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Sample records for brucei gambiense human

  1. Mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense resistance to human serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uzureau, Pierrick; Uzureau, Sophie; Lecordier, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    The African parasite Trypanosoma brucei gambiense accounts for 97% of human sleeping sickness cases. T. b. gambiense resists the specific human innate immunity acting against several other tsetse-fly-transmitted trypanosome species such as T. b. brucei, the causative agent of nagana disease...... in cattle. Human immunity to some African trypanosomes is due to two serum complexes designated trypanolytic factors (TLF-1 and -2), which both contain haptoglobin-related protein (HPR) and apolipoprotein LI (APOL1). Whereas HPR association with haemoglobin (Hb) allows TLF-1 binding and uptake via......GP), which prevents APOL1 toxicity and induces stiffening of membranes upon interaction with lipids. Two additional features contribute to resistance to TLFs: reduction of sensitivity to APOL1 requiring cysteine protease activity, and TbHpHbR inactivation due to a L210S substitution. According...

  2. The genome sequence of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, causative agent of chronic human african trypanosomiasis.

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    Andrew P Jackson

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is the causative agent of chronic Human African Trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness, a disease endemic across often poor and rural areas of Western and Central Africa. We have previously published the genome sequence of a T. b. brucei isolate, and have now employed a comparative genomics approach to understand the scale of genomic variation between T. b. gambiense and the reference genome. We sought to identify features that were uniquely associated with T. b. gambiense and its ability to infect humans.An improved high-quality draft genome sequence for the group 1 T. b. gambiense DAL 972 isolate was produced using a whole-genome shotgun strategy. Comparison with T. b. brucei showed that sequence identity averages 99.2% in coding regions, and gene order is largely collinear. However, variation associated with segmental duplications and tandem gene arrays suggests some reduction of functional repertoire in T. b. gambiense DAL 972. A comparison of the variant surface glycoproteins (VSG in T. b. brucei with all T. b. gambiense sequence reads showed that the essential structural repertoire of VSG domains is conserved across T. brucei.This study provides the first estimate of intraspecific genomic variation within T. brucei, and so has important consequences for future population genomics studies. We have shown that the T. b. gambiense genome corresponds closely with the reference, which should therefore be an effective scaffold for any T. brucei genome sequence data. As VSG repertoire is also well conserved, it may be feasible to describe the total diversity of variant antigens. While we describe several as yet uncharacterized gene families with predicted cell surface roles that were expanded in number in T. b. brucei, no T. b. gambiense-specific gene was identified outside of the subtelomeres that could explain the ability to infect humans.

  3. Aparasitemic serological suspects in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis : a potential human reservoir of parasites ?

    OpenAIRE

    Koffi, Mathurin; Solano, Philippe; Denizot, M.; Courtin, D.; Garcia, André; Lejon, V.; Buscher, P.; Cuny, Gérard; Jamonneau, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    The serological and parasitological tests used for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) diagnosis have low specificity and sensitivity, respectively, and in the field, control program teams are faced with subjects with positive serology but negative parasitology who remain untreated. The aim of this work was to explore, using PCR tool, the significance of these aparasitemic serological suspects. Since discordant PCR results have been observed earlier with different...

  4. Silent Human Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Infections around the Old Gboko Sleeping Sickness Focus in Nigeria

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    Karshima Solomon Ngutor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes Gambian trypanosomosis, a disease ravaging affected rural parts of Sub-Saharan Africa. We screened 1200 human blood samples for T. b. gambiense using the card agglutination test for trypanosomosis, characterized trypanosome isolates with Trypanosoma gambiense serum glycoprotein-PCR (TgsGP-PCR, and analyzed our data using Chi square and odds ratio at 95% confidence interval for statistical association. Of the 1200 samples, the CATT revealed an overall infection rate of 1.8% which ranged between 0.0% and 3.5% across study sites. Age and sex based infection rates ranged between 1.2% and 2.3%. We isolated 7 (33.3% trypanosomes from the 21 seropositive samples using immunosuppressed mice which were identified as T. b. gambiense group 1 by TgsGP-PCR. Based on study sites, PCR revealed an overall infection rate of 0.6% which ranged between 0.0% and 1.5%. Females and males revealed PCR based infection rates of 0.3% and 0.8%, respectively. Infection rates in adults (1.3% and children (0.1% varied significantly (p<0.05. We observed silent T. b. gambiense infections among residents of this focus. Risks of disease development into the second fatal stage in these patients who may also serve as reservoirs of infection in the focus exist.

  5. Molecular Evidence of a Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Sylvatic Cycle in the Human African Trypanosomiasis Foci of Equatorial Guinea

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    Carlos eCordon-Obras

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gambiense trypanosomiasis is considered an anthroponotic disease. Consequently, control programs are generally aimed at stopping transmission of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T. b. gambiense by detecting and treating human cases. However, the persistence of numerous foci despite efforts to eliminate this disease questions this strategy as unique tool to pursue the eradication. The role of animals as a reservoir of T. b. gambiense is still controversial, but could partly explain maintenance of the infection at hypo-endemic levels. In the present study, we evaluated the presence of T. b. gambiense in wild animals in Equatorial Guinea. The infection rate ranged from 0.8% in the insular focus of Luba to more than 12% in Mbini, a focus with a constant trickle of human cases. The parasite was detected in a wide range of animal species including four species never described previously as putative reservoirs. Our study comes to reinforce the hypothesis that animals may play a role in the persistence of T. b. gambiense transmission, being particularly relevant in low transmission settings. Under these conditions the integration of sustained vector control and medical interventions should be considered to achieve the elimination of Gambiense trypanosomiasis.

  6. Diagnosis of human trypanosomiasis, due to Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in central Africa, by the polymerase chain reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Penchenier, Laurent; Simo, G.; Grébaut, Pascal; Nkinin, S.; Laveissière, Claude; Herder, Stéphane

    2000-01-01

    During a mass screening of sleeping sickness conducted in 1998 and 1999, and involving 27,932 persons in Cameroon and the Central African Republic, we tested the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on whole blood for the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis due to #Trypanosoma brucei gambiense$. The 1858 samples obtained were from 4 groups : 155 infected patients, 1432 serological suspects detected by the card agglutination test for trypanosomiasis (CATT), 222 negative controls living in th...

  7. Untreated human infections by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense are not 100% fatal.

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    Vincent Jamonneau

    Full Text Available The final outcome of infection by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, the main agent of sleeping sickness, has always been considered as invariably fatal. While scarce and old reports have mentioned cases of self-cure in untreated patients, these studies suffered from the lack of accurate diagnostic tools available at that time. Here, using the most specific and sensitive tools available to date, we report on a long-term follow-up (15 years of a cohort of 50 human African trypanosomiasis (HAT patients from the Ivory Coast among whom 11 refused treatment after their initial diagnosis. In 10 out of 11 subjects who continued to refuse treatment despite repeated visits, parasite clearance was observed using both microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Most of these subjects (7/10 also displayed decreasing serological responses, becoming progressively negative to trypanosome variable antigens (LiTat 1.3, 1.5 and 1.6. Hence, in addition to the "classic" lethal outcome of HAT, we show that alternative natural progressions of HAT may occur: progression to an apparently aparasitaemic and asymptomatic infection associated with strong long-lasting serological responses and progression to an apparently spontaneous resolution of infection (with negative results in parasitological tests and PCR associated with a progressive drop in antibody titres as observed in treated cases. While this study does not precisely estimate the frequency of the alternative courses for this infection, it is noteworthy that in the field national control programs encounter a significant proportion of subjects displaying positive serologic test results but negative results in parasitological testing. These findings demonstrate that a number of these subjects display such infection courses. From our point of view, recognising that trypanotolerance exists in humans, as is now widely accepted for animals, is a major step forward for future research in the field of HAT.

  8. Characterization of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense stocks isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense was isolated twice from each of 23 patients in Côte d'Ivoire. Genetic characterization using RAPD (Random Primed Amplified Polymorphic DNA) showed additional variability within a given isoenzyme profile (zymodeme), confirming that this fingerprinting method has a higher discriminative ...

  9. Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense in Glossina fuscipes fuscipes ( Diptera: Glossinidae ) and Stomoxys flies using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique in southern Sudan.

  10. A Primate APOL1 Variant That Kills Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

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    Anneli Cooper

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Humans are protected against infection from most African trypanosomes by lipoprotein complexes present in serum that contain the trypanolytic pore-forming protein, Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1. The human-infective trypanosomes, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in East Africa and T. b. gambiense in West Africa have separately evolved mechanisms that allow them to resist APOL1-mediated lysis and cause human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, in man. Recently, APOL1 variants were identified from a subset of Old World monkeys, that are able to lyse East African T. b. rhodesiense, by virtue of C-terminal polymorphisms in the APOL1 protein that hinder that parasite's resistance mechanism. Such variants have been proposed as candidates for developing therapeutic alternatives to the unsatisfactory anti-trypanosomal drugs currently in use. Here we demonstrate the in vitro lytic ability of serum and purified recombinant protein of an APOL1 ortholog from the West African Guinea baboon (Papio papio, which is able to lyse examples of all sub-species of T. brucei including T. b. gambiense group 1 parasites, the most common agent of human African trypanosomiasis. The identification of a variant of APOL1 with trypanolytic ability for both human-infective T. brucei sub-species could be a candidate for universal APOL1-based therapeutic strategies, targeted against all pathogenic African trypanosomes.

  11. A Primate APOL1 Variant That Kills Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

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    Cooper, Anneli; Capewell, Paul; Clucas, Caroline; Veitch, Nicola; Weir, William; Thomson, Russell; Raper, Jayne; MacLeod, Annette

    2016-08-01

    Humans are protected against infection from most African trypanosomes by lipoprotein complexes present in serum that contain the trypanolytic pore-forming protein, Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1). The human-infective trypanosomes, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in East Africa and T. b. gambiense in West Africa have separately evolved mechanisms that allow them to resist APOL1-mediated lysis and cause human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, in man. Recently, APOL1 variants were identified from a subset of Old World monkeys, that are able to lyse East African T. b. rhodesiense, by virtue of C-terminal polymorphisms in the APOL1 protein that hinder that parasite's resistance mechanism. Such variants have been proposed as candidates for developing therapeutic alternatives to the unsatisfactory anti-trypanosomal drugs currently in use. Here we demonstrate the in vitro lytic ability of serum and purified recombinant protein of an APOL1 ortholog from the West African Guinea baboon (Papio papio), which is able to lyse examples of all sub-species of T. brucei including T. b. gambiense group 1 parasites, the most common agent of human African trypanosomiasis. The identification of a variant of APOL1 with trypanolytic ability for both human-infective T. brucei sub-species could be a candidate for universal APOL1-based therapeutic strategies, targeted against all pathogenic African trypanosomes.

  12. Neural Damage in Experimental Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Infection: The Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

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    Chiara Tesoriero

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei (T. b. gambiense is the parasite subspecies responsible for most reported cases of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness. This severe infection leads to characteristic disruption of the sleep-wake cycle, recalling attention on the circadian timing system. Most animal models of the disease have been hitherto based on infection of laboratory rodents with the T. b. brucei subspecies, which is not infectious to humans. In these animal models, functional, rather than structural, alterations of the master circadian pacemaker, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, have been reported. Information on the SCN after infection with the human pathogenic T. b. gambiense is instead lacking. The present study was aimed at the examination of the SCN after T. b. gambiense infection of a susceptible rodent, the multimammate mouse, Mastomys natalensis, compared with T. b. brucei infection of the same host species. The animals were examined at 4 and 8 weeks post-infection, when parasites (T. b. gambiense or T. b. brucei were detected in the brain parenchyma, indicating that the disease was in the encephalitic stage. Neuron and astrocyte changes were examined with Nissl staining, immunophenotyping and quantitative analyses. Interestingly, significant neuronal loss (about 30% reduction was documented in the SCN during the progression of T. b. gambiense infection. No significant neuronal density changes were found in the SCN of T. b. brucei-infected animals. Neuronal cell counts in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of T. b. gambiense-infected M. natalensis did not point out significant changes, indicating that no widespread neuron loss had occurred in the brain. Marked activation of astrocytes was detected in the SCN after both T. b. gambiense and T. b. brucei infections. Altogether the findings reveal that neurons of the biological clock are highly susceptible to the infection caused by human pathogenic African trypanosomes

  13. Contemporary and emerging strategies for eliminating human African trypanosomiasis due to Trypanosoma brucei gambiense: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Peter; Stone, Christopher M; Sutherland, C Simone; Tanner, Marcel; Tediosi, Fabrizio

    2015-06-01

    To review current and emerging tools for Gambiense HAT control and elimination, and propose strategies that integrate these tools with epidemiological evidence. We reviewed the scientific literature to identify contemporary and emerging tools and strategies for controlling and eliminating Gambiense HAT. Through an iterative process involving key stakeholders, we then developed comprehensive scenarios leading to elimination, considering both established and new tools for diagnosis, case treatment and vector control. Core components of all scenarios include detecting and treating cases with established or emerging techniques. Relatively more intensive scenarios incorporate vector control. New tools considered include tiny targets for tsetse fly control, use of rapid diagnostic tests and oral treatment with fexinidazole or oxaboroles. Scenarios consider the time when critical new tools are expected to become ready for deployment by national control programmes. Based on a review of the latest epidemiological data, we estimate the various interventions to cover 1,380,600 km(2) and 56,986,000 people. A number of new tools will fill critical gaps in the current armamentarium for diagnosing and treating Gambiense HAT. Deploying these tools in endemic areas will facilitate the comprehensive and sustainable control of the disease considerably and contribute to the ultimate goal of elimination. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The miRNA and mRNA Signatures of Peripheral Blood Cells in Humans Infected with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

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    Smiths Lueong

    Full Text Available Simple, reliable tools for diagnosis of human African Trypanosomiases could ease field surveillance and enhance patient care. In particular, current methods to distinguish patients with (stage II and without (stage I brain involvement require samples of cerebrospinal fluid. We describe here an exploratory study to find out whether miRNAs from peripheral blood leukocytes might be useful in diagnosis of human trypanosomiasis, or for determining the stage of the disease. Using microarrays, we measured miRNAs in samples from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense-infected patients (9 stage I, 10 stage II, 8 seronegative parasite-negative controls and 12 seropositive, but parasite-negative subjects. 8 miRNAs (out of 1205 tested showed significantly lower expression in patients than in seronegative, parasite-negative controls, and 1 showed increased expression. There were no clear differences in miRNAs between patients in different disease stages. The miRNA profiles could not distinguish seropositive, but parasitologically negative samples from controls and results within this group did not correlate with those from the trypanolysis test. Some of the regulated miRNAs, or their predicted mRNA targets, were previously reported changed during other infectious diseases or cancer. We conclude that the changes in miRNA profiles of peripheral blood lymphocytes in human African trypanosomiasis are related to immune activation or inflammation, are probably disease-non-specific, and cannot be used to determine the disease stage. The approach has little promise for diagnostics but might yield information about disease pathology.

  15. First evidence that parasite infecting apparent aparasitemic serological suspects in human African trypanosomiasis are Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and are similar to those found in patients.

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    Kaboré, Jacques; Koffi, Mathurin; Bucheton, Bruno; MacLeod, Annette; Duffy, Craig; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Camara, Mamadou; De Meeûs, Thierry; Belem, Adrien Marie Gaston; Jamonneau, Vincent

    2011-08-01

    Thanks to its sensitivity and its ease of use in the field, the card agglutination test for trypanosomiasis (CATT) is widely used for serological screening of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). Positive subjects are then examined by microscopy to confirm the disease. However, the CATT exhibits false-positive results raising the question of whether CATT-positive subjects who are not confirmed by microscopic detection of trypanosomes (SERO) are truly exposed to T.b. gambiense infection. For this purpose, we applied microsatellite genotyping on DNA extracted from blood of both HAT confirmed patients and SERO subjects in Guinea and Côte d'Ivoire since microsatellite genotyping has proved useful for the study of T.b. gambiense genetic diversity. Problems of amplification failures raise the question of the sensitivity of microsatellite markers when applied on biological samples especially from SERO subjects for who low blood parasitaemia are suspected. Nevertheless, we have shown that the trypanosomes from SERO individuals that have been genotyped belong to T.b. gambiense group 1 and were identical to those found in HAT patients. These results constitute the first evidences that at least some SERO are indeed infected by T.b. gambiense group 1 and that they may constitute a human reservoir of parasite in HAT foci. Whether these individuals should undergo treatment remains an open question as long as their role in HAT transmission is unknown. Our results strongly recommend the follow-up of such subjects to improve control strategies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The study of trypanosome species circulating in domestic animals in two human African trypanosomiasis foci of Côte d'Ivoire identifies pigs and cattle as potential reservoirs of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense

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    N’Djetchi, Martial Kassi; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Koffi, Mathurin; Kaboré, Jacques; Kaboré, Justin Windingoudi; Kaba, Dramane; Courtin, Fabrice; Coulibaly, Bamoro; Fauret, Pierre; Kouakou, Lingué; Ravel, Sophie; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Solano, Philippe; De Meeûs, Thierry; Bucheton, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Background Important control efforts have led to a significant reduction of the prevalence of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) in Côte d’Ivoire, but the disease is still present in several foci. The existence of an animal reservoir of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense may explain disease persistence in these foci where animal breeding is an important source of income but where the prevalence of animal African trypanosomiasis (AAT) is unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the trypanosome species circulating in domestic animals in both Bonon and Sinfra HAT endemic foci. Methodology/Principal findings 552 domestic animals (goats, pigs, cattle and sheep) were included. Blood samples were tested for trypanosomes by microscopic observation, species-specific PCR for T. brucei sl, T. congolense, T. vivax and subspecies-specific PCR for T. b. gambiense and T. b. gambiense immune trypanolysis (TL). Infection rates varied significantly between animal species and were by far the highest in pigs (30%). T. brucei s.l was the most prevalent trypanosome species (13.7%) followed by T. congolense. No T. b. gambiense was identified by PCR while high TL positivity rates were observed using T. b. gambiense specific variants (up to 27.6% for pigs in the Bonon focus). Conclusion This study shows that domestic animals are highly infected by trypanosomes in the studied foci. This was particularly true for pigs, possibly due to a higher exposure of these animals to tsetse flies. Whereas T. brucei s.l. was the most prevalent species, discordant results were obtained between PCR and TL regarding T. b. gambiense identification. It is therefore crucial to develop better tools to study the epidemiological role of potential animal reservoir for T. b. gambiense. Our study illustrates the importance of “one health” approaches to reach HAT elimination and contribute to AAT control in the studied foci. PMID:29045405

  17. The study of trypanosome species circulating in domestic animals in two human African trypanosomiasis foci of Côte d'Ivoire identifies pigs and cattle as potential reservoirs of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Djetchi, Martial Kassi; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Koffi, Mathurin; Kaboré, Jacques; Kaboré, Justin Windingoudi; Kaba, Dramane; Courtin, Fabrice; Coulibaly, Bamoro; Fauret, Pierre; Kouakou, Lingué; Ravel, Sophie; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Solano, Philippe; De Meeûs, Thierry; Bucheton, Bruno; Jamonneau, Vincent

    2017-10-01

    Important control efforts have led to a significant reduction of the prevalence of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) in Côte d'Ivoire, but the disease is still present in several foci. The existence of an animal reservoir of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense may explain disease persistence in these foci where animal breeding is an important source of income but where the prevalence of animal African trypanosomiasis (AAT) is unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the trypanosome species circulating in domestic animals in both Bonon and Sinfra HAT endemic foci. 552 domestic animals (goats, pigs, cattle and sheep) were included. Blood samples were tested for trypanosomes by microscopic observation, species-specific PCR for T. brucei sl, T. congolense, T. vivax and subspecies-specific PCR for T. b. gambiense and T. b. gambiense immune trypanolysis (TL). Infection rates varied significantly between animal species and were by far the highest in pigs (30%). T. brucei s.l was the most prevalent trypanosome species (13.7%) followed by T. congolense. No T. b. gambiense was identified by PCR while high TL positivity rates were observed using T. b. gambiense specific variants (up to 27.6% for pigs in the Bonon focus). This study shows that domestic animals are highly infected by trypanosomes in the studied foci. This was particularly true for pigs, possibly due to a higher exposure of these animals to tsetse flies. Whereas T. brucei s.l. was the most prevalent species, discordant results were obtained between PCR and TL regarding T. b. gambiense identification. It is therefore crucial to develop better tools to study the epidemiological role of potential animal reservoir for T. b. gambiense. Our study illustrates the importance of "one health" approaches to reach HAT elimination and contribute to AAT control in the studied foci.

  18. Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense in Glossina fuscipes fuscipes (Diptera: ... in nature are considered epidemiologically important. (Leak and Rowlands, 1997). ... The classical techniques used to detect trypanosome infection in flies (Lloyd and Johnson, 1924) are of limited.

  19. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense group 1 is distinguished by a unique amino acid substitution in the HpHb receptor implicated in human serum resistance.

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    Rebecca E Symula

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (Tbr and T. b. gambiense (Tbg, causative agents of Human African Trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness in Africa, have evolved alternative mechanisms of resisting the activity of trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs, components of innate immunity in human serum that protect against infection by other African trypanosomes. In Tbr, lytic activity is suppressed by the Tbr-specific serum-resistance associated (SRA protein. The mechanism in Tbg is less well understood but has been hypothesized to involve altered activity and expression of haptoglobin haemoglobin receptor (HpHbR. HpHbR has been shown to facilitate internalization of TLF-1 in T.b. brucei (Tbb, a member of the T. brucei species complex that is susceptible to human serum. By evaluating the genetic variability of HpHbR in a comprehensive geographical and taxonomic context, we show that a single substitution that replaces leucine with serine at position 210 is conserved in the most widespread form of Tbg (Tbg group 1 and not found in related taxa, which are either human serum susceptible (Tbb or known to resist lysis via an alternative mechanism (Tbr and Tbg group 2. We hypothesize that this single substitution contributes to reduced uptake of TLF and thus may play a key role in conferring serum resistance to Tbg group 1. In contrast, similarity in HpHbR sequence among isolates of Tbg group 2 and Tbb/Tbr provides further evidence that human serum resistance in Tbg group 2 is likely independent of HpHbR function.

  20. Neural Damage in Experimental Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Infection: Hypothalamic Peptidergic Sleep and Wake-Regulatory Neurons

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    Claudia Laperchia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuron populations of the lateral hypothalamus which synthesize the orexin (OX/hypocretin or melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH peptides play crucial, reciprocal roles in regulating wake stability and sleep. The disease human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, also called sleeping sickness, caused by extracellular Trypanosoma brucei (T. b. parasites, leads to characteristic sleep-wake cycle disruption and narcoleptic-like alterations of the sleep structure. Previous studies have revealed damage of OX and MCH neurons during systemic infection of laboratory rodents with the non-human pathogenic T. b. brucei subspecies. No information is available, however, on these peptidergic neurons after systemic infection with T. b. gambiense, the etiological agent of 97% of HAT cases. The present study was aimed at the investigation of immunohistochemically characterized OX and MCH neurons after T. b. gambiense or T. b. brucei infection of a susceptible rodent, the multimammate mouse, Mastomysnatalensis. Cell counts and evaluation of OX fiber density were performed at 4 and 8 weeks post-infection, when parasites had entered the brain parenchyma from the periphery. A significant decrease of OX neurons (about 44% reduction and MCH neurons (about 54% reduction was found in the lateral hypothalamus and perifornical area at 8 weeks in T. b. gambiense-infected M. natalensis. A moderate decrease (21% and 24% reduction, respectively, which did not reach statistical significance, was found after T. b. brucei infection. In two key targets of diencephalic orexinergic innervation, the peri-suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN region and the thalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVT, densitometric analyses showed a significant progressive decrease in the density of orexinergic fibers in both infection paradigms, and especially during T. b. gambiense infection. Altogether the findings provide novel information showing that OX and MCH neurons are highly vulnerable to chronic

  1. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Spliced Leader RNA Is a More Specific Marker for Cure of Human African Trypanosomiasis Than T. b. gambiense DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilboudo, Hamidou; Camara, Oumou; Ravel, Sophie; Bucheton, Bruno; Lejon, Veerle; Camara, Mamadou; Kaboré, Jacques; Jamonneau, Vincent; Deborggraeve, Stijn

    2015-12-15

    To assess the efficacy of treatment for human African trypanosomiasis, accurate tests that can discriminate relapse from cure are needed. We report the first data that the spliced leader (SL) RNA is a more specific marker for cure of human African trypanosomiasis than parasite DNA. In blood samples obtained from 61 patients in whom human African trypanosomiasis was cured, SL RNA detection had specificities of 98.4%-100%, while DNA detection had a specificity of only 77%. Data from our proof-of-concept study show that SL RNA detection has high potential as a test of cure. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Domestic animals as potential reservoir hosts of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in sleeping sickness foci in Cameroon

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    Njiokou F.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An explanation of the endemic nature and/or the resurgence of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT in the historic foci in West and Central Africa may be the existence of an animal reservoir. In some HAT foci, pigs were found infected by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense but the implication of the other domestic animals was not quite evaluated. This study aims to determine the prevalence of T. b. gambiense in domestic animal species (goat, sheep, pig and dog commonly found in the four active HAT foci in Cameroon (Bipindi, Fontem, Campo and Doumé. Blood samples were collected from 307 pigs, 264 goats, 267 sheep and 37 dogs and used for parasitological (QBC, immunological (LiTat 1.3 CATT and molecular (PCR analyses. QBC detected trypanosomes in 3.88 % domestic animals while 22.7 % were sero-positive with LiTat 1.3 CATT tests. Of the 875 animals analysed, 174 (19.88 % harboured T. brucei s.l. DNA, found in each of the four types of animal and in the four localities. The infection rate significantly differed among the animal species (p < 0.0001 and localities (p < 0.0001. The PCR also revealed T. b. gambiense group 1 DNA in 27 (3.08 % domestic animals. The specific infection rates were as follows: sheep (6.74 %, goats (3.08 %, pigs (0.32 % and dogs (0 %. T. b. gambiense was found in 8 (3.92 % animals from Bipindi, 15 (4.83 % from Campo, 4 (2.59 % from Fontem-Center and none from Doumé. The infection rates significantly differed between the localities, and correlated with the intensity of HAT transmission in the foci.

  3. In vitro investigation of Brazilian Cerrado plant extract activity against Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei gambiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charneau, Sébastien; de Mesquita, Mariana Laundry; Bastos, Izabela Marques Dourado; Santana, Jaime Martins; de Paula, José Elias; Grellier, Philippe; Espindola, Laila Salmen

    2016-06-01

    The threatened Brazilian Cerrado biome is an important biodiversity hotspot but still few explored that constitutes a potential reservoir of molecules to treat infectious diseases. We selected eight Cerrado plant species for screening against the erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum, human intracellular stages of Trypanosoma cruzi and bloodstream forms of T. brucei gambiense, and for their cytotoxicity upon the rat L6-myoblast cell line. Bioassays were performed with 37 hexane, ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts prepared from different plant organs. Activities against parasites were observed for 24 extracts: 9 with anti-P. falciparum, 4 with anti-T. cruzi and 11 with anti-T. brucei gambiense activities. High anti-protozoal activity (IC50 values Cerrado conservation and sustainable development.

  4. Key indicators for the monitoring and evaluation of control programmes of human African trypanosomiasis due to Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, B; Legros, D; Lee, E

    1998-06-01

    Very little research has been devoted to the design of epidemiological tools for the monitoring and evaluation of National Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) Control Programmes and daily management decisions are made in the absence of accurate knowledge of the situation. This paper identifies key indicators necessary to make decisions in the field and constantly adjust control activities to changing situations. Examples are derived from the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) HAT Control Programme in Adjumani, Uganda. Based on the principles of quality assurance, the focus is placed on process indicators. A conceptual framework derived from a system view/planning cycle perspective is also described for the construction of indicators. Finally, some specific challenging aspects of the epidemiology of HAT are presented and the limitations of the interpretation of the indicators discussed.

  5. Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in Urine and Saliva Samples in Nonhuman Primate Model

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    Maina Ngotho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is a vector-borne parasitic zoonotic disease. The disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is the most prevalent in Africa. Early diagnosis is hampered by lack of sensitive diagnostic techniques. This study explored the potential of loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP and polymerase chain reaction (PCR in the detection of T. b. gambiense infection in a vervet monkey HAT model. Six vervet monkeys were experimentally infected with T. b. gambiense IL3253 and monitored for 180 days after infection. Parasitaemia was scored daily. Blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, saliva, and urine samples were collected weekly. PCR and LAMP were performed on serum, CSF, saliva, and urine samples. The detection by LAMP was significantly higher than that of parasitological methods and PCR in all the samples. The performance of LAMP varied between the samples and was better in serum followed by saliva and then urine samples. In the saliva samples, LAMP had 100% detection between 21 and 77 dpi, whereas in urine the detection it was slightly lower, but there was over 80% detection between 28 and 91 dpi. However, LAMP could not detect trypanosomes in either saliva or urine after 140 and 126 dpi, respectively. The findings of this study emphasize the importance of LAMP in diagnosis of HAT using saliva and urine samples.

  6. Overproduction, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense glycerol kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogun, Emmanuel Oluwadare; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Kido, Yasutoshi; Shiba, Tomoo; Nara, Takeshi; Aoki, Takashi; Honma, Teruki; Tanaka, Akiko; Inoue, Masayuki; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Michels, Paul A. M.; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Glycerol kinase from human African trypanosomes has been purified and crystallized for X-ray structure analysis. In the bloodstream forms of human trypanosomes, glycerol kinase (GK; EC 2.7.1.30) is one of the nine glycosomally compartmentalized enzymes that are essential for energy metabolism. In this study, a recombinant Trypanosoma brucei gambiense GK (rTbgGK) with an N-terminal cleavable His 6 tag was overexpressed, purified to homogeneity and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 400 as a precipitant. A complete X-ray diffraction data set to 2.75 Å resolution indicated that the crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 63.84, b = 121.50, c = 154.59 Å. The presence of two rTbgGK molecules in the asymmetric unit gives a Matthews coefficient (V M ) of 2.5 Å 3 Da −1 , corresponding to 50% solvent content

  7. A single amino acid substitution in the group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor abolishes TLF-1 binding.

