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Sample records for brucei glutathione synthetase

  1. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... elevated acidity in the blood and tissues (metabolic acidosis). In addition to the features present in moderate ... Kaabachi N, Hachicha M. Hemolytic anemia and metabolic acidosis: think about glutathione synthetase deficiency. Fetal Pediatr Pathol. ...

  2. Genetic validation of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases as drug targets in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalidas, Savitha; Cestari, Igor; Monnerat, Severine; Li, Qiong; Regmi, Sandesh; Hasle, Nicholas; Labaied, Mehdi; Parsons, Marilyn; Stuart, Kenneth; Phillips, Margaret A

    2014-04-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is an important public health threat in sub-Saharan Africa. Current drugs are unsatisfactory, and new drugs are being sought. Few validated enzyme targets are available to support drug discovery efforts, so our goal was to obtain essentiality data on genes with proven utility as drug targets. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are known drug targets for bacterial and fungal pathogens and are required for protein synthesis. Here we survey the essentiality of eight Trypanosoma brucei aaRSs by RNA interference (RNAi) gene expression knockdown, covering an enzyme from each major aaRS class: valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS) (class Ia), tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS-1) (class Ib), arginyl-tRNA synthetase (ArgRS) (class Ic), glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS) (class 1c), threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) (class IIa), asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (AsnRS) (class IIb), and phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (α and β) (PheRS) (class IIc). Knockdown of mRNA encoding these enzymes in T. brucei mammalian stage parasites showed that all were essential for parasite growth and survival in vitro. The reduced expression resulted in growth, morphological, cell cycle, and DNA content abnormalities. ThrRS was characterized in greater detail, showing that the purified recombinant enzyme displayed ThrRS activity and that the protein localized to both the cytosol and mitochondrion. Borrelidin, a known inhibitor of ThrRS, was an inhibitor of T. brucei ThrRS and showed antitrypanosomal activity. The data show that aaRSs are essential for T. brucei survival and are likely to be excellent targets for drug discovery efforts. PMID:24562907

  3. Recurrent Isolated Neonatal Hemolytic Anemia: Think About Glutathione Synthetase Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signolet, Isabelle; Chenouard, Rachel; Oca, Florine; Barth, Magalie; Reynier, Pascal; Denis, Marie-Christine; Simard, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    Hemolytic anemia (HA) of the newborn should be considered in cases of rapidly developing, severe, or persistent hyperbilirubinemia. Several causes of corpuscular hemolysis have been described, among which red blood cell enzyme defects are of particular concern. We report a rare case of red blood cell enzyme defect in a male infant, who presented during his first months of life with recurrent and isolated neonatal hemolysis. All main causes were ruled out. At 6.5 months of age, the patient presented with gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization; fortuitously, urine organic acid chromatography revealed a large peak of 5-oxoproline. Before the association between HA and 5-oxoprolinuria was noted, glutathione synthetase deficiency was suspected and confirmed by a low glutathione synthetase concentration and a collapse of glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes. Moreover, molecular diagnosis revealed 2 mutations in the glutathione synthetase gene: a previously reported missense mutation (c.[656A>G]; p.[Asp219Gly]) and a mutation not yet described in the binding site of the enzyme (c.[902T>C]; p.[Leu301Pro]). However, 15 days later, a control sample revealed no signs of 5-oxoprolinuria and the clinical history discovered administration of acetaminophen in the 48 hours before hospitalization. Thus, in this patient, acetaminophen exposure allowed the diagnosis of a mild form of glutathione synthetase deficiency, characterized by isolated HA. Early diagnosis is important because treatment with bicarbonate, vitamins C and E, and elimination of trigger factors are recommended to improve long-term outcomes. Glutathione synthetase deficiency should be screened for in cases of unexplained newborn HA. PMID:27581854

  4. 19-Year Follow-up of A Patient With Severe Glutathione Synthetase Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwal, Paldeep S.; Medina, Casey R.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Sutton, V. Reid

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting in low levels of glutathione and an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress. Patients with glutathione synthetase deficiency typically present in the neonatal period with hemolytic anemia, metabolic acidosis and neurological impairment. Lifelong treatment with antioxidants has been recommended in an attempt to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with the disorder. Here we present a 19-year-old female who was diagnosed with glutathione synthetase deficiency shortly after birth and who has been closely followed in our metabolic clinic. Despite an initial severe presentation, she has had normal intellectual development and few complications of her disorder with a treatment regimen that includes polycitra (citric acid, potassium citrate and sodium citrate), vitamin C, vitamin E and selenium. PMID:26984560

  5. Genetic Validation of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases as Drug Targets in Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Kalidas, Savitha; Cestari, Igor; Monnerat, Severine; Li, Qiong; Regmi, Sandesh; Hasle, Nicholas; Labaied, Mehdi; Parsons, Marilyn; Stuart, Kenneth; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is an important public health threat in sub-Saharan Africa. Current drugs are unsatisfactory, and new drugs are being sought. Few validated enzyme targets are available to support drug discovery efforts, so our goal was to obtain essentiality data on genes with proven utility as drug targets. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are known drug targets for bacterial and fungal pathogens and are required for protein synthesis. Here we survey the essentiality of...

  6. Radiosensitivity of glutathione-synthetase deficient human fibroblasts in vitro: Indication of a correlation between OER and glutathione-synthetase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    5-oxoprolinuria is an autosomal recessive disease associated with a glutathione-synthetase (GSH-S) deficiency. Previous results obtained with a fibroplast cell strain originating from such a patient (VP) and exhibiting a decreased glutathione (GSH) level, showed a reduced oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) (1.5; control: 2.9). In order to assess the radioprotective role of the intrinsic GSH, radiosensitivity of 6 fibroblast cell strains with different GSH-S activity have been studied using colony assay as endpoint. 3 strains originated from 5-oxoprolinuria patients (OB, EB and AZ); 3 other strains were got from parents of patients (RB, JB and SP). Among those 6 cell strains, the GSH level was found to be depleted only in AZ and SP. However, a reduced OER is observed for the 6 cell strains (1.7, 2.0 and 2.0 for the patients; 1.9, 2.2 and 2.7 for parents; controls: 2.9). As far as survival of GSH-S deficient cells is concerned, OER seems to be correlated with GSH-S activity: the lower the GSH-S activity, the lower the OER. These results are discussed taking into account other unpublished results obtained from experiments designed to investigate the role of GSH in radio-induced enzymatic repair

  7. Characterization of bifunctional L-glutathione synthetases from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Actinobacillus succinogenes for efficient glutathione biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhua; Li, Wei; Wang, Dezheng; Wu, Hui; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2016-07-01

    Glutathione (GSH), an important bioactive substance, is widely applied in pharmaceutical and food industries. In this work, two bifunctional L-glutathione synthetases (GshF) from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (GshFAp) and Actinobacillus succinogenes (GshFAs) were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL-21(DE3). Similar to the GshF from Streptococcus thermophilus (GshFSt), GshFAp and GshFAs can be applied for high titer GSH production because they are less sensitive to end-product inhibition (Ki values 33 and 43 mM, respectively). The active catalytic forms of GshFAs and GshFAp are dimers, consistent with those of GshFPm (GshF from Pasteurella multocida) and GshFSa (GshF from Streptococcus agalactiae), but are different from GshFSt (GshF from S. thermophilus) which is an active monomer. The analysis of the protein sequences and three dimensional structures of GshFs suggested that the binding sites of GshFs for substrates, L-cysteine, L-glutamate, γ-glutamylcysteine, adenosine-triphosphate, and glycine are highly conserved with only very few differences. With sufficient supply of the precursors, the recombinant strains BL-21(DE3)/pET28a-gshFas and BL-21(DE3)/pET28a-gshFap were able to produce 36.6 and 34.1 mM GSH, with the molar yield of 0.92 and 0.85 mol/mol, respectively, based on the added L-cysteine. The results showed that GshFAp and GshFAs are potentially good candidates for industrial GSH production. PMID:26996628

  8. Structures of Trypanosoma brucei methionyl-tRNA synthetase with urea-based inhibitors provide guidance for drug design against sleeping sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Yeow Koh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Methionyl-tRNA synthetase of Trypanosoma brucei (TbMetRS is an important target in the development of new antitrypanosomal drugs. The enzyme is essential, highly flexible and displaying a large degree of changes in protein domains and binding pockets in the presence of substrate, product and inhibitors. Targeting this protein will benefit from a profound understanding of how its structure adapts to ligand binding. A series of urea-based inhibitors (UBIs has been developed with IC50 values as low as 19 nM against the enzyme. The UBIs were shown to be orally available and permeable through the blood-brain barrier, and are therefore candidates for development of drugs for the treatment of late stage human African trypanosomiasis. Here, we expand the structural diversity of inhibitors from the previously reported collection and tested for their inhibitory effect on TbMetRS and on the growth of T. brucei cells. The binding modes and binding pockets of 14 UBIs are revealed by determination of their crystal structures in complex with TbMetRS at resolutions between 2.2 Å to 2.9 Å. The structures show binding of the UBIs through conformational selection, including occupancy of the enlarged methionine pocket and the auxiliary pocket. General principles underlying the affinity of UBIs for TbMetRS are derived from these structures, in particular the optimum way to fill the two binding pockets. The conserved auxiliary pocket might play a role in binding tRNA. In addition, a crystal structure of a ternary TbMetRS•inhibitor•AMPPCP complex indicates that the UBIs are not competing with ATP for binding, instead are interacting with ATP through hydrogen bond. This suggests a possibility that a general 'ATP-engaging' binding mode can be utilized for the design and development of inhibitors targeting tRNA synthetases of other disease-causing pathogen.

  9. Investigating arsenic susceptibility from a genetic perspective in Drosophila reveals a key role for glutathione synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Jorge G Muñiz; Opoka, Robert; Kane, Daniel; Cartwright, Iain L

    2009-02-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic-contaminated drinking water can lead to a variety of serious pathological outcomes. However, differential responsiveness within human populations suggests that interindividual genetic variation plays an important role. We are using Drosophila to study toxic metal response pathways because of unrivalled access to varied genetic approaches and significant demonstrable overlap with many aspects of mammalian physiology and disease phenotypes. Genetic analysis (via chromosomal segregation and microsatellite marker-based recombination) of various wild-type strains exhibiting relative susceptibility or tolerance to the lethal toxic effects of arsenite identified a limited X-chromosomal region (16D-F) able to confer a differential response phenotype. Using an FRT-based recombination approach, we created lines harboring small, overlapping deficiencies within this region and found that relative arsenite sensitivity arose when the dose of the glutathione synthetase (GS) gene (located at 16F1) was reduced by half. Knockdown of GS expression by RNA interference (RNAi) in cultured S2 cells led to enhanced arsenite sensitivity, while GS RNAi applied to intact organisms dramatically reduced the concentration of food-borne arsenite compatible with successful growth and development. Our analyses, initially guided by observations on naturally occurring variants, provide genetic proof that an optimally functioning two-step glutathione (GSH) biosynthetic pathway is required in vivo for a robust defense against arsenite; the enzymatic implications of this are discussed in the context of GSH supply and demand under arsenite-induced stress. Given an identical pathway for human GSH biosynthesis, we suggest that polymorphisms in GSH biosynthetic genes may be an important contributor to differential arsenic sensitivity and exposure risk in human populations.

  10. Improving Protein Crystal Quality by the Without-Oil Microbatch Method: Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Analysis of Glutathione Synthetase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis

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    Antonella Albino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione synthetases catalyze the ATP-dependent synthesis of glutathione from L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteine and glycine. Although these enzymes have been sequenced and characterized from a variety of biological sources, their exact catalytic mechanism is not fully understood and nothing is known about their adaptation at extremophilic environments. Glutathione synthetase from the Antarctic eubacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis (PhGshB has been expressed, purified and successfully crystallized. An overall improvement of the crystal quality has been obtained by adapting the crystal growth conditions found with vapor diffusion experiments to the without-oil microbatch method. The best crystals of PhGshB diffract to 2.34 Å resolution and belong to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 83.28 Å, b = 119.88 Å, c = 159.82 Å. Refinement of the model, obtained using phases derived from the structure of the same enzyme from Escherichia coli by molecular replacement, is in progress. The structural determination will provide the first structural characterization of a psychrophilic glutathione synthetase reported to date.

  11. Identification of PAD2 as a gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase highlights the importance of glutathione in disease resistance of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisy, Vincent; Poinssot, Benoit; Owsianowski, Lucas; Buchala, Antony; Glazebrook, Jane; Mauch, Felix

    2007-01-01

    The Arabidopsis pad2-1 mutant belongs to a series of non-allelic camalexin-deficient mutants. It was originally described as showing enhanced susceptibility to virulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae and was later shown to be hyper-susceptible to the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora brassicae (formerly P. porri). Surprisingly, in both pathosystems, the disease susceptibility of pad2-1 was not caused by the camalexin deficiency, suggesting additional roles of PAD2 in disease resistance. The susceptibility of pad2-1 to P. brassicae was used to map the mutation to the gene At4g23100, which encodes gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-ECS, GSH1). GSH1 catalyzes the first committed step of glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis. The pad2-1 mutation caused an S to N transition at amino acid position 298 close to the active center. The conclusion that PAD2 encodes GSH1 is supported by several lines of evidence: (i) pad2-1 mutants contained only about 22% of wild-type amounts of GSH, (ii) genetic complementation of pad2-1 with wild-type GSH1 cDNA restored GSH production, accumulation of camalexin in response to P. syringae and resistance to P. brassicae and P. syringae, (iii) another GSH1 mutant, cad2-1, showed pad2-like phenotypes, and (iv) feeding of GSH to excised leaves of pad2-1 restored camalexin production and resistance to P. brassicae. Inoculation of Col-0 with P. brassicae caused a coordinated increase in the transcript abundance of GSH1 and GSH2, the gene encoding the second enzyme in GSH biosynthesis, and resulted in enhanced foliar GSH accumulation. The pad2-1 mutant showed enhanced susceptibility to additional pathogens, suggesting an important general role of GSH in disease resistance of Arabidopsis.

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Trypanosoma brucei [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei Trypanosoma brucei Trypanosoma_brucei_L.png Trypanosoma_brucei_NL.png Trypanosoma_bruce...i_S.png Trypanosoma_brucei_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+bruce...i&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=NL http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp.../taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=121 ...

  13. A Multiple Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Complex That Enhances tRNA-Aminoacylation in African Trypanosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Cestari, Igor; Kalidas, Savitha; Monnerat, Severine; Anupama, Atashi; Phillips, Margaret A.; Stuart, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    The genes for all cytoplasmic and potentially all mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) were identified, and all those tested by RNA interference were found to be essential for the growth of Trypanosoma brucei. Some of these enzymes were localized to the cytoplasm or mitochondrion, but most were dually localized to both cellular compartments. Cytoplasmic T. brucei aaRSs were organized in a multiprotein complex in both bloodstream and procyclic forms. The multiple aminoacyl-tRNA syn...

  14. Catalytic properties, localization, and in vivo role of Px IV, a novel tryparedoxin peroxidase of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ilon; Bogacz, Marta; Schaffroth, Corinna; Dirdjaja, Natalie; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise

    2016-06-01

    Px IV is a distant relative of the known glutathione peroxidase-type enzymes of African trypanosomes. Immunofluorescence microscopy of bloodstream cells expressing C-terminally Myc6-tagged Px IV revealed a mitochondrial localization. Recombinant Px IV possesses very low activity as glutathione peroxidase but catalyzes the trypanothione/tryparedoxin-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide and, even more efficiently, of arachidonic acid hydroperoxide. Neither overexpression in bloodstream cells nor the deletion of both alleles in bloodstream or procyclic parasites affected the in vitro proliferation. Trypanosoma brucei Px IV shares 58% of all residues with TcGPXII. The orthologous enzymes have in common their substrate preference for fatty acid hydroperoxides. However, the T. cruzi protein has been reported to be localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and to be specific for glutathione as reducing agent. Taken together, our data show that Px IV is a low abundant tryparedoxin peroxidase of T. brucei that is not essential, at least under culture conditions. PMID:27262262

  15. Wild chimpanzees are infected by Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirků, Milan; Votýpka, Jan; Petrželková, Klára J; Jirků-Pomajbíková, Kateřina; Kriegová, Eva; Vodička, Roman; Lankester, Felix; Leendertz, Siv Aina J; Wittig, Roman M; Boesch, Christophe; Modrý, David; Ayala, Francisco J; Leendertz, Fabian H; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-12-01

    Although wild chimpanzees and other African great apes live in regions endemic for African sleeping sickness, very little is known about their trypanosome infections, mainly due to major difficulties in obtaining their blood samples. In present work, we established a diagnostic ITS1-based PCR assay that allows detection of the DNA of all four Trypanosoma brucei subspecies (Trypanosoma brucei brucei, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, and Trypanosoma brucei evansi) in feces of experimentally infected mice. Next, using this assay we revealed the presence of trypanosomes in the fecal samples of wild chimpanzees and this finding was further supported by results obtained using a set of primate tissue samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS1 region showed that the majority of obtained sequences fell into the robust T. brucei group, providing strong evidence that these infections were caused by T. b. rhodesiense and/or T. b. gambiense. The optimized technique of trypanosome detection in feces will improve our knowledge about the epidemiology of trypanosomes in primates and possibly also other endangered mammals, from which blood and tissue samples cannot be obtained. Finally, we demonstrated that the mandrill serum was able to efficiently lyse T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, and to some extent T. b. gambiense, while the chimpanzee serum failed to lyse any of these subspecies. PMID:26110113

  16. Mapping of VSG similarities in Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Weirather, Jason L.; Wilson, Mary E; Donelson, John E.

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei switches its variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) to subvert its mammalian hosts’ immune responses. The T. brucei genome contains as many as 1600 VSG genes (VSGs), but most are silent noncoding pseudogenes. Only one functional VSG, located in a telomere-linked expression site, is transcribed at a time. Silent VSGs are copied into a VSG expression site through gene conversion. Truncated gene conversion events can generate new mosaic VSGs with segments of...

  17. What happens when Trypanosoma brucei leaves Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Robert E.; Simpson, Larry; Englund, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Julius Lukeš and co-workers evaluated the evolutionary origin of Trypanosoma equiperdum and Trypanosoma evansi, parasites that cause horse and camel diseases. Although similar to T. brucei, the sleeping-sickness parasite, these trypanosomes do not cycle through the tsetse fly and have been able to spread beyond Africa. Transmission occurs sexually, or via blood-sucking flies or vampire bats. They concluded that these parasites, which resemble yeast petite mutants, are T. brucei sub-species, w...

  18. Effects of tea on survival rates and liver pathology of Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mbuthia, S.K; Wachira, N.W; Ngure, R.M; Ouma, J; Kagira, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of different types of Kenyan tea extracts on the pathogenesis ofTrypanosoma brucei brucei in a Swiss White mice model. Following infection with trypanosomes, the micewere monitored for survival and liver pathology. Tea significantly (P

  19. Anti-trypanosomal effect of Peristrophe bicalyculata extract on Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdulazeez Mansurah Abimbola; Ibrahim Abdulrazak Baba; Edibo Zakari Yenusa; Sidali Joseph Omanibe; Idris Habeeb Oladimeji

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the in vitro and in vivo effect of whole plant extracts of Peristrophe bicalyculata on Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected rats. Methods: The experiment was divided into two phases: In the first phase, the anti-trypanosomal activity of the hot water, cold water, methanol and butanol extracts of the whole plant were determined by incubating with Trypanosoma brucei brucei. The cold water extract was partially-purified and the anti-trypanosomal activity of the fractions determined. In the second phase, Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected rats were treated with fraction 2c for nine days. Packed cell volume (PCV), high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerol (TAG), aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferases (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total and direct bilirubin levels were determined at the end of the experiment. Results:Cold water extract immobilized 90%of the parasites after 60 min of incubation, and fraction 2c completely immobilized the parasites after 35 min. It significantly increased PCV in Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected rats. Decreased TC, TAG, HDL and LDL levels of infected rats increased significantly when rats were treated with the fraction, while elevated levels of total bilirubin and ALT also decreased. The difference in urea, direct bilirubin and ALP was not significant when infected rats were compared to rats in other groups. Conclusions:The ability of the plant to ameliorate the infection-induced biochemical changes calls for detailed investigation of the potentials of the plant for antitrypanosomiasis drug delivery.

  20. Subcellular Distribution of Glutathione Precursors in Arabidopsis thafiana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbara Eva Koffier; Romana Maier; Bernd Zechmann

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione is an important antioxidant and has many important functions in plant development,growth and defense.Glutathione synthesis and degradation is highly compartment-specific and relies on the subcellular availability of its precursors,cysteine,glutamate,glycine and y-glutamylcysteine especially in plastids and the cytosol which are considered as the main centers for glutathione synthesis.The availability of glutathione precursors within these cell compartments is therefore of great importance for successful plant development and defense.The aim of this study was to investigate the compartmentspecific importance of glutathione precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana.The subcellular distribution was compared between wild type plants (Col-0),plants with impaired glutathione synthesis (glutathione deficient pad2-1 mutant,wild type plants treated with buthionine sulfoximine),and one complemented line (OE3) with restored glutathione synthesis.Immunocytohistochemistry revealed that the inhibition of glutathione synthesis induced the accumulation of the glutathione precursors cysteine,glutamate and glycine in most cell compartments including plastids and the cytosol.A strong decrease could be observed in γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC) contents in these cell compartments.These experiments demonstrated that the inhibition of y-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) - the first enzyme of glutathione synthesis - causes a reduction of γ-EC levels and an accumulation of all other glutathione precursors within the cells.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIPARASITIC ACTIVITY OF BENZOPHENONE THIOSEMICARBAZONES ON Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Georges C. Accrombessi; Jacques Poupaert; Raymond H. Fatondji; Salomé D. S. Kpoviessi; Gbaguidi, Fernand A.; Bienvenu Glinma

    2011-01-01

    The structure of four synthesized thiosemicarbazones, substituted or not, of benzophenone has been confirmed by spectrometrical analysis IR, NMR 1H and 13C. Their anti-trypanosomal activities were evaluated on Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among these compounds, benzophenone 4 phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 4 has the highest activity with the half-inhibitory concentration (IC50) = 8.48 micromolar (µM). Benzophenone 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 3 and benzophenone thiosemicarbazone 1 showed moderate a...

  2. Wild chimpanzees are infected by Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Jirků

    2015-12-01

    Finally, we demonstrated that the mandrill serum was able to efficiently lyse T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, and to some extent T. b. gambiense, while the chimpanzee serum failed to lyse any of these subspecies.

  3. A multiple aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex that enhances tRNA-aminoacylation in African trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestari, Igor; Kalidas, Savitha; Monnerat, Severine; Anupama, Atashi; Phillips, Margaret A; Stuart, Kenneth

    2013-12-01

    The genes for all cytoplasmic and potentially all mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) were identified, and all those tested by RNA interference were found to be essential for the growth of Trypanosoma brucei. Some of these enzymes were localized to the cytoplasm or mitochondrion, but most were dually localized to both cellular compartments. Cytoplasmic T. brucei aaRSs were organized in a multiprotein complex in both bloodstream and procyclic forms. The multiple aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (MARS) complex contained at least six aaRS enzymes and three additional non-aaRS proteins. Steady-state kinetic studies showed that association in the MARS complex enhances tRNA-aminoacylation efficiency, which is in part dependent on a MARS complex-associated protein (MCP), named MCP2, that binds tRNAs and increases their aminoacylation by the complex. Conditional repression of MCP2 in T. brucei bloodstream forms resulted in reduced parasite growth and infectivity in mice. Thus, association in a MARS complex enhances tRNA-aminoacylation and contributes to parasite fitness. The MARS complex may be part of a cellular regulatory system and a target for drug development. PMID:24126051

  4. Cell cycle regulation in Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Tansy C Hammarton

    2007-01-01

    Cell division is regulated by intricate and interconnected signal transduction pathways that precisely coordinate, in time and space, the complex series of events involved in replicating and segregating the component parts of the cell. In Trypanosoma brucei, considerable progress has been made over recent years in identifying molecular regulators of the cell cycle and elucidating their functions, although many regulators undoubtedly remain to be identified, and there is still a long way to go...

  5. Motility modes of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Qu, Zijie; McAllaster, Michael; de Graffenried, Christopher; Breuer, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    The parasitic single-celled protozoan Trypanosoma brucei causes African Sleeping Sickness, which is a fatal disease in humans and animals that threatens more than 60 million people in 36 African countries. Cell motility plays a critical role in the developmental phases and dissemination of the parasite. Unlike many other motile cells such as bacteria Escherichia coli or Caulobacter crescentus, the flagellum of T. brucei is attached along the length of its awl-like body, producing a unique mode of motility that is not fully understood or characterized. Here, we report on the motility of T. brucei, which swims using its single flagellum employing both rotating and undulating propulsion modes. We tracked cells in real-time in three dimensions using fluorescent microscopy. Data obtained from experiments using both short-term tracking within the field of view and long-term tracking using a tracking microscope were analyzed. Motility modes and swimming speed were analyzed as functions of cell size, rotation rate and undulation pattern. Research supported by NSF.

  6. Plant Glutathione Biosynthesis: Diversity in Biochemical Regulation and Reaction Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley eGalant

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In plants, exposure to temperature extremes, heavy metal-contaminated soils, drought, air pollutants, and pathogens results in the generation of reactive oxygen species that alter the intracellular redox environment, which in turn influences signaling pathways and cell fate. As part of their response to these stresses, plants produce glutathione. Glutathione acts as an antioxidant by quenching reactive oxygen species, and is involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle that eliminates damaging peroxides. Plants also use glutathione for the detoxification of xenobiotics, herbicides, air pollutants (sulfur dioxide and ozone, and toxic heavy metals. Two enzymes catalyze glutathione synthesis: glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL, and glutathione synthetase (GS. Glutathione is a ubiquitous protective compound in plants, but the structural and functional details of the proteins that synthesize it, as well as the potential biochemical mechanisms of their regulation, have only begun to be explored. As discussed here, the core reactions of glutathione synthesis are conserved across various organisms, but plants have diversified both the regulatory mechanisms that control its synthesis and the range of products derived from this pathway. Understanding the molecular basis of glutathione biosynthesis and its regulation will expand our knowledge of this component in the plant stress response network.

  7. Trypanosoma evansi is alike to Trypanosoma brucei brucei in the subcellular localisation of glycolytic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Andrea Moreno

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi, which causes surra, is descended from Trypanosoma brucei brucei, which causes nagana. Although both parasites are presumed to be metabolically similar, insufficient knowledge of T. evansi precludes a full comparison. Herein, we provide the first report on the subcellular localisation of the glycolytic enzymes in T. evansi, which is a alike to that of the bloodstream form (BSF of T. b. brucei: (i fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, phosphoglycerate kinase, triosephosphate isomerase (glycolytic enzymes and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (a glycolysis-auxiliary enzyme in glycosomes, (ii enolase, phosphoglycerate mutase, pyruvate kinase (glycolytic enzymes and a GAPDH isoenzyme in the cytosol, (iii malate dehydrogenase in cytosol and (iv glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in both glycosomes and the cytosol. Specific enzymatic activities also suggest that T. evansi is alike to the BSF of T. b. brucei in glycolytic flux, which is much faster than the pentose phosphate pathway flux, and in the involvement of cytosolic GAPDH in the NAD+/NADH balance. These similarities were expected based on the close phylogenetic relationship of both parasites.

  8. Mapping of VSG similarities in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirather, Jason L; Wilson, Mary E; Donelson, John E

    2012-02-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei switches its variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) to subvert its mammalian hosts' immune responses. The T. brucei genome contains as many as 1600 VSG genes (VSGs), but most are silent noncoding pseudogenes. Only one functional VSG, located in a telomere-linked expression site, is transcribed at a time. Silent VSGs are copied into a VSG expression site through gene conversion. Truncated gene conversion events can generate new mosaic VSGs with segments of sequence identity to other VSGs. To examine the VSG family sub-structure within which these events occur, we combined the available VSG sequences and annotations with scripted BLAST searches to map the relationships among VSGs in the T. brucei genome. Clusters of related VSGs were visualized in 2- and 3-dimensions for different N- and C-terminal regions. Five types of N-termini (N1-N5) were observed, within which gene recombinational events are likely to occur, often with fully-coding 'functional' or 'atypical'VSGs centrally located between more dissimilar VSGs. Members of types N1, N3 and N4 are most closely related in the middle of the N-terminal region, whereas type N2 members are more similar near the N-terminus. Some preference occurs in pairing between specific N- and C-terminal types. Statistical analyses indicated no overall tendency for more related VSGs to be located closer in the genome than less related VSGs, although exceptions were noted. Many potential mosaic gene formation events within each N-terminal type were identified, contrasted by only one possible mosaic gene formation between N-terminal types (N1 and N2). These data suggest that mosaic gene formation is a major contributor to the overall VSG diversity, even though gene recombinational events between members of different N-terminal types occur only rarely. PMID:22079099

  9. CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIPARASITIC ACTIVITY OF BENZOPHENONE THIOSEMICARBAZONES ON Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges C. Accrombessi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The structure of four synthesized thiosemicarbazones, substituted or not, of benzophenone has been confirmed by spectrometrical analysis IR, NMR 1H and 13C. Their anti-trypanosomal activities were evaluated on Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among these compounds, benzophenone 4 phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 4 has the highest activity with the half-inhibitory concentration (IC50 = 8.48 micromolar (µM. Benzophenone 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 3 and benzophenone thiosemicarbazone 1 showed moderate anti-trypanosomal activity with IC50 values equal to 23.27 µM and 67.17 µM respectively. Benzophenone 2 methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 2 showed no activity up to IC50 = 371.74 µM.

  10. Classical clinical signs in rats experimemtally infected with Trypanosoma brucei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi; Omamegbe Joseph Omolathebu

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate clinical signs in Trypanosoma brucei infection in albino rats. Methods:Fourteen rats grouped into 2 with 7 rats in each group were used to determine classical clinical manifestation of Trypanosoma brucei infection in rats. Group A rats were uninfected control and Group B rats were infected with Trypanosoma brucei. Results:Parasitaemia was recorded in Group B by (3.86±0.34) d and the peak of parasitaemia was observed at Day 5 post infection. Classical signs observed included squint eyes, raised whiskers, lethargy, no weight loss, pyrexia, isolation from the other rats, and starry hair coat. Conclusions:These signs could be diagnostic or aid in diagnosis of Trypanosoma brucei infection in rats.

  11. Brucella melitensis Methionyl-tRNA-Synthetase (MetRS), a Potential Drug Target for Brucellosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade, Ranae M.; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Dranow, David M.; Myers, Janette B.; Choi, Ryan; Nakazawa Hewitt, Steve; Edwards, Thomas E.; Davies, Douglas R.; Lorimer, Donald; Boyle, Stephen M.; Barrett, Lynn K.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Fan, Erkang; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated Brucella melitensis methionyl-tRNA-synthetase (BmMetRS) with molecular, structural and phenotypic methods to learn if BmMetRS is a promising target for brucellosis drug development. Recombinant BmMetRS was expressed, purified from wild type Brucella melitensis biovar Abortus 2308 strain ATCC/CRP #DD-156 and screened by a thermal melt assay against a focused library of one hundred previously classified methionyl-tRNA-synthetase inhibitors of the blood stage form of Trypanosoma brucei. Three compounds showed appreciable shift of denaturation temperature and were selected for further studies on inhibition of the recombinant enzyme activity and cell viability against wild type B. melitensis strain 16M. BmMetRS protein complexed with these three inhibitors resolved into three-dimensional crystal structures and was analyzed. All three selected methionyl-tRNA-synthetase compounds inhibit recombinant BmMetRS enzymatic functions in an aminoacylation assay at varying concentrations. Furthermore, growth inhibition of B. melitensis strain 16M by the compounds was shown. Inhibitor-BmMetRS crystal structure models were used to illustrate the molecular basis of the enzyme inhibition. Our current data suggests that BmMetRS is a promising target for brucellosis drug development. However, further studies are needed to optimize lead compound potency, efficacy and safety as well as determine the pharmacokinetics, optimal dosage, and duration for effective treatment. PMID:27500735

  12. Role of expression site switching in the development of resistance to human Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 in Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Rudo; Stephens, Natalie A; Capewell, Paul; MacLeod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen L

    2012-05-01

    Human high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) play an important role in human innate immunity to infection by African trypanosomes with a minor subclass, Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1), displaying highly selective cytotoxicity to the veterinary pathogen Trypanosoma brucei brucei but not against the human sleeping sickness pathogens Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. T. b. rhodesiense has evolved the serum resistance associated protein (SRA) that binds and confers resistance to TLF-1 while T. b. gambiense lacks the gene for SRA indicating that these parasites have diverse mechanisms of resistance to TLF-1. Recently, we have shown that T. b. gambiense (group 1) resistance to TLF-1 correlated with the loss of the haptoglobin/hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) expression, the protein responsible for high affinity binding and uptake of TLF-1. In the course of these studies we also examined TLF-1 resistant T. b. brucei cell lines, generated by long-term in vitro selection. We found that changes in TLF-1 susceptibility in T. b. brucei correlated with changes in variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression in addition to reduced TLF-1 binding and uptake. To determine whether the expressed VSG or expression site associated genes (ESAGs) contribute to TLF-1 resistance we prepared a TLF-1 resistant T. b. brucei with a selectable marker in a silent bloodstream expression site (BES). Drug treatment allowed rapid selection of trypanosomes that activated the tagged BES. These studies show that TLF-1 resistance in T. b. brucei is largely independent of the expressed VSG or ESAGs further supporting the central role of HpHbR expression in TLF-1 susceptibility in these cells. PMID:22226682

  13. 6-Hydroxydopamine-induced glutathione alteration occurs via glutathione enzyme system in primary cultured astrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji ZHANG; Jun HU; Jian-hua DING; Hong-hong YAO; Gang HU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To define the role of enzymes involved in glutathione metabolism in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced glutathione alteration in primary cultured astrocytes.Methods: Total glutathione (GSx) levels were determined using the modified enzymatic microtiter plate assay.The mRNA levels ofγ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γGCS), γ-glutamyltransferase (γGT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), GR (glutathione reductase), and glutathione transferases (GST) were determined using RT-PCR.γGT activity was determined using γGT assay kits.Results: In primary cultured astrocytes, 6-OHDA induced a significant elevation of cellular GSx levels after treatment for 24 h.However, the GSx levels decreased after 24 h and the values were even lower than the value in the control group without 6-OHDA at 48 h.RT-PCR data showed that the mRNA levels of γGCS, the ratelimiting enzyme of γ-L-glutamyl-L-cysteinylglycine (GSH) synthesis, were increased by 6-OHDA after treatment for 24 h and 48 h; the mRNA levels of GPx, GR, and GST did not alter in 6-OHDA-treated astrocytes after treatment for 24 h and 48 h; and 6-OHDA increased the mRNA levels and the activity of γGT after treatment for 48 h,which induced a decrease in GSx levels, despite the up-regulation of γGCS after exposure to 6-OHDA for 48 h.Conclusion: The change in γGCS correlated with the increase in GSH levels induced by 6-OHDA after treatment for 24 h.GSx levels decreased because of increased γGT mRNA levels and γGT activity induced by 6-OHDA after treatment for 48 h.

  14. Glutathione Production in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachhawat, Anand K.; Ganguli, Dwaipayan; Kaur, Jaspreet; Kasturia, Neha; Thakur, Anil; Kaur, Hardeep; Kumar, Akhilesh; Yadav, Amit

    Glutathione, γ -glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine, is the most abundant non-protein thiol found in almost all eukaryotic cells (and in some prokaryotes). The tripeptide, which is synthesized non-ribosomally by the consecutive action of two soluble enzymes, is needed for carrying out numerous functions in the cell, most important of which is the maintenance of the redox buffer. The cycle of glutathione biosynthesis and degradation forms part of the γ -glutamyl cycle in most organisms although the latter half of the pathway has not been demonstrated in yeasts. Our current understanding of how glutathione levels are controlled at different levels in the cell is described. Several different routes and processes have been attempted to increase commercial production of glutathione using both yeast and bacteria. In this article we discuss the history of glutathione production in yeast. The current bottlenecks for increased glutathione production are presented based on our current understanding of the regulation of glutathione homeostasis, and possible strategies for overcoming these limitations for further enhancing and improving glutathione production are discussed

  15. Glutathione in cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudes, D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of light and O2 on glutathione production were determined. Results of light and dark studies under normal and reduced oxygen tensions were compared to determine the effect of reduction in oxygen tension on glutathione levels. The growth rate of Anacystis nidulans and concurrent production of glutathione is presented. The generation of time of Anacystis nidulans was approximately 12 hours. Results of light and dark incubation of Aphanothece halophytica dominated planktonic microbial community from Pond 4 and Anacystis nidulans under high and low oxygen tension is also presented. It appears that light grown Anacystis nidulans cells have equal amounts of glutathione while dark grown cells produce more glutathione in the presence of increased O2.

  16. Phenolic Constituents of Medicinal Plants with Activity against Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Nan Sun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs affect over one billion people all over the world. These diseases are classified as neglected because they impact populations in areas with poor financial conditions and hence do not attract sufficient research investment. Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is one of the NTDs. The current therapeutic interventions for T. brucei infections often have toxic side effects or require hospitalization so that they are not available in the rural environments where HAT occurs. Furthermore, parasite resistance is increasing, so that there is an urgent need to identify novel lead compounds against this infection. Recognizing the wide structural diversity of natural products, we desired to explore and identify novel antitrypanosomal chemotypes from a collection of natural products obtained from plants. In this study, 440 pure compounds from various medicinal plants were tested against T. brucei by in a screening using whole cell in vitro assays. As the result, twenty-two phenolic compounds exhibited potent activity against cultures of T. brucei. Among them, eight compounds—4, 7, 11, 14, 15, 18, 20, and 21—showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei, with IC50 values below 5 µM, ranging from 0.52 to 4.70 μM. Based on these results, we attempt to establish some general trends with respect to structure-activity relationships, which indicate that further investigation and optimization of these derivatives might enable the preparation of potentially useful compounds for treating HAT.

  17. Regulation and spatial organization of PCNA in Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, Doris; Gassen, Alwine [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology I, Genetics, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Maiser, Andreas; Leonhardt, Heinrich [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology II, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Janzen, Christian J., E-mail: christian.janzen@uni-wuerzburg.de [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology I, Genetics, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in Trypanosoma brucei (TbPCNA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TbPCNA is a suitable marker to detect replication in T. brucei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TbPCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to closely related parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania donovani. -- Abstract: As in most eukaryotic cells, replication is regulated by a conserved group of proteins in the early-diverged parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Only a few components of the replication machinery have been described in this parasite and regulation, sub-nuclear localization and timing of replication are not well understood. We characterized the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in T. brucei (TbPCNA) to establish a spatial and temporal marker for replication. Interestingly, PCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to the closely related parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania donovani. TbPCNA foci are clearly detectable during S phase of the cell cycle but in contrast to T. cruzi they are not preferentially located at the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, PCNA seems to be degraded when cells enter G2 phase in T. brucei suggesting different modes of replication regulation or functions of PCNA in these closely related eukaryotes.

  18. A comparative study on the susceptibility of male and female albino mice to Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Turay, G.O. Nwobu, G.R.A. Okogun, C.U. Igwe, K. Adeyeye, K.E. Aghatise, H.O. Okpal & Y.M. Tatfeng

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Trypanosomiasis has remained a major set-back in the development oflivestock farming in tropical Africa. Thus the need for ascertaining the trypanotolerant levels ofdomestic animal breeds and possible improvement on them cannot be over-emphasised.Methods: Level of trypanotolerance in animals was compared between sexes using albino mice infectedwith a Nigerian strain of Trypanosoma brucei brucei at a 50% mouse lethal dose (MLD50.Results: The male mice showed unrestrained parasite growth with a prepatent period (PP of two daysand a mean survival period (MSP of six days corresponding to a gradual decrease in packed cellvolume (PCV, body weight, diet response and white blood cells (WBC count to the time of death.Their female counterparts showed a PP of three days and MSP of ten days with a similar PCV gradientbut a refractory WBC count. There was no significant difference in the differential leucocytes countin both sexes. However, the eosinophils count was significantly higher in the infected animals. It wasfound that female albino mice exercised more parasite restraint than their male counterparts.Interpretation & conclusion: The result suggests that the female animals may be more trypanotoleranthence may be more useful in protein production in trypanosomiasis endemic areas. However, furtherresearch using large domestic breeds like goats and sheep may be required to confirm the hypothesis.

  19. Evaluation of In Vitro Activity of Essential Oils against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Habila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils (EOs from Cymbopogon citratus (CC, Eucalyptus citriodora (EC, Eucalyptus camaldulensis (ED, and Citrus sinensis (CS were obtained by hydrodistillation process. The EOs were evaluated in vitro for activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Tbb and Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi. The EOs were found to possess antitrypanosomal activity in vitro in a dose-dependent pattern in a short period of time. The drop in number of parasite over time was achieved doses of 0.4 g/ml, 0.2 g/mL, and 0.1 g/mL for all the EOs. The concentration of 0.4 g/mL CC was more potent at 3 minutes and 2 minutes for Tbb and T. evansi, respectively. The GC-MS analysis of the EOs revealed presence of Cyclobutane (96.09% in CS, 6-octenal (77.11% in EC, Eucalyptol (75% in ED, and Citral (38.32% in CC among several other organic compounds. The results are discussed in relation to trypanosome chemotherapy.

  20. Evaluation of In Vitro Activity of Essential Oils against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habila, Nathan; Agbaji, Abel S; Ladan, Zakari; Bello, Isaac A; Haruna, Emmanuel; Dakare, Monday A; Atolagbe, Taofiq O

    2010-01-01

    Essential oils (EOs) from Cymbopogon citratus (CC), Eucalyptus citriodora (EC), Eucalyptus camaldulensis (ED), and Citrus sinensis (CS) were obtained by hydrodistillation process. The EOs were evaluated in vitro for activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Tbb) and Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi). The EOs were found to possess antitrypanosomal activity in vitro in a dose-dependent pattern in a short period of time. The drop in number of parasite over time was achieved doses of 0.4 g/ml, 0.2 g/mL, and 0.1 g/mL for all the EOs. The concentration of 0.4 g/mL CC was more potent at 3 minutes and 2 minutes for Tbb and T. evansi, respectively. The GC-MS analysis of the EOs revealed presence of Cyclobutane (96.09%) in CS, 6-octenal (77.11%) in EC, Eucalyptol (75%) in ED, and Citral (38.32%) in CC among several other organic compounds. The results are discussed in relation to trypanosome chemotherapy. PMID:20700425

  1. Evaluation of In Vitro Activity of Essential Oils against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habila, Nathan; Agbaji, Abel S.; Ladan, Zakari; Bello, Isaac A.; Haruna, Emmanuel; Dakare, Monday A.; Atolagbe, Taofiq O.

    2010-01-01

    Essential oils (EOs) from Cymbopogon citratus (CC), Eucalyptus citriodora (EC), Eucalyptus camaldulensis (ED), and Citrus sinensis (CS) were obtained by hydrodistillation process. The EOs were evaluated in vitro for activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Tbb) and Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi). The EOs were found to possess antitrypanosomal activity in vitro in a dose-dependent pattern in a short period of time. The drop in number of parasite over time was achieved doses of 0.4 g/ml, 0.2 g/mL, and 0.1 g/mL for all the EOs. The concentration of 0.4 g/mL CC was more potent at 3 minutes and 2 minutes for Tbb and T. evansi, respectively. The GC-MS analysis of the EOs revealed presence of Cyclobutane (96.09%) in CS, 6-octenal (77.11%) in EC, Eucalyptol (75%) in ED, and Citral (38.32%) in CC among several other organic compounds. The results are discussed in relation to trypanosome chemotherapy. PMID:20700425

  2. Triacylglycerol Storage in Lipid Droplets in Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmann, Stefan; Mazet, Muriel; Ziebart, Nicole; Bouyssou, Guillaume; Fouillen, Laetitia; Dupuy, Jean-William; Bonneu, Marc; Moreau, Patrick; Bringaud, Frédéric; Boshart, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Carbon storage is likely to enable adaptation of trypanosomes to nutritional challenges or bottlenecks during their stage development and migration in the tsetse. Lipid droplets are candidates for this function. This report shows that feeding of T. brucei with oleate results in a 4-5 fold increase in the number of lipid droplets, as quantified by confocal fluorescence microscopy and by flow cytometry of BODIPY 493/503-stained cells. The triacylglycerol (TAG) content also increased 4-5 fold, and labeled oleate is incorporated into TAG. Fatty acid carbon can thus be stored as TAG in lipid droplets under physiological growth conditions in procyclic T. brucei. β-oxidation has been suggested as a possible catabolic pathway for lipids in T. brucei. A single candidate gene, TFEα1 with coding capacity for a subunit of the trifunctional enzyme complex was identified. TFEα1 is expressed in procyclic T. brucei and present in glycosomal proteomes, Unexpectedly, a TFEα1 gene knock-out mutant still expressed wild-type levels of previously reported NADP-dependent 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity, and therefore, another gene encodes this enzymatic activity. Homozygous Δtfeα1/Δtfeα1 null mutant cells show a normal growth rate and an unchanged glycosomal proteome in procyclic T. brucei. The decay kinetics of accumulated lipid droplets upon oleate withdrawal can be fully accounted for by the dilution effect of cell division in wild-type and Δtfeα1/Δtfeα1 cells. The absence of net catabolism of stored TAG in procyclic T. brucei, even under strictly glucose-free conditions, does not formally exclude a flux through TAG, in which biosynthesis equals catabolism. Also, the possibility remains that TAG catabolism is completely repressed by other carbon sources in culture media or developmentally activated in post-procyclic stages in the tsetse. PMID:25493940

  3. Triacylglycerol Storage in Lipid Droplets in Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Allmann

    Full Text Available Carbon storage is likely to enable adaptation of trypanosomes to nutritional challenges or bottlenecks during their stage development and migration in the tsetse. Lipid droplets are candidates for this function. This report shows that feeding of T. brucei with oleate results in a 4-5 fold increase in the number of lipid droplets, as quantified by confocal fluorescence microscopy and by flow cytometry of BODIPY 493/503-stained cells. The triacylglycerol (TAG content also increased 4-5 fold, and labeled oleate is incorporated into TAG. Fatty acid carbon can thus be stored as TAG in lipid droplets under physiological growth conditions in procyclic T. brucei. β-oxidation has been suggested as a possible catabolic pathway for lipids in T. brucei. A single candidate gene, TFEα1 with coding capacity for a subunit of the trifunctional enzyme complex was identified. TFEα1 is expressed in procyclic T. brucei and present in glycosomal proteomes, Unexpectedly, a TFEα1 gene knock-out mutant still expressed wild-type levels of previously reported NADP-dependent 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity, and therefore, another gene encodes this enzymatic activity. Homozygous Δtfeα1/Δtfeα1 null mutant cells show a normal growth rate and an unchanged glycosomal proteome in procyclic T. brucei. The decay kinetics of accumulated lipid droplets upon oleate withdrawal can be fully accounted for by the dilution effect of cell division in wild-type and Δtfeα1/Δtfeα1 cells. The absence of net catabolism of stored TAG in procyclic T. brucei, even under strictly glucose-free conditions, does not formally exclude a flux through TAG, in which biosynthesis equals catabolism. Also, the possibility remains that TAG catabolism is completely repressed by other carbon sources in culture media or developmentally activated in post-procyclic stages in the tsetse.

  4. Mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense resistance to human serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uzureau, Pierrick; Uzureau, Sophie; Lecordier, Laurence;

    2013-01-01

    The African parasite Trypanosoma brucei gambiense accounts for 97% of human sleeping sickness cases. T. b. gambiense resists the specific human innate immunity acting against several other tsetse-fly-transmitted trypanosome species such as T. b. brucei, the causative agent of nagana disease......GP), which prevents APOL1 toxicity and induces stiffening of membranes upon interaction with lipids. Two additional features contribute to resistance to TLFs: reduction of sensitivity to APOL1 requiring cysteine protease activity, and TbHpHbR inactivation due to a L210S substitution. According...

  5. Testicular pathology, gonadal and epididymal sperm reserves of Yankasa rams infected with experimental Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yunusa A.; Oniye, Sonnie J.; Rekwot, Peter I.; Okubanjo, Oluyinka O.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study was conducted to evaluate the pathological effects of trypanosomosis on the testes, gonadal, and epididymal sperm reserves of Yankasa rams for 98 days. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 Yankasa rams, aged between 24 and 30 months and weighed between 22 and 25 kg, were acclimatized for a period of 2-months in a clean fly proof house and were adequately fed and given water ad-libitum. Of the 16 rams, 12 that were clinically fit for the experiment at the end of the acclimatization period were randomly divided into four groups: Groups I, II, III, and IV, each having 3 rams. Groups I and II were each challenged singly with experimental Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Federer strain) and Trypanosoma evansi (Sokoto strain), respectively, while Group III was challenged with mixed T. brucei brucei and T. evansi parasites (50% of each species in the infective inoculum) and Group IV was left as an uninfected control. Each infected ram received 2 mL of the infected blood containing 2×106 trypomastigotes via the jugular vein, while the control group received 2 mL each, normal saline. Results: All the infected rams developed clinical signs typical of trypanosomosis at varying pre-patent periods. The gross lesions observed in the infected rams in Group II were moderate and more severe in those of Groups I and III. Histological sections of the testes of infected rams (Groups I, II, and III) showed moderate (T. evansi-infected group) to severe (mixed and T. brucei brucei-infected groups) testicular degenerations with reduction in number of spermatogenic cell layers, degenerated seminiferous tubules, congested interlobular spaces, loss of tissue architecture with significant (p<0.01) depletion, and loss of gonadal and epididymal sperm reserves in Groups I and III in comparison to Group II and the control Group IV. No observable clinical signs and histopathological lesions were found in those rams of the control Group IV. Conclusion: The study concluded that

  6. Testicular pathology, gonadal and epididymal sperm reserves of Yankasa rams infected with experimental Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunusa A. Wada

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was conducted to evaluate the pathological effects of trypanosomosis on the testes, gonadal, and epididymal sperm reserves of Yankasa rams for 98 days. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 Yankasa rams, aged between 24 and 30 months and weighed between 22 and 25 kg, were acclimatized for a period of 2-months in a clean fly proof house and were adequately fed and given water ad-libitum. Of the 16 rams, 12 that were clinically fit for the experiment at the end of the acclimatization period were randomly divided into four groups: Groups I, II, III, and IV, each having 3 rams. Groups I and II were each challenged singly with experimental Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Federer strain and Trypanosoma evansi (Sokoto strain, respectively, while Group III was challenged with mixed T. brucei brucei and T. evansi parasites (50% of each species in the infective inoculum and Group IV was left as an uninfected control. Each infected ram received 2 mL of the infected blood containing 2×106 trypomastigotes via the jugular vein, while the control group received 2 mL each, normal saline. Results: All the infected rams developed clinical signs typical of trypanosomosis at varying pre-patent periods. The gross lesions observed in the infected rams in Group II were moderate and more severe in those of Groups I and III. Histological sections of the testes of infected rams (Groups I, II, and III showed moderate (T. evansi-infected group to severe (mixed and T. brucei brucei-infected groups testicular degenerations with reduction in number of spermatogenic cell layers, degenerated seminiferous tubules, congested interlobular spaces, loss of tissue architecture with significant (p<0.01 depletion, and loss of gonadal and epididymal sperm reserves in Groups I and III in comparison to Group II and the control Group IV. No observable clinical signs and histopathological lesions were found in those rams of the control Group IV. Conclusion: The study concluded

  7. Nanomolar Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei RNA Triphosphatase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Smith

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryal taxa differ with respect to the structure and mechanism of the RNA triphosphatase (RTPase component of the mRNA capping apparatus. Protozoa, fungi, and certain DNA viruses have a metal-dependent RTPase that belongs to the triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme (TTM superfamily. Because the structures, active sites, and chemical mechanisms of the TTM-type RTPases differ from those of mammalian RTPases, the TTM RTPases are potential targets for antiprotozoal, antifungal, and antiviral drug discovery. Here, we employed RNA interference (RNAi knockdown methods to show that Trypanosoma brucei RTPase Cet1 (TbCet1 is necessary for proliferation of procyclic cells in culture. We then conducted a high-throughput biochemical screen for small-molecule inhibitors of the phosphohydrolase activity of TbCet1. We identified several classes of chemicals—including chlorogenic acids, phenolic glycopyranosides, flavonoids, and other phenolics—that inhibit TbCet1 with nanomolar to low-micromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s. We confirmed the activity of these compounds, and tested various analogs thereof, by direct manual assays of TbCet1 phosphohydrolase activity. The most potent nanomolar inhibitors included tetracaffeoylquinic acid, 5-galloylgalloylquinic acid, pentagalloylglucose, rosmarinic acid, and miquelianin. TbCet1 inhibitors were less active (or inactive against the orthologous TTM-type RTPases of mimivirus, baculovirus, and budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results affirm that a TTM RTPase is subject to potent inhibition by small molecules, with the caveat that parallel screens against TTM RTPases from multiple different pathogens may be required to fully probe the chemical space of TTM inhibition.

  8. Membrane accessibility of glutathione

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Alvaro; Eljack, Nasma D; Sani, Marc-Antoine;

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of the ion pumping activity of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase is crucial to the survival of animal cells. Recent evidence has suggested that the activity of the enzyme could be controlled by glutathionylation of cysteine residue 45 of the β-subunit. Crystal structures so far available indicate...... that this cysteine is in a transmembrane domain of the protein. Here we have analysed via fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy as well as molecular dynamics simulations whether glutathione is able to penetrate into the interior of a lipid membrane. No evidence for any penetration of glutathione into the...... membrane was found. Therefore, the most likely mechanism whereby the cysteine residue could become glutathionylated is via a loosening of the α-β subunit association, creating a hydrophilic passageway between them to allow access of glutathione to the cysteine residue. By such a mechanism...

  9. Streptomyces hygroscopicus Has Two Glutamine Synthetase Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumada, Y.; Takano, E.; Nagaoka, Kozo; Thompson, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    Streptomyces hygroscopicus, which produces the glutamine synthetase inhibitor phosphinothricin, possesses at least two genes (glnA and glnB) encoding distinct glutamine synthetase isoforms (GSI and GSII). The glnB gene was cloned from S. hygroscopicus DNA by complementation in an Escherichia coli gl

  10. Cystamine induces AIF-mediated apoptosis through glutathione depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Yup; Lee, Jin-Haeng; Ju, Mi-kyeong; Jeong, Eui Man; Kim, Hyo-Jun; Lim, Jisun; Lee, Seungun; Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Park, Hyun Ho; Choi, Kihang; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Kim, In-Gyu

    2015-03-01

    Cystamine and its reduced form cysteamine showed protective effects in various models of neurodegenerative disease, including Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. Other lines of evidence demonstrated the cytotoxic effect of cysteamine on duodenal mucosa leading to ulcer development. However, the mechanism for cystamine cytotoxicity remains poorly understood. Here, we report a new pathway in which cystamine induces apoptosis by targeting apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). By screening of various cell lines, we observed that cystamine and cysteamine induce cell death in a cell type-specific manner. Comparison between cystamine-sensitive and cystamine-resistant cell lines revealed that cystamine cytotoxicity is not associated with unfolded protein response, reactive oxygen species generation and transglutaminase or caspase activity; rather, it is associated with the ability of cystamine to trigger AIF nuclear translocation. In cystamine-sensitive cells, cystamine suppresses the levels of intracellular glutathione by inhibiting γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase expression that triggers AIF translocation. Conversely, glutathione supplementation completely prevents cystamine-induced AIF translocation and apoptosis. In rats, cysteamine administration induces glutathione depletion and AIF translocation leading to apoptosis of duodenal epithelium. These results indicate that AIF translocation through glutathione depletion is the molecular mechanism of cystamine toxicity, and provide important implications for cystamine in the neurodegenerative disease therapeutics as well as in the regulation of AIF-mediated cell death. PMID:25549939

  11. Pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in Trypanosoma brucei function in mitochondrial ribosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Pusnik, Mascha; Small, Ian; Read, Laurie K.; Fabbro, Thomas; Schneider, André

    2008-01-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR), a degenerate 35-amino-acid motif, defines a novel eukaryotic protein family. Plants have 400 to 500 distinct PPR proteins, whereas other eukaryotes generally have fewer than 5. The few PPR proteins that have been studied have roles in organellar gene expression, probably via direct interaction with RNA. Here we show that the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei encodes 28 distinct PPR proteins, an extraordinarily high number for a nonplant organism. A com...

  12. Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial respiratome: Composition and organization in procyclic form

    KAUST Repository

    Acestor, Nathalie

    2011-05-24

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is comprised of four different protein complexes (I-IV), which are responsible for electron transport and generation of proton gradient in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. This proton gradient is then used by F oF 1-ATP synthase (complex V) to produce ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. In this study, the respiratory complexes I, II, and III were affinity purified from Trypanosoma brucei procyclic form cells and their composition was determined by mass spectrometry. The results along with those that we previously reported for complexes IV and V showed that the respiratome of Trypanosoma is divergent because many of its proteins are unique to this group of organisms. The studies also identified two mitochondrial subunit proteins of respiratory complex IV that are encoded by edited RNAs. Proteomics data from analyses of complexes purified using numerous tagged component proteins in each of the five complexes were used to generate the first predicted protein-protein interaction network of the Trypanosoma brucei respiratory chain. These results provide the first comprehensive insight into the unique composition of the respiratory complexes in Trypanosoma brucei, an early diverged eukaryotic pathogen. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Comparative genomics of drug resistance in Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Fabrice E; Ludin, Philipp; Arquint, Christian; Schmidt, Remo S; Schaub, Nadia; Kunz Renggli, Christina; Munday, Jane C; Krezdorn, Jessica; Baker, Nicola; Horn, David; Balmer, Oliver; Caccone, Adalgisa; de Koning, Harry P; Mäser, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense is one of the causative agents of human sleeping sickness, a fatal disease that is transmitted by tsetse flies and restricted to Sub-Saharan Africa. Here we investigate two independent lines of T. b. rhodesiense that have been selected with the drugs melarsoprol and pentamidine over the course of 2 years, until they exhibited stable cross-resistance to an unprecedented degree. We apply comparative genomics and transcriptomics to identify the underlying mutations. Only few mutations have become fixed during selection. Three genes were affected by mutations in both lines: the aminopurine transporter AT1, the aquaporin AQP2, and the RNA-binding protein UBP1. The melarsoprol-selected line carried a large deletion including the adenosine transporter gene AT1, whereas the pentamidine-selected line carried a heterozygous point mutation in AT1, G430R, which rendered the transporter non-functional. Both resistant lines had lost AQP2, and both lines carried the same point mutation, R131L, in the RNA-binding motif of UBP1. The finding that concomitant deletion of the known resistance genes AT1 and AQP2 in T. b. brucei failed to phenocopy the high levels of resistance of the T. b. rhodesiense mutants indicated a possible role of UBP1 in melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistance. However, homozygous in situ expression of UBP1-Leu(131) in T. b. brucei did not affect the sensitivity to melarsoprol or pentamidine. PMID:26973180

  14. Changes in blood sugar levels of rats experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei and treated with imidocarb dipropionate and diminazene aceturate

    OpenAIRE

    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi; Omamegbe Joseph Omalathebu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei) on blood sugar level of infected rats. Methods: The experiment was done with 42 albino rats grouped into 3 groups of 14 members each. Group A was uninfected (control group), Group B was infected with T. brucei and treated with diminazene aceturate, and Group C was infected with T. brucei and treated with imidocarb dipropionate. Blood samples were collected from the media canthus of the experimental rats on ...

  15. Glutathione and mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Ribas, Vicent; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C.

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the main non-protein thiol in cells whose functions are dependent on the redox-active thiol of its cysteine moiety that serves as a cofactor for a number of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes. While synthesized exclusively in the cytosol from its constituent amino acids, GSH is distributed in different compartments, including mitochondria where its concentration in the matrix equals that of the cytosol. This feature and its negative charge at physiological pH imply the e...

  16. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Hanne Cecilie

    Improving crop nitrogen (N) utilization efficiency (NUE) is of major importance in modern agriculture in order to reduce the amount of N fertilizer used for crop production. There is a high demand for development of crops which are able to produce high yields but with a concomitantly lower N...... fertilizer requirement. The enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) has been a major topic in plant nitrogen research for decades due to its central role in plant N metabolism. The cytosolic version of this enzyme (GS1) plays an important role in relation to primary N assimilation as well as in relation to N...... and wildtype control. However, when grown to maturity the differences between transgenic lines and wildtype were highly dependent on the growth conditions applied. The transgenic lines had a higher N utilization efficiency (NUtE) than wildtype control, but only when exposed to a mild N stress following...

  17. Identification of Novel Chemical Scaffolds Inhibiting Trypanothione Synthetase from Pathogenic Trypanosomatids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Benítez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The search for novel chemical entities targeting essential and parasite-specific pathways is considered a priority for neglected diseases such as trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis. The thiol-dependent redox metabolism of trypanosomatids relies on bis-glutathionylspermidine [trypanothione, T(SH2], a low molecular mass cosubstrate absent in the host. In pathogenic trypanosomatids, a single enzyme, trypanothione synthetase (TryS, catalyzes trypanothione biosynthesis, which is indispensable for parasite survival. Thus, TryS qualifies as an attractive drug target candidate.A library composed of 144 compounds from 7 different families and several singletons was screened against TryS from three major pathogen species (Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania infantum. The screening conditions were adjusted to the TryS´ kinetic parameters and intracellular concentration of substrates corresponding to each trypanosomatid species, and/or to avoid assay interference. The screening assay yielded suitable Z' and signal to noise values (≥0.85 and ~3.5, respectively, and high intra-assay reproducibility. Several novel chemical scaffolds were identified as low μM and selective tri-tryp TryS inhibitors. Compounds displaying multi-TryS inhibition (N,N'-bis(3,4-substituted-benzyl diamine derivatives and an N5-substituted paullone (MOL2008 halted the proliferation of infective Trypanosoma brucei (EC50 in the nM range and Leishmania infantum promastigotes (EC50 = 12 μM, respectively. A bis-benzyl diamine derivative and MOL2008 depleted intracellular trypanothione in treated parasites, which confirmed the on-target activity of these compounds.Novel molecular scaffolds with on-target mode of action were identified as hit candidates for TryS inhibition. Due to the remarkable species-specificity exhibited by tri-tryp TryS towards the compounds, future optimization and screening campaigns should aim at designing and detecting, respectively, more potent

  18. The multiple roles of cyclin E1 in controlling cell cycle progression and cellular morphology of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourguechon, Stéphane; Savich, Jason M; Wang, Ching C

    2007-05-11

    Regulation of eukaryotic cell cycle progression requires sequential activation and inactivation of cyclin-dependent kinases. Previous RNA interference (RNAi) experiments in Trypanosoma brucei indicated that cyclin E1, cdc2-related kinase (CRK)1 and CRK2 are involved in regulating G1/S transition, whereas cyclin B2 and CRK3 play a pivotal role in controlling the G2/M checkpoint. To search for potential interactions between the other cyclins and CRKs that may not have been revealed by the RNAi assays, we used the yeast two-hybrid system and an in vitro glutathione-S-transferase pulldown assay and observed interactions between cyclin E1 and CRK1, CRK2 and CRK3. Cyclins E1-E4 are homologues of yeast Pho80 cyclin. But yeast complementation assays indicated that none of them possesses a Pho80-like function. Analysis of cyclin E1+CRK1 and cyclin E1+CRK2 double knockdowns in the procyclic form of T. brucei indicated that the cells were arrested more extensively in the G1 phase beyond the cumulative effect of individual knockdowns. But BrdU incorporation was impaired significantly only in cyclin E1+CRK1-depleted cells, whereas a higher percentage of cyclin E1+CRK2 knockdown cells assumed a grossly elongated posterior end morphology. A double knockdown of cyclin E1 and CRK3 arrested cells in G2/M much more efficiently than if only CRK3 was depleted. Taken together, these data suggest multiple functions of cyclin E1: it forms a complex with CRK1 in promoting G1/S phase transition; it forms a complex with CRK2 in controlling the posterior morphogenesis during G1/S transition; and it forms a complex with CRK3 in promoting passage across the G2/M checkpoint in the trypanosome. PMID:17376478

  19. Simultaneous depletion of Atm and Mdl rebalances cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly but not heme import into the mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horáková, Eva; Changmai, Piya; Paris, Zdeněk; Salmon, Didier; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-11-01

    ABC transporter mitochondrial 1 (Atm1) and multidrug resistance-like 1 (Mdl) are mitochondrial ABC transporters. Although Atm1 was recently suggested to transport different forms of glutathione from the mitochondrion, which are used for iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster maturation in the cytosol, the function of Mdl remains elusive. In Trypanosoma brucei, we identified one homolog of each of these genes, TbAtm and TbMdl, which were downregulated either separately or simultaneously using RNA interference. Individual depletion of TbAtm and TbMdl led to limited growth defects. In cells downregulated for TbAtm, the enzymatic activities of the Fe-S cluster proteins aconitase and fumarase significantly decreased in the cytosol but not in the mitochondrion. Downregulation of TbMdl did not cause any change in activities of the Fe-S proteins. Unexpectedly, the simultaneous downregulation of TbAtm and TbMdl did not result in any growth defect, nor were the Fe-S cluster protein activities altered in either the cytosolic or mitochondrial compartments. Additionally, TbAtm and TbMdl were able to partially restore the growth of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Δatm1 and Δmdl2 null mutants, respectively. Because T. brucei completely lost the heme b biosynthesis pathway, this cofactor has to be obtained from the host. Based on our results, TbMdl is a candidate for mitochondrial import of heme b, which was markedly decreased in both TbMdl and TbAtm + TbMdl knockdowns. Moreover, the levels of heme a were strongly decreased in the same knockdowns, suggesting that TbMdl plays a key role in heme a biosynthesis, thus affecting the overall heme homeostasis in T. brucei. PMID:26277108

  20. Glutathione depletion in antioxidant defense of differentiated NT2-LHON cybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeler, S; Winkler-Stuck, K; Szibor, R; Haroon, M F; Gellerich, F N; Chamaon, K; Mawrin, C; Kirches, E

    2007-03-01

    The mechanism of retinal ganglion cell loss in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is still uncertain, and a role of enhanced superoxide production by the mutant mitochondrial complex I has been hypothesized. In the present study, it was shown that LHON cybrids, carrying the np11778 mutation, became selectively more H(2)O(2) sensitive compared with the parental cell line only following short-term retinoic acid differentiation. They contained a decreased cellular glutathione pool (49%, p< or =0.05), despite 1.5-fold enhanced expression of the regulatory subunit of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (p< or =0.05). This points to a reduction of the capacity to detoxify H(2)O(2) and to changes in thiol redox potential. The activity of the H(2)O(2) degrading enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and the activities of glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were unaffected.

