the larvae experienced poorer growth, lower nutrient retention and lower lipid levels, compared to a pure plant based feeding medium. Our results confirm the plasticity of the nutritional make-up of black soldier fly larvae, allowing it to accumulate both lipid- and water-soluble compounds. A broader understanding of the effect of the composition of the feeding media on the larvae composition can help to tailor black soldier fly larvae into a nutrient profile more suited for specific feed or food purposes.

  19. Chronic Wounds, Biofilms and Use of Medicinal Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J. Cowan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds are a significant health problem in the United States, with annual associated costs exceeding $20 billion annually. Traditional wound care consists of surgical debridement, manual irrigation, moisture retentive dressings, and topical and/or systemic antimicrobial therapy. However, despite progress in the science of wound healing, the prevalence and incidence of chronic wounds and their complications are escalating. The presence & complexity of bacterial biofilms in chronic wounds has recently been recognized as a key aspect of non-healing wounds. Bacterial biofilms are sessile colonies of polymicrobial organisms (bacteria, fungus, etc. enclosed within a self-produced exopolymeric matrix that provides high levels of tolerance to host defenses, antibiotics and antiseptics. Thus, there is a need for alternative therapies to reduce biofilms in chronic wounds. In this report, we present initial findings from in vitro experiments which show that larval debridement therapy with disinfected blow fly larvae (Phaenicia sericata reduced total CFUs (6-logs of planktonic and mature biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus grown on dermal pig skin explants by 5-logs after 24 hours of exposure, and eliminated biofilms (no measurable CFUs after 48 hours of exposure.

  20. Gag grouper larvae pathways on the West Florida Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Robert H.; Zheng, Lianyuan; Peebles, Ernst

    2014-10-01

    A numerical circulation model, quantitatively assessed against in situ observations, is used to describe the circulation on the West Florida Continental Shelf during spring 2007 when pre-settlement gag (Mycteroperca microlepis) were present in the surf zone near Tampa Bay, Florida. The pre-settlement fish were found to be isotopically distinct from settled juveniles in the area, which is consistent with recent arrival at near shore nursery habitats from offshore spawning grounds. Simulated particle trajectories are employed to test hypotheses relating to either a surface or a near-bottom route of across-shelf transport. The surface-route hypothesis is rejected, whereas the bottom-route hypothesis is found to be consistent with the location of pre-settlement fish and their co-occurrence with macroalgae of offshore, hard-bottom origin. We conclude that gag larvae are transported to the near shore via the bottom Ekman layer and that such transport is facilitated by remote forcing associated with Gulf of Mexico Loop Current interactions with the shelf slope near the Dry Tortugas. Being that such remote forcing occurs inter-annually and not always in phase with the preferred spawning months (late winter through early spring), gag recruitment success should similarly vary with year and location.

  1. Cultures of skin fragments of Salamandra salamandra salamandra (L.) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederzoli, A; Restani, C

    1998-04-01

    As part of a study on the pigmentary system of Salamandra salamandra salamandra (L.), we cultured skin fragments of 7-10-day-old larvae in order to examine the expression of molecules implicated in cellular adhesion and migration and in regulating cell-cell relationships. Keratinocytes, fibroblasts, Leydig cells, xanthophores, and melanophores migrated from the fragments and were observed in the outgrowth. Keratinocytes and fibroblasts organized into an epidermal layer and an underlying "dermal portion." The chromatophores were always located below the epithelial cells, often with fibroblasts. We examined by immunocytochemistry the expression of fibronectin, beta1-integrin, L-CAM, and A-CAM in the cultures. Many keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and Leydig cells expressed all the signal molecules tested. Xanthophores and melanophores were only immunoreactive to the anti-adhesion molecules antisera. Since the molecules tested are known to play a role in cell adhesion, growth, and spreading, as well as in regulating tissue differentiation and in maintaining normal tissue morphology, we may hypothesize that in Salamandra salamandra salamandra fibronectin, beta1-integrin, L-, and A-CAMs concertedly act to stabilize the architecture of the outgrowth and regulate the relationships between chromatophores and those between chromatophores and the other elements of the skin culture.