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    E DeJesus

    Full Text Available Critical to human innate immunity against African trypanosomes is a minor subclass of human high-density lipoproteins, termed Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1. This primate-specific molecule binds to a haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR on the surface of susceptible trypanosomes, initiating a lytic pathway. Group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT, escaping TLF-1 killing due to reduced uptake. Previously, we found that group 1 T. b. gambiense HpHbR (TbgHpHbR mRNA levels were greatly reduced and the gene contained substitutions within the open reading frame. Here we show that a single, highly conserved amino acid in the TbgHpHbR ablates high affinity TLF-1 binding and subsequent endocytosis, thus evading TLF-1 killing. In addition, we show that over-expression of TbgHpHbR failed to rescue TLF-1 susceptibility. These findings suggest that the single substitution present in the TbgHpHbR directly contributes to the reduced uptake and resistance to TLF-1 seen in these important human pathogens.

  8. Screening of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in Domestic Livestock and Tsetse Flies from an Insular Endemic Focus (Luba, Equatorial Guinea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordon-Obras, Carlos; García-Estébanez, Carmen; Ndong-Mabale, Nicolás; Abaga, Simón; Ndongo-Asumu, Pedro; Benito, Agustín; Cano, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Background Sleeping sickness is spread over 36 Sub-Saharan African countries. In West and Central Africa, the disease is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, which produces a chronic clinical manifestation. The Luba focus (Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea) has not reported autochthonous sleeping sickness cases since 1995, but given the complexity of the epidemiological cycle, the elimination of the parasite in the environment is difficult to categorically ensure. Methodology/Principal Findings The aim of this work is to assess, by a molecular approach (Polymerase Chain Reaction, PCR), the possible permanence of T. b. gambiense in the vector (Glossina spp.) and domestic fauna in order to improve our understanding of the epidemiological situation of the disease in an isolated focus considered to be under control. The results obtained show the absence of the parasite in peridomestic livestock but its presence, although at very low rate, in the vector. On the other hand, interesting entomological data highlight that an elevated concentration of tsetse flies was observed in two out of the ten villages considered to be in the focus. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that even in conditions of apparent control, a complete parasite clearance is difficult to achieve. Further investigations must be focused on animal reservoirs which could allow the parasites to persist without leading to human cases. In Luba, where domestic livestock are scarcer than other foci in mainland Equatorial Guinea, the epidemiological significance of wild fauna should be assessed to establish their role in the maintenance of the infection. PMID:20544031

  9. About Trypanosoma brucei gambiense , the causative agent of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since its discovery at the beginning of 20th century, Human African Trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness has killed several hundred thousands of individuals in Africa, mainly in Central part of the continent. The actual situation of the disease in several countries is dramatic, such as in Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo ...

  10. Chimerization at the AQP2–AQP3 locus is the genetic basis of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in clinical Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates

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    Fabrice E. Graf

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aquaglyceroporin-2 is a known determinant of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in Trypanosoma brucei brucei laboratory strains. Recently, chimerization at the AQP2–AQP3 tandem locus was described from melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistant Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates from sleeping sickness patients in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Here, we demonstrate that reintroduction of wild-type AQP2 into one of these isolates fully restores drug susceptibility while expression of the chimeric AQP2/3 gene in aqp2–aqp3 null T. b. brucei does not. This proves that AQP2–AQP3 chimerization is the cause of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in the T. b. gambiense isolates.

  11. Comparative Genomics of Glossina palpalis gambiensis and G. morsitans morsitans to Reveal Gene Orthologs Involved in Infection by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidou Soumana, Illiassou; Tchicaya, Bernadette; Rialle, Stéphanie; Parrinello, Hugues; Geiger, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Blood-feeding Glossina palpalis gambiense (Gpg) fly transmits the single-celled eukaryotic parasite Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (Tbg), the second Glossina fly African trypanosome pair being Glossina morsitans / T .brucei rhodesiense. Whatever the T. brucei subspecies, whereas the onset of their developmental program in the zoo-anthropophilic blood feeding flies does unfold in the fly midgut, its completion is taking place in the fly salivary gland where does emerge a low size metacyclic trypomastigote population displaying features that account for its establishment in mammals-human individuals included. Considering that the two Glossina - T. brucei pairs introduced above share similarity with respect to the developmental program of this African parasite, we were curious to map on the Glossina morsitans morsitans (Gmm), the Differentially Expressed Genes (DEGs) we listed in a previous study. Briefly, using the gut samples collected at days 3, 10, and 20 from Gpg that were fed or not at day 0 on Tbg-hosting mice, these DGE lists were obtained from RNA seq-based approaches. Here, post the mapping on the quality controlled DEGs on the Gmm genome, the identified ortholog genes were further annotated, the resulting datasets being compared. Around 50% of the Gpg DEGs were shown to have orthologs in the Gmm genome. Under one of the three Glossina midgut sampling conditions, the number of DEGs was even higher when mapping on the Gmm genome than initially recorded. Many Gmm genes annotated as "Hypothetical" were mapped and annotated on many distinct databases allowing some of them to be properly identified. We identify Glossina fly candidate genes encoding (a) a broad panel of proteases as well as (b) chitin-binding proteins, (c) antimicrobial peptide production-Pro3 protein, transferrin, mucin, atttacin, cecropin, etc-to further select in functional studies, the objectives being to probe and validated fly genome manipulation that prevents the onset of the developmental

  12. Aquaporin 2 mutations in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense field isolates correlate with decreased susceptibility to pentamidine and melarsoprol.

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    Fabrice E Graf

    Full Text Available The predominant mechanism of drug resistance in African trypanosomes is decreased drug uptake due to loss-of-function mutations in the genes for the transporters that mediate drug import. The role of transporters as determinants of drug susceptibility is well documented from laboratory-selected Trypanosoma brucei mutants. But clinical isolates, especially of T. b. gambiense, are less amenable to experimental investigation since they do not readily grow in culture without prior adaptation. Here we analyze a selected panel of 16 T. brucei ssp. field isolates that (i have been adapted to axenic in vitro cultivation and (ii mostly stem from treatment-refractory cases. For each isolate, we quantify the sensitivity to melarsoprol, pentamidine, and diminazene, and sequence the genomic loci of the transporter genes TbAT1 and TbAQP2. The former encodes the well-characterized aminopurine permease P2 which transports several trypanocides including melarsoprol, pentamidine, and diminazene. We find that diminazene-resistant field isolates of T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense carry the same set of point mutations in TbAT1 that was previously described from lab mutants. Aquaglyceroporin 2 has only recently been identified as a second transporter involved in melarsoprol/pentamidine cross-resistance. Here we describe two different kinds of TbAQP2 mutations found in T. b. gambiense field isolates: simple loss of TbAQP2, or loss of wild-type TbAQP2 allele combined with the formation of a novel type of TbAQP2/3 chimera. The identified mutant T. b. gambiense are 40- to 50-fold less sensitive to pentamidine and 3- to 5-times less sensitive to melarsoprol than the reference isolates. We thus demonstrate for the first time that rearrangements of the TbAQP2/TbAQP3 locus accompanied by TbAQP2 gene loss also occur in the field, and that the T. b. gambiense carrying such mutations correlate with a significantly reduced susceptibility to pentamidine and melarsoprol.

  13. Influence of habitat and seasonal variation on wild mammal diversity and distribution with special reference to the Trypanosoma brucei gambiense host-reservoir in Bipindi (Cameroon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massussi, Jacques Anselme; Djieto-Lordon, Champlain; Njiokou, Flobert; Laveissière, Claude; van der Ploeg, Jan Douwe

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the role of wildlife in the resurgence and perenisation of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), we investigated the influence of habitat and seasonal variations on the diversity and spatial distribution of wild mammals, with special reference to those recognised as potential host-reservoirs of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in Bipindi (southwestern Cameroon). To achieve this, we carried out transect surveys in four habitat types over two years. A total of 31 mammal species were recorded, of which 14 occurred in the undisturbed forest, 9 in cocoa plantations, 11 in farmlands and 11 in village-adjacent gallery forests. Among them, six species (Cephalophus monticola, Cephalophus dorsalis, Atherurus africanus, Cricetomys emini, Nandinia binotata and Cercopithecus nictitans), known as reservoir hosts of T. b. gambiense, occurred in all kinds of habitats suitable or unsuited to Glossina palpalis palpalis and in all seasons. These species are the most involved in the transmission cycle (human being/tsetse flies/wild animals). Cercopithecus cephus, Miopithecus talapoin and Heliosciurus rufobrachium host Trypanosoma brucei spp.; however, only C. cephus does not occur permanently in the suitable habitat of G. palpalis palpalis. In general, some species (C. monticola, Tragelaphus spekei and C. emini) showed a slight density increase from the long dry to the heavy rainy season within the undisturbed and farmland habitats, and a slight decrease within cocoa plantations and village-adjacent forests in the same period. The density of A. africanus increased greatly from the long dry season to the heavy rainy season in the undisturbed forest while, the density of primates in this habitat decreased slightly from the long dry season to the heavy rainy season. These variations indicate a permanent movement of wild mammal reservoir or feeding hosts from one biotope to another over the seasons. Thryonomys swinderianus needs to be investigated because it occurs permanently in

  14. Oral fexinidazole for late-stage African Trypanosoma brucei gambiense trypanosomiasis: a pivotal multicentre, randomised, non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesu, Victor Kande Betu Ku; Kalonji, Wilfried Mutombo; Bardonneau, Clélia; Mordt, Olaf Valverde; Blesson, Séverine; Simon, François; Delhomme, Sophie; Bernhard, Sonja; Kuziena, Willy; Lubaki, Jean-Pierre Fina; Vuvu, Steven Lumeya; Ngima, Pathou Nganzobo; Mbembo, Hélène Mahenzi; Ilunga, Médard; Bonama, Augustin Kasongo; Heradi, Josué Amici; Solomo, Jean Louis Lumaliza; Mandula, Guylain; Badibabi, Lewis Kaninda; Dama, Francis Regongbenga; Lukula, Papy Kavunga; Tete, Digas Ngolo; Lumbala, Crispin; Scherrer, Bruno; Strub-Wourgaft, Nathalie; Tarral, Antoine

    2018-01-13

    Few therapeutic options are available to treat the late-stage of human African trypanosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease, caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (g-HAT). The firstline treatment is a combination therapy of oral nifurtimox and intravenous eflornithine that needs to be administered in a hospital setting by trained personnel, which is not optimal given that patients often live in remote areas with few health resources. Therefore, we aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of an oral regimen of fexinidazole (a 2-substituted 5-nitroimidazole with proven trypanocidal activity) versus nifurtimox eflornithine combination therapy in patients with late-stage g-HAT. In this randomised, phase 2/3, open-label, non-inferiority trial, we recruited patients aged 15 years and older with late-stage g-HAT from g-HAT treatment centres in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (n=9) and the Central African Republic (n=1). Patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to receive either fexinidazole or nifurtimox eflornithine combination therapy according to a predefined randomisation list (block size six). The funder, data management personnel, and study statisticians were masked to treatment. Oral fexinidazole was given once a day (days 1-4: 1800 mg, days 5-10: 1200 mg). Oral nifurtimox was given three times a day (days 1-10: 15 mg/kg per day) with eflornithine twice a day as 2 h infusions (days 1-7: 400 mg/kg per day). The primary endpoint was success at 18 months (ie, deemed as patients being alive, having no evidence of trypanosomes in any body fluid, not requiring rescue medication, and having a cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count ≤20 cells per μL). Safety was assessed through routine monitoring. Primary efficacy analysis was done in the modified intention-to-treat population and safety analyses in the intention-to-treat population. The acceptable margin for the difference in success rates was defined as 13%. This study has been completed and is registered with

  15. RNA-seq de novo Assembly Reveals Differential Gene Expression in Glossina palpalis gambiensis Infected with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense vs. Non-Infected and Self-Cured Flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidou Soumana, Illiassou; Klopp, Christophe; Ravel, Sophie; Nabihoudine, Ibouniyamine; Tchicaya, Bernadette; Parrinello, Hugues; Abate, Luc; Rialle, Stéphanie; Geiger, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (Tbg), causing the sleeping sickness chronic form, completes its developmental cycle within the tsetse fly vector Glossina palpalis gambiensis (Gpg) before its transmission to humans. Within the framework of an anti-vector disease control strategy, a global gene expression profiling of trypanosome infected (susceptible), non-infected, and self-cured (refractory) tsetse flies was performed, on their midguts, to determine differential genes expression resulting from in vivo trypanosomes, tsetse flies (and their microbiome) interactions. An RNAseq de novo assembly was achieved. The assembled transcripts were mapped to reference sequences for functional annotation. Twenty-four percent of the 16,936 contigs could not be annotated, possibly representing untranslated mRNA regions, or Gpg- or Tbg-specific ORFs. The remaining contigs were classified into 65 functional groups. Only a few transposable elements were present in the Gpg midgut transcriptome, which may represent active transpositions and play regulatory roles. One thousand three hundred and seventy three genes differentially expressed (DEGs) between stimulated and non-stimulated flies were identified at day-3 post-feeding; 52 and 1025 between infected and self-cured flies at 10 and 20 days post-feeding, respectively. The possible roles of several DEGs regarding fly susceptibility and refractoriness are discussed. The results provide new means to decipher fly infection mechanisms, crucial to develop anti-vector control strategies.

  16. Treatment options for second-stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eperon, Gilles; Balasegaram, Manica; Potet, Julien; Mowbray, Charles; Valverde, Olaf; Chappuis, François

    2014-11-01

    Treatment of second-stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis relied on toxic arsenic-based derivatives for over 50 years. The availability and subsequent use of eflornithine, initially in monotherapy and more recently in combination with nifurtimox (NECT), has drastically improved the prognosis of treated patients. However, NECT logistic and nursing requirements remain obstacles to its deployment and use in peripheral health structures in rural sub-Saharan Africa. Two oral compounds, fexinidazole and SCYX-7158, are currently in clinical development. The main scope of this article is to discuss the potential impact of new oral therapies to improve diagnosis-treatment algorithms and patients' access to treatment, and to contribute to reach the objectives of the recently launched gambiense human African trypanosomiasis elimination program.

  17. Impact of the Ebola outbreak on Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infection medical activities in coastal Guinea, 2014-2015: A retrospective analysis from the Guinean national Human African Trypanosomiasis control program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Mariame; Ouattara, Eric; Duvignaud, Alexandre; Migliani, René; Camara, Oumou; Leno, Mamadou; Solano, Philippe; Bucheton, Bruno; Camara, Mamadou; Malvy, Denis

    2017-11-01

    The 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak massively hit Guinea. The coastal districts of Boffa, Dubreka and Forecariah, three major foci of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), were particularly affected. We aimed to assess the impact of this epidemic on sleeping sickness screening and caring activities. We used preexisting data from the Guinean sleeping sickness control program, collected between 2012 and 2015. We described monthly: the number of persons (i) screened actively; (ii) or passively; (iii) treated for HAT; (iv) attending post-treatment follow-up visits. We compared clinical data, treatment characteristics and Disability Adjusted Life-Years (DALYs) before (February 2012 to December 2013) and during (January 2014 to October 2015) the Ebola outbreak period according to available data. Whereas 32,221 persons were actively screened from February 2012 to December 2013, before the official declaration of the first Ebola case in Guinea, no active screening campaigns could be performed during the Ebola outbreak. Following the reinforcement and extension of HAT passive surveillance system early in 2014, the number of persons tested passively by month increased from 7 to 286 between April and September 2014 and then abruptly decreased to 180 until January 2015 and to none after March 2015. 213 patients initiated HAT treatment, 154 (72%) before Ebola and 59 (28%) during the Ebola outbreak. Those initiating HAT therapy during Ebola outbreak were recruited through passive screening and diagnosed at a later stage 2 of the disease (96% vs. 55% before Ebola, phuman resources allocation are mandatory during post Ebola period to reduce HAT burden in Guinea.

  18. Melarsoprol sensitivity profile of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates from cured and relapsed sleeping sickness patients from the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

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    Patient Pyana Pati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sleeping sickness caused by Trypanosoma brucei (T.b. gambiense constitutes a serious health problem in sub-Sahara Africa. In some foci, alarmingly high relapse rates were observed in patients treated with melarsoprol, which used to be the first line treatment for patients in the neurological disease stage. Particularly problematic was the situation in Mbuji-Mayi, East Kasai Province in the Democratic Republic of the Congo with a 57% relapse rate compared to a 5% relapse rate in Masi-Manimba, Bandundu Province. The present study aimed at investigating the mechanisms underlying the high relapse rate in Mbuji-Mayi using an extended collection of recently isolated T.b. gambiense strains from Mbuji-Mayi and from Masi-Manimba.Forty five T.b. gambiense strains were used. Forty one were isolated from patients that were cured or relapsed after melarsoprol treatment in Mbuji-Mayi. In vivo drug sensitivity tests provide evidence of reduced melarsoprol sensitivity in these strains. This reduced melarsoprol sensitivity was not attributable to mutations in TbAT1. However, in all these strains, irrespective of the patient treatment outcome, the two aquaglyceroporin (AQP 2 and 3 genes are replaced by chimeric AQP2/3 genes that may be associated with resistance to pentamidine and melarsoprol. The 4 T.b. gambiense strains isolated in Masi-Manimba contain both wild-type AQP2 and a different chimeric AQP2/3. These findings suggest that the reduced in vivo melarsoprol sensitivity of the Mbuji-Mayi strains and the high relapse rates in that sleeping sickness focus are caused by mutations in the AQP2/AQP3 locus and not by mutations in TbAT1.We conclude that mutations in the TbAQP2/3 locus of the local T.b. gambiense strains may explain the high melarsoprol relapse rates in the Mbuji-Mayi focus but other factors must also be involved in the treatment outcome of individual patients.

  19. Human and animal Trypanosomes in Cote d'Ivoire form a single breeding population.

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    Paul Capewell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of African Sleeping Sickness in humans and contributes to the related veterinary disease, Nagana. T. brucei is segregated into three subspecies based on host specificity, geography and pathology. T. b. brucei is limited to animals (excluding some primates throughout sub-Saharan Africa and is non-infective to humans due to trypanolytic factors found in human serum. T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense are human infective sub-species. T. b. gambiense is the more prevalent human, causing over 97% of human cases. Study of T. b. gambiense is complicated in that there are two distinct groups delineated by genetics and phenotype. The relationships between the two groups and local T. b. brucei are unclear and may have a bearing on the evolution of the human infectivity traits. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A collection of sympatric T. brucei isolates from Côte d'Ivoire, consisting of T. b. brucei and both groups of T. b. gambiense have previously been categorized by isoenzymes, RFLPs and Blood Incubation Infectivity Tests. These samples were further characterized using the group 1 specific marker, TgSGP, and seven microsatellites. The relationships between the T. b. brucei and T. b. gambiense isolates were determined using principal components analysis, neighbor-joining phylogenetics, STRUCTURE, FST, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and linkage disequilibrium. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Group 1 T. b. gambiense form a clonal genetic group, distinct from group 2 and T. b. brucei, whereas group 2 T. b. gambiense are genetically indistinguishable from local T. b. brucei. There is strong evidence for mating within and between group 2 T. b. gambiense and T. b. brucei. We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that group 2 T. b. gambiense are hybrids of group 1 and T. b. brucei, suggesting that human infectivity has evolved independently in groups 1 and 2 T. b. gambiense.

  20. Syndromic algorithms for detection of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis in South Sudan.

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    Jennifer J Palmer

    Full Text Available Active screening by mobile teams is considered the best method for detecting human African trypanosomiasis (HAT caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense but the current funding context in many post-conflict countries limits this approach. As an alternative, non-specialist health care workers (HCWs in peripheral health facilities could be trained to identify potential cases who need testing based on their symptoms. We explored the predictive value of syndromic referral algorithms to identify symptomatic cases of HAT among a treatment-seeking population in Nimule, South Sudan.Symptom data from 462 patients (27 cases presenting for a HAT test via passive screening over a 7 month period were collected to construct and evaluate over 14,000 four item syndromic algorithms considered simple enough to be used by peripheral HCWs. For comparison, algorithms developed in other settings were also tested on our data, and a panel of expert HAT clinicians were asked to make referral decisions based on the symptom dataset. The best performing algorithms consisted of three core symptoms (sleep problems, neurological problems and weight loss, with or without a history of oedema, cervical adenopathy or proximity to livestock. They had a sensitivity of 88.9-92.6%, a negative predictive value of up to 98.8% and a positive predictive value in this context of 8.4-8.7%. In terms of sensitivity, these out-performed more complex algorithms identified in other studies, as well as the expert panel. The best-performing algorithm is predicted to identify about 9/10 treatment-seeking HAT cases, though only 1/10 patients referred would test positive.In the absence of regular active screening, improving referrals of HAT patients through other means is essential. Systematic use of syndromic algorithms by peripheral HCWs has the potential to increase case detection and would increase their participation in HAT programmes. The algorithms proposed here, though promising, should be

  1. The journey towards elimination of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis: not far, nor easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, J R; Simarro, P P; Diarra, A; Ruiz-Postigo, J A; Jannin, J G

    2014-05-01

    Considering the epidemic situation of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) at the end of the twentieth century, the World Health Organization (WHO) and partners strengthened disease control and surveillance. Over the last 15 years, the activities implemented through the National Control Programmes have brought gambiense HAT under control and now its elimination is deemed as an achievable goal. In 2012, WHO targeted gambiense HAT for elimination as a public health problem by 2020. The final goal will be the sustainable disease elimination by 2030, defined as the interruption of the transmission of gambiense HAT. The elimination is considered feasible, because of the epidemiological vulnerability of the disease, the current state of control, the availability of strategies and tools and international commitment and political will. Integration of activities in the health system is needed to ensure the sustainability of the elimination. The development of user-friendly diagnostic and treatment tools will facilitate the integration process. Adequate funding is needed to implement activities, but also to support research that will make the elimination sustainable. A long-term commitment by donors is needed and ownership of the process by endemic countries is critical.

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of loopamp Trypanosoma brucei detection kit for diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis in clinical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Mitashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular methods have great potential for sensitive parasite detection in the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, but the requirements in terms of laboratory infrastructure limit their use to reference centres. A recently developed assay detects the Trypanozoon repetitive insertion mobile element (RIME DNA under isothermal amplification conditions and has been transformed into a ready-to-use kit format, the Loopamp Trypanosoma brucei. In this study, we have evaluated the diagnostic performance of the Loopamp Trypanosoma brucei assay (hereafter called LAMP in confirmed T.b. gambiense HAT patients, HAT suspects and healthy endemic controls from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 142 T.b. gambiense HAT patients, 111 healthy endemic controls and 97 HAT suspects with unconfirmed status were included in this retrospective evaluation. Reference standard tests were parasite detection in blood, lymph or cerebrospinal fluid. Archived DNA from blood of all study participants was analysed in duplicate with LAMP. Sensitivity of LAMP in parasitologically confirmed cases was 87.3% (95% CI 80.9-91.8% in the first run and 93.0% (95% CI 87.5-96.1% in the second run. Specificity in healthy controls was 92.8% (95% CI 86.4-96.3% in the first run and 96.4% (95% CI 91.1-98.6% in the second run. Reproducibility was excellent with a kappa value of 0.81. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this laboratory-based study, the Loopamp Trypanosoma brucei Detection Kit showed good diagnostic accuracy and excellent reproducibility. Further studies are needed to assess the feasibility of its routine use for diagnosis of HAT under field conditions.

  3. Identifying transmission cycles at the human-animal interface: the role of animal reservoirs in maintaining gambiense human african trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Funk

    Full Text Available Many infections can be transmitted between animals and humans. The epidemiological roles of different species can vary from important reservoirs to dead-end hosts. Here, we present a method to identify transmission cycles in different combinations of species from field data. We used this method to synthesise epidemiological and ecological data from Bipindi, Cameroon, a historical focus of gambiense Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT, sleeping sickness, a disease that has often been considered to be maintained mainly by humans. We estimated the basic reproduction number [Formula: see text] of gambiense HAT in Bipindi and evaluated the potential for transmission in the absence of human cases. We found that under the assumption of random mixing between vectors and hosts, gambiense HAT could not be maintained in this focus without the contribution of animals. This result remains robust under extensive sensitivity analysis. When using the distributions of species among habitats to estimate the amount of mixing between those species, we found indications for an independent transmission cycle in wild animals. Stochastic simulation of the system confirmed that unless vectors moved between species very rarely, reintroduction would usually occur shortly after elimination of the infection from human populations. This suggests that elimination strategies may have to be reconsidered as targeting human cases alone would be insufficient for control, and reintroduction from animal reservoirs would remain a threat. Our approach is broadly applicable and could reveal animal reservoirs critical to the control of other infectious diseases.

  4. Updated estimate of the duration of the meningo-encephalitic stage in gambiense human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checchi, Francesco; Funk, Sebastian; Chandramohan, Daniel; Haydon, Daniel T; Chappuis, François

    2015-07-04

    The duration of the stages of HAT is an important factor in epidemiological studies and intervention planning. Previously, we published estimates of the duration of the haemo-lymphatic stage 1 and meningo-encephalitic stage 2 of the gambiense form of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), in the absence of treatment. Here we revise the estimate of stage 2 duration, computed based on data from Uganda and South Sudan, by adjusting observed infection prevalence for incomplete case detection coverage and diagnostic inaccuracy. The revised best estimate for the mean duration of stage 2 is 252 days (95% CI 171-399), about half of our initial best estimate, giving a total mean duration of untreated gambiense HAT infection of approximately 2 years and 2 months. Our new estimate provides improved information on the transmission dynamics of this neglected tropical disease in Uganda and South Sudan. We stress that there remains considerable variability around the estimated mean values, and that one must be cautious in applying these results to other foci.

  5. Mapping the capacities of fixed health facilities to cover people at risk of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simarro, Pere P; Cecchi, Giuliano; Franco, José R; Paone, Massimo; Diarra, Abdoulaye; Ruiz-Postigo, José A; Mattioli, Raffaele C; Jannin, Jean G

    2014-02-11

    The emphasis placed on the activities of mobile teams in the detection of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) can at times obscure the major role played by fixed health facilities in HAT control and surveillance. The lack of consistent and detailed data on the coverage of passive case-finding and treatment further constrains our ability to appreciate the full contribution of the health system to the control of HAT. A survey was made of all fixed health facilities that are active in the control and surveillance of gambiense HAT. Information on their diagnostic and treatment capabilities was collected, reviewed and harmonized. Health facilities were geo-referenced. Time-cost distance analysis was conducted to estimate physical accessibility and the potential coverage of the population at-risk of gambiense HAT. Information provided by the National Sleeping Sickness Control Programmes revealed the existence of 632 fixed health facilities that are active in the control and surveillance of gambiense HAT in endemic countries having reported cases or having conducted active screening activities during the period 2000-2012. Different types of diagnosis (clinical, serological, parasitological and disease staging) are available from 622 facilities. Treatment with pentamidine for first-stage disease is provided by 495 health facilities, while for second-stage disease various types of treatment are available in 206 health facilities only. Over 80% of the population at-risk for gambiense HAT lives within 5-hour travel of a fixed health facility offering diagnosis and treatment for the disease. Fixed health facilities have played a crucial role in the diagnosis, treatment and coverage of at-risk-population for gambiense HAT. As the number of reported cases continues to dwindle, their role will become increasingly important for the prospects of disease elimination. Future updates of the database here presented will regularly provide evidence to inform and monitor a

  6. Influence of habitat and seasonal variation on wild mammal diversity and distribution with special reference to the Trypanosoma brucei gambiense host-reservoir in Bipindi (Cameroon)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anselme Massussi, J.; Djieto-Lordon, C.; Nijokou, F.; Laveissière, C.; Ploeg, van der J.D.

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the role of wildlife in the resurgence and perenisation of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), we investigated the influence of habitat and seasonal variations on the diversity and spatial distribution of wild mammals, with special reference to those recognised as potential

  7. Monitoring the use of nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT in the treatment of second stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco JR

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Jose R Franco,1 Pere P Simarro,1 Abdoulaye Diarra,2 Jose A Ruiz-Postigo,3 Mireille Samo,1 Jean G Jannin11World Health Organization, Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases, Innovative and Intensified Disease Management, Geneva, Switzerland; 2World Health Organization, Regional Office for Africa, Brazzaville, Congo; 3World Health Organization, Communicable Disease Control, Control of Tropical Diseases and Zoonoses Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean, Cairo, EgyptAbstract: After inclusion of the nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT in the Model List of Essential Medicines for the treatment of second-stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, the World Health Organization, in collaboration with National Sleeping Sickness Control Programs and nongovernmental organizations set up a pharmacovigilance system to assess the safety and efficacy of NECT during its routine use. Data were collected for 1735 patients treated with NECT in nine disease endemic countries during 2010–2011. At least one adverse event (AE was described in 1043 patients (60.1% and a total of 3060 AE were reported. Serious adverse events (SAE were reported for 19 patients (1.1% of treated, leading to nine deaths (case fatality rate of 0.5%. The most frequent AE were gastrointestinal disorders (vomiting/nausea and abdominal pain, followed by headache, musculoskeletal pains, and vertigo. The most frequent SAE and cause of death were convulsions, fever, and coma that were considered as reactive encephalopathy. Two hundred and sixty-two children below 15 years old were treated. The characteristics of AE were similar to adults, but the major AE were less frequent in children with only one SAE and no deaths registered in this group. Gastrointestinal problems (vomiting and abdominal pain were more frequent than in adults, but musculoskeletal pains, vertigo, asthenia, neuropsychiatric troubles (headaches, seizures, tremors, hallucinations, insomnia were less

  8. Human African trypanosomiasis transmission, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

    OpenAIRE

    Simo, G.; Diabakana, P. M.; Mesu, Vkbk; Manzambi, E. Z.; Ollivier, G.; Asonganyi, T.; Cuny, Gérard; Grébaut, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the epidemiology of human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, 2 entomologic surveys were conducted in 2005. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and human-blood meals were found in tsetse fly midguts, which suggested active disease transmission. Vector control should be used to improve human African trypanosomiasis control efforts.

  9. Wild chimpanzees are infected by Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Jirků

    2015-12-01

    Finally, we demonstrated that the mandrill serum was able to efficiently lyse T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, and to some extent T. b. gambiense, while the chimpanzee serum failed to lyse any of these subspecies.