  1. Effect of small doses of γ-ray on the glutathione synthesis in mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The induction of biological adaptive response against small doses of γ-ray irradiation was investigated in C57BL/6 mice, in connection with the reduced form of glutathione (GSH). A significant increase in GSH content was recognized in several organs, including liver and brain, from 3 to 6 hr after irradiation with 50 cGy of γ-ray. These changes were consistent with those of the total radical scavenging activity of these organs against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), a chemically stable radical. These increases persisted for around 24 hr. γ-rays at doses of 25-50 cGy elevated GSH content, but this was never seen more than 100 cGy. The elevation of GSH content was accompanied by elevated glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase. Furthermore, the mRNA inductions for these enzymes mere observed at an earlier time post-irradiation. (author)

  2. Rab23 is a flagellar protein in Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Field Mark C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rab small GTPases are important mediators of membrane transport, and orthologues frequently retain similar locations and functions, even between highly divergent taxa. In metazoan organisms Rab23 is an important negative regulator of Sonic hedgehog signaling and is crucial for correct development and differentiation of cellular lineages by virtue of an involvement in ciliary recycling. Previously, we reported that Trypanosoma brucei Rab23 localized to the nuclear envelope 1, which is clearly inconsistent with the mammalian location and function. As T. brucei is unicellular the potential that Rab23 has no role in cell signaling was possible. Here we sought to further investigate the role(s of Rab23 in T. brucei to determine if Rab23 was an example of a Rab protein with divergent function in distinct taxa. Methods/major findings The taxonomic distribution of Rab23 was examined and compared with the presence of flagella/cilia in representative taxa. Despite evidence for considerable secondary loss, we found a clear correlation between a conventional flagellar structure and the presence of a Rab23 orthologue in the genome. By epitope-tagging, Rab23 was localized and found to be present at the flagellum throughout the cell cycle. However, RNAi knockdown did not result in a flagellar defect, suggesting that Rab23 is not required for construction or maintenance of the flagellum. Conclusions The location of Rab23 at the flagellum is conserved between mammals and trypanosomes and the Rab23 gene is restricted to flagellated organisms. These data may suggest the presence of a Rab23-mediated signaling mechanism in trypanosomes.

  3. T cells and macrophages in Trypanosoma brucei-related glomerulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velthuysen, M L; Mayen, A E; van Rooijen, N; Fleuren, G J; de Heer, E; Bruijn, J A

    1994-08-01

    In a previous study, susceptibility for Trypanosoma brucei-related glomerulopathy in mice was shown to be dependent on non-major histocompatibility complex genes. Glomerular disease in this model could not be explained by the production of autoantibodies alone. In order to analyze which part of the defense system, in addition to the B-cell compartment, is involved in the development of this infection-related glomerular disease, groups of athymic (BALB/c rnu/rnu), splenectomized, or macrophage-depleted BALB/c mice were inoculated with T. brucei parasites. Polyclonal B-cell activation, invariably observed in infected BALB/c mice, was absent in BALB/c rnu/rnu mice. Glomerular disease in athymic mice, however, as defined by albuminuria and deposition of immune complexes, was not different from that seen in euthymic infected BALB/c mice. Splenectomy prior to inoculation of parasites led to a decreased incidence of albuminuria in 40% of the animals, whereas splenectomy 21 days after inoculation reduced albuminuria significantly, suggesting a role for spleen cells in the induction of glomerular disease. After macrophage depletion with liposome-encapsulated dichlorodimethylene-diphosphonate, infected BALB/c mice developed significantly higher albuminuria levels for a period up to 2 weeks after depletion. Therefore, it was concluded that the development of T. brucei-related glomerular disease is independent of thymus-matured T cells, while the involvement of macrophages in the development of proteinuria is inhibitory rather than disease inducing. Spleen cells other than thymus-dependent T cells, B cells, and macrophages should be investigated for their role in the pathogenesis of this glomerulopathy. PMID:7913696

  4. VSG gene expression site control in insect form Trypanosoma brucei.

    OpenAIRE

    Rudenko, G; Blundell, P A; Taylor, M. C.; Kieft, R.; Borst, P

    1994-01-01

    When the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei is taken up from mammals by a tse-tse fly, it replaces its variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat by a procyclin coat. Transcription of VSG genes stops in the fly, but transcription of sequences derived from the promoter area of the VSG expression site(s) remains high. Whether this is due to continuing high activity of one promoter or to low activity of many promoters was unclear. We have used the small differences between the sequences of diff...

  5. [Studies on regulation of glutamine synthetase activity from Streptomyces lincolnensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Z; Jiao, R; Mao, Y

    2001-08-01

    Glutamine synthetase in crude extracts from Streptomyces lincolnensis growing under different nitrogen sources were studied. The results showed that NH4+ in high concentration repressed the biosynthesis of the enzyme. To determine whether Streptomyces lincolnensis has undergone covalent modification, a comparison of the glutamine synthetase isolated from cells grown on different nitrogen sources was made. No significant difference was observed in specific activity, pH optima, divalent cation response, and ultraviolet absorption spectra. Glutamine synthetase activity was not influenced by ammonia shock or snake venom phosphodiesterase treatment. Under these conditions, the activity of glutamine synthetase from K. aerogenes was markedly changed. There was therefore no evidence for enzymatic adenylylation of glutamine synthetase from Streptomyces lincolnensis. Glutamine synthetase was subject to feedback inhibition by end products of glutamine metabolism. Cumulative feedback inhibition of the Mn(2+)-dependent glutamine synthetase activity was demonstrated. These results suggest that glutamine synthetase from Streptomyces lincolnensis is an allosteric enzyme. PMID:12552916

  6. Minimum Information Loss Based Multi-kernel Learning for Flagellar Protein Recognition in Trypanosoma Brucei

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jingyan

    2014-12-01

    Trypanosma brucei (T. Brucei) is an important pathogen agent of African trypanosomiasis. The flagellum is an essential and multifunctional organelle of T. Brucei, thus it is very important to recognize the flagellar proteins from T. Brucei proteins for the purposes of both biological research and drug design. In this paper, we investigate computationally recognizing flagellar proteins in T. Brucei by pattern recognition methods. It is argued that an optimal decision function can be obtained as the difference of probability functions of flagella protein and the non-flagellar protein for the purpose of flagella protein recognition. We propose to learn a multi-kernel classification function to approximate this optimal decision function, by minimizing the information loss of such approximation which is measured by the Kull back-Leibler (KL) divergence. An iterative multi-kernel classifier learning algorithm is developed to minimize the KL divergence for the problem of T. Brucei flagella protein recognition, experiments show its advantage over other T. Brucei flagellar protein recognition and multi-kernel learning methods. © 2014 IEEE.

  7. Impaired synthesis contributes to diabetes-induced decrease in liver glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Nitti, Mariapaola; Marengo, Barbara; Domenicotti, Cinzia; Cottalasso, Damiano; Marinari, Umberto Maria; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Traverso, Nicola

    2012-05-01

    Diabetes-induced glutathione (GSH) decrease is usually ascribed to GSH oxidation. Here we investigate, in streptozotocin-treated rats, if impairment of GSH synthesis contributes to GSH decrease in diabetic liver, and if antioxidant treatments can provide protection. Diabetic rats were divided into 3 groups: untreated diabetic rats (UD); N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC)-treated diabetic rats; taurine (TAU)-treated diabetic rats; a group of non-streptozotocin-treated rats was used as control (CTR). All rats were sacrificed at 40 weeks of age. Diabetes induced hepatic glutathione decrease, but oxidized glutathione (GSSG) did not increase significantly. Accumulations of cysteine and cysteinyl-glycine in UD suggest respectively decreased glutathione synthesis and increased loss through the plasma membrane with subsequent degradation. Decreased expression of γ-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase in UD is consistent with repressed GSH synthesis. Moreover, diabetes caused increase of GSSG/GSH ratio and induction of heme oxygenase-1, both signs of oxidative stress. Supplementation with NAC or TAU resulted in amelioration of glutathione levels, probably depending on antioxidant activity, more efficient glutathione synthesis and decreased GSH loss and degradation. In conclusion, impaired synthesis and increased loss and degradation of GSH appear to contribute to a decrease in GSH levels in diabetic liver. NAC and TAU are able to partially protect from oxidative stress and GSH decrease, while enhancing GSH synthesis and restricting GSH loss.

  8. Glutathione transferases and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetti, Anna Paola; Fiorile, Maria Carmela; Primavera, Alessandra; Lo Bello, Mario

    2015-03-01

    There is substantial agreement that the unbalance between oxidant and antioxidant species may affect the onset and/or the course of a number of common diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Many studies suggest a crucial role for oxidative stress in the first phase of aging, or in the pathogenesis of various diseases including neurological ones. Particularly, the role exerted by glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes (Glutathione Transferases) in the nervous system appears more relevant, this latter tissue being much more vulnerable to toxins and oxidative stress than other tissues such as liver, kidney or muscle. The present review addresses the question by focusing on the results obtained by specimens from patients or by in vitro studies using cells or animal models related to Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. In general, there is an association between glutathione depletion and Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. In addition, a significant decrease of glutathione transferase activity in selected areas of brain and in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid was found. For some glutathione transferase genes there is also a correlation between polymorphisms and onset/outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, there is a general agreement about the protective effect exerted by glutathione and glutathione transferases but no clear answer about the mechanisms underlying this crucial role in the insurgence of neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Effects of DMSO on Diminazene Efficacy in Experimental Murine T. brucei Infection

    OpenAIRE

    K.I. Eghianruwa; Anika, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) daily supplementation on diminazene treatment of trypanosomosis. Four groups of Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected rats received 7.0 mg/kg diminazene aceturate on day 7 post infection. Three of the four groups received different doses of DMSO (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg, respectively) in addition to diminazene treatment. The changes in hematological parameters and the weights of liver, spleen and heart caused by T. brucei infection we...

  10. Substrate specificity of hybrid modules from peptide synthetases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsner, A; Engert, H; Saenger, W; Hamoen, L; Venema, G; Bernhard, F

    1997-01-01

    Homologous modules from two different peptide synthetases were analyzed for functionally equivalent regions. Hybrids between the coding regions of the phenylalanine-activating module of tyrocidine synthetase and the valine activating module of surfactin synthetase were constructed by combining the t

  11. Telomeric expression sites are highly conserved in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Hertz-Fowler

    Full Text Available Subtelomeric regions are often under-represented in genome sequences of eukaryotes. One of the best known examples of the use of telomere proximity for adaptive purposes are the bloodstream expression sites (BESs of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei. To enhance our understanding of BES structure and function in host adaptation and immune evasion, the BES repertoire from the Lister 427 strain of T. brucei were independently tagged and sequenced. BESs are polymorphic in size and structure but reveal a surprisingly conserved architecture in the context of extensive recombination. Very small BESs do exist and many functioning BESs do not contain the full complement of expression site associated genes (ESAGs. The consequences of duplicated or missing ESAGs, including ESAG9, a newly named ESAG12, and additional variant surface glycoprotein genes (VSGs were evaluated by functional assays after BESs were tagged with a drug-resistance gene. Phylogenetic analysis of constituent ESAG families suggests that BESs are sequence mosaics and that extensive recombination has shaped the evolution of the BES repertoire. This work opens important perspectives in understanding the molecular mechanisms of antigenic variation, a widely used strategy for immune evasion in pathogens, and telomere biology.

  12. Antitrypanosomal effect of methanolic extract of Zingiber officinale (ginger on Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected Wistar mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Kobo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was carried out to determine the in vivo antitrypanosomal effect of methanolic extract of Zingiber officinale (ginger in Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected mice. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five mice were randomly allocated into five groups of five animals each. Group I and II were given Tween 80 (1 ml/kg and diminazene aceturate (3.5 mg/kg to serve as untreated and treated controls, respectively. Groups III-V received the extract at 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg body weight, respectively. All treatments were given for 6 consecutive days and through the oral route. The mean body weight, mean survival period and daily level of parasitaemia were evaluated. Results: Acute toxicity showed the extract to be relatively safe. There was an insignificant increase in body weight and survival rate of mice treated with the extract. The level of parasitaemia in the extract treated groups was decreased. Conclusion: This study shows the in vivo potential of methanolic extract of Z. officinale in the treatment of trypanosomiasis.

  13. Glutathione and Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicent eRibas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (GSH is the main nonprotein thiol in cells whose functions are dependent on the redox-active thiol of its cysteine moiety that serves as a cofactor for a number of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes. While synthesized exclusively in the cytosol from its constituent amino acids, GSH is distributed in different compartments, including mitochondria where its concentration in the matrix equals that of the cytosol. This feature and its negative charge at physiological pH imply the existence of specific carriers to import GSH from the cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix, where it plays a key role in defense against respiration-induced reactive oxygen species and in the detoxification of lipid hydroperoxides and electrophiles. Moreover, as mitochondria play a central strategic role in the activation and mode of cell death, mitochondrial GSH has been shown to critically regulate the level of sensitization to secondary hits that induce mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and release of proteins confined in the intermembrane space that once in the cytosol engage the molecular machinery of cell death. In this review, we summarize recent data on the regulation of mitochondrial GSH and its role in cell death and prevalent human diseases, such as cancer, fatty liver disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

  14. Cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase is an essential gene in procyclic form Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djikeng, Appolinaire; Raverdy, Sylvine; Foster, Jeremy; Bartholomeu, Daniella; Zhang, Yinhua; El-Sayed, Najib M; Carlow, Clotilde

    2007-03-01

    Glycolysis and gluconeogenesis are, in part, driven by the interconversion of 3- and 2-phosphoglycerate (3-PG and 2-PG) which is performed by phosphoglycerate mutases (PGAMs) which can be cofactor dependant (dPGAM) or cofactor independent (iPGAM). The African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, possesses the iPGAM form which is thought to play an important role in glycolysis. Here, we report on the use of RNA interference to down-regulate the T. brucei iPGAM in procyclic form T. brucei and evaluation of the resulting phenotype. We first demonstrated biochemically that depletion of the steady state levels of iPGM mRNA correlates with a marked reduction of enzyme activity. We further show that iPGAM is required for cell growth in procyclic T. brucei.

  15. THz spectrum of reduced glutathione

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Weining; YAN; Haitao; YUE; Weiwei; ZHAO; Guozhong; Z

    2005-01-01

    The optical characteristics of reduced glutathione molecules between 0.2 THz and 2.4 THz have been investigated by THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The absorption characteristics and optical parameters of the reduced glutathione purged with Nitrogen at room temperature were obtained experimentally. The measured results were fitted well with the theoretical results computed by using Density Functional Theory (DFT) in far-infrared range. Also the conformation of the reduced glutathione molecule was simulated by Gaussian 03. This work has demonstrated significantly that THz-TDS spectroscopy can further be used to study other biological molecules in biological and biomedical engineering.

  16. Hidden Markov Models for Gene Sequence Classification: Classifying the VSG genes in the Trypanosoma brucei Genome

    OpenAIRE

    Mesa, Andrea; Basterrech, Sebastián; Guerberoff, Gustavo; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The article presents an application of Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) for pattern recognition on genome sequences. We apply HMM for identifying genes encoding the Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) in the genomes of Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei) and other African trypanosomes. These are parasitic protozoa causative agents of sleeping sickness and several diseases in domestic and wild animals. These parasites have a peculiar strategy to evade the host's immune system that consists in periodicall...

  17. Mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (group 1) resistance to human trypanosome lytic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Rudo; Capewell, Paul; Turner, C Michael R; Veitch, Nicola J; MacLeod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen

    2010-09-14

    Human innate immunity against most African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma brucei brucei, is mediated by a minor subclass of toxic serum HDL, called trypanosome lytic factor-1 (TLF-1). This HDL contains two primate specific proteins, apolipoprotein L-1 and haptoglobin (Hp)-related protein, as well as apolipoprotein A-1. These assembled proteins provide a powerful defense against trypanosome infection. Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense causes human African sleeping sickness because it has evolved an inhibitor of TLF-1, serum resistance-associated (SRA) protein. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense lacks the SRA gene, yet it infects humans. As transfection of T. b. gambiense (group 1) is not possible, we initially used in vitro-selected TLF-1-resistant T. b. brucei to examine SRA-independent mechanisms of TLF-1 resistance. Here we show that TLF-1 resistance in T. b. brucei is caused by reduced expression of the Hp/Hb receptor gene (TbbHpHbR). Importantly, T. b. gambiense (group 1) also showed a marked reduction in uptake of TLF-1 and a corresponding decrease in expression of T. b. gambiense Hp/Hb receptor (TbgHpHbR). Ectopic expression of TbbHpHbR in TLF-1-resistant T. b. brucei rescued TLF-1 uptake, demonstrating that decreased TbbHpHbR expression conferred TLF-1 resistance. Ectopic expression of TbgHpHbR in TLF-1-resistant T. b. brucei failed to rescue TLF-1 killing, suggesting that coding sequence changes altered Hp/Hb receptor binding affinity for TLF-1. We propose that the combination of coding sequence mutations and decreased expression of TbgHpHbR directly contribute to parasite evasion of human innate immunity and infectivity of group 1 T. b. gambiense. PMID:20805508

  18. Comparison of inhibitory effects between acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione in human glutathione reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nýdlová, Erika; Vrbová, Martina; Cesla, Petr; Jankovičová, Barbora; Ventura, Karel; Roušar, Tomáš

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen overdose is the most frequent cause of acute liver injury. The main mechanism of acetaminophen toxicity has been attributed to oxidation of acetaminophen. The oxidation product is very reactive and reacts with glutathione generating acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate (APAP-SG). Although this conjugate has been recognized to be generally nontoxic, we have found recently that APAP-SG could produce a toxic effect. Therefore, the aim of our study was to estimate the toxicity of purified APAP-SG by characterizing the inhibitory effect in human glutathione reductase (GR) and comparing that to the inhibitory effect of the natural inhibitor reduced glutathione. We used two types of human GR: recombinant and freshly purified from red blood cells. Our results show that GR was significantly inhibited in the presence of both APAP-SG and reduced glutathione. For example, the enzyme activity of recombinant and purified GR was reduced in the presence of 4 mm APAP-SG (with 0.5 mm glutathione disulfide) by 28% and 22%, respectively. The type of enzyme inhibition was observed to be competitive in the cases of both APAP-SG and glutathione. As glutathione inhibits GR activity in cells under physiological conditions, the rate of enzyme inhibition ought to be weaker in the case of glutathione depletion that is typical of acetaminophen overdose. Notably, however, enzyme activity likely remains inhibited due to the presence of APAP-SG, which might enhance the pro-oxidative status in the cell. We conclude that our finding could reflect some other pathological mechanism that may contribute to the toxicity of acetaminophen.

  19. Mosaic VSGs and the scale of Trypanosoma brucei antigenic variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P J Hall

    Full Text Available A main determinant of prolonged Trypanosoma brucei infection and transmission and success of the parasite is the interplay between host acquired immunity and antigenic variation of the parasite variant surface glycoprotein (VSG coat. About 0.1% of trypanosome divisions produce a switch to a different VSG through differential expression of an archive of hundreds of silent VSG genes and pseudogenes, but the patterns and extent of the trypanosome diversity phenotype, particularly in chronic infection, are unclear. We applied longitudinal VSG cDNA sequencing to estimate variant richness and test whether pseudogenes contribute to antigenic variation. We show that individual growth peaks can contain at least 15 distinct variants, are estimated computationally to comprise many more, and that antigenically distinct 'mosaic' VSGs arise from segmental gene conversion between donor VSG genes or pseudogenes. The potential for trypanosome antigenic variation is probably much greater than VSG archive size; mosaic VSGs are core to antigenic variation and chronic infection.

  20. The glutathione reductase GSR-1 determines stress tolerance and longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Lüersen

    Full Text Available Glutathione (GSH and GSH-dependent enzymes play a key role in cellular detoxification processes that enable organism to cope with various internal and environmental stressors. However, it is often not clear, which components of the complex GSH-metabolism are required for tolerance towards a certain stressor. To address this question, a small scale RNAi-screen was carried out in Caenorhabditis elegans where GSH-related genes were systematically knocked down and worms were subsequently analysed for their survival rate under sub-lethal concentrations of arsenite and the redox cycler juglone. While the knockdown of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase led to a diminished survival rate under arsenite stress conditions, GSR-1 (glutathione reductase was shown to be essential for survival under juglone stress conditions. gsr-1 is the sole GSR encoding gene found in C. elegans. Knockdown of GSR-1 hardly affected total glutathione levels nor reduced glutathione/glutathione disulphide (GSH/GSSG ratio under normal laboratory conditions. Nevertheless, when GSSG recycling was impaired by gsr-1(RNAi, GSH synthesis was induced, but not vice versa. Moreover, the impact of GSSG recycling was potentiated under oxidative stress conditions, explaining the enormous effect gsr-1(RNAi knockdown had on juglone tolerance. Accordingly, overexpression of GSR-1 was capable of increasing stress tolerance. Furthermore, expression levels of SKN-1-regulated GSR-1 also affected life span of C. elegans, emphasising the crucial role the GSH redox state plays in both processes.

  1. Neural control of glutamine synthetase activity in rat skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, B; Konagaya, M; Konagaya, Y; Thomas, J W; Banner, C; Mill, J; Max, S R

    1990-05-01

    The mechanism of glutamine synthetase induction in rat skeletal muscle after denervation or limb immobilization was investigated. Adult male rats were subjected to midthigh section of the sciatic nerve. At 1, 2, and 5 h and 1, 2, and 7 days after denervation, rats were killed and denervated, and contralateral control soleus and plantaris muscles were excised, weighted, homogenized, and assayed for glutamine synthetase. Glutamine synthetase activity increased approximately twofold 1 h after denervation in both muscles. By 7 days postdenervation enzyme activity had increased to three times the control level in plantaris muscle and to four times the control level in soleus muscle. Increased enzyme activity after nerve section was associated with increased maximum velocity with no change in apparent Michaelis constant. Immunotitration with an antiglutamine synthetase antibody suggested that denervation caused an increase in the number of glutamine synthetase molecules in muscle. However, Northern-blot analysis revealed no increase in the steady-state level of glutamine synthetase mRNA after denervation. A mixing experiment failed to yield evidence for the presence of a soluble factor involved in regulating the activity of glutamine synthetase in denervated muscle. A combination of denervation and dexamethasone injections resulted in additive increases in glutamine synthetase. Thus the mechanism underlying increased glutamine synthetase after denervation appears to be posttranscriptional and is distinct from that of the glucocorticoid-mediated glutamine synthetase induction previously described by us. PMID:1970709

  2. Different effects of nine clausenamide ennatiomers on liver glutathione biosynthesis and glutathione S-transferase activity in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-qun WU; Li-de LIU; Hua-ling WEI; Geng-tao LIU

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study the effects of nine synthetic clausenamide with different stereo structures on liver glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in mice. Methods: The nine test compounds were racemic mixtures and their ennatiomers of clausenamide, neoclausenamide and epineoclausenamide. Mice were administered clausenamide 250 mg/kg once daily for 3 consecutive days, ig, and were killed 24 h after the last dosing. The mouse liver cytosol GSH and GST were determined with related biochemical methods. Results: Nine clausenamides exhibited different effects on liver GSH and GST. Of nine clausenamides, only (+) and (±)clausenamide markedly increased liver cytosol GSH content. The mechanism of increasing liver GSH content of (+)clausenamide is mainly due to stimulating the key limiting enzyme γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) activity for GSH biosynthesis. The other test clausenamides had no such effect on liver GSH. All of the nine clausenamides induced a significant increase of GST activity. Conclusion: The effects of clausenamide ennatiomers on liver GST and GSH varied with the alterations of their spatial structures. (+)Clausenamide stimulated liver GSH biosynthesis through enhancingγ-GCS activity.

  3. Glutathione analogue sorbents selectively bind glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, V M; Kelley, M K; Engqvist-Goldstein, A; Kauvar, L M

    1993-06-01

    Novel affinity sorbents for glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) were created by binding glutathione (GSH) analogues to Sepharose 6B. The GSH molecule was modified at the glycine moiety and at the group attached to the sulphur of cysteine. When tested by affinity chromatography in a flow-through microplate format, several of these sorbents selectively bound GST isoenzymes. gamma E-C(Hx)-phi G (glutathione with a hexyl moiety bound to cysteine and phenylglycine substituted for glycine) specifically bound rat GST 7-7, the Pi-class isoenzyme, from liver, kidney and small intestine. gamma E-C(Bz)-beta A (benzyl bound to cysteine and beta-alanine substituted for glycine) was highly selective for rat subunits 3 and 4, which are Mu-class isoenzymes. By allowing purification of the isoenzymes under mild conditions that preserve activity, the novel sorbents should be useful in characterizing the biological roles of GSTs in both normal animal and cancer tissues.

  4. Aromatase inhibitors and anti-synthetase syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascella, Fabio; Gianni, Lorenzo; Affatato, Alessandra; Fantini, Manuela

    2016-09-01

    Adjuvant therapy in postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive breast cancer (BC) is actually centered on the use of anti-aromatase inhibitors (AI). Several reports, however, are emerging in literature associating the use of this drugs to rheumatic disorders. This case report describes the first case of anti-synthetase syndrome diagnosis after treatment with anti-estrogen agents in a patient with pre-existing rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27225465

  5. Glutathione transferases: a structural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Aaron

    2011-05-01

    The glutathione transferases (GSTs) are one of the most important families of detoxifying enzymes in nature. The classic activity of the GSTs is conjugation of compounds with electrophilic centers to the tripeptide glutathione (GSH), but many other activities are now associated with GSTs, including steroid and leukotriene biosynthesis, peroxide degradation, double-bond cis-trans isomerization, dehydroascorbate reduction, Michael addition, and noncatalytic "ligandin" activity (ligand binding and transport). Since the first GST structure was determined in 1991, there has been an explosion in structural data across GSTs of all three families: the cytosolic GSTs, the mitochondrial GSTs, and the membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism (MAPEG family). In this review, the major insights into GST structure and function will be discussed.

  6. Dexamethasone regulates glutamine synthetase expression in rat skeletal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Stephen R.; Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase by glucocorticoids in rat skeletal muscles was studied. Administration of dexamethasone strikingly enhanced glutamine synthetase activity in plantaris and soleus muscles. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked to a significant extent by orally administered RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves dramatically increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. The induction of glutamine synthetase was selective in that glutaminase activity of soleus and plantaris muscles was not increased by dexamethasone. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment resulted in only a small increase in glutamine synthetase activity in the heart. Accordingly, there was only a slight change in glutamine synthetase mRNA level in this tissue. Thus, glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase gene expression in rat muscles at the transcriptional level via interaction with intracellular glutamine production by muscle and to mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  7. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase from the ancestral bacterium Aquifex aeolicus contains relics of synthetase evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ming-Wei; Zhu, Bin; Hao, Rui; Xu, Min-Gang; Eriani, Gilbert; Wang, En-Duo

    2005-01-01

    The editing reactions catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are critical for the faithful protein synthesis by correcting misactivated amino acids and misaminoacylated tRNAs. We report that the isolated editing domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase from the deep-rooted bacterium Aquifex aeolicus (αβ-LeuRS) catalyzes the hydrolytic editing of both mischarged tRNALeu and minihelixLeu. Within the domain, we have identified a crucial 20-amino-acid peptide that confers editing capacity when transplan...

  8. MIF Contributes to Trypanosoma brucei Associated Immunopathogenicity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stijlemans, Benoît; Leng, Lin; Brys, Lea; Sparkes, Amanda; Vansintjan, Liese; Caljon, Guy; Raes, Geert; Van Den Abbeele, Jan; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.; Beschin, Alain

    2014-01-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a chronic debilitating disease affecting the health and economic well-being of many people in developing countries. The pathogenicity associated with this disease involves a persistent inflammatory response, whereby M1-type myeloid cells, including Ly6Chigh inflammatory monocytes, are centrally implicated. A comparative gene analysis between trypanosusceptible and trypanotolerant animals identified MIF (macrophage migrating inhibitory factor) as an important pathogenic candidate molecule. Using MIF-deficient mice and anti-MIF antibody treated mice, we show that MIF mediates the pathogenic inflammatory immune response and increases the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils to contribute to liver injury in Trypanosoma brucei infected mice. Moreover, neutrophil-derived MIF contributed more significantly than monocyte-derived MIF to increased pathogenic liver TNF production and liver injury during trypanosome infection. MIF deficient animals also featured limited anemia, coinciding with increased iron bio-availability, improved erythropoiesis and reduced RBC clearance during the chronic phase of infection. Our data suggest that MIF promotes the most prominent pathological features of experimental trypanosome infections (i.e. anemia and liver injury), and prompt considering MIF as a novel target for treatment of trypanosomiasis-associated immunopathogenicity. PMID:25255103

  9. MIF contributes to Trypanosoma brucei associated immunopathogenicity development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Stijlemans

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomiasis is a chronic debilitating disease affecting the health and economic well-being of many people in developing countries. The pathogenicity associated with this disease involves a persistent inflammatory response, whereby M1-type myeloid cells, including Ly6C(high inflammatory monocytes, are centrally implicated. A comparative gene analysis between trypanosusceptible and trypanotolerant animals identified MIF (macrophage migrating inhibitory factor as an important pathogenic candidate molecule. Using MIF-deficient mice and anti-MIF antibody treated mice, we show that MIF mediates the pathogenic inflammatory immune response and increases the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils to contribute to liver injury in Trypanosoma brucei infected mice. Moreover, neutrophil-derived MIF contributed more significantly than monocyte-derived MIF to increased pathogenic liver TNF production and liver injury during trypanosome infection. MIF deficient animals also featured limited anemia, coinciding with increased iron bio-availability, improved erythropoiesis and reduced RBC clearance during the chronic phase of infection. Our data suggest that MIF promotes the most prominent pathological features of experimental trypanosome infections (i.e. anemia and liver injury, and prompt considering MIF as a novel target for treatment of trypanosomiasis-associated immunopathogenicity.

  10. Protective effect of humus extract against Trypanosoma brucei infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Hiroshi; Denso; Okazaki, Fumi; Ishida, Saeko

    2008-11-01

    Humic substances are formed during the decomposition of organic matter in humus, and are found in many natural environments in which organic materials and microorganisms are present. Oral administration of humus extract to mice successfully induced effective protection against experimental challenge by the two subspecies, Trypanosoma brucei brucei and T. brucei gambiense. Mortality was most reduced among mice who received a 3% humus extract for 21 days in drinking water ad libitum. Spleen cells from humus-administered mice exhibited significant non-specific cytotoxic activity against L1210 mouse leukemia target cells. Also, spleen cells produced significantly higher amounts of Interferon-gamma when stimulated in vitro with Concanavalin A than cells from normal controls. These results clearly show that administration to mice of humus extract induced effective resistance against Trypanosoma infection. Enhancement of the innate immune system may be involved in host defense against trypanosomiasis.

  11. Stearoyl-CoA desaturase is an essential enzyme for the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alloatti, Andres [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Gupta, Shreedhara; Gualdron-Lopez, Melisa; Nguewa, Paul A. [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute and Laboratory of Biochemistry, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Altabe, Silvia G. [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Deumer, Gladys; Wallemacq, Pierre [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, LTAP, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Michels, Paul A.M. [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute and Laboratory of Biochemistry, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Uttaro, Antonio D., E-mail: toniuttaro@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Inhibiting {Delta}9 desaturase drastically changes T. brucei's fatty-acid composition. {yields} Isoxyl specifically inhibits the {Delta}9 desaturase causing a growth arrest. {yields} RNA interference of desaturase expression causes a similar effect. {yields} Feeding T. brucei-infected mice with Isoxyl decreases the parasitemia. {yields} 70% of Isoxyl-treated mice survived the trypanosome infection. -- Abstract: Trypanosoma brucei, the etiologic agent of sleeping sickness, is exposed to important changes in nutrients and temperature during its life cycle. To adapt to these changes, the fluidity of its membranes plays a crucial role. This fluidity, mediated by the fatty-acid composition, is regulated by enzymes named desaturases. We have previously shown that the oleoyl desaturase is essential for Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei. In this work, we present experimental support for the relevance of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) for T. brucei's survival, in both its insect or procyclic-form (PCF) and bloodstream-form (BSF) stages. We evaluated this essentiality in two different ways: by generating a SCD knocked-down parasite line using RNA interference, and by chemical inhibition of the enzyme with two compounds, Isoxyl and a thiastearate with the sulfur atom at position 10 (10-TS). The effective concentration for 50% growth inhibition (EC{sub 50}) of PCF was 1.0 {+-} 0.2 {mu}M for Isoxyl and 5 {+-} 2 {mu}M for 10-TS, whereas BSF appeared more susceptible with EC{sub 50} values 0.10 {+-} 0.03 {mu}M (Isoxyl) and 1.0 {+-} 0.6 {mu}M (10-TS). RNA interference showed to be deleterious for both stages of the parasite. In addition, T. brucei-infected mice were fed with Isoxyl, causing a reduction of the parasitemia and an increase of the rodents' survival.

  12. Characterization of inhibitors acting at the synthetase site of Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehlein, S K; Nakatsu, T; Hiratake, J; Thirumoorthy, R; Stewart, J D; Richards, N G; Schuster, S M

    2001-09-18

    Asparagine synthetase catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of L-asparagine from L-aspartate and L-glutamine, via a beta-aspartyl-AMP intermediate. Since interfering with this enzyme activity might be useful for treating leukemia and solid tumors, we have sought small-molecule inhibitors of Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase B (AS-B) as a model system for the human enzyme. Prior work showed that L-cysteine sulfinic acid competitively inhibits this enzyme by interfering with L-aspartate binding. Here, we demonstrate that cysteine sulfinic acid is also a partial substrate for E. coli asparagine synthetase, acting as a nucleophile to form the sulfur analogue of beta-aspartyl-AMP, which is subsequently hydrolyzed back to cysteine sulfinic acid and AMP in a futile cycle. While cysteine sulfinic acid did not itself constitute a clinically useful inhibitor of asparagine synthetase B, these results suggested that replacing this linkage by a more stable analogue might lead to a more potent inhibitor. A sulfoximine reported recently by Koizumi et al. as a competitive inhibitor of the ammonia-dependent E. coli asparagine synthetase A (AS-A) [Koizumi, M., Hiratake, J., Nakatsu, T., Kato, H., and Oda, J. (1999) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 121, 5799-5800] can be regarded as such a species. We found that this sulfoximine also inhibited AS-B, effectively irreversibly. Unlike either the cysteine sulfinic acid interaction with AS-B or the sulfoximine interaction with AS-A, only AS-B productively engaged in asparagine synthesis could be inactivated by the sulfoximine; free enzyme was unaffected even after extended incubation with the sulfoximine. Taken together, these results support the notion that sulfur-containing analogues of aspartate can serve as platforms for developing useful inhibitors of AS-B. PMID:11551215

  13. Retinal Vasculitis in Anti-Synthetase Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Christopher P; Pecen, Paula E; Baynes, Kimberly; Ehlers, Justis P; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a history of anti-synthetase syndrome-related myositis and interstitial lung disease presented with acute-onset blurry vision and rash on her hands and feet. Visual acuity was hand motion in her right eye and 20/40 in her left eye. Dilated fundus exam showed extensive retinal vasculitis, diffuse intraretinal hemorrhages, and subretinal fluid. Optical coherence tomography revealed significant macular thickening, and fluorescein angiography revealed vascular leakage with peripheral nonperfusion. Aggressive systemic immunosuppression was initiated, with gradual resolution of her disease during 8 months of follow-up. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:874-879.].

  14. Dissecting and Exploiting Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Tao SHEN; Xiu-Lan CHEN; Cai-Yun SUN; Yu-Zhong ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    A large number of therapeutically useful cyclic and linear peptides of bacteria or fungal origin are synthesized via a template-directed, nucleic-acid-independent nonribosomal mechanism. This process is carried out by mega-enzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). NRPSs contain repeated coordinated groups of active sites called modules, and each module is composed of several domains with different catalytic activities. The familiarity to these domains lays base for the future genetic engineering of NRPSs to generate entirely "unnature" Products. The details about NRPSs domain structures and the exploitation of NRPSs are described in this review.

  15. Glutathione protects Lactococcus lactis against oxidative stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Hugenholtz, J.; Abee, T.; Molenaar, D.

    2003-01-01

    Glutathione was found in several dairy Lactococcus lactis strains grown in M17 medium. None of these strains was able to synthesize glutathione. In chemically defined medium, L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain SK11 was able to accumulate up to similar to60 mM glutathione when this compound was added t

  16. Characterization of cereulide synthetase, a toxin-producing macromolecular machine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego A Alonzo

    Full Text Available Cereulide synthetase is a two-protein nonribosomal peptide synthetase system that produces a potent emetic toxin in virulent strains of Bacillus cereus. The toxin cereulide is a depsipeptide, as it consists of alternating aminoacyl and hydroxyacyl residues. The hydroxyacyl residues are derived from keto acid substrates, which cereulide synthetase selects and stereospecifically reduces with imbedded ketoreductase domains before incorporating them into the growing depsipeptide chain. We present an in vitro biochemical characterization of cereulide synthetase. We investigate the kinetics and side chain specificity of α-keto acid selection, evaluate the requirement of an MbtH-like protein for adenylation domain activity, assay the effectiveness of vinylsulfonamide inhibitors on ester-adding modules, perform NADPH turnover experiments and evaluate in vitro depsipeptide biosynthesis. This work also provides biochemical insight into depsipeptide-synthesizing nonribosomal peptide synthetases responsible for other bioactive molecules such as valinomycin, antimycin and kutzneride.

  17. Biosynthetic engineering of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kries, Hajo

    2016-09-01

    From the evolutionary melting pot of natural product synthetase genes, microorganisms elicit antibiotics, communication tools, and iron scavengers. Chemical biologists manipulate these genes to recreate similarly diverse and potent biological activities not on evolutionary time scales but within months. Enzyme engineering has progressed considerably in recent years and offers new screening, modelling, and design tools for natural product designers. Here, recent advances in enzyme engineering and their application to nonribosomal peptide synthetases are reviewed. Among the nonribosomal peptides that have been subjected to biosynthetic engineering are the antibiotics daptomycin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, and gramicidin S. With these peptides, incorporation of unnatural building blocks and modulation of bioactivities via various structural modifications have been successfully demonstrated. Natural product engineering on the biosynthetic level is not a reliable method yet. However, progress in the understanding and manipulation of biosynthetic pathways may enable the routine production of optimized peptide drugs in the near future. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27465074

  18. Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei do not use Krebs cycle activity for energy generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weelden, van S.W.H.; Fast, B.; Vogt, A.; Meer, van der P.; Saas, J.; Hellemond, van J.J.; Tielens, A.G.M.; Boshart, M.

    2003-01-01

    The importance of a functional Krebs cycle for energy generation in the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei was investigated under physiological conditions during logarithmic phase growth of a pleomorphic parasite strain. Wild type procyclic cells and mutants with targeted deletion of the gene cod

  19. Involvement of lysosomes in the uptake of macromolecular material by bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opperdoes, F R; Van Roy, J

    1982-09-01

    To investigate whether the lysosomes of Trypanosoma brucei are capable of uptake of macromolecules after internalization by the cell, we used Triton WR-1339, a non-digestible macromolecular compound, which is known to cause a marked decrease in the density of hepatic lysosomes due to massive intralysosomal storage. Intraperitoneal administration of 0.4 g/kg Triton WR-1339 to rats infected with T. brucei led to the development of a large vacuole in the trypanosomes between nucleus and kinetoplast within 22 h. Higher doses (2 g/kg) led to the disappearance of the trypanosomes from the blood and resulted in permanent cures (greater than 100 days). Lysosomes isolated from the trypanosomes of animals treated with a sub-curative dose showed a decrease in equilibrium density of 0.03 g/cm3 in sucrose gradients. These lysosomes were partly damaged as evidenced by a reduction in latency and an increase in the non-sedimentable part of lysosomal enzymes. We conclude that acid proteinase and alpha-mannosidase-containing organelles of T. brucei take up exogenous macromolecules and must therefore be considered as true lysosomes and that Triton WR-1339 acts in T. brucei as a true lysosomotropic drug. Its trypanocidal action probably results from an interference with lysosomal function.

  20. Dynamic Modelling under Uncertainty : The Case of Trypanosoma brucei Energy Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achcar, Fiona; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Barrett, Michael P.; Breitling, Rainer; Papin, Jason A.

    2012-01-01

    Kinetic models of metabolism require detailed knowledge of kinetic parameters. However, due to measurement errors or lack of data this knowledge is often uncertain. The model of glycolysis in the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei is a particularly well analysed example of a quantitative metabol

  1. Handling Uncertainty in Dynamic Models : The Pentose Phosphate Pathway in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Achcar, Fiona; Alibu, Vincent P.; Burchmore, Richard J.; Gilbert, Ian H.; Trybilo, Maciej; Driessen, Nicole N.; Gilbert, David; Breitling, Rainer; Bakker, Barbara M.; Barrett, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic models of metabolism can be useful in identifying potential drug targets, especially in unicellular organisms. A model of glycolysis in the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma brucei, has already shown the utility of this approach. Here we add the pentose phosphate

  2. Telomere length affects the frequency and mechanism of antigenic variation in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galadriel A Hovel-Miner

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is a master of antigenic variation and immune response evasion. Utilizing a genomic repertoire of more than 1000 Variant Surface Glycoprotein-encoding genes (VSGs, T. brucei can change its protein coat by "switching" from the expression of one VSG to another. Each active VSG is monoallelically expressed from only one of approximately 15 subtelomeric sites. Switching VSG expression occurs by three predominant mechanisms, arguably the most significant of which is the non-reciprocal exchange of VSG containing DNA by duplicative gene conversion (GC. How T. brucei orchestrates its complex switching mechanisms remains to be elucidated. Recent work has demonstrated that an exogenous DNA break in the active site could initiate a GC based switch, yet the source of the switch-initiating DNA lesion under natural conditions is still unknown. Here we investigated the hypothesis that telomere length directly affects VSG switching. We demonstrate that telomerase deficient strains with short telomeres switch more frequently than genetically identical strains with long telomeres and that, when the telomere is short, switching preferentially occurs by GC. Our data supports the hypothesis that a short telomere at the active VSG expression site results in an increase in subtelomeric DNA breaks, which can initiate GC based switching. In addition to their significance for T. brucei and telomere biology, the findings presented here have implications for the many diverse pathogens that organize their antigenic genes in subtelomeric regions.

  3. Nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with oligochromatography for detection of Trypanosoma brucei in clinical samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Mugasa; T. Laurent; G.J. Schoone; P.A. Kager; G.W. Lubega; H.D.F.H. Schallig

    2009-01-01

    Molecular tools, such as real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) and PCR, have been developed to detect Trypanosoma brucei parasites in blood for the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). Despite good sensitivity, these techniques are not implemented in HAT control pr

  4. The major transcripts of the kinetoplast Trypanosoma brucei are very small ribosomal RNA's.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.C. Eperon; J.W.G. Janssen; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P. Borst (Piet)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractThe nucleotide sequence has been determined of a 2.2 kb segment of kinetoplast DNA, which encodes the major mitochondrial transcripts (12S and 9S) of Trypanosoma brucei. The sequence shows that the 12S RNA is a large subunit rRNA, although sufficiently unusual for resistance to chloramph

  5. Biosynthesis of SUMOylated Proteins in Bacteria Using the Trypanosoma brucei Enzymatic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, Paula Ana; Berazategui, María Agustina; Cazzulo, Juan José; Alvarez, Vanina Eder

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modification with the Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) is conserved in eukaryotic organisms and plays important regulatory roles in proteins affecting diverse cellular processes. In Trypanosoma brucei, member of one of the earliest branches in eukaryotic evolution, SUMO is essential for normal cell cycle progression and is likely to be involved in the epigenetic control of genes crucial for parasite survival, such as those encoding the variant surface glycoproteins. Molecular pathways modulated by SUMO have started to be discovered by proteomic studies; however, characterization of functional consequences is limited to a reduced number of targets. Here we present a bacterial strain engineered to produce SUMOylated proteins, by transferring SUMO from T. brucei together with the enzymes essential for its activation and conjugation. Due to the lack of background in E. coli, this system is useful to express and identify SUMOylated proteins directly in cell lysates by immunoblotting, and SUMOylated targets can be eventually purified for biochemical or structural studies. We applied this strategy to describe the ability of TbSUMO to form chains in vitro and to detect SUMOylation of a model substrate, PCNA both from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and from T. brucei. To further validate targets, we applied an in vitro deconjugation assay using the T. brucei SUMO-specific protease capable to revert the pattern of modification. This system represents a valuable tool for target validation, mutant generation and functional studies of SUMOylated proteins in trypanosomatids. PMID:26258470

  6. Selenophosphate Synthetase 1 is an Essential Protein with Roles in Regulation of Redox Homeostasis in Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobe, Ryuta; Carlson, Bradley A.; Huh, Jang Hoe; Castro, Nadia P.; Xu, Xue-Ming; Tsuji, Petra A.; Lee, Sang-Goo; Bang, Jeyoung; Na, Ji-Woon; Kong, Young-Yun; Beaglehole, Daniel; Southon, Eileen; Seifried, Harold; Tessarollo, Lino; Salomon, David S.; Schweizer, Ulrich; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Lee, Byeong Jae

    2016-01-01

    Selenophosphate synthetase (SPS) was initially detected in bacteria and was shown to synthesize selenophosphate, the active selenium donor. However, mammals have two SPS paralogs, which are designated SPS1 and SPS2. Although it is known that SPS2 catalyzes the synthesis of selenophosphate, the function of SPS1 remains largely unclear. To examine the role of SPS1 in mammals, we generated a Sps1 knockout mouse and found that systemic SPS1 deficiency led to embryos that were clearly underdeveloped by E8.5 and virtually resorbed by E14.5. The knockout of Sps1 in the liver preserved viability, but significantly affected the expression of a large number of mRNAs involved in cancer, embryonic development, and the glutathione system. Particularly notable was the extreme deficiency of glutaredoxin 1 (GLRX1) and glutathione-S-transferase omega 1. To assess these phenotypes at the cellular level, we targeted the removal of SPS1 in F9 cells, a mouse embryonal carcinoma cell line, which affected the glutathione system proteins and accordingly led to the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in the cell. Further, we found that several malignant characteristics of SPS1-deficient F9 cells were reversed, suggesting that SPS1 played a role in supporting and/or sustaining cancer. In addition, the overexpression of mouse or human GLRX1 led to a reversal of observed increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the F9 SPS1/GLRX1-deficient cells and resulted in levels that were similar to those in F9 SPS1-sufficient cells. The results suggested that SPS1 is an essential mammalian enzyme with roles in regulating redox homeostasis and controlling cell growth. PMID:27208177

  7. Genome shuffling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhanced glutathione yield and relative gene expression analysis using fluorescent quantitation reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hua; Ma, Yanlin; Deng, Yang; Xu, Zhenbo; Liu, Junyan; Zhao, Junfeng; Dong, Jianjun; Yu, Junhong; Chang, Zongming

    2016-08-01

    Genome shuffling is an efficient and promising approach for the rapid improvement of microbial phenotypes. In this study, genome shuffling was applied to enhance the yield of glutathione produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae YS86. Six isolates with subtle improvements in glutathione yield were obtained from populations generated by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and nitrosoguanidine (NTG) mutagenesis. These yeast strains were then subjected to recursive pool-wise protoplast fusion. A strain library that was likely to yield positive colonies was created by fusing the lethal protoplasts obtained from both UV irradiation and heat treatments. After two rounds of genome shuffling, a high-yield recombinant YSF2-19 strain that exhibited 3.2- and 3.3-fold increases in glutathione production in shake flask and fermenter respectively was obtained. Comparative analysis of synthetase gene expression was conducted between the initial and shuffled strains using FQ (fluorescent quantitation) RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction). Delta CT (threshold cycle) relative quantitation analysis revealed that glutathione synthetase gene (GSH-I) expression at the transcriptional level in the YSF2-19 strain was 9.9-fold greater than in the initial YS86. The shuffled yeast strain has a potential application in brewing, other food, and pharmaceutical industries. Simultaneously, the analysis of improved phenotypes will provide more valuable data for inverse metabolic engineering. PMID:27302037

  8. Genetics Home Reference: carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency ...

  9. A regulatory review for products containing glutathione

    OpenAIRE

    Nur Hidayah Abd Rahim; Long Chiau Ming; Yaser Mohammed Ali Al-Worafi; Md. Moklesur Rahman Sarker

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione is a potent antioxidant as well as has important role for DNA synthesis and repair, protein synthesis, amino acid transport, and enzyme activation. Besides this, Glutathione products are now mainly selling as whitening agent which are mainly marketing through social media (Facebook) and different websites. Information is not available whether glutathione product are following the regulatory guidelines of National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau of Malaysia (NPCB) for selling, advert...

  10. The lysosomotropic drug LeuLeu-OMe induces lysosome disruption and autophagy-independent cell death in Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Hazel Xinyu Koh; Htay Mon Aye; Tan, Kevin S W; He, Cynthia Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Trypanosoma brucei is a blood-borne, protozoan parasite that causes African sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in animals. The current chemotherapy relies on only a handful of drugs that display undesirable toxicity, poor efficacy and drug-resistance. In this study, we explored the use of lysosomotropic drugs to induce bloodstream form T. brucei cell death via lysosome destabilization. Methods: We measured drug concentrations that inhibit cell proliferation by 50% (...

  11. Organisation and sequence determination of glutamine-dependent carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J

    2003-01-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II encodes the first enzymic step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II is essential for Toxoplasma gondii replication and virulence. In this study, we characterised the primary structure of a 28kb gene encoding Toxoplasma gondii carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II. The carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II gene was interrupted by 36 introns. The predicted protein encoded by the 37 carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II exons was a 1,687 amino acid polypeptide with an N-terminal glutamine amidotransferase domain fused with C-terminal carbamoyl phosphate synthetase domains. This bifunctional organisation of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II is unique, so far, to protozoan parasites from the phylum Apicomplexa (Plasmodium, Babesia, Toxoplasma) or zoomastigina (Trypanosoma, Leishmania). Apicomplexan parasites possessed the largest carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II enzymes due to insertions in the glutamine amidotransferase and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase domains that were not present in the corresponding gene segments from bacteria, plants, fungi and mammals. The C-terminal allosteric regulatory domain, the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase linker domain and the oligomerisation domain were also distinct from the corresponding domains in other species. The novel C-terminal regulatory domain may explain the lack of activation of Toxoplasma gondii carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II by the allosteric effector 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate. Toxoplasma gondii growth in vitro was markedly inhibited by the glutamine antagonist acivicin, an inhibitor of glutamine amidotransferase activity typically associated with carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II, guanosine monophosphate synthetase, or CTP synthetase. PMID:12547350

  12. Identification of a Wee1-like kinase gene essential for procyclic Trypanosoma brucei survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Y Boynak

    Full Text Available Regulation of eukaryotic cell cycle progression requires sequential activation and inactivation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs. Activation of the cyclin B-cdc2 kinase complex is a pivotal step in mitotic initiation and the tyrosine kinase Wee1 is a key regulator of cell cycle sequence during G2/M transition and inhibits mitotic entry by phosphorylating the inhibitory tyrosine 15 on the cdc2 M-phase-inducing kinase. Wee1 degradation is essential for the exit from the G2 phase. In trypanosomatids, little is known about the genes that regulate cyclin B-cdc2 complexes at the G2/M transition of their cell cycle. Although canonical tyrosine kinases are absent in the genome of trypanosomatids, phosphorylation on protein tyrosine residues has been reported in Trypanosoma brucei. Here, we characterized a Wee1-like protein kinase gene from T. brucei. Expression of TbWee1 in a Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain null for Wee1 inhibited cell division and caused cell elongation. This demonstrates the lengthening of G2, which provided cells with extra time to grow before dividing. The Wee1-like protein kinase was expressed in the procyclic and bloodstream proliferative slender forms of T. brucei and the role of Wee1 in cell cycle progression was analyzed by generating RNA interference cell lines. In the procyclic form of T. brucei, the knock-down of TbWee1 expression by RNAi led to inhibition of parasite growth. Abnormal phenotypes showing an increase in the percentage of cells with 1N0K, 0N1K and 2N1K were observed in these RNAi cell lines. Using parasites with a synchronized cell cycle, we demonstrated that TbWee1 is linked to the G2/M phase. We also showed that TbWee1 is an essential gene necessary for proper cell cycle progression and parasite growth in T. brucei. Our results provide evidence for the existence of a functional Wee1 in T. brucei with a potential role in cell division at G2/M.

  13. Proteomic responses to lead-induced oxidative stress in Talinum triangulare Jacq. (Willd.) roots: identification of key biomarkers related to glutathione metabolisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhay; Majeti, Narasimha Vara Prasad

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Talinum triangulare Jacq. (Willd.) treated with different lead (Pb) concentrations for 7 days has been investigated to understand the mechanisms of ascorbate-glutathione metabolisms in response to Pb-induced oxidative stress. Proteomic study was performed for control and 1.25 mM Pb-treated plants to examine the root protein dynamics in the presence of Pb. Results of our analysis showed that Pb treatment caused a decrease in non-protein thiols, reduced glutathione (GSH), total ascorbate, total glutathione, GSH/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio, and activities of glutathione reductase and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase. Conversely, cysteine and GSSG contents and glutathione-S-transferase activity was increased after Pb treatment. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed our metabolic and proteomic studies and showed that amino, phenolic, and carboxylic acids as well as alcoholic, amide, and ester-containing biomolecules had key roles in detoxification of Pb/Pb-induced toxic metabolites. Proteomic analysis revealed an increase in relative abundance of 20 major proteins and 3 new proteins (appeared only in 1.25 mM Pb). Abundant proteins during 1.25 mM Pb stress conditions have given a very clear indication about their involvement in root architecture, energy metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification, cell signaling, primary and secondary metabolisms, and molecular transport systems. Relative accumulation patterns of both common and newly identified proteins are highly correlated with our other morphological, physiological, and biochemical parameters. PMID:24705950

  14. Function of the major synthetase subdomains of carbamyl-phosphate synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, H I; Evans, D R

    1996-06-01

    The amidotransferase domain (GLNase) of mammalian carbamyl-phosphate synthetase II hydrolyzes glutamine and transfers ammonia to the synthetase domain where carbamyl phosphate is formed in a three-step reaction sequence. The synthetase domain consists of two homologous subdomains, CPS.A and CPS.B. Recent studies suggest that CPS.A catalyzes the initial ATP dependent-activation of bicarbonate, whereas CPS.B uses a second ATP to form carbamyl phosphate. To establish the function of these substructural elements, we have cloned and expressed the mammalian protein and its subdomains in Escherichia coli. Recombinant CPSase (GLNase-CPS.A-CPS.B) was found to be fully functional. Two other proteins were made; the first consisted of only GLNase and CPS.A, whereas the second lacked CPS.A and had the GLNase domain fused directly to CPS.B. Remarkably, both proteins catalyzed the entire series of reactions involved in glutamine-dependent carbamyl phosphate synthesis. The stoichiometry, like that of the native enzyme, was 2 mol of ATP utilized per mol of carbamyl phosphate formed. GLN-CPS.B is allosterically regulated, whereas GLN-CPS.A was insensitive to effectors, a result consistent with evidence showing that allosteric effectors bind to CPS.B. These properties are not peculiar to the mammalian protein, because the separately cloned CPS.A subdomain of the E. coli enzyme was also found to catalyze carbamyl phosphate synthesis. Gel filtration chromatography and chemical cross-linking studies showed that these molecules are dimers, a structural organization that may be a prerequisite for the overall reaction. Thus, the homologous CPS.A and CPS.B subdomains are functionally equivalent, although in the native enzyme they may have different functions resulting from their juxtaposition relative to the other components in the complex. PMID:8662713

  15. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  16. Alkaloids Induce Programmed Cell Death in Bloodstream Forms of Trypanosomes (Trypanosoma b. brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wink

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The potential induction of a programmed cell death (PCD in Trypanosoma b. brucei by 55 alkaloids of the quinoline, quinolizidine, isoquinoline, indole, terpene, tropane, steroid, and piperidine type was studied by measuring DNA fragmentation and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. For comparison, the induction of apoptosis by the same alkaloids in human leukemia cells (Jurkat APO-S was tested. Several alkaloids of the isoquinoline, quinoline, indole and steroidal type (berberine, chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, quinine, ajmalicine, ergotamine, harmine, vinblastine, vincristine, colchicine, chaconine, demissidine and veratridine induced programmed cell death, whereas quinolizidine, tropane, terpene and piperidine alkaloids were mostly inactive. Effective PCD induction (EC50 below 10 µM was caused in T. brucei by chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, and chaconine. The active alkaloids can be characterized by their general property to inhibit protein biosynthesis, to intercalate DNA, to disturb membrane fluidity or to inhibit microtubule formation.

  17. Trypanosoma brucei Infection in asymptomatic greater Kudus (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) on a game ranch in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Siamudaala, Victor; Munyeme, Musso; Nambota, Andrew; Mutoloki, Stephen; Matandiko, Wigganson

    2010-03-01

    Trypomastogotes of Trypanosoma brucei were detected from 4 asymptomatic kudus (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) on a game ranch located approximately 45 km north east of Lusaka, Zambia. Blood smears examined from 14 wildlife species comprising of the impala (Aepyceros melampus), Kafue lechwe (kobus leche kafuensis), sable antelope (Hippotragus niger), tsessebe (Damaliscus lunatus), warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus), puku (Kobus vardoni), zebra (Equus burchelli), waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus), bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus), reedbuck (Redunca arundinum), wilderbeest (Connochaetes taurinus), hartebeest (Alcephelus lichtensteini), African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), and kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) showed that only the kudu had T. brucei. Although game ranching has emerged to be a successful ex-situ conservation strategy aimed at saving the declining wildlife population in the National Parks, our findings suggest that it has the potential of aiding the re-distribution of animal diseases. Hence, there is a need for augmenting wildlife conservation with disease control strategies aimed at reducing the risk of disease transmission between wildlife and domestic animals. PMID:20333288

  18. Elevation of brain glutathione by gamma-glutamylcysteine ethyl ester protects against peroxynitrite-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Jennifer; Kanski, Jaroslaw; Varadarajan, Sridhar; Tsoras, Maria; Butterfield, D Allan

    2002-06-15

    Elevation of glutathione (GSH) has been recognized as an important method for modulating levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the brain. We investigated the antioxidant properties of gamma-glu-cys-ethyl ester (GCEE) in vitro and its ability to increase GSH levels upon in vivo i.p. injection. GCEE displays antioxidant activity similar to GSH as assessed by various in vitro indices such as hydroxyl radical scavenging, dichlorofluorescein fluorescence (DCF), protein specific spin labeling, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, and protein carbonyls. Intraperitoneal injection of GCEE to gerbils resulted in a 41% increase in brain total GSH levels in vivo as determined by the DTNB-GSH reductase recycling method. Gerbils injected with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, had 40% less total brain glutathione. Gerbils injected with BSO followed by a GCEE injection had GSH levels similar to vehicle-injected controls, suggesting that GCEE upregulates GSH biosynthesis by providing gamma-glutamylcysteine and not cysteine. Cortical synaptosomes from GCEE-injected animals were less susceptible to peroxynitrite-induced oxidative damage as assessed by DCF fluorescence, protein-specific spin labeling, and GS activity. These experiments suggest that GCEE is effective in increasing brain GSH levels and may potentially play an important therapeutic role in attenuating oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases associated with oxidative stress such as Alzheimer disease.

  19. Identification of Paralogous Life-Cycle Stage Specific Cytoskeletal Proteins in the Parasite Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Neil Portman; Keith Gull

    2014-01-01

    The life cycle of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei, is characterised by a transition between insect and mammalian hosts representing very different environments that present the parasite with very different challenges. These challenges are met by the expression of life-cycle stage-specific cohorts of proteins, which function in systems such as metabolism and immune evasion. These life-cycle transitions are also accompanied by morphological rearrangements orchestrated by microtubule ...

  20. Ribose 5-Phosphate Isomerase B Knockdown Compromises Trypanosoma brucei Bloodstream Form Infectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Inês Loureiro; Joana Faria; Christine Clayton; Sandra Macedo-Ribeiro; Nuno Santarém; Nilanjan Roy; Anabela Cordeiro-da-Siva; Joana Tavares

    2015-01-01

    Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase is an enzyme involved in the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway, and catalyzes the inter-conversion of D-ribose 5-phosphate and D-ribulose 5-phosphate. Trypanosomatids, including the agent of African sleeping sickness namely Trypanosoma brucei, have a type B ribose-5-phosphate isomerase. This enzyme is absent from humans, which have a structurally unrelated ribose 5-phosphate isomerase type A, and therefore has been proposed as an attractive dru...

  1. The promoter for a variant surface glycoprotein gene expression site in Trypanosoma brucei.

    OpenAIRE

    Zomerdijk, J C; Ouellette, M; ten Asbroek, A L; Kieft, R.; Bommer, A M; Clayton, C E; Borst, P

    1990-01-01

    The variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene 221 of Trypanosoma brucei is transcribed as part of a 60 kb expression site (ES). We have identified the promoter controlling this multigene transcription unit by the use of 221 chromosome-enriched DNA libraries and VSG gene 221 expression site specific transcripts. The start of transcription was determined by hybridization and RNase protection analysis of nascent RNA. The 5' ends of the major transcripts coming from the initiation region m...