  2. Architecture of the primary taste center of Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomb, Julien; Grillenzoni, Nicola; Ramaekers, Ariane; Stocker, Reinhard F

    2007-06-10

    A simple nervous system combined with stereotypic behavioral responses to tastants, together with powerful genetic and molecular tools, have turned Drosophila larvae into a very promising model for studying gustatory coding. Using the Gal4/UAS system and confocal microscopy for visualizing gustatory afferents, we provide a description of the primary taste center in the larval central nervous system. Essentially, gustatory receptor neurons target different areas of the subesophageal ganglion (SOG), depending on their segmental and sensory organ origin. We define two major and two smaller subregions in the SOG. One of the major areas is a target of pharyngeal sensilla, the other one receives inputs from both internal and external sensilla. In addition to such spatial organization of the taste center, circumstantial evidence suggests a subtle functional organization: aversive and attractive stimuli might be processed in the anterior and posterior part of the SOG, respectively. Our results also suggest less coexpression of gustatory receptors than proposed in prior studies. Finally, projections of putative second-order taste neurons seem to cover large areas of the SOG. These neurons may thus receive multiple gustatory inputs. This suggests broad sensitivity of secondary taste neurons, reminiscent of the situation in mammals.

  3. Single experience learning of host fruit selection by lepidopteran larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pszczolkowski, Maciej A; Brown, John J

    2005-09-15

    Neonate larvae of a lepidopteran, the codling moth (Cydia pomonella L.) search for their host fruit after hatch. The process of host searching is known to be activated by kairomones contained in host fruit volatiles, but the mechanism of actual selection and infestation of the fruit is unclear. Here we show that lepidopteran neonates can utilize single experience learning in selection and infestation of host apple. We found that the process of host fruit selection may be modified by single experience learning, namely preference induction or averse conditioning. Both types of learning were acquired within 3 h of training. Experience was retained for over 3 days in the case of averse conditioning. Preference induction, a form of learning specific to insects, is expected to produce rigid host preference lasting for days if not weeks, but in codling moth neonates this type of memory was retained only for 3 h. We speculate that conjunction of preference induction with short retention time and averse conditioning with long retention time provide an optimal adaptive strategy of host fruit selection for codling moth neonates.

  4. A digestive prolyl carboxypeptidase in Tenebrio molitor larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goptar, Irina A; Shagin, Dmitry A; Shagina, Irina A; Mudrik, Elena S; Smirnova, Yulia A; Zhuzhikov, Dmitry P; Belozersky, Mikhail A; Dunaevsky, Yakov E; Oppert, Brenda; Filippova, Irina Yu; Elpidina, Elena N

    2013-06-01

    Prolyl carboxypeptidase (PRCP) is a lysosomal proline specific serine peptidase that also plays a vital role in the regulation of physiological processes in mammals. In this report, we isolate and characterize the first PRCP in an insect. PRCP was purified from the anterior midgut of larvae of a stored product pest, Tenebrio molitor, using a three-step chromatography strategy, and it was determined that the purified enzyme was a dimer. The cDNA of PRCP was cloned and sequenced, and the predicted protein was identical to the proteomic sequences of the purified enzyme. The substrate specificity and kinetic parameters of the enzyme were determined. The T. molitor PRCP participates in the hydrolysis of the insect's major dietary proteins, gliadins, and is the first PRCP to be ascribed a digestive function. Our collective data suggest that the evolutionary enrichment of the digestive peptidase complex in insects with an area of acidic to neutral pH in the midgut is a result of the incorporation of lysosomal peptidases, including PRCP. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Susceptibility of Aedes aegypti and Anopheles quadrimaculatus larvae to infection with the cercariae of Plagiorchis noblei (Trematoda: Plagiorchiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, R A; Rau, M E; Lewis, D J

    1987-06-01

    The impact of interspecific behavioral differences on the relative susceptibility of third instar Aedes aegypti and Anopheles quadrimaculatus larvae to infection with cercariae of Plagiorchis noblei was determined. When permitted to move freely in a column of water, larvae of Ae. aegypti were significantly more susceptible to infection with the parasite than were An. quadrimaculatus larvae. This difference is ascribed to the significantly greater activity of Ae. aegypti larvae in the water column. Since cercariae are suspended in the column, particularly near the bottom, contact with larvae of Ae. aegypti may be enhanced, whereas contact with An. quadrimaculatus larvae, which tend to remain near the surface, may be reduced. Interspecific differences other than behavior are not thought to play a major role, since immobilized larvae of the two species did not differ significantly in their susceptibility to this parasite.