  10. Human African Trypanosomiasis in Emigrant Returning to China from Gabon, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyu; Ruan, Qiaoling; Xu, Bin; Gu, Jianfei; Qian, Yiyi; Chen, Muxin; Liu, Qin; Lu, Qing; Zhang, Wenhong

    2018-02-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis is endemic to parts of sub-Saharan Africa and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who have visited or lived in Africa. We report a 2017 case of stage 2 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense disease in an emigrant who returned to China from Gabon.

  11. Enhanced passive screening and diagnosis for gambiense human African trypanosomiasis in north-western Uganda - Moving towards elimination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Wamboga

    Full Text Available The incidence of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (gHAT in Uganda has been declining, from 198 cases in 2008, to only 20 in 2012. Interruption of transmission of the disease by early diagnosis and treatment is core to the control and eventual elimination of gHAT. Until recently, the format of available screening tests had restricted screening and diagnosis to central health facilities (passive screening. We describe a novel strategy that is contributing to elimination of gHAT in Uganda through expansion of passive screening to the entire population at risk.In this strategy, patients who are clinically suspected of having gHAT at primary health facilities are screened using a rapid diagnostic test (RDT, followed by parasitological confirmation at strategically located microscopy centres. For patients who are positive with the RDT and negative by microscopy, blood samples undergo further testing using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP, a molecular test that detects parasite DNA. LAMP positive patients are considered strong suspects, and are re-evaluated by microscopy. Location and upgrading of facilities to perform microscopy and LAMP was informed by results of georeferencing and characterization of all public healthcare facilities in the 7 gHAT endemic districts in Uganda. Three facilities were upgraded to perform RDTs, microscopy and LAMP, 9 to perform RDTs and microscopy, and 200 to screen patients with RDTs. This reduced the distance that a sick person must travel to be screened for gHAT to a median distance of 2.5km compared to 23km previously. In this strategy, 9 gHAT cases were diagnosed in 2014, and 4 in 2015.This enhanced passive screening strategy for gHAT has enabled full coverage of the population at risk, and is being replicated in other gHAT endemic countries. The improvement in case detection is making elimination of the disease in Uganda an imminent possibility.

  12. Enhanced passive screening and diagnosis for gambiense human African trypanosomiasis in north-western Uganda - Moving towards elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamboga, Charles; Matovu, Enock; Bessell, Paul Richard; Picado, Albert; Biéler, Sylvain; Ndung'u, Joseph Mathu

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (gHAT) in Uganda has been declining, from 198 cases in 2008, to only 20 in 2012. Interruption of transmission of the disease by early diagnosis and treatment is core to the control and eventual elimination of gHAT. Until recently, the format of available screening tests had restricted screening and diagnosis to central health facilities (passive screening). We describe a novel strategy that is contributing to elimination of gHAT in Uganda through expansion of passive screening to the entire population at risk. In this strategy, patients who are clinically suspected of having gHAT at primary health facilities are screened using a rapid diagnostic test (RDT), followed by parasitological confirmation at strategically located microscopy centres. For patients who are positive with the RDT and negative by microscopy, blood samples undergo further testing using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), a molecular test that detects parasite DNA. LAMP positive patients are considered strong suspects, and are re-evaluated by microscopy. Location and upgrading of facilities to perform microscopy and LAMP was informed by results of georeferencing and characterization of all public healthcare facilities in the 7 gHAT endemic districts in Uganda. Three facilities were upgraded to perform RDTs, microscopy and LAMP, 9 to perform RDTs and microscopy, and 200 to screen patients with RDTs. This reduced the distance that a sick person must travel to be screened for gHAT to a median distance of 2.5km compared to 23km previously. In this strategy, 9 gHAT cases were diagnosed in 2014, and 4 in 2015. This enhanced passive screening strategy for gHAT has enabled full coverage of the population at risk, and is being replicated in other gHAT endemic countries. The improvement in case detection is making elimination of the disease in Uganda an imminent possibility.

  13. A luciferase based viability assay for ATP detection in 384-well format for high throughput whole cell screening of Trypanosoma brucei brucei bloodstream form strain 427

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery Vicky M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT is caused by two trypanosome species, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. Current drugs available for the treatment of HAT have significant issues related to toxicity, administration regimes with limited effectiveness across species and disease stages, thus there is a considerable need to find alternative drugs. A well recognised approach to identify new drug candidates is high throughput screening (HTS of large compound library collections. Results We describe here the development of a luciferase based viability assay in 384-well plate format suitable for HTS of T.b.brucei. The parameters that were explored to determine the final HTS assay conditions are described in detail and include DMSO tolerability, Z', diluents and cell inoculum density. Reference compound activities were determined for diminazene, staurosporine and pentamidine and compared to previously published IC50 data obtained. The assay has a comparable sensitivity to reference drugs and is more cost effective than the 96-well format currently reported for T.b.brucei. Conclusion Due to the reproducibility and sensitivity of this assay it is recommended for potential HTS application. As it is commercially available this assay can also be utilised in many laboratories for both large and small scale screening.

  14. IgM, lgG and IL-6 profiles in the Trypanosoma brucei brucei monkey model of human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waema, Maxwell W; Maina, Naomi W; Ngotho, Maina; Karanja, Simon M; Gachie, Beatrice M; Maranga, Dawn N; Kagira, John M

    2017-04-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) patients manifest immunological profiles, whose variations over time can be used to indicate disease progression. However, monitoring of these biomarkers in human patients is beset by several limitations which can be offset by using chronic animal models. A recent improved monkey model of HAT using a Trypanosoma brucei brucei isolate has been developed but the immunological profile has not been elucidated. The objectives of the current study was to determine the IgM, IgG and IL-6 profiles in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in vervet monkeys infected with T. b. brucei. Three vervet monkeys were infected intravenously with 10 5 T. b. brucei, monitored for disease development and subsequently treated 28days post infection (dpi) sub-curatively using diminazene aceturate (DA) to induce late stage disease and curatively treated with melarsoprol (Mel B) at 119 dpi, respectively. Matched serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained at regular intervals and immunospecific IgM, immunoglobulin G (IgG) were quantified by ELISA while IL-6 was assayed using a cytometric bead array (CBA) kit. Results showed that following infection, CSF IgM, IgG, IL-6 and serum IL-6 were significantly (p0.05) between infection and 35 dpi but levels increased significantly (P<0.05) with the highest level of 55.53pg/ml recorded at112 dpi. IL-6 elevation from 35 dpi may be indicative of parasite neuroinvasion hence can be used as possible candidate marker for late stage disease in the monkey model. Further, the marker can also be used in conjunction with IgG and IgM as markers for development of test of cure for HAT. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. A haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor conveys innate immunity to Trypanosoma brucei in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhollebeke, Benoit; De Muylder, Géraldine; Nielsen, Marianne J

    2008-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is lysed by apolipoprotein L-I, a component of human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles that are also characterized by the presence of haptoglobin-related protein. We report that this process is mediated by a parasite glycoprotein receptor, which...... binds the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex with high affinity for the uptake and incorporation of heme into intracellular hemoproteins. In mice, this receptor was required for optimal parasite growth and the resistance of parasites to the oxidative burst by host macrophages. In humans, the trypanosome...

  16. The transcriptome of the human pathogen Trypanosoma brucei at single-nucleotide resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay G Kolev

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The genome of Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African trypanosomiasis, was published five years ago, yet identification of all genes and their transcripts remains to be accomplished. Annotation is challenged by the organization of genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II (Pol II into long unidirectional gene clusters with no knowledge of how transcription is initiated. Here we report a single-nucleotide resolution genomic map of the T. brucei transcriptome, adding 1,114 new transcripts, including 103 non-coding RNAs, confirming and correcting many of the annotated features and revealing an extensive heterogeneity of 5' and 3' ends. Some of the new transcripts encode polypeptides that are either conserved in T. cruzi and Leishmania major or were previously detected in mass spectrometry analyses. High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq was sensitive enough to detect transcripts at putative Pol II transcription initiation sites. Our results, as well as recent data from the literature, indicate that transcription initiation is not solely restricted to regions at the beginning of gene clusters, but may occur at internal sites. We also provide evidence that transcription at all putative initiation sites in T. brucei is bidirectional, a recently recognized fundamental property of eukaryotic promoters. Our results have implications for gene expression patterns in other important human pathogens with similar genome organization (Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania sp. and revealed heterogeneity in pre-mRNA processing that could potentially contribute to the survival and success of the parasite population in the insect vector and the mammalian host.

  17. An Overview of Trypanosoma brucei Infections: An Intense Host–Parasite Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte-Sucre, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and T. brucei gambiense, the causative agents of Human African Trypanosomiasis, are transmitted by tsetse flies. Within the vector, the parasite undergoes through transformations that prepares it to infect the human host. Sequentially these developmental stages are the replicative procyclic (in which the parasite surface is covered by procyclins) and trypo-epimastigote forms, as well as the non-replicative, infective, metacyclic form that develops in the vector salivary glands. As a pre-adaptation to their life in humans, metacyclic parasites begin to express and be densely covered by the Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG). Once the metacyclic form invades the human host the parasite develops into the bloodstream form. Herein the VSG triggers a humoral immune response. To avoid this humoral response, and essential for survival while in the bloodstream, the parasite changes its cover periodically and sheds into the surroundings the expressed VSG, thus evading the consequences of the immune system activation. Additionally, tools comparable to quorum sensing are used by the parasite for the successful parasite transmission from human to insect. On the other hand, the human host promotes clearance of the parasite triggering innate and adaptive immune responses and stimulating cytokine and chemokine secretion. All in all, the host–parasite interaction is extremely active and leads to responses that need multiple control sites to develop appropriately. PMID:28082973

  18. Active transmission of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Dutton, 1902 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thereafter, palpation for enlarged cervical lymph gland (ECLG) was followed by parasitological examination of aspirate using wet film, haematocrit centrifugation technique (HCT) and mini-anion exchange centrifugation technique (mAECT). Only one confirmed case of sleeping sickness was diagnosed out of the 491 ...

  19. Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... gallery forests grow along the banks of the river, and are infested with Glossina fuscipes fuscipes. The main trees of the gallery forest are Ficus religiose, Tamarindus indica, Azadirachta indica,. Anogeissus leiocarpus together with Combretum spp. and various climbers and grasses. This riverine vegetation ...

  20. A mixed methods study of a health worker training intervention to increase syndromic referral for gambiense human African trypanosomiasis in South Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Jennifer J; Surur, Elizeous I; Checchi, Francesco; Ahmad, Fayaz; Ackom, Franklin Kweku; Whitty, Christopher J M

    2014-03-01

    Active screening by mobile teams is considered the most effective method for detecting gambiense-type human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) but constrained funding in many post-conflict countries limits this approach. Non-specialist health care workers (HCWs) in peripheral health facilities could be trained to identify potential cases for testing based on symptoms. We tested a training intervention for HCWs in peripheral facilities in Nimule, South Sudan to increase knowledge of HAT symptomatology and the rate of syndromic referrals to a central screening and treatment centre. We trained 108 HCWs from 61/74 of the public, private and military peripheral health facilities in the county during six one-day workshops and assessed behaviour change using quantitative and qualitative methods. In four months prior to training, only 2/562 people passively screened for HAT were referred from a peripheral HCW (0 cases detected) compared to 13/352 (2 cases detected) in the four months after, a 6.5-fold increase in the referral rate observed by the hospital. Modest increases in absolute referrals received, however, concealed higher levels of referral activity in the periphery. HCWs in 71.4% of facilities followed-up had made referrals, incorporating new and pre-existing ideas about HAT case detection into referral practice. HCW knowledge scores of HAT symptoms improved across all demographic sub-groups. Of 71 HAT referrals made, two-thirds were from new referrers. Only 11 patients completed the referral, largely because of difficulties patients in remote areas faced accessing transportation. The training increased knowledge and this led to more widespread appropriate HAT referrals from a low base. Many referrals were not completed, however. Increasing access to screening and/or diagnostic tests in the periphery will be needed for greater impact on case-detection in this context. These data suggest it may be possible for peripheral HCWs to target the use of rapid diagnostic tests

  1. Isolation of a human serum-resistant Trypanosoma brucei from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A strain of trypanosome was isolated from one of the trade pigs held at the Orie Orba market lairage in Udenu Local Government Area of Enugu State. It was identified by its motility in wet blood film and morphological characteristics in Giemsa-stained thin blood film as Trypanosoma brucei. To further characterize the ...

  2. Characterisation of the Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum resistance associated (SRA) gene has been found to confer resistance to the innate trypanolytic factor (TLF) found in normal human serum; thus allowing Trypanosoma brucei brucei to survive exposure to normal human serum. This study was carried out to examine the presence of SRA gene and identify the origin of ...

  3. Cardiac alterations in human African trypanosomiasis (T.b. gambiense with respect to the disease stage and antiparasitic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes A Blum

    Full Text Available In Human African Trypanosomiasis, neurological symptoms dominate and cardiac involvement has been suggested. Because of increasing resistance to the available drugs for HAT, new compounds are desperately needed. Evaluation of cardiotoxicity is one parameter of drug safety, but without knowledge of the baseline heart involvement in HAT, cardiologic findings and drug-induced alterations will be difficult to interpret. The aims of the study were to assess the frequency and characteristics of electrocardiographic findings in the first stage of HAT, to compare these findings to those of second stage patients and healthy controls and to assess any potential effects of different therapeutic antiparasitic compounds with respect to ECG changes after treatment.Four hundred and six patients with first stage HAT were recruited in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Angola and Sudan between 2002 and 2007 in a series of clinical trials comparing the efficacy and safety of the experimental treatment DB289 to the standard first stage treatment, pentamidine. These ECGs were compared to the ECGs of healthy volunteers (n = 61 and to those of second stage HAT patients (n = 56.In first and second stage HAT, a prolonged QTc interval, repolarization changes and low voltage were significantly more frequent than in healthy controls. Treatment in first stage was associated with repolarization changes in both the DB289 and the pentamidine group to a similar extent. The QTc interval did not change during treatment.Cardiac involvement in HAT, as demonstrated by ECG alterations, appears early in the evolution of the disease. The prolongation of the QTC interval comprises a risk of fatal arrhythmias if new drugs with an additional potential of QTC prolongation will be used. During treatment ECG abnormalities such as repolarization changes consistent with peri-myocarditis occur frequently and appear to be associated with the disease stage, but not with a specific drug.

  4. Accuracy of individual rapid tests for serodiagnosis of gambiense sleeping sickness in West Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Jamonneau

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Individual rapid tests for serodiagnosis (RDT of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT are particularly suited for passive screening and surveillance. However, so far, no large scale evaluation of RDTs has been performed for diagnosis of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense HAT in West Africa. The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of 2 commercial HAT-RDTs on stored plasma samples from West Africa.SD Bioline HAT and HAT Sero-K-Set were performed on 722 plasma samples originating from Guinea and Côte d'Ivoire, including 231 parasitologically confirmed HAT patients, 257 healthy controls, and 234 unconfirmed individuals whose blood tested antibody positive in the card agglutination test but negative by parasitological tests. Immune trypanolysis was performed as a reference test for trypanosome specific antibody presence. Sensitivities in HAT patients were respectively 99.6% for SD Bioline HAT, and 99.1% for HAT Sero-K-Set, specificities in healthy controls were respectively 87.9% and 88.3%. Considering combined positivity in both RDTs, increased the specificity significantly (p ≤ 0.0003 to 93.4%, while 98.7% sensitivity was maintained. Specificities in controls were 98.7-99.6% for the combination of one or two RDTs with trypanolysis, maintaining a sensitivity of at least 98.1%.The observed specificity of the single RDTs was relatively low. Serial application of SD Bioline HAT and HAT Sero-K-Set might offer superior specificity compared to a single RDT, maintaining high sensitivity. The combination of one or two RDTs with trypanolysis seems promising for HAT surveillance.

  5. The natural progression of Gambiense sleeping sickness: what is the evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Checchi

    Full Text Available Gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, sleeping sickness is widely assumed to be 100% pathogenic and fatal. However, reports to the contrary exist, and human trypano-tolerance has been postulated. Furthermore, there is uncertainty about the actual duration of both stage 1 and stage 2 infection, particularly with respect to how long a patient remains infectious. Understanding such basic parameters of HAT infection is essential for optimising control strategies based on case detection. We considered the potential existence and relevance of human trypano-tolerance, and explored the duration of infectiousness, through a review of published evidence on the natural progression of gambiense HAT in the absence of treatment, and biological considerations. Published reports indicate that most gambiense HAT cases are fatal if untreated. Self-resolving and asymptomatic chronic infections probably constitute a minority if they do indeed exist. Chronic carriage, however, deserves further study, as it could seed renewed epidemics after control programmes cease.

  6. Development of multiplex serological assay for the detection of human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzou, Samson Muuo; Fujii, Yoshito; Miura, Masashi; Mwau, Matilu; Mwangi, Anne Wanjiru; Itoh, Makoto; Salam, Md Abdus; Hamano, Shinjiro; Hirayama, Kenji; Kaneko, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a disease caused by Kinetoplastid infection. Serological tests are useful for epidemiological surveillance. The aim of this study was to develop a multiplex serological assay for HAT to assess the diagnostic value of selected HAT antigens for sero-epidemiological surveillance. We cloned loci encoding eight antigens from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, expressed the genes in bacterial systems, and purified the resulting proteins. Antigens were subjected to Luminex multiplex assays using sera from HAT and VL patients to assess the antigens' immunodiagnostic potential. Among T. b. gambiense antigens, the 64-kDa and 65-kDa invariant surface glycoproteins (ISGs) and flagellar calcium binding protein (FCaBP) had high sensitivity for sera from T. b. gambiense patients, yielding AUC values of 0.871, 0.737 and 0.858 respectively in receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. The ISG64, ISG65, and FCaBP antigens were partially cross-reactive to sera from Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense patients. The GM6 antigen was cross-reactive to sera from T. b. rhodesiense patients as well as to sera from VL patients. Furthermore, heterogeneous antibody responses to each individual HAT antigen were observed. Testing for multiple HAT antigens in the same panel allowed specific and sensitive detection. Our results demonstrate the utility of applying multiplex assays for development and evaluation of HAT antigens for use in sero-epidemiological surveillance. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Epidemiology of human African trypanosomiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Jose R; Simarro, Pere P; Diarra, Abdoulaye; Jannin, Jean G

    2014-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or sleeping sickness, is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, which is a chronic form of the disease present in western and central Africa, and by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, which is an acute disease located in eastern and southern Africa. The rhodesiense form is a zoonosis, with the occasional infection of humans, but in the gambiense form, the human being is regarded as the main reservoir that plays a key role in the transmission cycle of the disease. The gambiense form currently assumes that 98% of the cases are declared; the Democratic Republic of the Congo is the most affected country, with more than 75% of the gambiense cases declared. The epidemiology of the disease is mediated by the interaction of the parasite (trypanosome) with the vectors (tsetse flies), as well as with the human and animal hosts within a particular environment. Related to these interactions, the disease is confined in spatially limited areas called “foci”, which are located in Sub-Saharan Africa, mainly in remote rural areas. The risk of contracting HAT is, therefore, determined by the possibility of contact of a human being with an infected tsetse fly. Epidemics of HAT were described at the beginning of the 20th century; intensive activities have been set up to confront the disease, and it was under control in the 1960s, with fewer than 5,000 cases reported in the whole continent. The disease resurged at the end of the 1990s, but renewed efforts from endemic countries, cooperation agencies, and nongovernmental organizations led by the World Health Organization succeeded to raise awareness and resources, while reinforcing national programs, reversing the trend of the cases reported, and bringing the disease under control again. In this context, sustainable elimination of the gambiense HAT, defined as the interruption of the transmission of the disease, was considered as a feasible target for 2030. Since rhodesiense HAT is a zoonosis

  8. A global comparison of the human and T. brucei degradomes gives insights about possible parasite drug targets.

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    Susan T Mashiyama

    Full Text Available We performed a genome-level computational study of sequence and structure similarity, the latter using crystal structures and models, of the proteases of Homo sapiens and the human parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Using sequence and structure similarity networks to summarize the results, we constructed global views that show visually the relative abundance and variety of proteases in the degradome landscapes of these two species, and provide insights into evolutionary relationships between proteases. The results also indicate how broadly these sequence sets are covered by three-dimensional structures. These views facilitate cross-species comparisons and offer clues for drug design from knowledge about the sequences and structures of potential drug targets and their homologs. Two protease groups ("M32" and "C51" that are very different in sequence from human proteases are examined in structural detail, illustrating the application of this global approach in mining new pathogen genomes for potential drug targets. Based on our analyses, a human ACE2 inhibitor was selected for experimental testing on one of these parasite proteases, TbM32, and was shown to inhibit it. These sequence and structure data, along with interactive versions of the protein similarity networks generated in this study, are available at http://babbittlab.ucsf.edu/resources.html.

  9. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Test for Trypanosoma gambiense Group 1 with Stem Primers: A Molecular Xenomonitoring Test for Sleeping Sickness

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    Zablon K. Njiru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization has targeted Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT for elimination by 2020 with zero incidence by 2030. To achieve and sustain this goal, accurate and easy-to-deploy diagnostic tests for Gambian trypanosomiasis which accounts for over 98% of reported cases will play a crucial role. Most needed will be tools for surveillance of pathogen in vectors (xenomonitoring since population screening tests are readily available. The development of new tests is expensive and takes a long time while incremental improvement of existing technologies that have potential for xenomonitoring may offer a shorter pathway to tools for HAT surveillance. We have investigated the effect of including a second set of reaction accelerating primers (stem primers to the standard T. brucei gambiense LAMP test format. The new test format was analyzed with and without outer primers. Amplification was carried out using Rotorgene 6000 and the portable ESE Quant amplification unit capable of real-time data output. The stem LAMP formats indicated shorter time to results (~8 min, were 10–100-fold more sensitive, and indicated higher diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy compared to the standard LAMP test. It was possible to confirm the predicted product using ESE melt curves demonstrating the potential of combining LAMP and real-time technologies as possible tool for HAT molecular xenomonitoring.

  10. Crystal Structures of Trypanosoma brucei Sterol 14[alpha]-Demethylase and Implications for Selective Treatment of Human Infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Park, Hee-Won; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Harp, Joel M.; Sundaramoorthy, Munirathinam; Nes, W. David; Pays, Etienne; Chaudhuri, Minu; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R. (ULdB); (Vanderbilt); (TTU); (Toronto); (NWU); (Meharry)

    2010-01-25

    Sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (14DM, the CYP51 family of cytochrome P450) is an essential enzyme in sterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes. It serves as a major drug target for fungal diseases and can potentially become a target for treatment of human infections with protozoa. Here we present 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures of 14DM from the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma brucei, ligand-free and complexed with a strong chemically selected inhibitor N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl-4-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadi-azol-2-yl)benzamide that we previously found to produce potent antiparasitic effects in Trypanosomatidae. This is the first structure of a eukaryotic microsomal 14DM that acts on sterol biosynthesis, and it differs profoundly from that of the water-soluble CYP51 family member from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, both in organization of the active site cavity and in the substrate access channel location. Inhibitor binding does not cause large scale conformational rearrangements, yet induces unanticipated local alterations in the active site, including formation of a hydrogen bond network that connects, via the inhibitor amide group fragment, two remote functionally essential protein segments and alters the heme environment. The inhibitor binding mode provides a possible explanation for both its functionally irreversible effect on the enzyme activity and its selectivity toward the 14DM from human pathogens versus the human 14DM ortholog. The structures shed new light on 14DM functional conservation and open an excellent opportunity for directed design of novel antiparasitic drugs.

  11. Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense transmitted by a single tsetse fly bite in vervet monkeys as a model of human African trypanosomiasis.

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    John K Thuita

    Full Text Available We have investigated the pathogenicity of tsetse (Glossina pallidipes-transmitted cloned strains of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in vervet monkeys. Tsetse flies were confirmed to have mature trypanosome infections by xenodiagnosis, after which nine monkeys were infected via the bite of a single infected fly. Chancres developed in five of the nine (55.6% monkeys within 4 to 8 days post infection (dpi. All nine individuals were successfully infected, with a median pre-patent period of 4 (range = 4-10 days, indicating that trypanosomes migrated from the site of fly bite to the systemic circulation rapidly and independently of the development of the chancre. The time lag to detection of parasites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was a median 16 (range = 8-40 days, marking the onset of central nervous system (CNS, late stage disease. Subsequently, CSF white cell numbers increased above the pre-infection median count of 2 (range = 0-9 cells/microl, with a positive linear association between their numbers and that of CSF trypanosomes. Haematological changes showed that the monkeys experienced an early microcytic-hypochromic anaemia and severe progressive thrombocytopaenia. Despite a 3-fold increase in granulocyte numbers by 4 dpi, leucopaenia occurred early (8 dpi in the monkey infection, determined mainly by reductions in lymphocyte numbers. Terminally, leucocytosis was observed in three of nine (33% individuals. The duration of infection was a median of 68 (range = 22-120 days. Strain and individual differences were observed in the severity of the clinical and clinical pathology findings, with two strains (KETRI 3741 and 3801 producing a more acute disease than the other two (KETRI 3804 and 3928. The study shows that the fly-transmitted model accurately mimics the human disease and is therefore a suitable gateway to understanding human African trypanosomiasis (HAT; sleeping sickness.

  12. Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense Transmitted by a Single Tsetse Fly Bite in Vervet Monkeys as a Model of Human African Trypanosomiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuita, John K.; Kagira, John M.; Mwangangi, David; Matovu, Enock; Turner, C. M. R.; Masiga, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the pathogenicity of tsetse (Glossina pallidipes)-transmitted cloned strains of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in vervet monkeys. Tsetse flies were confirmed to have mature trypanosome infections by xenodiagnosis, after which nine monkeys were infected via the bite of a single infected fly. Chancres developed in five of the nine (55.6%) monkeys within 4 to 8 days post infection (dpi). All nine individuals were successfully infected, with a median pre-patent period of 4 (range = 4–10) days, indicating that trypanosomes migrated from the site of fly bite to the systemic circulation rapidly and independently of the development of the chancre. The time lag to detection of parasites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was a median 16 (range = 8–40) days, marking the onset of central nervous system (CNS, late) stage disease. Subsequently, CSF white cell numbers increased above the pre-infection median count of 2 (range = 0–9) cells/µl, with a positive linear association between their numbers and that of CSF trypanosomes. Haematological changes showed that the monkeys experienced an early microcytic-hypochromic anaemia and severe progressive thrombocytopaenia. Despite a 3-fold increase in granulocyte numbers by 4 dpi, leucopaenia occurred early (8 dpi) in the monkey infection, determined mainly by reductions in lymphocyte numbers. Terminally, leucocytosis was observed in three of nine (33%) individuals. The duration of infection was a median of 68 (range = 22–120) days. Strain and individual differences were observed in the severity of the clinical and clinical pathology findings, with two strains (KETRI 3741 and 3801) producing a more acute disease than the other two (KETRI 3804 and 3928). The study shows that the fly-transmitted model accurately mimics the human disease and is therefore a suitable gateway to understanding human African trypanosomiasis (HAT; sleeping sickness). PMID:18846231

  13. Development of a safer laboratory vervet monkey model for the study of human African trypanosomiasis

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    Maxwell Waema

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are three subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei: T. b. gambiense, T. b. rhodesiense and T. b. brucei. The first two are infectious to humans, whilst T. b. brucei is not. Identifying an animal model of T. b. brucei that mimics human African trypanosomiasis (HAT would enable researchers to study HAT without subjecting themselves to undue risks such as accidental infection. Objectives: This study assessed the sequential clinical, parasitological and haematological changes in vervet monkeys infected with T. b. brucei. Methods: Three vervet monkeys were infected with a 104 inoculum of T. b. brucei (isolate GUTat 1. Late-stage disease was induced by subcurative treatment with diminazene aceturate 28 days post-infection. The animals were treated curatively with melarsoprol upon relapse. Parasitaemia and clinical signs were monitored daily and, at weekly intervals, the monkeys’ blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF were sampled for haematology and parasitosis assessments, respectively. Results: The first-peak parasitaemia was observed between seven and nine days post-infection. Clinical signs associated with the disease included fever, dullness, pallor of mucous membranes, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly and oedema. Late-stage signs included stiffness of joints and lethargy. The monkeys developed a disease associated with microcytic hypochromic anaemia. There was an initial decline, followed by an increase, in total white blood cell counts from early- to late-stage disease. Trypanosomes were detected in the CSF and there was a significant increase in white cell counts in the CSF during late-stage disease. Infected vervet monkeys displayed classical clinical symptoms, parasitological and haematological trends that were similar to monkeys infected withT.b. rhodesiense. Conclusion: The T. b. brucei vervet monkey model can be used for studying HAT without putting laboratory technicians and researchers at high risk of accidental infection.

  14. Human African trypanosomiasis in endemic populations and travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, J A; Neumayr, A L; Hatz, C F

    2012-06-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) or sleeping sickness is caused by the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma brucei (T.b.) gambiense (West African form) and T.b. rhodesiense (East African form) that are transmitted by the bite of the tsetse fly, Glossina spp.. Whereas most patients in endemic populations are infected with T.b. gambiense, most tourists are infected with T.b. rhodesiense. In endemic populations, T.b. gambiense HAT is characterized by chronic and intermittent fever, headache, pruritus, and lymphadenopathy in the first stage and by sleep disturbances and neuro-psychiatric disorders in the second stage. Recent descriptions of the clinical presentation of T.b. rhodesiense in endemic populations show a high variability in different foci. The symptomatology of travellers is markedly different from the usual textbook descriptions of African HAT patients. The onset of both infections is almost invariably an acute and febrile disease. Diagnosis and treatment are difficult and rely mostly on old methods and drugs. However, new molecular diagnostic technologies are under development. A promising new drug combination is currently evaluated in a phase 3 b study and further new drugs are under evaluation.