  2. Reconstitution of a surface transferrin binding complex in insect form Trypanosoma brucei.

    OpenAIRE

    Ligtenberg, M.J.; Bitter, W.; Kieft, R.; Steverding, D; Janssen, H.; Calafat, J.; Borst, P

    1994-01-01

    In the bloodstream of the mammalian host, Trypanosoma brucei takes up host transferrin by means of a high-affinity uptake system, presumably a transferrin receptor. Transferrin-binding activity is seen in the flagellar pocket and is absent in insect form trypanosomes. By transfection we have reconstituted a transferrin-binding complex in insect form trypanosomes. Formation of this complex requires the products of two genes that are part of a variant surface glycoprotein expression site, expre...

  3. Molecular variation of Trypanosoma brucei subspecies as revealed by AFLP fingerprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Agbo, E.E.C.; Majiwa, P.A.O.; Claassen, H.J.H.M.; Pas, te, M.F.W.

    2002-01-01

    Genetic analysis of Trypanosoma spp. depends on the detection of variation between strains. We have used the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technique to develop a convenient and reliable method for genetic characterization of Trypanosome (sub)species. AFLP accesses multiple independent sites within the genome and would allow a better definition of the relatedness of different Trypanosome (sub)species. Nine isolates (3 from each T. brucei subspecies) were tested with 40 AFLP pri...

  4. A Pre-clinical Animal Model of Trypanosoma brucei Infection Demonstrating Cardiac Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    McCarroll, Charlotte S; Rossor, Charlotte L.; Linda R Morrison; Morrison, Liam J.; Loughrey, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Author Summary African trypanosomiasis (AT) is a disease caused by the single-celled protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. In humans, AT causes neurological problems including sleep disturbances, which give the disease its colloquial name of “sleeping sickness”. Much of the focus of AT research has been on the neurological deficits, but other major organs are also affected, including the heart. Previous studies in humans and animals with AT have identified heart abnormalities such as contrac...

  5. An Atypical Mitochondrial Carrier That Mediates Drug Action in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macêdo, Juan P; Schumann Burkard, Gabriela; Niemann, Moritz; Barrett, Michael P; Vial, Henri; Mäser, Pascal; Roditi, Isabel; Schneider, André; Bütikofer, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Elucidating the mechanism of action of trypanocidal compounds is an important step in the development of more efficient drugs against Trypanosoma brucei. In a screening approach using an RNAi library in T. brucei bloodstream forms, we identified a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, TbMCP14, as a prime candidate mediating the action of a group of anti-parasitic choline analogs. Depletion of TbMCP14 by inducible RNAi in both bloodstream and procyclic forms increased resistance of parasites towards the compounds by 7-fold and 3-fold, respectively, compared to uninduced cells. In addition, down-regulation of TbMCP14 protected bloodstream form mitochondria from a drug-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Conversely, over-expression of the carrier in procyclic forms increased parasite susceptibility more than 13-fold. Metabolomic analyses of parasites over-expressing TbMCP14 showed increased levels of the proline metabolite, pyrroline-5-carboxylate, suggesting a possible involvement of TbMCP14 in energy production. The generation of TbMCP14 knock-out parasites showed that the carrier is not essential for survival of T. brucei bloodstream forms, but reduced parasite proliferation under standard culture conditions. In contrast, depletion of TbMCP14 in procyclic forms resulted in growth arrest, followed by parasite death. The time point at which parasite proliferation stopped was dependent on the major energy source, i.e. glucose versus proline, in the culture medium. Together with our findings that proline-dependent ATP production in crude mitochondria from TbMCP14-depleted trypanosomes was reduced compared to control mitochondria, the study demonstrates that TbMCP14 is involved in energy production in T. brucei. Since TbMCP14 belongs to a trypanosomatid-specific clade of mitochondrial carrier family proteins showing very poor similarity to mitochondrial carriers of mammals, it may represent an interesting target for drug action or targeting. PMID

  6. An essential signal peptide peptidase identified in an RNAi screen of serine peptidases of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine X Moss

    Full Text Available The serine peptidases of Trypanosoma brucei have been viewed as potential drug targets. In particular, the S9 prolyl oligopeptidase subfamily is thought to be a good avenue for drug discovery. This is based on the finding that some S9 peptidases are secreted and active in the mammalian bloodstream, and that they are a class of enzyme against which drugs have successfully been developed. We collated a list of all serine peptidases in T. brucei, identifying 20 serine peptidase genes, of which nine are S9 peptidases. We screened all 20 serine peptidases by RNAi to determine which, if any, are essential for bloodstream form T. brucei survival. All S9 serine peptidases were dispensable for parasite survival in vitro, even when pairs of similar genes, coding for oligopeptidase B or prolyl oligopeptidase, were targeted simultaneously. We also found no effect on parasite survival in an animal host when the S9 peptidases oligopeptidase B, prolyl oligopeptidase or dipeptidyl peptidase 8 were targeted. The only serine peptidase to emerge from the RNAi screen as essential was a putative type-I signal peptide peptidase (SPP1. This gene was essential for parasite survival both in vitro and in vivo. The growth defect conferred by RNAi depletion of SPP1 was rescued by expression of a functional peptidase from an RNAi resistant SPP1 gene. However, expression of catalytically inactive SPP1 was unable to rescue cells from the SPP1 depleted phenotype, demonstrating that SPP1 serine peptidase activity is necessary for T. brucei survival.

  7. Alkaloids Induce Programmed Cell Death in Bloodstream Forms of Trypanosomes (Trypanosoma b. brucei)

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Wink; Vera Rosenkranz

    2008-01-01

    The potential induction of a programmed cell death (PCD) in Trypanosoma b. brucei by 55 alkaloids of the quinoline, quinolizidine, isoquinoline, indole, terpene, tropane, steroid, and piperidine type was studied by measuring DNA fragmentation and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. For comparison, the induction of apoptosis by the same alkaloids in human leukemia cells (Jurkat APO-S) was tested. Several alkaloids of the isoquinoline, quinoline, indole and steroidal type (berberine, c...

  8. An Atypical Mitochondrial Carrier That Mediates Drug Action in Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Juan P de Macêdo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating the mechanism of action of trypanocidal compounds is an important step in the development of more efficient drugs against Trypanosoma brucei. In a screening approach using an RNAi library in T. brucei bloodstream forms, we identified a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, TbMCP14, as a prime candidate mediating the action of a group of anti-parasitic choline analogs. Depletion of TbMCP14 by inducible RNAi in both bloodstream and procyclic forms increased resistance of parasites towards the compounds by 7-fold and 3-fold, respectively, compared to uninduced cells. In addition, down-regulation of TbMCP14 protected bloodstream form mitochondria from a drug-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Conversely, over-expression of the carrier in procyclic forms increased parasite susceptibility more than 13-fold. Metabolomic analyses of parasites over-expressing TbMCP14 showed increased levels of the proline metabolite, pyrroline-5-carboxylate, suggesting a possible involvement of TbMCP14 in energy production. The generation of TbMCP14 knock-out parasites showed that the carrier is not essential for survival of T. brucei bloodstream forms, but reduced parasite proliferation under standard culture conditions. In contrast, depletion of TbMCP14 in procyclic forms resulted in growth arrest, followed by parasite death. The time point at which parasite proliferation stopped was dependent on the major energy source, i.e. glucose versus proline, in the culture medium. Together with our findings that proline-dependent ATP production in crude mitochondria from TbMCP14-depleted trypanosomes was reduced compared to control mitochondria, the study demonstrates that TbMCP14 is involved in energy production in T. brucei. Since TbMCP14 belongs to a trypanosomatid-specific clade of mitochondrial carrier family proteins showing very poor similarity to mitochondrial carriers of mammals, it may represent an interesting target for drug

  9. Wild fauna as a probable animal reservoir for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Njiokou, F.; Laveissière, Claude; Simo, G.; Nkinin, S.; Grébaut, Pascal; Cuny, Gérard; Herder, Stéphane

    2006-01-01

    In order to Study the existence of a wild animal reservoir for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in South Cameroon, blood was collected from wild animals in three human African trypanosomiasis foci and from a nonendemic control area. The 1142 wild animals sampled belonged to 36 different species pertaining to eight orders (407 primates, 347 artiodactyls, 265 rodents, 54 pangolins, 53 carnivores, 11 Saurians and crocodilians, and five hyraxes). QBC (R) and KIVI tests detected trypanosomes on 1.7% (...

  10. A regulatory review for products containing glutathione

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Hidayah Abd Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione is a potent antioxidant as well as has important role for DNA synthesis and repair, protein synthesis, amino acid transport, and enzyme activation. Besides this, Glutathione products are now mainly selling as whitening agent which are mainly marketing through social media (Facebook and different websites. Information is not available whether glutathione product are following the regulatory guidelines of National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau of Malaysia (NPCB for selling, advertisement and promotion. This review was carried out by extracting information about glutathione from scientific database using PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase. Analysis of the available information, case example of glutathione products showed that a brand of glutathione (Glutacaps HQ did not show the product's registration number from NPCB, and also did not show the name, address, contact number of the advertiser, and even not found the name of the manufacture. Without providing the above mentioned information, the product is selling and promoting through social media (fb which is not allowed by the NPCB guidelines part 4.14. So far, only two clinical trials were conducted on glutathione supplementation for 4 weeks duration. There was no serious or systematic adverse effects reported in clinical trials. As the two clinic trials resulted contradictory outcomes, further studies needed for conformation of the clinic benefits of glutathione. Otherwise, random use of glutathione may be risk for the health of the people. Besides, the marketer mainly promoting glutathione as the skin whitening beauty product instead of using as health supplement, it may cause additional and serious risk to the users as the manufacturer not providing sufficient information about the product, its registration number, manufacturing company, etc.

  11. Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei do not use Krebs cycle activity for energy generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weelden, Susanne W H; Fast, Beate; Vogt, Achim; van der Meer, Pieter; Saas, Joachim; van Hellemond, Jaap J; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Boshart, Michael

    2003-04-11

    The importance of a functional Krebs cycle for energy generation in the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei was investigated under physiological conditions during logarithmic phase growth of a pleomorphic parasite strain. Wild type procyclic cells and mutants with targeted deletion of the gene coding for aconitase were derived by synchronous in vitro differentiation from wild type and mutant (Delta aco::NEO/Delta aco::HYG) bloodstream stage parasites, respectively, where aconitase is not expressed and is dispensable. No differences in intracellular levels of glycolytic and Krebs cycle intermediates were found in procyclic wild type and mutant cells, except for citrate that accumulated up to 90-fold in the mutants, confirming the absence of aconitase activity. Surprisingly, deletion of aconitase did not change differentiation nor the growth rate or the intracellular ATP/ADP ratio in those cells. Metabolic studies using radioactively labeled substrates and NMR analysis demonstrated that glucose and proline were not degraded via the Krebs cycle to CO(2). Instead, glucose was degraded to acetate, succinate, and alanine, whereas proline was degraded to succinate. Importantly, there was absolutely no difference in the metabolic products released by wild type and aconitase knockout parasites, and both were for survival strictly dependent on respiration via the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Hence, although the Krebs cycle enzymes are present, procyclic T. brucei do not use Krebs cycle activity for energy generation, but the mitochondrial respiratory chain is essential for survival and growth. We therefore propose a revised model of the energy metabolism of procyclic T. brucei.

  12. Experimental Trypanosoma brucei infection at immediate post partum period:effects on dam and the offspring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Izuchukwu S Ochiogu; Chukwuka N Uchendu; John I Ihedioha

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of immediate post-partum infection with Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei) on dam and offspring. Methods:Sixty female Albino rats (Rattus norvegicus) weighing between 130-170 g were used as animal model. The animals were divided as follows:25 infected between 1-5 days post partum; 10 infected unbred as positive controls; and 25 uninfected as negative controls. The following parameters were evaluated:packed cell volume (PCV), level of parasitaemia, survival time, litter size and litter weight at birth and on days 7, 14 and 21 post delivery, using conventional methods. Possible trans-mammary transmission of infection to litter through milk was also assessed. Results:The results showed a comparatively (P<0.05) higher mean PCV value for the uninfected negative control on the 8th day post infection compared with the infected groups which corresponded with the increasing level of parasitaemia in the two infected groups. Mean litter size and litter weights were higher (P< 0.05) in the uninfected controls on the 21st day. Survival time in the infected groups were similar. No evidence of trans-mammary transfer of infection was recorded. Conclusion:T. brucei infection during immediate post partum period is detrimental to the dam and impairs growth of the offspring.

  13. Advancing Trypanosoma brucei genome annotation through ribosome profiling and spliced leader mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Marilyn; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Vasconcelos, Elton J R; Jensen, Bryan C; Myler, Peter J

    2015-08-01

    Since the initial publication of the trypanosomatid genomes, curation has been ongoing. Here we make use of existing Trypanosoma brucei ribosome profiling data to provide evidence of ribosome occupancy (and likely translation) of mRNAs from 225 currently unannotated coding sequences (CDSs). A small number of these putative genes correspond to extra copies of previously annotated genes, but 85% are novel. The median size of these novels CDSs is small (81 aa), indicating that past annotation work has excelled at detecting large CDSs. Of the unique CDSs confirmed here, over half have candidate orthologues in other trypanosomatid genomes, most of which were not yet annotated as protein-coding genes. Nonetheless, approximately one-third of the new CDSs were found only in T. brucei subspecies. Using ribosome footprints, RNA-Seq and spliced leader mapping data, we updated previous work to definitively revise the start sites for 414 CDSs as compared to the current gene models. The data pointed to several regions of the genome that had sequence errors that altered coding region boundaries. Finally, we consolidated this data with our previous work to propose elimination of 683 putative genes as protein-coding and arrive at a view of the translatome of slender bloodstream and procyclic culture form T. brucei.

  14. Discovery of Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei by Phenotypic Screening of a Focused Protein Kinase Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, Andrew; Thompson, Stephen; Cleghorn, Laura A T; Norcross, Neil; De Rycker, Manu; Grimaldi, Raffaella; Hallyburton, Irene; Rao, Bhavya; Norval, Suzanne; Stojanovski, Laste; Brun, Reto; Kaiser, Marcel; Frearson, Julie A; Gray, David W; Wyatt, Paul G; Read, Kevin D; Gilbert, Ian H

    2015-11-01

    A screen of a focused kinase inhibitor library against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense led to the identification of seven series, totaling 121 compounds, which showed >50 % inhibition at 5 μm. Screening of these hits in a T. b. brucei proliferation assay highlighted three compounds with a 1H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyrazin-2(3H)-one scaffold that showed sub-micromolar activity and excellent selectivity against the MRC5 cell line. Subsequent rounds of optimisation led to the identification of compounds that exhibited good in vitro drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) properties, although in general this series suffered from poor solubility. A scaffold-hopping exercise led to the identification of a 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine scaffold, which retained potency. A number of examples were assessed in a T. b. brucei growth assay, which could differentiate static and cidal action. Compounds from the 1H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyrazin-2(3H)-one series were found to be either static or growth-slowing and not cidal. Compounds with the 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine scaffold were found to be cidal and showed an unusual biphasic nature in this assay, suggesting they act by at least two mechanisms.

  15. Role of glutathione in the oxidative stress response in the fungal pathogen Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Escobedo, Guadalupe; Orta-Zavalza, Emmanuel; Castaño, Irene; De Las Peñas, Alejandro

    2013-08-01

    Candida glabrata, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, accounts for 18-26 % of all Candida systemic infections in the US. C. glabrata has a robust oxidative stress response (OSR) and in this work we characterized the role of glutathione (GSH), an essential tripeptide-like thiol-containing molecule required to keep the redox homeostasis and in the detoxification of metal ions. GSH is synthesized from glutamate, cysteine, and glycine by the sequential action of Gsh1 (γ-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase) and Gsh2 (glutathione synthetase) enzymes. We first screened for suppressor mutations that would allow growth in the absence of GSH1 (gsh1∆ background) and found a single point mutation in PRO2 (pro2-4), a gene that encodes a γ-glutamyl phosphate reductase and catalyzes the second step in the biosynthesis of proline. We demonstrate that GSH is important in the OSR since the gsh1∆ pro2-4 and gsh2∆ mutant strains are more sensitive to oxidative stress generated by H2O2 and menadione. GSH is also required for Cadmium tolerance. In the absence of Gsh1 and Gsh2, cells show decreased viability in stationary phase. Furthermore, C. glabrata does not contain Saccharomyces cerevisiae high affinity GSH transporter ortholog, ScOpt1/Hgt1, however, our genetic and biochemical experiments show that the gsh1∆ pro2-4 and gsh2∆ mutant strains are able to incorporate GSH from the medium. Finally, GSH and thioredoxin, which is a second redox system in the cell, are not essential for the catalase-independent adaptation response to H2O2. PMID:23455613

  16. Kinetics profiling of gramicidin S synthetase A, a member of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xun; Li, Hao; Alfermann, Jonas; Mootz, Henning D; Yang, Haw

    2014-12-23

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) incorporate assorted amino acid substrates into complex natural products. The substrate is activated via the formation of a reactive aminoacyl adenylate and is subsequently attached to the protein template via a thioester bond. The reactive nature of such intermediates, however, leads to side reactions that also break down the high-energy anhydride bond. The off-pathway kinetics or their relative weights compared to that of the on-pathway counterpart remains generally elusive. Here, we introduce multiplatform kinetics profiling to quantify the relative weights of on- and off-pathway reactions. Using the well-defined stoichiometry of thioester formation, we integrate a mass spectrometry (MS) kinetics assay, a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay, and an ATP-pyrophosphate (PPi) exchange assay to map out a highly efficient on-pathway kinetics profile of the substrate activation and intermediate uploading (>98% relative weight) for wide-type gramicidin S synthetase A (GrsA) and a 87% rate profile for a cysteine-free GrsA mutant. Our kinetics profiling approach complements the existing enzyme-coupled byproduct-release assays, unraveling new mechanistic insights of substrate activation/channeling in NRPS enzymes. PMID:25437123

  17. SCREENING OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AND GENES CODING POLYKETIDE SYNTHETASE AND NONRIBOSOMAL PEPTIDE SYNTHETASE OF ACTINOMYCETE ISOLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Kovácsová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to observe antimicrobial activity using agar plate diffusion method and screening genes coding polyketide synthetase (PKS-I and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS from actinomycetes. A total of 105 actinomycete strains were isolated from arable soil. Antimicrobial activity was demonstrated at 54 strains against at least 1 of total 12 indicator organisms. Antifungal properties were recorded more often than antibacterial properties. The presence of PKS-I and NRPS genes were founded at 61 of total 105 strains. The number of strains with mentioned biosynthetic enzyme gene fragments matching the anticipated length were 19 (18% and 50 (47% respectively. Overall, five actinomycete strains carried all the biosynthetical genes, yet no antimicrobial activity was found against any of tested pathogens. On the other hand, twenty-one strains showed antimicrobial activity even though we were not able to amplify any of the PKS or NRPS genes from them. Combination of the two methods showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of actinomycetes isolated from arable soil, which indicate that actinomycetes are valuable reservoirs of novel bioactive compounds.

  18. Kinetics profiling of gramicidin S synthetase A, a member of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xun; Li, Hao; Alfermann, Jonas; Mootz, Henning D; Yang, Haw

    2014-12-23

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) incorporate assorted amino acid substrates into complex natural products. The substrate is activated via the formation of a reactive aminoacyl adenylate and is subsequently attached to the protein template via a thioester bond. The reactive nature of such intermediates, however, leads to side reactions that also break down the high-energy anhydride bond. The off-pathway kinetics or their relative weights compared to that of the on-pathway counterpart remains generally elusive. Here, we introduce multiplatform kinetics profiling to quantify the relative weights of on- and off-pathway reactions. Using the well-defined stoichiometry of thioester formation, we integrate a mass spectrometry (MS) kinetics assay, a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay, and an ATP-pyrophosphate (PPi) exchange assay to map out a highly efficient on-pathway kinetics profile of the substrate activation and intermediate uploading (>98% relative weight) for wide-type gramicidin S synthetase A (GrsA) and a 87% rate profile for a cysteine-free GrsA mutant. Our kinetics profiling approach complements the existing enzyme-coupled byproduct-release assays, unraveling new mechanistic insights of substrate activation/channeling in NRPS enzymes.

  19. A mathematical model of glutathione metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S Jill

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione (GSH plays an important role in anti-oxidant defense and detoxification reactions. It is primarily synthesized in the liver by the transsulfuration pathway and exported to provide precursors for in situ GSH synthesis by other tissues. Deficits in glutathione have been implicated in aging and a host of diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cardiovascular disease, cancer, Down syndrome and autism. Approach We explore the properties of glutathione metabolism in the liver by experimenting with a mathematical model of one-carbon metabolism, the transsulfuration pathway, and glutathione synthesis, transport, and breakdown. The model is based on known properties of the enzymes and the regulation of those enzymes by oxidative stress. We explore the half-life of glutathione, the regulation of glutathione synthesis, and its sensitivity to fluctuations in amino acid input. We use the model to simulate the metabolic profiles previously observed in Down syndrome and autism and compare the model results to clinical data. Conclusion We show that the glutathione pools in hepatic cells and in the blood are quite insensitive to fluctuations in amino acid input and offer an explanation based on model predictions. In contrast, we show that hepatic glutathione pools are highly sensitive to the level of oxidative stress. The model shows that overexpression of genes on chromosome 21 and an increase in oxidative stress can explain the metabolic profile of Down syndrome. The model also correctly simulates the metabolic profile of autism when oxidative stress is substantially increased and the adenosine concentration is raised. Finally, we discuss how individual variation arises and its consequences for one-carbon and glutathione metabolism.

  20. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Estrela

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  1. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  2. Mitochondrial Thioredoxin-Glutathione Reductase from Larval Taenia crassiceps (Cysticerci

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    Alberto Guevara-Flores

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial thioredoxin-glutathione reductase was purified from larval Taenia crassiceps (cysticerci. The preparation showed NADPH-dependent reductase activity with either thioredoxin or GSSG, and was able to perform thiol/disulfide exchange reactions. At 25∘C specific activities were 437  ±  27 mU mg-1 and 840  ±  49 mU mg-1 with thioredoxin and GSSG, respectively. Apparent Km values were 0.87  ±  0.04  μM, 41  ±  6  μM and 19  ±  10  μM for thioredoxin, GSSG and NADPH, respectively. Thioredoxin from eukaryotic sources was accepted as substrate. The enzyme reduced H2O2 in a NADPH-dependent manner, although with low catalytic efficiency. In the presence of thioredoxin, mitochondrial TGR showed a thioredoxin peroxidase-like activity. All disulfide reductase activities were inhibited by auranofin, suggesting mTGR is dependent on selenocysteine. The reductase activity with GSSG showed a higher dependence on temperature as compared with the DTNB reductase activity. The variation of the GSSG- and DTNB reductase activities on pH was dependent on the disulfide substrate. Like the cytosolic isoform, mTGR showed a hysteretic kinetic behavior at moderate or high GSSG concentrations, but it was less sensitive to calcium. The enzyme was able to protect glutamine synthetase from oxidative inactivation, suggesting that mTGR is competent to contend with oxidative stress.

  3. The antioxidant master glutathione and periodontal health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Vivek Kumar; Bains, Rhythm

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, considered to be the master antioxidant (AO), is the most-important redox regulator that controls inflammatory processes, and thus damage to the periodontium. Periodontitis patients have reduced total AO capacity in whole saliva, and lower concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) in serum and gingival crevicular fluid, and periodontal therapy restores the redox balance. Therapeutic considerations for the adjunctive use of glutathione in management of periodontitis, in limiting the tissue damage associated with oxidative stress, and enhancing wound healing cannot be underestimated, but need to be evaluated further through multi-centered randomized controlled trials. PMID:26604952

  4. The antioxidant master glutathione and periodontal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar Bains

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione, considered to be the master antioxidant (AO, is the most-important redox regulator that controls inflammatory processes, and thus damage to the periodontium. Periodontitis patients have reduced total AO capacity in whole saliva, and lower concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH in serum and gingival crevicular fluid, and periodontal therapy restores the redox balance. Therapeutic considerations for the adjunctive use of glutathione in management of periodontitis, in limiting the tissue damage associated with oxidative stress, and enhancing wound healing cannot be underestimated, but need to be evaluated further through multi-centered randomized controlled trials.

  5. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  6. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

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    Cánovas Francisco M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists of 8 different genes exhibiting all structural and regulatory elements consistent with their roles as functional genes. Our results indicate that the family members are organized in 4 groups of duplicated genes, 3 of which code for cytosolic GS isoforms (GS1 and 1 which codes for the choroplastic GS isoform (GS2. Our analysis shows that Populus trichocarpa is the first plant species in which it was observed the complete GS family duplicated. Detailed expression analyses have revealed specific spatial and seasonal patterns of GS expression in poplar. These data provide insights into the metabolic function of GS isoforms in poplar and pave the way for future functional studies. Conclusions Our data suggest that GS duplicates could have been retained in order to increase the amount of enzyme in a particular cell type. This possibility could contribute to the homeostasis of nitrogen metabolism in functions associated to changes in glutamine-derived metabolic products. The presence of duplicated GS genes in poplar could also contribute to diversification of the enzymatic properties for a particular GS isoform through the assembly of GS polypeptides into homo oligomeric and/or hetero oligomeric holoenzymes in specific cell types.

  7. Novel Insights into Regulation of Asparagine Synthetase in Conifers

    OpenAIRE

    Canales, Javier; Rueda-López, Marina; Craven-Bartle, Blanca; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M.

    2012-01-01

    Asparagine, a key amino acid for nitrogen storage and transport in plants, is synthesized via the ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the enzyme asparagine synthetase (AS; EC 6.3.5.4). In this work, we present the molecular analysis of two full-length cDNAs that encode asparagine synthetase in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), PpAS1, and PpAS2. Phylogenetic analyses of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that both genes are class II AS, suggesting an ancient origin of these genes in ...

  8. Arsenic and mercury tolerance and cadmium sensitivity in Arabidopsis plants expressing bacterial gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yujing; Dhankher, Om Parkash; Carreira, Laura; Balish, Rebecca S; Meagher, Richard B

    2005-06-01

    Cysteine sulfhydryl-rich peptide thiols are believed to play important roles in the detoxification of many heavy metals and metalloids such as arsenic, mercury, and cadmium in plants. The gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-ECS) catalyzes the synthesis of the dipeptidethiol gamma-glu-cys (gamma-EC), the first step in the biosynthesis of phytochelatins (PCs). Arabidopsis thaliana, engineered to express the bacterial gamma-ECS gene under control of a strong constitutive actin regulatory sequence (A2), expressed gamma-ECS at levels approaching 0.1% of total protein. In response to arsenic, mercury, and cadmium stresses, the levels of gamma-EC and its derivatives, glutathione (GSH) and PCs, were increased in the A2::ECS transgenic plants to three- to 20-fold higher concentrations than the increases that occurred in wild-type (WT). Compared to cadmium and mercury treatments, arsenic treatment most significantly increased levels of gamma-EC and PCs in both the A2::ECS transgenic and WT plants. The A2::ECS transgenic plants were highly resistant to arsenic and weakly resistant to mercury. Although exposure to cadmium produced three- to fivefold increases in levels of gamma-EC-related peptides in the A2::ECS lines, these plants were significantly more sensitive to Cd(II) than WT and trace levels of Cd(II) blocked resistance to arsenic and mercury. A few possible mechanisms for gamma-ECS-enhanced arsenic and mercury resistance and cadmium hypersensitivity are discussed.

  9. Induction of Glutathione Synthesis and Glutathione Reductase Activity by Abiotic Stresses in Maize and Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Gabor Kocsy; Gabriella Szalai; Gabor Galiba

    2002-01-01

    The effect of different abiotic stresses (extreme temperatures and osmotic stress) on the synthesis of glutathione and hydroxymethylglutathione, on the ratio of the reduced to oxidised forms of these thiols (GSH/GSSG, hmGSH/hmGSSG), and on the glutathione reductase (GR) activity was studied in maize and wheat genotypes having different sensitivity to low temperature stress. Cold treatment induced a greater increase in total glutathione (TG) content and in GR activity in tolerant genotypes of ...

  10. Glutathione Transferase (GST)-Activated Prodrugs

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Calderan; Paolo Ruzza

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione transferase (formerly GST) catalyzes the inactivation of various electrophile-producing anticancer agents via conjugation to the tripeptide glutathione. Moreover, several data link the overexpression of some GSTs, in particular GSTP1-1, to both natural and acquired resistance to various structurally unrelated anticancer drugs. Tumor overexpression of these proteins has provided a rationale for the search of GST inhibitors and GST activated cytotoxic prodrugs. In the present review...

  11. Does glutathione metabolism have a role in the defence of poplar against zinc excess?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Baccio, Daniela; Kopriva, Stanislav; Sebastiani, Luca; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2005-07-01

    Transition metals such as zinc (Zn) are essential micronutrients for many physiological processes, but they become toxic at elevated levels. Zinc is one of the most abundant trace heavy metals present in agro-ecosystems. Populus spp. have been suggested as good candidates for using to study the removal and/or immobilization of environmental organic and inorganic pollutants. In order to understand the physiological and biochemical bases of this assumption for Zn, plants of Populus deltoides x P. nigra (P. x euramericana) were grown in hydroponics with different concentrations of Zn [1 microm (control), and 1, 5 and 10 mm] in the nutrient solution.Shoot biomass decreased at 5 and 10 mm Zn, while the Zn content of young leaves increased progressively with increasing Zn concentration (1-10 mm). Total glutathione (GSH+GSSG) content was reduced with increasing Zn concentration, while the contribution of oxidized to total glutathione increased. Despite these observations, semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that the gene expression of GSH reductase (GR, chloroplastic and cytosolic isoform) and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-ECS) increased in young leaves of poplars treated with excess Zn. We conclude that GSH synthesis, consumption and redox status play a central role in the response of poplars to high concentrations of Zn. PMID:15948831

  12. Abnormal glutathione conjugation in patients with tyrosinaemia type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, DJW; PollThe, BT; Smit, GPA; Breimer, DD; Duran, M; Smeitink, JAM

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that tyrosinaemia type I may be associated with reduced glutathione availability due to conjugation of tyrosinaemia-associated reactive intermediates with glutathione. In the present study, the glutathione/glutathione S-transferase system of two tyrosinaemia patients

  13. Ethanolamine phosphoglycerol attachment to eEF1A is not essential for normal growth of Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Greganova; Peter Bütikofer

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) is the only protein modified by ethanolamine phosphoglycerol (EPG). In mammals and plants, EPG is attached to conserved glutamate residues located in eEF1A domains II and III, whereas in the unicellular eukaryote, Trypanosoma brucei, a single EPG moiety is attached to domain III. A biosynthetic precursor of EPG and structural requirements for EPG attachment to T. brucei eEF1A have been reported, but the role of this unique protein modification in cellul...

  14. Central Nervous System Parasitosis and Neuroinflammation Ameliorated by Systemic IL-10 Administration in Trypanosoma brucei-Infected Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Jean; Bradley, Barbara; Kennedy, Peter G E; Sternberg, Jeremy M

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) by African trypanosomes represents a critical step in the development of human African trypanosomiasis. In both clinical cases and experimental mouse infections it has been demonstrated that predisposition to CNS invasion is associated with a type 1 systemic inflammatory response. Using the Trypanosoma brucei brucei GVR35 experimental infection model, we demonstrate that systemic delivery of the counter-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 lowers plasma IFN-γ and TNF-α concentrations, CNS parasitosis and ameliorates neuro-inflammatory pathology and clinical symptoms of disease. The results provide evidence that CNS invasion may be susceptible to immunological attenuation.

  15. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, S.M.; Habash, D.Z.

    2009-07-02

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  16. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M.; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L.; Steitz, Thomas A.; O’Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNAPyl have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate Nε-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNAPyl. Here, we examine an Nε-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids. PMID:25385624

  17. Haploinsufficiency of glutamine synthetase increases susceptibility to experimental febrile seizures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gassen, K.L.I. van; Hel, W.S. van der; Hakvoort, T.B.; Lamers, W.H.; Graan, P.N. de

    2009-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a pivotal glial enzyme in the glutamate-glutamine cycle. GS is important in maintaining low extracellular glutamate concentrations and is downregulated in the hippocampus of temporal lobe epilepsy patients with mesial-temporal sclerosis, an epilepsy syndrome that is freq

  18. Haploinsufficiency of glutamine synthetase increases susceptibility to experimental febrile seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.L.I. van Gassen; W.S. van der Hel; T.B.M. Hakvoort; W.H. Lamers; P.N.E. de Graan

    2009-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a pivotal glial enzyme in the glutamate-glutamine cycle. GS is important in maintaining low extracellular glutamate concentrations and is downregulated in the hippocampus of temporal lobe epilepsy patients with mesial-temporal sclerosis, an epilepsy syndrome that is freq

  19. Binding of divalent magnesium by Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of binding of the substrates Mg x ATP and ribose 5-phosphate as well as Mg2+ to the enzyme 5-phospho-D-ribosyl (alpha-1-diphosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli has been analyzed. By use of the competive inhibitors of ATP and ribose 5-phosphate binding, alpha,beta-methylene ATP ...

  20. Glutamine Synthetase Deficiency in Murine Astrocytes Results in Neonatal Death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. He; T.B.M. Hakvoort; J.L.M. Vermeulen; W.T. Labruyere; D.R. de Waart; W.S. van der Hel; J.M. Ruijter; H.B.M. Uylings; W.H. Lamers

    2010-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a key enzyme in the "glutamine-glutamate cycle" between astrocytes and neurons, but its function in vivo was thus far tested only pharmacologically. Crossing GS(fl/lacZ) or GS(fl/f)l mice with hGFAP-Cre mice resulted in prenatal excision of the GS(fl) allele in astrocyte

  1. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L; Steitz, Thomas A; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-11-25

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNA(Pyl) have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate N(ε)-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNA(Pyl). Here, we examine an N(ε)-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids.

  2. Cellular concentrations of glutamine synthetase in murine organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.W.M. van Straaten; Y.J. He; M.M. van Duist; W.T. Labruyere; J.L.M. Vermeulen; P.J. van Dijk; J.M. Ruijter; W.H. Lamers; T.B.M. Hakvoort

    2006-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the only enzyme that can synthesize glutamine, but it also functions to detoxify glutamate and ammonia. Organs with high cellular concentrations of GS appear to function primarily to remove glutamate or ammonia. whereas those with a low cellular concentration appear to p

  3. Trypanosoma brucei modifies the tsetse salivary composition, altering the fly feeding behavior that favors parasite transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Van Den Abbeele

    Full Text Available Tsetse flies are the notorious transmitters of African trypanosomiasis, a disease caused by the Trypanosoma parasite that affects humans and livestock on the African continent. Metacyclic infection rates in natural tsetse populations with Trypanosoma brucei, including the two human-pathogenic subspecies, are very low, even in epidemic situations. Therefore, the infected fly/host contact frequency is a key determinant of the transmission dynamics. As an obligate blood feeder, tsetse flies rely on their complex salivary potion to inhibit host haemostatic reactions ensuring an efficient feeding. The results of this experimental study suggest that the parasite might promote its transmission through manipulation of the tsetse feeding behavior by modifying the saliva composition. Indeed, salivary gland Trypanosoma brucei-infected flies display a significantly prolonged feeding time, thereby enhancing the likelihood of infecting multiple hosts during the process of a single blood meal cycle. Comparison of the two major anti-haemostatic activities i.e. anti-platelet aggregation and anti-coagulation activity in these flies versus non-infected tsetse flies demonstrates a significant suppression of these activities as a result of the trypanosome-infection status. This effect was mainly related to the parasite-induced reduction in salivary gland gene transcription, resulting in a strong decrease in protein content and related biological activities. Additionally, the anti-thrombin activity and inhibition of thrombin-induced coagulation was even more severely hampered as a result of the trypanosome infection. Indeed, while naive tsetse saliva strongly inhibited human thrombin activity and thrombin-induced blood coagulation, saliva from T. brucei-infected flies showed a significantly enhanced thrombinase activity resulting in a far less potent anti-coagulation activity. These data clearly provide evidence for a trypanosome-mediated modification of the tsetse

  4. A Gateway® compatible vector for gene silencing in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Kalidas, Savitha; Li, Qiong; Margaret A Phillips

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference is the most rapid method for generation of conditional knockdown mutants in Trypanosoma brucei. The dual T7 promoter (pZJM) and the stem-loop vectors have been widely used to generate stable inducible RNAi cell lines with the latter providing tighter regulatory control. However, the steps for cloning stem-loop constructs are cumbersome requiring either multiple cloning steps or multi-fragment ligation reactions. We report the development of a vector (pTrypRNAiGate) derived fr...

  5. Development of Simplified Heterocyclic Acetogenin Analogues as Potent and Selective Trypanosoma brucei Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florence, Gordon J; Fraser, Andrew L; Gould, Eoin R; King, Elizabeth F; Menzies, Stefanie K; Morris, Joanne C; Thomson, Marie I; Tulloch, Lindsay B; Zacharova, Marija K; Smith, Terry K

    2016-07-19

    Neglected tropical diseases caused by parasitic infections are an ongoing and increasing concern. They are a burden to human and animal health, having the most devastating effect on the world's poorest countries. Building upon our previously reported triazole analogues, in this study we describe the synthesis and biological testing of other novel heterocyclic acetogenin-inspired derivatives, namely 3,5-isoxazoles, furoxans, and furazans. Several of these compounds maintain low-micromolar levels of inhibition against Trypanosoma brucei, whilst having no observable inhibitory effect on mammalian cells, leading to the possibility of novel lead compounds for selective treatment. PMID:27283448

  6. Evidence for a degradosome-like complex in the mitochondria of Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Mattiacio, Jonelle L.; Read, Laurie K.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial RNA turnover in yeast involves the degradosome, composed of DSS-1 exoribonuclease and SUV3 RNA helicase. Here, we describe a degradosome-like complex, containing SUV3 and DSS-1 homologues, in the early branching protozoan, Trypanosoma brucei. TbSUV3 is mitochondrially localized and co-sediments with TbDSS-1 on glycerol gradients. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrates that TbSUV3 and TbDSS-1 associate in a stable complex, which differs from the yeast degradosome in that it is not s...

  7. KREX2 is not essential for either procyclic or bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Carnes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most mitochondrial mRNAs in Trypanosoma brucei require RNA editing for maturation and translation. The edited RNAs primarily encode proteins of the oxidative phosphorylation system. These parasites undergo extensive changes in energy metabolism between the insect and bloodstream stages which are mirrored by alterations in RNA editing. Two U-specific exonucleases, KREX1 and KREX2, are both present in protein complexes (editosomes that catalyze RNA editing but the relative roles of each protein are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The requirement for KREX2 for RNA editing in vivo was assessed in both procyclic (insect and bloodstream form parasites by methods that use homologous recombination for gene elimination. These studies resulted in null mutant cells in which both alleles were eliminated. The viability of these cells demonstrates that KREX2 is not essential in either life cycle stage, despite certain defects in RNA editing in vivo. Furthermore, editosomes isolated from KREX2 null cells require KREX1 for in vitro U-specific exonuclease activity. CONCLUSIONS: KREX2 is a U-specific exonuclease that is dispensable for RNA editing in vivo in T. brucei BFs and PFs. This result suggests that the U deletion activity, which is required for RNA editing, is primarily mediated in vivo by KREX1 which is normally found associated with only one type of editosome. The retention of the KREX2 gene implies a non-essential role or a role that is essential in other life cycle stages or conditions.

  8. The TgsGP gene is essential for resistance to human serum in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capewell, Paul; Clucas, Caroline; DeJesus, Eric; Kieft, Rudo; Hajduk, Stephen; Veitch, Nicola; Steketee, Pieter C; Cooper, Anneli; Weir, William; MacLeod, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes 97% of all cases of African sleeping sickness, a fatal disease of sub-Saharan Africa. Most species of trypanosome, such as T. b. brucei, are unable to infect humans due to the trypanolytic serum protein apolipoprotein-L1 (APOL1) delivered via two trypanosome lytic factors (TLF-1 and TLF-2). Understanding how T. b. gambiense overcomes these factors and infects humans is of major importance in the fight against this disease. Previous work indicated that a failure to take up TLF-1 in T. b. gambiense contributes to resistance to TLF-1, although another mechanism is required to overcome TLF-2. Here, we have examined a T. b. gambiense specific gene, TgsGP, which had previously been suggested, but not shown, to be involved in serum resistance. We show that TgsGP is essential for resistance to lysis as deletion of TgsGP in T. b. gambiense renders the parasites sensitive to human serum and recombinant APOL1. Deletion of TgsGP in T. b. gambiense modified to uptake TLF-1 showed sensitivity to TLF-1, APOL1 and human serum. Reintroducing TgsGP into knockout parasite lines restored resistance. We conclude that TgsGP is essential for human serum resistance in T. b. gambiense. PMID:24098129

  9. The TgsGP gene is essential for resistance to human serum in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Capewell

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes 97% of all cases of African sleeping sickness, a fatal disease of sub-Saharan Africa. Most species of trypanosome, such as T. b. brucei, are unable to infect humans due to the trypanolytic serum protein apolipoprotein-L1 (APOL1 delivered via two trypanosome lytic factors (TLF-1 and TLF-2. Understanding how T. b. gambiense overcomes these factors and infects humans is of major importance in the fight against this disease. Previous work indicated that a failure to take up TLF-1 in T. b. gambiense contributes to resistance to TLF-1, although another mechanism is required to overcome TLF-2. Here, we have examined a T. b. gambiense specific gene, TgsGP, which had previously been suggested, but not shown, to be involved in serum resistance. We show that TgsGP is essential for resistance to lysis as deletion of TgsGP in T. b. gambiense renders the parasites sensitive to human serum and recombinant APOL1. Deletion of TgsGP in T. b. gambiense modified to uptake TLF-1 showed sensitivity to TLF-1, APOL1 and human serum. Reintroducing TgsGP into knockout parasite lines restored resistance. We conclude that TgsGP is essential for human serum resistance in T. b. gambiense.

  10. Trypanosoma Brucei Aquaglyceroporins Facilitate the Uptake of Arsenite and Antimonite in a pH Dependent Way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor L. Uzcátegui

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trypanosoma brucei is a primitive parasitic protozoan that thrives in diverse environments such as the midgut of the tsetse fly and the blood of a mammalian host. For an adequate adaptation to these environments, the parasite´s aquaglyceroporins play an important role. Methods and Results: In order to test their ability to transport trivalent arsenic and antimony, we expressed the three known Trypanosoma brucei aquaglyceroporins (TbAQPs in the heterologous systems of yeast null aquaporin mutant and Xenopus laevis oocytes. For both expression systems, we found a pH dependent intracellular accumulation of As(III or Sb(III mediated by all of the three TbAQPs, with the exception of TbAQP1-As(III uptake. Additionally, we observed that Trypanosoma brucei aquaglyceroporins allow the passage of As(III in both directions. Conclusion: Taken together, these results demonstrated that T. brucei aquaglyceroporins can serve as entry routes for As(III and Sb(III into the parasitic cell, and that this uptake is pH sensitive. Therefore, aquaporins of protozoan parasites may be considered useful as a vehicle for drug delivery.

  11. Variations in maxi-circle and mini-circle sequences in kinetoplast DNAs from different Trypanosoma brucei strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Borst (Piet); F. Fase-Fowler; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A.C.C. Frasch

    1980-01-01

    textabstractWe have compared a total of 30 recognition sites for eight restriction endonucleases on the 20-kilobase-pair maxi-circle of kinetoplast DNAs from five different Trypanosoma brucei strains. In addition to three polymorphic sites were have found a 5 kilobase-pair region that is not cleaved

  12. Role of glutathione, glutathione transferase, and glutaredoxin in regulation of redox-dependent processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina, E V; Chernov, N N; Novichkova, M D

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade fundamentally new features have been revealed for the participation of glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes (glutathione transferase and glutaredoxin) in cell proliferation, apoptosis, protein folding, and cell signaling. Reduced glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in maintaining cellular redox status by participating in thiol-disulfide exchange, which regulates a number of cell functions including gene expression and the activity of individual enzymes and enzyme systems. Maintaining optimum GSH/GSSG ratio is essential to cell viability. Decrease in the ratio can serve as an indicator of damage to the cell redox status and of changes in redox-dependent gene regulation. Disturbance of intracellular GSH balance is observed in a number of pathologies including cancer. Consequences of inappropriate GSH/GSSG ratio include significant changes in the mechanism of cellular redox-dependent signaling controlled both nonenzymatically and enzymatically with the participation of isoforms of glutathione transferase and glutaredoxin. This review summarizes recent data on the role of glutathione, glutathione transferase, and glutaredoxin in the regulation of cellular redox-dependent processes.

  13. Binding properties of ferrocene-glutathione conjugates as inhibitors and sensors for glutathione S-transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Téllez-Sanz, Ramiro; Mesa-Valle, Concepción; Quesada-Soriano, Indalecio; García-Maroto, Federico; Vargas-Berenguel, Antonio; García-Fuentes, Luís

    2012-02-01

    The binding properties of two electroactive glutathione-ferrocene conjugates that consist in glutathione attached to one or both of the cyclopentadienyl rings of ferrocene (GSFc and GSFcSG), to Schistosoma japonica glutathione S-transferase (SjGST) were studied by spectroscopy fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Such ferrocene conjugates resulted to be competitive inhibitors of glutathione S-transferase with an increased binding affinity relative to the natural substrate glutathione (GSH). We found that the conjugate having two glutathione units (GSFcSG) exhibits an affinity for SjGST approximately two orders of magnitude higher than GSH. Furthermore, it shows negative cooperativity with the affinity for the second binding site two orders of magnitude lower than that for the first one. We propose that the reason for such negative cooperativity is steric since, i) the obtained thermodynamic parameters do not indicate profound conformational changes upon GSFcSG binding and ii) docking studies have shown that, when bound, part of the first bound ligand invades the second site due to its large size. In addition, voltammetric measurements show a strong decrease of the peak current upon binding of ferrocene-glutathione conjugates to SjGST and provide very similar K values than those obtained by ITC. Moreover, the sensing ability, expressed by the sensitivity parameter shows that GSFcSG is much more sensitive than GSFc, for the detection of SjGST.

  14. Glutathione-binding site of a bombyx mori theta-class glutathione transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M D Tofazzal; Yamada, Naotaka; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2014-01-01

    The glutathione transferase (GST) superfamily plays key roles in the detoxification of various xenobiotics. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a silkworm protein belonging to a previously reported theta-class GST family. The enzyme (bmGSTT) catalyzes the reaction of glutathione with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, 1,2-epoxy-3-(4-nitrophenoxy)-propane, and 4-nitrophenethyl bromide. Mutagenesis of highly conserved residues in the catalytic site revealed that Glu66 and Ser67 are important for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTT and into the metabolism of exogenous chemical agents.

  15. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli, Identification of a mutant enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Nygaard, Per

    1982-01-01

    , stimulated the mutant enzyme. The activity of PRib-PP synthetase in crude extract was higher in the mutant than in the parent. When starved for purines an accumulation of PRib-PP was observed in the parent strain, while the pool decreased in the mutant. During pyrimidine starvation derepression of PRib....... Kinetic analysis of the mutant PRib-PP synthetase revealed an apparent Km for ATP and ribose 5-phosphate of 1.0 mM and 240 μM respectively, compared to 60 μM and 45 μM respectively for the wild-type enzyme. ADP, which inhibits the wild-type enzyme at a concentration of 0.5 mM ribose 5-phosphate...

  16. Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Complexes in Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Havrylenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are essential enzymes for interpreting the genetic code. They are responsible for the proper pairing of codons on mRNA with amino acids. In addition to this canonical, translational function, they are also involved in the control of many cellular pathways essential for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Association of several of these enzymes within supramolecular assemblies is a key feature of organization of the translation apparatus in eukaryotes. It could be a means to control their oscillation between translational functions, when associated within a multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex (MARS, and nontranslational functions, after dissociation from the MARS and association with other partners. In this review, we summarize the composition of the different MARS described from archaea to mammals, the mode of assembly of these complexes, and their roles in maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

  17. Glutamine synthetase gene evolution: A good molecular clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesole, G.; Lanvave, C.; Saccone, C. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, Bari (Italy)); Bozzetti, M.P. (Univ. di Bari (Italy)); Preparata, G. (Univ. di Milano (Italy))

    1991-01-15

    Glutamine synthetase gene evolution in various animals, plants, and bacteria was evaluated by a general stationary Markov model. The evolutionary process proved to be unexpectedly regular even for a time span as long as that between the divergence of prokaryotes from eukaryotes. This enabled us to draw phylogenetic trees for species whose phylogeny cannot be easily reconstructed from the fossil record. The calculation of the times of divergence of the various organelle-specific enzymes led us to hypothesize that the pea and bean chloroplast genes for these enzymes originated from the duplication of nuclear genes as a result of the different metabolic needs of the various species. The data indicate that the duplication of plastid glutamine synthetase genes occurred long after the endosymbiotic events that produced the organelles themselves.

  18. Glutathione conjugation as a bioactivation reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bladeren, P.J. van

    2000-01-01

    In general, glutathione conjugation is regarded as a detoxication reaction. However, depending on the properties of the substrate, bioactivation is also possible. Four types of activation reaction have been recognized: direct-acting compounds, conjugates that are activated through cysteine conjugate

  19. [Structure and functions of glutathione transferases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedets, O M

    2014-01-01

    Data about classification, nomenclature, structure, substrate specificity and role of many glutathione transferase's isoenzymes in cell functions have been summarised. The enzyme has been discovered more than 50 years ago. This family of proteins is updated continuously. It has very different composition and will have demand for system analysis for many years.

  20. Glutathione-Dependent Detoxification Processes in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dringen, Ralf; Brandmann, Maria; Hohnholt, Michaela C;

    2015-01-01

    component in many of the astrocytic detoxification processes is the tripeptide glutathione (GSH) which serves as electron donor in the GSH peroxidase-catalyzed reduction of peroxides. In addition, GSH is substrate in the detoxification of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds by GSH-S-transferases which...

  1. Five decades with glutathione and the GSTome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannervik, Bengt

    2012-02-24

    Uncle Folke inspired me to become a biochemist by demonstrating electrophoresis experiments on butterfly hemolymph in his kitchen. Glutathione became the subject for my undergraduate project in 1964 and has remained a focal point in my research owing to its multifarious roles in the cell. Since the 1960s, the multiple forms of glutathione transferase (GST), the GSTome, were isolated and characterized, some of which were discovered in our laboratory. Products of oxidative processes were found to be natural GST substrates. Examples of toxic compounds against which particular GSTs provide protection include 4-hydroxynonenal and ortho-quinones, with possible links to the etiology of Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and other degenerative conditions. The role of thioltransferase and glutathione reductase in the cellular reduction of disulfides and other oxidized forms of thiols was clarified. Glyoxalase I catalyzes still another glutathione-dependent detoxication reaction. The unusual steady-state kinetics of this zinc-containing enzyme initiated model discrimination by regression analysis. Functional properties of the enzymes have been altered by stochastic mutations based on DNA shuffling and rationally tailored by structure-based redesign. We found it useful to represent promiscuous enzymes by vectors or points in multidimensional substrate-activity space and visualize them by multivariate analysis. Adopting the concept "molecular quasi-species," we describe clusters of functionally related enzyme variants that may emerge in natural as well as directed evolution.

  2. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

    OpenAIRE

    Cánovas Francisco M; Kirby Edward G; Avila Concepción; Canales Javier; García-Gutiérrez Angel; Castro-Rodríguez Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming) is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists ...

  3. Recurrent adenylation domain replacement in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laakso Kati

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microcystins are small cyclic heptapeptide toxins produced by a range of distantly related cyanobacteria. Microcystins are synthesized on large NRPS-PKS enzyme complexes. Many structural variants of microcystins are produced simulatenously. A recombination event between the first module of mcyB (mcyB1 and mcyC in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster is linked to the simultaneous production of microcystin variants in strains of the genus Microcystis. Results Here we undertook a phylogenetic study to investigate the order and timing of recombination between the mcyB1 and mcyC genes in a diverse selection of microcystin producing cyanobacteria. Our results provide support for complex evolutionary processes taking place at the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains which recognize and activate the amino acids found at X and Z positions. We find evidence for recent recombination between mcyB1 and mcyC in strains of the genera Anabaena, Microcystis, and Hapalosiphon. We also find clear evidence for independent adenylation domain conversion of mcyB1 by unrelated peptide synthetase modules in strains of the genera Nostoc and Microcystis. The recombination events replace only the adenylation domain in each case and the condensation domains of mcyB1 and mcyC are not transferred together with the adenylation domain. Our findings demonstrate that the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains are recombination hotspots in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster. Conclusion Recombination is thought to be one of the main mechanisms driving the diversification of NRPSs. However, there is very little information on how recombination takes place in nature. This study demonstrates that functional peptide synthetases are created in nature through transfer of adenylation domains without the concomitant transfer of condensation domains.

  4. The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jiongming; Marygold, Steven J; Gharib, Walid H; Suter, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNAs, allowing them to decode the triplet code during translation. Through different mechanisms aaRSs also perform several non-canonical functions in transcription, translation, apoptosis, angiogenesis and inflammation. Drosophila has become a preferred system to model human diseases caused by mutations in aaRS, to dissect effects of reduced translation or non-canonical activities, and to study aminoacylation and translat...

  5. Co-purification of dihydrofolate synthetase and N10formyltetrahydropteroyldiglutamate synthetase from E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enzymatic activities which add a single glutamate to dihydropteroate (H2Pte) and to N10formyltetrahydropteroylglutamate (N10formylH4PteGlu) remained at a constant ratio when various purification techniques were used, including ammonium sulfate fractionation, isoelectric focusing, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and column chromatography on Sephadex G-100, DEAE-Sephadex, CM-Sephadex, ADP-Sepharose, N10formylfolate-agarose or matrix Gel Red-A. The best combination of these methods yielded 900-fold purified enzyme. However, the kinetic properties were dependent upon the substrate used. H2Pte was a noncompetitive inhibitor (Kii . 1.1 microM) of the utilization of N10formylH4PteGlu, but no inhibition was detected in the reciprocal experiment. Aminopterin was a competitive inhibitor (Kis . 370 microM) of the reaction with N10formylH4PteGlu but was not inhibitory with H2Pte as substrate. In the dihydrofolate synthetase reaction, in Tris-HCl, pH 8.9 with 50 mM KCl, the apparent Km values for glutamate and MgATP were 3.5 mM and 8.1 microM respectively. With N10formylH4PteGlu as substrate, these Km values were 1.2 mM and 80 microM. Since the two activities were not separated by protein purification procedures but exhibited different kinetic properties (including lack of reciprocal inhibition), the data suggest these reactions are catalyzed on independent sites of a common protein

  6. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-04-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxidation, requiring both molecular oxygen and a reduced nucleotide. This step can also be catalyzed by a purified, mammalian cytochrome P-450 system, as well as by a model system consisting of ascorbic acid and oxygen. Catalase blocks this oxidative modification step. Thus, the overall process of proteolytic degradation can be observed only if care is taken to remove catalase activity from the extracts. The inactivation reaction is dependent on the state of adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase, suggesting that this a physiologically important reaction. If so, then mixed-function oxidases are now implicated in the process of intracellular protein turnover.

  7. Identification of the glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferase of Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dommelen, Anne; Spaepen, Stijn; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2009-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase, a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, is strictly regulated. One means of regulation is the modulation of activity through adenylylation catalyzed by adenylyltransferases. Using PCR primers based on conserved sequences in glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferases, we amplified part of the glnE gene of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7. The complete glnE sequence of A. brasilense Sp245 was retrieved from the draft genome sequence of this organism (http://genomics.ornl.gov/research/azo/). Adenylyltransferase is a bifunctional enzyme consisting of an N-terminal domain responsible for deadenylylation activity and a C-terminal domain responsible for adenylylation activity. Both domains are partially homologous to each other. Residues important for catalytic activity were present in the deduced amino acid sequence of the A. brasilense Sp245 glnE sequence. A glnE mutant was constructed in A. brasilense Sp7 by inserting a kanamycin resistance cassette between the two active domains of the enzyme. The resulting mutant was unable to adenylylate the glutamine synthetase enzyme and was impaired in growth when shifted from nitrogen-poor to nitrogen-rich medium.

  8. Expression of glutamine synthetase in balloon cells: a basis of their antiepileptic role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Barba, Carmen; Giordano, Flavio; Baroni, Gianna; Genitori, Lorenzo; Guerrini, Renzo; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase is an enzyme involved in the clearance of glutamate, the most potent excitatory neurotransmitter. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of glutamine synthetase in neocortical samples from 5 children who underwent surgery for pharmacoresistant epilepsy and a histological diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia IIb. In all cases, balloon cells, but not dysmorphic neurons, were immunopositive for glutamine synthetase. This finding suggests that balloon cells can be involved in the neutralization of glutamate and play a protective anti-seizure role.

  9. Chimerization at the AQP2–AQP3 locus is the genetic basis of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in clinical Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice E. Graf

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aquaglyceroporin-2 is a known determinant of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in Trypanosoma brucei brucei laboratory strains. Recently, chimerization at the AQP2–AQP3 tandem locus was described from melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistant Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates from sleeping sickness patients in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Here, we demonstrate that reintroduction of wild-type AQP2 into one of these isolates fully restores drug susceptibility while expression of the chimeric AQP2/3 gene in aqp2–aqp3 null T. b. brucei does not. This proves that AQP2–AQP3 chimerization is the cause of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in the T. b. gambiense isolates.

  10. Glutathione Reductase/Glutathione Is Responsible for Cytotoxic Elemental Sulfur Tolerance via Polysulfide Shuttle in Fungi*

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Ikuo; Shimatani, Kanami; Fujita, Kensaku; Abe, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Fujii, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Fungi that can reduce elemental sulfur to sulfide are widely distributed, but the mechanism and physiological significance of the reaction have been poorly characterized. Here, we purified elemental sulfur-reductase (SR) and cloned its gene from the elemental sulfur-reducing fungus Fusarium oxysporum. We found that NADPH-glutathione reductase (GR) reduces elemental sulfur via glutathione as an intermediate. A loss-of-function mutant of the SR/GR gene generated less sulfide from elemental sulf...

  11. Selective inhibition of type 2 fatty acid synthetase by the antibiotic thiolactomycin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, Ikuo; Kawaguchi, Akihiko; Yamada, Mitsuhiro (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1984-03-01

    The antibiotic thiolactomycin inhibits the fatty acid synthesis from both (1-/sup 14/C)-acetate and (2/sup 14/C) malonyl-CoA of spinach leaves, developing castor bean endosperms and avocado mesocarp. On the other hand, fatty acid synthetases of Brevibacterium ammoniagenes and Corynebacterium glutamicum are much less sensitive to this antibiotic. As Hayashi et al. have indicated in their paper that thiolactomycin inhibits fatty acid synthetase of Escherichia coli but has little effect on the synthetases of yeast and rat liver, thiolactomycin is suggested to be a selective inhibitor of type 2 fatty acid synthetases.

  12. Selective inhibition of type 2 fatty acid synthetase by the antibiotic thiolactomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The antibiotic thiolactomycin inhibits the fatty acid synthesis from both [1-14C]-acetate and [214C] malonyl-CoA of spinach leaves, developing castor bean endosperms and avocado mesocarp. On the other hand, fatty acid synthetases of Brevibacterium ammoniagenes and Corynebacterium glutamicum are much less sensitive to this antibiotic. As Hayashi et al. have indicated in their paper that thiolactomycin inhibits fatty acid synthetase of Escherichia coli but has little effect on the synthetases of yeast and rat liver, thiolactomycin is suggested to be a selective inhibitor of type 2 fatty acid synthetases. (author)

  13. Novel interaction of diethyldithiocarbamate with the glutathione/glutathione peroxidase system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) exhibits a variety of pharmacologic activities, including both radioprotective and sensitizing properties. Since the glutathione/glutathione peroxidase system may be a significant factor in determining radiation sensitivity, the potential mechanisms of action of DDC in relation to this system were examined in vitro. The interaction of DDC with reduced glutathione (GSH) was tested using a simple system based on the reduction of cytochrome c. When DDC (0.005 mM) was incubated with GSH (0.5 mM), the reduction of cytochrome c was eightfold greater than that expected from an additive effect of DDC and GSH. GSH could be replaced by oxidized glutathione and glutathione reductase. Cytochrome c reduced by DDC was oxidized by mitochondria. The interaction of DDC with both the hexosemonophosphate shunt pathway and the mitochondrial respiratory chain suggests the possibility of linking these two pathways through DDC. Oxidation of DDC by peroxide and reversal by GSH indicated that the drug can engage in a cyclic reaction with peroxide and GSH. This was confirmed when DDC was used in the assay system for glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) without GSHPx. DDC at a concentration of 0.25 mM was more active than 0.01 unit of pure GSHPx in eliminating peroxide, and much more active than the other sulfhydryl compounds tested. These studies indicate that DDC can supplement GSHPx activity or substitute for it in detoxifying peroxides, and suggests a unique role in the chemical modification of radiation sensitivity

  14. Glutathione Dynamics in Arabidopsis Seed Development and Germination

    OpenAIRE

    Sumugat, Mae Rose S.

    2004-01-01

    Seed desiccation and germination have great potential for oxidative stress. Glutathione, one of the most abundant antioxidants in plant cells, is a crucial to the plant's defense mechanisms. To better understand glutathione's responses during these two stages, we examined its dynamics in wildtype Arabidopsis seeds and in a transgenic line containing an antisense glutathione reductase2 (anGR2) cDNA insert. Seeds from the two genotypes were compared morphologically. Glutathione levels in maturi...