  6. The larvae of Sericostoma bergeri Malicky, 1973 and Sericostoma herakles Malicky, 1999 (Trichoptera, Sericostomatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Waringer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the previously unknown larvae of Sericostoma bergeri and S. herakles (Trichoptera: Sericostomatidae restricted to European Ecoregion 6 (= Hellenic western Balkan. Information on the morphology of the larvae is given, and the most important diagnostic features are illustrated. Sericostoma bergeri and S. herakles can be easily separated from known sericostomatid larvae of Ecoregion 6 (Schizopelex huettingeri, Oecismus monedula, Sericostoma flavicorne and S. personatum by the shape of the pronotum, presence or lack of a comma-like marking on the lateral protuberance, by the number of setae on abdominal dorsum IX, and by distribution patterns. With respect to the latter, S. bergeri is a micro-endemic of the Greek Islands of Euboea and Andros whereas S. herakles is an endemic of the Peloponnese. The species are integrated in a dichotomous key including the currently known Sericostomatidae larvae of the Hellenic western Balkan. In addition, ecological information on the two species is provided.

  7. Experimental Susceptibility of Gilthead Sea Bream, Sparus aurata, via Challenge with Anisakis pegreffii Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Marino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoscopic and histopathological findings detected in Sparus aurata experimentally infected with third-stage Anisakis larvae without intermediate host are evaluated and discussed. In six fish, live nematode larvae were introduced by gastroscopy into the stomach. The first observation by endoscope, 15 days after challenge, showed the presence of some larvae at the level of gastric mucosa. An explorative celioscopy, performed 60 days after challenge, showed haemorrhages and/or nodules on the gut of two fishes. Necropsy and histology demonstrated parasites in the context of the tissue changes. The finding of live nematode larvae as well as the evidence of tissue change confirm the experimental susceptibility of gilthead sea bream towards Anisakis.

  8. Viviparity of larvae, a new type of development in phoronids (Lophophorata: Phoronida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temereva, E N; Malakhov, V V

    2016-03-01

    A new type of phoronid development, viviparity of larvae, has been discovered in a new phoronid species that lives as a commensal of digging sand shrimps in Vostok Bay, the Sea of Japan. The embryos develop in the mother's trunk coelom up to the young larva stage. During development, embryos increase in size twice and probably obtain nutriment from the mother's coelomic fluid. Spawning occurs by young larvae, which are released through nephridiopores. The new type of development is described in a phoronid that has a small body size but a high fertility, producing large amounts of extremely small eggs. The combination of viviparity and large number of eggs increases the number of competent larvae that can undergo metamorphosis in the burrows of shrimps.

  9. Tolerance to low temperatures of Toxocara cati larvae in chicken muscle tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taira, Kensuke; Saitoh, Yasuhide; Okada, Natsuki

    2012-01-01

    Infectivity of Toxocara cati larvae in muscle tissue of chickens after storage at 4 degrees C and -25 degrees C was assessed in a mouse bioassay to provide information on the risk of meat-borne toxocarosis. Muscle tissue samples of 30-day old T. cati infections were stored at 4 degrees C for 14...... of the infected chicken meat), 47.9% of the inoculated larvae established in mice, whereas storage of meat at 4 degrees C for 14 days or 28 days reduced the recovery to 24.1% or 3.3 respectively. Muscle larvae exposed to -25 degrees C for 12,24 or 48 h did not establish in the mice. The observation that larvae...

  10. "Epidermal Streaming" and associated phenomena displayed by Larvae of Chrysomyia marginalis (Wd. (Diptera: CALLIPHORIDAE at carcasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.E.O Braack

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available Competition with vertebrate scavengers for carrion necessitates blow-fly larvae to make rapid and effective use of dead animals. Blow-fly eggs are deposited in shaded, concealed positions at a carcass, and the larvae need to enter the body to feed on muscle and other soft tissues as soon as possible after eclosion. They do so by digesting away the skin with enzymes, but this is often preceded by an exploratory phase in which larvae migrate over the carcass to find wounds by which they are able to gain more rapid entry into the body. Epidermal streaming is one method of performing this exploratory phase, and involves movement by small larvae below the superficial outermost layer of skin. Several possible benefits of this behaviour are discussed.