  15. Evaluation of Antigens for Development of a Serological Test for Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biéler, Sylvain; Waltenberger, Harald; Barrett, Michael P; McCulloch, Richard; Mottram, Jeremy C; Carrington, Mark; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; McKerrow, James; Phillips, Margaret A; Michels, Paul A; Büscher, Philippe; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Bishop, Richard; Robinson, Derrick R; Bangs, James; Ferguson, Michael; Nerima, Barbara; Albertini, Audrey; Michel, Gerd; Radwandska, Magdalena; Ndung'u, Joseph Mathu

    2016-01-01

    Control and elimination of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) can be accelerated through the use of diagnostic tests that are more accurate and easier to deploy. The goal of this work was to evaluate the immuno-reactivity of antigens and identify candidates to be considered for development of a simple serological test for the detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense infections, ideally both. The reactivity of 35 antigens was independently evaluated by slot blot and ELISA against sera from both T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense infected patients and controls. The antigens that were most reactive by both tests to T. b. gambiense sera were the membrane proteins VSG LiTat 1.3, VSG LiTat 1.5 and ISG64. Reactivity to T. b. rhodesiense sera was highest with VSG LiTat 1.3, VSG LiTat 1.5 and SRA, although much lower than with T. b. gambiense samples. The reactivity of all possible combinations of antigens was also calculated. When the slot blot results of 2 antigens were paired, a VSG LiTat 1.3- ISG75 combination performed best on T. b. gambiense sera, while a VSG LiTat 1.3-VSG LiTat 1.5 combination was the most reactive using ELISA. A combination of SRA and either VSG LiTat 1.3 or VSG LiTat 1.5 had the highest reactivity on T. b. rhodesiense sera according to slot blot, while in ELISA, pairing SRA with either GM6 or VSG LiTat 1.3 yielded the best results. This study identified antigens that were highly reactive to T. b. gambiense sera, which could be considered for developing a serological test for gambiense HAT, either individually or in combination. Antigens with potential for inclusion in a test for T. b. rhodesiense HAT were also identified, but because their reactivity was comparatively lower, a search for additional antigens would be required before developing a test for this form of the disease.

  16. Reduced Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Is a Late Adaptation of Trypanosoma brucei brucei to Isometamidium Preceded by Mutations in the γ Subunit of the F1Fo-ATPase.

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    Anthonius A Eze

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Isometamidium is the main prophylactic drug used to prevent the infection of livestock with trypanosomes that cause Animal African Trypanosomiasis. As well as the animal infective trypanosome species, livestock can also harbor the closely related human infective subspecies T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. Resistance to isometamidium is a growing concern, as is cross-resistance to the diamidine drugs diminazene and pentamidine.Two isometamidium resistant Trypanosoma brucei clones were generated (ISMR1 and ISMR15, being 7270- and 16,000-fold resistant to isometamidium, respectively, which retained their ability to grow in vitro and establish an infection in mice. Considerable cross-resistance was shown to ethidium bromide and diminazene, with minor cross-resistance to pentamidine. The mitochondrial membrane potentials of both resistant cell lines were significantly reduced compared to the wild type. The net uptake rate of isometamidium was reduced 2-3-fold but isometamidium efflux was similar in wild-type and resistant lines. Fluorescence microscopy and PCR analysis revealed that ISMR1 and ISMR15 had completely lost their kinetoplast DNA (kDNA and both lines carried a mutation in the nuclearly encoded γ subunit gene of F1 ATPase, truncating the protein by 22 amino acids. The mutation compensated for the loss of the kinetoplast in bloodstream forms, allowing near-normal growth, and conferred considerable resistance to isometamidium and ethidium as well as significant resistance to diminazene and pentamidine, when expressed in wild type trypanosomes. Subsequent exposure to either isometamidium or ethidium led to rapid loss of kDNA and a further increase in isometamidium resistance.Sub-lethal exposure to isometamidium gives rise to viable but highly resistant trypanosomes that, depending on sub-species, are infective to humans and cross-resistant to at least some diamidine drugs. The crucial mutation is in the F1 ATPase γ subunit, which

  17. Human African trypanosomiasis with 7-year incubation period: clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengert, Oliver; Kopp, Marcel; Siebert, Eberhard; Stenzel, Werner; Hegasy, Guido; Suttorp, Norbert; Stich, August; Zoller, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also referred to as "sleeping sickness", is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Diagnosing imported HAT outside endemic areas is difficult and diagnosis is often delayed. We report a case of imported human African trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense with an unusually long incubation period of at least 7 years. A 33 year old male African patient, a former resident of Cameroon, presented with a 4-month history of progressive personality changes. A few weeks before presentation the patient had first been admitted to a psychiatric ward and received antidepressant treatment, until a lumbar puncture showed pleocytosis and then antibiotic treatment for suspected neuroborreliosis was initiated. The patient continued to deteriorate during antibiotic treatment and became increasingly lethargic. Under antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory treatment, the condition of the patient gradually improved over the following months and he recovered completely after 24 months of follow-up. This well-documented case illustrates typical difficulties in establishing the correct diagnosis outside endemic areas and provides an overview of typical clinical, neuropathological and neuroimaging findings in T. b. gambiense trypanosomiasis, guiding the clinician in establishing the correct diagnosis in this rare disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Haematology of experimental Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haematological aberrations associated with human infective trypanosomes were investigated in the vervet monkey model of the Rhodesian sleeping sickness. Four monkeys were infected intravenously with 104 Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and monitored for changes in the blood profile using a haematological ...

  19. A current analysis of chemotherapy strategies for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babokhov, Peter; Sanyaolu, Adekunle O; Oyibo, Wellington A; Fagbenro-Beyioku, Adetayo F; Iriemenam, Nnaemeka C

    2013-07-01

    Despite the recent advances in drug research, finding a safe, effective, and easy to use chemotherapy for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) remains a challenging task. The four current anti-trypanosomiasis drugs have major disadvantages that limit more widespread use of these drugs in the endemic regions of sub-Saharan Africa. Pentamidine and suramin are limited by their effectiveness against the only first stage of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, respectively. In addition, melarsoprol and eflornithine (two second stage drugs) each have disadvantages of their own. The former is toxic and has increasing treatment failures while the latter is expensive, laborious to administer, and lacks efficacy against T. b. rhodesiense. Furthermore, melarsoprol's toxicity and decreasing efficacy are glaring problems and phasing out the drug as a frontline treatment against T. b. gambiense is now possible with the emergence of competent, safe combination chemotherapies such as nifurtimox-eflornithine combination treatment (NECT). The future of eflornithine, on the other hand, is more promising. The drug is useful in the context of combination chemotherapy and potential orally administered analogues. Due to the limits of monotherapies, greater emphasis should be placed on the research and development of combination chemotherapies, based on the successful clinical tests with NECT and its current use as a frontline anti-trypanosomiasis treatment. This review discussed the current and future chemotherapy strategies for the treatment of HAT.

  20. A Protein Complex Map of Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Vahid H Gazestani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The functions of the majority of trypanosomatid-specific proteins are unknown, hindering our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of Trypanosomatida. While protein-protein interactions are highly informative about protein function, a global map of protein interactions and complexes is still lacking for these important human parasites. Here, benefiting from in-depth biochemical fractionation, we systematically interrogated the co-complex interactions of more than 3354 protein groups in procyclic life stage of Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Using a rigorous methodology, our analysis led to identification of 128 high-confidence complexes encompassing 716 protein groups, including 635 protein groups that lacked experimental annotation. These complexes correlate well with known pathways as well as for proteins co-expressed across the T. brucei life cycle, and provide potential functions for a large number of previously uncharacterized proteins. We validated the functions of several novel proteins associated with the RNA-editing machinery, identifying a candidate potentially involved in the mitochondrial post-transcriptional regulation of T. brucei. Our data provide an unprecedented view of the protein complex map of T. brucei, and serve as a reliable resource for further characterization of trypanosomatid proteins. The presented results in this study are available at: www.TrypsNetDB.org.

  1. Performance of the SD BIOLINE® HAT rapid test in various diagnostic algorithms for gambiense human African trypanosomiasis in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

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    Crispin Lumbala

    Full Text Available We carried out a study to compare the performance, in terms of sensitivity and specificity, of the new SD BIOLINE® HAT rapid diagnostic test (RDT with the card agglutination test for trypanosomiasis (CATT for diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC. Participants were enrolled actively by four mobile teams, and passively at four health facilities in three provinces. Consenting participants were tested concurrently with the RDT and CATT on whole blood. Those found positive by either test were tested with CATT on serial dilutions of plasma, and with a parasitological composite reference standard (CRS. Cases were only the individuals found positive by the CRS, while controls were negative by both CATT and RDT, as well as those that were positive by CATT or RDT, but were negative by the CRS, and had no history of HAT. Over five months, 131 cases and 13,527 controls were enrolled. The sensitivity of the RDT was 92.0% (95% confidence interval (CI = 86.1-95.5, which was significantly higher than CATT (sensitivity 69.1%; 95% CI = 60.7-76.4. The sensitivity of CATT on plasma at a dilution of 1:8 was 59.0% (95% CI = 50.2-67.2. The specificity of the RDT was 97.1% (95% CIs = 96.8-97.4 while that of CATT was 98.0% (95% CIs = 97.8, 98.2 and specificities of algorithms involving CATT at 1:8 dilution were 99.6% (95% CI = 99.5-99.7. Reproducibility of results was excellent. We concluded that an algorithm in which the SD BIOLINE® HAT RDT is used for screening is optimal for case detection in both passive and active screening settings. However, the lower specificity of the RDT compared to that of CATT would result in a larger number of false positive individuals undergoing confirmatory testing.

  2. Performance of the SD BIOLINE® HAT rapid test in various diagnostic algorithms for gambiense human African trypanosomiasis in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbala, Crispin; Bessell, Paul R; Lutumba, Pascal; Baloji, Sylvain; Biéler, Sylvain; Ndung'u, Joseph M

    2017-01-01

    We carried out a study to compare the performance, in terms of sensitivity and specificity, of the new SD BIOLINE® HAT rapid diagnostic test (RDT) with the card agglutination test for trypanosomiasis (CATT) for diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Participants were enrolled actively by four mobile teams, and passively at four health facilities in three provinces. Consenting participants were tested concurrently with the RDT and CATT on whole blood. Those found positive by either test were tested with CATT on serial dilutions of plasma, and with a parasitological composite reference standard (CRS). Cases were only the individuals found positive by the CRS, while controls were negative by both CATT and RDT, as well as those that were positive by CATT or RDT, but were negative by the CRS, and had no history of HAT. Over five months, 131 cases and 13,527 controls were enrolled. The sensitivity of the RDT was 92.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 86.1-95.5), which was significantly higher than CATT (sensitivity 69.1%; 95% CI = 60.7-76.4). The sensitivity of CATT on plasma at a dilution of 1:8 was 59.0% (95% CI = 50.2-67.2). The specificity of the RDT was 97.1% (95% CIs = 96.8-97.4) while that of CATT was 98.0% (95% CIs = 97.8, 98.2) and specificities of algorithms involving CATT at 1:8 dilution were 99.6% (95% CI = 99.5-99.7). Reproducibility of results was excellent. We concluded that an algorithm in which the SD BIOLINE® HAT RDT is used for screening is optimal for case detection in both passive and active screening settings. However, the lower specificity of the RDT compared to that of CATT would result in a larger number of false positive individuals undergoing confirmatory testing.

  3. Transport proteins determine drug sensitivity and resistance in a protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei

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    Jane Claire Munday

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance in pathogenic protozoa is very often caused by changes to the ‘transportome’ of the parasites. In Trypanosoma brucei, several transporters have been implicated in uptake of the main classes of drugs, diamidines and melaminophenyl arsenicals. The resistance mechanism had been thought to be due to loss of a transporter known to carry both types of agents: the aminopurine transporter P2, encoded by the gene TbAT1. However, although loss of P2 activity is well-documented as the cause of resistance to the veterinary diamidine diminazene aceturate (Berenil®, cross-resistance between the human-use arsenical melarsoprol and the diamidine pentamidine (MPXR is the result of loss of a separate High Affinity Pentamidine Transporter (HAPT1. A genome-wide RNAi library screen for resistance to pentamidine, published in 2012, gave the key to the genetic identity of HAPT1 by linking the phenomenon to a locus that contains the closely related T. brucei aquaglyceroporin genes TbAQP2 and TbAQP3. Further analysis determined that knockdown of only one pore, TbAQP2, produced the MPXR phenotype. TbAQP2 is an unconventional aquaglyceroporin with unique residues in the selectivity region of the pore, and it was found that in several MPXR lab strains the WT gene was either absent or replaced by a chimeric protein, recombined with parts of TbAQP3. Importantly, wild-type AQP2 was also absent in field isolates of T. b. gambiense, correlating with the outcome of melarsoprol treatment. Expression of a wild-type copy of TbAQP2 in even the most resistant strain completely reversed MPXR and re-introduced HAPT1 function and transport kinetics. Expression of TbAQP2 in Leishmania mexicana introduced a pentamidine transport activity indistinguishable from HAPT1. Although TbAQP2 has been shown to function as a classical aquaglyceroporin it is now clear that it is also a high affinity drug transporter, HAPT1. We discuss here a possible structural rationale for this

  4. Transcriptional analyses of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense from infected mice and in vitro culture

    OpenAIRE

    Kuboki, Noritaka; Kibe, Michael K; Thekisoe, Oriel M. M.; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Inoue, Noboru

    2007-01-01

    With the hypothesis that African trypanosomes could have in vivo specific genes for adaptation to host’s environment, the present study was conducted by using suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) technique to seek the highly expressed genes especially in host. A total of 328 clones from the in vivo SSH library and that of 160 clones from the in vitro SSH library were analyzed in order to determine their expression levels, but none of the above-mentioned genes showed differential expres...

  5. Proteomic Selection of Immunodiagnostic Antigens for Human African Trypanosomiasis and Generation of a Prototype Lateral Flow Immunodiagnostic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Lauren; Wall, Steven J.; Carrington, Mark; Ferguson, Michael A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of Human African Trypanosomiasis relies mainly on the Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT). While this test is successful, it is acknowledged that there may be room for improvement. Our aim was to develop a prototype lateral flow test based on the detection of antibodies to trypanosome antigens. Methodology/Principal Findings We took a non-biased approach to identify potential immunodiagnostic parasite protein antigens. The IgG fractions from the sera from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infected and control patients were isolated using protein-G affinity chromatography and then immobilized on Sepharose beads. The IgG-beads were incubated with detergent lysates of trypanosomes and those proteins that bound were identified by mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods. This approach provided a list of twenty-four trypanosome proteins that selectively bound to the infection IgG fraction and that might, therefore, be considered as immunodiagnostic antigens. We selected four antigens from this list (ISG64, ISG65, ISG75 and GRESAG4) and performed protein expression trials in E. coli with twelve constructs. Seven soluble recombinant protein products (three for ISG64, two for ISG65 and one each for ISG75 and GRESAG4) were obtained and assessed for their immunodiagnostic potential by ELISA using individual and/or pooled patient sera. The ISG65 and ISG64 construct ELISAs performed well with respect to detecting T. b. gambiense infections, though less well for detecting T. b. rhodesiense infections, and the best performing ISG65 construct was used to develop a prototype lateral flow diagnostic device. Conclusions/Significance Using a panel of eighty randomized T. b. gambiense infection and control sera, the prototype showed reasonable sensitivity (88%) and specificity (93%) using visual readout in detecting T. b. gambiense infections. These results provide encouragement to further develop and optimize the lateral flow device for clinical

  6. Proteomic selection of immunodiagnostic antigens for human African trypanosomiasis and generation of a prototype lateral flow immunodiagnostic device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Sullivan

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of Human African Trypanosomiasis relies mainly on the Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT. While this test is successful, it is acknowledged that there may be room for improvement. Our aim was to develop a prototype lateral flow test based on the detection of antibodies to trypanosome antigens.We took a non-biased approach to identify potential immunodiagnostic parasite protein antigens. The IgG fractions from the sera from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infected and control patients were isolated using protein-G affinity chromatography and then immobilized on Sepharose beads. The IgG-beads were incubated with detergent lysates of trypanosomes and those proteins that bound were identified by mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods. This approach provided a list of twenty-four trypanosome proteins that selectively bound to the infection IgG fraction and that might, therefore, be considered as immunodiagnostic antigens. We selected four antigens from this list (ISG64, ISG65, ISG75 and GRESAG4 and performed protein expression trials in E. coli with twelve constructs. Seven soluble recombinant protein products (three for ISG64, two for ISG65 and one each for ISG75 and GRESAG4 were obtained and assessed for their immunodiagnostic potential by ELISA using individual and/or pooled patient sera. The ISG65 and ISG64 construct ELISAs performed well with respect to detecting T. b. gambiense infections, though less well for detecting T. b. rhodesiense infections, and the best performing ISG65 construct was used to develop a prototype lateral flow diagnostic device.Using a panel of eighty randomized T. b. gambiense infection and control sera, the prototype showed reasonable sensitivity (88% and specificity (93% using visual readout in detecting T. b. gambiense infections. These results provide encouragement to further develop and optimize the lateral flow device for clinical use.

  7. Hepatic response in Trypanosomia brucei brucei infected-rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethanol leaf extract of Tithonia diversifolia was investigated for its hepato-curative activity in Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected-rats. The phytochemical compositions of the plant extract were also evaluated. The leaf extract was administered 14 days post-infection at dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg orally once daily.

  8. 3-(Oxazolo[4,5-b]pyridin-2-yl)anilides as a novel class of potent inhibitors for the kinetoplastid Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent for human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrins, Lori; Rahmani, Raphaël; Sykes, Melissa L; Jones, Amy J; Avery, Vicky M; Teston, Eliott; Almohaywi, Basmah; Yin, JieXiang; Smith, Jason; Hyland, Chris; White, Karen L; Ryan, Eileen; Campbell, Michael; Charman, Susan A; Kaiser, Marcel; Baell, Jonathan B

    2013-08-01

    A whole organism high-throughput screen of approximately 87,000 compounds against Trypanosoma brucei brucei led to the recent discovery of several novel compound classes with low micromolar activity against this organism and without appreciable cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. Herein we report a structure-activity relationship (SAR) investigation around one of these hit classes, the 3-(oxazolo[4,5-b]pyridin-2-yl)anilides. Sharp SAR is revealed, with our most active compound (5) exhibiting an IC₅₀ of 91 nM against the human pathogenic strain T.b. rhodesiense and being more than 700 times less toxic towards the L6 mammalian cell line. Physicochemical properties are attractive for many compounds in this series. For the most potent representatives, we show that solubility and metabolic stability are key parameters to target during future optimisation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. The detection and treatment of human African trypanosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouteille B

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Bernard Bouteille,1 Alain Buguet21Laboratory of Parasitology, Dupuytren University Hospital of Limoges, France; 2Polyclinic Marie-Louise Poto-Djembo, Pointe-Noire, CongoAbstract: Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is caused by the injection of Trypanosoma brucei (T. b. gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense by Glossina, the tsetse fly. Three historical eras followed the exclusive clinical approach of the 19th century. At the turn of the century, the “initial research” era was initiated because of the dramatic spread of HAT throughout intertropical Africa, and scientists discovered the agent and its vector. Two entities, recurrent fever and sleeping sickness, were then considered a continuum between hemolymphatic stage 1 and meningoencephalitic stage 2. Treatments were developed. Soon after World War I, specific services and mobile teams were created, initiating the “epidemiological” era, during which populations were visited, screened, and treated. As a result, by 1960, annual new cases were rare. New mass screening and staging tools were then developed in a third, “modern” era, especially to counter a new epidemic wave. Currently, diagnosis still relies on microscopic detection of trypanosomes without (wet and thick blood films or with concentration techniques (capillary tube centrifugation, miniature anion-exchange centrifugation technique. Staging is a vital step.Stage 1 patients are treated on site with pentamidine or suramin. However, stage 2 patients are treated in specialized facilities, using drugs that are highly toxic and/or that require complex administration procedures (melarsoprol, eflornithine, or nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy. Suramin and melarsoprol are the only medications active against Rhodesian HAT. Staging still relies on cerebrospinal fluid examination for trypanosome detection and white blood cell counts: stage 1, absence of trypanosomes, white blood cell counts ≤ 5/µL; stage 2, presence of

  10. Gambiense Sleeping Sickness In The Abraka Region Of Delta State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gambiense Sleeping Sickness In The Abraka Region Of Delta State, Nigeria: Passive Case Detection (Pcd) At The Baptist Medical Centre (BMC) Eku 1999 – 2004. ... The highest prevalence of infection was among patients aged between 26-35 years with 35.6% infection rate, 23.3 percent was recorded among those aged ...

  11. The flagellum of Trypanosoma brucei: new tricks from an old dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Katherine S.; Hill, Kent L.

    2010-01-01

    African trypanosomes, i.e. Trypanosoma brucei and related sub-species, are devastating human and animal pathogens that cause significant human mortality and limit sustained economic development in sub-Saharan Africa. Trypanosoma brucei is a highly motile protozoan parasite and coordinated motility is central to both disease pathogenesis in the mammalian host and parasite development in the tsetse fly vector. Since motility is critical for parasite development and pathogenesis, understanding unique aspects of the T. brucei flagellum may uncover novel targets for therapeutic intervention in African sleeping sickness. Moreover, studies of conserved features of the T. brucei flagellum are directly relevant to understanding fundamental aspects of flagellum and cilium function in other eukaryotes, making T. brucei an important model system. The T. brucei flagellum contains a canonical 9 + 2 axoneme, together with additional features that are unique to kinetoplastids and a few closely-related organisms. Until recently, much of our knowledge of the structure and function of the trypanosome flagellum was based on analogy and inference from other organisms. There has been an explosion in functional studies in T. brucei in recent years, revealing conserved as well as novel and unexpected structural and functional features of the flagellum. Most notably, the flagellum has been found to be an essential organelle, with critical roles in parasite motility, morphogenesis, cell division and immune evasion. This review highlights recent discoveries on the T. brucei flagellum. PMID:18472102

  12. Beyond Tsetse--Implications for Research and Control of Human African Trypanosomiasis Epidemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welburn, Susan C; Molyneux, David H; Maudlin, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Epidemics of both forms of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) are confined to spatially stable foci in Sub-Saharan Africa while tsetse distribution is widespread. Infection rates of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in tsetse are extremely low and cannot account for the catastrophic epidemics of Gambian HAT (gHAT) seen over the past century. Here we examine the origins of gHAT epidemics and evidence implicating human genetics in HAT epidemiology. We discuss the role of stress causing breakdown of heritable tolerance in silent disease carriers generating gHAT outbreaks and see how peculiarities in the epidemiologies of gHAT and Rhodesian HAT (rHAT) impact on strategies for disease control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Phenolic Constituents of Medicinal Plants with Activity against Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Nan Sun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs affect over one billion people all over the world. These diseases are classified as neglected because they impact populations in areas with poor financial conditions and hence do not attract sufficient research investment. Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is one of the NTDs. The current therapeutic interventions for T. brucei infections often have toxic side effects or require hospitalization so that they are not available in the rural environments where HAT occurs. Furthermore, parasite resistance is increasing, so that there is an urgent need to identify novel lead compounds against this infection. Recognizing the wide structural diversity of natural products, we desired to explore and identify novel antitrypanosomal chemotypes from a collection of natural products obtained from plants. In this study, 440 pure compounds from various medicinal plants were tested against T. brucei by in a screening using whole cell in vitro assays. As the result, twenty-two phenolic compounds exhibited potent activity against cultures of T. brucei. Among them, eight compounds—4, 7, 11, 14, 15, 18, 20, and 21—showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei, with IC50 values below 5 µM, ranging from 0.52 to 4.70 μM. Based on these results, we attempt to establish some general trends with respect to structure-activity relationships, which indicate that further investigation and optimization of these derivatives might enable the preparation of potentially useful compounds for treating HAT.

  14. Clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Peter Ge

    2013-02-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, is caused by infection with parasites of the genus Trypanosoma, transmitted by the tsetse fly. The disease has two forms, Trypanosoma brucei (T b) rhodesiense and T b gambiense; and is almost always fatal if untreated. Despite a recent reduction in the number of reported cases, patients with African trypanosomiasis continue to present major challenges to clinicians. Because treatment for CNS-stage disease can be very toxic, diagnostic staging to distinguish early-stage from late-stage disease when the CNS in invaded is crucial but remains problematic. Melarsoprol is the only available treatment for late-stage T b rhodesiense infection, but can be lethal to 5% of patients owing to post-treatment reactive encephalopathy. Eflornithine combined with nifurtimox is the first-line treatment for late-stage T b gambiense. New drugs are in the pipeline for treatment of CNS human African trypanosomiasis, giving rise to cautious optimism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The nuclear proteome of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goos, Carina; Dejung, Mario; Janzen, Christian J; Butter, Falk; Kramer, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan flagellate that is transmitted by tsetse flies into the mammalian bloodstream. The parasite has a huge impact on human health both directly by causing African sleeping sickness and indirectly, by infecting domestic cattle. The biology of trypanosomes involves some highly unusual, nuclear-localised processes. These include polycistronic transcription without classical promoters initiated from regions defined by histone variants, trans-splicing of all transcripts to the exon of a spliced leader RNA, transcription of some very abundant proteins by RNA polymerase I and antigenic variation, a switch in expression of the cell surface protein variants that allows the parasite to resist the immune system of its mammalian host. Here, we provide the nuclear proteome of procyclic Trypanosoma brucei, the stage that resides within the tsetse fly midgut. We have performed quantitative label-free mass spectrometry to score 764 significantly nuclear enriched proteins in comparison to whole cell lysates. A comparison with proteomes of several experimentally characterised nuclear and non-nuclear structures and pathways confirmed the high quality of the dataset: the proteome contains about 80% of all nuclear proteins and less than 2% false positives. Using motif enrichment, we found the amino acid sequence KRxR present in a large number of nuclear proteins. KRxR is a sub-motif of a classical eukaryotic monopartite nuclear localisation signal and could be responsible for nuclear localization of proteins in Kinetoplastida species. As a proof of principle, we have confirmed the nuclear localisation of six proteins with previously unknown localisation by expressing eYFP fusion proteins. While proteome data of several T. brucei organelles have been published, our nuclear proteome closes an important gap in knowledge to study trypanosome biology, in particular nuclear-related processes.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in human African trypanosomiasis: a four-year follow-up study in a patient and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kager, Piet A.; Schipper, Hans G.; Stam, Jan; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.

    2009-01-01

    Serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed up to 4 years after treatment in a patient with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infection. Four years after treatment and cure abnormalities were still present, although the patient led a normal social life, without physical and mental impairments.

  17. The genome of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berriman, Matthew; Ghedin, Elodie; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Blandin, Gaëlle; Renauld, Hubert; Bartholomeu, Daniella C; Lennard, Nicola J; Caler, Elisabet; Hamlin, Nancy E; Haas, Brian; Böhme, Ulrike; Hannick, Linda; Aslett, Martin A; Shallom, Joshua; Marcello, Lucio; Hou, Lihua; Wickstead, Bill; Alsmark, U Cecilia M; Arrowsmith, Claire; Atkin, Rebecca J; Barron, Andrew J; Bringaud, Frederic; Brooks, Karen; Carrington, Mark; Cherevach, Inna; Chillingworth, Tracey-Jane; Churcher, Carol; Clark, Louise N; Corton, Craig H; Cronin, Ann; Davies, Rob M; Doggett, Jonathon; Djikeng, Appolinaire; Feldblyum, Tamara; Field, Mark C; Fraser, Audrey; Goodhead, Ian; Hance, Zahra; Harper, David; Harris, Barbara R; Hauser, Heidi; Hostetler, Jessica; Ivens, Al; Jagels, Kay; Johnson, David; Johnson, Justin; Jones, Kristine; Kerhornou, Arnaud X; Koo, Hean; Larke, Natasha; Landfear, Scott; Larkin, Christopher; Leech, Vanessa; Line, Alexandra; Lord, Angela; Macleod, Annette; Mooney, Paul J; Moule, Sharon; Martin, David M A; Morgan, Gareth W; Mungall, Karen; Norbertczak, Halina; Ormond, Doug; Pai, Grace; Peacock, Chris S; Peterson, Jeremy; Quail, Michael A; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Rajandream, Marie-Adele; Reitter, Chris; Salzberg, Steven L; Sanders, Mandy; Schobel, Seth; Sharp, Sarah; Simmonds, Mark; Simpson, Anjana J; Tallon, Luke; Turner, C Michael R; Tait, Andrew; Tivey, Adrian R; Van Aken, Susan; Walker, Danielle; Wanless, David; Wang, Shiliang; White, Brian; White, Owen; Whitehead, Sally; Woodward, John; Wortman, Jennifer; Adams, Mark D; Embley, T Martin; Gull, Keith; Ullu, Elisabetta; Barry, J David; Fairlamb, Alan H; Opperdoes, Fred; Barrell, Barclay G; Donelson, John E; Hall, Neil; Fraser, Claire M; Melville, Sara E; El-Sayed, Najib M

    2005-07-15

    African trypanosomes cause human sleeping sickness and livestock trypanosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. We present the sequence and analysis of the 11 megabase-sized chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei. The 26-megabase genome contains 9068 predicted genes, including approximately 900 pseudogenes and approximately 1700 T. brucei-specific genes. Large subtelomeric arrays contain an archive of 806 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes used by the parasite to evade the mammalian immune system. Most VSG genes are pseudogenes, which may be used to generate expressed mosaic genes by ectopic recombination. Comparisons of the cytoskeleton and endocytic trafficking systems with those of humans and other eukaryotic organisms reveal major differences. A comparison of metabolic pathways encoded by the genomes of T. brucei, T. cruzi, and Leishmania major reveals the least overall metabolic capability in T. brucei and the greatest in L. major. Horizontal transfer of genes of bacterial origin has contributed to some of the metabolic differences in these parasites, and a number of novel potential drug targets have been identified.

  18. Response of Tripanosoma brucei brucei –induced anaemia to a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was therefore carried out to determine the effect of the preparation on packed cell volume (PCV) and haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations in anaemic rabbits. The PCV and Hb concentrations of healthy rabbits infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei were monitored for 49 days. T. b. brucei produced a significant ...