  15. Adenine nucleotides as allosteric effectors of pea seed glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, T J; Langston-Unkefer, P J

    1988-08-15

    The effects of adenine nucleotides on pea seed glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) activity were examined as a part of our investigation of the regulation of this octameric plant enzyme. Saturation curves for glutamine synthetase activity versus ATP with ADP as the changing fixed inhibitor were not hyperbolic; greater apparent Vmax values were observed in the presence of added ADP than the Vmax observed in the absence of ADP. Hill plots of data with ADP present curved upward and crossed the plot with no added ADP. The stoichiometry of adenine nucleotide binding to glutamine synthetase was examined. Two molecules of [gamma-32P]ATP were bound per subunit in the presence of methionine sulfoximine. These ATP molecules were bound at an allosteric site and at the active site. One molecule of either [gamma-32P]ATP or [14C]ADP bound per subunit in the absence of methionine sulfoximine; this nucleotide was bound at an allosteric site. ADP and ATP compete for binding at the allosteric site, although ADP was preferred. ADP binding to the allosteric site proceeded in two kinetic phases. A Vmax value of 1.55 units/mg was measured for glutamine synthetase with one ADP tightly bound per enzyme subunit; a Vmax value of 0.8 unit/mg was measured for enzyme with no adenine nucleotide bound at the allosteric site. The enzyme activation caused by the binding of ADP to the allosteric sites was preceded by a lag phase, the length of which was dependent on the ADP concentration. Enzyme incubated in 10 mM ADP bound approximately 4 mol of ADP/mol of native enzyme before activation was observed; the activation was complete when 7-8 mol of ADP were bound per mol of the octameric, native enzyme. The Km for ATP (2 mM) was not changed by ADP binding to the allosteric sites. ADP was a simple competitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.05 mM) of ATP for glutamine synthetase with eight molecules of ADP tightly bound to the allosteric sites of the octamer. Binding of ATP to the allosteric sites led to marked

  16. Evaluation of the In Vitro Efficacy of Artemisia annua, Rumex abyssinicus, and Catha edulis Forsk Extracts in Cancer and Trypanosoma brucei Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worku, Netsanet; Mossie, Andualem; Stich, August; Daugschies, Arwid; Trettner, Susanne; Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Birkenmeier, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    The current drugs against sleeping sickness are derived from cancer chemotherapeutic approaches. Herein, we aimed at evaluating the in vitro effect of alcoholic extracts of Artemisia annua (AMR), Rumex abyssinicus (RMA), and Catha edulis Forsk (CEF) on proliferation/viability of 1321N1 astrocytoma, MCF-7 breast cancer, THP-1 leukemia, and LNCaP, Du-145, and PC-3 prostate cancer cells and on Trypanosoma brucei cells. Proliferation of tumor cells was evaluated by WST-1 assay and viability/behaviour of T. brucei by cell counting and light microscopy. CEF was the most efficient growth inhibitor in comparison to AMR and RMA. Nevertheless, in LNCaP and THP-1 cells, all extracts significantly inhibited tumor growth at 3 μg/mL. All extracts inhibited proliferation of T. brucei cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Microscopic analysis revealed that 95% of the T. brucei cells died when exposed to 33 μg/mL CEF for 3 hrs. Similar results were obtained using 33 μg/mL AMR for 6 hrs. In case of RMA, however, higher concentrations were necessary to obtain similar effects on T. brucei. This demonstrates the antitumor efficacy of these extracts as well as their ability to dampen viability and proliferation of T. brucei, suggesting a common mechanism of action on highly proliferative cells, most probably by targeting cell metabolism. PMID:25937964

  17. Sec16 determines the size and functioning of the Golgi in the protist parasite, Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealey-Cardona, Marco; Schmidt, Katy; Demmel, Lars; Hirschmugl, Tatjana; Gesell, Tanja; Dong, Gang; Warren, Graham

    2014-06-01

    The Sec16 homologue in Trypanosoma brucei has been identified and characterized. TbSec16 colocalizes with COPII components at the single endoplasmic reticulum exit site (ERES), which is next to the single Golgi stack in the insect (procyclic) form of this organism. Depletion of TbSec16 reduces the size of the ERES and the Golgi, and slows growth and transport of a secretory marker to the cell surface; conversely, overexpression of TbSec16 increases the size of the ERES and Golgi but has no effect on growth or secretion. Together these data suggest that TbSec16 regulates the size of the ERES and Golgi and this size is set for optimal growth of the organism.

  18. Extracellular Vesicles from Trypanosoma brucei Mediate Virulence Factor Transfer and Cause Host Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szempruch, Anthony J; Sykes, Steven E; Kieft, Rudo; Dennison, Lauren; Becker, Allison C; Gartrell, Anzio; Martin, William J; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Almeida, Igor C; Hajduk, Stephen L; Harrington, John M

    2016-01-14

    Intercellular communication between parasites and with host cells provides mechanisms for parasite development, immune evasion, and disease pathology. Bloodstream African trypanosomes produce membranous nanotubes that originate from the flagellar membrane and disassociate into free extracellular vesicles (EVs). Trypanosome EVs contain several flagellar proteins that contribute to virulence, and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense EVs contain the serum resistance-associated protein (SRA) necessary for human infectivity. T. b. rhodesiense EVs transfer SRA to non-human infectious trypanosomes, allowing evasion of human innate immunity. Trypanosome EVs can also fuse with mammalian erythrocytes, resulting in rapid erythrocyte clearance and anemia. These data indicate that trypanosome EVs are organelles mediating non-hereditary virulence factor transfer and causing host erythrocyte remodeling, inducing anemia. PMID:26771494

  19. Trypanosoma brucei: Enrichment by UV of intergenic transcripts from the variable surface glycoprotein gene expression site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expression site for the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene AnTat 1.3A of Trypanosoma brucei is 45 kilobases long and encompasses seven expression site-associated genes (ESAGs). After UV irradiation, several large transcripts from the putative promoter region were strongly enriched. We report that one such major transcript starts near the poly(A) addition site of the first gene (ESAG 7), spans the intergenic region, and extends to the poly(A) addition site of the second gene (ESAG 6), thus bypassing the normal 3' splice site of the ESAG 6 mRNA. Since this transcript is spliced, we conclude that UV irradiation does not inhibit splicing but stabilizes unstable processing products. This demonstrates that at least some intergenic regions of the VSG gene expression site are continuously transcribed in accordance with a polycistronic transcription model

  20. Processing of the glycosomal matrix-protein import receptor PEX5 of Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualdrón-López, Melisa [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Michels, Paul A.M., E-mail: paul.michels@uclouvain.be [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Most eukaryotic cells have a single gene for the peroxin PEX5. ► PEX5 is sensitive to in vitro proteolysis in distantly related organisms. ► TbPEX5 undergoes N-terminal truncation in vitro and possibly in vivo. ► Truncated TbPEX5 is still capable of binding PTS1-containing proteins. ► PEX5 truncation is physiologically relevant or an evolutionary conserved artifact. -- Abstract: Glycolysis in kinetoplastid protists such as Trypanosoma brucei is compartmentalized in peroxisome-like organelles called glycosomes. Glycosomal matrix-protein import involves a cytosolic receptor, PEX5, which recognizes the peroxisomal-targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) present at the C-terminus of the majority of matrix proteins. PEX5 appears generally susceptible to in vitro proteolytic processing. On western blots of T. brucei, two PEX5 forms are detected with apparent M{sub r} of 100 kDa and 72 kDa. 5′-RACE-PCR showed that TbPEX5 is encoded by a unique transcript that can be translated into a protein of maximally 72 kDa. However, recombinant PEX5 migrates aberrantly in SDS–PAGE with an apparent M{sub r} of 100 kDa, similarly as observed for the native peroxin. In vitro protease susceptibility analysis of native and {sup 35}S-labelled PEX5 showed truncation of the 100 kDa form at the N-terminal side by unknown parasite proteases, giving rise to the 72 kDa form which remains functional for PTS1 binding. The relevance of these observations is discussed.

  1. Knockdown of Inner Arm Protein IC138 in Trypanosoma brucei Causes Defective Motility and Flagellar Detachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne S Wilson

    Full Text Available Motility in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is conferred by a single flagellum, attached alongside the cell, which moves the cell forward using a beat that is generated from tip-to-base. We are interested in characterizing components that regulate flagellar beating, in this study we extend the characterization of TbIC138, the ortholog of a dynein intermediate chain that regulates axonemal inner arm dynein f/I1. TbIC138 was tagged In situ-and shown to fractionate with the inner arm components of the flagellum. RNAi knockdown of TbIC138 resulted in significantly reduced protein levels, mild growth defect and significant motility defects. These cells tended to cluster, exhibited slow and abnormal motility and some cells had partially or fully detached flagella. Slight but significant increases were observed in the incidence of mis-localized or missing kinetoplasts. To document development of the TbIC138 knockdown phenotype over time, we performed a detailed analysis of flagellar detachment and motility changes over 108 hours following induction of RNAi. Abnormal motility, such as slow twitching or irregular beating, was observed early, and became progressively more severe such that by 72 hours-post-induction, approximately 80% of the cells were immotile. Progressively more cells exhibited flagellar detachment over time, but this phenotype was not as prevalent as immotility, affecting less than 60% of the population. Detached flagella had abnormal beating, but abnormal beating was also observed in cells with no flagellar detachment, suggesting that TbIC138 has a direct, or primary, effect on the flagellar beat, whereas detachment is a secondary phenotype of TbIC138 knockdown. Our results are consistent with the role of TbIC138 as a regulator of motility, and has a phenotype amenable to more extensive structure-function analyses to further elucidate its role in the control of flagellar beat in T. brucei.

  2. Population genetics of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense: clonality and diversity within and between foci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig W Duffy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes are unusual among pathogenic protozoa in that they can undergo their complete morphological life cycle in the tsetse fly vector with mating as a non-obligatory part of this development. Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, which infects humans and livestock in East and Southern Africa, has classically been described as a host-range variant of the non-human infective Trypanosoma brucei that occurs as stable clonal lineages. We have examined T. b. rhodesiense populations from East (Uganda and Southern (Malawi Africa using a panel of microsatellite markers, incorporating both spatial and temporal analyses. Our data demonstrate that Ugandan T. b. rhodesiense existed as clonal populations, with a small number of highly related genotypes and substantial linkage disequilibrium between pairs of loci. However, these populations were not stable as the dominant genotypes changed and the genetic diversity also reduced over time. Thus these populations do not conform to one of the criteria for strict clonality, namely stability of predominant genotypes over time, and our results show that, in a period in the mid 1990s, the previously predominant genotypes were not detected but were replaced by a novel clonal population with limited genetic relationship to the original population present between 1970 and 1990. In contrast, the Malawi T. b. rhodesiense population demonstrated significantly greater diversity and evidence for frequent genetic exchange. Therefore, the population genetics of T. b. rhodesiense is more complex than previously described. This has important implications for the spread of the single copy T. b. rhodesiense gene that allows human infectivity, and therefore the epidemiology of the human disease, as well as suggesting that these parasites represent an important organism to study the influence of optional recombination upon population genetic dynamics.

  3. Protein functional links in Trypanosoma brucei, identified by gene fusion analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trimpalis Philip

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domain or gene fusion analysis is a bioinformatics method for detecting gene fusions in one organism by comparing its genome to that of other organisms. The occurrence of gene fusions suggests that the two original genes that participated in the fusion are functionally linked, i.e. their gene products interact either as part of a multi-subunit protein complex, or in a metabolic pathway. Gene fusion analysis has been used to identify protein functional links in prokaryotes as well as in eukaryotic model organisms, such as yeast and Drosophila. Results In this study we have extended this approach to include a number of recently sequenced protists, four of which are pathogenic, to identify fusion linked proteins in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. We have also examined the evolution of the gene fusion events identified, to determine whether they can be attributed to fusion or fission, by looking at the conservation of the fused genes and of the individual component genes across the major eukaryotic and prokaryotic lineages. We find relatively limited occurrence of gene fusions/fissions within the protist lineages examined. Our results point to two trypanosome-specific gene fissions, which have recently been experimentally confirmed, one fusion involving proteins involved in the same metabolic pathway, as well as two novel putative functional links between fusion-linked protein pairs. Conclusions This is the first study of protein functional links in T. brucei identified by gene fusion analysis. We have used strict thresholds and only discuss results which are highly likely to be genuine and which either have already been or can be experimentally verified. We discuss the possible impact of the identification of these novel putative protein-protein interactions, to the development of new trypanosome therapeutic drugs.

  4. Secondary Metabolites from Vietnamese Marine Invertebrates with Activity against Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Phuong Thao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine-derived natural products from invertebrates comprise an extremely diverse and promising source of the compounds from a wide variety of structural classes. This study describes the discovery of five marine natural products with activity against Trypanosoma species by natural product library screening using whole cell in vitro assays. We investigated the anti-trypanosomal activity of the extracts from the soft corals and echinoderms living in Vietnamese seas. Of the samples screened, the methanolic extracts of several marine organisms exhibited potent activities against cultures of Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi (EC50 < 5.0 μg/mL. Among the compounds isolated from these extracts, laevigatol B (1 from Lobophytum crassum and L. laevigatum, (24S-ergost-4-ene-3-one (2 from Sinularia dissecta, astropectenol A (3 from Astropecten polyacanthus, and cholest-8-ene-3β,5α,6β,7α-tetraol (4 from Diadema savignyi showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei with EC50 values ranging from 1.57 ± 0.14 to 14.6 ± 1.36 μM, relative to the positive control, pentamidine (EC50 = 0.015 ± 0.003 μM. Laevigatol B (1 and 5α-cholest-8(14-ene-3β,7α-diol (5 exhibited also significant inhibitory effects on T. cruzi. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds on mammalian cells was also assessed and found to be insignificant in all cases. This is the first report on the inhibitory effects of marine organisms collected in Vietnamese seas against Trypanosoma species responsible for neglected tropical diseases.

  5. No Net Splanchnic Release of Glutathione in Man during N-Acetylcysteine Infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E.; Vilstrup, H.; Almdal, Thomas Peter;

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, N-acetylcysteine, glutathione, indocyanine green, amino acid analysis, glutathione synthesis, liver/liver vein catheterization......Farmakologi, N-acetylcysteine, glutathione, indocyanine green, amino acid analysis, glutathione synthesis, liver/liver vein catheterization...

  6. The effect of oxidative stress on human red cells glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase level, and prevalence of anemia among diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Waggiallah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The oxidative stress is considered as major consequence of diabetes mellitus affecting red cell antioxidant enzymes. Aim: The present study was conducted to assess the impact of oxidative stress (reduced glutathione on glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductse and prevalence of anemia among diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: The study involved 100 adult patients attending Buraidah Central Hospital and 30 healthy controls. Blood samples were collected and analyzed for glutathione (GSH concentration, glutathione peroxidase (GPO, glutathione reductase (GR, fasting blood sugar (RBS, hemoglobin (HGB, red cell count (RBCs hematocrit (HCT mean cell volume (MCV mean cell hemoglobin (MCH and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC and hemoglobin A1c. Blood urea, serum creatinine, and microalbuminuria were measured to exclude diabetes mellitus nephropathy. Results : were obtained showed significant correlation between deficiency of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and deficient of glutathione among diabetics, which has significant correlation between low hemoglobin concentration (females <120 g/L, males <130 g/L, also there is low concentration of red cell count and red cell indices (MCV, MCH and MCHC. The prevalence of anemia was 22% in diabetes patients. Conclusion: It can be concluded that there is strong significant effect of oxidative stress (reduced glutathione on glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase level these may reduce hemoglobin concentration in diabetic patients. This means oxidative stress of diabetes mellitus is the possible cause of anemia in diabetics without nephropathy.

  7. Regulation of glutamine synthetase, aspartokinase, and total protein turnover in Klebsiella aerogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1985-12-13

    When suspensions of Klebsiella aerogenes are incubated in a nitrogen-free medium there is a gradual decrease in the levels of acid-precipitable protein and of aspartokinase III (lysine-sensitive) and aspartokinase I (threonine-sensitive) activities. In contrast, the level of glutamine synthetase increases slightly and then remains constant. Under these conditions, the glutamine synthetase and other proteins continue to be synthesized as judged by the incorporation of [14C]leucine into the acid-precipitable protein fraction and into protein precipitated by anti-glutamine synthetase antibodies, by the fact that growth-inhibiting concentrations of chloramphenicol also inhibit the incorporation of [14C]leucine into protein and into protein precipitated by anti-glutamine synthetase antibody, and by the fact that chloramphenicol leads to acceleration in the loss of aspartokinases I and III and promotes a net decrease in the level of glutamine synthetase and its cross-reactive protein. The loss of aspartokinases I and III in cell suspensions is stimulated by glucose and is inhibited by 2,4-dinitrophenol. Glucose also stimulates the loss of aspartokinases and glutamine synthetase in the presence of chloramphenicol. Cell-free extracts of K. aerogenes catalyze rapid inactivation of endogenous glutamine synthetase as well as exogenously added pure glutamine synthetase. This loss of glutamine synthetase is not associated with a loss of protein that cross-reacts with anti-glutamine synthetase antibodies. The inactivation of glutamine synthetase in extracts is not due to adenylylation. It is partially prevented by sulfhydryl reagents, Mn2+, antimycin A, 2,4-dinitrophenol, EDTA, anaerobiosis and by dialysis. Following 18 h dialysis, the capacity of extracts to catalyze inactivation of glutamine synthetase is lost but can be restored by the addition of Fe2+ (or Ni2+) together with ATP (or other nucleoside di- and triphosphates. After 40-60 h dialysis Fe3+ together with NADH (but

  8. Glutathione cycle in diquat neurotoxicity: Assessed by intrastriatal pre-treatment with glutathione reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurđević Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diquat (DQ neurotoxicity mechanisms are unknown, although, it's systemic toxicity is mediated by free radical reactions. The role of glutathione cycle was assessed by glutathione reductase (GR applied in the pre-treatment of DQ poisoning. Wistar rats were used and tested compounds were administered intrastriatally (i.s. in one single dose. Total glutathione (tGSH, glutathione disulfide (GSSG and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were measured in the vulnerable brain regions (VBRs (striatum, hippocampus and cortex, at 30 minutes, 24 hours and 7 days post treatment. Results from the intact and the sham operated groups were not statistically different. Rapid spatial spreading of oxidative stress was confirmed in the examined VBRs. Mortality (30-40%, within 24hrs and signs of lethargy were observed in the DQ group. Activity of GPx activity was elevated and GSSG/GSH was higher in the examined VBRs during the experiment, compared to the controls. The i.s. pre-treatment with GR achieved neuroprotective role against DQ induced neurotoxicity, based on animal survival, absence of lethargy and decreased GPx activity and GSSG/GSH in the examined VBRs during the experiment, compared to the DQ group. Our results confirmed that oxidation of GSH was the reason for the reduced antioxidative defense against DQ neurotoxicity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III41018

  9. Response of transgenic poplar overexpressing cytosolic glutamine synthetase to phosphinothricin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, María Belén; Jing, Zhong Ping; Kirby, Edward G; Cánovas, Francisco M; Gallardo, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the main enzyme involved in ammonia assimilation in plants and is the target of phosphinothricin (PPT), an herbicide commonly used for weed control in agriculture. As a result of the inhibition of GS, PPT also blocks photorespiration, resulting in the depletion of leaf amino acid pools leading to the plant death. Hybrid transgenic poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba INRA clone 7171-B4) overexpressing cytosolic GS is characterized by enhanced vegetative growth [Gallardo, F., Fu, J., Cantón, F.R., García-Gutiérrez, A., Cánovas, F.M., Kirby, E.G., 1999. Expression of a conifer glutamine synthetase gene in transgenic poplar. Planta 210, 19-26; Fu, J., Sampalo, R., Gallardo, F., Cánovas, F.M., Kirby, E.G., 2003. Assembly of a cytosolic pine glutamine synthetase holoenzyme in leaves of transgenic poplar leads to enhanced vegetative growth in young plants. Plant Cell Environ. 26, 411-418; Jing, Z.P., Gallardo, F., Pascual, M.B., Sampalo, R., Romero, J., Torres de Navarra, A., Cánovas, F.M., 2004. Improved growth in a field trial of transgenic hybrid poplar overexpressing glutamine synthetase. New Phytol. 164, 137-145], increased photosynthetic and photorespiratory capacities [El-Khatib, R.T., Hamerlynck, E.P., Gallardo, F., Kirby, E.G., 2004. Transgenic poplar characterized by ectopic expression of a pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene exhibits enhanced tolerance to water stress. Tree Physiol. 24, 729-736], enhanced tolerance to water stress (El-Khatib et al., 2004), and enhanced nitrogen use efficiency [Man, H.-M., Boriel, R., El-Khatib, R.T., Kirby, E.G., 2005. Characterization of transgenic poplar with ectopic expression of pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase under conditions of varying nitrogen availability. New Phytol. 167, 31-39]. In vitro plantlets of GS transgenic poplar exhibited enhanced resistance to PPT when compared with non-transgenic controls. After 30 days exposure to PPT at an equivalent dose of 275 g ha(-1), growth

  10. Inhibitors of the mitochondrial cytochrome b-c1 complex inhibit the cyanide-insensitive respiration of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrens, J F; Bickar, D; Lehninger, A L

    1986-06-01

    The cyanide-insensitive respiration of bloodstream trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma brucei (75 +/- 8 nmol O2 min-1(mg protein)-1) is completely inhibited by the mitochondrial ubiquinone-like inhibitors 2-hydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (UHNQ) and 5-n-undecyl-6-hydroxy-4,7-dioxobenzothiazole (UHDBT). The Ki values for UHDBT (30 nM) and UHNQ (2 microM) are much lower than the reported Ki for salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) (5 microM), a widely used inhibitor of the cyanide-insensitive oxidase. UHNQ also stimulated the glycerol-3-phosphate-dependent reduction of phenazine methosulfate, demonstrating that the site of UHNQ inhibition is on the terminal oxidase of the cyanide-insensitive respiration of T. brucei. These results suggest that a ubiquinone-like compound may act as an electron carrier between the two enzymatic components of the cyanide-insensitive glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase.

  11. In vitro investigation of Brazilian Cerrado plant extract activity against Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei gambiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charneau, Sébastien; de Mesquita, Mariana Laundry; Bastos, Izabela Marques Dourado; Santana, Jaime Martins; de Paula, José Elias; Grellier, Philippe; Espindola, Laila Salmen

    2016-06-01

    The threatened Brazilian Cerrado biome is an important biodiversity hotspot but still few explored that constitutes a potential reservoir of molecules to treat infectious diseases. We selected eight Cerrado plant species for screening against the erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum, human intracellular stages of Trypanosoma cruzi and bloodstream forms of T. brucei gambiense, and for their cytotoxicity upon the rat L6-myoblast cell line. Bioassays were performed with 37 hexane, ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts prepared from different plant organs. Activities against parasites were observed for 24 extracts: 9 with anti-P. falciparum, 4 with anti-T. cruzi and 11 with anti-T. brucei gambiense activities. High anti-protozoal activity (IC50 values knowledge essential for Cerrado conservation and sustainable development. PMID:26222897

  12. Inhibitors of the mitochondrial cytochrome b-c1 complex inhibit the cyanide-insensitive respiration of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrens, J F; Bickar, D; Lehninger, A L

    1986-06-01

    The cyanide-insensitive respiration of bloodstream trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma brucei (75 +/- 8 nmol O2 min-1(mg protein)-1) is completely inhibited by the mitochondrial ubiquinone-like inhibitors 2-hydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (UHNQ) and 5-n-undecyl-6-hydroxy-4,7-dioxobenzothiazole (UHDBT). The Ki values for UHDBT (30 nM) and UHNQ (2 microM) are much lower than the reported Ki for salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) (5 microM), a widely used inhibitor of the cyanide-insensitive oxidase. UHNQ also stimulated the glycerol-3-phosphate-dependent reduction of phenazine methosulfate, demonstrating that the site of UHNQ inhibition is on the terminal oxidase of the cyanide-insensitive respiration of T. brucei. These results suggest that a ubiquinone-like compound may act as an electron carrier between the two enzymatic components of the cyanide-insensitive glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase. PMID:3016533

  13. Regulation of glutamine synthetase by regulatory protein PII in Klebsiella aerogenes mutants lacking adenylyltransferase.

    OpenAIRE

    Reuveny, Z; Foor, F; Magasanik, B

    1981-01-01

    A mutation of Klebsiella aerogenes causing production of an altered PII regulatory protein which stimulates overadenylylation of glutamine synthetase and also prevents its derepression was combined with mutations abolishing the activity of adenylyltransferase. The results support the idea that PII plays a role in the regulation of the level of glutamine synthetase which is independent of its interaction with adenylyltransferase.

  14. Glutamine versus ammonia utilization in the NAD synthetase family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica De Ingeniis

    Full Text Available NAD is a ubiquitous and essential metabolic redox cofactor which also functions as a substrate in certain regulatory pathways. The last step of NAD synthesis is the ATP-dependent amidation of deamido-NAD by NAD synthetase (NADS. Members of the NADS family are present in nearly all species across the three kingdoms of Life. In eukaryotic NADS, the core synthetase domain is fused with a nitrilase-like glutaminase domain supplying ammonia for the reaction. This two-domain NADS arrangement enabling the utilization of glutamine as nitrogen donor is also present in various bacterial lineages. However, many other bacterial members of NADS family do not contain a glutaminase domain, and they can utilize only ammonia (but not glutamine in vitro. A single-domain NADS is also characteristic for nearly all Archaea, and its dependence on ammonia was demonstrated here for the representative enzyme from Methanocaldococcus jannaschi. However, a question about the actual in vivo nitrogen donor for single-domain members of the NADS family remained open: Is it glutamine hydrolyzed by a committed (but yet unknown glutaminase subunit, as in most ATP-dependent amidotransferases, or free ammonia as in glutamine synthetase? Here we addressed this dilemma by combining evolutionary analysis of the NADS family with experimental characterization of two representative bacterial systems: a two-subunit NADS from Thermus thermophilus and a single-domain NADS from Salmonella typhimurium providing evidence that ammonia (and not glutamine is the physiological substrate of a typical single-domain NADS. The latter represents the most likely ancestral form of NADS. The ability to utilize glutamine appears to have evolved via recruitment of a glutaminase subunit followed by domain fusion in an early branch of Bacteria. Further evolution of the NADS family included lineage-specific loss of one of the two alternative forms and horizontal gene transfer events. Lastly, we identified NADS

  15. Functional dissection of T. brucei Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1 and investigation of its development as a therapeutic target

    OpenAIRE

    Ruberto, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei undergoes developmentally regulated morphological and biochemical changes during its life cycle, being transmitted between the mammalian host and the tsetse fly. It is generally recognized that cellular responses to environmental changes are mediated through signalling pathways, but our understanding of trypanosome signal transduction during differentiation is limited. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1 (TbPTP1) is the one of the few factors identified to b...

  16. A structural domain mediates attachment of ethanolamine phosphoglycerol to eukaryotic elongation factor 1A in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Greganova

    Full Text Available Ethanolamine phosphoglycerol (EPG represents a protein modification that so far has only been found in eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A. In mammals and plants, EPG is covalently attached to two conserved glutamate residues located in domains II and III of eEF1A. In contrast, Trypanosoma brucei eEF1A contains a single EPG attached to Glu362 in domain III. The sequence and/or structural requirements for covalent linkage of EPG to eEF1A have not been determined for any organism. Using a combination of biosynthetic labelling of parasites with tritiated ethanolamine and mass spectrometry analyses, we demonstrate that replacement of Glu362 in T. brucei eEF1A by site-directed mutagenesis prevents EPG attachment, whereas single or multiple amino acid substitutions around the attachment site are not critical. In addition, by expressing a series of eEF1A deletion mutants in T. brucei procyclic forms, we demonstrate that a peptide consisting of 80 amino acids of domain III of eEF1A is sufficient for EPG attachment to occur. Furthermore, EPG addition also occurs if domain III of eEF1A is fused to a soluble reporter protein. To our knowledge, this is the first report addressing amino acid sequence, or structure, requirements for EPG modification of eEF1A in any organism. Using T. brucei as a model organism, we show that amino acid substitutions around the modification site are not critical for EPG attachment and that a truncated version of domain III of eEF1A is sufficient to mediate EPG addition.

  17. Comparative genomics reveals two novel RNAi factors in Trypanosoma brucei and provides insight into the core machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L Barnes

    Full Text Available The introduction ten years ago of RNA interference (RNAi as a tool for molecular exploration in Trypanosoma brucei has led to a surge in our understanding of the pathogenesis and biology of this human parasite. In particular, a genome-wide RNAi screen has recently been combined with next-generation Illumina sequencing to expose catalogues of genes associated with loss of fitness in distinct developmental stages. At present, this technology is restricted to RNAi-positive protozoan parasites, which excludes T. cruzi, Leishmania major, and Plasmodium falciparum. Therefore, elucidating the mechanism of RNAi and identifying the essential components of the pathway is fundamental for improving RNAi efficiency in T. brucei and for transferring the RNAi tool to RNAi-deficient pathogens. Here we used comparative genomics of RNAi-positive and -negative trypanosomatid protozoans to identify the repertoire of factors in T. brucei. In addition to the previously characterized Argonaute 1 (AGO1 protein and the cytoplasmic and nuclear Dicers, TbDCL1 and TbDCL2, respectively, we identified the RNA Interference Factors 4 and 5 (TbRIF4 and TbRIF5. TbRIF4 is a 3'-5' exonuclease of the DnaQ superfamily and plays a critical role in the conversion of duplex siRNAs to the single-stranded form, thus generating a TbAGO1-siRNA complex required for target-specific cleavage. TbRIF5 is essential for cytoplasmic RNAi and appears to act as a TbDCL1 cofactor. The availability of the core RNAi machinery in T. brucei provides a platform to gain mechanistic insights in this ancient eukaryote and to identify the minimal set of components required to reconstitute RNAi in RNAi-deficient parasites.

  18. High-resolution complex of papain with remnants of a cysteine protease inhibitor derived from Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Alphey, Magnus S.; Hunter, William N.

    2006-01-01

    Attempts to cocrystallize the cysteine protease papain derived from the latex of Carica papaya with an inhibitor of cysteine proteases (ICP) from Trypanosoma brucei were unsuccessful. However, crystals of papain that diffracted to higher resolution, 1.5 Å, than other crystals of this archetypal cysteine protease were obtained, so the analysis was continued. Surprisingly, the substrate-binding cleft was occupied by two short peptide fragments which have been assigned as remnants of ICP. Compar...

  19. A target-based high throughput screen yields Trypanosoma brucei hexokinase small molecule inhibitors with antiparasitic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R Sharlow

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei utilizes glycolysis exclusively for ATP production during infection of the mammalian host. The first step in this metabolic pathway is mediated by hexokinase (TbHK, an enzyme essential to the parasite that transfers the gamma-phospho of ATP to a hexose. Here we describe the identification and confirmation of novel small molecule inhibitors of bacterially expressed TbHK1, one of two TbHKs expressed by T. brucei, using a high throughput screening assay. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Exploiting optimized high throughput screening assay procedures, we interrogated 220,233 unique compounds and identified 239 active compounds from which ten small molecules were further characterized. Computation chemical cluster analyses indicated that six compounds were structurally related while the remaining four compounds were classified as unrelated or singletons. All ten compounds were approximately 20-17,000-fold more potent than lonidamine, a previously identified TbHK1 inhibitor. Seven compounds inhibited T. brucei blood stage form parasite growth (0.03brucei parasites, Leishmania promastigotes, and mammalian cell lines. Analysis of two structurally related compounds, ebselen and SID 17387000, revealed that both were mixed inhibitors of TbHK1 with respect to ATP. Additionally, both compounds inhibited parasite lysate-derived HK activity. None of the compounds displayed structural similarity to known hexokinase inhibitors or human African trypanosomiasis therapeutics. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The novel chemotypes identified here could represent leads for future therapeutic development against the African trypanosome.

  20. Evolutionary consequences of a large duplication event in Trypanosoma brucei: Chromosomes 4 and 8 are partial duplicons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Andrew P

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene order along the genome sequence of the human parasite Trypanosoma brucei provides evidence for a 0.5 Mb duplication, comprising the 3' regions of chromosomes 4 and 8. Here, the principal aim was to examine the contribution made by this duplication event to the T. brucei genome sequence, emphasising the consequences for gene content and the evolutionary change subsequently experienced by paralogous gene copies. The duplicated region may be browsed online at http://www.genedb.org/genedb/tryp/48dup_image.jsp Results Comparisons of trypanosomatid genomes demonstrated widespread gene loss from each duplicon, but also showed that 47% of duplicated genes were retained on both chromosomes as paralogous loci. Secreted and surface-expressed genes were over-represented among retained paralogs, reflecting a bias towards important factors at the host-parasite interface, and consistent with a dosage-balance hypothesis. Genetic divergence in both coding and regulatory regions of retained paralogs was bimodal, with a deficit in moderately divergent paralogs; in particular, non-coding sequences were either conserved or entirely remodelled. The conserved paralogs included examples of remarkable sequence conservation, but also considerable divergence of both coding and regulatory regions. Sequence divergence typically displayed strong negative selection; but several features, such as asymmetric evolutionary rates, positively-selected codons and other non-neutral substitutions, suggested that divergence of some paralogs was driven by functional change. The absence of orthologs to retained paralogs in T. congolense indicated that the duplication event was specific to T. brucei. Conclusion The duplication of this chromosomal region doubled the dosage of many genes. Rather than creating 'more of the same', these results show that paralogs were structurally modified according to various evolutionary trajectories. The retention of paralogs, and

  1. Increased hepatic glycogen synthetase and decreased phosphorylase in trained rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbo, H; Saugmann, P; Richter, Erik

    1979-01-01

    Rats were either physically trained by a 12 wk swimming program or were freely eating or weight matched, sedentary controls. Trained rats had a higher relative liver weight and total hepatic glycogen synthetase (EC 2.4.1.11) activity and a lower phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1) activity than the other...... groups of rats. These changes may partly explain the demonstrated training-induced increase in glucose tolerance. None of the findings could be ascribed to differences in foold intake or body weight....

  2. Chemopreventive effect of methanolic extract of Azadirachta indica on experimental Trypanosoma brucei induced oxidative stress in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temidayo O Omobowale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The medicinal properties of Azadirachta indica have been harnessed for many years in the treatment of many diseases in both humans and animals. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five apparently healthy dogs weighing between 3 and 8 kg were randomly divided into five groups with five dogs in each group. Ameliorative effect of A. indica on erythrocyte antioxidant status and markers of oxidative stress were assessed. Liver and kidney function tests were also performed. Results: Pre-treatment with methanolic extract of Azadirachta indica (MEAI at different doses did not significantly alter the values of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activity in Trypanosoma brucei infection. Although, serum creatinine significantly (P 0.05 difference compared to the values obtained in pre-treated animals. Pre-treatment with 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg of A. indica significantly (P < 0.05 decreased serum myeloperoxidase activity at 2 weeks post-infection with T. brucei. Conclusion: From this study, MEAI showed significant ability to attenuate oxidative stress and inflammation during experimental T. brucei infection.

  3. Ab initio identification of novel regulatory elements in the genome of Trypanosoma brucei by Bayesian inference on sequence segmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Kelly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rapid increase in the availability of genome information has created considerable demand for both comparative and ab initio predictive bioinformatic analyses. The biology laid bare in the genomes of many organisms is often novel, presenting new challenges for bioinformatic interrogation. A paradigm for this is the collected genomes of the kinetoplastid parasites, a group which includes Trypanosoma brucei the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis. These genomes, though outwardly simple in organisation and gene content, have historically challenged many theories for gene expression regulation in eukaryotes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Here we utilise a Bayesian approach to identify local changes in nucleotide composition in the genome of T. brucei. We show that there are several elements which are found at the starts and ends of multicopy gene arrays and that there are compositional elements that are common to all intergenic regions. We also show that there is a composition-inversion element that occurs at the position of the trans-splice site. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The nature of the elements discovered reinforces the hypothesis that context dependant RNA secondary structure has an important influence on gene expression regulation in Trypanosoma brucei.

  4. Efflux of glutathione and glutathione complexes from human erythrocytes in response to inorganic arsenic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Deniz; Cakir, Yeliz

    2012-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate if arsenic exposure results in glutathione efflux from human erythrocytes. Arsenite significantly depleted intracellular nonprotein thiol level in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The intracellular nonprotein thiol level was decreased to 0.767 ± 0.0017 μmol/ml erythrocyte following exposure to 10 mM of arsenite for 4 h. Extracellular nonprotein thiol level was increased concomitantly with the intracellular decrease and reached to 0.481 ± 0.0005 μmol/ml erythrocyte in 4 h. In parallel with the change in extracellular nonprotein thiol levels, significant increases in extracellular glutathione levels were detected. Extracellular glutathione levels reached to 0.122 ± 0.0013, 0.226 ± 0.003, and 0.274 ± 0.004 μmol/ml erythrocyte with 1, 5, and 10 mM of arsenite, respectively. Dimercaptosuccinic acid treatment of supernatants significantly increased the glutathione levels measured in the extracellular media. Utilization of MK571 and verapamil, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and Pgp inhibitors, decreased the rate of glutathione efflux from erythrocytes suggesting a role for these membrane transporters in the process. The results of the present study indicate that human erythrocytes efflux glutathione in reduced free form and in conjugated form or forms that can be recovered with dimercaptosuccinic acid when exposed to arsenite. PMID:22890881

  5. The Glutathione Biosynthetic Pathway of Plasmodium Is Essential for Mosquito Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Rodríguez, Joel; Janse, Chris J.; Pastrana-Mena, Rebecca; Waters, Andrew P.; Coppens, Isabelle; Rodríguez-Orengo, José F.; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo; Serrano, Adelfa E.

    2009-01-01

    Infection of red blood cells (RBC) subjects the malaria parasite to oxidative stress. Therefore, efficient antioxidant and redox systems are required to prevent damage by reactive oxygen species. Plasmodium spp. have thioredoxin and glutathione (GSH) systems that are thought to play a major role as antioxidants during blood stage infection. In this report, we analyzed a critical component of the GSH biosynthesis pathway using reverse genetics. Plasmodium berghei parasites lacking expression of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), the rate limiting enzyme in de novo synthesis of GSH, were generated through targeted gene disruption thus demonstrating, quite unexpectedly, that γ-GCS is not essential for blood stage development. Despite a significant reduction in GSH levels, blood stage forms of pbggcs− parasites showed only a defect in growth as compared to wild type. In contrast, a dramatic effect on development of the parasites in the mosquito was observed. Infection of mosquitoes with pbggcs− parasites resulted in reduced numbers of stunted oocysts that did not produce sporozoites. These results have important implications for the design of drugs aiming at interfering with the GSH redox-system in blood stages and demonstrate that de novo synthesis of GSH is pivotal for development of Plasmodium in the mosquito. PMID:19229315

  6. Purification and properties of the dihydrofolate synthetase from Serratia indica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dihydrofolate synthetase (EC6.3.2.12) responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of dihydrofolic acid from dihydropteroic acid and L-glutamic acid was purified about 130-fold from extracts of Serratia indica IFO 3759 by ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephadex column chromatography, Sephadex G-200 gel filtration, and DEAE-cellulose column chromatography. The enzyme preparation obtained was shown to be homogeneous by DEAE-cellulose column chromatography and ultracentrifugal analysis. The sedimentation coefficient of this enzyme was 3.9 S, and the molecular weight was determined to be about 47,000 by Sephadex G-100. The optimum pH for the reaction was 9.0. The enzymatic reaction required dihydropteroate, L-glutamate and ATP as substrates, and Mg2+ and K+ as cofactors. γ-L-Glutamyl-L-glutamic acid cannot replace L-glutamic acid as the substrate. Neither pteroic acid nor tetrahydropteroic acid can be used as the substrate. ATP was partially replaced by ITP or GTP. The enzyme reaction was inhibited by the addition of ADP, but not by AMP. One mole of dihydrofolate, 1 mole of ADP and 1 mole of orthophosphate were produced from each 1 mole of dihydropteroic acid, L-glutamic acid, and ATP. These results suggest that the systematic name for the dihydrofolate synthetase is 7,8-dihydropteroate: L-glutamate ligase (ADP). (auth.)

  7. ß-Lysine discrimination by lysyl-tRNA synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilreath, Marla S; Roy, Hervé; Bullwinkle, Tammy J;

    2011-01-01

    Elongation factor P is modified with (R)-ß-lysine by the lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS) paralog PoxA. PoxA specificity is orthogonal to LysRS, despite their high similarity. To investigate a- and ß-lysine recognition by LysRS and PoxA, amino acid replacements were made in the LysRS active site gui...... enantiomers of ß-lysine were substrates for tRNA aminoacylation by LysRS, which, together with the relaxed specificity of the A233S variant, suggest a possible means to develop systems for in vivo co-translational insertion of ß-amino acids.......Elongation factor P is modified with (R)-ß-lysine by the lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS) paralog PoxA. PoxA specificity is orthogonal to LysRS, despite their high similarity. To investigate a- and ß-lysine recognition by LysRS and PoxA, amino acid replacements were made in the LysRS active site...

  8. Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency pre and post newborn screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraka R. Donti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of biotin metabolism resulting in multiple carboxylase deficiency. The typical presentation described in the medical literature is of neonatal onset within hours to weeks of birth with emesis, hypotonia, lethargy, seizures, metabolic ketolactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, developmental delay, skin rash and alopecia. The condition is screened for by newborn screening (NBS tandem mass spectroscopy by elevated hydroxypentanoylcarnitine on dried blood spots. Urine organic acid profile may demonstrate elevated lactic, 3-OH isovaleric, 3-OH propionic, 3-MCC, methylcitric acids, and tiglylglycine consistent with loss of function of the above carboxylases. Here we describe a cohort of patients, 2 diagnosed pre-NBS and 3 post-NBS with broad differences in initial presentation and phenotype. In addition, prior to the advent of NBS, there are isolated reports of late-onset holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the medical literature, which describe patients diagnosed between 1 and 8 years of life, however to our knowledge there are no reports of late-onset HCLS being missed by NBS. Also we report two cases, each with novel pathogenic variants HCLS, diagnosed at age 3 years and 21 months respectively. The first patient had a normal newborn screen whilst the second had an abnormal newborn screen but was misdiagnosed as 3-methylcrotonylcarboxylase (3-MCC deficiency and subsequently lost to follow-up until they presented again with severe metabolic acidosis.

  9. Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency pre and post newborn screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donti, Taraka R; Blackburn, Patrick R; Atwal, Paldeep S

    2016-06-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of biotin metabolism resulting in multiple carboxylase deficiency. The typical presentation described in the medical literature is of neonatal onset within hours to weeks of birth with emesis, hypotonia, lethargy, seizures, metabolic ketolactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, developmental delay, skin rash and alopecia. The condition is screened for by newborn screening (NBS) tandem mass spectroscopy by elevated hydroxypentanoylcarnitine on dried blood spots. Urine organic acid profile may demonstrate elevated lactic, 3-OH isovaleric, 3-OH propionic, 3-MCC, methylcitric acids, and tiglylglycine consistent with loss of function of the above carboxylases. Here we describe a cohort of patients, 2 diagnosed pre-NBS and 3 post-NBS with broad differences in initial presentation and phenotype. In addition, prior to the advent of NBS, there are isolated reports of late-onset holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the medical literature, which describe patients diagnosed between 1 and 8 years of life, however to our knowledge there are no reports of late-onset HCLS being missed by NBS. Also we report two cases, each with novel pathogenic variants HCLS, diagnosed at age 3 years and 21 months respectively. The first patient had a normal newborn screen whilst the second had an abnormal newborn screen but was misdiagnosed as 3-methylcrotonylcarboxylase (3-MCC) deficiency and subsequently lost to follow-up until they presented again with severe metabolic acidosis. PMID:27114915

  10. A futile cycle, formed between two ATP-dependant -glutamyl cycle enzymes, -glutamyl cysteine synthetase and 5-oxoprolinase: the cause of cellular ATP depletion in nephrotic cystinosis?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhilesh Kumar; Anand Kumar Bachhawat

    2010-03-01

    Cystinosis, an inherited disease caused by a defect in the lysosomal cystine transporter (CTNS), is characterized by renal proximal tubular dysfunction. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion appears to be a key event in the pathophysiology of the disease, even though the manner in which ATP depletion occurs is still a puzzle. We present a model that explains how a futile cycle that is generated between two ATP-utilizing enzymes of the -glutamyl cycle leads to ATP depletion. The enzyme -glutamyl cysteine synthetase (-GCS), in the absence of cysteine, forms 5-oxoproline (instead of the normal substrate, -glutamyl cysteine) and the 5-oxoproline is converted into glutamate by the ATP-dependant enzyme, 5-oxoprolinase. Thus, in cysteine-limiting conditions, glutamate is cycled back into glutamate via 5-oxoproline at the cost of two ATP molecules without production of glutathione and is the cause of the decreased levels of glutathione synthesis, as well as the ATP depletion observed in these cells. The model is also compatible with the differences seen in the human patients and the mouse model of cystinosis, where renal failure is not observed.

  11. Deficient Glutathione in the Pathophysiology of Mycotoxin-Related Illness

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    Frederick T. Guilford

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of mycotoxin-related illness is increasing. The glutathione antioxidant and detoxification systems play a major role in the antioxidant function of cells. Exposure to mycotoxins in humans requires the production of glutathione on an “as needed” basis. Research suggests that mycotoxins can decrease the formation of glutathione due to decreased gene expression of the enzymes needed to form glutathione. Mycotoxin-related compromise of glutathione production can result in an excess of oxidative stress that leads to tissue damage and systemic illness. The review discusses the mechanisms by which mycotoxin-related deficiency of glutathione may lead to both acute and chronic illnesses.

  12. Transport proteins determine drug sensitivity and resistance in a protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Jane C.; Settimo, Luca; de Koning, Harry P.

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in pathogenic protozoa is very often caused by changes to the ‘transportome’ of the parasites. In Trypanosoma brucei, several transporters have been implicated in uptake of the main classes of drugs, diamidines and melaminophenyl arsenicals. The resistance mechanism had been thought to be due to loss of a transporter known to carry both types of agents: the aminopurine transporter P2, encoded by the gene TbAT1. However, although loss of P2 activity is well-documented as the cause of resistance to the veterinary diamidine diminazene aceturate (DA; Berenil®), cross-resistance between the human-use arsenical melarsoprol and the diamidine pentamidine (melarsoprol/pentamidine cross resistance, MPXR) is the result of loss of a separate high affinity pentamidine transporter (HAPT1). A genome-wide RNAi library screen for resistance to pentamidine, published in 2012, gave the key to the genetic identity of HAPT1 by linking the phenomenon to a locus that contains the closely related T. brucei aquaglyceroporin genes TbAQP2 and TbAQP3. Further analysis determined that knockdown of only one pore, TbAQP2, produced the MPXR phenotype. TbAQP2 is an unconventional aquaglyceroporin with unique residues in the “selectivity region” of the pore, and it was found that in several MPXR lab strains the WT gene was either absent or replaced by a chimeric protein, recombined with parts of TbAQP3. Importantly, wild-type AQP2 was also absent in field isolates of T. b. gambiense, correlating with the outcome of melarsoprol treatment. Expression of a wild-type copy of TbAQP2 in even the most resistant strain completely reversed MPXR and re-introduced HAPT1 function and transport kinetics. Expression of TbAQP2 in Leishmania mexicana introduced a pentamidine transport activity indistinguishable from HAPT1. Although TbAQP2 has been shown to function as a classical aquaglyceroporin it is now clear that it is also a high affinity drug transporter, HAPT1. We discuss here a

  13. Channel-forming activities in the glycosomal fraction from the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Melisa Gualdron-López

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glycosomes are a specialized form of peroxisomes (microbodies present in unicellular eukaryotes that belong to the Kinetoplastea order, such as Trypanosoma and Leishmania species, parasitic protists causing severe diseases of livestock and humans in subtropical and tropical countries. The organelles harbour most enzymes of the glycolytic pathway that is responsible for substrate-level ATP production in the cell. Glycolysis is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei and enzymes comprising this pathway have been validated as drug targets. Glycosomes are surrounded by a single membrane. How glycolytic metabolites are transported across the glycosomal membrane is unclear. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We hypothesized that glycosomal membrane, similarly to membranes of yeast and mammalian peroxisomes, contains channel-forming proteins involved in the selective transfer of metabolites. To verify this prediction, we isolated a glycosomal fraction from bloodstream-form T. brucei and reconstituted solubilized membrane proteins into planar lipid bilayers. The electrophysiological characteristics of the channels were studied using multiple channel recording and single channel analysis. Three main channel-forming activities were detected with current amplitudes 70-80 pA, 20-25 pA, and 8-11 pA, respectively (holding potential +10 mV and 3.0 M KCl as an electrolyte. All channels were in fully open state in a range of voltages ±150 mV and showed no sub-conductance transitions. The channel with current amplitude 20-25 pA is anion-selective (P(K+/P(Cl-∼0.31, while the other two types of channels are slightly selective for cations (P(K+/P(Cl- ratios ∼1.15 and ∼1.27 for the high- and low-conductance channels, respectively. The anion-selective channel showed an intrinsic current rectification that may suggest a functional asymmetry of the channel's pore. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that the membrane of glycosomes

  14. Piperaquine and Lumefantrine resistance in Plasmodium berghei ANKA associated with increased expression of Ca2+/H+ antiporter and glutathione associated enzymes.

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    Kiboi, Daniel; Irungu, Beatrice; Orwa, Jennifer; Kamau, Luna; Ochola-Oyier, Lynette Isabella; Ngángá, Joseph; Nzila, Alexis

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of resistance of two antimalarial drugs piperaquine (PQ) and lumefantrine (LM) using the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei as a surrogate of the human parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. We analyzed the whole coding sequence of Plasmodium berghei chloroquine resistance transporter (Pbcrt) and Plasmodium berghei multidrug resistance gene 1(Pbmdr-1) for polymorphisms. These genes are associated with quinoline resistance in Plasmodium falciparum. No polymorphic changes were detected in the coding sequences of Pbcrt and Pbmdr1 or in the mRNA transcript levels of Pbmdr1. However, our data demonstrated that PQ and LM resistance is achieved by multiple mechanisms that include elevated mRNA transcript levels of V-type H(+) pumping pyrophosphatase (vp2), Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter (vcx1), gamma glutamylcysteine synthetase (ggcs) and glutathione-S-transferase (gst) genes, mechanisms also known to contribute to chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum and rodent malaria parasites. The increase in ggcs and gst transcript levels was accompanied by high glutathione (GSH) levels and elevated activity of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) enzyme. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Pbcrt and Pbmdr1 are not associated with PQ and LM resistance in P. berghei ANKA, while vp2, vcx1, ggcs and gst may mediate resistance directly or modulate functional mutations in other unknown genes. PMID:25448357

  15. Changes in blood sugar levels of rats experimentally infected withTrypanosoma brucei and treated with imidocarb dipropionate and diminazene aceturate

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    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi; Omamegbe Joseph Omalathebu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To determine the effect ofTrypanosoma brucei (T. brucei) on blood sugar level of infected rats. Methods: The experiment was done with 42 albino rats grouped into 3 groups of 14 members each. Group A was uninfected (control group), Group B was infected withT. brucei and treated with diminazene aceturate, and Group C was infected withT. brucei and treated with imidocarb dipropionate. Blood samples were collected from the media canthus of the experimental rats on Days 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 for the assessment of change in blood sugar levels. The blood sugar levels were determined with a glucometer (Accu-chek active serialNo.GN:10023338). Results: By 4 to 5 days post infection, there was a significant increase (P 0.05) was observed in the groups when compared with the control group till Day 12 of the experiment. Conclusions:T. brucei caused a significant increase in blood sugar of infected rats.

  16. Plasma cysteine, cystine, and glutathione in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, R K; Lewis, F W; Kutner, M H; Bate, D M; Roy, R G; Rudman, D

    1984-10-01

    Plasma contains three forms of cyst(e)ine: cysteine, cystine, and protein-bound cysteine. The former is a thiol and the latter two are disulfides. The levels of all three types of cyst(e)ine, as well as the cysteinyl tripeptide glutathione, were measured in the plasma of 14 normal and 10 cirrhotic individuals. All subjects ate mixed foods. Some cirrhotic patients were studied during nasogastric hyperalimentation with Vivonex (Norwich Eaton Pharmaceuticals, Norwich, N.Y.) as well as during total parenteral nutrition with FreAmine III (American McGaw, Irvine, Calif.); neither formula contains cyst(e)ine. Regardless of the nature of the diet, cirrhotic patients had significantly subnormal values for cysteine, glutathione, and albumin. In addition, the following significant changes were found to be diet-dependent: (a) elevated methionine during Vivonex, (b) subnormal taurine during mixed foods and total parenteral nutrition, (c) depressed protein-bound cysteine during total parenteral nutrition, (d) depressed cyst(e)ine thiol/disulfide ratio during mixed foods, and (e) depressed total thiol during Vivonex and total parenteral nutrition. The data indicate multiple abnormalities in sulfur metabolism in cirrhosis. PMID:6468868

  17. Antenatal and postnatal radiologic diagnosis of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandaralage, Sahan P.S. [Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service, Southport, Queensland (Australia); Griffith University, School of Medicine, Southport, Queensland (Australia); Farnaghi, Soheil [Caboolture Hospital, Caboolture, Queensland (Australia); Dulhunty, Joel M.; Kothari, Alka [Redcliffe Hospital, Redcliffe, Queensland (Australia); The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Herston, Queensland (Australia)

    2016-03-15

    Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency results in impaired activation of enzymes implicated in glucose, fatty acid and amino acid metabolism. Antenatal imaging and postnatal imaging are useful in making the diagnosis. Untreated holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is fatal, while antenatal and postnatal biotin supplementation is associated with good clinical outcomes. Although biochemical assays are required for definitive diagnosis, certain radiologic features assist in the diagnosis of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency. To review evidence regarding radiologic diagnostic features of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the antenatal and postnatal period. A systematic review of all published cases of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency identified by a search of Pubmed, Scopus and Web of Science. A total of 75 patients with holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency were identified from the systematic review, which screened 687 manuscripts. Most patients with imaging (19/22, 86%) had abnormal findings, the most common being subependymal cysts, ventriculomegaly and intraventricular hemorrhage. Although the radiologic features of subependymal cysts, ventriculomegaly, intraventricular hemorrhage and intrauterine growth restriction may be found in the setting of other pathologies, these findings should prompt consideration of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in at-risk children. (orig.)

  18. Effect of Liver Damage and Hyperbaric Oxygenation on Glutamine Synthetase of Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savilov, P N; Yakovlev, V N

    2016-01-01

    Activity of glutamine synthetase in the hepatocytes of healthy animals and animals with chronic CCl4-induced hepatitis was studied on white mature female rats after liver resection (15-20% of organ weight) and hyperbaric oxygenation (3 atm, 50 min, 3 times). Surgically operated left and non-operated middle lobes of the liver were analyzed on day 3 after liver resection and exposure to hyperbaric oxygenation. On day 65 of CCl4 poisoning, activity of glutamine synthetase decreased in both lobes and did not recover on day 3 after toxin cessation. Liver resection under conditions of CCl4-induced hepatitis restored reduced activity of glutamine synthetase in both liver lobes to the normal level. In healthy rats, the increase in glutamine synthetase activity after liver resection was found only in the middle lobe of the liver. Hyperbaric oxygenation enhanced the stimulatory effect of liver resection on glutamine synthetase activity in hepatocytes during chronic CCl4-induced hepatitis. In healthy animals with liver resection, activity of glutamine synthetase did not change after hyperbaric oxygenation, while normally oxygenation inhibited glutamine synthetase activity.

  19. Reduced Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Is a Late Adaptation of Trypanosoma brucei brucei to Isometamidium Preceded by Mutations in the γ Subunit of the F1Fo-ATPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Jane C.; Tagoe, Daniel N. A.; Stelmanis, Valters; Schnaufer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Background Isometamidium is the main prophylactic drug used to prevent the infection of livestock with trypanosomes that cause Animal African Trypanosomiasis. As well as the animal infective trypanosome species, livestock can also harbor the closely related human infective subspecies T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. Resistance to isometamidium is a growing concern, as is cross-resistance to the diamidine drugs diminazene and pentamidine. Methodology/Principal Findings Two isometamidium resistant Trypanosoma brucei clones were generated (ISMR1 and ISMR15), being 7270- and 16,000-fold resistant to isometamidium, respectively, which retained their ability to grow in vitro and establish an infection in mice. Considerable cross-resistance was shown to ethidium bromide and diminazene, with minor cross-resistance to pentamidine. The mitochondrial membrane potentials of both resistant cell lines were significantly reduced compared to the wild type. The net uptake rate of isometamidium was reduced 2-3-fold but isometamidium efflux was similar in wild-type and resistant lines. Fluorescence microscopy and PCR analysis revealed that ISMR1 and ISMR15 had completely lost their kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) and both lines carried a mutation in the nuclearly encoded γ subunit gene of F1 ATPase, truncating the protein by 22 amino acids. The mutation compensated for the loss of the kinetoplast in bloodstream forms, allowing near-normal growth, and conferred considerable resistance to isometamidium and ethidium as well as significant resistance to diminazene and pentamidine, when expressed in wild type trypanosomes. Subsequent exposure to either isometamidium or ethidium led to rapid loss of kDNA and a further increase in isometamidium resistance. Conclusions/Significance Sub-lethal exposure to isometamidium gives rise to viable but highly resistant trypanosomes that, depending on sub-species, are infective to humans and cross-resistant to at least some diamidine drugs. The crucial

  20. Treatment of renal colic by prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors and avafortan (analgesic antispasmodic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Sherif, A E; Foda, R; Norlen, L J; Yahia, H

    1990-12-01

    In a study of the pain-relieving effect of 3 drugs commonly used to treat acute renal colic in this hospital, intravenous indomethacin and intramuscular diclofenac (prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors) were compared with intravenous Avafortan (analgesic antispasmodic). As first-line analgesics, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors, if given intravenously, offer an effective alternative to Avafortan. Of 145 patients studied, 32 required a second injection for complete relief of pain. Administering a second dose of prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors resulted in equally significant pain relief rate even though the route was intramuscular. PMID:2265331

  1. Critical Evaluation of the Changes in Glutamine Synthetase Activity in Models of Cerebral Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Battaile, Kevin; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2015-12-01

    The following article addresses some seemingly paradoxical observations concerning cerebral glutamine synthetase in ischemia-reperfusion injury. In the brain, this enzyme is predominantly found in astrocytes and catalyzes part of the glutamine-glutamate cycle. Glutamine synthetase is also thought to be especially sensitive to inactivation by the oxygen- and nitrogen-centered radicals generated during strokes. Despite this apparent sensitivity, glutamine synthetase specific activity is elevated in the affected tissues during reperfusion. Given the central role of the glutamine-glutamate cycle in the brain, we sought to resolve these conflicting observations with the view of providing an alternative perspective for therapeutic intervention in stroke.

  2. Flux Analysis of the Trypanosoma brucei Glycolysis Based on a Multiobjective-Criteria Bioinformatic Approach

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    Amine Ghozlane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite of major of interest in discovering new genes for drug targets. This parasite alternates its life cycle between the mammal host(s (bloodstream form and the insect vector (procyclic form, with two divergent glucose metabolism amenable to in vitro culture. While the metabolic network of the bloodstream forms has been well characterized, the flux distribution between the different branches of the glucose metabolic network in the procyclic form has not been addressed so far. We present a computational analysis (called Metaboflux that exploits the metabolic topology of the procyclic form, and allows the incorporation of multipurpose experimental data to increase the biological relevance of the model. The alternatives resulting from the structural complexity of networks are formulated as an optimization problem solved by a metaheuristic where experimental data are modeled in a multiobjective function. Our results show that the current metabolic model is in agreement with experimental data and confirms the observed high metabolic flexibility of glucose metabolism. In addition, Metaboflux offers a rational explanation for the high flexibility in the ratio between final products from glucose metabolism, thsat is, flux redistribution through the malic enzyme steps.

  3. A new generation of T7 RNA polymerase-independent inducible expression plasmids for Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Jack Sunter

    Full Text Available Expression of transgenes is central to forward and reverse genetic analysis in Trypanosoma brucei. The inducible expression of transgenes in trypanosomes is based on the tetracycline repressor binding to a tetracycline operator to prevent transcription in the absence of tetracycline. The same inducible system is used to produce double-stranded RNA for RNAi knockdown of target genes. This study describes a new plasmid pSPR2.1 that drives consistent high-level expression of tetracycline repressor in procyclic form trypanosomes. A complementary expression plasmid, p3227, was constructed. The major difference between this and current plasmids is the separation of the inducible transgene and selectable marker promoters by the plasmid backbone. The plasmid p3227 was able to support inducible expression in cell lines containing pSPR2.1 as well as the established Lister 427 29-13 cell line. p3666, a derivative of p3227, was made for inducible expression of stem loop RNAi constructs and was effective for knockdown of DRBD3, which had proved problematic using existing RNAi plasmids with head-to-head promoters. The plasmid system was also able to support inducible transgene expression and DRBD3 RNAi knockdown in bloodstream form cells expressing tetracycline repressor from an integrated copy of the plasmid pHD1313.

  4. Immune Evasion Strategies of Trypanosoma brucei within the Mammalian Host: Progression to Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stijlemans, Benoît; Caljon, Guy; Van Den Abbeele, Jan; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.; Magez, Stefan; De Trez, Carl

    2016-01-01

    The diseases caused by African trypanosomes (AT) are of both medical and veterinary importance and have adversely influenced the economic development of sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, so far not a single field applicable vaccine exists, and chemotherapy is the only strategy available to treat the disease. These strictly extracellular protozoan parasites are confronted with different arms of the host’s immune response (cellular as well as humoral) and via an elaborate and efficient (vector)–parasite–host interplay they have evolved efficient immune escape mechanisms to evade/manipulate the entire host immune response. This is of importance, since these parasites need to survive sufficiently long in their mammalian/vector host in order to complete their life cycle/transmission. Here, we will give an overview of the different mechanisms AT (i.e. T. brucei as a model organism) employ, comprising both tsetse fly saliva and parasite-derived components to modulate host innate immune responses thereby sculpturing an environment that allows survival and development within the mammalian host.

  5. Latent Trypanosoma brucei gambiense foci in Uganda: a silent epidemic in children and adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastling, S L; Picozzi, K; Wamboga, C; VON Wissmann, B; Amongi-Accup, C; Wardrop, N A; Stothard, J R; Kakembo, A; Welburn, S C

    2011-10-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense sleeping sickness follows a long asymptomatic phase and persists in ancient foci from which epidemic clinical disease arises. A putative focus of T. b. gambiense infections has been identified, initially in mothers and young children, on the Lake Albert shoreline of Western Uganda leading to mass screening of 6207 individuals in September 2008. T. b. gambiense infections were identified by Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT) and sub-species-specific PCR although parasitological methods failed to confirm any patent trypanosome infections. In April 2009, CATT positives were re-visited; diagnosis of individuals by CATT and PCR was unstable over the two time points and parasites remained undetected, even using mini Anion Exchange Centrifugation Technique (mAECT). These observations suggest the possibility of a silent focus of disease, where all infected individuals are in a latent stage, and highlight our limited understanding of the local natural history and disease progression of T. b. gambiense in children and adults. PMID:21554841

  6. Synchronous expression of individual metacyclic variant surface glycoprotein genes in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey-Butler, Kiantra; Ullu, Elisabetta; Kolev, Nikolay G; Tschudi, Christian

    2015-01-01

    One distinctive feature of the Trypanosoma brucei life cycle is the presence of two discrete populations that are based on differential expression of variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs). Both are adapted to the environmental pressures they face and more importantly, both contribute directly to transmission. Metacyclics in the tsetse fly enable transmission to a new mammalian host, whereas bloodstream trypanosomes must avoid immune destruction to the extent that sufficient numbers are available for transmission, when the insect vector takes a blood meal. At present, there are few investigations on the molecular aspects of parasite biology in the tsetse vector and specifically about the activation of metacyclic VSG gene expression. Here we used an established in vitro differentiation system based on the overexpression of the RNA-binding protein 6 (RBP6), to monitor two metacyclic VSGs (VSG 397 and VSG 653) during development from procyclics to infectious metacyclic forms. We observed that activation of these two mVSGs was simultaneous both at the transcript and protein level, and manifested by the appearance of only one of the mVSGs in individual cells. PMID:25896436

  7. Identification and characterization of an unusual class I myosin involved in vesicle traffic in Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Diana Spitznagel

    Full Text Available Myosins are a multimember family of motor proteins with diverse functions in eukaryotic cells. African trypanosomes possess only two candidate myosins and thus represent a useful system for functional analysis of these motors. One of these candidates is an unusual class I myosin (TbMyo1 that is expressed at similar levels but organized differently during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei. This myosin localizes to the polarized endocytic pathway in bloodstream forms of the parasite. This organization is actin dependent. Knock down of TbMyo1 results in a significant reduction in endocytic activity, a cessation in cell division and eventually cell death. A striking morphological feature in these cells is an enlargement of the flagellar pocket, which is consistent with an imbalance in traffic to and from the surface. In contrast TbMyo1 is distributed throughout procyclic forms of the tsetse vector and a loss of approximately 90% of the protein has no obvious effects on growth or morphology. These results reveal a life cycle stage specific requirement for this myosin in essential endocytic traffic and represent the first description of the involvement of a motor protein in vesicle traffic in these parasites.