  11. Prolonged pre-incubation increases the susceptibility of Galleria mellonella larvae to bacterial and fungal infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Niall; Surlis, Carla; Maher, Amie; Gallagher, Clair; Carolan, James C; Clynes, Martin; Kavanagh, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Galleria mellonella larvae are widely used for assessing the virulence of microbial pathogens and for measuring the in vivo activity of antimicrobial agents and produce results comparable to those that can be obtained using mammals. The aim of the work described here was to ascertain the effect of pre-incubation at 15°C for 1, 3, 6 or 10 weeks on the susceptibility of larvae to infection with Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus. Larvae infected with C. albicans after 1 week pre-incubation at 15°C showed 73.3 ± 3.3% survival at 24 hours post-infection while those infected after 10 weeks pre-incubation showed 30 ± 3.3% survival (P mellonella larvae are a useful in vivo model system but the duration of the pre-incubation stage significantly affects their susceptibility to microbial pathogens possibly as a result of altered metabolism. PMID:25785635

  12. Identification of Balanus amphitrite larvae from field zooplankton using species-specific primers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaonkar, C.C.; Khandeparker, L.; Desai, D.V.; Anil, A.C.

    robotic molecular method for in situ detection of marine invertebrate larvae. Molecular Ecology Resources 8, 540-550. Karande A.A. (1967) On cirripede crustaceans (barnacles), an important fouling group in Bombay waters. Proceedings Symposium...

  13. Aspects of excretion of antlion larvae (Neuroptera: myrmeleontidae) during feeding and non-feeding periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zyl, A; Van Der Westhuizen, M C.; De K Van Der Linde, T C.

    1998-12-01

    The main nitrogenous excretory products were determined for third instar Cueta sp. and Furgella intermedia larvae during periods of food abundance and for F. intermedia during starvation periods. Biochemical analysis indicated that allantoin was the main nitrogenous excretory product, with smaller quantities of ammonia, urea and uric acid. Respectively 9 and 13amino acids of low concentrations (0.005-0.329g/l) were detected by high pressure liquid chromatography in the excreta of Cueta sp. and F. intermedia larvae. The volume of urine produced and concentrations of the nitrogenous excretory products of fed Cueta sp. and fed F. intermedia larvae did not differ. F. intermedia excreted smaller volumes of urine and smaller quantities of nitrogenous excretory products during starvation than during periods of food abundance. Feeding conditions rather than the pitbuilding or non-pitbuilding lifestyles seem to be the major influence on the excretory products of these antlion larvae.

  14. Infectivity of Trichinella spiralis larvae in pork buried in the ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovic S.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Time of survival and infectivity of Trichinella spiralis larvae in pig muscle tissue, buried at various depths in the ground were assessed. In the pork pieces the number of infective larvae was 250 ML/g. Meat originated from pig halves was divided in 39 equal pieces, 0.7 kg each, disposed in three groups of 1 3, and buried in depths of 30, 50, and 100 centimeters respectively. The pork was dug up at 13 intervals, approximately every week, until 91st day of the experiment. After each time interval, infectivity of larvae was assessed by bioassay on rats. The artificially infected rats were sacrificed on 42nd day after the infection and meat was examined by the following methods - artificial digestion and trichinoscopy. It was found that the larvae during all 90 days preserved infectivity in each depth.

  15. Effects and mechanisms of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal toxins for mosquito larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Hua, Gang; Adang, Michael J

    2017-10-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a Gram-positive aerobic bacterium that produces insecticidal crystalline inclusions during sporulation phases of the mother cell. The virulence factor, known as parasporal crystals, is composed of Cry and Cyt toxins. Most Cry toxins display a common 3-domain topology. Cry toxins exert intoxication through toxin activation, receptor binding and pore formation in a suitable larval gut environment. The mosquitocidal toxins of Bt subsp. israelensis (Bti) were found to be highly active against mosquito larvae and are widely used for vector control. Bt subsp. jegathesan is another strain which possesses high potency against broad range of mosquito larvae. The present review summarizes characterized receptors for Cry toxins in mosquito larvae, and will also discuss the diversity and effects of 3-D mosquitocidal Cry toxin and the ongoing research for Cry toxin mechanisms generated from investigations of lepidopteran and dipteran larvae. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. Crown-of-Thorns Starfish Larvae Can Feed on Organic Matter Released from Corals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Nakajima