  19. Lead optimization of a pyrazole sulfonamide series of Trypanosoma brucei N-myristoyltransferase inhibitors: identification and evaluation of CNS penetrant compounds as potential treatments for stage 2 human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Stephen; Norcross, Neil R; Thompson, Stephen; Harrison, Justin R; Smith, Victoria C; Robinson, David A; Torrie, Leah S; McElroy, Stuart P; Hallyburton, Irene; Norval, Suzanne; Scullion, Paul; Stojanovski, Laste; Simeons, Frederick R C; van Aalten, Daan; Frearson, Julie A; Brenk, Ruth; Fairlamb, Alan H; Ferguson, Michael A J; Wyatt, Paul G; Gilbert, Ian H; Read, Kevin D

    2014-12-11

    Trypanosoma brucei N-myristoyltransferase (TbNMT) is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). From previous studies, we identified pyrazole sulfonamide, DDD85646 (1), a potent inhibitor of TbNMT. Although this compound represents an excellent lead, poor central nervous system (CNS) exposure restricts its use to the hemolymphatic form (stage 1) of the disease. With a clear clinical need for new drug treatments for HAT that address both the hemolymphatic and CNS stages of the disease, a chemistry campaign was initiated to address the shortfalls of this series. This paper describes modifications to the pyrazole sulfonamides which markedly improved blood-brain barrier permeability, achieved by reducing polar surface area and capping the sulfonamide. Moreover, replacing the core aromatic with a flexible linker significantly improved selectivity. This led to the discovery of DDD100097 (40) which demonstrated partial efficacy in a stage 2 (CNS) mouse model of HAT.

  20. Human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejon, Veerle; Bentivoglio, Marina; Franco, José Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness is a neglected tropical disease that affects populations in sub-Saharan Africa. The disease is caused by infection with the gambiense and rhodesiense subspecies of the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei, and is transmitted to humans by bites of infected tsetse flies. The disease evolves in two stages, the hemolymphatic and meningoencephalitic stages, the latter being defined by central nervous system infection after trypanosomal traversal of the blood-brain barrier. African trypanosomiasis, which leads to severe neuroinflammation, is fatal without treatment, but the available drugs are toxic and complicated to administer. The choice of medication is determined by the infecting parasite subspecies and disease stage. Clinical features include a constellation of nonspecific symptoms and signs with evolving neurological and psychiatric alterations and characteristic sleep-wake disturbances. Because of the clinical profile variability and insidiously progressive central nervous system involvement, disease staging is currently based on cerebrospinal fluid examination, which is usually performed after the finding of trypanosomes in blood or other body fluids. No vaccine being available, control of human African trypanosomiasis relies on diagnosis and treatment of infected patients, assisted by vector control. Better diagnostic tools and safer, easy to use drugs are needed to facilitate elimination of the disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Malleable Mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verner, Zdeněk; Basu, Somsuvro; Benz, C.; Dixit, S.; Dobáková, Eva; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Hashimi, Hassan; Horáková, Eva; Huang, Zhenqiu; Paris, Zdeněk; Peña-Diaz, Priscila; Ridlon, L.; Týč, Jiří; Wildridge, David; Zíková, Alena; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 315, 2015 Feb 07 (2015), s. 73-151 ISSN 1937-6448 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/12/2513; GA MŠk LL1205; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA MŠk LH12104; GA ČR GAP305/12/2261 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Kinetoplast * Metabolism * Mitochondria l transport * Mitochondrion * RNA import * T. brucei * Trypanosome * kDNA Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.752, year: 2015

  2. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Luis; Martínez-García, Marta; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, José Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa; Gamarro, Francisco; Pérez-Victoria, José M

    2015-10-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca(2+), and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Crystal structure of arginine methyltransferase 6 from Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongyuan Wang

    Full Text Available Arginine methylation plays vital roles in the cellular functions of the protozoan Trypanosoma brucei. The T. brucei arginine methyltransferase 6 (TbPRMT6 is a type I arginine methyltransferase homologous to human PRMT6. In this study, we report the crystal structures of apo-TbPRMT6 and its complex with the reaction product S-adenosyl-homocysteine (SAH. The structure of apo-TbPRMT6 displays several features that are different from those of type I PRMTs that were structurally characterized previously, including four stretches of insertion, the absence of strand β15, and a distinct dimerization arm. The comparison of the apo-TbPRMT6 and SAH-TbPRMT6 structures revealed the fine rearrangements in the active site upon SAH binding. The isothermal titration calorimetry results demonstrated that SAH binding greatly increases the affinity of TbPRMT6 to a substrate peptide derived from bovine histone H4. The western blotting and mass spectrometry results revealed that TbPRMT6 methylates bovine histone H4 tail at arginine 3 but cannot methylate several T. brucei histone tails. In summary, our results highlight the structural differences between TbPRMT6 and other type I PRMTs and reveal that the active site rearrangement upon SAH binding is important for the substrate binding of TbPRMT6.

  4. Polymerase chain reaction identification of Trypanosoma brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymerase chain reaction identification of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in wild tsetse flies from Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve, Malawi. Janelisa Musaya, John Chisi, Edward Senga, Peter Nambala, Emmanuel Maganga, Enock Matovu, John Enyaru ...

  5. Non-cytochrome mediated mitochondrial ATP production in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bienen, E. J.; Maturi, R. K.; Pollakis, G.; Clarkson, A. B.

    1993-01-01

    The life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei brucei involves a series of differentiation steps characterized by marked changes in mitochondrial development and function. The bloodstream forms of this parasite completely lack cytochromes and have not been considered to have any Krebs cycle function. It has

  6. In Vitro and In Vivo Investigation of the Inhibition of Trypanosoma brucei Cell Growth by Lipophilic Bisphosphonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gyongseon; Zhu, Wei; Kim, Kuglae; Byun, Soo Young; Choi, Gahee; Wang, Ke; Cha, Jeong Seok; Cho, Hyun-Soo

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a screen of a library of 925 potential prenyl synthase inhibitors against Trypanosoma brucei farnesyl diphosphate synthase (TbFPPS) and against T. brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis. The most potent compounds were lipophilic analogs of the bone resorption drug zoledronate, some of which had submicromolar to low micromolar activity against bloodstream form T. brucei and selectivity indices of up to ∼300. We evaluated the effects of two such inhibitors on survival and parasitemia in a T. brucei mouse model of infection and found that survival increased by up to 16 days. We also investigated the binding of three lipophilic bisphosphonates to an expressed TbFPPS using crystallography and investigated the thermodynamics of binding using isothermal titration calorimetry. PMID:26392508

  7. RNA interference of Trypanosoma brucei cathepsin B and L affects disease progression in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha-Hamadien Abdulla

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the roles played by the cysteine proteases cathepsin B and cathepsin L (brucipain in the pathogenesis of Trypansoma brucei brucei in both an in vivo mouse model and an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier. Doxycycline induction of RNAi targeting cathepsin B led to parasite clearance from the bloodstream and prevent a lethal infection in the mice. In contrast, all mice infected with T. brucei containing the uninduced Trypanosoma brucei cathepsin B (TbCatB RNA construct died by day 13. Induction of RNAi against brucipain did not cure mice from infection; however, 50% of these mice survived 60 days longer than uninduced controls. The ability of T. b. brucei to cross an in vitro model of the human blood-brain barrier was also reduced by brucipain RNAi induction. Taken together, the data suggest that while TbCatB is the more likely target for the development of new chemotherapy, a possible role for brucipain is in facilitating parasite entry into the brain.

  8. An essential farnesylated kinesin in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin J Engelson

    Full Text Available Kinesins are a family of motor proteins conserved throughout eukaryotes. In our present study we characterize a novel kinesin, Kinesin(CaaX, orthologs of which are only found in the kinetoplastids and not other eukaryotes. Kinesin(CaaX has the CVIM amino acids at the C-terminus, and CVIM was previously shown to be an ideal signal for protein farnesylation in T. brucei. In this study we show Kinesin(CaaX is farnesylated using radiolabeling studies and that farnesylation is dependent on the CVIM motif. Using RNA interference, we show Kinesin(CaaX is essential for T. brucei proliferation. Additionally RNAi Kinesin(CaaX depleted T. brucei are 4 fold more sensitive to the protein farneysltransferase (PFT inhibitor LN-59, suggesting that Kinesin(CaaX is a target of PFT inhibitors' action to block proliferation of T. brucei. Using tetracycline-induced exogenous tagged Kinesin(CaaX and Kinesin(CVIMdeletion (non-farnesylated Kinesin expression lines in T. brucei, we demonstrate Kinesin(CaaX is farnesylated in T. brucei cells and this farnesylation has functional effects. In cells expressing a CaaX-deleted version of Kinesin, the localization is more diffuse which suggests correct localization depends on farnesylation. Through our investigation of cell cycle, nucleus and kinetoplast quantitation and immunofluorescence assays an important role is suggested for Kinesin(CaaX in the separation of nuclei and kinetoplasts during and after they have been replicated. Taken together, our work suggests Kinesin(CaaX is a target of PFT inhibition of T. brucei cell proliferation and Kinesin(CaaX functions through both the motor and farnesyl groups.

  9. Nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with oligochromatography for detection of Trypanosoma brucei in clinical samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugasa, Claire M.; Laurent, Thierry; Schoone, Gerard J.; Kager, Piet A.; Lubega, George W.; Schallig, Henk D. F. H.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular tools, such as real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) and PCR, have been developed to detect Trypanosoma brucei parasites in blood for the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). Despite good sensitivity, these techniques are not implemented in HAT control

  10. Genetic control of resistance to Trypanosoma brucei brucei infection in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šíma, Matyáš; Havelková, Helena; Quan, L.; Svobodová, M.; Jarošíková, T.; Vojtíšková, Jarmila; Stassen, A. P. M.; Demant, P.; Lipoldová, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 6 (2011), e1173 ISSN 1935-2735 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500520606; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Grant - others:NIH-NCI(US) 1R01CA127162-01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei brucei * mouse recombinant congenic strains * Tbbr Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.716, year: 2011

  11. Interaction between Trypanosoma brucei and Haemonchus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to investigate the immunomodulatory influence of concurrent T. brucei and H. contortus infection in West African Dwarf (WAD) goats, 28 infected and 7 uninfected (control) of 8-9 months old male WAD goats were studied. The infected goats were separated into resistant (Class 1) and susceptible (Class 2) Faecal ...

  12. Effect of Concurrent Trypanosoma brucei Infection on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of concurrent Trypanosoma bruceiinfection on caprine haemonchosis was investigated in Red Sokoto (Maradi) goats infected with either Haemonchus contortus alone or concurrently with Trypanosoma brucei. The goats infected with H. contortus alone manifested clinical disease that was mild and without ...

  13. Candidate gene polymorphisms study between human African trypanosomiasis clinical phenotypes in Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaboré, Justin Windingoudi; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Noyes, Harry; Camara, Oumou; Kaboré, Jacques; Camara, Mamadou; Koffi, Mathurin; Lejon, Veerle; Jamonneau, Vincent; MacLeod, Annette; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Belem, Adrien Marie Gaston; Matovu, Enock; Bucheton, Bruno; Sidibe, Issa

    2017-08-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), a lethal disease induced by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, has a range of clinical outcomes in its human host in West Africa: an acute form progressing rapidly to second stage, spontaneous self-cure and individuals able to regulate parasitaemia at very low levels, have all been reported from endemic foci. In order to test if this clinical diversity is influenced by host genetic determinants, the association between candidate gene polymorphisms and HAT outcome was investigated in populations from HAT active foci in Guinea. Samples were collected from 425 individuals; comprising of 232 HAT cases, 79 subjects with long lasting positive and specific serology but negative parasitology and 114 endemic controls. Genotypes of 28 SNPs in eight genes passed quality control and were used for an association analysis. IL6 rs1818879 allele A (p = 0.0001, OR = 0.39, CI95 = [0.24-0.63], BONF = 0.0034) was associated with a lower risk of progressing from latent infection to active disease. MIF rs36086171 allele G seemed to be associated with an increased risk (p = 0.0239, OR = 1.65, CI95 = [1.07-2.53], BONF = 0.6697) but did not remain significant after Bonferroni correction. Similarly MIF rs12483859 C allele seems be associated with latent infections (p = 0.0077, OR = 1.86, CI95 = [1.18-2.95], BONF = 0.2157). We confirmed earlier observations that APOL1 G2 allele (DEL) (p = 0.0011, OR = 2.70, CI95 = [1.49-4.91], BONF = 0.0301) is associated with a higher risk and APOL1 G1 polymorphism (p = 0.0005, OR = 0.45, CI95 = [0.29-0.70], BONF = 0.0129) with a lower risk of developing HAT. No associations were found with other candidate genes. Our data show that host genes are involved in modulating Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infection outcome in infected individuals from Guinea with IL6 rs1818879 being associated with a lower risk of progressing to active HAT. These results enhance our understanding of host-parasite interactions and, ultimately, may

  14. Genetic control of resistance to Trypanosoma brucei brucei infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matyáš Síma

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei brucei infects livestock, with severe effects in horses and dogs. Mouse strains differ greatly in susceptibility to this parasite. However, no genes controlling these differences were mapped.We studied the genetic control of survival after T. b. brucei infection using recombinant congenic (RC strains, which have a high mapping power. Each RC strain of BALB/c-c-STS/A (CcS/Dem series contains a different random subset of 12.5% genes from the parental "donor" strain STS/A and 87.5% genes from the "background" strain BALB/c. Although BALB/c and STS/A mice are similarly susceptible to T. b. brucei, the RC strain CcS-11 is more susceptible than either of them. We analyzed genetics of survival in T. b. brucei-infected F(2 hybrids between BALB/c and CcS-11. CcS-11 strain carries STS-derived segments on eight chromosomes. They were genotyped in the F(2 hybrid mice and their linkage with survival was tested by analysis of variance.We mapped four Tbbr (Trypanosoma brucei brucei response loci that influence survival after T. b. brucei infection. Tbbr1 (chromosome 3 and Tbbr2 (chromosome 12 have effects on survival independent of inter-genic interactions (main effects. Tbbr3 (chromosome 7 influences survival in interaction with Tbbr4 (chromosome 19. Tbbr2 is located on a segment 2.15 Mb short that contains only 26 genes.This study presents the first identification of chromosomal loci controlling susceptibility to T. b. brucei infection. While mapping in F(2 hybrids of inbred strains usually has a precision of 40-80 Mb, in RC strains we mapped Tbbr2 to a 2.15 Mb segment containing only 26 genes, which will enable an effective search for the candidate gene. Definition of susceptibility genes will improve the understanding of pathways and genetic diversity underlying the disease and may result in new strategies to overcome the active subversion of the immune system by T. b. brucei.

  15. A search for Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense diagnostic antigens by proteomic screening and targeted cloning.

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    Theresa Manful

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The only available diagnostic method for East African trypanosomiasis is light microscopy of blood samples. A simple immunodiagnostic would greatly aid trypanosomiasis control. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To find trypanosome proteins that are specifically recognised by sera from human sleeping sickness patients, we have screened the Trypanosoma brucei brucei proteome by Western blotting. Using cytosolic, cytoskeletal and glycosomal fractions, we found that the vast majority of abundant trypanosome proteins is not specifically recognised by patient sera. We identified phosphoglycerate kinase (PGKC, heat shock protein (HSP70, and histones H2B and H3 as possible candidate diagnostic antigens. These proteins, plus paraflagellar rod protein 1, rhodesain (a cysteine protease, and an extracellular fragment of the Trypanosoma brucei nucleoside transporter TbNT10, were expressed in E. coli and tested for reactivity with patient and control sera. Only TbHSP70 was preferentially recognized by patient sera, but the sensitivity and specificity were insufficient for use of TbHSP70 alone as a diagnostic. Immunoprecipitation using a native protein extract revealed no specifically reacting proteins. CONCLUSIONS: No abundant T. brucei soluble, glycosomal or cytoskeletal protein is likely to be useful in diagnosis. To find useful diagnostic antigens it will therefore be necessary to use more sophisticated proteomic methods, or to test a very large panel of candidate proteins.

  16. Studies on the glycosome of Trypanosoma brucei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aman, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Glycosomes (microbodies) have been purified from bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei by an improved procedure involving freezing and thawing live organisms in 15% glycerol prior to cell disruption. Highly purified organelles of bloodstream form T. brucei contain 11 major proteins of which 8 tentatively identified glycolytic enzymes make up about 90% of the total glycosomal protein. Treatment of these intact isolated organelles with the bisimidoester dimethylsuberimidate (DMSI) resulted in crosslinking of all glycosomal proteins into a large complex suggestive of juxtapositioning of the glycosomal proteins. The crosslinked complex was capable of catalyzing the multienzyme conversion of glucose to glycerol-3-phosphate but did not possess any special kinetic features different from those of the unaggregated enzymes represented by solubilized glycosomes. The multienzyme reaction had a lab phase associated with it and [ 14 C]-glucose label incorporation into sugar phosphate intermediates was effectively competed by unlabeled intermediates. Glycosomes were also purified from culture form T. brucei by several different procedures. Comparison of highly purified organelles from the two different life stages of the organism showed reduced specific activities and contents of the early glycolytic enzymes in organelles from the culture form with a decrease from 87% to 35% of the contribution of glycolytic enzymes to the total glycosomal protein

  17. Evaluation of Anti-trypanosomal Properties of Four Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JTEkanem

    2004-11-16

    Nov 16, 2004 ... on the trypanosomal parasite involved, Human. African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), exist in two potentially fatal clinical forms: a chronic form caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense affecting countries in west and central Africa, and an acute form, caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in East and ...

  18. Trypanosomosis agglutination card test for Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense sleeping sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akol, M N; Olaho-Mukani, W; Odiit, M; Enyaru, J C; Matovu, E; Magona, J; Okitoi, N D

    1999-01-01

    To develop a simple field test for diagnosis of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in man. Trypanosomosis Agglutination Card Test (TACT) was developed for the diagnosis of sleeping sickness due to Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense infection, based on stabilised procyclic forms derived from Utat 4.1. Procyclics were fixed in buffered formalin at 4 degrees for 24 hours and further stabilised in acid/alcohol mixture for 30 minutes. The fixed antigen was stained with Coomassie blue and suspended in 0.1 M PBS/sodium azide buffer pH 7.2 at a concentration of 1 x 10(8) trypanosomes/ml and kept at room temperature. This antigen was used to screen 100 sera from rabbits infected with T. b. rhodesiense, eight from normal rabbits, and 220 only sera 60 of which were from sleeping sickness patients, 50 from normal persons and 110 from other parasitic infections. Laboratory testing of the antigen types against the rabbit and human sera infected with cloned variable antigen types of T. b. rhodesiense, was routinely carried on test cards under room temperature. Serum samples from normal and infected rabbits and human subjects. All sera from infected rabbits and 59 from sleeping sickness patients reacted strongly with the antigen showing agglutination reaction which ranged from 1:4 to 1:1024 serum dilution. There was minimal cross reaction with other parasitic infections as follows: one out of 20 malaria patients none of the 20 hookworm patients, one out of 30 for schistosomiasis patients, none of the 10 amoebiasis patients and one out of 20 for filariasis patients. Agglutination titres from all these non-sleeping sickness patients were below 1:16. Based on rabbit positive and negative sera, TACT gave a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 80% while for human sera a sensitivity of 98.3% and specificity of 96% were observed. These preliminary results show that TACT could be a promising screening field test for T. b. rhodesiense sleeping sickness.

  19. Identification of sVSG117 as an immunodiagnostic antigen and evaluation of a dual-antigen lateral flow test for the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Lauren; Fleming, Jennifer; Sastry, Lalitha; Mehlert, Angela; Wall, Steven J; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2014-07-01

    The diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense relies mainly on the Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT). There is no immunodiagnostic for HAT caused by T. b. rhodesiense. Our principle aim was to develop a prototype lateral flow test that might be an improvement on CATT. Pools of infection and control sera were screened against four different soluble form variant surface glycoproteins (sVSGs) by ELISA and one, sVSG117, showed particularly strong immunoreactivity to pooled infection sera. Using individual sera, sVSG117 was shown to be able to discriminate between T. b. gambiense infection and control sera by both ELISA and lateral flow test. The sVSG117 antigen was subsequently used with a previously described recombinant diagnostic antigen, rISG65, to create a dual-antigen lateral flow test prototype. The latter was used blind in a virtual field trial of 431 randomized infection and control sera from the WHO HAT Specimen Biobank. In the virtual field trial, using two positive antigen bands as the criterion for infection, the sVSG117 and rISG65 dual-antigen lateral flow test prototype showed a sensitivity of 97.3% (95% CI: 93.3 to 99.2) and a specificity of 83.3% (95% CI: 76.4 to 88.9) for the detection of T. b. gambiense infections. The device was not as good for detecting T. b. rhodesiense infections using two positive antigen bands as the criterion for infection, with a sensitivity of 58.9% (95% CI: 44.9 to 71.9) and specificity of 97.3% (95% CI: 90.7 to 99.7). However, using one or both positive antigen band(s) as the criterion for T. b. rhodesiense infection improved the sensitivity to 83.9% (95% CI: 71.7 to 92.4) with a specificity of 85.3% (95% CI: 75.3 to 92.4). These results encourage further development of the dual-antigen device for clinical use.

  20. Identification of sVSG117 as an immunodiagnostic antigen and evaluation of a dual-antigen lateral flow test for the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Sullivan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense relies mainly on the Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT. There is no immunodiagnostic for HAT caused by T. b. rhodesiense. Our principle aim was to develop a prototype lateral flow test that might be an improvement on CATT.Pools of infection and control sera were screened against four different soluble form variant surface glycoproteins (sVSGs by ELISA and one, sVSG117, showed particularly strong immunoreactivity to pooled infection sera. Using individual sera, sVSG117 was shown to be able to discriminate between T. b. gambiense infection and control sera by both ELISA and lateral flow test. The sVSG117 antigen was subsequently used with a previously described recombinant diagnostic antigen, rISG65, to create a dual-antigen lateral flow test prototype. The latter was used blind in a virtual field trial of 431 randomized infection and control sera from the WHO HAT Specimen Biobank.In the virtual field trial, using two positive antigen bands as the criterion for infection, the sVSG117 and rISG65 dual-antigen lateral flow test prototype showed a sensitivity of 97.3% (95% CI: 93.3 to 99.2 and a specificity of 83.3% (95% CI: 76.4 to 88.9 for the detection of T. b. gambiense infections. The device was not as good for detecting T. b. rhodesiense infections using two positive antigen bands as the criterion for infection, with a sensitivity of 58.9% (95% CI: 44.9 to 71.9 and specificity of 97.3% (95% CI: 90.7 to 99.7. However, using one or both positive antigen band(s as the criterion for T. b. rhodesiense infection improved the sensitivity to 83.9% (95% CI: 71.7 to 92.4 with a specificity of 85.3% (95% CI: 75.3 to 92.4. These results encourage further development of the dual-antigen device for clinical use.

  1. The Effect of Garlic Extracts on Experimental Trypanosoma brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-trypanosomal effect of aqueous and methanolic extracts of garlic were studied in Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected rabbits. With the establishment of infection, parasitaemia, anaemia, leucopenia, neutropenia and lymphocytosis developed. There was decrease in total serum protein, albumin and increase in ...

  2. Trypanosoma evansi is alike to Trypanosoma brucei brucei in the subcellular localisation of glycolytic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Andrea Moreno

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi, which causes surra, is descended from Trypanosoma brucei brucei, which causes nagana. Although both parasites are presumed to be metabolically similar, insufficient knowledge of T. evansi precludes a full comparison. Herein, we provide the first report on the subcellular localisation of the glycolytic enzymes in T. evansi, which is a alike to that of the bloodstream form (BSF of T. b. brucei: (i fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, phosphoglycerate kinase, triosephosphate isomerase (glycolytic enzymes and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (a glycolysis-auxiliary enzyme in glycosomes, (ii enolase, phosphoglycerate mutase, pyruvate kinase (glycolytic enzymes and a GAPDH isoenzyme in the cytosol, (iii malate dehydrogenase in cytosol and (iv glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in both glycosomes and the cytosol. Specific enzymatic activities also suggest that T. evansi is alike to the BSF of T. b. brucei in glycolytic flux, which is much faster than the pentose phosphate pathway flux, and in the involvement of cytosolic GAPDH in the NAD+/NADH balance. These similarities were expected based on the close phylogenetic relationship of both parasites.

  3. Transcript expression analysis of putative Trypanosoma brucei GPI-anchored surface proteins during development in the tsetse and mammalian hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy F Savage

    Full Text Available Human African Trypanosomiasis is a devastating disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Trypanosomes live extracellularly in both the tsetse fly and the mammal. Trypanosome surface proteins can directly interact with the host environment, allowing parasites to effectively establish and maintain infections. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchoring is a common posttranslational modification associated with eukaryotic surface proteins. In T. brucei, three GPI-anchored major surface proteins have been identified: variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs, procyclic acidic repetitive protein (PARP or procyclins, and brucei alanine rich proteins (BARP. The objective of this study was to select genes encoding predicted GPI-anchored proteins with unknown function(s from the T. brucei genome and characterize the expression profile of a subset during cyclical development in the tsetse and mammalian hosts. An initial in silico screen of putative T. brucei proteins by Big PI algorithm identified 163 predicted GPI-anchored proteins, 106 of which had no known functions. Application of a second GPI-anchor prediction algorithm (FragAnchor, signal peptide and trans-membrane domain prediction software resulted in the identification of 25 putative hypothetical proteins. Eighty-one gene products with hypothetical functions were analyzed for stage-regulated expression using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of most of these genes were found to be upregulated in trypanosomes infecting tsetse salivary gland and proventriculus tissues, and 38% were specifically expressed only by parasites infecting salivary gland tissues. Transcripts for all of the genes specifically expressed in salivary glands were also detected in mammalian infective metacyclic trypomastigotes, suggesting a possible role for these putative proteins in invasion and/or establishment processes in the mammalian host. These results represent the first large-scale report of the differential

  4. Alkaloids Induce Programmed Cell Death in Bloodstream Forms of Trypanosomes (Trypanosoma b. brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wink

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The potential induction of a programmed cell death (PCD in Trypanosoma b. brucei by 55 alkaloids of the quinoline, quinolizidine, isoquinoline, indole, terpene, tropane, steroid, and piperidine type was studied by measuring DNA fragmentation and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. For comparison, the induction of apoptosis by the same alkaloids in human leukemia cells (Jurkat APO-S was tested. Several alkaloids of the isoquinoline, quinoline, indole and steroidal type (berberine, chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, quinine, ajmalicine, ergotamine, harmine, vinblastine, vincristine, colchicine, chaconine, demissidine and veratridine induced programmed cell death, whereas quinolizidine, tropane, terpene and piperidine alkaloids were mostly inactive. Effective PCD induction (EC50 below 10 µM was caused in T. brucei by chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, and chaconine. The active alkaloids can be characterized by their general property to inhibit protein biosynthesis, to intercalate DNA, to disturb membrane fluidity or to inhibit microtubule formation.

  5. Comparison of nucleic acid sequence-based amplification and loop-mediated isothermal amplification for diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugasa, Claire M; Katiti, Diana; Boobo, Alex; Lubega, George W; Schallig, Henk D F H; Matovu, Enock

    2014-02-01

    Diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) using molecular tests should ideally achieve high sensitivity without compromising specificity. This study compared 2 simplified tests, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) combined with oligochromatography (OC) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), executed on 181 blood samples from 65 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense HAT patients, 86 controls, and 30 serological suspects from Uganda. Basing on the composite reference standard, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of NASBA were 93.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 84.9-98.3%) and 100% (95% CI = 94.9-100%), respectively. The same parameters for LAMP were 76.9% (95% CI = 64.8-86.5%) and 100% (95% CI = 91.6-100%), respectively. The level of agreement between LAMP and microscopy was good with a kappa (κ) value of 79.2% (95% CI = 69.4-88.9%), while that of NASBA-OC/microscopy was very good (κ value 94.6%; 95% CI = 89.3-99.8%). The sensitivity of NASBA-OC was significantly higher than that of LAMP (Z = 2.723; P = 0.007). These tests have potential application to HAT surveillance. © 2013.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIPARASITIC ACTIVITY OF BENZOPHENONE THIOSEMICARBAZONES ON Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges C. Accrombessi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The structure of four synthesized thiosemicarbazones, substituted or not, of benzophenone has been confirmed by spectrometrical analysis IR, NMR 1H and 13C. Their anti-trypanosomal activities were evaluated on Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among these compounds, benzophenone 4 phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 4 has the highest activity with the half-inhibitory concentration (IC50 = 8.48 micromolar (µM. Benzophenone 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 3 and benzophenone thiosemicarbazone 1 showed moderate anti-trypanosomal activity with IC50 values equal to 23.27 µM and 67.17 µM respectively. Benzophenone 2 methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 2 showed no activity up to IC50 = 371.74 µM.

  7. In vivo trypanocidal activity of Nymphaea lotus Linn. methanol extract against Trypanosoma brucei brucei

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    Muhammad Haruna Garba

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antitrypanosomal potentials of methanol extract of Nymphaea lotus Linn. (N. lotus with the aim of obtaining a new lead for formulating safe, inexpensive, nontoxic and readily available trypanocidal drugs. Methods: Seventy percent (v/v (methanol/water crude extract of N. lotus was evaluated for antitrypanosomal activity in experimental trypanosomiasis using Trypanosoma brucei bruceiinfected mice. Infected mice in different groups were administered intraperitoneally 100, 200, 300 and 400 mg/kg body weight/day of the crude for two weeks, while a positive control group was treated with standard drug, berenil. Results: The crude extract at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight/day was more effective than the higher doses in completely clearing parasites from the blood of mice infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Pre-treatment of healthy mice with the crude extract for 5 days before infection did not prevent the establishment of the infection, indicating that the extract had no prophylactic activity. Subinoculation of the blood and cerebrospinal fluid drawn from the cured mice into healthy mice failed to produce any infection within 50 days post inoculation. Administration of 1 000 mg/kg body weight of the crude extract led to the death of 50% of the experimental animals indicating a high level of toxicity of the extract at higher doses. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the potency of the crude extract of N. lotus in treating experimental trypanosomiasis at lower doses.

  8. Chloramphenicol-sensitive mitochondrial translation in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabholz, C. E.; Speijer, D.; Schneider, A.