  8. Identification and characterization of an unusual class I myosin involved in vesicle traffic in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitznagel, Diana; O'Rourke, John F; Leddy, Neal; Hanrahan, Orla; Nolan, Derek P

    2010-01-01

    Myosins are a multimember family of motor proteins with diverse functions in eukaryotic cells. African trypanosomes possess only two candidate myosins and thus represent a useful system for functional analysis of these motors. One of these candidates is an unusual class I myosin (TbMyo1) that is expressed at similar levels but organized differently during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei. This myosin localizes to the polarized endocytic pathway in bloodstream forms of the parasite. This organization is actin dependent. Knock down of TbMyo1 results in a significant reduction in endocytic activity, a cessation in cell division and eventually cell death. A striking morphological feature in these cells is an enlargement of the flagellar pocket, which is consistent with an imbalance in traffic to and from the surface. In contrast TbMyo1 is distributed throughout procyclic forms of the tsetse vector and a loss of approximately 90% of the protein has no obvious effects on growth or morphology. These results reveal a life cycle stage specific requirement for this myosin in essential endocytic traffic and represent the first description of the involvement of a motor protein in vesicle traffic in these parasites.

  9. Isothermal microcalorimetry, a new tool to monitor drug action against Trypanosoma brucei and Plasmodium falciparum.

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    Tanja Wenzler

    Full Text Available Isothermal microcalorimetry is an established tool to measure heat flow of physical, chemical or biological processes. The metabolism of viable cells produces heat, and if sufficient cells are present, their heat production can be assessed by this method. In this study, we investigated the heat flow of two medically important protozoans, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Plasmodium falciparum. Heat flow signals obtained for these pathogens allowed us to monitor parasite growth on a real-time basis as the signals correlated with the number of viable cells. To showcase the potential of microcalorimetry for measuring drug action on pathogenic organisms, we tested the method with three antitrypanosomal drugs, melarsoprol, suramin and pentamidine and three antiplasmodial drugs, chloroquine, artemether and dihydroartemisinin, each at two concentrations on the respective parasite. With the real time measurement, inhibition was observed immediately by a reduced heat flow compared to that in untreated control samples. The onset of drug action, the degree of inhibition and the time to death of the parasite culture could conveniently be monitored over several days. Microcalorimetry is a valuable element to be added to the toolbox for drug discovery for protozoal diseases such as human African trypanosomiasis and malaria. The method could probably be adapted to other protozoan parasites, especially those growing extracellularly.

  10. The isolation and partial characterization of the plasma membrane from Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorheis, H P; Gale, J S; Owen, M J; Edwards, W

    1979-04-15

    Whole sheets of plasma membrane, each with their attached flagellum, were purified from Trypanosoma brucei. The method devised for their isolation included a new technique of cell breakage that used a combination of osmotic stress followed by mechanical sheer and avoided the problem of extreme vesiculation as well as the trapping of organelles in cell 'ghosts'. The purified membranes all contained the pellicular microtubular array. The antigenic surface coat was completely released from the plasma membrane during the isolation procedure. The membranes had a very high cholesterol/phospholipid ratio (1.54). A large proportion (42%) of the cellular DNA was recovered in the plasma-membrane fraction unless a step involving deoxyribonuclease treatment, which decreased the DNA content to less than 13%, was included before secrose-density gradient centrifugation. This step also aided the separation of plasma membranes from other cellular components. The ouabain-sensitive Na+ + K+-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase and adenylate cyclase co-purified with the plasma membranes. Although 5'-nucleotidase was thought to be a plasma-membrane component, it was easily detached from the membrane. The purified membranes were essentially free of L-alanine-alpha-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, L-asparte-alpha-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, malate dehydrogenase, oligomycin-sensitive adenosine triphosphatase, glucose 6-phosphatase, Mg2+-stimulated p-nitrophenyl phosphatase and catalase. PMID:486094

  11. Identification of paralogous life-cycle stage specific cytoskeletal proteins in the parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Neil Portman

    Full Text Available The life cycle of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei, is characterised by a transition between insect and mammalian hosts representing very different environments that present the parasite with very different challenges. These challenges are met by the expression of life-cycle stage-specific cohorts of proteins, which function in systems such as metabolism and immune evasion. These life-cycle transitions are also accompanied by morphological rearrangements orchestrated by microtubule dynamics and associated proteins of the subpellicular microtubule array. Here we employed a gel-based comparative proteomic technique, Difference Gel Electrophoresis, to identify cytoskeletal proteins that are expressed differentially in mammalian infective and insect form trypanosomes. From this analysis we identified a pair of novel, paralogous proteins, one of which is expressed in the procyclic form and the other in the bloodstream form. We show that these proteins, CAP51 and CAP51V, localise to the subpellicular corset of microtubules and are essential for correct organisation of the cytoskeleton and successful cytokinesis in their respective life cycle stages. We demonstrate for the first time redundancy of function between life-cycle stage specific paralogous sets in the cytoskeleton and reveal modification of cytoskeletal components in situ prior to their removal during differentiation from the bloodstream form to the insect form. These specific results emphasise a more generic concept that the trypanosome genome encodes a cohort of cytoskeletal components that are present in at least two forms with life-cycle stage-specific expression.

  12. Dynamic modelling under uncertainty: the case of Trypanosoma brucei energy metabolism.

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    Fiona Achcar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic models of metabolism require detailed knowledge of kinetic parameters. However, due to measurement errors or lack of data this knowledge is often uncertain. The model of glycolysis in the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei is a particularly well analysed example of a quantitative metabolic model, but so far it has been studied with a fixed set of parameters only. Here we evaluate the effect of parameter uncertainty. In order to define probability distributions for each parameter, information about the experimental sources and confidence intervals for all parameters were collected. We created a wiki-based website dedicated to the detailed documentation of this information: the SilicoTryp wiki (http://silicotryp.ibls.gla.ac.uk/wiki/Glycolysis. Using information collected in the wiki, we then assigned probability distributions to all parameters of the model. This allowed us to sample sets of alternative models, accurately representing our degree of uncertainty. Some properties of the model, such as the repartition of the glycolytic flux between the glycerol and pyruvate producing branches, are robust to these uncertainties. However, our analysis also allowed us to identify fragilities of the model leading to the accumulation of 3-phosphoglycerate and/or pyruvate. The analysis of the control coefficients revealed the importance of taking into account the uncertainties about the parameters, as the ranking of the reactions can be greatly affected. This work will now form the basis for a comprehensive Bayesian analysis and extension of the model considering alternative topologies.

  13. Fluorinated Sterols Are Suicide Inhibitors of Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Growth in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaver, David J; Patkar, Presheet; Singha, Ujjal K; Miller, Matthew B; Haubrich, Brad A; Chaudhuri, Minu; Nes, W David

    2015-10-22

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causal agent for sleeping sickness, depends on ergosterol for growth. Here, we describe the effects of a mechanism-based inhibitor, 26-fluorolanosterol (26FL), which converts in vivo to a fluorinated substrate of the sterol C24-methyltransferase essential for sterol methylation and function of ergosterol, and missing from the human host. 26FL showed potent inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis and growth of procyclic and bloodstream forms while having no effect on cholesterol biosynthesis or growth of human epithelial kidney cells. During exposure of cloned TbSMT to 26-fluorocholesta-5,7,24-trienol, the enzyme is gradually killed as a consequence of the covalent binding of the intermediate C25 cation to the active site (kcat/kinact = 0.26 min(-1)/0.24 min(-1); partition ratio of 1.08), whereas 26FL is non-productively bound. These results demonstrate that poisoning of ergosterol biosynthesis by a 26-fluorinated Δ(24)-sterol is a promising strategy for developing a new treatment for trypanosomiasis.

  14. Spliced leader trapping reveals widespread alternative splicing patterns in the highly dynamic transcriptome of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nilsson

    Full Text Available Trans-splicing of leader sequences onto the 5'ends of mRNAs is a widespread phenomenon in protozoa, nematodes and some chordates. Using parallel sequencing we have developed a method to simultaneously map 5'splice sites and analyze the corresponding gene expression profile, that we term spliced leader trapping (SLT. The method can be applied to any organism with a sequenced genome and trans-splicing of a conserved leader sequence. We analyzed the expression profiles and splicing patterns of bloodstream and insect forms of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. We detected the 5' splice sites of 85% of the annotated protein-coding genes and, contrary to previous reports, found up to 40% of transcripts to be differentially expressed. Furthermore, we discovered more than 2500 alternative splicing events, many of which appear to be stage-regulated. Based on our findings we hypothesize that alternatively spliced transcripts present a new means of regulating gene expression and could potentially contribute to protein diversity in the parasite. The entire dataset can be accessed online at TriTrypDB or through: http://splicer.unibe.ch/.

  15. Identification of the mitochondrially encoded subunit 6 of F1FO ATPase in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škodová-Sveráková, Ingrid; Horváth, Anton; Maslov, Dmitri A

    2015-06-01

    Kinetoplast maxicircle DNA of trypanosomatids encodes eighteen proteins. RNA editing is required to confer translatability to mRNA for twelve of these. Sequence conservation of the predicted hydrophobic polypeptides indicates that they represent functional components of the respiratory chain. Yet, so far only two of those, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and apocytochrome b of cytochrome c reductase, have been identified with biochemical methods. Here we report on identification of A6 subunit of F1FO ATPase encoded by a pan-edited mRNA in Trypanosoma brucei. The polypeptide was present among the (35)S-labeled mitochondrial translation products characterized by anomalous migration in denaturing 2D gels. It was identified as an ATPase subunit by co-migration with this complex in Blue Native 2D gels. A partial N-terminal sequence of the corresponding polypeptide present in the gel-purified ATPase complex from Leishmania tarentolae was consistent with the predicted A6 sequence. PMID:26276057

  16. Decreased Glutathione Peroxidase Activities with Concomitant Increased Oxidized Glutathione Levels among Residents in an Arsenic Contaminated Community of Southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warangkana CHUNGLOK

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione peroxidase (GPx and glutathione are important antioxidants responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS. It has been shown that changes in GPx activities and glutathione levels are associated with various diseases including toxic chemical related diseases and cancers. The study aimed to determine the levels of GPx activity and glutathione among residents in Ron Phibun district, an arsenic-exposed area. Blood samples were obtained from 32 volunteers in the Thasala group, a nearby nonarsenic-exposed area and 36 residents in the Ron Phibun group. Red cell lysates were subjected to analysis of GPx activity and glutathione. The results showed that GPx activities were significantly decreased among study subjects from Ron Phibun (p < 0.05. Interestingly, oxidized glutathione (GSSG levels were significantly increased compared with those from Thasala (p < 0.05. Total glutathione and reduced glutathione (GSH levels were not different among the two groups. Mean values of GPx activities, total glutathione and GSH tended to decrease among high-exposure subjects compared to low-exposure subjects. This was concomitant with a slight increase in GSSG levels among high-exposure subjects. The levels of GPx activities and GSSG may be early biomarkers for low levels of oxidative stress in a mining area affected with arsenic poisoning.

  17. Regulation of Angiogenesis by Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Mirando

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their canonical roles in translation the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs have developed secondary functions over the course of evolution. Many of these activities are associated with cellular survival and nutritional stress responses essential for homeostatic processes in higher eukaryotes. In particular, six ARSs and one associated factor have documented functions in angiogenesis. However, despite their connection to this process, the ARSs are mechanistically distinct and exhibit a range of positive or negative effects on aspects of endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and survival. This variability is achieved through the appearance of appended domains and interplay with inflammatory pathways not found in prokaryotic systems. Complete knowledge of the non-canonical functions of ARSs is necessary to understand the mechanisms underlying the physiological regulation of angiogenesis.

  18. Oncogenic Myc Induces Expression of Glutamine Synthetase through Promoter Demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, Alex J; Peng, I-Chen; Fan, Yongjun; Faubert, Brandon; Zhao, Lu; Li, Jinyu; Neidler, Sarah; Sun, Yu; Jaber, Nadia; Krokowski, Dawid; Lu, Wenyun; Pan, Ji-An; Powers, Scott; Rabinowitz, Joshua; Hatzoglou, Maria; Murphy, Daniel J; Jones, Russell; Wu, Song; Girnun, Geoffrey; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2015-12-01

    c-Myc is known to promote glutamine usage by upregulating glutaminase (GLS), which converts glutamine to glutamate that is catabolized in the TCA cycle. Here we report that in a number of human and murine cells and cancers, Myc induces elevated expression of glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL), also termed glutamine synthetase (GS), which catalyzes the de novo synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. This is through upregulation of a Myc transcriptional target thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG), which promotes active demethylation of the GS promoter and its increased expression. Elevated expression of GS promotes cell survival under glutamine limitation, while silencing of GS decreases cell proliferation and xenograft tumor growth. Upon GS overexpression, increased glutamine enhances nucleotide synthesis and amino acid transport. These results demonstrate an unexpected role of Myc in inducing glutamine synthesis and suggest a molecular connection between DNA demethylation and glutamine metabolism in Myc-driven cancers.

  19. Astrocyte glutamine synthetase: pivotal in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Christopher F; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2013-12-01

    The multifunctional properties of astrocytes signify their importance in brain physiology and neurological function. In addition to defining the brain architecture, astrocytes are primary elements of brain ion, pH and neurotransmitter homoeostasis. GS (glutamine synthetase), which catalyses the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to form glutamine, is an enzyme particularly found in astrocytes. GS plays a pivotal role in glutamate and glutamine homoeostasis, orchestrating astrocyte glutamate uptake/release and the glutamate-glutamine cycle. Furthermore, astrocytes bear the brunt of clearing ammonia in the brain, preventing neurotoxicity. The present review depicts the central function of astrocytes, concentrating on the importance of GS in glutamate/glutamine metabolism and ammonia detoxification in health and disease.

  20. Bisphosphonic acids as effective inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosikowska, Paulina; Bochno, Marta; Macegoniuk, Katarzyna; Forlani, Giuseppe; Kafarski, Paweł; Berlicki, Łukasz

    2016-12-01

    Inhibition of glutamine synthetase (GS) is one of the most promising strategies for the discovery of novel drugs against tuberculosis. Forty-three bisphosphonic and bis-H-phosphinic acids of various scaffolds, bearing aromatic substituents, were screened against recombinant GS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Most of the studied compounds exhibited activities in micromolar range, with N-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-2-aminoethylidenebisphoshonic acid, N-(3,5-difluorophenyl)-2-aminoethylidene-bisphoshonic acid and N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-hydroxy-1,1-ethanebisphosphonic acid showing the highest potency with kinetic parameters similar to the reference compound - L-methionine-S-sulfoximine. Moreover, these inhibitors were found to be much more effective against pathogen enzyme than against the human ortholog. Thus, with the bone-targeting properties of the bisphosphonate compounds in mind, this activity/selectivity profile makes these compounds attractive agents for the treatment of bone tuberculosis.

  1. Transformation of Bacillus Subtilis with cloned thymidylate synthetases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Edward M.

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis carries two genes, thyA and thyB, each encoding different protein products, with thymidylate synthetase (TSase) activity. Either of these genes alone is sufficient for thymidine independence in B. subtilis. In addition there exist two B. subtilis temperate bacteriophages which upon infection of thymine requiring auxotrophs results in conversion of the organism to thymine independence. Chimeric plasmids selected for Thy/sup +/ transforming activity in E. coli were constructed and then used as a source of defined highly enriched DNA with which to transform competent B. subtilis. These plasmids were studied for their: (1) abiility to transform B. subtilis to thymine independence; (2) site of integration within the B. subtilis chromosome upon transformation; (3) phenotype of Thy/sup +/ plasmid generated transformants; and (4) nucleotide sequence homology among the cloned DNA fragments conferring thymine independence. Plasmids containing the two bacteriophage thy genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyA, whereas the plasmids containing the cloned B. subtilis chromosomal genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyB. Utilizing similar technology, the ability of an entirely foreign hybred bacterial plasmiid to transform B. subtilis was examined. In this case the gene from E. coli encoding thymidylate synthetase was cloned in the plasmid pBR322. The resulting chimeric plasmid was effective in transforming both E. coli and B. subtilis to thymine prototrophy. Uncloned linear E. coli chromosomal DNA was unable to transform thymine requiring strains of B. subtilis to thymine independence. Although the Thy/sup +/ transformants of E. coli contained plasmid DNA, the Thy/sup +/ transformants derived from the transformation of B. subtilis did not contain detectable extrachromosomal DNA. Instead the DNA from the chimeric plasmid was integrated into the chromosome of B. subtilis. (ERB)

  2. Common peptides study of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Gottlieb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs constitute an essential enzyme super-family, providing fidelity of the translation process of mRNA to proteins in living cells. They are common to all kingdoms and are of utmost importance to all organisms. It is thus of great interest to understand the evolutionary relationships among them and underline signature motifs defining their common domains. RESULTS: We utilized the Common Peptides (CPs framework, based on extracted deterministic motifs from all aaRSs, to study family-specific properties. We identified novel aaRS-class related signatures that may supplement the current classification methods and provide a basis for identifying functional regions specific to each aaRS class. We exploited the space spanned by the CPs in order to identify similarities between aaRS families that are not observed using sequence alignment methods, identifying different inter-aaRS associations across different kingdom of life. We explored the evolutionary history of the aaRS families and evolutionary origins of the mitochondrial aaRSs. Lastly, we showed that prevalent CPs significantly overlap known catalytic and binding sites, suggesting that they have meaningful functional roles, as well as identifying a motif shared between aaRSs and a the Biotin-[acetyl-CoA carboxylase] synthetase (birA enzyme overlapping binding sites in both families. CONCLUSIONS: The study presents the multitude of ways to exploit the CP framework in order to extract meaningful patterns from the aaRS super-family. Specific CPs, discovered in this study, may play important roles in the functionality of these enzymes. We explored the evolutionary patterns in each aaRS family and tracked remote evolutionary links between these families.

  3. Nomenclature for mammalian soluble glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannervik, Bengt; Board, Philip G; Hayes, John D; Listowsky, Irving; Pearson, William R

    2005-01-01

    The nomenclature for human soluble glutathione transferases (GSTs) is extended to include new members of the GST superfamily that have been discovered, sequenced, and shown to be expressed. The GST nomenclature is based on primary structure similarities and the division of GSTs into classes of more closely related sequences. The classes are designated by the names of the Greek letters: Alpha, Mu, Pi, etc., abbreviated in Roman capitals: A, M, P, and so on. (The Greek characters should not be used.) Class members are distinguished by Arabic numerals and the native dimeric protein structures are named according to their subunit composition (e.g., GST A1-2 is the enzyme composed of subunits 1 and 2 in the Alpha class). Soluble GSTs from other mammalian species can be classified in the same manner as the human enzymes, and this chapter presents the application of the nomenclature to the rat and mouse GSTs. PMID:16399376

  4. Glutathione transferases in the bioactivation of azathioprine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modén, Olof; Mannervik, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    The prodrug azathioprine is primarily used for maintaining remission in inflammatory bowel disease, but approximately 30% of the patients suffer adverse side effects. The prodrug is activated by glutathione conjugation and release of 6-mercaptopurine, a reaction most efficiently catalyzed by glutathione transferase (GST) A2-2. Among five genotypes of GST A2-2, the variant A2*E has threefold-fourfold higher catalytic efficiency with azathioprine, suggesting that the expression of A2*E could boost 6-mercaptopurine release and adverse side effects in treated patients. Structure-activity studies of the GST A2-2 variants and homologous alpha class GSTs were made to delineate the determinants of high catalytic efficiency compared to other alpha class GSTs. Engineered chimeras identified GST peptide segments of importance, and replacing the corresponding regions in low-activity GSTs by these short segments produced chimeras with higher azathioprine activity. By contrast, H-site mutagenesis led to decreased azathioprine activity when active-site positions 208 and 213 in these favored segments were mutagenized. Alternative substitutions indicated that hydrophobic residues were favored. A pertinent question is whether variant A2*E represents the highest azathioprine activity achievable within the GST structural framework. This issue was addressed by mutagenesis of H-site residues assumed to interact with the substrate based on molecular modeling. The mutants with notably enhanced activities had small or polar residues in the mutated positions. The most active mutant L107G/L108D/F222H displayed a 70-fold enhanced catalytic efficiency with azathioprine. The determination of its structure by X-ray crystallography showed an expanded H-site, suggesting improved accommodation of the transition state for catalysis.

  5. The glutathione biotransformation system and colon carcinogenesis in human

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grubben, M.J.A.L.; Nagengast, F.M.; Katan, M.B.; Peters, W.H.M.

    2001-01-01

    Evidence for a protective role of the glutathione biotransformation system in carcinogenesis is growing. However, most data on this system in relation to colorectal cancer originate from animal studies. Here we review the human data. In humans, a significant association was found between glutathione

  6. Immunolocalization of glutathione reductase in the murine brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knollema, S; Hom, HW; Schirmer, H; Korf, J; TerHorst, GJ

    1996-01-01

    Free radical species arise from the univalent reduction of oxygen. The cytosolic agent H2O2, produced during enzymatic scavenging of the superoxide radical (. O-2-) is in turn removed predominantly via the oxidation of reduced glutathione (GSH) to the oxidized form (GSSG) by glutathione peroxidase.

  7. Glutathione Redox System in β-Thalassemia/Hb E Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchaneekorn W. Kalpravidh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available β-thalassemia/Hb E is known to cause oxidative stress induced by iron overload. The glutathione system is the major endogenous antioxidant that protects animal cells from oxidative damage. This study aimed to determine the effect of disease state and splenectomy on redox status expressed by whole blood glutathione (GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG and also to evaluate glutathione-related responses to oxidation in β-thalassemia/Hb E patients. Twenty-seven normal subjects and 25 β-thalassemia/Hb E patients were recruited and blood was collected. The GSH/GSSG ratio, activities of glutathione-related enzymes, hematological parameters, and serum ferritin levels were determined in individuals. Patients had high iron-induced oxidative stress, shown as significantly increased serum ferritin, a decreased GSH/GSSG ratio, and increased activities of glutathione-related enzymes. Splenectomy increased serum ferritin levels and decreased GSH levels concomitant with unchanged glutathione-related enzyme activities. The redox ratio had a positive correlation with hemoglobin levels and negative correlation with levels of serum ferritin. The glutathione system may be the body’s first-line defense used against oxidative stress and to maintain redox homeostasis in thalassemic patients based on the significant correlations between the GSH/GSSH ratio and degree of anemia or body iron stores.

  8. Glutathione S-transferases as risk factors in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Judith; Thomassen, L.H.; Olsen, J.H.;

    1999-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases are enzymes involved in the metabolism of carcinogens and in the defence against reactive oxygen species. Genetic polymorphisms have been detected in glutathione S-transferases M1, T1 and P1, and some of these polymorphisms have been associated with an increased risk...

  9. Compartment specific importance of glutathione during abiotic and biotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd eZechmann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The tripeptide thiol glutathione (γ-L-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine is the most important sulfur containing antioxidant in plants and essential for plant defense against abiotic and biotic stress conditions. It is involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species, redox signaling, the modulation of defense gene expression and important for the regulation of enzymatic activities. Even though changes in glutathione contents are well documented in plants and its roles in plant defense are well established, still too little is known about its compartment specific importance during abiotic and biotic stress conditions. Due to technical advances in the visualization of glutathione and the redox state of plants through microscopical methods some progress was made in the last few years in studying the importance of subcellular glutathione contents during stress conditions in plants. This review summarizes the data available on compartment specific importance of glutathione in the protection against abiotic and biotic stress conditions such as high light stress, exposure to cadmium, drought, and pathogen attack (Pseudomonas, Botrytis, Tobacco Mosaic Virus. The data will be discussed in connection with the subcellular accumulation of ROS during these conditions and glutathione synthesis which are both highly compartment specific (e.g. glutathione synthesis takes place in chloroplasts and the cytosol. Thus this review will reveal the compartment specific importance of glutathione during abiotic and biotic stress conditions.

  10. Study of Oxidation of Glutathione by Capillary Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A capillary electrophoresis method for the separation and quantification of reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) was developed. A baseline separation was achieved within five minutes. The effects of time and the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the oxidation of GSH were investigated.

  11. Glutamine attenuates post-traumatic glutathione depletion in human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fläring, U B; Rooyackers, O E; Wernerman, J; Hammarqvist, F

    2003-03-01

    Glutathione is quantitatively the most important endogenous scavenger system. Glutathione depletion in skeletal muscle is pronounced following major trauma and sepsis in intensive care unit patients. Also, following elective surgery, glutathione depletion occurs in parallel with a progressive decline in muscle glutamine concentration. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that glutamine supplementation may counteract glutathione depletion in a human trauma model. A homogeneous group of patients (n = 17) undergoing a standardized surgical procedure were prospectively randomly allocated to receive glutamine (0.56 g x day(-1) x kg(-1)) or placebo as part of isonitrogenous and isocaloric nutrition. Percutaneous muscle biopsies and blood samples were taken pre-operatively and at 24 and 72 h after surgery. The concentrations of muscle glutathione and related amino acids were determined in muscle tissue and plasma. In the control (unsupplemented) subjects, total muscle glutathione had decreased by 47+/-8% and 37+/-11% and reduced glutathione had decreased by 53+/-10% and 45+/-16% respectively at 24 and 72 h after surgery (P glutamine supplementation attenuates glutathione depletion in skeletal muscle in humans following standardized surgical trauma.

  12. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864... reductase assay. (a) Identification. A glutathione reductase assay is a device used to determine the... fluorescence and photometry. The results of this assay are used in the diagnosis of liver disease,...

  13. Response of Glutathione and Glutathione S-transferase in Rice Seedlings Exposed to Cadmium Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chun-hua; GE Ying

    2008-01-01

    A hydroponic culture experiment was done to investigate the effect of Cd stress on glutathione content(GSH)and glutathione S-transferase(GST,EC 2.5.1.18)activity in rice seedlings.The rice growth was severely inhibited when Cd level in the solution was higher than 10 mg/L.In rice shoots,GSH content and GST activity increased with the increasing Cd level,while in roots,GST was obviously inhibited by Cd treatments.Compared with shoots,the rice roots had higher GSH content and GST activity,indicating the ability of Cd detoxification was much higher in roots than in shoots.There was a significant correlation between Cd level and GSH content or GST activity,suggesting that both parameters may be used as biomarkers of Cd stress in rice.

  14. High cerebral guanidinoacetate and variable creatine concentrations in argininosuccinate synthetase and lyase deficiency : Implications for treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsen, F. J.; Reijngoud, D. J.; Verhoeven, N. M.; Soorani-Lunsing, R. J.; Jakobs, C.; Sijens, P. E.

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral creatine and guanidinoacetate and blood and urine metabolites were studied in four patients with argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) or argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) deficiency receiving large doses of arginine. Urine and blood metabolites varied largely. Cerebral guanidinoacetate was increa

  15. Cloning and characterization of the prs gene encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1985-01-01

    The gene, prs, encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase of Escherichia coli was isolated from a library of E. coli genes cloned in the bacteriophage λD69 vector. A strain with a temperature-lethal defect in PRPP synthetase, (prs-2), was used as the host and cloning was performed...... by lysogenic complementation. The prs gene resided on a 5.6 kilobase-pair (kbp) DNA fragment generated by hydrolysis with restriction endonuclease BamHI. The nearby gene pth, encoding peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase, was also on this fragment. Subcloning of the fragment in the multi-copy plasmid pBR322 and subsequent...... deletion of parts of the insert resulted in a 1.7 kbp DNA fragment containing the entire prs gene. Bacterial strains harbouring prs-bearing plasmids showed up to 50-fold increased PRPP synthetase activity. The PRPP synthetase subunit was identified by analysis of plasmid-harbouring minicells...

  16. Regulation of active site coupling in glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Resto, Melissa; Gerratana, Barbara; (Maryland)

    2009-05-21

    NAD{sup +} is an essential metabolite both as a cofactor in energy metabolism and redox homeostasis and as a regulator of cellular processes. In contrast to humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD{sup +} biosynthesis is absolutely dependent on the activity of a multifunctional glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} at the synthetase domain using ammonia derived from L-glutamine in the glutaminase domain. Here we report the kinetics and structural characterization of M. tuberculosis NAD{sup +} synthetase. The kinetics data strongly suggest tightly coupled regulation of the catalytic activities. The structure, the first of a glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, reveals a homooctameric subunit organization suggesting a tight dependence of catalysis on the quaternary structure, a 40-{angstrom} intersubunit ammonia tunnel and structural elements that may be involved in the transfer of information between catalytic sites.

  17. Age-related changes in glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes in rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yuangui; Carvey, Paul M.; Ling, Zaodung

    2006-01-01

    The most reliable and robust risk factor for some neurodegenerative diseases is aging. It has been proposed that processes of aging are associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species and a disturbance of glutathione homeostasis in the brain. Yet, aged animals have rarely been used to model the diseases that are considered to be age-related such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. This suggests that the results from these studies would be more valuable if aged animals were used. ...

  18. Substrate profiling of glutathione S-transferase with engineered enzymes and matched glutathione analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shan; Zhang, Lei; Adilijiang, Gulishana; Liu, Jieyuan; Luo, Minkui; Deng, Haiteng

    2014-07-01

    The identification of specific substrates of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) is important for understanding drug metabolism. A method termed bioorthogonal identification of GST substrates (BIGS) was developed, in which a reduced glutathione (GSH) analogue was developed for recognition by a rationally engineered GST to label the substrates of the corresponding native GST. A K44G-W40A-R41A mutant (GST-KWR) of the mu-class glutathione S-transferases GSTM1 was shown to be active with a clickable GSH analogue (GSH-R1) as the cosubstrate. The GSH-R1 conjugation products can react with an azido-based biotin probe for ready enrichment and MS identification. Proof-of-principle studies were carried to detect the products of GSH-R1 conjugation to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and dopamine quinone. The BIGS technology was then used to identify GSTM1 substrates in the Chinese herbal medicine Ganmaocongji.

  19. Induction of Glutathione Synthesis and Glutathione Reductase Activity by Abiotic Stresses in Maize and Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Kocsy

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different abiotic stresses (extreme temperatures and osmotic stress on the synthesis of glutathione and hydroxymethylglutathione, on the ratio of the reduced to oxidised forms of these thiols (GSH/GSSG, hmGSH/hmGSSG, and on the glutathione reductase (GR activity was studied in maize and wheat genotypes having different sensitivity to low temperature stress. Cold treatment induced a greater increase in total glutathione (TG content and in GR activity in tolerant genotypes of both species than in sensitive ones. The GSH/GSSG and hmGSH/hmGSSG ratios were increased by this treatment only in the frost-tolerant wheat variety. High-temperature stress increased the TG content and the GSH/GSSG ratio only in the chilling-sensitive maize genotype, but GR activity was greater after this treatment in both maize genotypes. Osmotic stress resulted in a great increase in the TG content in wheat and the GR activity in maize. The amount of total hydroxymethylglutathione increased following all stress treatments. These results indicate the involvement of these antioxidants in the stress responses of wheat and maize.

  20. Diffuse glutamine synthetase overexpression restricted to areas of peliosis in a β-catenin-activated hepatocellular adenoma: a potential pitfall in glutamine synthetase interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Ryan S; Gullapalli, Rama R; Wu, Jin; Morris, Katherine; Hanson, Joshua A

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular adenomas have recently been classified into four subtypes based on molecular findings: hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) inactivated, inflammatory/telangiectatic, β-catenin activated, and unclassifiable. β-catenin-activated adenomas have the potential for malignant transformation and are thus important to recognize. Diffuse glutamine synthetase immunohistochemical positivity has been shown to be a reliable surrogate marker for β-catenin activation, though variations in staining patterns may be difficult to interpret. We report a case of a peliotic adenoma that was morphologically consistent with a β-catenin wild-type hepatocellular adenoma but harbored a β-catenin mutation by molecular analysis. The tumor lacked nuclear β-catenin positivity and demonstrated a hitherto undescribed pattern of glutamine synthetase overexpression restricted to areas of peliosis with mostly negative staining in non-peliotic areas. This pattern was initially interpreted as physiologic and may represent a potential pitfall in glutamine synthetase interpretation.

  1. Regulation of the activity of the Bacillus licheniformis A5 glutamine synthetase.

    OpenAIRE

    Donohue, T J; Bernlohr, R W

    1981-01-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase activity by positive and negative effectors of enzyme activity singularly and in combinations was studied by using a homogeneous enzyme preparation from Bacillus licheniformis A5. Phosphorylribosyl pyrophosphate at concentrations greater than 2mM stimulated glutamine synthetase activity by approximately 70%. The concentration of phosphorylribosyl pyrophosphate required for half-maximal stimulation of enzyme activity was 0.4 mM. Results obtained from stud...

  2. THE MULTIPLE ROLES OF CYCLIN E1 IN CONTROLLING CELL CYCLE PROGRESSION AND CELLULAR MORPHOLOGY OF TRYPANOSOMA BRUCEI

    OpenAIRE

    Gourguechon, Stéphane; Savich, Jason M.; Ching C Wang

    2007-01-01

    Regulation of eukaryotic cell cycle progression requires sequential activation and inactivation of cyclin-dependent kinases. Previous RNA interference (RNAi) experiments in Trypanosoma brucei indicated that cyclin E1, cdc2-related kinase (CRK)1 and CRK2 are involved in regulating G1/S transition, whereas cyclin B2 and CRK3 play a pivotal role in controlling the G2/M checkpoint. To search for potential interactions between the other cyclins and CRKs that may not have been revealed by the RNAi ...

  3. The identification of new cytosolic glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase genes in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), and their expression during leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Ospina, Liliana; Marmagne, Anne; Talbotec, Joël; Krupinska, Karin; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2015-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase are two master enzymes involved in ammonium assimilation in plants. Their roles in nitrogen remobilization and nitrogen use efficiency have been proposed. In this report, the genes coding for the cytosolic glutamine synthetases (HvGS1) and asparagine synthetases (HvASN) in barley were identified. In addition to the three HvGS1 and two HvASN sequences previously reported, two prokaryotic-like HvGS1 and three HvASN cDNA sequences were identified. Gene structures were then characterized, obtaining full genomic sequences. The response of the five HvGS1 and five HvASN genes to leaf senescence was then studied. Developmental senescence was studied using primary and flag leaves. Dark-exposure or low-nitrate conditions were also used to trigger stress-induced senescence. Well-known senescence markers such as the chlorophyll and Rubisco contents were monitored in order to characterize senescence levels in the different leaves. The three eukaryotic-like HvGS1_1, HvGS1_2, and HvGS1_3 sequences showed the typical senescence-induced reduction in gene expression described in many plant species. By contrast, the two prokaryotic-like HvGS1_4 and HvGS1_5 sequences were repressed by leaf senescence, similar to the HvGS2 gene, which encodes the chloroplast glutamine synthetase isoenzyme. There was a greater contrast in the responses of the five HvASN and this suggested that these genes are needed for N remobilization in senescing leaves only when plants are well fertilized with nitrate. Responses of the HvASN sequences to dark-induced senescence showed that there are two categories of asparagine synthetases, one induced in the dark and the other repressed by the same conditions.

  4. Immunohistochemical localization of glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione peroxidase in adult Syrian hamster tissues and during kidney development.

    OpenAIRE

    Oberley, T. D.; Oberley, L. W.; Slattery, A. F.; Elwell, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Tissues from adult Syrian hamsters were studied with immunoperoxidase techniques using polyclonal antibodies to glutathione-S-transferase (rat liver and human placental enzymes) and human erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase. Most tissues immunostained similarly with these antibodies. Most notable was the cytoplasmic staining of mesenchyme tissues, especially smooth muscle, by all three antibodies. Epithelial cells stained distinctively, but usually less intensely than mesenchyme. Epithelial ce...

  5. Human glutathione S-transferase-mediated glutathione conjugation of curcumin and efflux of these conjugates in Caco-2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Usta, M.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Vervoort, J.J.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Cnubben, N.H.P.

    2007-01-01

    Curcumin, an alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl compound, reacts with glutathione, leading to the formation of two monoglutathionyl curcumin conjugates. In the present study, the structures of both glutathione conjugates of curcumin were identified by LC-MS and one- and two-dimensional H-1 NMR analysis

  6. Human glutathione S-transferase-mediated glutathione conjugation of curcumin and efflux of these conjugates in caco-2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Usta, M.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Vervoort, J.; Boersma, M.G.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Cnubben, N.H.P.

    2007-01-01

    Curcumin, an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compound, reacts with glutathione, leading to the formation of two monoglutathionyl curcumin conjugates. In the present study, the structures of both glutathione conjugates of curcumin were identified by LC-MS and one- and two-dimensional 1H NMR analysis, and th

  7. Comparison of plasma malondialdehyde, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, hydroxyproline and selenium levels in patients with vitiligo and healthy controls

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    Ozturk I

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology and pathophysiologic mechanism of vitiligo are still unclear. The relationship between increased oxidative stress due to the accumulation of radicals and reactive oxygen species and the associated changes in blood and epidermal component of vitiliginous skin have been reported many times. We investigated the possible changes of plasma malondialdehyde, glutathione, selenium, hydroxyproline and glutathione peroxidase activity levels in patients with vitiligo in order to evaluate the relationship between oxidative stress and etiopathogenesis of vitiligo. Materials and Methods: Plasma malondialdehyde, glutathione, hydroxyproline and glutathione peroxidase activity levels were measured by spectrophotometric methods, and HPLC was used for measurement of selenium concentrations. Results: Our results showed increased malondialdehyde, hydroxyproline and glutathione peroxidase activity levels in plasma of vitiligo group ( P < 0.05. Conclusion: Support of antioxidant system via nonenzymatic antioxidant compounds and antioxidant enzymes may be useful to prevent of melanocyte degeneration which occur due to oxidative damage in vitiligo.

  8. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP method for rapid detection of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense.

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    Zablon Kithinji Njiru

    Full Text Available Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP of DNA is a novel technique that rapidly amplifies target DNA under isothermal conditions. In the present study, a LAMP test was designed from the serum resistance-associated (SRA gene of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, the cause of the acute form of African sleeping sickness, and used to detect parasite DNA from processed and heat-treated infected blood samples. The SRA gene is specific to T. b. rhodesiense and has been shown to confer resistance to lysis by normal human serum. The assay was performed at 62 degrees C for 1 h, using six primers that recognised eight targets. The template was varying concentrations of trypanosome DNA and supernatant from heat-treated infected blood samples. The resulting amplicons were detected using SYTO-9 fluorescence dye in a real-time thermocycler, visual observation after the addition of SYBR Green I, and gel electrophoresis. DNA amplification was detected within 35 min. The SRA LAMP test had an unequivocal detection limit of one pg of purified DNA (equivalent to 10 trypanosomes/ml and 0.1 pg (1 trypanosome/ml using heat-treated buffy coat, while the detection limit for conventional SRA PCR was approximately 1,000 trypanosomes/ml. The expected LAMP amplicon was confirmed through restriction enzyme RsaI digestion, identical melt curves, and sequence analysis. The reproducibility of the SRA LAMP assay using water bath and heat-processed template, and the ease in results readout show great potential for the diagnosis of T. b. rhodesiense in endemic regions.

  9. Genome-wide dissection of the quorum sensing signalling pathway in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mony, Binny M; MacGregor, Paula; Ivens, Alasdair; Rojas, Federico; Cowton, Andrew; Young, Julie; Horn, David; Matthews, Keith

    2014-01-30

    The protozoan parasites Trypanosoma brucei spp. cause important human and livestock diseases in sub-Saharan Africa. In mammalian blood, two developmental forms of the parasite exist: proliferative 'slender' forms and arrested 'stumpy' forms that are responsible for transmission to tsetse flies. The slender to stumpy differentiation is a density-dependent response that resembles quorum sensing in microbial systems and is crucial for the parasite life cycle, ensuring both infection chronicity and disease transmission. This response is triggered by an elusive 'stumpy induction factor' (SIF) whose intracellular signalling pathway is also uncharacterized. Laboratory-adapted (monomorphic) trypanosome strains respond inefficiently to SIF but can generate forms with stumpy characteristics when exposed to cell-permeable cAMP and AMP analogues. Exploiting this, we have used a genome-wide RNA interference library screen to identify the signalling components driving stumpy formation. In separate screens, monomorphic parasites were exposed to 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP (pCPT-cAMP) or 8-pCPT-2'-O-methyl-5'-AMP to select cells that were unresponsive to these signals and hence remained proliferative. Genome-wide Ion Torrent based RNAi target sequencing identified cohorts of genes implicated in each step of the signalling pathway, from purine metabolism, through signal transducers (kinases, phosphatases) to gene expression regulators. Genes at each step were independently validated in cells naturally capable of stumpy formation, confirming their role in density sensing in vivo. The putative RNA-binding protein, RBP7, was required for normal quorum sensing and promoted cell-cycle arrest and transmission competence when overexpressed. This study reveals that quorum sensing signalling in trypanosomes shares similarities to fundamental quiescence pathways in eukaryotic cells, its components providing targets for quorum-sensing interference-based therapeutics.

  10. Enhanced succinic acid production in Aspergillus saccharolyticus by heterologous expression of fumarate reductase from Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Lübeck, Mette; Ahring, Birgitte K; Lübeck, Peter S

    2016-02-01

    Aspergillus saccharolyticus exhibits great potential as a cell factory for industrial production of dicarboxylic acids. In the analysis of the organic acid profile, A. saccharolyticus was cultivated in an acid production medium using two different pH conditions. The specific activities of the enzymes, pyruvate carboxylase (PYC), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and fumarase (FUM), involved in the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) branch, were examined and compared in cells harvested from the acid production medium and a complete medium. The results showed that ambient pH had a significant impact on the pattern and the amount of organic acids produced by A. saccharolyticus. The wild-type strain produced higher amount of malic acid and succinic acid in the pH buffered condition (pH 6.5) compared with the pH non-buffered condition. The enzyme assays showed that the rTCA branch was active in the acid production medium as well as the complete medium, but the measured enzyme activities were different depending on the media. Furthermore, a soluble NADH-dependent fumarate reductase gene (frd) from Trypanosoma brucei was inserted and expressed in A. saccharolyticus. The expression of the frd gene led to an enhanced production of succinic acid in frd transformants compared with the wild-type in both pH buffered and pH non-buffered conditions with highest amount produced in the pH buffered condition (16.2 ± 0.5 g/L). This study demonstrates the feasibility of increasing succinic acid production through the cytosolic reductive pathway by genetic engineering in A. saccharolyticus.

  11. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Adaptation to Different Mammalian Sera Is Associated with VSG Expression Site Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordon-Obras, Carlos; Cano, Jorge; González-Pacanowska, Dolores; Benito, Agustin; Navarro, Miguel; Bart, Jean-Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infection is widely considered an anthroponosis, although it has also been found in wild and domestic animals. Thus, fauna could act as reservoir, constraining the elimination of the parasite in hypo-endemic foci. To better understand the possible maintenance of T. b. gambiense in local fauna and investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation, we generated adapted cells lines (ACLs) by in vitro culture of the parasites in different mammalian sera. Using specific antibodies against the Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) we found that serum ACLs exhibited different VSG variants when maintained in pig, goat or human sera. Although newly detected VSGs were independent of the sera used, the consistent appearance of different VSGs suggested remodelling of the co-transcribed genes at the telomeric Expression Site (VSG-ES). Thus, Expression Site Associated Genes (ESAGs) sequences were analysed to investigate possible polymorphism selection. ESAGs 6 and 7 genotypes, encoding the transferrin receptor (TfR), expressed in different ACLs were characterised. In addition, we quantified the ESAG6/7 mRNA levels and analysed transferrin (Tf) uptake. Interestingly, the best growth occurred in pig and human serum ACLs, which consistently exhibited a predominant ESAG7 genotype and higher Tf uptake than those obtained in calf and goat sera. We also detected an apparent selection of specific ESAG3 genotypes in the pig and human serum ACLs, suggesting that other ESAGs could be involved in the host adaptation processes. Altogether, these results suggest a model whereby VSG-ES remodelling allows the parasite to express a specific set of ESAGs to provide selective advantages in different hosts. Finally, pig serum ACLs display phenotypic adaptation parameters closely related to human serum ACLs but distinct to parasites grown in calf and goat sera. These results suggest a better suitability of swine to maintain T. b. gambiense infection supporting

  12. A monoclonal antibody marker for the exclusion-zone filaments of Trypanosoma brucei

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    Decossas Marion

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosoma brucei is a haemoflagellate pathogen of man, wild animals and domesticated livestock in central and southern Africa. In all life cycle stages this parasite has a single mitochondrion that contains a uniquely organised genome that is condensed into a flat disk-like structure called the kinetoplast. The kinetoplast is essential for insect form procyclic cells and therefore is a potential drug target. The kinetoplast is unique in nature because it consists of novel structural proteins and thousands of circular, interlocking, DNA molecules (kDNA. Secondly, kDNA replication is critically timed to coincide with nuclear S phase and new flagellum biogenesis. Thirdly, the kinetoplast is physically attached to the flagellum basal bodies via a structure called the tripartite attachment complex (TAC. The TAC consists of unilateral filaments (within the mitochondrion matrix, differentiated mitochondrial membranes and exclusion-zone filaments that extend from the distal end of the basal bodies. To date only one protein, p166, has been identified to be a component of the TAC. Results In the work presented here we provide data based on a novel EM technique developed to label and characterise cytoskeleton structures in permeabilised cells without extraction of mitochondrion membranes. We use this protocol to provide data on a new monoclonal antibody reagent (Mab 22 and illustrate the precise localisation of basal body-mitochondrial linker proteins. Mab 22 binds to these linker proteins (exclusion-zone filaments and provides a new tool for the characterisation of cytoskeleton mediated kinetoplast segregation. Conclusion The antigen(s recognised by Mab 22 are cytoskeletal, insensitive to extraction by high concentrations of non-ionic detergent, extend from the proximal region of basal bodies and bind to the outer mitochondrial membrane. This protein(s is the first component of the TAC exclusion-zone fibres to be identified. Mab 22

  13. Untreated human infections by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense are not 100% fatal.

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    Vincent Jamonneau

    Full Text Available The final outcome of infection by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, the main agent of sleeping sickness, has always been considered as invariably fatal. While scarce and old reports have mentioned cases of self-cure in untreated patients, these studies suffered from the lack of accurate diagnostic tools available at that time. Here, using the most specific and sensitive tools available to date, we report on a long-term follow-up (15 years of a cohort of 50 human African trypanosomiasis (HAT patients from the Ivory Coast among whom 11 refused treatment after their initial diagnosis. In 10 out of 11 subjects who continued to refuse treatment despite repeated visits, parasite clearance was observed using both microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Most of these subjects (7/10 also displayed decreasing serological responses, becoming progressively negative to trypanosome variable antigens (LiTat 1.3, 1.5 and 1.6. Hence, in addition to the "classic" lethal outcome of HAT, we show that alternative natural progressions of HAT may occur: progression to an apparently aparasitaemic and asymptomatic infection associated with strong long-lasting serological responses and progression to an apparently spontaneous resolution of infection (with negative results in parasitological tests and PCR associated with a progressive drop in antibody titres as observed in treated cases. While this study does not precisely estimate the frequency of the alternative courses for this infection, it is noteworthy that in the field national control programs encounter a significant proportion of subjects displaying positive serologic test results but negative results in parasitological testing. These findings demonstrate that a number of these subjects display such infection courses. From our point of view, recognising that trypanotolerance exists in humans, as is now widely accepted for animals, is a major step forward for future research in the field of HAT.

  14. Simulating the complex cell design of Trypanosoma brucei and its motility.

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    Davod Alizadehrad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The flagellate Trypanosoma brucei, which causes the sleeping sickness when infecting a mammalian host, goes through an intricate life cycle. It has a rather complex propulsion mechanism and swims in diverse microenvironments. These continuously exert selective pressure, to which the trypanosome adjusts with its architecture and behavior. As a result, the trypanosome assumes a diversity of complex morphotypes during its life cycle. However, although cell biology has detailed form and function of most of them, experimental data on the dynamic behavior and development of most morphotypes is lacking. Here we show that simulation science can predict intermediate cell designs by conducting specific and controlled modifications of an accurate, nature-inspired cell model, which we developed using information from live cell analyses. The cell models account for several important characteristics of the real trypanosomal morphotypes, such as the geometry and elastic properties of the cell body, and their swimming mechanism using an eukaryotic flagellum. We introduce an elastic network model for the cell body, including bending rigidity and simulate swimming in a fluid environment, using the mesoscale simulation technique called multi-particle collision dynamics. The in silico trypanosome of the bloodstream form displays the characteristic in vivo rotational and translational motility pattern that is crucial for survival and virulence in the vertebrate host. Moreover, our model accurately simulates the trypanosome's tumbling and backward motion. We show that the distinctive course of the attached flagellum around the cell body is one important aspect to produce the observed swimming behavior in a viscous fluid, and also required to reach the maximal swimming velocity. Changing details of the flagellar attachment generates less efficient swimmers. We also simulate different morphotypes that occur during the parasite's development in the tsetse fly, and

  15. 3D Architecture of the Trypanosoma brucei Flagella Connector, a Mobile Transmembrane Junction.

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    Johanna L Höög

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular junctions are crucial for the formation of multicellular organisms, where they anchor cells to each other and/or supportive tissue and enable cell-to-cell communication. Some unicellular organisms, such as the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei, also have complex cellular junctions. The flagella connector (FC is a three-layered transmembrane junction that moves with the growing tip of a new flagellum and attaches it to the side of the old flagellum. The FC moves via an unknown molecular mechanism, independent of new flagellum growth. Here we describe the detailed 3D architecture of the FC suggesting explanations for how it functions and its mechanism of motility.We have used a combination of electron tomography and cryo-electron tomography to reveal the 3D architecture of the FC. Cryo-electron tomography revealed layers of repetitive filamentous electron densities between the two flagella in the interstitial zone. Though the FC does not change in length and width during the growth of the new flagellum, the interstitial zone thickness decreases as the FC matures. This investigation also shows interactions between the FC layers and the axonemes of the new and old flagellum, sufficiently strong to displace the axoneme in the old flagellum. We describe a novel filament, the flagella connector fibre, found between the FC and the axoneme in the old flagellum.The FC is similar to other cellular junctions in that filamentous proteins bridge the extracellular space and are anchored to underlying cytoskeletal structures; however, it is built between different portions of the same cell and is unique because of its intrinsic motility. The detailed description of its structure will be an important tool to use in attributing structure / function relationships as its molecular components are discovered in the future. The FC is involved in the inheritance of cell shape, which is important for the life cycle of this human parasite.

  16. Expression of glutamine synthetase in the mouse kidney: localization in multiple epithelial cell types and differential regulation by hypokalemia

    OpenAIRE

    Verlander, Jill W.; Chu, Diana; Lee, Hyun-wook; Handlogten, Mary E; Weiner, I. David

    2013-01-01

    Renal glutamine synthetase catalyzes the reaction of NH4+ with glutamate, forming glutamine and decreasing the ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine glutamine synthetase's specific cellular expression in the mouse kidney and its regulation by hypokalemia, a common cause of altered renal ammonia metabolism. Glutamine synthetase mRNA and protein were present in the renal cortex and in both the outer and inner stripes of the outer medulla. Im...

  17. Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases in the Bacterial World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giegé, Richard; Springer, Mathias

    2016-05-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are modular enzymes globally conserved in the three kingdoms of life. All catalyze the same two-step reaction, i.e., the attachment of a proteinogenic amino acid on their cognate tRNAs, thereby mediating the correct expression of the genetic code. In addition, some aaRSs acquired other functions beyond this key role in translation. Genomics and X-ray crystallography have revealed great structural diversity in aaRSs (e.g., in oligomery and modularity, in ranking into two distinct groups each subdivided in 3 subgroups, by additional domains appended on the catalytic modules). AaRSs show huge structural plasticity related to function and limited idiosyncrasies that are kingdom or even species specific (e.g., the presence in many Bacteria of non discriminating aaRSs compensating for the absence of one or two specific aaRSs, notably AsnRS and/or GlnRS). Diversity, as well, occurs in the mechanisms of aaRS gene regulation that are not conserved in evolution, notably between distant groups such as Gram-positive and Gram-negative Bacteria. The review focuses on bacterial aaRSs (and their paralogs) and covers their structure, function, regulation, and evolution. Structure/function relationships are emphasized, notably the enzymology of tRNA aminoacylation and the editing mechanisms for correction of activation and charging errors. The huge amount of genomic and structural data that accumulated in last two decades is reviewed, showing how the field moved from essentially reductionist biology towards more global and integrated approaches. Likewise, the alternative functions of aaRSs and those of aaRS paralogs (e.g., during cell wall biogenesis and other metabolic processes in or outside protein synthesis) are reviewed. Since aaRS phylogenies present promiscuous bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryal features, similarities and differences in the properties of aaRSs from the three kingdoms of life are pinpointed throughout the review and

  18. Labor Augmentation with Oxytocin Decreases Glutathione Level

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    Naomi Schneid-Kofman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare oxidative stress following spontaneous vaginal delivery with that induced by Oxytocin augmented delivery. Methods. 98 women recruited prior to labor. 57 delivered spontaneously, while 41 received Oxytocin for augmentation of labor. Complicated deliveries and high-risk pregnancies were excluded. Informed consent was documented. Arterial cord blood gases, levels of Hematocrit, Hemoglobin, and Bilirubin were studied. Glutathione (GSH concentration was measured by a spectroscopic method. Plasma and red blood cell (RBC levels of Malondialdehyde indicated lipid peroxidation. RBC uptake of phenol red denoted cell penetrability. SPSS data analysis was used. Results. Cord blood GSH was significantly lower in the Oxytocin group (2.3±0.55 mM versus 2.55±0.55 mM, =.01. No differences were found in plasma or RBC levels of MDA or in uptake of Phenol red between the groups. Conclusion. Lower GSH levels following Oxytocin augmentation indicate an oxidative stress, though selected measures of oxidative stress demonstrate no cell damage.

  19. Status of glutathione in nasal epithelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During inhalation exposure to air-born toxicants, the nasal epithelium may be subjected to local toxicity. Since glutathione (GSH) is often involved in xenobiotic metabolism, GSH status in these tissues has been examined. GSH content and apparent first-order rate constants for GSH content and apparent first-order rate constants for GSH turnover and synthesis were determined for respiratory epithelium covering the anterior ventral septum, olfactory epithelium covering the dorsal posterior septum, olfactory epithelium covering the dorsal meatus from male Fischer rats. The three tissues had similar concentrations of GSH (approximately 3-3.4 umol/g tissue) as determined by the Ellman's assay or by HPLC equipped with an electrochemical detector. Animals were administered [35S]Cysteine (Cys) by tail vein injection and rate constants were estimated, after incorporation of Cys into tissue GSH pools, by the decrease in GSH specific activity 1-102 hr after administration. Total [35S]GSH was analyzed by HPLC with a flow-through radioactivity detector. The three nasal epithelial tissues had similar apparent biphasic rates of GSH turnover, with rapid-phase half-lives of less than 10 hr and slow-phase half-lives of approximately 30 hr. The high GSH concentrations and the apparent rapid GSH turnover may facilitate the GSH-mediated detoxification within nasal tissue

  20. The Genetic Architecture of Murine Glutathione Transferases.

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    Lu Lu

    Full Text Available Glutathione S-transferase (GST genes play a protective role against oxidative stress and may influence disease risk and drug pharmacokinetics. In this study, massive multiscalar trait profiling across a large population of mice derived from a cross between C57BL/6J (B6 and DBA2/J (D2--the BXD family--was combined with linkage and bioinformatic analyses to characterize mechanisms controlling GST expression and to identify downstream consequences of this variation. Similar to humans, mice show a wide range in expression of GST family members. Variation in the expression of Gsta4, Gstt2, Gstz1, Gsto1, and Mgst3 is modulated by local expression QTLs (eQTLs in several tissues. Higher expression of Gsto1 in brain and liver of BXD strains is strongly associated (P < 0.01 with inheritance of the B6 parental allele whereas higher expression of Gsta4 and Mgst3 in brain and liver, and Gstt2 and Gstz1 in brain is strongly associated with inheritance of the D2 parental allele. Allele-specific assays confirmed that expression of Gsto1, Gsta4, and Mgst3 are modulated by sequence variants within or near each gene locus. We exploited this endogenous variation to identify coexpression networks and downstream targets in mouse and human. Through a combined systems genetics approach, we provide new insight into the biological role of naturally occurring variants in GST genes.

  1. Calvatia lilacina protein-extract induces apoptosis through glutathione depletion in human colorectal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Jwu-Guh; Chung, King-Thom; Yeh, Chung-Hung; Chen, Wan-Ling; Chen, Chi-Hung; Lin, Martin Hsiu-Chu; Lu, Fung-Jou; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Chen, Ching-Hsein

    2009-02-25

    This paper reports that a novel protein extract isolated from Calvatia lilacina (CL) can induce cell death against four types of human colorectal cancer cells. Importantly, CL was shown to be free of apoptotic effects against normal rat liver cells. We have also identified that CL-induced glutathione (GSH) depletion is the major contributor responsible for the apoptotic cell death induction of SW 480 cells, as evidenced by the observation that exogenously added N-acetylcysteine (NAC), or GSH, but not vitamin C, could offer a near complete protection of CL-treated cells against apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, the participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) evoked a drop in the transmembrane potential (Delta Psi(m)) in the CL-induced apoptotic cell death. This observation can only be deemed as a minor pathway due to the fact that cyclosporine A (CyA) could only partially rescue the CL-treated cells from apoptotic cell death. Likewise, despite the fact that CL could induce the upregulation of Bax, its knockdown via siRNA (48 h) failed to completely mitigate apoptotic cell death, indicating that its role in this apoptotic process was insignificant. To further explore the possible underlying mechanism associated with CL-induced GSH depletion, we proceeded to determine the effect of CL on the cellular gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS), a rate-limiting enzyme responsible for GSH biosynthesis, and demonstrated that indeed gamma-GCS could be repressed by CL. Taken together, we report here for the first time that the anticancer effect of CL on human colorectal cancer cells is mediated through GSH depletion mechanism rather than a ROS-mediated killing process. This functional attribute of CL can thus provide the basis for the strategic design of a treatment of colorectal cancer.

  2. The role of glutathione in mercury tolerance resembles its function under cadmium stress in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino-Plata, Juan; Carrasco-Gil, Sandra; Abadía, Javier; Escobar, Carolina; Álvarez-Fernández, Ana; Hernández, Luis E

    2014-02-01

    Recent research efforts have highlighted the importance of glutathione (GSH) as a key antioxidant metabolite for metal tolerance in plants. Little is known about the mechanisms involved in stress due to mercury (Hg), one of the most hazardous metals to the environment and human health. To understand the implication of GSH metabolism for Hg tolerance, we used two γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γECS) Arabidopsis thaliana allele mutants (rax1-1 and cad2-1) and a phytochelatin synthase (PCS) mutant (cad1-3). The leaves of these mutants and of wild type (Col-0) were infiltrated with a solution containing Cd or Hg (0, 3 and 30 μM) and incubated for 24 and 48 h. The formation of phytochelatins (PCs) in the leaf extracts was followed by two different HPLC-based methods and occurred in Col-0, cad2-1 and rax1-1 plants exposed to Cd, whereas in the Hg treatments, PCs accumulated mainly in Col-0 and rax1-1, where Hg-PC complexes were also detected. ASA and GSH/GSSG levels increased under moderate metal stress conditions, accompanied by increased GSH reductase (GR) activity and expression. However, higher metal doses led to a decrease in the analysed parameters, and stronger toxic effects appeared with 30 μM Hg. The GSH concentration was significantly higher in rax1-1 (70% of Col-0) than in cad2-1 (40% of Col-0). The leaves of rax1-1 were less sensitive than cad2-1, in accordance with the greater expression of γECS in rax1-1. Our results underline the existence of a minimal GSH concentration threshold needed to minimise the toxic effects exerted by Hg.

  3. Glutathione is involved in physiological response of Candida utilis to acid stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da-Hui; Zhang, Jun-Li; Dong, Ying-Ying; Wei, Gong-Yuan; Qi, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Candida utilis often encounters an acid stress environment when hexose and pentose are metabolized to produce acidic bio-based materials. In order to reveal the physiological role of glutathione (GSH) in the response of cells of this industrial yeast to acid stress, an efficient GSH-producing strain of C. utilis CCTCC M 209298 and its mutants deficient in GSH biosynthesis, C. utilis Δgsh1 and Δgsh2, were used in this study. A long-term mild acid challenge (pH 3.5 for 6 h) and a short-term severe acid challenge (pH 1.5 for 2 h) were conducted at 18 h during batch culture of the yeast to generate acid stress conditions. Differences in the physiological performances among the three strains under acid stress were analyzed in terms of GSH biosynthesis and distribution; intracellular pH; activities of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase; intracellular ATP level; and ATP/ADP ratio. The intracellular GSH content of the yeast was found to be correlated with changes in physiological data, and a higher intracellular GSH content led to greater relief of cells to the acid stress, suggesting that GSH may be involved in protecting C. utilis against acid stress. Results presented in this manuscript not only increase our understanding of the impact of GSH on the physiology of C. utilis but also help us to comprehend the mechanism underlying the response to acid stress of eukaryotic microorganisms. PMID:26346268

  4. A novel high-throughput activity assay for the Trypanosoma brucei editosome enzyme REL1 and other RNA ligases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Stephan; Hall, Laurence; Riley, Sean; Sørensen, Jesper; Amaro, Rommie E.; Schnaufer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    The protist parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), which threatens millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa. Without treatment the infection is almost always lethal. Current drugs for HAT are difficult to administer and have severe side effects. Together with increasing drug resistance this results in urgent need for new treatments. T. brucei and other trypanosomatid pathogens require a distinct form of post-transcriptional mRNA modification for mitochondrial gene expression. A multi-protein complex called the editosome cleaves mitochondrial mRNA, inserts or deletes uridine nucleotides at specific positions and re-ligates the mRNA. RNA editing ligase 1 (REL1) is essential for the re-ligation step and has no close homolog in the mammalian host, making it a promising target for drug discovery. However, traditional assays for RELs use radioactive substrates coupled with gel analysis and are not suitable for high-throughput screening of compound libraries. Here we describe a fluorescence-based REL activity assay. This assay is compatible with a 384-well microplate format and sensitive, satisfies statistical criteria for high-throughput methods and is readily adaptable for other polynucleotide ligases. We validated the assay by determining kinetic properties of REL1 and by identifying REL1 inhibitors in a library of small, pharmacologically active compounds. PMID:26400159

  5. TbPIF5 is a Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial DNA helicase involved in processing of minicircle Okazaki fragments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beiyu Liu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei's mitochondrial genome, kinetoplast DNA (kDNA, is a giant network of catenated DNA rings. The network consists of a few thousand 1 kb minicircles and several dozen 23 kb maxicircles. Here we report that TbPIF5, one of T. brucei's six mitochondrial proteins related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DNA helicase ScPIF1, is involved in minicircle lagging strand synthesis. Like its yeast homolog, TbPIF5 is a 5' to 3' DNA helicase. Together with other enzymes thought to be involved in Okazaki fragment processing, TbPIF5 localizes in vivo to the antipodal sites flanking the kDNA. Minicircles in wild type cells replicate unidirectionally as theta-structures and are unusual in that Okazaki fragments are not joined until after the progeny minicircles have segregated. We now report that overexpression of TbPIF5 causes premature removal of RNA primers and joining of Okazaki fragments on theta structures. Further elongation of the lagging strand is blocked, but the leading strand is completed and the minicircle progeny, one with a truncated H strand (ranging from 0.1 to 1 kb, are segregated. The minicircles with a truncated H strand electrophorese on an agarose gel as a smear. This replication defect is associated with kinetoplast shrinkage and eventual slowing of cell growth. We propose that TbPIF5 unwinds RNA primers after lagging strand synthesis, thus facilitating processing of Okazaki fragments.

  6. In Silico Identification and in Vitro Activity of Novel Natural Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian C. Herrmann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As part of our ongoing efforts to identify natural products with activity against pathogens causing neglected tropical diseases, we are currently performing an extensive screening of natural product (NP databases against a multitude of protozoan parasite proteins. Within this project, we screened a database of NPs from a commercial supplier, AnalytiCon Discovery (Potsdam, Germany, against Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TbGAPDH, a glycolytic enzyme whose inhibition deprives the parasite of energy supply. NPs acting as potential inhibitors of the mentioned enzyme were identified using a pharmacophore-based virtual screening and subsequent docking of the identified hits into the active site of interest. In a set of 700 structures chosen for the screening, 13 (1.9% were predicted to possess significant affinity towards the enzyme and were therefore tested in an in vitro enzyme assay using recombinant TbGAPDH. Nine of these in silico hits (69% showed significant inhibitory activity at 50 µM, of which two geranylated benzophenone derivatives proved to be particularly active with IC50 values below 10 µM. These compounds also showed moderate in vitro activity against T. brucei rhodesiense and may thus represent interesting starting points for further optimization.