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that Crown-of-Thorns starfish (COTS larvae may be able to survive in the absence of abundant phytoplankton resources suggesting that they may be able to utilize alternative food sources. Here, we tested the hypothesis that COTS larvae are able to feed on coral-derived organic matter using labeled stable isotope tracers (13C and 15N. Our results show that coral-derived organic matter (coral mucus and associated microorganisms can be assimilated by COTS larvae and may be an important alternative or additional food resource for COTS larvae through periods of low phytoplankton biomass. This additional food resource could potentially facilitate COTS outbreaks by reducing resource limitation.

  17. Toxicity of poison from spider Nephila sp. to Aëdes aegypti L. larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAYAN SANJAYA

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A research about the toxicity of poison from spider Nephila sp. unto larvae of Aëdes aegypti L. had been done. The objectives of this research were to get the information about the toxicity of poison from spider Nephila sp. into larvae A. aegypti. The experiment method of this research was using Randomized Complete Block Design. This experiment used all of four instars of A. aegypti larvae. The experiment of each instar had been done with six treatments of the lethal concentration from spiders poison. Those six treatments were 1%, 10%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%. Each treatment had four replications. The result of this research showed that poison from spider Nephila sp. is toxic unto the larvae of A. aegypti. The average of lethal concentration for the first instar is 13.11%, for the second instar is 28.16%, for the third instar is 41.46% and for the fourth instar is 63.09%.

  18. Description of two final stadium Onychogomphus larvae from Thailand (Odonata: Gomphidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainthong, Damrong; Boonsoong, Boonsatien

    2016-01-19

    The final stadium larvae of Onychogomphus castor Lieftinck and O. duaricus Fraser are described and illustrated for the first time based on reared specimens from Thailand. The taxonomic characteristics of the larvae of the genus Onychogomphus are discussed and summarized. The larva of O. castor differs from other Southeast Asian species in having distinct mid-dorsal spines on S2-9, divergent wing pads reaching S5, and lateral spines on S6-9. The larva of O. duaricus has a weakly swollen third antennal segment, with short blunt mid-dorsal spines on S2-9, divergent wing sheaths reaching the middle of S4, and lateral spines present on S7-9.

  19. [Cutaneous myiasis caused by a double infestation with larvae of Dermatobia hominis and Cochliomyia hominivorax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupan-Kajcovski, B; Simonian, H; Keller, J J; Faber, W R

    2004-10-16

    In a 51-year-old man who had visited Surinam, cutaneous myiasis was diagnosed, caused by simultaneous infestation with the larvae of two different species of flies: Dermatobia hominis and Cochliomyia hominivorax. On his right lower arm the man had two solitary, furuncle-like lesions with a central breathing hole. Two days after these holes had been occluded with vaseline, two white larvae of D. hominis emerged. On both ankles the man had large, undermined ulcers containing hundreds of creeping larvae about 2 cm in length with a salmon-like colour: C. hominivorax. The larvae were removed from the ulcers by hand and by rinsing with physiological saline, after which the wounds healed rapidly. Myiasis is seen in the Netherlands mostly in people returning from a holiday in myiasis-endemic areas.

  20. Metabolomics reveal physiological changes in mayfly larvae (Neocloeon triangulifer) at ecological upper thermal limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Hsuan; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Deese-Spruill, Jocelin; Sumner, Susan; Buchwalter, David B

    2017-08-01

    Aquatic insects play critical roles in freshwater ecosystems and temperature is a fundamental driver of species performance and distributions. However, the physiological mechanisms that determine the thermal performance of species remain unclear. Here we used a metabolomics approach to gain insights into physiological changes associated with a short-term, sublethal thermal challenge in the mayfly Neocloeon triangulifer (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae). Larvae were subjected to a thermal ramp (from 22 to 30°C at a rate of 1°C/h) and metabolomics analysis (both Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography coupled Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS)) indicated that processes related to energetics (sugar metabolism) and membrane stabilization primarily differentiated heat treated larvae from controls. Limited evidence of anaerobic metabolism was observed in the heat treated larvae at 30°C, a temperature that is chronically lethal to larvae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.