    1999-01-01

    We developed an in organello system to label newly synthesized mitochondrially encoded proteins of Trypanosoma brucei. Highly purified mitochondria, prepared under isotonic conditions, were incubated with radioactive methionine and cysteine in a suitable translation buffer. Analysis of mitochondrial

  9. Population genetics of Trypanosoma brucei circulating in Glossina palpalis palpalis and domestic animals of the Fontem sleeping sickness focus of Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Human African Trypanosomiasis is still a public health threat in Cameroon. To assess Trypanosoma brucei strains circulating in the Fontem sleeping sickness focus, we conducted a genetic structure study using microsatellites to assess genotypes circulating in both tsetse flies and domestic animals. Method For this study, pyramidal traps were set up and 2695 tsetse flies were collected and 1535 (57%) living flies were dissected and their mid-guts collected. Furthermore, blood samples were collected from 397 domestic animals (pigs, goats, sheep and dogs). DNA was extracted from midguts and blood samples, and specific primers were used to identify trypanosomes of the subgenus Trypanozoon. All positive samples were genetically characterized with seven microsatellite markers. Results Seventy five (4.7%) midguts of tsetse flies and 140 (35.2%) domestic animals were found infected by trypanosomes of the subgenus Trypanozoon. The genetic characterization of 215 Trypanozoon positive samples (75 from tsetse and 140 from animals) revealed a genetic diversity between Trypanosoma brucei circulating in tsetse and domestic animals. Of these positive samples, 87 (40.5%) single infections were used here to investigate the population genetics of Trypanosoma brucei circulating in tsetse and domestic animals. The dendrogram illustrating the genetic similarities between Trypanosoma brucei genotypes was subdivided into four clusters. The samples from tsetse belonged to the same cluster whereas the samples from domestic animals and espcially pigs were distributed in the four clusters. Conclusion Pigs appeared as the animal species harboring the highest number of different Trypanosoma brucei strains. They may play an important role in the propagation of different genotypes. The FST values revealed a sub structuration of Trypanosoma brucei according to hosts and sometimes villages. The data obtained from this study may have considerable importance for the understanding of the

  10. Excreted/Secreted Proteins from Trypanosome Procyclic Strains

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    Celestine Michelle Atyame Nten

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma secretome was shown to be involved in parasite virulence and is suspected of interfering in parasite life-cycle steps such as establishment in the Glossina midgut, metacyclogenesis. Therefore, we attempted to identify the proteins secreted by procyclic strains of T. brucei gambiense and T. brucei brucei, responsible for human and animal trypanosomiasis, respectively. Using mass spectrometry, 427 and 483 nonredundant proteins were characterized in T. brucei brucei and T. brucei gambiense secretomes, respectively; 35% and 42% of the corresponding secretome proteins were specifically secreted by T. brucei brucei and T. brucei gambiense, respectively, while 279 proteins were common to both subspecies. The proteins were assigned to 12 functional classes. Special attention was paid to the most abundant proteases (14 families because of their potential implication in the infection process and nutrient supply. The presence of proteins usually secreted via an exosome pathway suggests that this type of process is involved in trypanosome ESP secretion. The overall results provide leads for further research to develop novel tools for blocking trypanosome transmission.

  11. Regulation and spatial organization of PCNA in Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, Doris; Gassen, Alwine [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology I, Genetics, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Maiser, Andreas; Leonhardt, Heinrich [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology II, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Janzen, Christian J., E-mail: christian.janzen@uni-wuerzburg.de [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology I, Genetics, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in Trypanosoma brucei (TbPCNA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TbPCNA is a suitable marker to detect replication in T. brucei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TbPCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to closely related parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania donovani. -- Abstract: As in most eukaryotic cells, replication is regulated by a conserved group of proteins in the early-diverged parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Only a few components of the replication machinery have been described in this parasite and regulation, sub-nuclear localization and timing of replication are not well understood. We characterized the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in T. brucei (TbPCNA) to establish a spatial and temporal marker for replication. Interestingly, PCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to the closely related parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania donovani. TbPCNA foci are clearly detectable during S phase of the cell cycle but in contrast to T. cruzi they are not preferentially located at the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, PCNA seems to be degraded when cells enter G2 phase in T. brucei suggesting different modes of replication regulation or functions of PCNA in these closely related eukaryotes.

  12. In vitro effect of essential oils and isolated mono- and sesquiterpenes on Leishmania major and Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikus, J; Harkenthal, M; Steverding, D; Reichling, J

    2000-05-01

    The effect of different essential oils as well as of isolated mono- and sesquiterpenes on the viability of bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei, promastigotes of Leishmania major and human HL-60 cells was evaluated using the Almar Blue assay. Of the 12 essential oils and 8 terpenes investigated, only three essential oils, Melissa officinalis (balmmint) oil, Thymus vulgaris (thyme) oil, and Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil were about 50-fold and 80-fold more toxic to bloodstream forms of T. brucei than to HL-60 cells, respectively. Terpinen-4-ol, the main compound of the Australian tea tree oil, was even 1000-fold more toxic to trypanosomes than to the human cells. On the other hand, none of the essential oils and terpenes tested were more toxic to promastigotes of L. major than to HL-60 cells.

  13. Evaluation of In Vitro Activity of Essential Oils against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Habila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils (EOs from Cymbopogon citratus (CC, Eucalyptus citriodora (EC, Eucalyptus camaldulensis (ED, and Citrus sinensis (CS were obtained by hydrodistillation process. The EOs were evaluated in vitro for activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Tbb and Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi. The EOs were found to possess antitrypanosomal activity in vitro in a dose-dependent pattern in a short period of time. The drop in number of parasite over time was achieved doses of 0.4 g/ml, 0.2 g/mL, and 0.1 g/mL for all the EOs. The concentration of 0.4 g/mL CC was more potent at 3 minutes and 2 minutes for Tbb and T. evansi, respectively. The GC-MS analysis of the EOs revealed presence of Cyclobutane (96.09% in CS, 6-octenal (77.11% in EC, Eucalyptol (75% in ED, and Citral (38.32% in CC among several other organic compounds. The results are discussed in relation to trypanosome chemotherapy.

  14. Discovery of novel Trypanosoma brucei phosphodiesterase B1 inhibitors by virtual screening against the unliganded TbrPDEB1 crystal structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, C.; Wang, H.; Kooistra, A.J.; de Graaf, C.; Orrling, K.M.; Tenor, H.; Seebeck, T.; de Esch, I.J.P.; Ke, H.; Leurs, R.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase B1 (TbrPDEB1) and TbrPDEB2 have recently been validated as new therapeutic targets for human African trypanosomiasis by both genetic and pharmacological means. In this study we report the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the

  15. Triacylglycerol Storage in Lipid Droplets in Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Allmann

    Full Text Available Carbon storage is likely to enable adaptation of trypanosomes to nutritional challenges or bottlenecks during their stage development and migration in the tsetse. Lipid droplets are candidates for this function. This report shows that feeding of T. brucei with oleate results in a 4-5 fold increase in the number of lipid droplets, as quantified by confocal fluorescence microscopy and by flow cytometry of BODIPY 493/503-stained cells. The triacylglycerol (TAG content also increased 4-5 fold, and labeled oleate is incorporated into TAG. Fatty acid carbon can thus be stored as TAG in lipid droplets under physiological growth conditions in procyclic T. brucei. β-oxidation has been suggested as a possible catabolic pathway for lipids in T. brucei. A single candidate gene, TFEα1 with coding capacity for a subunit of the trifunctional enzyme complex was identified. TFEα1 is expressed in procyclic T. brucei and present in glycosomal proteomes, Unexpectedly, a TFEα1 gene knock-out mutant still expressed wild-type levels of previously reported NADP-dependent 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity, and therefore, another gene encodes this enzymatic activity. Homozygous Δtfeα1/Δtfeα1 null mutant cells show a normal growth rate and an unchanged glycosomal proteome in procyclic T. brucei. The decay kinetics of accumulated lipid droplets upon oleate withdrawal can be fully accounted for by the dilution effect of cell division in wild-type and Δtfeα1/Δtfeα1 cells. The absence of net catabolism of stored TAG in procyclic T. brucei, even under strictly glucose-free conditions, does not formally exclude a flux through TAG, in which biosynthesis equals catabolism. Also, the possibility remains that TAG catabolism is completely repressed by other carbon sources in culture media or developmentally activated in post-procyclic stages in the tsetse.

  16. Arginine and Lysine Transporters Are Essential for Trypanosoma brucei.

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieu, Christoph; Pereira de Macêdo, Juan; Hürlimann, Daniel; Wirdnam, Corina; Haindrich, Alexander; Suter, Marianne; González Salgado, Amaia; Schmidt, Remo; Inbar, Ehud; Mäser, Pascal; Bütikofer, Peter; Zilberstein, Dan; Rentsch, Doris

    2017-01-01

    For Trypanosoma brucei arginine and lysine are essential amino acids and therefore have to be imported from the host. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants identified cationic amino acid transporters among members of the T. brucei AAAP (amino acid/auxin permease) family. TbAAT5-3 showed high affinity arginine uptake (K m 3.6 ? 0.4 ?M) and high selectivity for L-arginine. L-arginine transport was reduced by a 10-times excess of L-arginine, homo-arginine, canavanine or arg...

  17. Challenges towards the elimination of Human African Trypanosomiasis in the sleeping sickness focus of Campo in southern Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo, Gustave; Mbida Mbida, Jean Arthur; Ebo'o Eyenga, Vincent; Asonganyi, Tazoacha; Njiokou, Flobert; Grébaut, Pascal

    2014-08-16

    The sleeping sickness focus of Campo lies along the Atlantic coast and extends along the Ntem River, which constitutes the Cameroonian and Equatorial Guinean border. It is a hypo-endemic focus with the disease prevalence varying from 0.3 to 0.86% during the last few decades. Investigations on animal reservoirs revealed a prevalence of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense of 0.6% in wild animals and 4.83% in domestic animals of this focus. From 2001 to 2012, about 19 931 tsetse were collected in this focus and five tsetse species including Glossina palpalis palpalis, G. pallicera, G. nigrofusca, G. tabaniformis and G. caliginea were identified. The analysis of blood meals of these flies showed that they feed on human, pig, goat, sheep, and wild animals such as antelope, duiker, wild pig, turtle and snake. The percentage of blood meals taken on these hosts varies according to sampling periods. For instance, 6.8% of blood meals from pig were reported in 2004 and 22% in 2008. This variation is subjected to considerable evolutions because the Campo HAT focus is submitted to socio-economic mutations including the reopening of a new wood company, the construction of autonomous port at "Kribi" as well as the dam at "Memve ele". These activities will bring more that 3000 inhabitants around Campo and induce the deforestation for the implementation of farmlands as well as breeding of domestic animals. Such mutations have impacts on the transmission and the epidemiology of sleeping sickness due to the modification of the fauna composition, the nutritional behavior of tsetse, the zoophilic/anthropophilic index. To achieve the elimination goal in the sleeping sickness focus of Campo, we report in this paper the current epidemiological situation of the disease, the research findings of the last decades notably on the population genetics of trypanosomes, the modifications of nutritional behavior of tsetse, the prevalence of T. b. gambiense in humans, domestic and wild animals. An overview

  18. Andrographolide induces oxidative stress-dependent cell death in unicellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Malabika; Parai, Debaprasad; Dhar, Pranab; Roy, Manab; Barik, Rajib; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2017-12-01

    African sleeping sickness is a parasitic disease in humans and livestock caused by Trypanosoma brucei throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Absence of appropriate vaccines and prevalence of drug resistance proclaim that a new way of therapeutic interventions is essential against African trypanosomiasis. In the present study, we have looked into the effect of andrographolide (andro), a diterpenoid lactone from Andrographis paiculata on Trypanosoma brucei PRA 380. Although andro has been recognized as a promosing anti-cancer drug, its usefulness against Trypanosoma spp remained unexplored. Andro showed promising anti-trypanosomal activity with an IC 50 value of 8.3μM assessed through SYBR Green cell viability assay and also showed no cytotoxicity towards normal murine macrophages. Cell cycle analysis revealed that andro could induce sub-G 0 /G 1 phase arrest. Flow cytometric analysis also revealed that incubation with andro caused exposure of phosphatidyl serine to the outer leaflet of plasma membrane in T. brucei PCF. This event was preceded by andro-induced depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δym) and elevation of cytosolic calcium. Andro also caused elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as lipid peroxidation level, and depletion in reduced thiol levels. Taken together, these data indicate that andro has promising antitrypanosomal activity mediated by promoting oxidative stress and depolarizing the mitochondrial membrane potential and thereby triggering an apoptosis-like programmed cell death. Therefore, this study merits further investigation to the therapeutic possibility of using andro for the treatment of African trypanosomiasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Species-Specific Inactivation of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trypanosoma brucei: Kinetic and Molecular Dynamics Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Vázquez-Raygoza

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT, a disease that provokes 2184 new cases a year in Sub-Saharan Africa, is caused by Trypanosoma brucei. Current treatments are limited, highly toxic, and parasite strains resistant to them are emerging. Therefore, there is an urgency to find new drugs against HAT. In this context, T. brucei depends on glycolysis as the unique source for ATP supply; therefore, the enzyme triosephosphate isomerase (TIM is an attractive target for drug design. In the present work, three new benzimidazole derivatives were found as TbTIM inactivators (compounds 1, 2 and 3 with an I50 value of 84, 82 and 73 µM, respectively. Kinetic analyses indicated that the three molecules were selective when tested against human TIM (HsTIM activity. Additionally, to study their binding mode in TbTIM, we performed a 100 ns molecular dynamics simulation of TbTIM-inactivator complexes. Simulations showed that the binding of compounds disturbs the structure of the protein, affecting the conformations of important domains such as loop 6 and loop 8. In addition, the physicochemical and drug-like parameters showed by the three compounds suggest a good oral absorption. In conclusion, these molecules will serve as a guide to design more potent inactivators that could be used to obtain new drugs against HAT.

  20. Population Size and Diet of Bush Hyrax Hetrohyrax brucei (Gray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A number of species in these forests however, are suffering from the effects of isolation and fragmentations which are poorly investigated issues. We studied population size and diet of bush hyrax, Heterohyrax brucei, in the isolated Romanat Michael church forest in Northern Ethiopia. The overall population size of the bush ...

  1. What controls glycolysis in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, B.M.; Michels, P.A.M.; Opperdoes, F.R.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of the experimentally determined kinetic properties of the trypanosomal enzymes, the question is addressed of which step limits the glycolytic flux in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei. There appeared to be no single answer; in the physiological range, control shifted between the

  2. Therapeutic properties and serum iron in T. brucei infected rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum iron was monitored in Trypanosoma brucei-infected rats treated with Amodiaquine and mefloquine antimalarials as the infection progressed. The chemotherapeutic properties of the drugs against African sleeping sickness were also assessed. Results show gradual reduction in the levels of serum iron in the infected ...

  3. ( Nigella sativa ) oil on Trypanosoma brucei -infected rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of black seed oil (Nigella sativa oil) on parasitaemia, some serum and liver enzymes as well as some haematological parameters in Trypanosoma brucei-infected rats were investigated. The results show there was low parasitaemia and extension of life span of rats from 12 days of the infected untreated (control) ...

  4. A tropical tale: how Naja nigricollis venom beats Trypanosoma brucei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martos Esteban, Andrea; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Carrington, Mark

    Trypanosoma brucei is a parasitic protozoan species capable to infecting insect vectors whose bite further produces African sleeping sickness inhuman beings [1]. During the parasite’s extracellular life in the mammalian host,its outer coat, mainly composed of Variable Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs)...

  5. Effect of trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei mixed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of Trypanosoma congolense and T. brucei mixed infection on the pattern of haematological changes was demonstrated in a rat model. At the end of 21 days post infection (PI), anaemia which was characterised by drop in the packed cell volume (PCV), was found to be significantly (P<0.05) severer in rats with ...

  6. Roles of triosephosphate isomerase and aerobic metabolism in Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helfert, S.; Estevez, A.M.; Bakker, B.M.; Michels, P.A.M.; Clayton, C.

    2001-01-01

    Kinetoplastid protozoa compartmentalize the first seven enzymes of glycolysis and two enzymes of glycerol metabolism in a microbody, the glycosome. While in its mammalian host, Trypanosoma brucei depends entirely on glucose for ATP generation. Under aerobic conditions, most of the glucose is

  7. A combined CXCL10, CXCL8 and H-FABP panel for the staging of human African trypanosomiasis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Hainard

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, also known as sleeping sickness, is a parasitic tropical disease. It progresses from the first, haemolymphatic stage to a neurological second stage due to invasion of parasites into the central nervous system (CNS. As treatment depends on the stage of disease, there is a critical need for tools that efficiently discriminate the two stages of HAT. We hypothesized that markers of brain damage discovered by proteomic strategies and inflammation-related proteins could individually or in combination indicate the CNS invasion by the parasite.Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF originated from parasitologically confirmed Trypanosoma brucei gambiense patients. Patients were staged on the basis of CSF white blood cell (WBC count and presence of parasites in CSF. One hundred samples were analysed: 21 from stage 1 (no trypanosomes in CSF and 5 WBC/microL patients. The concentration of H-FABP, GSTP-1 and S100beta in CSF was measured by ELISA. The levels of thirteen inflammation-related proteins (IL-1ra, IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-9, IL-10, G-CSF, VEGF, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, CCL2, CCL4, CXCL8 and CXCL10 were determined by bead suspension arrays.CXCL10 most accurately distinguished stage 1 and stage 2 patients, with a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 100%. Rule Induction Like (RIL analysis defined a panel characterized by CXCL10, CXCL8 and H-FABP that improved the detection of stage 2 patients to 97% sensitivity and 100% specificity.This study highlights the value of CXCL10 as a single biomarker for staging T. b. gambiense-infected HAT patients. Further combination of CXCL10 with H-FABP and CXCL8 results in a panel that efficiently rules in stage 2 HAT patients. As these molecules could potentially be markers of other CNS infections and disorders, these results should be validated in a larger multi-centric cohort including other inflammatory diseases such as cerebral malaria and active tuberculosis.

  8. Arginine and Lysine Transporters Are Essential for Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Christoph; Macêdo, Juan P; Hürlimann, Daniel; Wirdnam, Corina; Haindrich, Alexander C; Suter Grotemeyer, Marianne; González-Salgado, Amaia; Schmidt, Remo S; Inbar, Ehud; Mäser, Pascal; Bütikofer, Peter; Zilberstein, Dan; Rentsch, Doris

    2017-01-01

    For Trypanosoma brucei arginine and lysine are essential amino acids and therefore have to be imported from the host. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants identified cationic amino acid transporters among members of the T. brucei AAAP (amino acid/auxin permease) family. TbAAT5-3 showed high affinity arginine uptake (Km 3.6 ± 0.4 μM) and high selectivity for L-arginine. L-arginine transport was reduced by a 10-times excess of L-arginine, homo-arginine, canavanine or arginine-β-naphthylamide, while lysine was inhibitory only at 100-times excess, and histidine or ornithine did not reduce arginine uptake rates significantly. TbAAT16-1 is a high affinity (Km 4.3 ± 0.5 μM) and highly selective L-lysine transporter and of the compounds tested, only L-lysine and thialysine were competing for L-lysine uptake. TbAAT5-3 and TbAAT16-1 are expressed in both procyclic and bloodstream form T. brucei and cMyc-tagged proteins indicate localization at the plasma membrane. RNAi-mediated down-regulation of TbAAT5 and TbAAT16 in bloodstream form trypanosomes resulted in growth arrest, demonstrating that TbAAT5-mediated arginine and TbAAT16-mediated lysine transport are essential for T. brucei. Growth of induced RNAi lines could partially be rescued by supplementing a surplus of arginine or lysine, respectively, while addition of both amino acids was less efficient. Single and double RNAi lines indicate that additional low affinity uptake systems for arginine and lysine are present in T. brucei.

  9. T. brucei infection reduces B lymphopoiesis in bone marrow and truncates compensatory splenic lymphopoiesis through transitional B-cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viki Bockstal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes of the Trypanosoma brucei species are extracellular protozoan parasites that cause the deadly disease African trypanosomiasis in humans and contribute to the animal counterpart, Nagana. Trypanosome clearance from the bloodstream is mediated by antibodies specific for their Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG coat antigens. However, T. brucei infection induces polyclonal B cell activation, B cell clonal exhaustion, sustained depletion of mature splenic Marginal Zone B (MZB and Follicular B (FoB cells, and destruction of the B-cell memory compartment. To determine how trypanosome infection compromises the humoral immune defense system we used a C57BL/6 T. brucei AnTat 1.1 mouse model and multicolor flow cytometry to document B cell development and maturation during infection. Our results show a more than 95% reduction in B cell precursor numbers from the CLP, pre-pro-B, pro-B, pre-B and immature B cell stages in the bone marrow. In the spleen, T. brucei induces extramedullary B lymphopoiesis as evidenced by significant increases in HSC-LMPP, CLP, pre-pro-B, pro-B and pre-B cell populations. However, final B cell maturation is abrogated by infection-induced apoptosis of transitional B cells of both the T1 and T2 populations which is not uniquely dependent on TNF-, Fas-, or prostaglandin-dependent death pathways. Results obtained from ex vivo co-cultures of living bloodstream form trypanosomes and splenocytes demonstrate that trypanosome surface coat-dependent contact with T1/2 B cells triggers their deletion. We conclude that infection-induced and possibly parasite-contact dependent deletion of transitional B cells prevents replenishment of mature B cell compartments during infection thus contributing to a loss of the host's capacity to sustain antibody responses against recurring parasitemic waves.

  10. Comparative genomics reveals two novel RNAi factors in Trypanosoma brucei and provides insight into the core machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L Barnes

    Full Text Available The introduction ten years ago of RNA interference (RNAi as a tool for molecular exploration in Trypanosoma brucei has led to a surge in our understanding of the pathogenesis and biology of this human parasite. In particular, a genome-wide RNAi screen has recently been combined with next-generation Illumina sequencing to expose catalogues of genes associated with loss of fitness in distinct developmental stages. At present, this technology is restricted to RNAi-positive protozoan parasites, which excludes T. cruzi, Leishmania major, and Plasmodium falciparum. Therefore, elucidating the mechanism of RNAi and identifying the essential components of the pathway is fundamental for improving RNAi efficiency in T. brucei and for transferring the RNAi tool to RNAi-deficient pathogens. Here we used comparative genomics of RNAi-positive and -negative trypanosomatid protozoans to identify the repertoire of factors in T. brucei. In addition to the previously characterized Argonaute 1 (AGO1 protein and the cytoplasmic and nuclear Dicers, TbDCL1 and TbDCL2, respectively, we identified the RNA Interference Factors 4 and 5 (TbRIF4 and TbRIF5. TbRIF4 is a 3'-5' exonuclease of the DnaQ superfamily and plays a critical role in the conversion of duplex siRNAs to the single-stranded form, thus generating a TbAGO1-siRNA complex required for target-specific cleavage. TbRIF5 is essential for cytoplasmic RNAi and appears to act as a TbDCL1 cofactor. The availability of the core RNAi machinery in T. brucei provides a platform to gain mechanistic insights in this ancient eukaryote and to identify the minimal set of components required to reconstitute RNAi in RNAi-deficient parasites.

  11. A target-based high throughput screen yields Trypanosoma brucei hexokinase small molecule inhibitors with antiparasitic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R Sharlow

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei utilizes glycolysis exclusively for ATP production during infection of the mammalian host. The first step in this metabolic pathway is mediated by hexokinase (TbHK, an enzyme essential to the parasite that transfers the gamma-phospho of ATP to a hexose. Here we describe the identification and confirmation of novel small molecule inhibitors of bacterially expressed TbHK1, one of two TbHKs expressed by T. brucei, using a high throughput screening assay.Exploiting optimized high throughput screening assay procedures, we interrogated 220,233 unique compounds and identified 239 active compounds from which ten small molecules were further characterized. Computation chemical cluster analyses indicated that six compounds were structurally related while the remaining four compounds were classified as unrelated or singletons. All ten compounds were approximately 20-17,000-fold more potent than lonidamine, a previously identified TbHK1 inhibitor. Seven compounds inhibited T. brucei blood stage form parasite growth (0.03brucei parasites, Leishmania promastigotes, and mammalian cell lines. Analysis of two structurally related compounds, ebselen and SID 17387000, revealed that both were mixed inhibitors of TbHK1 with respect to ATP. Additionally, both compounds inhibited parasite lysate-derived HK activity. None of the compounds displayed structural similarity to known hexokinase inhibitors or human African trypanosomiasis therapeutics.The novel chemotypes identified here could represent leads for future therapeutic development against the African trypanosome.

  12. Trypanosoma brucei metabolite indolepyruvate decreases HIF-1α and glycolysis in macrophages as a mechanism of innate immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGettrick, Anne F; Corcoran, Sarah E; Barry, Paul J G; McFarland, Jennifer; Crès, Cécile; Curtis, Anne M; Franklin, Edward; Corr, Sinéad C; Mok, K Hun; Cummins, Eoin P; Taylor, Cormac T; O'Neill, Luke A J; Nolan, Derek P

    2016-11-29

    The parasite Trypanasoma brucei causes African trypanosomiasis, known as sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in domestic animals. These diseases are a major burden in the 36 sub-Saharan African countries where the tsetse fly vector is endemic. Untreated trypanosomiasis is fatal and the current treatments are stage-dependent and can be problematic during the meningoencephalitic stage, where no new therapies have been developed in recent years and the current drugs have a low therapeutic index. There is a need for more effective treatments and a better understanding of how these parasites evade the host immune response will help in this regard. The bloodstream form of T. brucei excretes significant amounts of aromatic ketoacids, including indolepyruvate, a transamination product of tryptophan. This study demonstrates that this process is essential in bloodstream forms, is mediated by a specialized isoform of cytoplasmic aminotransferase and, importantly, reveals an immunomodulatory role for indolepyruvate. Indolepyruvate prevents the LPS-induced glycolytic shift in macrophages. This effect is the result of an increase in the hydroxylation and degradation of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). The reduction in HIF-1α levels by indolepyruvate, following LPS or trypanosome activation, results in a decrease in production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. These data demonstrate an important role for indolepyruvate in immune evasion by T. brucei.

  13. Proteome remodelling during development from blood to insect-form Trypanosoma brucei quantified by SILAC and mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunasekera Kapila

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of human African sleeping sickness and Nagana in cattle. In addition to being an important pathogen T. brucei has developed into a model system in cell biology. Results Using Stable Isotope Labelling of Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC in combination with mass spectrometry we determined the abundance of >1600 proteins in the long slender (LS, short stumpy (SS mammalian bloodstream form stages relative to the procyclic (PC insect-form stage. In total we identified 2645 proteins, corresponding to ~30% of the total proteome and for the first time present a comprehensive overview of relative protein levels in three life stages of the parasite. Conclusions We can show the extent of pre-adaptation in the SS cells, especially at the level of the mitochondrial proteome. The comparison to a previously published report on monomorphic in vitro grown bloodstream and procyclic T. brucei indicates a loss of stringent regulation particularly of mitochondrial proteins in these cells when compared to the pleomorphic in vivo situation. In order to better understand the different levels of gene expression regulation in this organism we compared mRNA steady state abundance with the relative protein abundance-changes and detected moderate but significant correlation indicating that trypanosomes possess a significant repertoire of translational and posttranslational mechanisms to regulate protein abundance.

  14. Trypanosoma brucei Bloodstream Forms Depend upon Uptake of myo-Inositol for Golgi Complex Phosphatidylinositol Synthesis and Normal Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Salgado, Amaia; Steinmann, Michael; Major, Louise L; Sigel, Erwin; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Smith, Terry K; Bütikofer, Peter

    2015-06-01

    myo-Inositol is a building block for all inositol-containing phospholipids in eukaryotes. It can be synthesized de novo from glucose-6-phosphate in the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum. Alternatively, it can be taken up from the environment via Na(+)- or H(+)-linked myo-inositol transporters. While Na(+)-coupled myo-inositol transporters are found exclusively in the plasma membrane, H(+)-linked myo-inositol transporters are detected in intracellular organelles. In Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human African sleeping sickness, myo-inositol metabolism is compartmentalized. De novo-synthesized myo-inositol is used for glycosylphosphatidylinositol production in the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas the myo-inositol taken up from the environment is used for bulk phosphatidylinositol synthesis in the Golgi complex. We now provide evidence that the Golgi complex-localized T. brucei H(+)-linked myo-inositol transporter (TbHMIT) is essential in bloodstream-form T. brucei. Downregulation of TbHMIT expression by RNA interference blocked phosphatidylinositol production and inhibited growth of parasites in culture. Characterization of the transporter in a heterologous expression system demonstrated a remarkable selectivity of TbHMIT for myo-inositol. It tolerates only a single modification on the inositol ring, such as the removal of a hydroxyl group or the inversion of stereochemistry at a single hydroxyl group relative to myo-inositol. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. A literature review of economic evaluations for a neglected tropical disease: human African trypanosomiasis ("sleeping sickness").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, C Simone; Yukich, Joshua; Goeree, Ron; Tediosi, Fabrizio

    2015-02-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a disease caused by infection with the parasite Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense. It is transmitted to humans via the tsetse fly. Approximately 70 million people worldwide were at risk of infection in 1995, and approximately 20,000 people across Africa are infected with HAT. The objective of this review was to identify existing economic evaluations in order to summarise cost-effective interventions to reduce, control, or eliminate the burden of HAT. The studies included in the review were compared and critically appraised in order to determine if there were existing standardised methods that could be used for economic evaluation of HAT interventions or if innovative methodological approaches are warranted. A search strategy was developed using keywords and was implemented in January 2014 in several databases. The search returned a total of 2,283 articles. After two levels of screening, a total of seven economic evaluations were included and underwent critical appraisal using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) Methodology Checklist 6: Economic Evaluations. Results from the existing studies focused on the cost-effectiveness of interventions for the control and reduction of disease transmission. Modelling was a common method to forecast long-term results, and publications focused on interventions by category, such as case detection, diagnostics, drug treatments, and vector control. Most interventions were considered cost-effective based on the thresholds described; however, the current treatment, nifurtomix-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT), has not been evaluated for cost-effectiveness, and considerations for cost-effective strategies for elimination have yet to be completed. Overall, the current evidence highlights the main components that play a role in control; however, economic evaluations of HAT elimination strategies are needed to assist national decision makers, stakeholders, and

  16. Anaemia in human African trypanosomiasis caused by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To find out if indeed anaemia is a major sign in human trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodensiense. Design: A one year cross-sectional study of all admitted and surveyed Trypanosoma brucei rhodensiense infected patients (June 2001-June 2002) Setting: Nkhotakota District Hospital-Central ...