  7. Tracking the Biogenesis and Inheritance of Subpellicular Microtubule in Trypanosoma brucei with Inducible YFP-α-Tubulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Sheriff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microtubule cytoskeleton forms the most prominent structural system in Trypanosoma brucei, undergoing extensive modifications during the cell cycle. Visualization of tyrosinated microtubules leads to a semiconservative mode of inheritance, whereas recent studies employing microtubule plus end tracking proteins have hinted at an asymmetric pattern of cytoskeletal inheritance. To further the knowledge of microtubule synthesis and inheritance during T. brucei cell cycle, the dynamics of the microtubule cytoskeleton was visualized by inducible YFP-α-tubulin expression. During new flagellum/flagellum attachment zone (FAZ biogenesis and cell growth, YFP-α-tubulin was incorporated mainly between the old and new flagellum/FAZ complexes. Cytoskeletal modifications at the posterior end of the cells were observed with EB1, a microtubule plus end binding protein, particularly during mitosis. Additionally, the newly formed microtubules segregated asymmetrically, with the daughter cell inheriting the new flagellum/FAZ complex retaining most of the new microtubules. Together, our results suggest an intimate connection between new microtubule formation and new FAZ assembly, consequently leading to asymmetric microtubule inheritance and cell division.

  8. Independent analysis of the flagellum surface and matrix proteomes provides insight into flagellum signaling in mammalian-infectious Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholzer, Michael; Langousis, Gerasimos; Nguyen, HoangKim T; Saada, Edwin A; Shimogawa, Michelle M; Jonsson, Zophonias O; Nguyen, Steven M; Wohlschlegel, James A; Hill, Kent L

    2011-10-01

    The flagellum of African trypanosomes is an essential and multifunctional organelle that functions in motility, cell morphogenesis, and host-parasite interaction. Previous studies of the trypanosome flagellum have been limited by the inability to purify flagella without first removing the flagellar membrane. This limitation is particularly relevant in the context of studying flagellum signaling, as signaling requires surface-exposed proteins in the flagellar membrane and soluble signaling proteins in the flagellar matrix. Here we employ a combination of genetic and mechanical approaches to purify intact flagella from the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, in its mammalian-infectious stage. We combined flagellum purification with affinity-purification of surface-exposed proteins to conduct independent proteomic analyses of the flagellum surface and matrix fractions. The proteins identified encompass a broad range of molecular functionalities, including many predicted to function in signaling. Immunofluorescence and RNA interference studies demonstrate flagellum localization and function for proteins identified and provide insight into mechanisms of flagellum attachment and motility. The flagellum surface proteome includes many T. brucei-specific proteins and is enriched for proteins up-regulated in the mammalian-infectious stage of the parasite life-cycle. The combined results indicate that the flagellum surface presents a diverse and dynamic host-parasite interface that is well-suited for host-parasite signaling. PMID:21685506

  9. Genome-wide Analysis Reveals Extensive Functional Interaction between DNA Replication Initiation and Transcription in the Genome of Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin Tiengwe

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Identification of replication initiation sites, termed origins, is a crucial step in understanding genome transmission in any organism. Transcription of the Trypanosoma brucei genome is highly unusual, with each chromosome comprising a few discrete transcription units. To understand how DNA replication occurs in the context of such organization, we have performed genome-wide mapping of the binding sites of the replication initiator ORC1/CDC6 and have identified replication origins, revealing that both localize to the boundaries of the transcription units. A remarkably small number of active origins is seen, whose spacing is greater than in any other eukaryote. We show that replication and transcription in T. brucei have a profound functional overlap, as reducing ORC1/CDC6 levels leads to genome-wide increases in mRNA levels arising from the boundaries of the transcription units. In addition, ORC1/CDC6 loss causes derepression of silent Variant Surface Glycoprotein genes, which are critical for host immune evasion.

  10. Biochemical genetics of glutathione-S-transferase in man.

    OpenAIRE

    Board, P G

    1981-01-01

    Glutathione-S-transferases from liver and erythrocytes have been separated by starch gel electrophoresis and localized by a specific staining procedure. The data suggest that the most active glutathione-S-transferases in liver are the products of two autosomal loci, GST1 and GST2. Both these loci are polymorphic, and there is evidence that a common null allele exists at the GST1 locus. The glutathione-S-transferase expressed in erythrocytes is the product of a third locus, GST3, and is not po...

  11. Thiol-Disulfide Exchange between Glutaredoxin and Glutathione

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Rasmus; Andersen, Peter Anders; Jensen, Kristine Steen;

    2010-01-01

    Glutaredoxins are ubiquitous thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases which catalyze the reduction of glutathione-protein mixed disulfides. Belonging to the thioredoxin family, they contain a conserved active site CXXC motif. The N-proximal active site cysteine can form a mixed disulfide with glutathione ...... has been replaced with serine. The exchange reaction between the reduced protein and oxidized glutathione leading to formation of the mixed disulfide could readily be monitored by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) due to the enthalpic contributions from the noncovalent interactions...... a substantial effect on the thermal stability of the protein as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry....

  12. Expression of glutamine synthetase in the mouse kidney: localization in multiple epithelial cell types and differential regulation by hypokalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlander, Jill W; Chu, Diana; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Handlogten, Mary E; Weiner, I David

    2013-09-01

    Renal glutamine synthetase catalyzes the reaction of NH4+ with glutamate, forming glutamine and decreasing the ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine glutamine synthetase's specific cellular expression in the mouse kidney and its regulation by hypokalemia, a common cause of altered renal ammonia metabolism. Glutamine synthetase mRNA and protein were present in the renal cortex and in both the outer and inner stripes of the outer medulla. Immunohistochemistry showed glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in nonproximal tubule cells. Double immunolabel with cell-specific markers demonstrated glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells, non-A, non-B intercalated cells, and distal convoluted tubule cells, but not in principal cells, type B intercalated cells, or connecting segment cells. Hypokalemia induced by feeding a nominally K+ -free diet for 12 days decreased glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in the distal convoluted tubule and simultaneously increased glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells in both the cortical and outer medullary collecting duct. We conclude that glutamine synthetase is widely and specifically expressed in renal epithelial cells and that the regulation of expression differs in specific cell populations. Glutamine synthetase is likely to mediate an important role in renal ammonia metabolism.

  13. Regulation of expression from the glnA promoter of Escherichia coli in the absence of glutamine synthetase.

    OpenAIRE

    Rothstein, D. M.; Pahel, G; Tyler, B.; Magasanik, B

    1980-01-01

    One of the suspected regulators of glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2] in enteric bacteria is glutamine synthetase itself. We isolated Escherichia coli strains carrying fusions of the beta-galactosidase structural gene to the promoter of the glutamine synthetase gene, with the aid of the Casadaban Mud1 (ApR, lac, cts62) phage. Some aspects of regulation were retained in haploid fusion strains despite the absence of glutamine synthetase, whereas other as...

  14. The predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus aspartyl-tRNA synthetase recognizes tRNAAsn as a substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Alperstein

    Full Text Available The predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus preys on other Gram-negative bacteria and was predicted to be an asparagine auxotroph. However, despite encoding asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase and glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase, B. bacteriovorus also contains the amidotransferase GatCAB. Deinococcus radiodurans, and Thermus thermophilus also encode both of these aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with GatCAB. Both also code for a second aspartyl-tRNA synthetase and use the additional aspartyl-tRNA synthetase with GatCAB to synthesize asparagine on tRNAAsn. Unlike those two bacteria, B. bacteriovorus encodes only one aspartyl-tRNA synthetase. Here we demonstrate the lone B. bacteriovorus aspartyl-tRNA synthetase catalyzes aspartyl-tRNAAsn formation that GatCAB can then amidate to asparaginyl-tRNAAsn. This non-discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase with GatCAB thus provides B. bacteriovorus a second route for Asn-tRNAAsn formation with the asparagine synthesized in a tRNA-dependent manner. Thus, in contrast to a previous prediction, B. bacteriovorus codes for a biosynthetic route for asparagine. Analysis of bacterial genomes suggests a significant number of other bacteria may also code for both routes for Asn-tRNAAsn synthesis with only a limited number encoding a second aspartyl-tRNA synthetase.

  15. Deviating the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in Trypanosoma brucei elicits distinct mechanisms for inhibiting proliferation and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenciano, Ana L; Ramsey, Aaron C; Mackey, Zachary B

    2015-01-01

    The DNA replication machinery is spatially and temporally coordinated in all cells to reproduce a single exact copy of the genome per division, but its regulation in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is not well characterized. We characterized the effects of altering the levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a key component of the DNA replication machinery, in bloodstream form T. brucei. This study demonstrated that tight regulation of TbPCNA levels was critical for normal proliferation and DNA replication in the parasite. Depleting TbPCNA mRNA reduced proliferation, severely diminished DNA replication, arrested the synthesis of new DNA and caused the parasites to accumulated in G2/M. Attenuating the parasite by downregulating TbPCNA caused it to become hypersensitive to hydroxyurea. Overexpressing TbPCNA in T. brucei arrested proliferation, inhibited DNA replication and prevented the parasite from exiting G2/M. These results indicate that distinct mechanisms of cell cycle arrest are associated with upregulating or downregulating TbPCNA. The findings of this study validate deregulating intra-parasite levels of TbPCNA as a potential strategy for therapeutically exploiting this target in bloodstream form T. brucei.

  16. Identification and Characterization of Hundreds of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei Growth from a Kinase-Targeted Library Screening Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Rosario; Luengo-Arratta, Sandra A.; Seixas, João D.; Amata, Emanuele; Devine, William; Cordon-Obras, Carlos; Rojas-Barros, Domingo I.; Jimenez, Elena; Ortega, Fatima; Crouch, Sabrinia; Colmenarejo, Gonzalo; Fiandor, Jose Maria; Martin, Jose Julio; Berlanga, Manuela; Gonzalez, Silvia; Manzano, Pilar; Navarro, Miguel; Pollastri, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    In the interest of identification of new kinase-targeting chemotypes for target and pathway analysis and drug discovery in Trypanosomal brucei, a high-throughput screen of 42,444 focused inhibitors from the GlaxoSmithKline screening collection was performed against parasite cell cultures and counter-screened against human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells. In this way, we have identified 797 sub-micromolar inhibitors of T. brucei growth that are at least 100-fold selective over HepG2 cells. Importantly, 242 of these hit compounds acted rapidly in inhibiting cellular growth, 137 showed rapid cidality. A variety of in silico and in vitro physicochemical and drug metabolism properties were assessed, and human kinase selectivity data were obtained, and, based on these data, we prioritized three compounds for pharmacokinetic assessment and demonstrated parasitological cure of a murine bloodstream infection of T. brucei rhodesiense with one of these compounds (NEU-1053). This work represents a successful implementation of a unique industrial-academic collaboration model aimed at identification of high quality inhibitors that will provide the parasitology community with chemical matter that can be utilized to develop kinase-targeting tool compounds. Furthermore these results are expected to provide rich starting points for discovery of kinase-targeting tool compounds for T. brucei, and new HAT therapeutics discovery programs. PMID:25340575

  17. A proteomics approach reveals molecular manipulators of distinct cellular processes in the salivary glands of Glossina m. morsitans in response to Trypanosoma b. brucei infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kariithi, Henry M.; Boeren, Sjef; Murungi, Edwin K.; Vlak, Just M.; Abd-Alla, Adly M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glossina m. morsitans is the primary vector of the Trypanosoma brucei group, one of the causative agents of African trypanosomoses. The parasites undergo metacyclogenesis, i.e. transformation into the mammalian-infective metacyclic trypomastigote (MT) parasites, in the salivary glands

  18. Stage-dependent expression and up-regulation of trypanothione synthetase in amphotericin B resistant Leishmania donovani.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Equbal

    Full Text Available Kinetoplastids differ from other organisms in their ability to conjugate glutathione and spermidine to form trypanothione which is involved in maintaining redox homeostasis and removal of toxic metabolites. It is also involved in drug resistance, antioxidant mechanism, and defense against cellular oxidants. Trypanothione synthetase (TryS of thiol metabolic pathway is the sole enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of trypanothione in Leishmania donovani. In this study, TryS gene of L. donovani (LdTryS was cloned, expressed, and fusion protein purified with affinity column chromatography. The purified protein showed optimum enzymatic activity at pH 8.0-8.5. The TryS amino acids sequences alignment showed that all amino acids involved in catalytic and ligands binding of L. major are conserved in L. donovani. Subcellular localization using digitonin fractionation and immunoblot analysis showed that LdTryS is localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, RT-PCR coupled with immunoblot analysis showed that LdTryS is overexpressed in Amp B resistant and stationary phase promastigotes (∼ 2.0-folds than in sensitive strain and logarithmic phase, respectively, which suggests its involvement in Amp B resistance. Also, H2O2 treatment upto 150 µM for 8 hrs leads to 2-fold increased expression of LdTryS probably to cope up with oxidative stress generated by H2O2. Therefore, this study demonstrates stage- and Amp B sensitivity-dependent expression of LdTryS in L. donovani and involvement of TryS during oxidative stress to help the parasites survival.

  19. Possible role of glutamine synthetase in the NO signaling response in root nodules by contributing to the antioxidant defenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Santos Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is emerging as an important regulatory player in the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. The occurrence of NO during several steps of the symbiotic interaction suggests an important, but yet unknown, signaling role of this molecule for root nodule formation and functioning. The identification of the molecular targets of NO is key for the assembly of the signal transduction cascade that will ultimately help to unravel NO function. We have recently shown that the key nitrogen assimilatory enzyme Glutamine Synthetase (GS is a molecular target of NO in root nodules of Medicago truncatula, being post-translationally regulated by tyrosine nitration in relation to nitrogen fixation. In functional nodules of M. truncatula NO formation has been located in the bacteroid containing cells of the fixation zone, where the ammonium generated by bacterial nitrogenase is released to the plant cytosol and assimilated into the organic pools by plant GS. We propose that the NO-mediated GS post-translational inactivation is connected to nitrogenase inhibition induced by NO and is related to metabolite channeling to boost the nodule antioxidant defenses. Glutamate, a substrate for GS activity is also the precursor for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH, which is highly abundant in root nodules of several plant species and known to play a major role in the antioxidant defense participating in the ascorbate/GSH cycle. Existing evidence suggests that upon NO-mediated GS inhibition, glutamate could be channeled for the synthesis of GSH. According to this hypothesis, GS would be involved in the NO-signaling responses in root nodules and the NO-signaling events would meet the nodule metabolic pathways to provide an adaptive response to the inhibition of symbiotic nitrogen fixation by reactive nitrogen species (RNS.

  20. Quantitation of protein S-glutathionylation by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: correction for contaminating glutathione and glutathione disulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Michael R; Bucklin, Christopher; Picklo, Matthew J

    2015-01-15

    Protein S-glutathionylation is a posttranslational modification that links oxidative stimuli to reversible changes in cellular function. Protein-glutathione mixed disulfide (PSSG) is commonly quantified by reduction of the disulfide and detection of the resultant glutathione species. This methodology is susceptible to contamination by free unreacted cellular glutathione (GSH) species, which are present in 1000-fold greater concentration. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based method was developed for quantification of glutathione and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), which was used for the determination of PSSG in biological samples. Analysis of rat liver samples demonstrated that GSH and GSSG coprecipitated with proteins similar to the range for PSSG in the sample. The use of [(13)C2,(5)N]GSH and [(13)C4,(5)N2]GSSG validated these results and demonstrated that the release of GSH from PSSG did not occur during sample preparation and analysis. These data demonstrate that GSH and GSSG contamination must be accounted for when determining PSSG content in cellular/tissue preparations. A protocol for rinsing samples to remove the adventitious glutathione species is demonstrated. The fragmentation patterns for glutathione were determined by high-resolution mass spectrometry, and candidate ions for detection of PSSG on protein and protein fragments were identified.

  1. Chitin synthetase in encysting Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba invadens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giardia lamblia (Gl) and Entamoeba invadens (Ei) are protozoan parasites with two morphologic stages in their life cycles. Motile trophozoites colonize the intestine of humans and reptiles respectively. Water resistant cysts, which can survive outside the host, transmit infection. In vitro cyst formation of Ei from trophozoites has been reported, and the authors have recently induced in vitro encystation of Gl. Although the cyst walls of both parasites contain chitin, it synthesis by encysting trophozoites has not been reported. The authors now show that encystation conditions greatly increase chitin synthetase (CS) specific activity (incorporation of 3H GlcNAc from UDP-GlcNAc into TCA-or alcohol-precipitable material). Extracts of encysting Gl incorporated 3.6 nmol/mg protein in 5 hr compared to < 0.005 in controls. Extracts of encysting Fi incorporated 4.8 n mol/mg protein, compared to 1.7 in the control. CS activity of both parasites requires preformed chitin. The Gl enzyme requires a reducing agent, is inhibited by digitonin and the CS inhibitors, polyoxin D and Nikkomycin, but not by tunicamycin. The product is digested by chitinase. Ei enzyme does not require a reducing agent and is stimulated by 1 mg/ml digitonin, but inhibited by higher concentrations. These studies demonstrate CS enzymes which may play important roles in encystation of Gl and Ei

  2. Versatility of acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beld, Joris; Finzel, Kara; Burkart, Michael D

    2014-10-23

    The acyl carrier protein (ACP) requires posttranslational modification with a 4'-phosphopantetheine arm for activity, and this thiol-terminated modification carries cargo between enzymes in ACP-dependent metabolic pathways. We show that acyl-ACP synthetases (AasSs) from different organisms are able to load even, odd, and unnatural fatty acids onto E. coli ACP in vitro. Vibrio harveyi AasS not only shows promiscuity for the acid substrate, but also is active upon various alternate carrier proteins. AasS activity also extends to functional activation in living organisms. We show that exogenously supplied carboxylic acids are loaded onto ACP and extended by the E. coli fatty acid synthase, including unnatural fatty acid analogs. These analogs are further integrated into cellular lipids. In vitro characterization of four different adenylate-forming enzymes allowed us to disambiguate CoA-ligases and AasSs, and further in vivo studies show the potential for functional application in other organisms. PMID:25308274

  3. Chitin synthetase in encysting Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba invadens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.; Gillin, F.D.

    1987-05-01

    Giardia lamblia (Gl) and Entamoeba invadens (Ei) are protozoan parasites with two morphologic stages in their life cycles. Motile trophozoites colonize the intestine of humans and reptiles respectively. Water resistant cysts, which can survive outside the host, transmit infection. In vitro cyst formation of Ei from trophozoites has been reported, and the authors have recently induced in vitro encystation of Gl. Although the cyst walls of both parasites contain chitin, it synthesis by encysting trophozoites has not been reported. The authors now show that encystation conditions greatly increase chitin synthetase (CS) specific activity (incorporation of /sup 3/H GlcNAc from UDP-GlcNAc into TCA-or alcohol-precipitable material). Extracts of encysting Gl incorporated 3.6 nmol/mg protein in 5 hr compared to < 0.005 in controls. Extracts of encysting Fi incorporated 4.8 n mol/mg protein, compared to 1.7 in the control. CS activity of both parasites requires preformed chitin. The Gl enzyme requires a reducing agent, is inhibited by digitonin and the CS inhibitors, polyoxin D and Nikkomycin, but not by tunicamycin. The product is digested by chitinase. Ei enzyme does not require a reducing agent and is stimulated by 1 mg/ml digitonin, but inhibited by higher concentrations. These studies demonstrate CS enzymes which may play important roles in encystation of Gl and Ei.

  4. Secondary NAD+ deficiency in the inherited defect of glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liyan; Ibrahim, Khalid; Stucki, Martin; Frapolli, Michele; Shahbeck, Noora; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter; Penberthy, W Todd; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Häberle, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) deficiency is an ultra-rare inborn error of amino acid metabolism that has been described in only three patients so far. The disease is characterized by neonatal onset of severe encephalopathy, low levels of glutamine in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, chronic moderate hyperammonemia, and an overall poor prognosis in the absence of an effective treatment. Recently, enteral glutamine supplementation was shown to be a safe and effective therapy for this disease but there are no data available on the long-term effects of this intervention. The amino acid glutamine, severely lacking in this disorder, is central to many metabolic pathways in the human organism and is involved in the synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) starting from tryptophan or niacin as nicotinate, but not nicotinamide. Using fibroblasts, leukocytes, and immortalized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from a patient carrying a GLUL gene point mutation associated with impaired GS activity, we tested whether glutamine deficiency in this patient results in NAD(+) depletion and whether it can be rescued by supplementation with glutamine, nicotinamide or nicotinate. The present study shows that congenital GS deficiency is associated with NAD(+) depletion in fibroblasts, leukocytes and PBSC, which may contribute to the severe clinical phenotype of the disease. Furthermore, it shows that NAD(+) depletion can be rescued by nicotinamide supplementation in fibroblasts and leukocytes, which may open up potential therapeutic options for the treatment of this disorder.

  5. Overexpression of glutamine synthetases confers transgenic rice herbicide resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Hui; Huang Qiman; Su Jin

    2005-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS, E.C.6.3.1.2) is a key enzyme involved in the assimilation of inorganic nitrogen in higher plants and gram-negative microorganisms. GS is the targeting enzyme of a herbicide phosphinothricin (PPT) or Basta. In order to generate PPT-resistant transgenic rice via overexpression of GS, we constructed a plant expression vector p2GS harboring two different isoenzymes GS1 and GS2 cDNAs under the control of constitutive promoters of rice Act1 and maize Ubiquitin(Ubi) genes. The p2GS was introduced into rice genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and confirmed by PCR and Southern blot hybridization. GS-transgene expression was first detected by Northern blot analyses. Results from Basta test indicated that GS-transgenic plants can tolerate as high as 0.3% Basta solution. In addition, our results also demonstrated that GS overexpression conferred transformed rice calli PPT resistance. Thus, GS cassette can serve as a selective marker gene instead of bar cassette for selection of PPT transformants.

  6. Adenine nucleotides as allosteric effectors of PEA seed glutamine synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J.

    1986-05-01

    The energy charge in the plant cell has been proposed as a regulator of glutamine synthetase (GS) activity. The authors have shown that 2.1 moles of ..gamma..(/sup 32/P)-ATP were bound/mole subunits of purified pea seed GS during complete inactivation with methionine sulfoximine. Since GS has one active site per subunit, the second binding site provides the potential for allosteric regulation of GS by adenine nucleotides. The authors have investigated the inhibition of the ATP-dependent synthetic activity by ADP and AMP. ADP and AMP cannot completely inhibit GS; but ATP does overcome the inhibition by ADP and AMP as shown by plots of % inhibition vs inhibitor concentration. This indicates that inhibition of GS by ADP or AMP is not completely due to competitive inhibition. In the absence of ADP or AMP, double reciprocal plots for ATP are linear below 10 mM; however, in the presence of either ADP or AMP these pots are curvilinear downwards. The ratio of Vm/asymptote is less than 1. The Hill number for ATP in the absence of ADP or AMP is 0.93 but decreases with increasing ADP or AMP to a value of 0.28 with 10 mM ADP. These data are consistent with negative cooperativity by ADP and AMP. Thus, as the ADP/ATP or AMP/ATP ratios are increased GS activity decreases. This is consistent with regulation of GS activity by energy charge in planta.

  7. Nitric oxide synthetase and Helicobacter pylori in patients undergoing appendicectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to determine whether Helicobacter pylori forms part of the normal microenvironment of the appendix, whether it plays a role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis, and whether it is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) in appendicular macrophages. METHODS: Serology for H. pylori was performed on 51 consecutive patients undergoing emergency appendicectomy. Appendix samples were tested for urease activity, cultured and stained for H. pylori, graded according to the degree of inflammatory infiltrate, and probed immunohistochemically for iNOS expression. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 21 (range 7-51) years. Seventeen patients (33 per cent) were seropositive for H. pylori but no evidence of H. pylori was found in any appendix specimen. However, an enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in seropositive patients (P < 0.04) and the expression of macrophage iNOS in the mucosa of normal and inflamed appendix specimens was increased (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: H. pylori does not colonize the appendix and is unlikely to be a pathogenic stimulus for appendicitis. Priming effects on mucosal immunology downstream from the foregut may occur after infection with H. pylori.

  8. The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiongming; Marygold, Steven J; Gharib, Walid H; Suter, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNAs, allowing them to decode the triplet code during translation. Through different mechanisms aaRSs also perform several non-canonical functions in transcription, translation, apoptosis, angiogenesis and inflammation. Drosophila has become a preferred system to model human diseases caused by mutations in aaRS genes, to dissect effects of reduced translation or non-canonical activities, and to study aminoacylation and translational fidelity. However, the lack of a systematic annotation of this gene family has hampered such studies. Here, we report the identification of the entire set of aaRS genes in the fly genome and we predict their roles based on experimental evidence and/or orthology. Further, we propose a new, systematic and logical nomenclature for aaRSs. We also review the research conducted on Drosophila aaRSs to date. Together, our work provides the foundation for further research in the fly aaRS field. PMID:26761199

  9. Cysteine but not glutathione modulates the radiosensitivity of human melanoma cells by affecting both survival and DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaert, E; Duez, P; Morandini, R; Dubois, J; Van Houtte, P; Ghanem, G

    2004-06-01

    Glutathione (GSH) and its precursor cysteine (Cys) are both known to react within any cells with oxidative species and thus play an important role in cellular defense mechanisms against oxidative stress. In melanocytes, these are also important precursors of melanogenesis by reacting non-enzymatically with l-dopaquinone to form the sulfur-containing pheomelanin. Our aim was to assess pigment role in the cellular radioprotection mechanism using a human melanoma cell model of mixed-type melanin under GSH depletion to obtain a radiosensitizing effect. The latter has been achieved either by Cys deprivation or GSH specific depletion. We first compared cell survival of Cys-deprived and GSH-depleted cells vs. control cells. Cys deprivation was achieved by decreasing Cys concentration in the culture medium for 24 h. In this condition, no toxicity was observed, Cys and GSH levels decreased, melanogenesis switched to a higher eumelanin synthesis and cells were significantly more resistant to 10-Gy dose of ionizing radiations than untreated cells. Glutathione depletion was achieved with the gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase inhibitor buthionine-S-sulfoximine (BSO) for 24 h at 50 microM, a concentration yielding no toxicity. In this condition, intracellular GSH level decreased but no change in pigmentation was observed and cells were slightly but significantly more sensitive to radiation than the control. We then compared DNA radio-induced damages by Comet assay in control cells, cells treated as above and cells with stimulated pigmentation by increasing Tyr concentration in the medium. Our results showed that, when intracellular eumelanin content increased, DNA damage decreased. By contrast, DNA damage increased in cells treated with BSO alone. It is concluded that increasing the intracellular eumelanin content by the melanin precursor Tyr or by favoring the Pheo- to Eumelanin switch, compensates for the loss of the two intracellular radioprotectors that are GSH and Cys. PMID

  10. Effect of glutathione during bottle storage of sparkling wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Vanessa; Dutra, Sandra Valduga; Spinelli, Fernanda Rodrigues; Carnieli, Gilberto João; Cardozo, Alejandro; Vanderlinde, Regina

    2017-02-01

    Reduced glutathione (GSH) is an efficient antioxidant on limiting browning, losing varietal aromas and off-flavor formation. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the effect of GSH addition (10, 20 and 30mgL(-1)) after the disgorging of the sparkling wine during storage. The sparkling wines were analyzed at 1, 6, 12 and 18months of storage according to the color index, concentration of the free SO2, phenolic compounds, catechin, epicatechin, caffeic acid, coumaric acid, acetaldehyde, total and reduced glutathione. The results show that GSH concentration decreased to the level of the control sparkling wine during the first 6months, and the total glutathione gradually declined up to 12months. The GSH reduces browning and acetaldehyde formation for up to 12months. However, the presence of glutathione had low or no influence on the concentration of free SO2, total phenolics, catechin, epicatechin, caffeic and coumaric acids. PMID:27596417

  11. Evaluation of the antibiotic properties of glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, David O; Chouake, Jason S; Kutner, Allison J; Makdisi, Joy; Nosanchuk, Josh D; Friedman, Adam J

    2013-11-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are growing in prevalence in both the outpatient and inpatient settings and are some of the most common diseases seen by dermatologists, who are often the first point of care for these patients. Microbial resistance to antibiotics continues to rise as more virulent strains evolve, and strains predominantly found in the hospital setting are now being seen in the community. Therefore, innovative approaches to combat this trend are needed. Glutathione (GSH) is a well-described and established antioxidant. It participates in detoxification of xenobiotics, regulation of cellular growth, modulation of immune response, and maintenance of the thiol status of proteins and cellular cysteine levels. GSH is also known to have a regulatory effect on immune cells and even inherent antibacterial properties have been reported. To this end, the value of GSH as an antibiotic was evaluated by growing methicillin resistant S. aureus, E. coli, K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa strains isolated from human skin and soft tissue infection in the presence of GSH. At a physiologic concentration of 10 mM, GSH had no effect on bacterial growth. At concentrations above 50 mM, which created acidic conditions (pH < 4), bacterial growth was completely inhibited. When adjusted to physiologic pH, GSH exhibited a bacteriostatic effect in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of GSH was evaluated in a murine cell line. GSH was relatively non-toxic to murine macrophages, even at the highest concentration tested (160 mM). These results suggest the potential utility of GSH for the prevention and/or as adjunctive treatment of infection, most significantly in disease states associated with GSH deficiency. PMID:24196336

  12. Analysis of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene family

    OpenAIRE

    Nebert Daniel W; Vasiliou Vasilis

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene family encodes genes that are critical for certain life processes, as well as for detoxication and toxification mechanisms, via conjugation of reduced glutathione (GSH) with numerous substrates such as pharmaceuticals and environmental pollutants. The GST genes are upregulated in response to oxidative stress and are inexplicably overexpressed in many tumours, leading to problems during cancer chemotherapy. An analysis of the GST gene family in...

  13. Nanofiltration concentration of extracellular glutathione produced by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kengo; Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Sazuka, Takashi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to optimize extracellular glutathione production by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered strain and to concentrate the extracellular glutathione by membrane separation processes, including ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF). Synthetic defined (SD) medium containing 20 g L(-1) glucose was fermented for 48 h; the fermentation liquid was passed through an UF membrane to remove macromolecules. Glutathione in this permeate was concentrated for 48 h to 545.1 ± 33.6 mg L(-1) using the NF membrane; this was a significantly higher concentration than that obtained with yeast extract peptone dextrose (YPD) medium following 96 h NF concentration (217.9 ± 57.4 mg L(-1)). This higher glutathione concentration results from lower cellular growth in SD medium (final OD600 = 6.9 ± 0.1) than in YPD medium (final OD600 = 11.0 ± 0.6) and thus higher production of extracellular glutathione (16.0 ± 1.3 compared to 9.2 ± 2.1 mg L(-1) in YPD medium, respectively). Similar fermentation and membrane processing of sweet sorghum juice containing 20 g L(-1) total sugars provided 240.3 ± 60.6 mg L(-1) glutathione. Increased extracellular production of glutathione by this engineered strain in SD medium and subsequent UF permeation and NF concentration in shortend time may help realize industrial recovery of extracellular glutathione.

  14. Glutathione synthesis is essential for pollen germination in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Koffler Barbara E; Zechmann Bernd; Russell Scott D

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The antioxidant glutathione fulfills many important roles during plant development, growth and defense in the sporophyte, however the role of this important molecule in the gametophyte generation is largely unclear. Bioinformatic data indicate that critical control enzymes are negligibly transcribed in pollen and sperm cells. Therefore, we decided to investigate the role of glutathione synthesis for pollen germination in vitro in Arabidopsis thaliana accession Col-0 and in...

  15. Nanofiltration concentration of extracellular glutathione produced by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kengo; Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Sazuka, Takashi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to optimize extracellular glutathione production by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered strain and to concentrate the extracellular glutathione by membrane separation processes, including ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF). Synthetic defined (SD) medium containing 20 g L(-1) glucose was fermented for 48 h; the fermentation liquid was passed through an UF membrane to remove macromolecules. Glutathione in this permeate was concentrated for 48 h to 545.1 ± 33.6 mg L(-1) using the NF membrane; this was a significantly higher concentration than that obtained with yeast extract peptone dextrose (YPD) medium following 96 h NF concentration (217.9 ± 57.4 mg L(-1)). This higher glutathione concentration results from lower cellular growth in SD medium (final OD600 = 6.9 ± 0.1) than in YPD medium (final OD600 = 11.0 ± 0.6) and thus higher production of extracellular glutathione (16.0 ± 1.3 compared to 9.2 ± 2.1 mg L(-1) in YPD medium, respectively). Similar fermentation and membrane processing of sweet sorghum juice containing 20 g L(-1) total sugars provided 240.3 ± 60.6 mg L(-1) glutathione. Increased extracellular production of glutathione by this engineered strain in SD medium and subsequent UF permeation and NF concentration in shortend time may help realize industrial recovery of extracellular glutathione. PMID:26105794

  16. Identification of Small-Molecule Frequent Hitters of Glutathione S-Transferase-Glutathione Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenke, Jara K; Salmina, Elena S; Ringelstetter, Larissa; Dornauer, Scarlett; Kuzikov, Maria; Rothenaigner, Ina; Schorpp, Kenji; Giehler, Fabian; Gopalakrishnan, Jay; Kieser, Arnd; Gul, Sheraz; Tetko, Igor V; Hadian, Kamyar

    2016-07-01

    In high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns, the binding of glutathione S-transferase (GST) to glutathione (GSH) is used for detection of GST-tagged proteins in protein-protein interactions or enzyme assays. However, many false-positives, so-called frequent hitters (FH), arise that either prevent GST/GSH interaction or interfere with assay signal generation or detection. To identify GST-FH compounds, we analyzed the data of five independent AlphaScreen-based screening campaigns to classify compounds that inhibit the GST/GSH interaction. We identified 53 compounds affecting GST/GSH binding but not influencing His-tag/Ni(2+)-NTA interaction and general AlphaScreen signals. The structures of these 53 experimentally identified GST-FHs were analyzed in chemoinformatic studies to categorize substructural features that promote interference with GST/GSH binding. Here, we confirmed several existing chemoinformatic filters and more importantly extended them as well as added novel filters that specify compounds with anti-GST/GSH activity. Selected compounds were also tested using different antibody-based GST detection technologies and exhibited no interference clearly demonstrating specificity toward their GST/GSH interaction. Thus, these newly described GST-FH will further contribute to the identification of FH compounds containing promiscuous substructures. The developed filters were uploaded to the OCHEM website (http://ochem.eu) and are publicly accessible for analysis of future HTS results. PMID:27044684

  17. The use of yellow fluorescent hybrids to indicate mating in Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferris Vanessa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosoma brucei undergoes genetic exchange in its insect vector, the tsetse fly, by an unknown mechanism. The difficulties of working with this experimental system of genetic exchange have hampered investigation, particularly because the trypanosome life cycle stages involved cannot be cultured in vitro and therefore must be examined in the insect. Searching for small numbers of hybrid trypanosomes directly in the fly has become possible through the incorporation of fluorescent reporter genes, and we have previously carried out a successful cross using a reporter-repressor strategy. However, we could not be certain that all fluorescent trypanosomes observed in that cross were hybrids, due to mutations of the repressor leading to spontaneous fluorescence, and we have therefore developed an alternative strategy. Results To visualize the production of hybrids in the fly, parental trypanosome clones were transfected with a gene encoding Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP or Red Fluorescent Protein (RFP. Co-infection of flies with red and green fluorescent parental trypanosomes produced yellow fluorescent hybrids, which were easily visualized in the fly salivary glands. Yellow trypanosomes were not seen in midgut or proventricular samples and first appeared in the glands as epimastigotes as early as 13 days after fly infection. Cloned progeny originating from individual salivary glands had yellow, red, green or no fluorescence and were confirmed as hybrids by microsatellite, molecular karyotype and kinetoplast (mitochondrial DNA analyses. Hybrid clones showed biparental inheritance of both nuclear and kinetoplast genomes. While segregation and reassortment of the reporter genes and microsatellite alleles were consistent with Mendelian inheritance, flow cytometry measurement of DNA content revealed both diploid and polyploid trypanosomes among the hybrid progeny clones. Conclusion The strategy of using production of yellow hybrids

  18. Calcium regulates the expression of a Dictyostelium discoideum asparaginyl tRNA synthetase gene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyoti K Jaiswal; Vidyanand Nanjundiah

    2003-12-01

    In a screen for calcium-regulated gene expression during growth and development of Dictyostelium discoideum we have identified an asparaginyl tRNA synthetase (ddAsnRS) gene, the second tRNA synthetase gene identified in this organism. The ddAsnRS gene shows many unique features. One, it is repressed by lowering cellular calcium, making it the first known calcium-regulated tRNA synthetase. Two, despite the calcium-dependence, its expression is unaltered during the cell cycle, making this the first D. discoideum gene to show a calcium-dependent but cell cycle phase-independent expression. Finally, the N-terminal domain of the predicted ddAsnRS protein shows higher sequence similarity to Glutaminyl tRNA synthetases than to other Asn tRNA synthetases. These unique features of the AsnRS from this primitive eukaryote not only point to a novel mechanism regulating the components of translation machinery and gene expression by calcium, but also hint at a link between the evolution of GlnRS and AsnRS in eukaryotes.

  19. Effect of estrogen administration on rat liver 2-5A synthetase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smekens, M; Dumont, J E; Degeyter, A; Galand, P

    1986-08-01

    Interferon-induced 2-5A synthetase is also present in various cells and tissues in the absence of any interferon treatment. The activity of this enzyme, which synthesizes a series of oligoadenylates, ppp(A2'p)n5'A (collectively referred to as 2-5A), was previously shown to vary with the growth status of liver tissue i.e., it decreased before and during the peak of DNA synthesis activity induced in rat liver by a two third hepatectomy. In the course of studies aimed at testing the hypothesis that 2-5A synthetase activity might exert negative control on normal cell growth and multiplication, we show here that a treatment of ovariectomized rats with a single dose of estradiol-17beta (100 micrograms/100 g body weight) induced a transient increase in the [3H]thymidine labelling index in the liver after 24 h and markedly decreased the 2-5A synthetase activity. A time course study revealed that 2-5A synthetase activity started to decrease after 3 h, reaching a minimal value (10% of the control level) after 12 h, then slowly increased to come back to control level at 48 h. These results, together with our similar data on regenerating liver, suggest that low 2-5A synthetase activity is permissive for acquisition of proliferative 'competence' by G0 cells. PMID:3730433

  20. Characterization of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase and leukotriene A4 synthetase from RBL-1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    5-lipoxygenase (LO) and leukotriene (LT) A4 synthetase from RBL-1 high speed (105,000 x g for 60 min) supernatants were partially purified by protein-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and characterized in detail. The partially purified preparation contained only 5-LO and LTA4 synthetase and was isolated from 12-LO, peroxidase and LTA4 hydrolase activities. Reaction products were separated by reversed phase HPLC and quantitated by absorption spectrophotometry and radiochemical detection. The enzyme preparation rapidly converted [14C]arachidonate to [14C]5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HPETE) and [14C]5,12-dihydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acids (diHETEs). The 5,12-diHETEs were primarily non-enzymatic breakdown products of LTA4 (e.g., 6-trans-LTB4 and 6-trans-12-epi-LTB4). Both the 5-LO and LTA4 synthetase activities were Ca2+- and ATP-dependent. For both enzyme activities, the CA2+ stimulation required the presence of ATP. The fatty acid hydroperoxides, 5-,12-, and 15-HPETE, both stimulated ([ 3 μM]) 5-LO and LTA4 synthetase activities. The rapid isolation and subsequent characterization of 5-LO and LTA4 synthetase provide the bases for the further understanding of the role of the LO pathway in biological processes

  1. The effect of glial glutamine synthetase inhibition on recognition and temporal memories in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Deepika; Tripathi, Shweta; Qureshi, Munazah F; Tripathi, Shweta; Pandey, Swati; Singh, Gunjan; Kumar, Tankesh; Mir, Fayaz A; Jha, Sushil K

    2014-02-01

    The glutamate neurotransmitter is intrinsically involved in learning and memory. Glial glutamine synthetase enzyme synthesizes glutamine, which helps maintain the optimal neuronal glutamate level. However, the role of glutamine synthetase in learning and memory remains unclear. Using associative trace learning task, we investigated the effects of methionine sulfoximine (MSO) (glutamine synthetase inhibitor) on recognition and temporal memories. MSO and vehicle were injected (i.p.) three hours before training in separate groups of male Wistar rats (n=11). Animals were trained to obtain fruit juice after following a set of sequential events. Initially, house-light was presented for 15s followed by 5s trace interval. Thereafter, juice was given for 20s followed by 20s inter-presentation interval. A total of 75 presentations were made over five sessions during the training and testing periods. The average number of head entries to obtain juice per session and during individual phases at different time intervals was accounted as an outcome measure of recognition and temporal memories. The total head entries in MSO and vehicle treated animals were comparable on training and testing days. However, it was 174.90% (p=0.08), 270.61% (pGlutamine synthetase inhibition did not induce recognition memory deficit, while temporal memory was altered, suggesting that glutamine synthetase modulates some aspects of mnemonic processes.

  2. Glutamine Synthetase Sensitivity to Oxidative Modification during Nutrient Starvation in Prochlorococcus marinus PCC 9511.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Donaldson, Robert P; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Diez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase plays a key role in nitrogen metabolism, thus the fine regulation of this enzyme in Prochlorococcus, which is especially important in the oligotrophic oceans where this marine cyanobacterium thrives. In this work, we studied the metal-catalyzed oxidation of glutamine synthetase in cultures of Prochlorococcus marinus strain PCC 9511 subjected to nutrient limitation. Nitrogen deprivation caused glutamine synthetase to be more sensitive to metal-catalyzed oxidation (a 36% increase compared to control, non starved samples). Nutrient starvation induced also a clear increase (three-fold in the case of nitrogen) in the concentration of carbonyl derivatives in cell extracts, which was also higher (22%) upon addition of the inhibitor of electron transport, DCMU, to cultures. Our results indicate that nutrient limitations, representative of the natural conditions in the Prochlorococcus habitat, affect the response of glutamine synthetase to oxidative inactivating systems. Implications of these results on the regulation of glutamine synthetase by oxidative alteration prior to degradation of the enzyme in Prochlorococcus are discussed.

  3. Interdomain and Intermodule Organization in Epimerization Domain Containing Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Hung; Li, Kunhua; Guntaka, Naga Sandhya; Bruner, Steven D

    2016-08-19

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases are large, complex multidomain enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of a wide range of peptidic natural products. Inherent to synthetase chemistry is the thioester templated mechanism that relies on protein/protein interactions and interdomain dynamics. Several questions related to structure and mechanism remain to be addressed, including the incorporation of accessory domains and intermodule interactions. The inclusion of nonproteinogenic d-amino acids into peptide frameworks is a common and important modification for bioactive nonribosomal peptides. Epimerization domains, embedded in nonribosomal peptide synthetases assembly lines, catalyze the l- to d-amino acid conversion. Here we report the structure of the epimerization domain/peptidyl carrier protein didomain construct from the first module of the cyclic peptide antibiotic gramicidin synthetase. Both holo (phosphopantethiene post-translationally modified) and apo structures were determined, each representing catalytically relevant conformations of the two domains. The structures provide insight into domain-domain recognition, substrate delivery during the assembly line process, in addition to the structural organization of homologous condensation domains, canonical players in all synthetase modules. PMID:27294598

  4. Regulation of the activity of the Bacillus licheniformis A5 glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, T J; Bernlohr, R W

    1981-10-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase activity by positive and negative effectors of enzyme activity singularly and in combinations was studied by using a homogeneous enzyme preparation from Bacillus licheniformis A5. Phosphorylribosyl pyrophosphate at concentrations greater than 2mM stimulated glutamine synthetase activity by approximately 70%. The concentration of phosphorylribosyl pyrophosphate required for half-maximal stimulation of enzyme activity was 0.4 mM. Results obtained from studies of fractional inhibition of glutamine synthetase activity were consistent with the presence of one allosteric site for glutamine binding (apparent I0.5, 2.2mM) per active enzyme unit at a glutamate concentration of 50 mM. At a glutamate concentration of 30 mM or less, the data were consistent with the enzyme containing two binding sites for glutamine (one of which was an allosteric site with an apparent I0.5 of 0.4 mM). Bases on an analysis of the response of glutamine synthetase activity to positive and negative effectors in vitro and to the intracellular concentration of these effectors in vivo, the primary modulators of glutamine synthetase activity in B. licheniformis A5 appear to be glutamine and alanine (apparent I0.5, 5.2mM). PMID:6169702

  5. Glutamine Synthetase Sensitivity to Oxidative Modification during Nutrient Starvation in Prochlorococcus marinus PCC 9511.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Donaldson, Robert P; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Diez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase plays a key role in nitrogen metabolism, thus the fine regulation of this enzyme in Prochlorococcus, which is especially important in the oligotrophic oceans where this marine cyanobacterium thrives. In this work, we studied the metal-catalyzed oxidation of glutamine synthetase in cultures of Prochlorococcus marinus strain PCC 9511 subjected to nutrient limitation. Nitrogen deprivation caused glutamine synthetase to be more sensitive to metal-catalyzed oxidation (a 36% increase compared to control, non starved samples). Nutrient starvation induced also a clear increase (three-fold in the case of nitrogen) in the concentration of carbonyl derivatives in cell extracts, which was also higher (22%) upon addition of the inhibitor of electron transport, DCMU, to cultures. Our results indicate that nutrient limitations, representative of the natural conditions in the Prochlorococcus habitat, affect the response of glutamine synthetase to oxidative inactivating systems. Implications of these results on the regulation of glutamine synthetase by oxidative alteration prior to degradation of the enzyme in Prochlorococcus are discussed. PMID:26270653

  6. Glutamine Synthetase Sensitivity to Oxidative Modification during Nutrient Starvation in Prochlorococcus marinus PCC 9511.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Gómez-Baena

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase plays a key role in nitrogen metabolism, thus the fine regulation of this enzyme in Prochlorococcus, which is especially important in the oligotrophic oceans where this marine cyanobacterium thrives. In this work, we studied the metal-catalyzed oxidation of glutamine synthetase in cultures of Prochlorococcus marinus strain PCC 9511 subjected to nutrient limitation. Nitrogen deprivation caused glutamine synthetase to be more sensitive to metal-catalyzed oxidation (a 36% increase compared to control, non starved samples. Nutrient starvation induced also a clear increase (three-fold in the case of nitrogen in the concentration of carbonyl derivatives in cell extracts, which was also higher (22% upon addition of the inhibitor of electron transport, DCMU, to cultures. Our results indicate that nutrient limitations, representative of the natural conditions in the Prochlorococcus habitat, affect the response of glutamine synthetase to oxidative inactivating systems. Implications of these results on the regulation of glutamine synthetase by oxidative alteration prior to degradation of the enzyme in Prochlorococcus are discussed.

  7. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A., E-mail: merritt@u.washington.edu [Medical Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa, (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine.

  8. Methylmercury alters glutathione homeostasis by inhibiting glutaredoxin 1 and enhancing glutathione biosynthesis in cultured human astrocytoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Stephan; Mailloux, Ryan J; Chan, Hing Man

    2016-08-10

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxin that binds strongly to thiol residues on protein and low molecular weight molecules like reduced glutathione (GSH). The mechanism of its effects on GSH homeostasis particularly at environmentally relevant low doses is not fully known. We hypothesized that exposure to MeHg would lead to a depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) and an accumulation of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) leading to alterations in S-glutathionylation of proteins. Our results showed exposure to low concentrations of MeHg (1μM) did not significantly alter GSH levels but increased GSSG levels by ∼12-fold. This effect was associated with a significant increase in total cellular glutathione content and a decrease in GSH/GSSG. Immunoblot analyses revealed that proteins involved in glutathione synthesis were upregulated accounting for the increase in cellular glutathione. This was associated an increase in cellular Nrf2 protein levels which is required to induce the expression of antioxidant genes in response to cellular stress. Intriguingly, we noted that a key enzyme involved in reversing protein S-glutathionylation and maintaining glutathione homeostasis, glutaredoxin-1 (Grx1), was inhibited by ∼50%. MeHg treatment also increased the S-glutathionylation of a high molecular weight protein. This observation is consistent with the inhibition of Grx1 and elevated H2O2 production however; contrary to our original hypothesis we found few S-glutathionylated proteins in the astrocytoma cells. Collectively, MeHg affects multiple arms of glutathione homeostasis ranging from pool management to protein S-glutathionylation and Grx1 activity. PMID:27180086

  9. Melatonin and nitric oxide modulate glutathione content and glutathione reductase activity in sunflower seedling cotyledons accompanying salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harmeet; Bhatla, Satish C

    2016-09-30

    The present findings demonstrate significant modulation of total glutathione content, reduced glutathione (GSH) content, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) content, GSH/GSSG ratio and glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2) activity in dark-grown seedling cotyledons in response to salt-stress (120 mM NaCl) in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings. A differential spatial distribution of GR activity (monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) imaging) is also evident. Melatonin and nitric oxide (NO) differentially ameliorate salt stress effect by modulating GR activity and GSH content in seedling cotyledons. Total glutathione content (GSH + GSSG) exhibit a seedling age-dependent increase in the cotyledons, more so in salt-stressed conditions and when subjected to melatonin treatment. Seedlings raised in presence of 15 μM of melatonin exhibit significant increase in GR activity in cotyledon homogenates (10,000 g supernatant) coinciding with significant increase in GSH content. GSSG content and GSH/GSSG ratio also increased due to melatonin treatment. A correlation is thus evident in NaCl-sensitized modulation of GSH content and GR activity by melatonin. GSH content is down regulated by NO provided as 250 μM of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) although total glutathione content remained in similar range. A reversal of response (enhanced total glutathione accumulation) by NO scavenger (cPTIO) highlights the critical role of NO in modulating glutathione homeostasis. SNP lowers the activity of hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (HIOMT) - a regulatory enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis in control seedlings whereas its activity is upregulated in salt-stressed seedling cotyledons. Melatonin content of seedling cotyledons is also modulated by NO. NO and melatonin thus seem to modulate GR activity and GSH content during seedling growth under salt stress. PMID:27432590

  10. Reduced glutathione as a persistence indicator of alien plants of the Amelancheir family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Dolgova

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available It was proved that glutathione is an important indicator of the vegetation condition and persistence. According to the amount of glutathione the studied mespilus species are adapted to the environmental conditions. Increase of the glutathione amount is caused by some abiotic factors, e.g. temperature. Some differences of the glutathione content may be explained by the plants species patterns.

  11. Interactions of alpha beta-unsaturated carbonyl compounds with the glutathione-related biotransformation system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iersel, van M.L.P.S.

    1998-01-01

    IntroductionModulation of glutathione-related biotransformation steps may play a role in important phenomena as anticarcinogenicity and multidrug resistance. Glutathione-related biotransformation comprises three main aspects i.e. glutathione, the glutathione S-transferases and the m

  12. Antimalarial Benzoxaboroles Target Plasmodium falciparum Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoiki, Ebere; Palencia, Andres; Guo, Denghui; Ahyong, Vida; Dong, Chen; Li, Xianfeng; Hernandez, Vincent S; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Choi, Wai; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jennifer; Cooper, Roland; Alley, M R K; Freund, Yvonne R; DeRisi, Joseph; Cusack, Stephen; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2016-08-01

    There is a need for new antimalarials, ideally with novel mechanisms of action. Benzoxaboroles have been shown to be active against bacteria, fungi, and trypanosomes. Therefore, we investigated the antimalarial activity and mechanism of action of 3-aminomethyl benzoxaboroles against Plasmodium falciparum Two 3-aminomethyl compounds, AN6426 and AN8432, demonstrated good potency against cultured multidrug-resistant (W2 strain) P. falciparum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 310 nM and 490 nM, respectively) and efficacy against murine Plasmodium berghei infection when administered orally once daily for 4 days (90% effective dose [ED90], 7.4 and 16.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively). To characterize mechanisms of action, we selected parasites with decreased drug sensitivity by culturing with stepwise increases in concentration of AN6426. Resistant clones were characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Three generations of resistant parasites had polymorphisms in the predicted editing domain of the gene encoding a P. falciparum leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS; PF3D7_0622800) and in another gene (PF3D7_1218100), which encodes a protein of unknown function. Solution of the structure of the P. falciparum LeuRS editing domain suggested key roles for mutated residues in LeuRS editing. Short incubations with AN6426 and AN8432, unlike artemisinin, caused dose-dependent inhibition of [(14)C]leucine incorporation by cultured wild-type, but not resistant, parasites. The growth of resistant, but not wild-type, parasites was impaired in the presence of the unnatural amino acid norvaline, consistent with a loss of LeuRS editing activity in resistant parasites. In summary, the benzoxaboroles AN6426 and AN8432 offer effective antimalarial activity and act, at least in part, against a novel target, the editing domain of P. falciparum LeuRS.

  13. Expression of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 reflects the state of villus architecture in human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gassler, Nikolaus; Kopitz, Jürgen; Tehrani, Arman;

    2004-01-01

    . Screening of antibodies from a hybridoma library led to the identification of an acyl-CoA synthetase 5-specific monoclonal antibody. Protein synthesis, mRNA expression, and the enzyme activity of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 were studied by several methods in human small intestinal tissues with Crohn's disease...

  14. Continuous recording of long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetase activity using fluorescently labeled bovine serum albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Erland J.F.; Nystrøm, Birthe T.

    2001-01-01

    acyl-Coenzyme A, synthetase, activity assay, fluorescence recording, fatty acid probe, serum albumin, hydroxycoumarin, detergent, micelles, Pseudomonas fragi, rat liver microsomes......acyl-Coenzyme A, synthetase, activity assay, fluorescence recording, fatty acid probe, serum albumin, hydroxycoumarin, detergent, micelles, Pseudomonas fragi, rat liver microsomes...

  15. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason W.; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2015-10-20

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  16. An archaeal tRNA-synthetase complex that enhances aminoacylation under extreme conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Jaric, Jelena; Hausmann, Corinne D;

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play an integral role in protein synthesis, functioning to attach the correct amino acid with its cognate tRNA molecule. AaRSs are known to associate into higher-order multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complexes (MSC) involved in archaeal and eukaryotic translation...... the catalytic efficiency of serine attachment to tRNA, but had no effect on the activity of MtArgRS. Further, the most pronounced improvements in the aminoacylation activity of MtSerRS induced by MtArgRS were observed under conditions of elevated temperature and osmolarity. These data indicate that......, although the precise biological role remains largely unknown. To gain further insights into archaeal MSCs, possible protein-protein interactions with the atypical Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus seryl-tRNA synthetase (MtSerRS) were investigated. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed arginyl-tRNA...

  17. Binding of divalent magnesium by Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of binding of the substrates Mg x ATP and ribose 5-phosphate as well as Mg2+ to the enzyme 5-phospho-D-ribosyl (alpha-1-diphosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli has been analyzed. By use of the competive inhibitors of ATP and ribose 5-phosphate binding, alpha,beta-methylene ATP...... to the binding of substrates and products indicated a role of Mg2+ in preparing the active site of phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase for binding of the highly phosphorylated ligands Mg x ATP and phosphoribosyl diphosphate, as evaluated by analysis of the effects of the inhibitors adenosine and ribose 1...... in competition with enzyme bound Mg2+. Ligand binding studies showed that 1 mol of Mg x ATP was bound per mol of phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase subunit, which indicated that the allosteric sites of the multimeric enzyme were not made up by inactive catalytic sites....

  18. Identification of autoantibodies to tyrosil-tRNA synthetase in heart disfunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryabenko D. V.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the levels of specific autoantibodies against tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and its individual modules in the blood serum of people with heart failure caused by dilated cardiomyopathy, myocarditis and ischemic heart disease compared with healthy donors. Methods. Recombinant proteins were obtained using bacterial strains transformed with appropriate plasmid vectors and were purified by chromatography on Ni-NTA-agarose. The levels of specific autoantibodies were investigated by ELISA. Results. The increased levels of autoantibodies specific to tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, its N-terminal catalytic module and non-catalytic C-module, were found in the blood serum of patients, compared with healthy donors. Conclusions. The results obtained demonstrate the possible role of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase in adaptive changes of the myocardium in response to stress factors.

  19. Induction of Glutathione and Glutathione S-transferase in Several Crops with the Treatment of Acetochlor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Gang; TAO Bo; WANG Yu-li; WANG Qiu-xia; LIU Hui

    2003-01-01

    The response of glutathione(GSH) content and glutathione S-transferease(GST) activity to the acetochlor in roots and shoots of the maize ‘Dongnong248',the sorghum ‘Aoza No.2' and millet‘Yugu' was evaluated.The concentrations of pre-emergence acetochlor causing a 50% inhibition of plant shoot height were 25 μmol*L-1 for the tolerant‘Dongnong248' maize,5 μmol*L-1 for the sensitive ‘Aoza No.2' sorghum and 0.5 μmol*L-1 for the very sensitive ‘Yugu'millet.Pre-treatment with 10 μmol*L-1 of acetochlor induced the root GST activities and nonprotein thiol content of all three cultivars.The induction of root GST activities and nonprotein thiol content compared to controls are observed on the fourth day after acetochlor treatment,The extents of activity and content increase from the higher to the lower were:tolerant maize cultivar ‘Dongnong248'>sorghum cultivar‘Aoza No.2'>millet cultivar ‘Yugu'.The activities and contents induced in shoots were similar to that in roots,but the degrees of increase were less.Under different concentration treatment,the thiol content and GST activities increased with the herbicide concentration rising,then reached their peaks and began to decrease in all tested crop seedlings.The extent of induced GST activities and thiol content correlated well with differential cultivar resistance to acetochlor,so their protective mechanism appears to be strongly dependent on the endogenous levels of GSH and activities of GST.

  20. Synthesis of novel guttiferone A derivatives: in-vitro evaluation toward Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromentin, Yann; Gaboriaud-Kolar, Nicolas; Lenta, Bruno Ndjakou; Wansi, Jean Duplex; Buisson, Didier; Mouray, Elisabeth; Grellier, Philippe; Loiseau, Philippe M; Lallemand, Marie-Christine; Michel, Sylvie

    2013-07-01

    The catechol pharmacomodulation of the natural product guttiferone A, isolated from the Symphonia globulifera tree, led to the semisynthesis of a collection of twenty derivatives. The ester and ether derivatives of guttiferone A were evaluated for their anti-plasmodial, trypanocidal and anti-leishmanial activities. Some compounds described below have shown potent antiparasitic activity against Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani in a range from 1 to 5 μM. The evaluation of guttiferone A derivatives against VERO cells highlighted catechol modulations as an interesting tool to decrease the toxicity and keep the activity of this natural compound. The current study revealed new molecules as promising new antiparasitic drug candidates. PMID:23727538

  1. JBP2, a SWI2/SNF2-like protein, regulates de novo telomeric DNA glycosylation in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Rudo; Brand, Verena; Ekanayake, Dilrukshi K; Sweeney, Kate; DiPaolo, Courtney; Reznikoff, William S; Sabatini, Robert

    2007-11-01

    Synthesis of the modified thymine base, beta-d-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil or J, within telomeric DNA of Trypanosoma brucei correlates with the bloodstream form specific epigenetic silencing of telomeric variant surface glycoprotein genes involved in antigenic variation. In order to analyze the function of base J in the regulation of antigenic variation, we are characterizing the regulatory mechanism of J biosynthesis. We have recently proposed a model in which chromatin remodeling by a SWI2/SNF2-like protein (JBP2) regulates the developmental and de novo site-specific localization of J synthesis within bloodstream form trypanosome DNA. Consistent with this model, we now show that JBP2 (-/-) bloodstream form trypanosomes contain five-fold less base J and are unable to stimulate de novo J synthesis in newly generated telomeric arrays. PMID:17706299

  2. Differential expression of glycosomal and mitochondrial proteins in the two major life-cycle stages of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertommen, Didier; Van Roy, Joris; Szikora, Jean-Pierre; Rider, Mark H; Michels, Paul A M; Opperdoes, Fred R

    2008-04-01

    Label-free semi-quantitative differential three-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (3D-LC-MS/MS) was used to compare the glycosomal and mitochondrial proteomes of the bloodstream- and insect-form of Trypanosoma brucei. The abundance of glycosomal marker proteins identified in the two life-cycle stages corresponded well with the relative importance of biochemical pathways present in the glycosomes of the two stages and the peptide spectral count ratios of selected enzymes were in good agreement with published data about their enzymatic specific activities. This approach proved extremely useful for the generation of large scale proteomics data for the comparison of different life-cycle stages. Several proteins involved in oxidative stress protection, sugar-nucleotide synthesis, purine salvage, nucleotide-monophosphate formation and purine-nucleotide cycle were identified as glycosomal proteins. PMID:18242729

  3. Crystal structures of Trypanosoma brucei oligopeptidase B broaden the paradigm of catalytic regulation in prolyl oligopeptidase family enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Canning

    Full Text Available Oligopeptidase B cleaves after basic amino acids in peptides up to 30 residues. As a virulence factor in bacteria and trypanosomatid pathogens that is absent in higher eukaryotes, this is a promising drug target. Here we present ligand-free open state and inhibitor-bound closed state crystal structures of oligopeptidase B from Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. These (and related structures show the importance of structural dynamics, governed by a fine enthalpic and entropic balance, in substrate size selectivity and catalysis. Peptides over 30 residues cannot fit the enzyme cavity, preventing the complete domain closure required for a key propeller Asp/Glu to fix the catalytic His and Arg in the catalytically competent conformation. This size exclusion mechanism protects larger peptides and proteins from degradation. Similar bacterial prolyl endopeptidase and archael acylaminoacyl peptidase structures demonstrate this mechanism is conserved among oligopeptidase family enzymes across all three domains of life.

  4. Immunospecific immunoglobulins and IL-10 as markers for Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense late stage disease in experimentally infected vervet monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngotho, Maina; Kagira, J.M.; Jensen, Henrik Michael Elvang;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of IL-10 and immunoglobulin M (IgM) as biomarkers for staging HAT in vervet monkeys, a useful pathogenesis model for humans. METHODS: Vervet monkeys were infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and subsequently given sub-curative and curative treatment 28...... and 140 days post-infection (dpi) respectively. Matched serum and CSF samples were obtained at regular intervals and immunospecific IgM, immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IL-10 were quantified by ELISA. RESULTS: There was no detectable immunospecific IgM and IgG in the CSF before 49 dpi. CSF IgM and Ig...... followed a pattern that mimics the progression of the disease and may present reliable and useful biomarkers of the disease stage. Due to rapid decline, serum IgM and IL-10 are, additionally, potential biomarkers of the success of chemotherapy....

  5. Various mechanisms in cyclopeptide production from precursors synthesized independently of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenyan Xu; Liling Li; Liangcheng Du; Ninghua Tan

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of cyclopeptides have been discovered as products of ribosomal synthetic pathway.The biosynthetic study of these cyclopeptides has revealed interesting new mechanisms for cyclization.This review highlighted the recent discoveries in cyclization mechanisms for cyclopeptides synthesized independently of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases,including endopeptidase-catalyzed cyclization,intein-mediated cyclization,and peptide synthetase-catalyzed cyclization.This information may help to design hybrid ribosomal and non-ribosomal biosynthetic systems to produce novel cyclopeptides with various bioactivities.

  6. A cDNA clone from Zea mays endosperm sucrose synthetase mRNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Geiser, M.; Döring, H P; Wöstemeyer, J; Behrens, U.; Tillmann, E; Starlinger, P.

    1980-01-01

    A cDNA clone for maize endosperm sucrose synthetase of 62o nucleotide pairs length was obtained by cloning double stranded DNA obtained from the total maize endosperm poly(A) RNA in pBR322, and identifying the appropriate clone by hybrid-promoter translation. In Southern blotting to genomic BamHI-digested DNA, a single band only of approximately 20 Kb lights up, indicating that the sucrose synthetase gene is unique, or that closely linked copies are located on this DNA fragment.

  7. The regulation of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase revisited: role of 2-ketoglutarate in the regulation of glutamine synthetase adenylylation state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, P; Peliska, J A; Ninfa, A J

    1998-09-15

    The regulation of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (GS) by reversible adenylylation has provided one of the classical paradigms for signal transduction by cyclic cascades. Yet, many mechanistic features of this regulation remain to be elucidated. We examined the regulation of GS adenylylation state in a reconstituted system containing GS, adenylyltransferase (ATase), the PII signal transduction protein that controls ATase, and the uridylyltransferase/uridylyl-removing enzyme (UTase/UR), which has a role in regulating PII. In this reconstituted bicyclic cascade system, the adenylylation state of GS was regulated reciprocally by the small molecule effectors 2-ketoglutarate and glutamine at physiological effector concentrations. By examination of the individual regulatory monocycles and comparison to the bicyclic system and existing data, we could deduce that the only sensors of 2-ketoglutarate were PII and PII-UMP. At physiological conditions, we observed that the main role of 2-ketoglutarate in bringing about the deadenylylation of GS was to inhibit GS adenylylation, and this was due to the allosteric regulation of PII activity. Glutamine acted as an allosteric regulator of both ATase and UTase/UR. We also compared the regulation of GS adenylylation state to the regulation of phosphorylation state of the transcription factor NRI (NtrC) in a reconstituted bicyclic system containing NRI, the bifunctional kinase/phosphatase NRII (NtrB), PII, and the UTase/UR. This comparison indicated that, at a fixed 2-ketoglutarate concentration, the regulation of GS adenylylation state by glutamine was sharper and occurred at a higher concentration than did the regulation of NRI phosphorylation. The possible biological implications of this regulatory arrangement are discussed. PMID:9737857

  8. Crystal Structures of TbCatB and rhodesain, potential chemotherapeutic targets and major cysteine proteases of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain D Kerr

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma brucei is the etiological agent of Human African Trypanosomiasis, an endemic parasitic disease of sub-Saharan Africa. TbCatB and rhodesain are the sole Clan CA papain-like cysteine proteases produced by the parasite during infection of the mammalian host and are implicated in the progression of disease. Of considerable interest is the exploration of these two enzymes as targets for cysteine protease inhibitors that are effective against T. brucei. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We have determined, by X-ray crystallography, the first reported structure of TbCatB in complex with the cathepsin B selective inhibitor CA074. In addition we report the structure of rhodesain in complex with the vinyl-sulfone K11002. CONCLUSIONS: The mature domain of our TbCat*CA074 structure contains unique features for a cathepsin B-like enzyme including an elongated N-terminus extending 16 residues past the predicted maturation cleavage site. N-terminal Edman sequencing reveals an even longer extension than is observed amongst the ordered portions of the crystal structure. The TbCat*CA074 structure confirms that the occluding loop, which is an essential part of the substrate-binding site, creates a larger prime side pocket in the active site cleft than is found in mammalian cathepsin B-small molecule structures. Our data further highlight enhanced flexibility in the occluding loop main chain and structural deviations from mammalian cathepsin B enzymes that may affect activity and inhibitor design. Comparisons with the rhodesain*K11002 structure highlight key differences that may impact the design of cysteine protease inhibitors as anti-trypanosomal drugs.

  9. The orthologue of Sjogren's syndrome nuclear autoantigen 1 (SSNA1 in Trypanosoma brucei is an immunogenic self-assembling molecule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen P Price

    Full Text Available Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (PSS is a highly prevalent autoimmune disease, typically manifesting as lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands leading to chronically impaired lacrimal and salivary secretion. Sjögren's Syndrome nuclear autoantigen 1 (SSNA1 or NA14 is a major specific target for autoantibodies in PSS but the precise function and clinical relevance of this protein are largely unknown. Orthologues of the gene are absent from many of the commonly used model organisms but are present in Chlamyodomonas reinhardtii (in which it has been termed DIP13 and most protozoa. We report the functional characterisation of the orthologue of SSNA1 in the kinetoplastid parasite, Trypanosoma brucei. Both TbDIP13 and human SSNA1 are small coiled-coil proteins which are predicted to be remote homologues of the actin-binding protein tropomyosin. We use comparative proteomic methods to identify potential interacting partners of TbDIP13. We also show evidence that TbDIP13 is able to self-assemble into fibril-like structures both in vitro and in vivo, a property which may contribute to its immunogenicity. Endogenous TbDIP13 partially co-localises with acetylated α-tubulin in the insect procyclic stage of the parasite. However, deletion of the DIP13 gene in cultured bloodstream and procyclic stages of T. brucei has little effect on parasite growth or morphology, indicating either a degree of functional redundancy or a function in an alternative stage of the parasite life cycle.

  10. The spliceosomal snRNP core complex of Trypanosoma brucei: Cloning and functional analysis reveals seven Sm protein constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palfi, Zsofia; Lücke, Stephan; Lahm, Hans-Werner; Lane, William S.; Kruft, Volker; Bragado-Nilsson, Elisabeth; Séraphin, Bertrand; Bindereif, Albrecht

    2000-01-01

    Each of the trypanosome small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) U2, U4/U6, and U5, as well as the spliced leader (SL) RNP, contains a core of common proteins, which we have previously identified. This core is unusual because it is not recognized by anti-Sm Abs and it associates with an Sm-related sequence in the trypanosome small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). Using peptide sequences derived from affinity-purified U2 snRNP proteins, we have cloned cDNAs for five common proteins of 8.5, 10, 12.5, 14, and 15 kDa of Trypanosoma brucei and identified them as Sm proteins SmF (8.5 kDa), -E (10 kDa), -D1 (12.5 kDa), -G (14 kDa), and -D2 (15 kDa), respectively. Furthermore, we found the trypanosome SmB (T. brucei) and SmD3 (Trypanosoma cruzi) homologues through database searches, thus completing a set of seven canonical Sm proteins. Sequence comparisons of the trypanosome proteins revealed several deviations in highly conserved positions from the Sm consensus motif. We have identified a network of specific heterodimeric and -trimeric Sm protein interactions in vitro. These results are summarized in a model of the trypanosome Sm core, which argues for a strong conservation of the Sm particle structure. The conservation extends also to the functional level, because at least one trypanosome Sm protein, SmG, was able to specifically complement a corresponding mutation in yeast. PMID:10900267

  11. Structural characterization of CYP51 from Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei bound to the antifungal drugs posaconazole and fluconazole.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Kuang Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas Disease is the leading cause of heart failure in Latin America. Current drug therapy is limited by issues of both efficacy and severe side effects. Trypansoma cruzi, the protozoan agent of Chagas Disease, is closely related to two other major global pathogens, Leishmania spp., responsible for leishmaniasis, and Trypansoma brucei, the causative agent of African Sleeping Sickness. Both T. cruzi and Leishmania parasites have an essential requirement for ergosterol, and are thus vulnerable to inhibitors of sterol 14alpha-demethylase (CYP51, which catalyzes the conversion of lanosterol to ergosterol. Clinically employed anti-fungal azoles inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis in fungi, and specific azoles are also effective against both Trypanosoma and Leishmania parasites. However, modification of azoles to enhance efficacy and circumvent potential drug resistance has been problematic for both parasitic and fungal infections due to the lack of structural insights into drug binding. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have determined the crystal structures for CYP51 from T. cruzi (resolutions of 2.35 A and 2.27 A, and from the related pathogen T. brucei (resolutions of 2.7 A and 2.6 A, co-crystallized with the antifungal drugs fluconazole and posaconazole. Remarkably, both drugs adopt multiple conformations when binding the target. The fluconazole 2,4-difluorophenyl ring flips 180 degrees depending on the H-bonding interactions with the BC-loop. The terminus of the long functional tail group of posaconazole is bound loosely in the mouth of the hydrophobic substrate binding tunnel, suggesting that the major contribution of the tail to drug efficacy is for pharmacokinetics rather than in interactions with the target. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The structures provide new insights into binding of azoles to CYP51 and mechanisms of potential drug resistance. Our studies define in structural detail the CYP51 therapeutic target in T. cruzi, and

  12. Glutathione-dependent responses of plants to drought: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Labudda

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Water is a renewable resource. However, with the human population growth, economic development and improved living standards, the world’s supply of fresh water is steadily decreasing and consequently water resources for agricultural production are limited and diminishing. Water deficiency is a significant problem in agriculture and increasing efforts are currently being made to understand plant tolerance mechanisms and to develop new tools (especially molecular that could underpin plant breeding and cultivation. However, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of plant water deficit tolerance are not fully understood, and the data available is incomplete. Here, we review the significance of glutathione and its related enzymes in plant responses to drought. Firstly, the roles of reduced glutathione and reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio, are discussed, followed by an extensive discussion of glutathione related enzymes, which play an important role in plant responses to drought. Special attention is given to the S-glutathionylation of proteins, which is involved in cell metabolism regulation and redox signaling in photosynthetic organisms subjected to abiotic stress. The review concludes with a brief overview of future perspectives for the involvement of glutathione and related enzymes in drought stress responses.

  13. Glutathione synthesis is compromised in erythrocytes from individuals with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwanath eVenketaraman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated that the levels of enzymes responsible for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH such as glutathione synthase (GSS, glutamate-cysteine ligase-catalytic subunit (GCLC and glutathione reductase (GSR were significantly reduced in the red blood cells (RBCs isolated from individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and this reduction correlated with decreased levels of intracellular GSH. GSH content in RBCs can be used as a marker for increased overall oxidative stress and immune dysfunctions caused by HIV infection. Our data supports our hypothesis that compromised levels of GSH in HIV infected individuals’ is due to decreased levels of GSH-synthetic enzymes. The role of GSH in combating oxidative stress and improving the functions of immune cells in HIV patients’ indicates the benefit of an antioxidant supplement which can reduce the cellular damage and promote the functions of immune cells.

  14. Characterization of 2,4-Diamino-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyrimidin-5-yl Ureido Based Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei FolD and Testing for Antiparasitic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadsforth, Thomas C; Pinto, Andrea; Luciani, Rosaria; Tamborini, Lucia; Cullia, Gregorio; De Micheli, Carlo; Marinelli, Luciana; Cosconati, Sandro; Novellino, Ettore; Lo Presti, Leonardo; Cordeiro da Silva, Anabela; Conti, Paola; Hunter, William N; Costi, Maria P

    2015-10-22

    The bifunctional enzyme N(5),N(10)-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase/cyclo hydrolase (FolD) is essential for growth in Trypanosomatidae. We sought to develop inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei FolD (TbFolD) as potential antiparasitic agents. Compound 2 was synthesized, and the molecular structure was unequivocally assigned through X-ray crystallography of the intermediate compound 3. Compound 2 showed an IC50 of 2.2 μM, against TbFolD and displayed antiparasitic activity against T. brucei (IC50 49 μM). Using compound 2, we were able to obtain the first X-ray structure of TbFolD in the presence of NADP(+) and the inhibitor, which then guided the rational design of a new series of potent TbFolD inhibitors. PMID:26322631

  15. Role of glutathione in cancer progression and chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Nicola; Ricciarelli, Roberta; Nitti, Mariapaola; Marengo, Barbara; Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Marinari, Umberto Maria; Domenicotti, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in a multitude of cellular processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, and disturbances in GSH homeostasis are involved in the etiology and progression of many human diseases including cancer. While GSH deficiency, or a decrease in the GSH/glutathione disulphide (GSSG) ratio, leads to an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress implicated in the progression of cancer, elevated GSH levels increase the antioxidant capacity and the resistance to oxidative stress as observed in many cancer cells. The present review highlights the role of GSH and related cytoprotective effects in the susceptibility to carcinogenesis and in the sensitivity of tumors to the cytotoxic effects of anticancer agents.

  16. Balneotherapy and platelet glutathione metabolism in type II diabetic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Agishi, Yuko

    1996-09-01

    Effects of balneotherapy on platelet glutathione metabolism were investigated in 12 type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. Levels of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) on admission were well correlated with those of fasting plasma glucose (FPG; r=0.692, P150 mg/dl), the value decreased ( Pmetabolism was partially improved by 4 weeks balneotherapy, an effect thought to be dependent on the control status of plasma glucose levels. It is suggested that balneotherapy is beneficial for patients whose platelet antioxidative defense system is damaged, such as those with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease.

  17. Glutathione, glutathione disulfide, and S-glutathionylated proteins in cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustarini, Daniela; Galvagni, Federico; Tesei, Anna; Farolfi, Alberto; Zanoni, Michele; Pignatta, Sara; Milzani, Aldo; Marone, Ilaria M; Dalle-Donne, Isabella; Nassini, Romina; Rossi, Ranieri

    2015-12-01

    The analysis of the global thiol-disulfide redox status in tissues and cells is a challenging task since thiols and disulfides can undergo artificial oxido-reductions during sample manipulation. Because of this, the measured values, in particular for disulfides, can have a significant bias. Whereas this methodological problem has already been addressed in samples of red blood cells and solid tissues, a reliable method to measure thiols and disulfides in cell cultures has not been previously reported. Here, we demonstrate that the major artifact occurring during thiol and disulfide analysis in cultured cells is represented by glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and S-glutathionylated proteins (PSSG) overestimation, due to artificial oxidation of glutathione (GSH) during sample manipulation, and that this methodological problem can be solved by the addition of N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) immediately after culture medium removal. Basal levels of GSSG and PSSG in different lines of cultured cells were 3-5 and 10-20 folds higher, respectively, when the cells were processed without NEM. NEM pre-treatment also prevented the artificial reduction of disulfides that occurs during the pre-analytical phase when cells are exposed to an oxidant stimulus. In fact, in the absence of NEM, after medium removal, GSH, GSSG and PSSG levels restored their initial values within 15-30 min, due to the activity of reductases and the lack of the oxidant. The newly developed protocol was used to measure the thiol-disulfide redox status in 16 different line cells routinely used for biomedical research both under basal conditions and after treatment with disulfiram, a thiol-specific oxidant (0-200 μM concentration range). Our data indicate that, in most cell lines, treatment with disulfiram affected the levels of GSH and GSSG only at the highest concentration. On the other hand, PSSG levels increased significantly also at the lower concentrations of the drug, and the rise was remarkable (from 100 to 1000

  18. Evaluation of the In Vitro Efficacy of Artemisia annua, Rumex abyssinicus, and Catha edulis Forsk Extracts in Cancer and Trypanosoma brucei Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Netsanet Worku; Andualem Mossie; August Stich; Arwid Daugschies; Susanne Trettner; Hemdan, Nasr Y. A.; Gerd Birkenmeier

    2013-01-01

    The current drugs against sleeping sickness are derived from cancer chemotherapeutic approaches. Herein, we aimed at evaluating the in vitro effect of alcoholic extracts of Artemisia annua (AMR), Rumex abyssinicus (RMA), and Catha edulis Forsk (CEF) on proliferation/viability of 1321N1 astrocytoma, MCF-7 breast cancer, THP-1 leukemia, and LNCaP, Du-145, and PC-3 prostate cancer cells and on Trypanosoma brucei cells. Proliferation of tumor cells was evaluated by WST-1 assay and viability/behav...

  19. Effect of experimental single Ancylostoma caninum and mixed infections of Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma congolense on the humoural immune response to anti-rabies vaccination in dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi; Anene Boniface Maduka

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To determine the effect of Ancylostoma caninum (A. caninum) and trypanosome parasites on the immune response to vaccination in dogs in endemic environments. Methods:Sixteen dogs for the experiment were grouped into 4 of 4 members each. Group I was the uninfected control one, and GPII was infected with A. caninum; GPIII was infected with A. caninum/Trypanosoma congolense (T. congolense), and GPIV was infected with Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei)/A. caninum. The dogs were first vaccinated with antirabies vaccine before infecting GPII, GPIII and GPIV with A. caninum which were done 4 weeks after vaccination. By 2-week post-vaccination, trypanosome parasites were superimposed on both GPIII and GPIV. A secondary vaccination was given to GPI, GPII, GPIII, and GPIV by Week 12 of the experiment (4 weeks post treatment). Results:The prepatent period was (3.00 ± 1.40) days, in the conjunct infection of T. brucei/A. caninum. It was (9.00 ± 1.10) days, in conjunct T. congolense/A. caninum. The prepatent period of A. caninum was (14.0 ± 2.0) days in the single A. caninum group and (13.0 ± 1.0) days in the conjunct trypanosome/A. caninum. At the 1st week after vaccination, the antibody titer in all the vaccinated groups (GPI, GPII, GPIII, and GPIV) significantly increased (P Conclusions:It was therefore concluded that A. caninum, T. brucei and T. congolense induced immunosuppression in antirabies vaccination in dogs.

  20. Absence of acetohydroxy acid synthetase in a clinical isolate of Neisseria gonorrhoeae requiring isoleucine and valine.

    OpenAIRE

    Lerner, S A; Friedman, E L; Dudek, E J; Kominski, G; Bohnhoff, M.; Morello, J A

    1980-01-01

    A clinical isolate of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with an unusual growth requirement for isoleucine and valine lacked the activity of acetohydroxy acid synthetase, one of the enzymes required for the biosynthesis of these amino acids. A spontaneous mutant which no longer required isoleucine and valine had acquired this enzymatic activity.

  1. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RAT GENE FOR CARBAMOYLPHOSPHATE SYNTHETASE-I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENHOFF, MJB; VANDEZANDE, LPWGM; DINGEMANSE, MA; DAS, AT; LABRUYERE, W; MOORMAN, AFM; CHARLES, R; LAMERS, WH; Jacobus Mgn Van De Zande, Louis

    1995-01-01

    Carbamoylphosphate synthetase I (CbmPS) is first expressed in rat hepatocytes shortly before birth. After birth, expression of CbmPS gradually becomes confined to the hepatocytes surrounding the portal veins. To obtain insight into the spatiotemporal regulation of its expression, the rat CbmPS gene

  2. A novel therapeutic target for peripheral nerve injury-related diseases: aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Sun Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AminoARSs are essential enzymes that perform the first step of protein synthesis. Beyond their original roles, AminoARSs possess non-canonical functions, such as cell cycle regulation and signal transduction. Therefore, AminoARSs represent a powerful pharmaceutical target if their non-canonical functions can be controlled. Using AminoARSs-specific primers, we screened mRNA expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn of rats with peripheral nerve injury created by sciatic nerve axotomy. Of 20 AminoARSs, we found that phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase beta chain (FARSB, isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase (IARS and methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MARS mRNA expression was increased in spinal dorsal horn neurons on the injured side, but not in glial cells. These findings suggest the possibility that FARSB, IARS and MARS, as a neurotransmitter, may transfer abnormal sensory signals after peripheral nerve damage and become a new target for drug treatment.

  3. Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase activity affects growth and riboflavin production in Ashbya gossypii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revuelta José L

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP is a central compound for cellular metabolism and may be considered as a link between carbon and nitrogen metabolism. PRPP is directly involved in the de novo and salvage biosynthesis of GTP, which is the immediate precursor of riboflavin. The industrial production of this vitamin using the fungus Ashbya gossypii is an important biotechnological process that is strongly influenced by substrate availability. Results Here we describe the characterization and manipulation of two genes of A. gossypii encoding PRPP synthetase (AGR371C and AGL080C. We show that the AGR371C and AGL080C gene products participate in PRPP synthesis and exhibit inhibition by ADP. We also observed a major contribution of AGL080C to total PRPP synthetase activity, which was confirmed by an evident growth defect of the Δagl080c strain. Moreover, we report the overexpression of wild-type and mutant deregulated isoforms of Agr371cp and Agl080cp that significantly enhanced the production of riboflavin in the engineered A. gossypii strains. Conclusion It is shown that alterations in PRPP synthetase activity have pleiotropic effects on the fungal growth pattern and that an increase in PRPP synthetase enzymatic activity can be used to enhance riboflavin production in A. gossypii.

  4. The PRPP Synthetase Spectrum: What Does it Demonstrate About Nucleotide Syndromes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duley, J.A.; Christodoulou, J.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de

    2011-01-01

    Defects in X-linked phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase 1 (PRPS1) manifest as follows: (1) PRS-I enzyme "superactivity" (gain-of-function mutations affecting allosteric regions); (2) PRS-I overexpression (which may be linked to miRNA mutation); (3) severe PRS-I deficiency/Arts syndrome (missense

  5. Draft Genome Sequences of Five Novel Polyketide Synthetase-Containing Mouse Escherichia coli Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Anthony; Shen, Zeli; Feng, Yan; Garcia, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    We report herein the draft genomes of five novel Escherichia coli strains isolated from surveillance and experimental mice housed at MIT and the Whitehead Institute and describe their genomic characteristics in context with the polyketide synthetase (PKS)-containing pathogenic E. coli strains NC101, IHE3034, and A192PP.

  6. 2'-phosphodiesterase and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activities in the lowest metazoans, sponge [porifera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saby, Emilie; Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Justesen, Just;

    2009-01-01

    Sponges [porifera], the most ancient metazoans, contain modules related to the vertebrate immune system, including the 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS). The components of the antiviral 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2–5A) system (OAS, 2′-Phosphodiesterase (2′-PDE) and RNAse L) of vertebrates have not...

  7. Characterization of a Salmonella typhimurium mutant defective in phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochimsen, Bjarne U.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Garber, Bruce B.;

    1985-01-01

    This study describes the isolation and characterization of a mutant (strain GP122) of Salmonella typhimurium with a partial deficiency of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase activity. This strain was isolated in a purE deoD gpt purine auxotroph by a procedure designed to select guanosin...

  8. Association of IDDM and attenuated response of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase to yellow fever vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnevie-Nielsen, V; Larsen, M L; Frifelt, J J;

    1989-01-01

    Basal and yellow fever vaccination-induced 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (2',5'A) activity was determined in blood mononuclear cells (peripheral blood lymphocytes [PBLs]) from insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and matched control subjects. The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine repre...

  9. Purification and properties of phosphoribosyl-diphosphate synthetase from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnvig, Kirsten; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Switzer, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Phosphoribosyl-diphosphate (PPRibP) synthetase from Bacillus subtiliis has been purified to near homogeneity from an Escherichia coli Δprs strain bearing the cloned B. subtilis prs gene, encoding PPRibP synthentase, on a plasmid. The Mr of the subunit (34,000) and its amino-terminal amino acid...

  10. Tandem heterocyclization domains in a nonribosomal peptide synthetase essential for siderophore biosynthesis in Vibrio anguillarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Lorenzo, M.; Stork, M.; Naka, H.; Tolmasky, M.E.; Crosa, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Anguibactin, the siderophore produced by Vibrio anguillarum 775, is synthesized via a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) mechanism. Most of the genes required for anguibactin biosynthesis are harbored by the pJM1 plasmid. Complete sequencing of this plasmid identified an orf encoding a 108 kDa p

  11. Glutamine synthetase sequence evolution in the mycobacteria and their use as molecular markers for Actinobacteria speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiid Ian JF

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the gene encoding for glutamine synthetase (glnA is essential in several organisms, multiple glnA copies have been identified in bacterial genomes such as those of the phylum Actinobacteria, notably the mycobacterial species. Intriguingly, previous reports have shown that only one copy (glnA1 is essential for growth in M. tuberculosis, while the other copies (glnA2, glnA3 and glnA4 are not. Results In this report it is shown that the glnA1 and glnA2 encoded glutamine synthetase sequences were inherited from an Actinobacteria ancestor, while the glnA4 and glnA3 encoded GS sequences were sequentially acquired during Actinobacteria speciation. The glutamine synthetase sequences encoded by glnA4 and glnA3 are undergoing reductive evolution in the mycobacteria, whilst those encoded by glnA1 and glnA2 are more conserved. Conclusion Different selective pressures by the ecological niche that the organisms occupy may influence the sequence evolution of glnA1 and glnA2 and thereby affecting phylogenies based on the protein sequences they encode. The findings in this report may impact the use of similar sequences as molecular markers, as well as shed some light on the evolution of glutamine synthetase in the mycobacteria.

  12. Redox status affects the catalytic activity of glutamyl-tRNA synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, Assaf; Banerjee, Rajat; de Armas, Merly;

    2010-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA synthetases (GluRS) provide Glu-tRNA for different processes including protein synthesis, glutamine transamidation and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. Many organisms contain multiple GluRSs, but whether these duplications solely broaden tRNA specificity or also play additional roles...

  13. Regulation of Amidase Formation in Mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO Lacking Glutamine Synthetase Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Herst, Patricia M.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    The formation of amidase was studied in mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO lacking glutamine synthetase activity. It appeared that catabolite repression of amidase synthesis by succinate was partially relieved when cellular growth was limited by glutamine. Under these conditions, a correlation

  14. Functions of Glutamine Synthetase Isoforms in the Nitrogen Metabolism of Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Miao

    ;2 which encode different isoforms of the key N-assimilatory enzyme cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1). In the single knockout mutant gln1;2 and in the double knockout mutant gln1;1:gln1;2, seed germination and seedling establishment were distinctly impaired. The negative effect of Gln1;2 deficiency...

  15. Changes in Activities of Glutamine Synthetase during Grain Filling and Their Relation to Rice Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Four japonica rice varieties differed in cooking and eating qualities were used in a pot experiment to study the relationship between the activities of glutamine synthetase during grain filling and rice quality. The activities of glutamine synthetase gradually increased and then declined as a single peak curve in the course of grain filling. The 15th day after heading was a turning point, before which the enzymatic activities in the inferior rice varieties with high protein content were higher than those in the superior rice varietie with low protein content, and after which it was converse. The activity of glutamine synthetase in grain was correlated with the taste meter value, peak viscosity and breakdown negatively at the early stage of grain filling whereas positively at the middle and late stages. Moreover, it was correlated with the protein content of rice grain and setback positively at the early stage and negatively at the middle and late stages. The correlation degree varied with the course of grain filling. From 15 days to 20 days after heading was a critical stage, in which the direction of correlation between the activity of glutamine synthetase and taste meter value and RVA properties of rice changed.

  16. Glutamine synthetase subunit mixing and regulation in Bacillus subtilis partial diploids.

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, A; Odebralski, J; Zahler, Stefan; Korman, R Z; Aronson, A I

    1982-01-01

    A specialized transducing phage, SP beta c2 dglnA2, of Bacillus subtilis was used to construct partial diploids with various glutamine auxotrophs. The overproduction of manganese-stimulated glutamine synthetase no longer occurred in the diploids. The kinetics of heat inactivation of the enzyme extracted from two diploids suggests that there was subunit mixing.

  17. Structure of the gene encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase (prsA>) in Salmonella typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bower, Stanley G.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Switzer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The Salmonella typhimurium gene prsA, which encodes phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase, has been cloned, and the nucleotide sequence has been determined. The amino acid sequence derived from the S. typhimurium gene is 99% identical to the derived Escherichia coli sequence and 47% identical to...

  18. EFFECT OF UP-REGULATION OF S-ADOMET SYNTHETASE ON TAXOL-INDUCED APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN BREAST CANCER CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Lirong; Zheng Shu; Fan Weimin; Zhang Suzhan

    1998-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the gene regulation of taxolinduced apoptosis. Methods: Northern blot hybridization,enzyme activity assay of S-AdoMet synthetase and flow cytometry were performed in the investigation of expression in the Mrna level and biological action of SAdoMet synthetase in taxol-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cell line (Bcap 37). Results: Up-regulation of S-AdoMet synthetase expression was resulted by taxol treatment and the expression peaked at 48hours. Moreover,the up-regulation of S-AdoMet synthetase was associated with cytotoxicity of antimicrotubule agents including taxol and colchicine.Inhibition rate of S-AdoMet synthetase activity by 1%DMSO was 34% in taxol-treated cells and 14% in taxoluntreated cells compared to control groups, respectively.Posttreatment with 1% DMSO following pretreatment with individual antitumor agent for 3 hrs promoted apoptotic cell death of taxol-,colchicine-,and adriamycintreated Bcap37 cells. Conclusion : The induction of apoptosis enhanced by post-treatment with DMSO in taxol-treated cells is probably linked to its inhibition on enzyme activity of S-AdoMet synthetase ,suggesting that the increased expression of S-AdoMet synthetase possibly plays an important role in protecting cells from DNA fragmentation in taxol-induced apoptosis.

  19. The effect of portacaval anastomosis on the expression of glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase in perivenous hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Robin; Levillain, Oliver; Brosnan, John T; Araneda, Silvia; Brosnan, Margaret E

    2013-05-01

    There is functional zonation of metabolism across the liver acinus, with glutamine synthetase restricted to a narrow band of cells around the terminal hepatic venules. Portacaval anastomosis, where there is a major rerouting of portal blood flow from the portal vein directly to the vena cava bypassing the liver, has been reported to result in a marked decrease in the activity of glutamine synthetase. It is not known whether this represents a loss of perivenous hepatocytes or whether there is a specific loss of glutamine synthetase. To answer this question, we have determined the activity of glutamine synthetase and another enzyme from the perivenous compartment, ornithine aminotransferase, as well as the immunochemical localization of both glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase in rats with a portacaval shunt. The portacaval shunt caused a marked decrease in glutamine synthetase activity and an increase in ornithine aminotransferase activity. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase proteins maintained their location in the perivenous cells. These results indicate that there is no generalized loss of perivenous hepatocytes, but rather, there is a significant alteration in the expression of these proteins and hence metabolism in this cell population.

  20. Analysis of glutathione and glutathione disulfide in whole cells and mitochondria by postcolumn derivatization high-performance liquid chromatography with ortho-phthalaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, K J; Therriault, H; Wagner, J R

    1999-10-01

    A method is described for the detection of glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) based on a HPLC postcolumn reaction with ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPT) at pH 12 followed by fluorescence detection. Although similar methods have been reported, the high pH of the postcolumn reaction adds considerable selectivity and sensitivity to the measurement of GSH and glutathione disulfide. The limit of detection approaches 100 fmol, which is sufficient to detect whole-cell glutathione disulfide in 10,000 cells or mitochondrial glutathione disulfide in 20 million cells. Using this method, glutathione and glutathione disulfide were measured in human lymphocytes, granulocytes, and cultured Jurkat T cells, as well as in the corresponding samples of mitochondria. The percentage of glutathione disulfide to total glutathione in whole-cell extracts was approximately 1%. In contrast, the percentage was relatively high in mitochondria, with the mitochondria of granulocytes having the highest (25%) followed by those of lymphocytes (15%) and finally by cultured Jurkat T cells (9%). This method extends the analysis of glutathione and glutathione disulfide to mitochondria obtained from a relatively small number of cells. PMID:10527505

  1. [Serological evidence of the existence of a wild reservoir of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in the Pendjari biosphere reservation in the Republic of Benin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedegbe, B; Verhulst, A; Van Meirvenne, N; Pandey, V S; Doko, A

    1992-06-01

    In the national park of Pendjari, situated in the North-West of Benin, 91 wild animals, belonging to seven species, were darted. Thick and thin blood smears were examined for trypanosomes and plasma for trypanolytic antibodies against 6 antigenic variants of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. Parasites were found in 13.92% and trypanolytic antibodies in 20.88% of the samples. A total of 28.57% of animals were positive by at least one of the two test systems used. Morphologically Trypanosoma congolense, T. vivax and T. brucei were identified. Overall prevalence was 40% in Adenota kob (n: 50), 13.63% in Alcelaphus buselaphus (n: 22), 10% in Hippotragus equinus (n: 10), 33% in Kobus defassa (n: 3), 0% in Phacochoerus aethiopicus (n: 3) and in Syncerus caffer (n: 2). The only lion (Panthera leo) examined was serologically positive. The results indicate that the wild animals are reservoirs of animal trypanosomes and suggest that among them Adenota kob and Panthera leo are carriers of T. brucei gambiense, one of the etiological aspects of human trypanosomiasis. PMID:1417158

  2. Regulation of the intersubunit ammonia tunnel in Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Resto, Melissa; Chang, Andrew; Gerratana, Barbara (SSRL); (Maryland)

    2012-08-31

    Glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase is an essential enzyme and a validated drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtuNadE). It catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} from NaAD{sup +} (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide) at the synthetase active site and glutamine hydrolysis at the glutaminase active site. An ammonia tunnel 40 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) long allows transfer of ammonia from one active site to the other. The enzyme displays stringent kinetic synergism; however, its regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the present paper, we report the structures of the inactive glutaminase C176A variant in an apo form and in three synthetase-ligand complexes with substrates (NaAD{sup +}/ATP), substrate analogue {l_brace}NaAD{sup +}/AMP-CPP (adenosine 5'-[{alpha},{beta}-methylene]triphosphate){r_brace} and intermediate analogues (NaAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi), as well as the structure of wild-type mtuNadE in a product complex (NAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi/glutamate). This series of structures provides snapshots of the ammonia tunnel during the catalytic cycle supported also by kinetics and mutagenesis studies. Three major constriction sites are observed in the tunnel: (i) at the entrance near the glutaminase active site; (ii) in the middle of the tunnel; and (iii) at the end near the synthetase active site. Variation in the number and radius of the tunnel constrictions is apparent in the crystal structures and is related to ligand binding at the synthetase domain. These results provide new insight into the regulation of ammonia transport in the intermolecular tunnel of mtuNadE.

  3. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli. Properties of the purified enzyme and primary structure of the prs gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Harlow, Kenneth W.; King, Cheryl J.;

    1986-01-01

    Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (P-Rib-PP) synthetase of Escherichia coli has been purified to near homogeneity from a strain harboring the prs gene, encoding P-Rib-PP synthetase, on a multicopy plasmid. Analysis of the enzyme showed that it required inorganic phosphate for activity and for stability...... of ADP. The nucleotide sequence of the E. coli prs gene has been determined and the coding segment established. The deduced amino acid sequence of P-Rib-PP synthetase contained 314 amino acid residues and the molecular weight was calculated as 34,060. The initiation site of transcription was determined...

  4. Glutathione S-Transferase Isoenzymes from Streptomyces griseus

    OpenAIRE

    Dhar, Kajari; Dhar, Alok; Rosazza, John P. N.

    2003-01-01

    An inducible, cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (GST) was purified from Streptomyces griseus. GST isoenzymes with pI values of 6.8 and 7.9 used standard GST substrates including 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. GST had subunit and native Mrs of 24 and 48, respectively, and the N-terminal sequence SMILXYWDIIRGLPAH.

  5. Electrochemical evaluation of glutathione S-transferase kinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), are a family of enzymes belonging to the phase II metabolism that catalyse the formation of thioether conjugates between the endogenous tripeptide glutathione and xenobiotic compounds. The voltammetric behaviour of glutathione (GSH), 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), as well as the catalytic conjugation reaction of GSH to CDNB by GST was investigated at room temperature, T=298.15K (25°C), at pH6.5, for low concentration of substrates and enzyme, using differential pulse (DP) voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode. Only GSH can be oxidized; a sensitivity of 0.14nA/μM and a LOD of 6.4μM were obtained. The GST kinetic parameter electrochemical evaluation, in relation to its substrates, GSH and CDNB, using reciprocal Michaelis-Menten and Lineweaver-Burk double reciprocal plots, was determined. A value of KM~100μM was obtained for either GSH or CDNB, and Vmax varied between 40 and 60μmol/min per mg of GST.

  6. METAL-INDUCED INHIBITION OF GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glutathione S-transferases comprise a group of multi-functional enzymes involved in the biotransformation/detoxication of a broad spectrum of hydrophobic compounds bearing an electrophilic center. The enzymes facilitate the nucleophilic attack of the -SH group of reduced glut...

  7. Glutathione peroxidases of the potato cyst nematode Globodera Rostochiensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, J.T.; Reavy, B.; Smant, G.; Prior, A.E.

    2004-01-01

    We report the cloning and characterisation of full-length DNAs complementary to RNA (cDNAs) encoding two glutathione peroxidases (GpXs) from a plant parasitic nematode, the potato cyst nematode (PCN) Globodera rostochiensis. One protein has a functional signal peptide that targets the protein for se

  8. 21 CFR 862.1365 - Glutathione test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione test system. 862.1365 Section 862.1365 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  9. Rational design of an organometallic glutathione transferase inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, W.H.; Parker, L.J.; De Luca, A.; Juillerat-Jeanneret, L.; Morton, C.J.; LoBello, M.; Parker, M.W.; Dyson, P.J.; (ISIC)

    2010-08-17

    A hybrid organic-inorganic (organometallic) inhibitor was designed to target glutathione transferases. The metal center is used to direct protein binding, while the organic moiety acts as the active-site inhibitor. The mechanism of inhibition was studied using a range of biophysical and biochemical methods.

  10. DOES GLUTATHIONE PLAY A ROLE IN FREEZING TOLERANCE OF PLANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, C.E.E.; De Kok, Luit J.; Kuiper, P.J.C.

    1992-01-01

    During low temperature hardening enhanced levels of glutathione (GSH) are generally observed in plant shoots and are often related to the development of freezing tolerance. The present communication shows that there is no direct relation between an increased GSH content and freezing tolerance of lea

  11. Expression of the glutathione enzyme system of human colon mucosa by localisation, gender and age.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoensch, H.; Peters, W.H.M.; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Kirch, W.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The glutathione S-transferases (GST) can metabolise endogenous and exogenous toxins and carcinogens by catalysing the conjugation of diverse electrophiles with reduced glutathione (GSH). Variations of GST enzyme activity could influence the susceptibility of developing cancers in certain

  12. Preparation of the multienzyme system gramicidin S-synthetase 2 with an aqueous three-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, A; Simonis, M; von Döhren, H

    1987-06-19

    The distribution of gramicidin S-synthetase activity from disrupted cells suspended in aqueous two- and three-phase systems was investigated. An optimized three-phase system containing 5% dextran, 8% Ficoll, 11% PEG and 6.7% disrupted cells was found to be effective in extracting gramicidin S-synthetase activity. The activity yield achieved was higher in comparison to other preparation methods, and the subsequent purification steps were greatly facilitated. The time needed for the preparation of the labile gramicidin S-synthetase was considerably reduced. The combination of the aqueous phase extraction with chromatographic methods yielded 19 mg gramicidin S-synthetase 2 in essentially pure form from 30 g (wet weight) of cells.

  13. Glutathione supplementation suppresses muscle fatigue induced by prolonged exercise via improved aerobic metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    AOI, WATARU; Ogaya, Yumi; Takami, Maki; Konishi, Toru; Sauchi, Yusuke; Park, Eun Young; Wada, Sayori; Sato, Kenji; Higashi, Akane

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds Glutathione is an endogenous redox couple in animal cells and plays important roles in antioxidant defense and detoxification, although it is unknown if oral glutathione supplementation affects exercise-induced physiological changes. The present study investigated the effect of glutathione intake on exercise-induced muscle metabolism and fatigue in mice and humans. Methods ICR mice were divided into 4 groups: sedentary control, sedentary supplemented with glutathione (2.0%, 5 μL/g...

  14. Glutathione supplementation suppresses muscle fatigue induced by prolonged exercise via improved aerobic metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    AOI, WATARU; Ogaya, Yumi; Takami, Maki; Konishi, Toru; Sauchi, Yusuke; Park, Young Y.; Wada, Sayori; Sato, Kenji; Higashi, Akane

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds: Glutathione is an endogenous redox couple in animal cells and plays important roles in antioxidant defense and detoxification, although it is unknown if oral glutathione supplementation affects exercise-induced physiological changes. The present study investigated the effect of glutathione intake on exercise-induced muscle metabolism and fatigue in mice and humans. Methods: ICR mice were divided into 4 groups: sedentary control, sedentary supplemented with glutathione (2.0%, 5μL/...

  15. Evidence that the mitochondrial leucyl tRNA synthetase (LARS2) gene represents a novel type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    hart, Leen M; Hansen, Torben; Rietveld, Ingrid;

    2005-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that a mutation in the mitochondrial DNA-encoded tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene is associated with type 2 diabetes. One of the consequences of this mutation is a reduced aminoacylation of tRNA(Leu(UUR)). In this study, we have examined whether variants in the leucyl tRNA synthetase...... first report of association between an aminoacyl tRNA synthetase gene and disease. Our results further highlight the important role of mitochondria in glucose homeostasis....

  16. Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes pesL and pes1 Are Essential for Fumigaclavine C Production in Aspergillus fumigatus

    OpenAIRE

    O'Hanlon, Karen A.; Gallagher, Lorna; Schrettl, Markus; Jöchl, Christoph; Kavanagh, Kevin; Larsen, Thomas O.; Doyle, Sean

    2012-01-01

    The identity of metabolites encoded by the majority of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in the opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, remains outstanding. We found that the nonribosomal peptide (NRP) synthetases PesL and Pes1 were essential for fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, the end product of the complex ergot alkaloid (EA) pathway in A. fumigatus. Deletion of either pesL (ΔpesL) or pes1 (Δpes1) resulted in complete loss of fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, relatively increased production...

  17. Properties of asparagine synthetase in asparagine-independent variants of Jensen rat sarcoma cells induced by 5-azacytidine.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama, R H; Arfin, S M; Harris, M.

    1983-01-01

    Jensen rat sarcoma cells in culture require L-asparagine for growth and lack detectable levels of asparagine synthetase. Cultures exposed for 24 h to graded concentrations of 5-azacytidine give rise to asparagine-independent variants in high frequency. These prototrophs are stable phenotypically whether maintained in the presence or absence of L-asparagine. Asparagine synthetase activity in several variant clones was uniform in thermolability and several kinetic parameters, as well as in immu...

  18. Compositions of orthogonal lysyl-tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J. Christopher; Wu, Ning; Santoro, Stephen; Schultz, Peter G

    2014-03-11

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal lysyl-tRNAs, orthogonal lysyl-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of lysyl-tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate homoglutamines into proteins are provided in response to a four base codon. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with homoglutamines using these orthogonal pairs.

  19. Reduced density of glutamine synthetase immunoreactive astrocytes in different cortical areas in major depression but not in bipolar I disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Gert eBernstein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence for disturbances within the glutamate system in patients with affective disorders, which involve disruptions of the glutamate-glutamine- cycle. The mainly astroglia-located enzyme glutamine synthetase catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to form glutamine, thus playing a central role in glutamate and glutamine homoeostasis. However, glutamine synthetase is also expressed in numerous oligodendrocytes, another class of glial cells implicated in mood disorder pathology. To learn more about the role of glia-associated glutamine synthetase in mental illnesses, we decided to find out if numerical densities of glial cells immunostained for the enzyme protein differ between subjects with major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder and psychically healthy control cases. Counting of glutamine synthetase expressing astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in eight cortical and two subcortical brain regions of subjects with mood disorder (N=14, bipolar disorder (N=15 and controls (N=16 revealed that in major depression the densities of astrocytes were significantly reduced in some cortical but not subcortical gray matter areas, whereas no changes were found for oligodendrocytes. In bipolar disorder no alterations of glutamine synthetase-immunoreactive glia were found. From our findings we conclude that (1 glutamine synthetase expressing astrocytes are prominently involved in glutamate-related disturbances in major depression, but not in bipolar disorder and (2 glutamine synthetase expressing oligodendrocytes, though being present in significant numbers in prefrontal cortical areas, play a minor (if any role in mood disorder pathology. The latter assumption is supported by findings of others showing that - at least in the mouse brain cortex - glutamine synthetase immunoreactive oligodendroglial cells are unable to contribute to the glutamate-glutamine cycle due to the complete lack of amino acid transporters

  20. Glutathione metabolism modeling: a mechanism for liver drug-robustness and a new biomarker strategy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Geenen; F.B. du Preez; J.L. Snoep; A.J. Foster; S. Sarda; J.G. Kenna; I.D. Wilson; H.V. Westerhoff

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glutathione metabolism can determine an individual's ability to detoxify drugs. To increase understanding of the dynamics of cellular glutathione homeostasis, we have developed an experiment-based mathematical model of the kinetics of the glutathione network. This model was used to simul

  1. Age-related changes of the redox state of glutathione in plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiu-lin; WANG Shu-ren; DING Yi; PENG Ke-jun; LIN Xia; QIAO Xiao-rong; LIU Yi-lun; WU Chen-heng

    2005-01-01

    @@ Glutathione (GSH) is the principal non-protein thiol responsible for maintaining intracellular redox status and protecting cells against oxidative/nitrosative stresses. In the biological system, some GSH is bound to proteins, and others exist freely, including the reduced glutathione and oxidized glutathione (GSSG).

  2. Study of Oxidation of Glutathione Treated with Hypochlorous Acid by Capillary Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) method was developed for the separation and quantification of reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and glutathione sulphonic acid (GSO3H). Baseline separation was obtained within five minutes. The effects of reaction time and molar ratio of hypochlorous acid (HOCI) to GSH on the oxidation of GSH were investigated.

  3. THE EFFECT OF IRISQUINONE ON THE GLUTATHIONE SYSTEM AND MRP EXPRESSION OF CISPLATIN-RESISTANT HUMAN LUNG ADENOCARCINOMA CELL LINE (A549DDP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG; li

    2001-01-01

    12]Chuman Y, Chen Z-S, Sumizawa T, et al. Characterization of the ATP-dependent LTC4 transporter in cisplatin-resistant human KB cells [J]. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1996; 226:158.[13]Ishikawa T, Bso J, Yamane Y, et al. Coordinated induction of MRP/GS-X pump and g-glutamylcysteine synthetase by heavy metals in human leukemia cells [J]. J Biol Chem 1996; 271:14981.[14]Hida T, Kuwabate M, Ahigoshe Y, et al. Serum glutathion-s-transferase-p level as a tumor marker for non-small cell lung cancer [J]. Cancer 1994; 73:1377.[15]Lai GM, Ozols RF, Young RC, et al. Effect of glutathione on DNA repair in isplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cell lines [J]. JNCI 1989; 81:535.

  4. Selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases——A highlight of the role of phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase in protection against oxidative damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Since the discovery that selenium is an integral component of the active site of the mammalian glu-tathione peroxidase, four members of the glutathione peroxidase family have been characterised: classical cellular glu-tathione peroxidase, gastrointestinal glutathione peroxidase; plasma glutathione peroxidase and phospholipid hydroperox-ide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx). They are products of different genes and have different specificities on hydrogenperoxide and lipid hydroperoxides, the latter are generated by free radicals and can damage cell membranes and disruptcellular functions. Interestingly, PHGPx is not only active on phospholipid hydroperoxide, but also active on thyminehydroperoxide (a model compound for DNA damage) and protein hydroperoxides. This review highlights the role ofPHGPx in protection against peroxidative damage of lipids, protein and DNA.

  5. eth-1, the Neurospora crassa locus encoding S-adenosylmethionine synthetase: Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and in vivo overexpression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mautino, M.R.; Barra, J.L.; Rosa, A.L. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina)

    1996-03-01

    Intense biochemical and genetic research on the eth-1 mutant of Neurospora crassa suggested that this locus might encode S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (S-Adomet synthetase). We have used protoplast transformation and phenotypic rescue of a thermosensitive phenotype associated with the eth-1 mutation to clone the locus. Nucleotide sequence analysis demonstrated that it encodes S-Adomet synthetase. Homology analyses of prokaryotic, fungal and higher eukaryotic S-Adomet synthetase polypeptide sequences show a remarkable evolutionary conservation of the enzyme. N. crassa strains carrying S-Adomet synthetase coding sequences fused to a strong heterologous promoter were constructed to assess the phenotypic consequences of in vivo S-Adomet synthetase overexpression. Studies of growth rates and microscopic examination of vegetative development revealed that normal growth and morphogenesis take place in N. crassa even at abnormally high levels of cellular S-Adomet. The degree of cytosine methylation of a naturally methylated genomic region was dependent on the cellular levels of S-Adomet. We conclude that variation in S-Adomet levels in N. crassa cells, which in addition to the status of genomic DNA methylation could modify the flux of other S-Adomet-dependent metabolic pathways, does not affect growth rate or morphogenesis. 90 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Lipid peroxide, glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzyme (GST) in mixed zooplankton from the North-West Coast of India: Implication for the use of environmental monitoring

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rathod, V.; Patil, B.A.

    themselves from these highly reactive compounds, cells have their own interdependent antioxidative defense system, composed of protective proteins removing the ROS/RNS. These chemical radicals are normally metabolized by the enzymatic antioxidants... glutathione (GSH) as a cofactor. Intracellular homeostasis cycling is regulated by antioxidants, mainly by thiol-containing molecules such as GSH. Glutathione reductase (GR) has important role in maintaining intracellular status of GSH. Glutathione S...

  7. A single amino acid substitution in the group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor abolishes TLF-1 binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E DeJesus

    Full Text Available Critical to human innate immunity against African trypanosomes is a minor subclass of human high-density lipoproteins, termed Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1. This primate-specific molecule binds to a haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR on the surface of susceptible trypanosomes, initiating a lytic pathway. Group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT, escaping TLF-1 killing due to reduced uptake. Previously, we found that group 1 T. b. gambiense HpHbR (TbgHpHbR mRNA levels were greatly reduced and the gene contained substitutions within the open reading frame. Here we show that a single, highly conserved amino acid in the TbgHpHbR ablates high affinity TLF-1 binding and subsequent endocytosis, thus evading TLF-1 killing. In addition, we show that over-expression of TbgHpHbR failed to rescue TLF-1 susceptibility. These findings suggest that the single substitution present in the TbgHpHbR directly contributes to the reduced uptake and resistance to TLF-1 seen in these important human pathogens.

  8. A single amino acid substitution in the group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor abolishes TLF-1 binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJesus, E; Kieft, R; Albright, B; Stephens, N A; Hajduk, S L

    2013-01-01

    Critical to human innate immunity against African trypanosomes is a minor subclass of human high-density lipoproteins, termed Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1). This primate-specific molecule binds to a haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) on the surface of susceptible trypanosomes, initiating a lytic pathway. Group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), escaping TLF-1 killing due to reduced uptake. Previously, we found that group 1 T. b. gambiense HpHbR (TbgHpHbR) mRNA levels were greatly reduced and the gene contained substitutions within the open reading frame. Here we show that a single, highly conserved amino acid in the TbgHpHbR ablates high affinity TLF-1 binding and subsequent endocytosis, thus evading TLF-1 killing. In addition, we show that over-expression of TbgHpHbR failed to rescue TLF-1 susceptibility. These findings suggest that the single substitution present in the TbgHpHbR directly contributes to the reduced uptake and resistance to TLF-1 seen in these important human pathogens. PMID:23637606

  9. Molecular evidence of a Trypanosoma brucei gambiense sylvatic cycle in the human african trypanosomiasis foci of Equatorial Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordon-Obras, Carlos; Rodriguez, Yasmin Fermin; Fernandez-Martinez, Amalia; Cano, Jorge; Ndong-Mabale, Nicolas; Ncogo-Ada, Policarpo; Ndongo-Asumu, Pedro; Aparicio, Pilar; Navarro, Miguel; Benito, Agustin; Bart, Jean-Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Gambiense trypanosomiasis is considered an anthroponotic disease. Consequently, control programs are generally aimed at stopping transmission of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T. b. gambiense) by detecting and treating human cases. However, the persistence of numerous foci despite efforts to eliminate this disease questions this strategy as unique tool to pursue the eradication. The role of animals as a reservoir of T. b. gambiense is still controversial, but could partly explain maintenance of the infection at hypo-endemic levels. In the present study, we evaluated the presence of T. b. gambiense in wild animals in Equatorial Guinea. The infection rate ranged from 0.8% in the insular focus of Luba to more than 12% in Mbini, a focus with a constant trickle of human cases. The parasite was detected in a wide range of animal species including four species never described previously as putative reservoirs. Our study comes to reinforce the hypothesis that animals may play a role in the persistence of T. b. gambiense transmission, being particularly relevant in low transmission settings. Under these conditions the integration of sustained vector control and medical interventions should be considered to achieve the elimination of gambiense trypanosomiasis.

  10. Molecular evidence of a Trypanosoma brucei gambiense sylvatic cycle in the human african trypanosomiasis foci of Equatorial Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordon-Obras, Carlos; Rodriguez, Yasmin Fermin; Fernandez-Martinez, Amalia; Cano, Jorge; Ndong-Mabale, Nicolas; Ncogo-Ada, Policarpo; Ndongo-Asumu, Pedro; Aparicio, Pilar; Navarro, Miguel; Benito, Agustin; Bart, Jean-Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Gambiense trypanosomiasis is considered an anthroponotic disease. Consequently, control programs are generally aimed at stopping transmission of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T. b. gambiense) by detecting and treating human cases. However, the persistence of numerous foci despite efforts to eliminate this disease questions this strategy as unique tool to pursue the eradication. The role of animals as a reservoir of T. b. gambiense is still controversial, but could partly explain maintenance of the infection at hypo-endemic levels. In the present study, we evaluated the presence of T. b. gambiense in wild animals in Equatorial Guinea. The infection rate ranged from 0.8% in the insular focus of Luba to more than 12% in Mbini, a focus with a constant trickle of human cases. The parasite was detected in a wide range of animal species including four species never described previously as putative reservoirs. Our study comes to reinforce the hypothesis that animals may play a role in the persistence of T. b. gambiense transmission, being particularly relevant in low transmission settings. Under these conditions the integration of sustained vector control and medical interventions should be considered to achieve the elimination of gambiense trypanosomiasis. PMID:26257727

  11. Screening of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in Domestic Livestock and Tsetse Flies from an Insular Endemic Focus (Luba, Equatorial Guinea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordon-Obras, Carlos; García-Estébanez, Carmen; Ndong-Mabale, Nicolás; Abaga, Simón; Ndongo-Asumu, Pedro; Benito, Agustín; Cano, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Background Sleeping sickness is spread over 36 Sub-Saharan African countries. In West and Central Africa, the disease is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, which produces a chronic clinical manifestation. The Luba focus (Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea) has not reported autochthonous sleeping sickness cases since 1995, but given the complexity of the epidemiological cycle, the elimination of the parasite in the environment is difficult to categorically ensure. Methodology/Principal Findings The aim of this work is to assess, by a molecular approach (Polymerase Chain Reaction, PCR), the possible permanence of T. b. gambiense in the vector (Glossina spp.) and domestic fauna in order to improve our understanding of the epidemiological situation of the disease in an isolated focus considered to be under control. The results obtained show the absence of the parasite in peridomestic livestock but its presence, although at very low rate, in the vector. On the other hand, interesting entomological data highlight that an elevated concentration of tsetse flies was observed in two out of the ten villages considered to be in the focus. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that even in conditions of apparent control, a complete parasite clearance is difficult to achieve. Further investigations must be focused on animal reservoirs which could allow the parasites to persist without leading to human cases. In Luba, where domestic livestock are scarcer than other foci in mainland Equatorial Guinea, the epidemiological significance of wild fauna should be assessed to establish their role in the maintenance of the infection. PMID:20544031

  12. A pseudouridylation switch in rRNA is implicated in ribosome function during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikne, Vaibhav; Doniger, Tirza; Rajan, K Shanmugha; Bartok, Osnat; Eliaz, Dror; Cohen-Chalamish, Smadar; Tschudi, Christian; Unger, Ron; Hashem, Yaser; Kadener, Sebastian; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes devastating diseases in humans and animals in sub-Saharan Africa, undergoes a complex life cycle between the mammalian host and the blood-feeding tsetse fly vector. However, little is known about how the parasite performs most molecular functions in such different environments. Here, we provide evidence for the intriguing possibility that pseudouridylation of rRNA plays an important role in the capacity of the parasite to transit between the insect midgut and the mammalian bloodstream. Briefly, we mapped pseudouridines (Ψ) on rRNA by Ψ-seq in procyclic form (PCF) and bloodstream form (BSF) trypanosomes. We detected 68 Ψs on rRNA, which are guided by H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNA). The small RNome of both life cycle stages was determined by HiSeq and 83 H/ACAs were identified. We observed an elevation of 21 Ψs modifications in BSF as a result of increased levels of the guiding snoRNAs. Overexpression of snoRNAs guiding modification on H69 provided a slight growth advantage to PCF parasites at 30 °C. Interestingly, these modifications are predicted to significantly alter the secondary structure of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA suggesting that hypermodified positions may contribute to the adaption of ribosome function during cycling between the two hosts. PMID:27142987

  13. GMP synthase is essential for viability and infectivity of Trypanosoma brucei despite a redundant purine salvage pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiong; Leija, Christopher; Rijo-Ferreira, Filipa; Chen, Jun; Cestari, Igor; Stuart, Kenneth; Tu, Benjamin P; Phillips, Margaret A

    2015-09-01

    The causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma brucei, lacks de novo purine biosynthesis and depends on purine salvage from the host. The purine salvage pathway is redundant and contains two routes to guanosine-5'-monophosphate (GMP) formation: conversion from xanthosine-5'-monophosphate (XMP) by GMP synthase (GMPS) or direct salvage of guanine by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). We show recombinant T. brucei GMPS efficiently catalyzes GMP formation. Genetic knockout of GMPS in bloodstream parasites led to depletion of guanine nucleotide pools and was lethal. Growth of gmps null cells was only rescued by supraphysiological guanine concentrations (100 μM) or by expression of an extrachromosomal copy of GMPS. Hypoxanthine was a competitive inhibitor of guanine rescue, consistent with a common uptake/metabolic conversion mechanism. In mice, gmps null parasites were unable to establish an infection demonstrating that GMPS is essential for virulence and that plasma guanine is insufficient to support parasite purine requirements. These data validate GMPS as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of human African trypanosomiasis. The ability to strategically inhibit key metabolic enzymes in the purine pathway unexpectedly bypasses its functional redundancy by exploiting both the nature of pathway flux and the limited nutrient environment of the parasite's extracellular niche. PMID:26043892

  14. Probing the metabolic network in bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei using untargeted metabolomics with stable isotope labelled glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J Creek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics coupled with heavy-atom isotope-labelled glucose has been used to probe the metabolic pathways active in cultured bloodstream form trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Glucose enters many branches of metabolism beyond glycolysis, which has been widely held to be the sole route of glucose metabolism. Whilst pyruvate is the major end-product of glucose catabolism, its transamination product, alanine, is also produced in significant quantities. The oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway is operative, although the non-oxidative branch is not. Ribose 5-phosphate generated through this pathway distributes widely into nucleotide synthesis and other branches of metabolism. Acetate, derived from glucose, is found associated with a range of acetylated amino acids and, to a lesser extent, fatty acids; while labelled glycerol is found in many glycerophospholipids. Glucose also enters inositol and several sugar nucleotides that serve as precursors to macromolecule biosynthesis. Although a Krebs cycle is not operative, malate, fumarate and succinate, primarily labelled in three carbons, were present, indicating an origin from phosphoenolpyruvate via oxaloacetate. Interestingly, the enzyme responsible for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was shown to be essential to the bloodstream form trypanosomes, as demonstrated by the lethal phenotype induced by RNAi-mediated downregulation of its expression. In addition, glucose derivatives enter pyrimidine biosynthesis via oxaloacetate as a precursor to aspartate and orotate.

  15. Molecular Evidence of a Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Sylvatic Cycle in the Human African Trypanosomiasis Foci of Equatorial Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eCordon-Obras

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gambiense trypanosomiasis is considered an anthroponotic disease. Consequently, control programs are generally aimed at stopping transmission of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T. b. gambiense by detecting and treating human cases. However, the persistence of numerous foci despite efforts to eliminate this disease questions this strategy as unique tool to pursue the eradication. The role of animals as a reservoir of T. b. gambiense is still controversial, but could partly explain maintenance of the infection at hypo-endemic levels. In the present study, we evaluated the presence of T. b. gambiense in wild animals in Equatorial Guinea. The infection rate ranged from 0.8% in the insular focus of Luba to more than 12% in Mbini, a focus with a constant trickle of human cases. The parasite was detected in a wide range of animal species including four species never described previously as putative reservoirs. Our study comes to reinforce the hypothesis that animals may play a role in the persistence of T. b. gambiense transmission, being particularly relevant in low transmission settings. Under these conditions the integration of sustained vector control and medical interventions should be considered to achieve the elimination of Gambiense trypanosomiasis.

  16. A global comparison of the human and T. brucei degradomes gives insights about possible parasite drug targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan T Mashiyama

    Full Text Available We performed a genome-level computational study of sequence and structure similarity, the latter using crystal structures and models, of the proteases of Homo sapiens and the human parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Using sequence and structure similarity networks to summarize the results, we constructed global views that show visually the relative abundance and variety of proteases in the degradome landscapes of these two species, and provide insights into evolutionary relationships between proteases. The results also indicate how broadly these sequence sets are covered by three-dimensional structures. These views facilitate cross-species comparisons and offer clues for drug design from knowledge about the sequences and structures of potential drug targets and their homologs. Two protease groups ("M32" and "C51" that are very different in sequence from human proteases are examined in structural detail, illustrating the application of this global approach in mining new pathogen genomes for potential drug targets. Based on our analyses, a human ACE2 inhibitor was selected for experimental testing on one of these parasite proteases, TbM32, and was shown to inhibit it. These sequence and structure data, along with interactive versions of the protein similarity networks generated in this study, are available at http://babbittlab.ucsf.edu/resources.html.

  17. Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in Urine and Saliva Samples in Nonhuman Primate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maina Ngotho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is a vector-borne parasitic zoonotic disease. The disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is the most prevalent in Africa. Early diagnosis is hampered by lack of sensitive diagnostic techniques. This study explored the potential of loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP and polymerase chain reaction (PCR in the detection of T. b. gambiense infection in a vervet monkey HAT model. Six vervet monkeys were experimentally infected with T. b. gambiense IL3253 and monitored for 180 days after infection. Parasitaemia was scored daily. Blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, saliva, and urine samples were collected weekly. PCR and LAMP were performed on serum, CSF, saliva, and urine samples. The detection by LAMP was significantly higher than that of parasitological methods and PCR in all the samples. The performance of LAMP varied between the samples and was better in serum followed by saliva and then urine samples. In the saliva samples, LAMP had 100% detection between 21 and 77 dpi, whereas in urine the detection it was slightly lower, but there was over 80% detection between 28 and 91 dpi. However, LAMP could not detect trypanosomes in either saliva or urine after 140 and 126 dpi, respectively. The findings of this study emphasize the importance of LAMP in diagnosis of HAT using saliva and urine samples.

  18. Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in Urine and Saliva Samples in Nonhuman Primate Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngotho, Maina; Kagira, John Maina; Gachie, Beatrice Muthoni; Karanja, Simon Muturi; Waema, Maxwell Wambua; Maranga, Dawn Nyawira; Maina, Naomi Wangari

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a vector-borne parasitic zoonotic disease. The disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is the most prevalent in Africa. Early diagnosis is hampered by lack of sensitive diagnostic techniques. This study explored the potential of loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the detection of T. b. gambiense infection in a vervet monkey HAT model. Six vervet monkeys were experimentally infected with T. b. gambiense IL3253 and monitored for 180 days after infection. Parasitaemia was scored daily. Blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), saliva, and urine samples were collected weekly. PCR and LAMP were performed on serum, CSF, saliva, and urine samples. The detection by LAMP was significantly higher than that of parasitological methods and PCR in all the samples. The performance of LAMP varied between the samples and was better in serum followed by saliva and then urine samples. In the saliva samples, LAMP had 100% detection between 21 and 77 dpi, whereas in urine the detection it was slightly lower, but there was over 80% detection between 28 and 91 dpi. However, LAMP could not detect trypanosomes in either saliva or urine after 140 and 126 dpi, respectively. The findings of this study emphasize the importance of LAMP in diagnosis of HAT using saliva and urine samples.