  17. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of prototype rapid tests for human African trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy M Sternberg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT remains a challenge both for active screening, which is critical in control of the disease, and in the point-of-care scenario where early and accurate diagnosis is essential. Recently, the first field deployment of a lateral flow rapid diagnostic test (RDT for HAT, "SD BIOLINE HAT" has taken place. In this study, we evaluated the performance of "SD BIOLINE HAT" and two new prototype RDTs.The performance of "SD BIOLINE HAT" and 2 prototype RDTs was tested using archived plasma from 250 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense patients, and 250 endemic controls. As well as comparison of the sensitivity and specificity of each device, the performance of individual antigens was assessed and the hypothetical performance of novel antigen combinations extrapolated. Neither of the prototype devices were inferior in sensitivity or specificity to "SD BIOLINE HAT" (sensitivity 0.82±0.01, specificity 0.97±0.01, 95% CI at the 5% margins, while one of the devices (BBI had significantly superior sensitivity (0.88±0.03. Analysis of the performance of individual antigens was used to model new antigen combinations to be explored in development of the next generation of HAT RDTs. The modelling showed that an RDT using two recombinant antigens (rLiTat1.5 and rISG65 would give a performance similar to the best devices in this study, and would also offer the most robust performance under deteriorating field conditions.Both "SD BIOLINE HAT" and the prototype devices performed comparably well to one another and also to the published performance range of the card agglutination test for trypanosomiasis in sensitivity and specificity. The performance of individual antigens enabled us to predict that an all-recombinant antigen RDT can be developed with an accuracy equivalent to " SD BIOLINE HAT." Such an RDT would have advantages in simplified manufacture, lower unit cost and assured reproducibility.

  18. Metabolomics Identifies Multiple Candidate Biomarkers to Diagnose and Stage Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Isabel M; Daly, Rónán; Courtioux, Bertrand; Cattanach, Amy M; Biéler, Sylvain; Ndung'u, Joseph M; Bisser, Sylvie; Barrett, Michael P

    2016-12-01

    Treatment for human African trypanosomiasis is dependent on the species of trypanosome causing the disease and the stage of the disease (stage 1 defined by parasites being present in blood and lymphatics whilst for stage 2, parasites are found beyond the blood-brain barrier in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)). Currently, staging relies upon detecting the very low number of parasites or elevated white blood cell numbers in CSF. Improved staging is desirable, as is the elimination of the need for lumbar puncture. Here we use metabolomics to probe samples of CSF, plasma and urine from 40 Angolan patients infected with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, at different disease stages. Urine samples provided no robust markers indicative of infection or stage of infection due to inherent variability in urine concentrations. Biomarkers in CSF were able to distinguish patients at stage 1 or advanced stage 2 with absolute specificity. Eleven metabolites clearly distinguished the stage in most patients and two of these (neopterin and 5-hydroxytryptophan) showed 100% specificity and sensitivity between our stage 1 and advanced stage 2 samples. Neopterin is an inflammatory biomarker previously shown in CSF of stage 2 but not stage 1 patients. 5-hydroxytryptophan is an important metabolite in the serotonin synthetic pathway, the key pathway in determining somnolence, thus offering a possible link to the eponymous symptoms of "sleeping sickness". Plasma also yielded several biomarkers clearly indicative of the presence (87% sensitivity and 95% specificity) and stage of disease (92% sensitivity and 81% specificity). A logistic regression model including these metabolites showed clear separation of patients being either at stage 1 or advanced stage 2 or indeed diseased (both stages) versus control.

  19. Metabolomics Identifies Multiple Candidate Biomarkers to Diagnose and Stage Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel M Vincent

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Treatment for human African trypanosomiasis is dependent on the species of trypanosome causing the disease and the stage of the disease (stage 1 defined by parasites being present in blood and lymphatics whilst for stage 2, parasites are found beyond the blood-brain barrier in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Currently, staging relies upon detecting the very low number of parasites or elevated white blood cell numbers in CSF. Improved staging is desirable, as is the elimination of the need for lumbar puncture. Here we use metabolomics to probe samples of CSF, plasma and urine from 40 Angolan patients infected with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, at different disease stages. Urine samples provided no robust markers indicative of infection or stage of infection due to inherent variability in urine concentrations. Biomarkers in CSF were able to distinguish patients at stage 1 or advanced stage 2 with absolute specificity. Eleven metabolites clearly distinguished the stage in most patients and two of these (neopterin and 5-hydroxytryptophan showed 100% specificity and sensitivity between our stage 1 and advanced stage 2 samples. Neopterin is an inflammatory biomarker previously shown in CSF of stage 2 but not stage 1 patients. 5-hydroxytryptophan is an important metabolite in the serotonin synthetic pathway, the key pathway in determining somnolence, thus offering a possible link to the eponymous symptoms of "sleeping sickness". Plasma also yielded several biomarkers clearly indicative of the presence (87% sensitivity and 95% specificity and stage of disease (92% sensitivity and 81% specificity. A logistic regression model including these metabolites showed clear separation of patients being either at stage 1 or advanced stage 2 or indeed diseased (both stages versus control.

  20. Population genetics of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense: clonality and diversity within and between foci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig W Duffy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes are unusual among pathogenic protozoa in that they can undergo their complete morphological life cycle in the tsetse fly vector with mating as a non-obligatory part of this development. Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, which infects humans and livestock in East and Southern Africa, has classically been described as a host-range variant of the non-human infective Trypanosoma brucei that occurs as stable clonal lineages. We have examined T. b. rhodesiense populations from East (Uganda and Southern (Malawi Africa using a panel of microsatellite markers, incorporating both spatial and temporal analyses. Our data demonstrate that Ugandan T. b. rhodesiense existed as clonal populations, with a small number of highly related genotypes and substantial linkage disequilibrium between pairs of loci. However, these populations were not stable as the dominant genotypes changed and the genetic diversity also reduced over time. Thus these populations do not conform to one of the criteria for strict clonality, namely stability of predominant genotypes over time, and our results show that, in a period in the mid 1990s, the previously predominant genotypes were not detected but were replaced by a novel clonal population with limited genetic relationship to the original population present between 1970 and 1990. In contrast, the Malawi T. b. rhodesiense population demonstrated significantly greater diversity and evidence for frequent genetic exchange. Therefore, the population genetics of T. b. rhodesiense is more complex than previously described. This has important implications for the spread of the single copy T. b. rhodesiense gene that allows human infectivity, and therefore the epidemiology of the human disease, as well as suggesting that these parasites represent an important organism to study the influence of optional recombination upon population genetic dynamics.

  1. Trypanosoma brucei solanesyl-diphosphate synthase localizes to the mitochondrion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lai, D.-H.; Bontempi, E. J.; Lukeš, Julius

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 2 (2012), s. 189-192 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei * Sleeping sickness * Ubiquinone * Solanesyl-diphosphate synthase * Digitonin permeabilization * In situ tagging Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.734, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166685112000539

  2. Trypanosoma brucei Mitochondrial Respiratome: Composition and Organization in Procyclic Form

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Acestor, N.; Zíková, Alena; Dalley, R. A.; Anupama, A.; Panigrahi, A. K.; Stuart, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 9 (2011), s. 1-14 ISSN 1535-9476 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/09/P563 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : SUCCINATE DEHYDROGENASE * EDITED MESSENGER-RNA * COMPLEX-I * TRYPANOSOMA-BRUCEI * UBIQUINONE OXIDOREDUCTASE * TAP-TAG * PROTEIN INTERACTION * ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE * STATISTICAL-MODEL * MASS-SPECTROMETRY Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.398, year: 2011

  3. The sequence and analysis of Trypanosoma brucei chromosome II

    OpenAIRE

    El-Sayed, Najib M. A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Song, Jinming; MacLeod, Annette; Bringaud, Frederic; Larkin, Christopher; Wanless, David; Peterson, Jeremy; Hou, Lihua; Taylor, Sonya; Tweedie, Alison; Biteau, Nicolas; Khalak, Hanif G.; Lin, Xiaoying; Mason, Tanya

    2003-01-01

    We report here the sequence of chromosome II from Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. The 1.2-Mb pairs encode about 470 predicted genes organised in 17 directional clusters on either strand, the largest cluster of which has 92 genes lined up over a 284-kb region. An analysis of the GC skew reveals strand compositional asymmetries that coincide with the distribution of protein-coding genes, suggesting these asymmetries may be the result of transcription-couple...

  4. Impact of mass chemotherapy in domestic livestock for control of zoonotic T. b. rhodesiense human African trypanosomiasis in Eastern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Jenna; Picozzi, Kim; Waiswa, Charles; Bardosh, Kevin Louis; Welburn, Susan Christina

    2017-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) comprises two fatal parasitic diseases. Uganda is home to both chronic T. b. gambiense (gHAT) and the acute zoonotic form T. b. rhodesiense (rHAT) which occur in two large but discrete geographical foci. The area affected by rHAT has been rapidly expanding due to importation of T. b. rhodesiense infected cattle into tsetse infested but previously HAT free districts. Migration of rHAT has resulted in a considerable human health burden in these newly affected districts. Here, we examined the impact of a single, district-wide, mass chemotherapeutic livestock intervention, on T. b. rhodesiense prevalence in cattle and on incidence and distribution of human rHAT cases in Kamuli and Soroti districts in eastern Uganda. A single mass intervention in domestic cattle (n=30,900) using trypanocidal drugs was undertaken in November and December 2002 under the EU funded Farming in Tsetse Controlled Areas (FITCA) programme. The intervention targeted removal of the reservoir of infection i.e. human infective T. b. rhodesiense parasites in cattle, in the absence of tsetse control. Interventions were applied in high-risk sub-counties of Kamuli district (endemic for rHAT) and Soroti district (where rHAT has been recently introduced). The prevalence of T. brucei s.l. and the human infective subspecies, T. b. rhodesiense in cattle (n=1833) was assessed before and 3 and 12 months after intervention using PCR-based methods. A combination of descriptive statistical analysis and spatial scan statistics were applied to analyse rHAT cases reported over a 5-year period (January 2000-July 2005). A single intervention was highly effective at removing human infective T. b. rhodesiense parasites from the cattle reservoir and contributed to a significant decrease in human rHAT cases. Intervention coverage was higher in Kamuli (81.1%) than in Soroti (47.3%) district but despite differences in coverage both districts showed a reduction in prevalence of T. b

  5. Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial respiratome: Composition and organization in procyclic form

    KAUST Repository

    Acestor, Nathalie

    2011-05-24

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is comprised of four different protein complexes (I-IV), which are responsible for electron transport and generation of proton gradient in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. This proton gradient is then used by F oF 1-ATP synthase (complex V) to produce ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. In this study, the respiratory complexes I, II, and III were affinity purified from Trypanosoma brucei procyclic form cells and their composition was determined by mass spectrometry. The results along with those that we previously reported for complexes IV and V showed that the respiratome of Trypanosoma is divergent because many of its proteins are unique to this group of organisms. The studies also identified two mitochondrial subunit proteins of respiratory complex IV that are encoded by edited RNAs. Proteomics data from analyses of complexes purified using numerous tagged component proteins in each of the five complexes were used to generate the first predicted protein-protein interaction network of the Trypanosoma brucei respiratory chain. These results provide the first comprehensive insight into the unique composition of the respiratory complexes in Trypanosoma brucei, an early diverged eukaryotic pathogen. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Changes in blood sugar levels of rats experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei and treated with imidocarb dipropionate and diminazene aceturate

    OpenAIRE

    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi; Omamegbe Joseph Omalathebu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei) on blood sugar level of infected rats. Methods: The experiment was done with 42 albino rats grouped into 3 groups of 14 members each. Group A was uninfected (control group), Group B was infected with T. brucei and treated with diminazene aceturate, and Group C was infected with T. brucei and treated with imidocarb dipropionate. Blood samples were collected from the media canthus of the experimental rats on ...

  7. The epidemiology of trypanosomiasis in Rumphi district, Malawi: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) is caused by two species of the tsetse fly vectored protozoan hemoflagellates belonging to Trypanosma brucei, namely T.b gambiense which predominates in Western Africa and follows a chronic disease course and T.b rhodensiense which is more prevalent in Southern ...

  8. In Silico Identification of a Candidate Synthetic Peptide (Tsgf118–43) to Monitor Human Exposure to Tsetse Flies in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dama, Emilie; Cornelie, Sylvie; Camara, Mamadou; Somda, Martin Bienvenu; Poinsignon, Anne; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Elanga Ndille, Emmanuel; Jamonneau, Vincent; Solano, Philippe; Remoue, Franck; Bengaly, Zakaria; Belem, Adrien Marie Gaston; Bucheton, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Background The analysis of humoral responses directed against the saliva of blood-sucking arthropods was shown to provide epidemiological biomarkers of human exposure to vector-borne diseases. However, the use of whole saliva as antigen presents several limitations such as problems of mass production, reproducibility and specificity. The aim of this study was to design a specific biomarker of exposure to tsetse flies based on the in silico analysis of three Glossina salivary proteins (Ada, Ag5 and Tsgf1) previously shown to be specifically recognized by plasma from exposed individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings Synthetic peptides were designed by combining several linear epitope prediction methods and Blast analysis. The most specific peptides were then tested by indirect ELISA on a bank of 160 plasma samples from tsetse infested areas and tsetse free areas. Anti-Tsgf118–43 specific IgG levels were low in all three control populations (from rural Africa, urban Africa and Europe) and were significantly higher (p<0.0001) in the two populations exposed to tsetse flies (Guinean HAT foci, and South West Burkina Faso). A positive correlation was also found between Anti-Tsgf118–43 IgG levels and the risk of being infected by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in the sleeping sickness foci of Guinea. Conclusion/Significance The Tsgf118–43 peptide is a suitable and promising candidate to develop a standardize immunoassay allowing large scale monitoring of human exposure to tsetse flies in West Africa. This could provide a new surveillance indicator for tsetse control interventions by HAT control programs. PMID:24086785

  9. Actigraphy in human African trypanosomiasis as a tool for objective clinical evaluation and monitoring: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred K Njamnshi

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness leads to a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome with characteristic sleep alterations. Current division into a first, hemolymphatic stage and second, meningoencephalitic stage is primarily based on the detection of white blood cells and/or trypanosomes in the cerebrospinal fluid. The validity of this criterion is, however, debated, and novel laboratory biomarkers are under study. Objective clinical HAT evaluation and monitoring is therefore needed. Polysomnography has effectively documented sleep-wake disturbances during HAT, but could be difficult to apply as routine technology in field work. The non-invasive, cost-effective technique of actigraphy has been widely validated as a tool for the ambulatory evaluation of sleep disturbances. In this pilot study, actigraphy was applied to the clinical assessment of HAT patients.Actigraphy was recorded in patients infected by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, and age- and sex-matched control subjects. Simultaneous nocturnal polysomnography was also performed in the patients. Nine patients, including one child, were analyzed at admission and two of them also during specific treatment. Parameters, analyzed with user-friendly software, included sleep time evaluated from rest-activity signals, rest-activity rhythm waveform and characteristics. The findings showed sleep-wake alterations of various degrees of severity, which in some patients did not parallel white blood cell counts in the cerebrospinal fluid. Actigraphic recording also showed improvement of the analyzed parameters after treatment initiation. Nocturnal polysomnography showed alterations of sleep time closely corresponding to those derived from actigraphy.The data indicate that actigraphy can be an interesting tool for HAT evaluation, providing valuable clinical information through simple technology, well suited also for long-term follow-up. Actigraphy could therefore objectively contribute to

  10. Performance of parasitological and molecular techniques for the diagnosis and surveillance of gambiense sleeping sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieudonné Mumba Ngoyi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, improvements have been made to diagnostics for gambiense sleeping sickness control but their performance remains poorly documented and may depend on specimen processing prior to examination. In a prospective study in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, we compared the diagnostic performance of several parasite detection techniques, immune trypanolysis and of m18S PCR on whole blood stored in a stabilisation buffer or dried on filter paper.Individuals with CATT whole blood (WB titer ≥1∶4 or with clinical signs indicative for sleeping sickness were examined for presence of trypanosomes in lymph node aspirate (LNA and/or in blood. Blood was examined with Capillary Centrifugation Technique (CTC, mini-Anion Exchange Centrifugation Technique (mAECT and mAECT on buffy coat (BC. PCR was performed on whole blood (i stored in guanidine hydrochloride EDTA (GE stabilisation buffer and (ii dried on filter paper, and repeatability and reproducibility were assessed. Immune trypanolysis (TL was performed on plasma.A total of 237 persons were included. Among 143 parasitologically confirmed cases, 85.3% had a CATT-WB titre of ≥1/8, 39.2% were positive in LNA, 47.5% in CTC, 80.4% in mAECT-WB, 90.9% in mAECT-BC, 95.1% in TL and up to 89.5% in PCR on GE-stabilised blood. PCR on GE-stabilised blood showed highest repeatability (87.8% and inter-laboratory reproducibility (86.9%. Of the 94 non-confirmed suspects, respectively 39.4% and 23.4% were TL or PCR positive. Suboptimal specificity of PCR and TL was also suggested by latent class analysis.The combination of LNA examination with mAECT-BC offered excellent diagnostic sensitivity. For PCR, storage of blood in stabilisation buffer is to be preferred over filter paper. TL as well as PCR are useful for remote diagnosis but are not more sensitive than mAECT-BC. For TL and PCR, the specificity, and thus usefulness for management of non-confirmed suspects remain to be determined.

  11. Wild chimpanzees are infected by Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirků, M.; Votýpka, J.; Petrželková, Klára Judita; Jirků-Pomajbíková, K.; Kriegová, E.; Vodička, R.; Lankester, F.; Leendertz, S. A. J.; Wittig, R. M.; Boesch, C.; Modrý, D.; Ayala, F. J.; Leendertz, F. H.; Lukeš, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2015), s. 277-282 ISSN 0020-7519 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Trypanosomes * Chimpanzee * Non-human primates * Transmission * Diagnostics Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 4.242, year: 2015

  12. Rab23 is a flagellar protein in Trypanosoma brucei

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    Field Mark C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rab small GTPases are important mediators of membrane transport, and orthologues frequently retain similar locations and functions, even between highly divergent taxa. In metazoan organisms Rab23 is an important negative regulator of Sonic hedgehog signaling and is crucial for correct development and differentiation of cellular lineages by virtue of an involvement in ciliary recycling. Previously, we reported that Trypanosoma brucei Rab23 localized to the nuclear envelope 1, which is clearly inconsistent with the mammalian location and function. As T. brucei is unicellular the potential that Rab23 has no role in cell signaling was possible. Here we sought to further investigate the role(s of Rab23 in T. brucei to determine if Rab23 was an example of a Rab protein with divergent function in distinct taxa. Methods/major findings The taxonomic distribution of Rab23 was examined and compared with the presence of flagella/cilia in representative taxa. Despite evidence for considerable secondary loss, we found a clear correlation between a conventional flagellar structure and the presence of a Rab23 orthologue in the genome. By epitope-tagging, Rab23 was localized and found to be present at the flagellum throughout the cell cycle. However, RNAi knockdown did not result in a flagellar defect, suggesting that Rab23 is not required for construction or maintenance of the flagellum. Conclusions The location of Rab23 at the flagellum is conserved between mammals and trypanosomes and the Rab23 gene is restricted to flagellated organisms. These data may suggest the presence of a Rab23-mediated signaling mechanism in trypanosomes.

  13. Trypanosoma brucei RAP1 maintains telomere and subtelomere integrity by suppressing TERRA and telomeric RNA:DNA hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanavaty, Vishal; Sandhu, Ranjodh; Jehi, Sanaa E; Pandya, Unnati M; Li, Bibo

    2017-06-02

    Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis and regularly switches its major surface antigen, VSG, thereby evading the host's immune response. VSGs are monoallelically expressed from subtelomeric expression sites (ESs), and VSG switching exploits subtelomere plasticity. However, subtelomere integrity is essential for T. brucei viability. The telomeric transcript, TERRA, was detected in T. brucei previously. We now show that the active ES-adjacent telomere is transcribed. We find that TbRAP1, a telomere protein essential for VSG silencing, suppresses VSG gene conversion-mediated switching. Importantly, TbRAP1 depletion increases the TERRA level, which appears to result from longer read-through into the telomere downstream of the active ES. Depletion of TbRAP1 also results in more telomeric RNA:DNA hybrids and more double strand breaks (DSBs) at telomeres and subtelomeres. In TbRAP1-depleted cells, expression of excessive TbRNaseH1, which cleaves the RNA strand of the RNA:DNA hybrid, brought telomeric RNA:DNA hybrids, telomeric/subtelomeric DSBs and VSG switching frequency back to WT levels. Therefore, TbRAP1-regulated appropriate levels of TERRA and telomeric RNA:DNA hybrid are fundamental to subtelomere/telomere integrity. Our study revealed for the first time an important role of a long, non-coding RNA in antigenic variation and demonstrated a link between telomeric silencing and subtelomere/telomere integrity through TbRAP1-regulated telomere transcription. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Minimum Information Loss Based Multi-kernel Learning for Flagellar Protein Recognition in Trypanosoma Brucei

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-12-01

    Trypanosma brucei (T. Brucei) is an important pathogen agent of African trypanosomiasis. The flagellum is an essential and multifunctional organelle of T. Brucei, thus it is very important to recognize the flagellar proteins from T. Brucei proteins for the purposes of both biological research and drug design. In this paper, we investigate computationally recognizing flagellar proteins in T. Brucei by pattern recognition methods. It is argued that an optimal decision function can be obtained as the difference of probability functions of flagella protein and the non-flagellar protein for the purpose of flagella protein recognition. We propose to learn a multi-kernel classification function to approximate this optimal decision function, by minimizing the information loss of such approximation which is measured by the Kull back-Leibler (KL) divergence. An iterative multi-kernel classifier learning algorithm is developed to minimize the KL divergence for the problem of T. Brucei flagella protein recognition, experiments show its advantage over other T. Brucei flagellar protein recognition and multi-kernel learning methods. © 2014 IEEE.

  15. Wild chimpanzees are infected by Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirků, Milan; Votýpka, Jan; Petrželková, Klára Judita; Jirků-Pomajbíková, K.; Kriegová, Eva; Vodička, R.; Lankester, F.; Leendertz, S. A. J.; Wittig, R. M.; Boesch, C.; Modrý, David; Ayala, F. J.; Leendertz, F. H.; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2015), s. 277-282 ISSN 2213-2244 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosomes * Chimpanzee * Non-human primates * Transmission * Diagnostics Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine

  16. against Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma congolense

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Human and animal African trypanosomiasis is a common and economically important disease in man and animal in Africa. The control of these infections relies mainly on the use of trypanocides. The failure of modern trypanocides to control the disease is a reality in Africa. The effects of such known and suspected ...

  17. Telomeric expression sites are highly conserved in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Hertz-Fowler

    Full Text Available Subtelomeric regions are often under-represented in genome sequences of eukaryotes. One of the best known examples of the use of telomere proximity for adaptive purposes are the bloodstream expression sites (BESs of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei. To enhance our understanding of BES structure and function in host adaptation and immune evasion, the BES repertoire from the Lister 427 strain of T. brucei were independently tagged and sequenced. BESs are polymorphic in size and structure but reveal a surprisingly conserved architecture in the context of extensive recombination. Very small BESs do exist and many functioning BESs do not contain the full complement of expression site associated genes (ESAGs. The consequences of duplicated or missing ESAGs, including ESAG9, a newly named ESAG12, and additional variant surface glycoprotein genes (VSGs were evaluated by functional assays after BESs were tagged with a drug-resistance gene. Phylogenetic analysis of constituent ESAG families suggests that BESs are sequence mosaics and that extensive recombination has shaped the evolution of the BES repertoire. This work opens important perspectives in understanding the molecular mechanisms of antigenic variation, a widely used strategy for immune evasion in pathogens, and telomere biology.

  18. Trisomy and chromosome size changes in hybrid trypanosomes from a genetic cross between Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and T. b. brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, W; Garside, L; Bailey, M

    1992-04-01

    Further analysis of hybrid clones from an experimental cross of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense 058 and T. b. brucei 196 shows 2 of the hybrid clones to have DNA contents about 1.5 times parental values. This represents over 40,000 kb of extra DNA. Comparison of the molecular karyotypes of parental and progeny trypanosomes shows that the bulk of the extra DNA constitutes chromosomes greater than 1 Mb in size, although a small proportion can be accounted for by an increased number of mini-chromosomes. The 2 hybrid clones have 3 alleles at several loci for housekeeping genes as shown by RFLP and isoenzyme analysis. Trisomy of the chromosome carrying phosphoglycerate kinase and tubulin genes and that carrying the phospholipase C gene was demonstrated by analysis of molecular karyotypes. These chromosomes appear prone to substantial size alterations associated with genetic exchange. Our results for one of the hybrid clones are completely consistent with it being triploid and the product of fusion of haploid and diploid nuclei.

  19. Antitrypanosomal effect of methanolic extract of Zingiber officinale (ginger on Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected Wistar mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Kobo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was carried out to determine the in vivo antitrypanosomal effect of methanolic extract of Zingiber officinale (ginger in Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected mice. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five mice were randomly allocated into five groups of five animals each. Group I and II were given Tween 80 (1 ml/kg and diminazene aceturate (3.5 mg/kg to serve as untreated and treated controls, respectively. Groups III-V received the extract at 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg body weight, respectively. All treatments were given for 6 consecutive days and through the oral route. The mean body weight, mean survival period and daily level of parasitaemia were evaluated. Results: Acute toxicity showed the extract to be relatively safe. There was an insignificant increase in body weight and survival rate of mice treated with the extract. The level of parasitaemia in the extract treated groups was decreased. Conclusion: This study shows the in vivo potential of methanolic extract of Z. officinale in the treatment of trypanosomiasis.

  20. Effects of dietary selenium supplementation on parasitemia, anemia and serum proteins of Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, J I; Okeke, M C; Ngene, A A; Omeje, J N; Abonyi, F O

    2013-10-01

    Trypanosomosis has been associated with immunosuppression, anemia and oxidative damage while selenium possesses both immunostimulatory and antioxidative effects. This study was designed to assess the effect of dietary selenium supplementation on parasitemia, anemia, survival pattern and serum protein profiles of trypanosome-infected rats. Twenty five rats, divided into five groups (A-E) of 5 each, were treated as follows: 4, 8 and 16 ppm (ppm) of selenium in their feed, respectively throughout the experimental period and were infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei on day 14 post supplementation, infected not supplemented and the negative control. Supplementation at 4 and 8 ppm increased the packed cell volume (PCV) and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration on day 7 of supplementation (PS) when compared with the unsupplemented groups. Following infection on day 14 PS, the PCV, Hb of 16 ppm and infected not supplemented groups were significantly (P Supplementation did not lead to significant (P > 0.05) changes on the total protein, albumin and globulin by day 14 PS. Infection, however, caused significant (P > 0.05) decrease in the total protein and albumin from day 28. The supplementation did not significantly (P > 0.05) increase the pre-patent period but caused a significant reduction in the parasitemia levels and increased survival intervals. Dietary selenium supplementation, from the results, may show promise in the management of African trypanosomosis as the supplementation was able to: reduce anemia and parasitemia and increase survival intervals of trypanosome infected rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Illuminating the Prevalence of Trypanosoma brucei s.l. in Glossina Using LAMP as a Tool for Xenomonitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas J Cunningham

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As the reality of eliminating human African trypanosomiasis (HAT by 2020 draws closer, the need to detect and identify the remaining areas of transmission increases. Here, we have explored the feasibility of using commercially available LAMP kits, designed to detect the Trypanozoon group of trypanosomes, as a xenomonitoring tool to screen tsetse flies for trypanosomes to be used in future epidemiological surveys.The DNA extraction method was simplified and worked with the LAMP kits to detect a single positive fly when pooled with 19 negative flies, and the absolute lowest limit of detection that the kits were able to work at was the equivalent of 0.1 trypanosome per ml. The DNA from Trypanosoma brucei brucei could be detected six days after the fly had taken a blood meal containing dead trypanosomes, and when confronted with a range of non-target species, from both laboratory-reared flies and wild-caught flies, the kits showed no evidence of cross-reacting.We have shown that it is possible to use a simplified DNA extraction method in conjunction with the pooling of tsetse flies to decrease the time it would take to screen large numbers of flies for the presence of Trypanozoon trypanosomes. The use of commercially-available LAMP kits provides a reliable and highly sensitive tool for xenomonitoring and identifying potential sleeping sickness transmission sites.

  2. myo-Inositol Uptake Is Essential for Bulk Inositol Phospholipid but Not Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Synthesis in Trypanosoma brucei*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Salgado, Amaia; Steinmann, Michael E.; Greganova, Eva; Rauch, Monika; Mäser, Pascal; Sigel, Erwin; Bütikofer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    myo-Inositol is an essential precursor for the production of inositol phosphates and inositol phospholipids in all eukaryotes. Intracellular myo-inositol is generated by de novo synthesis from glucose 6-phosphate or is provided from the environment via myo-inositol symporters. We show that in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative pathogen of human African sleeping sickness and nagana in domestic animals, myo-inositol is taken up via a specific proton-coupled electrogenic symport and that this transport is essential for parasite survival in culture. Down-regulation of the myo-inositol transporter using RNA interference inhibited uptake of myo-inositol and blocked the synthesis of the myo-inositol-containing phospholipids, phosphatidylinositol and inositol phosphorylceramide; in contrast, it had no effect on glycosylphosphatidylinositol production. This together with the unexpected localization of the myo-inositol transporter in both the plasma membrane and the Golgi demonstrate that metabolism of endogenous and exogenous myo-inositol in T. brucei is strictly segregated. PMID:22351763

  3. In or out? On the tightness of glycosomal compartmentalizatin of metabolites and enzymes in Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, J.R.; Bakker, B.M.; Michels, P.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids sequester large parts of glucose metabolism inside specialised peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Many studies have shown that correct glycosomal compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei. The recent finding of pore-forming

  4. Hemoglobin is a co-factor of human trypanosome lytic factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widener, Justin; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Shiflett, April

    2007-01-01

    Trypanosome lytic factor (TLF) is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subclass providing innate protection to humans against infection by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Two primate-specific plasma proteins, haptoglobin-related protein (Hpr) and apolipoprotein L-1 (ApoL-1), have be...