  19. A pseudouridylation switch in rRNA is implicated in ribosome function during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikne, Vaibhav; Doniger, Tirza; Rajan, K Shanmugha; Bartok, Osnat; Eliaz, Dror; Cohen-Chalamish, Smadar; Tschudi, Christian; Unger, Ron; Hashem, Yaser; Kadener, Sebastian; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes devastating diseases in humans and animals in sub-Saharan Africa, undergoes a complex life cycle between the mammalian host and the blood-feeding tsetse fly vector. However, little is known about how the parasite performs most molecular functions in such different environments. Here, we provide evidence for the intriguing possibility that pseudouridylation of rRNA plays an important role in the capacity of the parasite to transit between the insect midgut and the mammalian bloodstream. Briefly, we mapped pseudouridines (Ψ) on rRNA by Ψ-seq in procyclic form (PCF) and bloodstream form (BSF) trypanosomes. We detected 68 Ψs on rRNA, which are guided by H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNA). The small RNome of both life cycle stages was determined by HiSeq and 83 H/ACAs were identified. We observed an elevation of 21 Ψs modifications in BSF as a result of increased levels of the guiding snoRNAs. Overexpression of snoRNAs guiding modification on H69 provided a slight growth advantage to PCF parasites at 30 °C. Interestingly, these modifications are predicted to significantly alter the secondary structure of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA suggesting that hypermodified positions may contribute to the adaption of ribosome function during cycling between the two hosts.

  20. Structure of the gene encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase (prsA) in Salmonella typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bower, Stanley G.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Switzer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The Salmonella typhimurium gene prsA, which encodes phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase, has been cloned, and the nucleotide sequence has been determined. The amino acid sequence derived from the S. typhimurium gene is 99% identical to the derived Escherichia coli sequence and 47% identical...... to two rat isozyme sequences. Strains containing plasmid-borne prsA have been used to overproduce and purify the enzyme. The promoter for the S. typhimurium prsA gene was identified by deletion analysis and by similarity to the promoter for the E. coli prsA gene. The location of the prsA promoter results...... in a 416-base-pair 5' untranslated leader in the prsA transcript, which was shown by deletion to be necessary for maximal synthesis of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase. The S. typhimurium leader contains a 115-base-pair insert relative to the E. coli leader. The insert appears to have no functional...

  1. Targeted Disruption of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase pes3 Augments the Virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Hanlon, Karen A.; Cairns, Timothy; Stack, Deirdre;

    2011-01-01

    and ferricrocin. No structural or immunologically relevant NRP products have been identified in the organism. We investigated the function of the largest gene in A. fumigatus, which encodes the NRP synthetase Pes3 (AFUA_5G12730), by targeted gene deletion and extensive phenotypic analysis. It was observed...... that in contrast to other NRP synthetases, deletion of pes3 significantly increases the virulence of A. fumigatus, whereby the pes3 deletion strain (A. fumigatus Δpes3) exhibited heightened virulence (increased killing) in invertebrate (P ... of murine pulmonary aspergillosis. Complementation restored the wild-type phenotype in the invertebrate model. Deletion of pes3 also resulted in increased susceptibility to the antifungal, voriconazole (P

  2. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirando, Adam C; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F; Baldor, Linda C; Howe, Alan K; Ebert, Alicia M; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S

    2015-08-14

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans.

  3. Effects of aeration on formation and localization of the acetyl coenzyme A synthetases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H. P.; Jahnke, L.

    1979-01-01

    Previous studies on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that two different forms of the enzyme acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACS) are present, depending on the conditions under which the cells are grown. The paper evaluates the usefulness of a method designed to assay both synthetases simultaneously in yeast homogenates. The data presented confirm the possibility of simultaneous detection and estimation of the amount of both ACSs of S. cerevisiae in crude homogenates of this strain, making possible the study of physiological factors involved in the formation of these isoenzymes. One important factor for specifying which of the two enzymes is found in these yeast cells is the presence or absence of oxygen in their environment. Aeration not only affects the ratio of the two ACSs but also appears to affect the cellular distribution of these enzymes. Most of the data presented suggest the possibility that the nonaerobic ACS may serve as a precursor to the aerobic form.

  4. let-65 is cytoplasmic methionyl tRNA synthetase in C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Z. Alriyami

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic methionyl tRNA synthetase (MetRS is one of more than 20 cytoplasmic aminoacyl tRNA synthetase enzymes (ARS. This family of enzymes catalyzes a process fundamental for protein translation. Using a combination of genetic mapping, oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization, and phenotypic correlation, we show that mutations in the essential gene, let-65, reside within the predicted Caenorhabditis elegans homologue of MetRS, which we have named mars-1. We demonstrate that the lethality associated with alleles of let-65 is fully rescued by a transgenic array that spans the mars-1 genomic region. Furthermore, sequence analysis reveals that six let-65 alleles lead to the alteration of highly conserved amino acids.

  5. Natural aminoacyl tRNA synthetase fragment enhances cardiac function after myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E McCormick

    Full Text Available A naturally-occurring fragment of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS has been shown in higher eukaryotes to 'moonlight' as a pro-angiogenic cytokine in addition to its primary role in protein translation. Pro-angiogenic cytokines have previously been proposed to be promising therapeutic mechanisms for the treatment of myocardial infarction. Here, we show that systemic delivery of the natural fragment of TyRS, mini-TyrRS, improves heart function in mice after myocardial infarction. This improvement is associated with reduced formation of scar tissue, increased angiogenesis of cardiac capillaries, recruitment of c-kitpos cells and proliferation of myocardial fibroblasts. This work demonstrates that mini-TyrRS has beneficial effects on cardiac repair and regeneration and offers support for the notion that elucidation of the ever expanding repertoire of noncanonical functions of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases offers unique opportunities for development of novel therapeutics.

  6. Molecular analysis of intragenic recombination at the tryptophan synthetase locus in Neurospora crassa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Wiest; D. Barchers; M. Eaton; R. Henderson; R. Schnittker; K. Mccluskey

    2013-12-01

    Fifteen different classically generated and mapped mutations at the tryptophan synthetase locus in Neurospora crassa have been characterized to the level of the primary sequence of the gene. This sequence analysis has demonstrated that intragenic recombination is accurate to order mutations within one open reading frame. While classic genetic analysis correctly ordered the mutations, the position of mutations characterized by gene sequence analysis was more accurate. A leaky mutation was found to have a wild-type primary sequence. The presence of unique polymorphisms in the primary sequence of the trp-3 gene from strain 861 confirms that it has a unique history relative to the other strains studied. Most strains that were previously shown to be immunologically nonreactive with antibody preparations raised against tryptophan synthetase protein were shown to have nonsense mutations. This work defines 14 alleles of the N. crassa trp-3 gene.

  7. Reversible lysine acetylation controls the activity of the mitochondrial enzyme acetyl-CoA synthetase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwer, Bjoern; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Verdin, Regis O;

    2006-01-01

    by SIRT3 activates the acetyl-CoA synthetase activity of AceCS2. This report identifies the first acetylated substrate protein of SIRT3. Our findings show that a mammalian sirtuin directly controls the activity of a metabolic enzyme by means of reversible lysine acetylation. Because the activity......We report that human acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 (AceCS2) is a mitochondrial matrix protein. AceCS2 is reversibly acetylated at Lys-642 in the active site of the enzyme. The mitochondrial sirtuin SIRT3 interacts with AceCS2 and deacetylates Lys-642 both in vitro and in vivo. Deacetylation of AceCS2...

  8. Pleiotropic functions of glutathione S-transferase P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Grek, Christina; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Manevich, Yefim; Tew, Kenneth D; Townsend, Danyelle M

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP) is one member of the GST superfamily that is prevalently expressed in mammals. Known to possess catalytic activity through deprotonating glutathione allowing formation of thioether bonds with electrophilic substrates, more recent discoveries have broadened our understanding of the biological roles of this protein. In addition to catalytic detoxification, other properties so far ascribed to GSTP include chaperone functions, regulation of nitric oxide pathways, regulation of a variety of kinase signaling pathways, and participation in the forward reaction of protein S-glutathionylation. The expression of GSTP has been linked with cancer and other human pathologies and more recently even with drug addiction. With respect to human health, polymorphic variants of GSTP may determine individual susceptibility to oxidative stress and/or be critical in the design and development of drugs that have used redox pathways as a discovery platform.

  9. Targeted Disruption of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase pes3 Augments the Virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus

    OpenAIRE

    O'Hanlon, Karen; Cairns, Timothy; Stack, Deirdre; Schrettl, Markus; Bignell, Elaine; Kavanagh, Kevin; Miggin, Sinead; O'Keeffe, Grainne; Larsen, Thomas; Doyle, Sean

    2011-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptide synthesis (NRPS) is a documented virulence factor for the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus and other fungi. Secreted or intracellularly located NRP products include the toxic molecule gliotoxin and the iron-chelating siderophores triacetylfusarinine C and ferricrocin. No structural or immunologically relevant NRP products have been identified in the organism. We investigated the function of the largest gene in A. fumigatus, which encodes the NRP synthetase Pes...

  10. N-partitioning, nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase activities in two contrasting varieties of maize

    OpenAIRE

    Machado Altair Toledo; Sodek Ladaslav; Fernandes Mânlio Silvestre

    2001-01-01

    In order to identify useful parameters for maize genetic breeding programs aiming at a more efficient use of N, two maize varieties of contrasting N efficiency, Sol da Manhã NF (efficient) and Catetão (inefficient) were compared. Experiments were carried out under field and greenhouse conditions, at low and high N levels. The parameters analysed included total and relative plant and grain N content, biomass and the activities of nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase in different parts of...

  11. Nucleotide synthetase ribozymes may have emerged first in the RNA world

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Wentao; Yu, Chunwu; Zhang, Wentao; Hu, Jiming

    2007-01-01

    Though the “RNA world” hypothesis has gained a central role in ideas concerning the origin of life, the scenario concerning its emergence remains uncertain. It has been speculated that the first scene may have been the emergence of a template-dependent RNA synthetase ribozyme, which catalyzed its own replication: thus, “RNA replicase.” However, the speculation remains uncertain, primarily because of the large sequence length requirement of such a replicase and the lack of a convincing mechani...

  12. Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases, the Genetic Code, and the Evolutionary Process

    OpenAIRE

    Woese, Carl R.; Olsen, Gary J; Ibba, Michael; Söll, Dieter

    2000-01-01

    The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) and their relationship to the genetic code are examined from the evolutionary perspective. Despite a loose correlation between codon assignments and AARS evolutionary relationships, the code is far too highly structured to have been ordered merely through the evolutionary wanderings of these enzymes. Nevertheless, the AARSs are very informative about the evolutionary process. Examination of the phylogenetic trees for each of the AARSs reveals the followi...

  13. Glutamine synthetase immunor present in oligodendroglia of regions of the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, Fernando; Eng, Lawrence F.; Gibbs, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase immunoreactive oligodendrocytes were identified in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, brain stem, and spinal cord. They were mostly confined to the gray matter, particularly close to neurons and processes. The white matter showed few immunoreactive oligodendroglia. It was suggested that some type of oligodendrocytes, specially those in perineuronal location, might fulfill a functional role more akin to astrocytes than to the normally myelinating oligodendroglia.

  14. Structural basis for full-spectrum inhibition of translational functions on a tRNA synthetase

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Pengfei; Yu, Xue; Jeong, Seung Jae; Mirando, Adam; Chen, Kaige; Chen, Xin; Kim, Sunghoon; Francklyn, Christopher S.; Guo, Min

    2015-01-01

    The polyketide natural product borrelidin displays antibacterial, antifungal, antimalarial, anticancer, insecticidal and herbicidal activities through the selective inhibition of threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS). How borrelidin simultaneously attenuates bacterial growth and suppresses a variety of infections in plants and animals is not known. Here we show, using X-ray crystal structures and functional analyses, that a single molecule of borrelidin simultaneously occupies four distinct subsit...

  15. Reassimilation of Photorespiratory Ammonium in Lotus japonicus Plants Deficient in Plastidic Glutamine Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M; García-Calderón, Margarita; Márquez, Antonio J; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the plastidic isoform of glutamine synthetase (GS2) is the enzyme in charge of photorespiratory ammonium reassimilation in plants. The metabolic events associated to photorespiratory NH4(+) accumulation were analyzed in a Lotus japonicus photorespiratory mutant lacking GS2. The mutant plants accumulated high levels of NH4(+) when photorespiration was active, followed by a sudden drop in the levels of this compound. In this paper it was examined the possible existence of enzymatic pathways alternative to GS2 that could account for this decline in the photorespiratory ammonium. Induction of genes encoding for cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and asparagine synthetase (ASN) was observed in the mutant in correspondence with the diminishment of NH4(+). Measurements of gene expression, polypeptide levels, enzyme activity and metabolite levels were carried out in leaf samples from WT and mutant plants after different periods of time under active photorespiratory conditions. In the case of asparagine synthetase it was not possible to determine enzyme activity and polypeptide content; however, an increased asparagine content in parallel with the induction of ASN gene expression was detected in the mutant plants. This increase in asparagine levels took place concomitantly with an increase in glutamine due to the induction of cytosolic GS1 in the mutant, thus revealing a major role of cytosolic GS1 in the reassimilation and detoxification of photorespiratory NH4(+) when the plastidic GS2 isoform is lacking. Moreover, a diminishment in glutamate levels was observed, that may be explained by the induction of NAD(H)-dependent GDH activity.

  16. Genetic identification of essential indels and domains in carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II of Toxoplasma gondii

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Barbara A; Ristuccia, Jessica G.; Bzik, David J.

    2008-01-01

    New treatments need to be developed for the significant human diseases of toxoplasmosis and malaria to circumvent problems with current treatments and drug resistance. Apicomplexan parasites causing these lethal diseases are deficient in pyrimidine salvage suggesting that selective inhibition of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis can lead to a severe loss of UMP and dTMP pools thereby inhibiting parasite RNA and DNA synthesis. Disruption of Toxoplasma gondii carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II (CP...

  17. Glutathione S-transferases in human liver cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, P C; May, L.; Hayes, J. D.; Harrison, D J

    1991-01-01

    An immunohistochemical study of glutathione S-transferase (GST) expression in hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma is described. Unlike most animal models of hepatic malignancy pi class GST was not consistently overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma. This tumour type either predominantly expressed alpha class GST or failed to express GST. By contrast, cholangiocarcinoma always expressed pi class GST, presumably reflecting the tissue of origin, since in human biliary epithelium p...

  18. Proton mobilities in crambin and glutathione S-transferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Corsaro, C.; Hayward, R. L.; Bée, M.; Middendorf, H. D.

    2003-08-01

    Using a neutron backscattering spectrometer, the temperature dependence of mean-square atomic displacements derived from window-integrated quasielastic spectra was measured for two D 2O-hydrated proteins: crambin and glutathione S-transferase. Analyses show that the anharmonic dynamics observed around and above 200 K is consistent with a description in terms of proton/deuteron jumps within asymmetric double-minimum potentials. Also determined were activation energies along with estimates of effective masses and average oscillator energies.

  19. Reaction of the nitroxyl radical TAN with glutathione

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence for a stoichiometric reaction between 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone-N-oxyl (TAN) and glutathione (GSH) in vitro has been provided by the results of e.s.r., spectrophotometric and enzymatic measurements. The addition of TAN to a suspension of isolated hepatocytes resulted in a rapid reduction in cellular GSH. Possible mechanisms are discussed. The results are in accordance with the rapid in vivo degradation of TAN. (U.K.)

  20. Benzene oxide is a substrate for glutathione S-transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarth, Adam T; Murphy, Sharon E; Hecht, Stephen S

    2015-12-01

    Benzene is a known human carcinogen which must be activated to benzene oxide (BO) to exert its carcinogenic potential. BO can be detoxified in vivo by reaction with glutathione and excretion in the urine as S-phenylmercapturic acid. This process may be catalyzed by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), but kinetic data for this reaction have not been published. Therefore, we incubated GSTA1, GSTT1, GSTM1, and GSTP1 with glutathione and BO and quantified the formation of S-phenylglutathione. Kinetic parameters were determined for GSTT1 and GSTP1. At 37 °C, the putative Km and Vmax values for GSTT1 were 420 μM and 450 fmol/s, respectively, while those for GSTP1 were 3600 μM and 3100 fmol/s. GSTA1 and GSTM1 did not exhibit sufficient activity for determination of kinetic parameters. We conclude that GSTT1 is a critical enzyme in the detoxification of BO and that GSTP1 may also play an important role, while GSTA1 and GSTM1 seem to be less important.

  1. Glutamine: a precursor of glutathione and its effect on liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between alanyl-glutamine (ALA-GLN) and glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis in hepatic protection.METHODS Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: one receiving standard parenteral nutrition (STD) and the other supplemented with or without ALA-GLN for 7 days. The blood and liver tissue samples were examined after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was injected peritoneally.RESULTS The concentration measurements were significantly higher in ALA-GLN group than in STD group in serum GLN (687 μmol/ L±50 μmol/ L vs 505 μmol/ L±39 μmol/ L, P<0.05), serum GSH (14 μmol/ L±5 μmol/ L vs 7 μmol/ L±3 μmol/ L, P<0.01) and in liver GSH content (6.9 μmol/ g±2.5 μmol/ g vs 4.4 μmol/ g±1.6 μmol/ g liver tissue, P<0.05). Rats in ALA-GLN group had lesser elevations in hepatic enzymes after 5-FU administration.CONCLUSION The supplemented nutrition ALA-GLN can protect the liver function through increasing the glutathione biosynthesis and preserving the glutathione stores in hepatic tissue.

  2. Structural basis for the binding of succinate to succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ji; Fraser, Marie E

    2016-08-01

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase catalyzes the only step in the citric acid cycle that provides substrate-level phosphorylation. Although the binding sites for the substrates CoA, phosphate, and the nucleotides ADP and ATP or GDP and GTP have been identified, the binding site for succinate has not. To determine this binding site, pig GTP-specific succinyl-CoA synthetase was crystallized in the presence of succinate, magnesium ions and CoA, and the structure of the complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.2 Å resolution. Succinate binds in the carboxy-terminal domain of the β-subunit. The succinate-binding site is near both the active-site histidine residue that is phosphorylated in the reaction and the free thiol of CoA. The carboxy-terminal domain rearranges when succinate binds, burying this active site. However, succinate is not in position for transfer of the phosphoryl group from phosphohistidine. Here, it is proposed that when the active-site histidine residue has been phosphorylated by GTP, the phosphohistidine displaces phosphate and triggers the movement of the carboxylate of succinate into position to be phosphorylated. The structure shows why succinyl-CoA synthetase is specific for succinate and does not react appreciably with citrate nor with the other C4-dicarboxylic acids of the citric acid cycle, fumarate and oxaloacetate, but shows some activity with L-malate. PMID:27487822

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of FAD synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Native and selenomethionine-labelled FAD synthetase from C. ammoniagenes have been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A MAD data set for SeMet-labelled FAD synthetase was collected to 2.42 Å resolution, while data sets were collected to 1.95 Å resolution for the native crystals. FAD synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes (CaFADS), a prokaryotic bifunctional enzyme that catalyses the phosphorylation of riboflavin as well as the adenylylation of FMN, has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 277 K. Diffraction-quality cubic crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled (SeMet-CaFADS) protein belonged to the cubic space group P213, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 133.47 Å and a = b = c = 133.40 Å, respectively. Data sets for native and SeMet-containing crystals were collected to 1.95 and 2.42 Å resolution, respectively

  4. Oxidative modification of glutamine synthetase. I. Inactivation is due to loss of one histidine residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, R L

    1983-10-10

    Intracellular proteolytic degradation of glutamine synthetase occurs in two distinct steps in Escherichia coli (Levine, R. L., Oliver, C. N., Fulks, R. M., and Stadtman, E. R. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 78, 2120-2124). In the first step, a mixed function oxidation modifies the glutamine synthetase. The modified enzyme, which is catalytically inactive, becomes susceptible to proteolytic attack. In the second step, a protease specific for the modified enzyme catalyzes the actual proteolytic degradation. The oxidatively modified glutamine synthetase was studied to determine the chemical differences between it and the native enzyme. Only a single alteration was found; one of sixteen histidine residues/subunit was altered by the oxidative modification. The modification introduced a carbonyl group into the protein, permitting isolation of a stable dinitrophenylhydrazone. No other differences were detected between the native and modified proteins. Specifically, the cysteine, methionine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan contents were not altered. A number of other prokaryotic and eukaryotic enzymes are also susceptible to oxidative modification. This covalent modification may be important in intracellular proteolysis, in mammalian host defense systems, in prevention of autolysis, in aging processes, and in oxygen toxicity.

  5. Structural basis for the binding of succinate to succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ji; Fraser, Marie E

    2016-08-01

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase catalyzes the only step in the citric acid cycle that provides substrate-level phosphorylation. Although the binding sites for the substrates CoA, phosphate, and the nucleotides ADP and ATP or GDP and GTP have been identified, the binding site for succinate has not. To determine this binding site, pig GTP-specific succinyl-CoA synthetase was crystallized in the presence of succinate, magnesium ions and CoA, and the structure of the complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.2 Å resolution. Succinate binds in the carboxy-terminal domain of the β-subunit. The succinate-binding site is near both the active-site histidine residue that is phosphorylated in the reaction and the free thiol of CoA. The carboxy-terminal domain rearranges when succinate binds, burying this active site. However, succinate is not in position for transfer of the phosphoryl group from phosphohistidine. Here, it is proposed that when the active-site histidine residue has been phosphorylated by GTP, the phosphohistidine displaces phosphate and triggers the movement of the carboxylate of succinate into position to be phosphorylated. The structure shows why succinyl-CoA synthetase is specific for succinate and does not react appreciably with citrate nor with the other C4-dicarboxylic acids of the citric acid cycle, fumarate and oxaloacetate, but shows some activity with L-malate.

  6. Directed evolution of adenylosuccinate synthetase from Bacillus subtilis and its application in metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyue; Wang, Guanglu; Li, Xinli; Fu, Jing; Chen, Tao; Wang, Zhiwen; Zhao, Xueming

    2016-08-10

    Adenylosuccinate synthetase (EC. 6.3.4.4) encoded by purA in Bacillus subtilis, catalyzing the first step of the conversion of IMP to AMP, plays an important role in flux distribution in the purine biosynthetic pathway. In this study, we described the use of site saturation mutagenesis to obtain a desired enzyme activity of adenylosuccinate synthetase and its application in flux regulation. Based on sequence alignment and structural modeling, a library of enzyme variants was created by a semi-rational evolution strategy in position Thr238 and Pro242. Other than purA deletion, the leaky mutation purA(P242N) partially reduced the flux towards AMP derived from IMP and increased the riboflavin synthesis precursor GTP, while also kept the requirement of ATP synthesis for cell growth. PurA(P242N) was introduced into an inosine-producing strain and resulted in an approximately 4.66-fold increase in inosine production, from 0.088±0.009g/L to 0.41±0.051g/L, in minimal medium without hypoxanthine accumulation. These results underline that the directed evolution of adenylosuccinate synthetase could tailor its activities and adjust metabolic flux. This mutation may provide a promising application in purine-based product accumulation, like inosine, guanosine and folate which are directly stemming from purine pathway in B. subtilis. PMID:27234879

  7. (p)ppGpp synthetases regulate the pathogenesis of zoonotic Streptococcus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiawen; Zhang, Tengfei; Su, Zhipeng; Li, Lu; Wang, Dong; Xiao, Ran; Teng, Muye; Tan, Meifang; Zhou, Rui

    2016-10-01

    (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response is one of the main adaption mechanism in bacteria, and the ability to adapt to environment is linked to the pathogenesis of bacterial pathogens. In the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis, there are two (p)ppGpp synthetases, RelA and RelQ. To investigate the regulatory functions of (p)ppGpp/(p)ppGpp synthetases on the pathogenesis of S. suis, the phenotypes of the [(p)ppGpp(0)] mutant ΔrelAΔrelQ and its parental strain were compared. Light and electron microscopy observation showed that the mutant strain had a longer chain-length than its parental strain. Disruption of relA and relQ led to decreased adhesive and invasive ability to HEp-2 cells, and increased sensitivity to the blood killing and phagocytosis. Mouse infection experiments showed that the mutant strain was attenuated and easier to be cleaned up in vivo. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that the expressions of virulence related genes involving in morphology and virulence were down-regulated in the mutant strain. Our study demonstrated that the (p)ppGpp synthetases or (p)ppGpp can regulate the pathogenesis of this important zoonotic pathogen. PMID:27524648

  8. (p)ppGpp synthetases regulate the pathogenesis of zoonotic Streptococcus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiawen; Zhang, Tengfei; Su, Zhipeng; Li, Lu; Wang, Dong; Xiao, Ran; Teng, Muye; Tan, Meifang; Zhou, Rui

    2016-10-01

    (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response is one of the main adaption mechanism in bacteria, and the ability to adapt to environment is linked to the pathogenesis of bacterial pathogens. In the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis, there are two (p)ppGpp synthetases, RelA and RelQ. To investigate the regulatory functions of (p)ppGpp/(p)ppGpp synthetases on the pathogenesis of S. suis, the phenotypes of the [(p)ppGpp(0)] mutant ΔrelAΔrelQ and its parental strain were compared. Light and electron microscopy observation showed that the mutant strain had a longer chain-length than its parental strain. Disruption of relA and relQ led to decreased adhesive and invasive ability to HEp-2 cells, and increased sensitivity to the blood killing and phagocytosis. Mouse infection experiments showed that the mutant strain was attenuated and easier to be cleaned up in vivo. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that the expressions of virulence related genes involving in morphology and virulence were down-regulated in the mutant strain. Our study demonstrated that the (p)ppGpp synthetases or (p)ppGpp can regulate the pathogenesis of this important zoonotic pathogen.

  9. Effect of post-silking drought on nitrogen partitioning and gene expression patterns of glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase in two maize (Zea mays L.) varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajun; Wang, Meiling; Zhang, Fengxia; Xu, Yadong; Chen, Xiaohong; Qin, Xiaoliang; Wen, Xiaoxia

    2016-05-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) and asparagine synthetase (AS) are proposed to have important function in plant nitrogen (N) remobilization, but their roles under drought stress are not well defined. In this study, the expression dynamics of GS and AS genes were analyzed in two maize varieties (ZD958 and NH101) in relation to post-silking drought stress induced nitrogen partitioning. ZD958 was a 'stay-green' variety with 5% nitrogen harvest index (NHI) lower than NH101. From silking to maturity, the amount of nitrogen remobilized from ear-leaves in ZD958 was evidently lower than NH101, and post-silking drought stress increased the nitrogen remobilization for both varieties. In ear-leaves, the expression of ZmGln1-3 was enhanced under drought stress. Three AS genes (ZmAS1, ZmAS2 and ZmAS3) were differentially regulated by post-silking drought treatment, of which the expression of ZmAS3 was stimulated at late stage of leaf senescence. In NH101, the expression level of ZmAS3 was markedly higher than that in ZD958. In developing grains, there were no significant differences in expression patterns of GS and AS genes between well water and drought treated plants. Drought stress altered maize N partitioning at the whole-plant level, and the up-regulation of GS and AS genes may contribute to the higher leaf nitrogen remobilization when exposed to drought treatments.

  10. Effect of post-silking drought on nitrogen partitioning and gene expression patterns of glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase in two maize (Zea mays L.) varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajun; Wang, Meiling; Zhang, Fengxia; Xu, Yadong; Chen, Xiaohong; Qin, Xiaoliang; Wen, Xiaoxia

    2016-05-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) and asparagine synthetase (AS) are proposed to have important function in plant nitrogen (N) remobilization, but their roles under drought stress are not well defined. In this study, the expression dynamics of GS and AS genes were analyzed in two maize varieties (ZD958 and NH101) in relation to post-silking drought stress induced nitrogen partitioning. ZD958 was a 'stay-green' variety with 5% nitrogen harvest index (NHI) lower than NH101. From silking to maturity, the amount of nitrogen remobilized from ear-leaves in ZD958 was evidently lower than NH101, and post-silking drought stress increased the nitrogen remobilization for both varieties. In ear-leaves, the expression of ZmGln1-3 was enhanced under drought stress. Three AS genes (ZmAS1, ZmAS2 and ZmAS3) were differentially regulated by post-silking drought treatment, of which the expression of ZmAS3 was stimulated at late stage of leaf senescence. In NH101, the expression level of ZmAS3 was markedly higher than that in ZD958. In developing grains, there were no significant differences in expression patterns of GS and AS genes between well water and drought treated plants. Drought stress altered maize N partitioning at the whole-plant level, and the up-regulation of GS and AS genes may contribute to the higher leaf nitrogen remobilization when exposed to drought treatments. PMID:26913793

  11. Interferon titer and the 2',5'-oligoadenylate-synthetase activity in rat thymus lymphocytes in conditions of Omeprazol-caused hypergastrinemia

    OpenAIRE

    Kompanets I. V.; Korotkiy О. G.; Karpovets T. P.; Pilipenko S. V.; Nikolska V. V.; Ostapchenko L. I.; Yankovsky D. S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was the determination of rat thymocytes response to hypergastrinemia evoked by hypoacidity and multiprobiotic «Symbiter® acidophilic concentrated» (symbiter) treatment via the estimation of the interferon (IFN) titer and 2', 5'-oligoadenylate (OA)-synthetase activity in lymphocytes. 2', 5'-OA-synthetase is the IFN-induced enzyme. Methods. The micromethod of IFN titer determination by antiviral activity, spectrophotometrical method of 2', 5'-OA-synthetase activity determin...

  12. β-catenin accumulation in nuclei of hepatocellular carcinoma cells up-regulates glutathione-s-transferase M3 mRNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Sang Li; Min Liu; Yoshihiro Nakata; He-Bin Tang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To identify the differentially over-expressed genes associated with β-catenin accumulation in nuclei of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells.METHODS: Differentially expressed genes were identified in radiation-induced B6C3 F1 mouse HCC cells by mRNA differential display, Northern blot and RT-PCR,respectively. Total glutathione-s-transferase (GST) activity was measured by GST activity assay and β-catenin localization was detected with immunostaining in radiation-induced mouse HCC cells and in HepG2 cell lines.RESULTS: Two up-regulated genes, glutamine synthetase and glutathione-s-transferase M3 (GSTM3), were identified in radiation-induced mouse HCC cells. Influence of β-catenin accumulation in nuclei of HCC cells on upregulation of GSTM3 mRNA was investigated. The nearby upstream domain of GSTM3 contained the β-catenin/Tcf-Lef consensus binding site sequences [5'-(A/T)(A/T)CAAAG-3'], and the total GST activity ratio was considerably higher in B6C3F1 mouse HCC cells with β-cateninaccumulation in nuclei of HCC cells than in those withoutβ-catenin accumulation (0.353 ± 0.117 vs 0.071 ± 0.064,P < 0.001). The TWS119 (a distinct GSK-3β inhibitor)-induced total GST activity was significantly higher in HepG2 cells with β-catenin accumulation than in those withoutβ-catenin accumulation in nuclei of HCC cells. Additionally,the GSTM3 mRNA level was significantly higher at 24 h than at 12 h in TWS119-treated HepG2 cells.CONCLUSION: β-catenin accumulation increases GST activity in nuclei of HCC cells, and GSTM3 may be a novel target gene of the β-catenin/Tcf-Lef complex.

  13. Delayed cardiomyopathy in dystrophin deficient mdx mice relies on intrinsic glutathione resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khouzami, Lara; Bourin, Marie-Claude; Christov, Christo; Damy, Thibaud; Escoubet, Brigitte; Caramelle, Philippe; Perier, Magali; Wahbi, Karim; Meune, Christophe; Pavoine, Catherine; Pecker, Françoise

    2010-09-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although they have been a model for DMD, mdx mice exhibit slowly developing cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that disease process was delayed owing to the development of an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress, involving glutathione synthesis. At 15 to 20 weeks of age, mdx mice displayed a 33% increase in blood glutathione levels compared with age-matched C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, cardiac glutathione content was similar in mdx and C57BL/6 mice as a result of the balanced increased expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic and regulatory subunits ensuring glutathione synthesis in the mdx mouse heart, as well as increased glutathione peroxidase-1 using glutathione. Oral administration from 10 weeks of age of the glutamate cysteine ligase inhibitor, l-buthionine(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO, 5 mmol/L), led to a 33% and 50% drop in blood and cardiac glutathione, respectively, in 15- to 20-week-old mdx mice. Moreover, 20-week-old BSO-treated mdx mice displayed left ventricular hypertrophy associated with diastolic dysfunction, discontinuities in beta-dystroglycan expression, micronecrosis and microangiopathic injuries. Examination of the glutathione status in four DMD patients showed that three displayed systemic glutathione deficiency as well. In conclusion, low glutathione resource hastens the onset of cardiomyopathy linked to a defect in dystrophin in mdx mice. This is relevant to the glutathione deficiency that DMD patients may suffer.

  14. Hemin-mediated Hemolysis in Erythrocytes: Effects of Ascorbic Acid and Glutathione

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-De LI; Yan-Dan SU; Ming LI; Cheng-Gang ZOU

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we investigated the effect of ascorbic acid and glutathione on hemolysis induced by hemin in erythrocytes. Ascorbic acid not only enhanced hemolysis, but also induced formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in the presence of hemin. It has been shown that glutathione inhibits hemin-induced hemolysis by mediating hemin degradation. Erythrocytes depleted of glutathione became very sensitive to oxidative stress induced by hemin and ascorbic acid. H2O2 was involved in heminmediated hemolysis in the presence of ascorbic acid. However, a combination of glutathione and ascorbic acid was more effective in inhibiting hemolysis induced by hemin than glutathione alone. Extracellular and intracellular ascorbic acid exhibited a similar effect on hemin-induced hemolysis or inhibition of hemininduced hemolysis by glutathione. The current study indicates that ascorbic acid might function as an antioxidant or prooxidant in hemin-mediated hemolysis, depending on whether glutathione is available.

  15. Anti-Browning of Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus Slices by Glutathione during Hot Air Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenqiang Xia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Browning of mushroom tends to occur during hot air drying due to Poly Phenol Oxidase (PPO, while glutathione is known for its ability to inhibit the activity of PPO and browning. In this study, the efficacy of glutathione in inhibiting browning on mushroom slices was estimated. Browning of mushroom slices treated with glutathione was monitored during hot air drying. PPO activity in mushroom was inhibited by 98.2 with 0.08% glutathione. Compared with the control, mushroom slices treated with glutathione showed no browning during hot air drying. These results indicate that application of glutathione is a promising method of Anti-browning of mushroom by glutathione during hot air drying.

  16. Glutamine, insulin and glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase expression in C2C12 myotubes, Hep G2 hepatoma cells and 3T3 L1 adipocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yanxin; Watford, Malcolm

    2006-01-01

    The cell-specific regulation of glutamine synthetase expression was studied in three cell lines. In C2C12 myotubes, glucocorticoids increased the abundance of both glutamine synthetase protein and mRNA. Culture in the absence of glutamine also resulted in very high glutamine synthetase protein abundance but mRNA levels were unchanged. Glucocorticoids also increased the abundance of glutamine synthetase mRNA in Hep G2 hepatoma cells but this was not reflected in changes in protein abundance. C...

  17. Expression of Brassica napus L. γ-Glutamylcysteine Synthetase and Low-and High-Affinity Sulfate Transporters in Response to Excess Cadmium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin SUN; Xue-Mei SUN; Zhi-Min YANG; Shao-Qiong LI; Jin WANG; Song-Hua WANG

    2005-01-01

    In both the roots and leaves ofBrassica napus L. cv. Youyan No. 8 under treatment with 30 μmol/L Cd, massive production of non-protein thiols (NPT; mainly containing glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatins (PCs)) was induced, together with an increase in γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-ECS)mRNA transcripts. Because γ-ECS is the key enzyme catalyzing the first step in GSH biosynthesis, which, in turn, is converted to PCs, the Cd-induced increase in γ-ECS expression may be responsible for the observed increase in the production of NPT. Using a quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) approach, the expression of genes encoding a putative low-affinity sulfate transporter (LAST) and a putative high-affinity sulfate transporter (HAST) was determined at the transcriptional level. The RT-PCR analysis of relative transcript amounts indicates that the LAST gene in B. napus leaves showed a constitutive expression, which was hardly affected by Cd treatment. However, treatment with 30 μmol/L Cd for 2 or 3 d induced a marked increase in the expression of LAST in roots. Transcriptional expression of the HAST gene occurred in roots, but not in leaves. The expression of HAST only in the roots suggests that it has a specific function in sulfate uptake from soil and that the putative LAST may be responsible for the transport of sulfate from the roots to the shoots, as well as for the uptake of sulfate from soil. These results indicate that changes in transcriptional expression for sulfate transporters were required for the increased demand for sulfate during Cd stress.

  18. Histone H3 Variant Regulates RNA Polymerase II Transcription Termination and Dual Strand Transcription of siRNA Loci in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Reynolds

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Base J, β-D-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil, is a chromatin modification of thymine in the nuclear DNA of flagellated protozoa of the order Kinetoplastida. In Trypanosoma brucei, J is enriched, along with histone H3 variant (H3.V, at sites involved in RNA Polymerase (RNAP II termination and telomeric sites involved in regulating variant surface glycoprotein gene (VSG transcription by RNAP I. Reduction of J in T. brucei indicated a role of J in the regulation of RNAP II termination, where the loss of J at specific sites within polycistronic gene clusters led to read-through transcription and increased expression of downstream genes. We now demonstrate that the loss of H3.V leads to similar defects in RNAP II termination within gene clusters and increased expression of downstream genes. Gene derepression is intensified upon the subsequent loss of J in the H3.V knockout. mRNA-seq indicates gene derepression includes VSG genes within the silent RNAP I transcribed telomeric gene clusters, suggesting an important role for H3.V in telomeric gene repression and antigenic variation. Furthermore, the loss of H3.V at regions of overlapping transcription at the end of convergent gene clusters leads to increased nascent RNA and siRNA production. Our results suggest base J and H3.V can act independently as well as synergistically to regulate transcription termination and expression of coding and non-coding RNAs in T. brucei, depending on chromatin context (and transcribing polymerase. As such these studies provide the first direct evidence for histone H3.V negatively influencing transcription elongation to promote termination.

  19. Biosynthesis of Polymyxins B, E, and P Using Genetically Engineered Polymyxin Synthetases in the Surrogate Host Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Yu; Park, Soo-Young; Choi, Soo-Keun; Park, Seung-Hwan

    2015-07-01

    The development of diverse polymyxin derivatives is needed to solve the toxicity and resistance problems of polymyxins. However, no platform has generated polymyxin derivatives by genetically engineering a polymyxin synthetase, which is a nonribosomal peptide synthetase. In this study, we present a two-step approach for the construction of engineered polymyxin synthetases by substituting the adenylation (A) domains of polymyxin A synthetase, which is encoded by the pmxABCDE gene cluster of Paenibacillus polymyxa E681. First, the seventh L-threonine-specific A-domain region in pmxA was substituted with the Lleucine- specific A-domain region obtained from P. polymyxa ATCC21830 to make polymyxin E synthetase, and then the sixth D-leucine-specific A-domain region (A6-D-Leu-domain) was substituted with the D-phenylalanine-specific A-domain region (A6-D-Phe-domain) obtained from P. polymyxa F4 to make polymyxin B synthetase. This step was performed in Escherichia coli on a pmxA-containing fosmid, using the lambda Red recombination system and the sacB gene as a counter-selectable marker. Next, the modified pmxA gene was fused to pmxBCDE on the chromosome of Bacillus subtilis BSK4dA, and the resulting recombinant strains BSK4-PB and BSK4-PE were confirmed to produce polymyxins B and E, respectively. We also succeeded in constructing the B. subtilis BSK4-PP strain, which produces polymyxin P, by singly substituting the A6-D-Leu-domain with the A6-D-Phe-domain. This is the first report in which polymyxin derivatives were generated by genetically engineering polymyxin synthetases. The two recombinant B. subtilis strains will be useful for improving the commercial production of polymyxins B and E, and they will facilitate the generation of novel polymyxin derivatives. PMID:26059516

  20. Analysis of glutathione levels in the brain tissue samples from HIV-1-positive individuals and subject with Alzheimer's disease and its implication in the pathophysiology of the disease process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saing, Tommy; Lagman, Minette; Castrillon, Jeffery; Gutierrez, Eutiquio; Guilford, Frederick T; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2016-12-01

    HIV-1 positive individuals are at high risk for susceptibility to both pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and extra-pulmonary TB, including TB meningitis (TBM) which is an extreme form of TB. The goals of this study are to determine the mechanisms responsible for compromised levels of glutathione (GSH) in the brain tissue samples derived from HIV-1-infected individuals and individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD), investigate the possible underlying mechanisms responsible for GSH deficiency in these pathological conditions, and establish a link between GSH levels and pathophysiology of the disease processes. We demonstrated in the autopsied human brain tissues that the levels of total and reduced forms of GSH were significantly compromised in HIV-1 infected individuals compared to in healthy subjects and individuals with AD. Brain tissue samples derived from HIV-1-positive individuals had substantially higher levels of free radicals than that derived from healthy and AD individuals. Enzymes that are responsible for the de novo synthesis of GSH such as γ-glutamate cysteine-ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC-rate limiting step enzyme) and glutathione synthetase (GSS-enzyme involved in the second step reaction) were significantly decreased in the brain tissue samples derived from HIV-1-positive individuals with low CD4 + T-cells (HIV-1 infected individuals. Overall, our findings demonstrate causes for GSH deficiency in the brain tissue from HIV-1 infected individuals explaining the possible reasons for increased susceptibility to the most severe form of extra-pulmonary TB, TBM. PMID:27335804

  1. Conjugation of isoprene monoepoxides with glutathione, catalyzed by α, μ, π and θ-class glutathione S-transferases of rat and man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaards, J.J.P.; Venekamp, J.C.; Salmon, F.G.C.; Bladeren, P.J. van

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, the enzymatic conjugation of the isoprene monoepoxides 3,4 epoxy-3-methyl-1-butene (EPOX-I) and 3,4-epoxy-2-methyl-1-butene (EPOX-II) with glutathione was investigated, using purified glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) of the α, μ, π and θ-class of rat and man. HPLC analysis of

  2. Purification of a glutathione S-transferase and a glutathione conjugate-specific dehydrogenase involved in isoprene metabolism in Rhodococcus sp. strain AD45

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E.T. van; Kingma, Jaap; Kruizinga, Wim; Janssen, Dick B.

    1999-01-01

    A glutathione S transferase (GST) with activity toward 1,2-eposy-2-methyl-3-butene (isoprene monoxide) and cis-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane was purified from the isoprene-utilizing bacterium Rhodococcus sp. strain AD45, The homodimeric enzyme (two subunits of 27 kDa each) catalyzed the glutathione (GSH)-

  3. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Infections in Mice Lead to Tropism to the Reproductive Organs, and Horizontal and Vertical Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biteau, Nicolas; Asencio, Corinne; Izotte, Julien; Rousseau, Benoit; Fèvre, Muriel; Pillay, Davita; Baltz, Théo

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, transmitted by the tsetse fly, is the main causative agent of Human African trypanosomosis in West Africa and poses a significant health risk to 70 million people. Disease progression varies depending on host immunity, but usually begins with a haemo-lymphatic phase, followed by parasite invasion of the central nervous system. In the current study, the tropism of T. b. gambiense 1135, causing a low level chronic 'silent' infection, was monitored in a murine model using bioluminescence imaging and PCR. A tropism to the reproductive organs, in addition to the central nervous system, after 12-18 months of infection was observed. Bioluminescent analysis of healthy females crossed with infected males showed that 50%, 62.5% and 37.5% of the female mice were subsequently positive for parasites in their ovaries, uteri and brain respectively. Although PCR confirmed the presence of parasites in the uterus of one of these mice, the blood of all mice was negative by PCR and LAMP. Subsequently, bioluminescent imaging of the offspring of infected female mice crossed with healthy males indicated parasites were present in the reproductive organs of both male (80%) and female (60%) offspring. These findings imply that transmission of T. b. gambiense 1135 occurs horizontally, most probably via sexual contact, and vertically in a murine model, which raises the possibility of a similar transmission in humans. This has wide reaching implications. Firstly, the observations made in this study are likely to be valid for wild animals acting as a reservoir for T. b. gambiense. Also, the reproductive organs may act as a refuge for parasites during drug treatment in a similar manner to the central nervous system. This could leave patients at risk of a relapse, ultimately allowing them to act as a reservoir for subsequent transmission by tsetse and possibly, horizontally and vertically. PMID:26735855

  4. The miRNA and mRNA Signatures of Peripheral Blood Cells in Humans Infected with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smiths Lueong

    Full Text Available Simple, reliable tools for diagnosis of human African Trypanosomiases could ease field surveillance and enhance patient care. In particular, current methods to distinguish patients with (stage II and without (stage I brain involvement require samples of cerebrospinal fluid. We describe here an exploratory study to find out whether miRNAs from peripheral blood leukocytes might be useful in diagnosis of human trypanosomiasis, or for determining the stage of the disease. Using microarrays, we measured miRNAs in samples from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense-infected patients (9 stage I, 10 stage II, 8 seronegative parasite-negative controls and 12 seropositive, but parasite-negative subjects. 8 miRNAs (out of 1205 tested showed significantly lower expression in patients than in seronegative, parasite-negative controls, and 1 showed increased expression. There were no clear differences in miRNAs between patients in different disease stages. The miRNA profiles could not distinguish seropositive, but parasitologically negative samples from controls and results within this group did not correlate with those from the trypanolysis test. Some of the regulated miRNAs, or their predicted mRNA targets, were previously reported changed during other infectious diseases or cancer. We conclude that the changes in miRNA profiles of peripheral blood lymphocytes in human African trypanosomiasis are related to immune activation or inflammation, are probably disease-non-specific, and cannot be used to determine the disease stage. The approach has little promise for diagnostics but might yield information about disease pathology.

  5. Functional and structural insights revealed by molecular dynamics simulations of an essential RNA editing ligase in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommie E Amaro

    Full Text Available RNA editing ligase 1 (TbREL1 is required for the survival of both the insect and bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for the devastating tropical disease African sleeping sickness. The type of RNA editing that TbREL1 is involved in is unique to the trypanosomes, and no close human homolog is known to exist. In addition, the high-resolution crystal structure revealed several unique features of the active site, making this enzyme a promising target for structure-based drug design. In this work, two 20 ns atomistic molecular dynamics (MD simulations are employed to investigate the dynamics of TbREL1, both with and without the ATP substrate present. The flexibility of the active site, dynamics of conserved residues and crystallized water molecules, and the interactions between TbREL1 and the ATP substrate are investigated and discussed in the context of TbREL1's function. Differences in local and global motion upon ATP binding suggest that two peripheral loops, unique to the trypanosomes, may be involved in interdomain signaling events. Notably, a significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme's active site occurs during the apo simulations, opening an additional cavity adjacent to the ATP binding site that could be exploited in the development of effective inhibitors directed against this protozoan parasite. Finally, ensemble averaged electrostatics calculations over the MD simulations reveal a novel putative RNA binding site, a discovery that has previously eluded scientists. Ultimately, we use the insights gained through the MD simulations to make several predictions and recommendations, which we anticipate will help direct future experimental studies and structure-based drug discovery efforts against this vital enzyme.

  6. Crystal Structures of Trypanosoma brucei Sterol 14[alpha]-Demethylase and Implications for Selective Treatment of Human Infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Park, Hee-Won; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Harp, Joel M.; Sundaramoorthy, Munirathinam; Nes, W. David; Pays, Etienne; Chaudhuri, Minu; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R. (ULdB); (Vanderbilt); (TTU); (Toronto); (NWU); (Meharry)

    2010-01-25

    Sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (14DM, the CYP51 family of cytochrome P450) is an essential enzyme in sterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes. It serves as a major drug target for fungal diseases and can potentially become a target for treatment of human infections with protozoa. Here we present 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures of 14DM from the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma brucei, ligand-free and complexed with a strong chemically selected inhibitor N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl-4-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadi-azol-2-yl)benzamide that we previously found to produce potent antiparasitic effects in Trypanosomatidae. This is the first structure of a eukaryotic microsomal 14DM that acts on sterol biosynthesis, and it differs profoundly from that of the water-soluble CYP51 family member from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, both in organization of the active site cavity and in the substrate access channel location. Inhibitor binding does not cause large scale conformational rearrangements, yet induces unanticipated local alterations in the active site, including formation of a hydrogen bond network that connects, via the inhibitor amide group fragment, two remote functionally essential protein segments and alters the heme environment. The inhibitor binding mode provides a possible explanation for both its functionally irreversible effect on the enzyme activity and its selectivity toward the 14DM from human pathogens versus the human 14DM ortholog. The structures shed new light on 14DM functional conservation and open an excellent opportunity for directed design of novel antiparasitic drugs.

  7. Crystal structure of Glycine max glutathione transferase in complex with glutathione: investigation of the mechanism operating by the Tau class glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axarli, Irene; Dhavala, Prathusha; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2009-08-13

    Cytosolic GSTs (glutathione transferases) are a multifunctional group of enzymes widely distributed in Nature and involved in cellular detoxification processes. The three-dimensional structure of GmGSTU4-4 (Glycine max GST Tau 4-4) complexed with GSH was determined by the molecular replacement method at 2.7 A (1 A=0.1 nm) resolution. The bound GSH is located in a region formed by the beginning of alpha-helices H1, H2 and H3 in the N-terminal domain of the enzyme. Significant differences in the G-site (GSH-binding site) as compared with the structure determined in complex with Nb-GSH [S-(p-nitrobenzyl)-glutathione] were found. These differences were identified in the hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interaction pattern and, consequently, GSH was found bound in two different conformations. In one subunit, the enzyme forms a complex with the ionized form of GSH, whereas in the other subunit it can form a complex with the non-ionized form. However, only the ionized form of GSH may form a productive and catalytically competent complex. Furthermore, a comparison of the GSH-bound structure with the Nb-GSH-bound structure shows a significant movement of the upper part of alpha-helix H4 and the C-terminal. This indicates an intrasubunit modulation between the G-site and the H-site (electrophile-binding site), suggesting that the enzyme recognizes the xenobiotic substrates by an induced-fit mechanism. The reorganization of Arg111 and Tyr107 upon xenobiotic substrate binding appears to govern the intrasubunit structural communication between the G- and H-site and the binding of GSH. The structural observations were further verified by steady-state kinetic analysis and site-directed mutagenesis studies.

  8. Targeting aberrant glutathione metabolism to eradicate human acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M; Neering, Sarah J; Lagadinou, Eleni D; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L; O'Dwyer, Kristen M; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A; Becker, Michael W; Jordan, Craig T

    2013-11-22

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34(+)) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34(+) AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34(+) AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34(+) cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34(+) AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34(+) cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  9. Properties of 5-aminolaevulinate synthetase and its relationship to microsomal mixed-function oxidation in the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brattsten, L B; Wilkinson, C F

    1975-07-01

    1. Activity of 5-aminolaevulinate synthetase was measured in the midgut and other tissues of the last larval instar of the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania Cramer, formerly Prodenia eridania Cramer). 2. Optimum conditions for measuring the activity were established with respect to all variables involved and considerable differences from those reported for mammalian enzyme preparations were found. 3. Maximum activity (20 nmol/h per mg of protein) occurs 18-24 h after the fifth moult and thereafter decreases to trace amounts as the larvae age and approach pupation. 4. Synthetase activity was rapidly induced by oral administration (in the diet) of pentamethylbenzene, phenobarbital, diethyl 1,4-dihydro-2,4,6-trimethylpyridine-3, 5-dicarboxylate, and 2-allyl-2-isopropylacetamide. 5. Puromycin inhibited the induction of synthetase by pentamethylbenzene. 6. Induction of 5-aminolaevulinate synthetase correlated well with the induction of microsomal N-demethylation of p-chloro-N-methylaniline, except for phenobarbital, which induced the microsomal oxidase relatively more than the synthetase. PMID:1004

  10. In situ activated nanostructured platform for oxidized glutathione biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► New nanostructured platform for GSSG determination based on multi walled carbon nanotubes and chitosan. ► The redox mediator activated in situ showed a high electrocatalytic constant for NADH electrooxidation. ► An amperometric method for GSSG determination based on NADH consumption has been presented for the first time. -- Abstract: This work describes the construction of a biosensor for glutathione disulfide (GSSG) based on a nanostructured platform composed by MWCNTs, chitosan (CHIT) and the redox mediator 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid. The dispersion of MWCNTs and CHIT showed a good stability and was used to modify the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The nanostructured platform was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical techniques. The R-NO/R-NHOH redox couple was electrogenerated in situ by cycling the potential between 0.2 and −0.4 V vs. SCE. After activating the nanostructured platform, glutathione reductase was easily immobilized on the electrode surface by using glutaraldehyde as functional linker. The biosensor performance was optimized in terms of amount of enzyme, effect of CHIT concentration and NADH amount. Under optimized conditions, the biosensor response for GSSG sensing was linear from 2.0 up to 35 μmol L−1 with detection and quantification limits achieving values of 0.6 and 2.0 μmol L−1, respectively and sensitivity of 6.24 mA L mol−1. The apparent Michaelis–Menten constant (KMapp) obtained by amperometry for the immobilized glutathione reductase on the nanostructured platform was 60 μmol L−1

  11. Purification and properties of glutathione transferase from Issatchenkia orientalis.

    OpenAIRE

    Tamaki, H.; Kumagai, H.; Tochikura, T

    1989-01-01

    Glutathione transferase (GST) (EC 2.5.1.18) was purified from a cell extract of Issatchenkia orientalis, and two GST isoenzymes were isolated. They had molecular weights of 37,500 and 40,000 and were designated GST Y-1 and GST Y-2, respectively. GST Y-1 and GST Y-2 gave single bands with molecular weights of 22,000 and 23,500, respectively, on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. GST Y-1 and GST Y-2 were immunologically distinguished from each other. GST Y-1 showed speci...

  12. Glutathione and Transition-Metal Homeostasis in Escherichia coli▿

    OpenAIRE

    Helbig, Kerstin; Bleuel, Corinna; Krauss, Gerd J.; Nies, Dietrich H.

    2008-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) and its derivative phytochelatin are important binding factors in transition-metal homeostasis in many eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that GSH is also involved in chromate, Zn(II), Cd(II), and Cu(II) homeostasis and resistance in Escherichia coli. While the loss of the ability to synthesize GSH influenced metal tolerance in wild-type cells only slightly, GSH was important for residual metal resistance in cells without metal efflux systems. In mutant cells without the P-typ...

  13. Single-bilayer graphene oxide sheet tolerance and glutathione redox system significance assessment in faba bean (Vicia faba L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjum, Naser A. [University of Aveiro, Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) and Department of Chemistry (Portugal); Singh, Neetu; Singh, Manoj K. [University of Aveiro, Center for Mechanical Technology and Automation (TEMA) and Department of Mechanical Engineering (Portugal); Shah, Zahoor A. [University of Toledo, Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (United States); Duarte, Armando C.; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal, E-mail: ahmadr@ua.pt [University of Aveiro, Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) and Department of Chemistry (Portugal)

    2013-07-15

    Adsorbents based on single-bilayer graphene oxide sheet (hereafter termed 'graphene oxide') are widely used in contaminated environments cleanup which may easily open the avenues for their entry to different environmental compartments, exposure to organisms and their subsequent transfer to human/animal food chain. Considering a common food crop-faba bean (Vicia faba L.) germinating seedlings as a model plant system, this study assesses the V. faba-tolerance to different concentrations (0, 100, 200, 400, 800, and 1600 mg L{sup -1}) of graphene oxide (0.5-5 {mu}m) and evaluates glutathione ({gamma}-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine) redox system significance in this context. The results showed significantly increased V. faba sensitivity under three graphene oxide concentrations (in order of impact: 1,600 > 200 > 100 mg graphene oxide L{sup -1}), which was accompanied by decreased glutathione redox (reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione) ratio, reduced glutathione pool, as well as significant and equally elevated activities of glutathione-regenerating (glutathione reductase) and glutathione-metabolizing (glutathione peroxidase; glutathione sulfo-transferase) enzymes. Contrarily, the two graphene oxide concentrations (in order of impact: 800 > 400 graphene oxide mg L{sup -1}) yielded promising results; where, significant improvements in V. faba health status (measured as increased graphene oxide tolerance) were clearly perceptible with increased ratio of the reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione, reduced glutathione pool and glutathione reductase activity but decreased activities of glutathione-metabolizing enzymes. It is inferred that V. faba seedlings-sensitivity and/or tolerance to graphene oxide concentrations depends on both the cellular redox state (reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione ratio) and the reduced glutathione pool which in turn are controlled by a finely tuned modulation of the coordination between glutathione-regenerating and

  14. A Novel Basal Body Protein That Is a Polo-like Kinase Substrate Is Required for Basal Body Segregation and Flagellum Adhesion in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huiqing; Zhou, Qing; Li, Ziyin

    2015-10-01

    The Polo-like kinase (PLK) in Trypanosoma brucei plays multiple roles in basal body segregation, flagellum attachment, and cytokinesis. However, the mechanistic role of TbPLK remains elusive, mainly because most of its substrates are not known. Here, we report a new substrate of TbPLK, SPBB1, and its essential roles in T. brucei. SPBB1 was identified through yeast two-hybrid screening with the kinase-dead TbPLK as the bait. It interacts with TbPLK in vitro and in vivo, and is phosphorylated by TbPLK in vitro. SPBB1 localizes to both the mature basal body and the probasal body throughout the cell cycle, and co-localizes with TbPLK at the basal body during early cell cycle stages. RNAi against SPBB1 in procyclic trypanosomes inhibited basal body segregation, disrupted the new flagellum attachment zone filament, detached the new flagellum, and caused defective cytokinesis. Moreover, RNAi of SPBB1 confined TbPLK at the basal body and the bilobe structure, resulting in constitutive phosphorylation of TbCentrin2 at the bilobe. Altogether, these results identified a basal body protein as a TbPLK substrate and its essential role in promoting basal body segregation and flagellum attachment zone filament assembly for flagellum adhesion and cytokinesis initiation.

  15. Nucleolar accumulation of RNA binding proteins induced by Actinomycin D is functional in Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania mexicana but not in T. brucei.

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    Ezequiel Názer

    Full Text Available We have recently shown in T. cruzi that a group of RNA Binding Proteins (RBPs, involved in mRNA metabolism, are accumulated into the nucleolus in response to Actinomycin D (ActD treatment. In this work, we have extended our analysis to other members of the trypanosomatid lineage. In agreement with our previous study, the mechanism seems to be conserved in L. mexicana, since both endogenous RBPs and a transgenic RBP were relocalized to the nucleolus in parasites exposed to ActD. In contrast, in T. brucei, neither endogenous RBPs (TbRRM1 and TbPABP2 nor a transgenic RBP from T. cruzi were accumulated into the nucleolus under such treatment. Interestingly, when a transgenic TbRRM1 was expressed in T. cruzi and the parasites exposed to ActD, TbRRM1 relocated to the nucleolus, suggesting that it contains the necessary sequence elements to be targeted to the nucleolus. Together, both experiments demonstrate that the mechanism behind nucleolar localization of RBPs, which is present in T. cruzi and L. mexicana, is not functional in T. brucei, suggesting that it has been lost or retained differentially during the evolution of the trypanosomatid lineage.

  16. Dynein Light Chain LC8 Is Required for RNA Polymerase I-Mediated Transcription in Trypanosoma brucei, Facilitating Assembly and Promoter Binding of Class I Transcription Factor A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Justin K; Park, Sung Hee; Nguyen, Tu N; Lee, Ju Huck; Günzl, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Dynein light chain LC8 is highly conserved among eukaryotes and has both dynein-dependent and dynein-independent functions. Interestingly, LC8 was identified as a subunit of the class I transcription factor A (CITFA), which is essential for transcription by RNA polymerase I (Pol I) in the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Given that LC8 has never been identified with a basal transcription factor and that T. brucei relies on RNA Pol I for expressing the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG), the key protein in antigenic variation, we investigated the CITFA-specific role of LC8. Depletion of LC8 from mammalian-infective bloodstream trypanosomes affected cell cycle progression, reduced the abundances of rRNA and VSG mRNA, and resulted in rapid cell death. Sedimentation analysis, coimmunoprecipitation of recombinant proteins, and bioinformatic analysis revealed an LC8 binding site near the N terminus of the subunit CITFA2. Mutation of this site prevented the formation of a CITFA2-LC8 heterotetramer and, in vivo, was lethal, affecting assembly of a functional CITFA complex. Gel shift assays and UV cross-linking experiments identified CITFA2 as a promoter-binding CITFA subunit. Accordingly, silencing of LC8 or CITFA2 resulted in a loss of CITFA from RNA Pol I promoters. Hence, we discovered an LC8 interaction that, unprecedentedly, has a basal function in transcription.

  17. Atypical features of a Ure2p glutathione transferase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuillier, Anne; Roret, Thomas; Favier, Frédérique; Gelhaye, Eric; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Didierjean, Claude; Morel-Rouhier, Mélanie

    2013-07-11

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are known to transfer glutathione onto small hydrophobic molecules in detoxification reactions. The GST Ure2pB1 from Phanerochaete chrysosporium exhibits atypical features, i.e. the presence of two glutathione binding sites and a high affinity towards oxidized glutathione. Moreover, PcUre2pB1 is able to efficiently deglutathionylate GS-phenacylacetophenone. Catalysis is not mediated by the cysteines of the protein but rather by the one of glutathione and an asparagine residue plays a key role in glutathione stabilization. Interestingly PcUre2pB1 interacts in vitro with a GST of the omega class. These properties are discussed in the physiological context of wood degrading fungi.

  18. Three-dimensional structure of a Bombyx mori Omega-class glutathione transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Suzuki, Mamoru; Higashiura, Akifumi; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2013-09-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are major phase II detoxification enzymes that play central roles in the defense against various environmental toxicants as well as oxidative stress. Here we report the crystal structure of an Omega-class glutathione transferase of Bombyx mori, bmGSTO, to gain insight into its catalytic mechanism. The structure of bmGSTO complexed with glutathione determined at a resolution of 2.5Å reveals that it exists as a dimer and is structurally similar to Omega-class GSTs with respect to its secondary and tertiary structures. Analysis of a complex between bmGSTO and glutathione showed that bound glutathione was localized to the glutathione-binding site (G-site). Site-directed mutagenesis of bmGSTO mutants indicated that amino acid residues Leu62, Lys65, Lys77, Val78, Glu91 and Ser92 in the G-site contribute to catalytic activity.

  19. Structural characterization of the catalytic site of a Nilaparvata lugens delta-class glutathione transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamada, Naotaka; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2015-01-15

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a major class of detoxification enzymes that play a central role in the defense against environmental toxicants and oxidative stress. Here, we studied the crystal structure of a delta-class glutathione transferase from Nilaparvata lugens, nlGSTD, to gain insights into its catalytic mechanism. The structure of nlGSTD in complex with glutathione, determined at a resolution of 1.7Å, revealed that it exists as a dimer and its secondary and tertiary structures are similar to those of other delta-class GSTs. Analysis of a complex between nlGSTD and glutathione showed that the bound glutathione was localized to the glutathione-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of nlGSTD mutants indicated that amino acid residues Ser11, His52, Glu66, and Phe119 contribute to catalytic activity.

  20. Enhancement of Combined Umami and Salty Taste by Glutathione in the Human Tongue and Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tazuko K; Yeung, Andy Wai Kan; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Ito, Yuki; Jung, Han-Sung; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-09-01

    Glutathione, a natural substance, acts on calcium receptors on the tongue and is known to enhance basic taste sensations. However, the effects of glutathione on brain activity associated with taste sensation on the tongue have not been determined under standardized taste delivery conditions. In this study, we investigated the sensory effect of glutathione on taste with no effect of the smell when glutathione added to a combined umami and salty taste stimulus. Twenty-six volunteers (12 women and 14 men; age 19-27 years) performed a sensory evaluation of taste of a solution of monosodium L-glutamate and sodium chloride, with and without glutathione. The addition of glutathione changed taste qualities and significantly increased taste intensity ratings under standardized taste delivery conditions (P tasting an umami and salty mixture. PMID:27353260