  5. Mosaic VSGs and the scale of Trypanosoma brucei antigenic variation.

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    James P J Hall

    Full Text Available A main determinant of prolonged Trypanosoma brucei infection and transmission and success of the parasite is the interplay between host acquired immunity and antigenic variation of the parasite variant surface glycoprotein (VSG coat. About 0.1% of trypanosome divisions produce a switch to a different VSG through differential expression of an archive of hundreds of silent VSG genes and pseudogenes, but the patterns and extent of the trypanosome diversity phenotype, particularly in chronic infection, are unclear. We applied longitudinal VSG cDNA sequencing to estimate variant richness and test whether pseudogenes contribute to antigenic variation. We show that individual growth peaks can contain at least 15 distinct variants, are estimated computationally to comprise many more, and that antigenically distinct 'mosaic' VSGs arise from segmental gene conversion between donor VSG genes or pseudogenes. The potential for trypanosome antigenic variation is probably much greater than VSG archive size; mosaic VSGs are core to antigenic variation and chronic infection.

  6. Forecasting Human African Trypanosomiasis Prevalences from Population Screening Data Using Continuous Time Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. de Vries (Harwin); A.P.M. Wagelmans (Albert); E.C. Hasker (Epco C.); C. Lumbala (Crispin); P. Lutumba (Pascal); S.J. de Vlas (Sake); J. van de Klundert (Joris)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTo eliminate and eradicate gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), maximizing the effectiveness of active case finding is of key importance. The progression of the epidemic is largely influenced by the planning of these operations. This paper introduces and analyzes five models

  7. Steroid Alkaloids from Holarrhena africana with Strong Activity against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

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    Charles Okeke Nnadi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In our continued search for natural compounds with activity against Trypanosoma brucei, causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, “sleeping sickness”, we have investigated extracts from the leaves and bark of the West African Holarrhena africana (syn. Holarrhena floribunda; Apocynaceae. The extracts and their alkaloid-enriched fractions displayed promising in vitro activity against bloodstream forms of T. brucei rhodesiense (Tbr; East African HAT. Bioactivity-guided chromatographic fractionation of the alkaloid-rich fractions resulted in the isolation of 17 steroid alkaloids, one nitrogen-free steroid and one alkaloid-like non-steroid. Impressive activities (IC50 in µM against Tbr were recorded for 3β-holaphyllamine (0.40 ± 0.28, 3α-holaphyllamine (0.37 ± 0.16, 3β-dihydroholaphyllamine (0.67 ± 0.03, N-methylholaphyllamine (0.08 ± 0.01, conessimine (0.17 ± 0.08, conessine (0.42 ± 0.09, isoconessimine (0.17 ± 0.11 and holarrhesine (0.12 ± 0.08 with selectivity indices ranging from 13 to 302. Based on comparison of the structures of this congeneric series of steroid alkaloids and their activities, structure-activity relationships (SARs could be established. It was found that a basic amino group at position C-3 of the pregnane or pregn-5-ene steroid nucleus is required for a significant anti-trypanosomal activity. The mono-methylated amino group at C-3 represents an optimum for activity. ∆5,6 unsaturation slightly increased the activity while hydrolysis of C-12β ester derivatives led to a loss of activity. An additional amino group at C-20 engaged in a pyrrolidine ring closed towards C-18 significantly increased the selectivity index of the compounds. Our findings provide useful empirical data for further development of steroid alkaloids as a novel class of anti-trypanosomal compounds which represent a promising starting point towards new drugs to combat human African trypanosomiasis.

  8. Antitrypanosomal compounds from the essential oil and extracts of Keetia leucantha leaves with inhibitor activity on Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bero, J; Beaufay, C; Hannaert, V; Hérent, M-F; Michels, P A; Quetin-Leclercq, J

    2013-02-15

    Keetia leucantha is a West African tree used in traditional medicine to treat several diseases among which parasitic infections. The dichloromethane extract of leaves was previously shown to possess growth-inhibitory activities on Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Leishmania mexicana mexicana with low or no cytotoxicity (>100 μg/ml on human normal fibroblasts) (Bero et al. 2009, 2011). In continuation of our investigations on the antitrypanosomal compounds from this dichloromethane extract, we analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS the essential oil of its leaves obtained by hydrodistillation and the major triterpenic acids in this extract by LC-MS. Twenty-seven compounds were identified in the oil whose percentages were calculated using the normalization method. The essential oil, seven of its constituents and the three triterpenic acids were evaluated for their antitrypanosomal activity on Trypanosoma brucei brucei bloodstream forms (Tbb BSF) and procyclic forms (Tbb PF) to identify an activity on the glycolytic process of trypanosomes. The oil showed an IC(50) of 20.9 μg/ml on Tbb BSF and no activity was observed on Tbb PF. The best antitrypanosomal activity was observed for ursolic acid with IC(50) of 2.5 and 6.5 μg/ml respectively on Tbb BSF and Tbb PF. The inhibitory activity on a glycolytic enzyme of T. brucei, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), was also evaluated for betulinic acid, olenaolic acid, ursolic acid, phytol, α-ionone and β-ionone. The three triterpenic acids and β-ionone showed inhibitory activities on GAPDH with oleanolic acid being the most active with an inhibition of 72.63% at 20 μg/ml. This paper reports for the first time the composition and antitrypanosomal activity of the essential oil of Keetia leucantha. Several of its constituents and three triterpenic acids present in the dichloromethane leaves extract showed a higher antitrypanosomal activity on bloodstream forms of Tbb as compared to procyclic forms

  9. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G: A Promising Prognostic Marker of Disease Progression to Improve the Control of Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gineau, Laure; Courtin, David; Camara, Mamadou; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Jamonneau, Vincent; Dias, Fabricio C; Tokplonou, Leonidas; Milet, Jacqueline; Mendonça, Priscila B; Castelli, Erick C; Camara, Oumou; Camara, Mariam; Favier, Benoit; Rouas-Freiss, Nathalie; Moreau, Philippe; Donadi, Eduardo A; Bucheton, Bruno; Sabbagh, Audrey; Garcia, André

    2016-11-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense can be diagnosed in the early hemolymphatic stage (stage 1 [S1]) or meningoencephalitic stage (stage 2 [S2]). Importantly, individuals harbouring high and specific antibody responses to Tbg antigens but negative parasitology are also diagnosed in the field (seropositive [SERO]). Whereas some develop the disease in the months following their initial diagnosis (SERO/HAT), others remain parasitologically negative for long periods (SERO) and are apparently able to control infection. Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G, an immunosuppressive molecule, could play a critical role in this variability of progression between infection and disease.  Soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) was measured in plasma for patients in the SERO (n = 65), SERO/HAT (n = 14), or HAT (n = 268) group and in cerebrospinal fluid for patients in S1 (n = 55), early S2 (n = 93), or late S2 (n = 110). Associations between these different statuses and the soluble level or genetic polymorphisms of HLA-G were explored.  Plasma sHLA-G levels were significantly higher in HAT (P = 6 × 10 -7 ) and SERO/HAT (P = .007) than SERO patients. No difference was observed between the SERO/HAT and HAT groups. Within the HAT group, specific haplotypes (HG010102 and HG0103) displayed increased frequencies in S1 (P = .013) and late S2 (P = .036), respectively.  These results strongly suggest the involvement of HLA-G in HAT disease progression. Importantly, high plasma sHLA-G levels in SERO patients could be predictive of subsequent disease development and could represent a serological marker to help guide therapeutic decision making. Further studies are necessary to assess the predictive nature of HLA-G and to estimate both sensitivity and specificity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Channel-forming activities in the glycosomal fraction from the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Melisa Gualdron-López

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glycosomes are a specialized form of peroxisomes (microbodies present in unicellular eukaryotes that belong to the Kinetoplastea order, such as Trypanosoma and Leishmania species, parasitic protists causing severe diseases of livestock and humans in subtropical and tropical countries. The organelles harbour most enzymes of the glycolytic pathway that is responsible for substrate-level ATP production in the cell. Glycolysis is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei and enzymes comprising this pathway have been validated as drug targets. Glycosomes are surrounded by a single membrane. How glycolytic metabolites are transported across the glycosomal membrane is unclear. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We hypothesized that glycosomal membrane, similarly to membranes of yeast and mammalian peroxisomes, contains channel-forming proteins involved in the selective transfer of metabolites. To verify this prediction, we isolated a glycosomal fraction from bloodstream-form T. brucei and reconstituted solubilized membrane proteins into planar lipid bilayers. The electrophysiological characteristics of the channels were studied using multiple channel recording and single channel analysis. Three main channel-forming activities were detected with current amplitudes 70-80 pA, 20-25 pA, and 8-11 pA, respectively (holding potential +10 mV and 3.0 M KCl as an electrolyte. All channels were in fully open state in a range of voltages ±150 mV and showed no sub-conductance transitions. The channel with current amplitude 20-25 pA is anion-selective (P(K+/P(Cl-∼0.31, while the other two types of channels are slightly selective for cations (P(K+/P(Cl- ratios ∼1.15 and ∼1.27 for the high- and low-conductance channels, respectively. The anion-selective channel showed an intrinsic current rectification that may suggest a functional asymmetry of the channel's pore. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that the membrane of glycosomes

  11. Characterization of Trypanosoma brucei brucei S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase and its inhibition by Berenil, pentamidine and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitonti, A J; Dumont, J A; McCann, P P

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei brucei S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) decarboxylase was found to be relatively insensitive to activation by putrescine as compared with the mammalian enzyme, being stimulated by only 50% over a 10,000-fold range of putrescine concentrations. The enzyme was not stimulated by up to 10 mM-Mg2+. The Km for AdoMet was 30 microM, similar to that of other eukaryotic AdoMet decarboxylases. T.b. brucei AdoMet decarboxylase activity was apparently irreversibly inhibited in vitro by Berenil and reversibly by pentamidine and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone). Berenil also inhibited trypanosomal AdoMet decarboxylase by 70% within 4 h after administration to infected rats and markedly increased the concentration of putrescine in trypanosomes that were exposed to the drug in vivo. Spermidine and spermine blocked the curative effect of Berenil on model mouse T.b. brucei infections. This effect of the polyamines was probably not due to reversal of Berenil's inhibitory effects on the AdoMet decarboxylase. PMID:3800910

  12. Isothermal microcalorimetry, a new tool to monitor drug action against Trypanosoma brucei and Plasmodium falciparum.

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    Tanja Wenzler

    Full Text Available Isothermal microcalorimetry is an established tool to measure heat flow of physical, chemical or biological processes. The metabolism of viable cells produces heat, and if sufficient cells are present, their heat production can be assessed by this method. In this study, we investigated the heat flow of two medically important protozoans, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Plasmodium falciparum. Heat flow signals obtained for these pathogens allowed us to monitor parasite growth on a real-time basis as the signals correlated with the number of viable cells. To showcase the potential of microcalorimetry for measuring drug action on pathogenic organisms, we tested the method with three antitrypanosomal drugs, melarsoprol, suramin and pentamidine and three antiplasmodial drugs, chloroquine, artemether and dihydroartemisinin, each at two concentrations on the respective parasite. With the real time measurement, inhibition was observed immediately by a reduced heat flow compared to that in untreated control samples. The onset of drug action, the degree of inhibition and the time to death of the parasite culture could conveniently be monitored over several days. Microcalorimetry is a valuable element to be added to the toolbox for drug discovery for protozoal diseases such as human African trypanosomiasis and malaria. The method could probably be adapted to other protozoan parasites, especially those growing extracellularly.

  13. Immunospecific immunoglobulins and IL-10 as markers for Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense late stage disease in experimentally infected vervet monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngotho, Maina; Kagira, J.M.; Jensen, Henrik Michael Elvang

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of IL-10 and immunoglobulin M (IgM) as biomarkers for staging HAT in vervet monkeys, a useful pathogenesis model for humans. METHODS: Vervet monkeys were infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and subsequently given sub-curative and curative treatment 28...... and 140 days post-infection (dpi) respectively. Matched serum and CSF samples were obtained at regular intervals and immunospecific IgM, immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IL-10 were quantified by ELISA. RESULTS: There was no detectable immunospecific IgM and IgG in the CSF before 49 dpi. CSF IgM and Ig......G and serum IgM were significantly elevated with peak levels coinciding with meningoencephalitis 98 dpi. The serum IL-10 was upregulated in both early and late disease stage, coinciding with primary and relapse parasitaemia respectively. CSF white cell counts (CSF WCC) were elevated progressively till...

  14. More than meets the eye: understanding Trypanosoma brucei morphology in the tsetse

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    Cher-Pheng eOoi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available T. brucei, the causative parasite for African trypanosomiasis, faces an interesting dilemma in its life cycle. It has to successfully complete its infection cycle in the tsetse vector to be able to infect other vertebrate hosts. T. brucei has to undergo multiple morphological changes as it invades the alimentary canal of the tsetse successively to finally achieve infectivity in the salivary glands. In this review, we attempt to elucidate how these morphological changes are possible for a parasite that has evolved a highly robust cell structure to survive the chemically and physically diverse environments it finds itself in. To achieve this, we juxtaposed the experimental evidence that has been collected from T. brucei forms that are cultured in vitro with the observations that have been carried out on tsetse-infective forms in vivo. Although the accumulated knowledge on T. brucei biology is by no means trivial, several outstanding questions remain for how the parasite mechanistically changes its morphology as it traverses the tsetse and how those changes are triggered. However, we conclude that with recent breakthroughs allowing for the replication of the tsetse-infection process of T. brucei in vitro, these outstanding questions can finally be addressed.

  15. Role of centrins 2 and 3 in organelle segregation and cytokinesis in Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Angamuthu Selvapandiyan

    Full Text Available Centrins are calcium binding proteins involved in cell division in eukaryotes. Previously, we have shown that depletion of centrin1 in Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei displayed arrested organelle segregation resulting in loss of cytokinesis. In this study we analyzed the role of T. brucei centrin2 (TbCen2 and T. brucei 3 (TbCen3 in the early events of T. brucei procyclic cell cycle. Both the immunofluorescence assay and electron microscopy showed that TbCen2 and 3-deficient cells were enlarged in size with duplicated basal bodies, multinuclei and new flagella that are detached along the length of the cell body. In both TbCen2 and TbCen3 depleted cells segregation of the organelles i.e. basal bodies, kinetoplast and nucleus was disrupted. Further analysis of the cells with defective organelle segregation identified three different sub configurations of organelle mis-segregations (Type 1-3. In addition, in majority of the TbCen2 depleted cells and in nearly half of the TbCen3 depleted cells, the kinetoplasts were enlarged and undivided. The abnormal segregations ultimately led to aborted cytokinesis and hence affected growth in these cells. Therefore, both centrin2 and 3 are involved in organelle segregation similar to centrin1 as was previously observed. In addition, we identified their role in kinetoplast division which may be also linked to overall mis-segregation.

  16. Exosome secretion affects social motility in Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Dror Eliaz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV secreted by pathogens function in a variety of biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, exosome secretion is induced by stress that affects trans-splicing. Following perturbations in biogenesis of spliced leader RNA, which donates its spliced leader (SL exon to all mRNAs, or after heat-shock, the SL RNA is exported to the cytoplasm and forms distinct granules, which are then secreted by exosomes. The exosomes are formed in multivesicular bodies (MVB utilizing the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT, through a mechanism similar to microRNA secretion in mammalian cells. Silencing of the ESCRT factor, Vps36, compromised exosome secretion but not the secretion of vesicles derived from nanotubes. The exosomes enter recipient trypanosome cells. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that cells secreting exosomes or purified intact exosomes affect social motility (SoMo. This study demonstrates that exosomes are delivered to trypanosome cells and can change their migration. Exosomes are used to transmit stress signals for communication between parasites.

  17. The sequence and analysis of Trypanosoma brucei chromosome II

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Najib M. A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Song, Jinming; MacLeod, Annette; Bringaud, Frederic; Larkin, Christopher; Wanless, David; Peterson, Jeremy; Hou, Lihua; Taylor, Sonya; Tweedie, Alison; Biteau, Nicolas; Khalak, Hanif G.; Lin, Xiaoying; Mason, Tanya; Hannick, Linda; Caler, Elisabet; Blandin, Gaëlle; Bartholomeu, Daniella; Simpson, Anjana J.; Kaul, Samir; Zhao, Hong; Pai, Grace; Aken, Susan Van; Utterback, Teresa; Haas, Brian; Koo, Hean L.; Umayam, Lowell; Suh, Bernard; Gerrard, Caroline; Leech, Vanessa; Qi, Rong; Zhou, Shiguo; Schwartz, David; Feldblyum, Tamara; Salzberg, Steven; Tait, Andrew; Turner, C. Michael R.; Ullu, Elisabetta; White, Owen; Melville, Sara; Adams, Mark D.; Fraser, Claire M.; Donelson, John E.

    2003-01-01

    We report here the sequence of chromosome II from Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. The 1.2-Mb pairs encode about 470 predicted genes organised in 17 directional clusters on either strand, the largest cluster of which has 92 genes lined up over a 284-kb region. An analysis of the GC skew reveals strand compositional asymmetries that coincide with the distribution of protein-coding genes, suggesting these asymmetries may be the result of transcription-coupled repair on coding versus non-coding strand. A 5-cM genetic map of the chromosome reveals recombinational ‘hot’ and ‘cold’ regions, the latter of which is predicted to include the putative centromere. One end of the chromosome consists of a 250-kb region almost exclusively composed of RHS (pseudo)genes that belong to a newly characterised multigene family containing a hot spot of insertion for retroelements. Interspersed with the RHS genes are a few copies of truncated RNA polymerase pseudogenes as well as expression site associated (pseudo)genes (ESAGs) 3 and 4, and 76 bp repeats. These features are reminiscent of a vestigial variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene expression site. The other end of the chromosome contains a 30-kb array of VSG genes, the majority of which are pseudogenes, suggesting that this region may be a site for modular de novo construction of VSG gene diversity during transposition/gene conversion events. PMID:12907728

  18. Stearoyl-CoA desaturase is an essential enzyme for the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alloatti, Andres [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Gupta, Shreedhara; Gualdron-Lopez, Melisa; Nguewa, Paul A. [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute and Laboratory of Biochemistry, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Altabe, Silvia G. [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Deumer, Gladys; Wallemacq, Pierre [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, LTAP, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Michels, Paul A.M. [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute and Laboratory of Biochemistry, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Uttaro, Antonio D., E-mail: toniuttaro@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Inhibiting {Delta}9 desaturase drastically changes T. brucei's fatty-acid composition. {yields} Isoxyl specifically inhibits the {Delta}9 desaturase causing a growth arrest. {yields} RNA interference of desaturase expression causes a similar effect. {yields} Feeding T. brucei-infected mice with Isoxyl decreases the parasitemia. {yields} 70% of Isoxyl-treated mice survived the trypanosome infection. -- Abstract: Trypanosoma brucei, the etiologic agent of sleeping sickness, is exposed to important changes in nutrients and temperature during its life cycle. To adapt to these changes, the fluidity of its membranes plays a crucial role. This fluidity, mediated by the fatty-acid composition, is regulated by enzymes named desaturases. We have previously shown that the oleoyl desaturase is essential for Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei. In this work, we present experimental support for the relevance of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) for T. brucei's survival, in both its insect or procyclic-form (PCF) and bloodstream-form (BSF) stages. We evaluated this essentiality in two different ways: by generating a SCD knocked-down parasite line using RNA interference, and by chemical inhibition of the enzyme with two compounds, Isoxyl and a thiastearate with the sulfur atom at position 10 (10-TS). The effective concentration for 50% growth inhibition (EC{sub 50}) of PCF was 1.0 {+-} 0.2 {mu}M for Isoxyl and 5 {+-} 2 {mu}M for 10-TS, whereas BSF appeared more susceptible with EC{sub 50} values 0.10 {+-} 0.03 {mu}M (Isoxyl) and 1.0 {+-} 0.6 {mu}M (10-TS). RNA interference showed to be deleterious for both stages of the parasite. In addition, T. brucei-infected mice were fed with Isoxyl, causing a reduction of the parasitemia and an increase of the rodents' survival.

  19. Crystal Structures of TbCatB and rhodesain, potential chemotherapeutic targets and major cysteine proteases of Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Iain D Kerr

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is the etiological agent of Human African Trypanosomiasis, an endemic parasitic disease of sub-Saharan Africa. TbCatB and rhodesain are the sole Clan CA papain-like cysteine proteases produced by the parasite during infection of the mammalian host and are implicated in the progression of disease. Of considerable interest is the exploration of these two enzymes as targets for cysteine protease inhibitors that are effective against T. brucei.We have determined, by X-ray crystallography, the first reported structure of TbCatB in complex with the cathepsin B selective inhibitor CA074. In addition we report the structure of rhodesain in complex with the vinyl-sulfone K11002.The mature domain of our TbCat*CA074 structure contains unique features for a cathepsin B-like enzyme including an elongated N-terminus extending 16 residues past the predicted maturation cleavage site. N-terminal Edman sequencing reveals an even longer extension than is observed amongst the ordered portions of the crystal structure. The TbCat*CA074 structure confirms that the occluding loop, which is an essential part of the substrate-binding site, creates a larger prime side pocket in the active site cleft than is found in mammalian cathepsin B-small molecule structures. Our data further highlight enhanced flexibility in the occluding loop main chain and structural deviations from mammalian cathepsin B enzymes that may affect activity and inhibitor design. Comparisons with the rhodesain*K11002 structure highlight key differences that may impact the design of cysteine protease inhibitors as anti-trypanosomal drugs.

  20. RNA-Seq analysis validates the use of culture-derived Trypanosoma brucei and provides new markers for mammalian and insect life-cycle stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naguleswaran, Arunasalam; Doiron, Nicholas; Roditi, Isabel

    2018-04-02

    Trypanosoma brucei brucei, the parasite causing Nagana in domestic animals, is closely related to the parasites causing sleeping sickness, but does not infect humans. In addition to its importance as a pathogen, the relative ease of genetic manipulation and an innate capacity for RNAi extend its use as a model organism in cell and infection biology. During its development in its mammalian and insect (tsetse fly) hosts, T. b. brucei passes through several different life-cycle stages. There are currently four life-cycle stages that can be cultured: slender forms and stumpy forms, which are equivalent to forms found in the mammal, and early and late procyclic forms, which are equivalent to forms in the tsetse midgut. Early procyclic forms show coordinated group movement (social motility) on semi-solid surfaces, whereas late procyclic forms do not. RNA-Seq was performed on biological replicates of each life-cycle stage. These constitute the first datasets for culture-derived slender and stumpy bloodstream forms and early and late procyclic forms. Expression profiles confirmed that genes known to be stage-regulated in the animal and insect hosts were also regulated in culture. Sequence reads of 100-125 bases provided sufficient precision to uncover differential expression of closely related genes. More than 100 transcripts showed peak expression in stumpy forms, including adenylate cyclases and several components of inositol metabolism. Early and late procyclic forms showed differential expression of 73 transcripts, a number of which encoded proteins that were previously shown to be stage-regulated. Moreover, two adenylate cyclases previously shown to reduce social motility are up-regulated in late procyclic forms. This study validates the use of cultured bloodstream forms as alternatives to animal-derived parasites and yields new markers for all four stages. In addition to underpinning recent findings that early and late procyclic forms are distinct life-cycle stages

  1. Trypanosoma brucei Inhibition by Essential Oils from Medicinal and Aromatic Plants Traditionally Used in Cameroon (Azadirachta indica, Aframomum melegueta, Aframomum daniellii, Clausena anisata, Dichrostachys cinerea and Echinops giganteus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamte, Stephane L Ngahang; Ranjbarian, Farahnaz; Campagnaro, Gustavo Daniel; Nya, Prosper C Biapa; Mbuntcha, Hélène; Woguem, Verlaine; Womeni, Hilaire Macaire; Ta, Léon Azefack; Giordani, Cristiano; Barboni, Luciano; Benelli, Giovanni; Cappellacci, Loredana; Hofer, Anders; Petrelli, Riccardo; Maggi, Filippo

    2017-07-06

    Essential oils are complex mixtures of volatile components produced by the plant secondary metabolism and consist mainly of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes and, to a minor extent, of aromatic and aliphatic compounds. They are exploited in several fields such as perfumery, food, pharmaceutics, and cosmetics. Essential oils have long-standing uses in the treatment of infectious diseases and parasitosis in humans and animals. In this regard, their therapeutic potential against human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) has not been fully explored. In the present work, we have selected six medicinal and aromatic plants ( Azadirachta indica , Aframomum melegueta , Aframomum daniellii , Clausena anisata , Dichrostachys cinerea , and Echinops giganteus ) traditionally used in Cameroon to treat several disorders, including infections and parasitic diseases, and evaluated the activity of their essential oils against Trypanosma brucei TC221. Their selectivity was also determined with Balb/3T3 (mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line) cells as a reference. The results showed that the essential oils from A. indica , A . daniellii , and E. giganteus were the most active ones, with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) values of 15.21, 7.65, and 10.50 µg/mL, respectively. These essential oils were characterized by different chemical compounds such as sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, monoterpene hydrocarbons, and oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Some of their main components were assayed as well on T. brucei TC221, and their effects were linked to those of essential oils.

  2. Trypanosoma brucei Inhibition by Essential Oils from Medicinal and Aromatic Plants Traditionally Used in Cameroon (Azadirachta indica, Aframomum melegueta, Aframomum daniellii, Clausena anisata, Dichrostachys cinerea and Echinops giganteus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane L. Ngahang Kamte

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils are complex mixtures of volatile components produced by the plant secondary metabolism and consist mainly of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes and, to a minor extent, of aromatic and aliphatic compounds. They are exploited in several fields such as perfumery, food, pharmaceutics, and cosmetics. Essential oils have long-standing uses in the treatment of infectious diseases and parasitosis in humans and animals. In this regard, their therapeutic potential against human African trypanosomiasis (HAT has not been fully explored. In the present work, we have selected six medicinal and aromatic plants (Azadirachta indica, Aframomum melegueta, Aframomum daniellii, Clausena anisata, Dichrostachys cinerea, and Echinops giganteus traditionally used in Cameroon to treat several disorders, including infections and parasitic diseases, and evaluated the activity of their essential oils against Trypanosma brucei TC221. Their selectivity was also determined with Balb/3T3 (mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line cells as a reference. The results showed that the essential oils from A. indica, A. daniellii, and E. giganteus were the most active ones, with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of 15.21, 7.65, and 10.50 µg/mL, respectively. These essential oils were characterized by different chemical compounds such as sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, monoterpene hydrocarbons, and oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Some of their main components were assayed as well on T. brucei TC221, and their effects were linked to those of essential oils.

  3. Trypanocidal action of bisphosphonium salts through a mitochondrial target in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alkhaldi, A.A.M.; Martínek, Jan; Panicucci, Brian; Dardonville, C.; Zíková, Alena; de Koning, H.P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2016), s. 23-34 ISSN 2211-3207 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1205 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei * mitochondrion * FoF1 ATPase * succinate dehydrogenase * phosphonium salt * SDH complex Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.809, year: 2016

  4. Novel molecular mechanism for targeting the parasite Trypanosoma brucei with snake venom toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martos Esteban, Andrea; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Carrington, Mark

    Trypanosoma brucei is a parasitic protozoan species capable to infecting insect vectors whose bite further produces African sleeping sickness inhuman beings. During parasites’extracellular lives in the mammalian host, its outer coat, mainly composedof Variable surface glycoproteins (VSGs)[2], und...

  5. Interactions among Trypanosoma brucei RAD51 paralogues in DNA repair and antigenic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Rachel; Stockdale, Christopher; Lapsley, Craig; Wilkes, Jonathan; McCulloch, Richard

    2011-07-01

    Homologous recombination in Trypanosoma brucei is used for moving variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes into expression sites during immune evasion by antigenic variation. A major route for such VSG switching is gene conversion reactions in which RAD51, a universally conserved recombinase, catalyses homology-directed strand exchange. In any eukaryote, RAD51-directed strand exchange in vivo is mediated by further factors, including RAD51-related proteins termed Rad51 paralogues. These appear to be ubiquitously conserved, although their detailed roles in recombination remain unclear. In T. brucei, four putative RAD51 paralogue genes have been identified by sequence homology. Here we show that all four RAD51 paralogues act in DNA repair, recombination and RAD51 subnuclear dynamics, though not equivalently, while mutation of only one RAD51 paralogue gene significantly impedes VSG switching. We also show that the T. brucei RAD51 paralogues interact, and that the complexes they form may explain the distinct phenotypes of the mutants as well as observed expression interdependency. Finally, we document the Rad51 paralogues that are encoded by a wide range of protists, demonstrating that the Rad51 paralogue repertoire in T. brucei is unusually large among microbial eukaryotes and that one member of the protein family corresponds with a key, conserved eukaryotic Rad51 paralogue. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Particle-bound enzymes in the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opperdoes, F. R.; Borst, P.; Spits, H.

    1977-01-01

    We have screened the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei for the presence of enzymes that could serve as markers for the microbodies and the highly repressed mitochondrion of this organism. None of seven known microbody enzymes were detected at all, but glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase, ATPase,

  7. Contribution of glucose transport to the control of the glycolytic flux in Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, B.M.; Walsh, M.C.; ter Kuile, B.; Mensonides, F.I.C.; Michels, P.A.M.; Opperdoes, F.R.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    1999-01-01

    The rate of glucose transport across the plasma membrane of the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei was modulated by titration of the hexose transporter with the inhibitor phloretin, and the effect on the glycolytic flux was measured. A rapid glucose uptake assay was developed to measure the

  8. The promoter for a variant surface glycoprotein gene expression site in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomerdijk, J. C.; Ouellette, M.; ten Asbroek, A. L.; Kieft, R.; Bommer, A. M.; Clayton, C. E.; Borst, P.

    1990-01-01

    The variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene 221 of Trypanosoma brucei is transcribed as part of a 60 kb expression site (ES). We have identified the promoter controlling this multigene transcription unit by the use of 221 chromosome-enriched DNA libraries and VSG gene 221 expression site

  9. Arterial blood pressure changes in acute T. brucei infection of dogs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to find out the usefulness of serial arterial blood pressure measurements in predicting severity and outcome of acute Trypanosoma brucei infection in dogs. Twenty adult dogs of mixed sexes and aged between 2 and 5 years were used for this study. The dogs were of good cardiac health and were ...

  10. Telomere length affects the frequency and mechanism of antigenic variation in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galadriel A Hovel-Miner

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is a master of antigenic variation and immune response evasion. Utilizing a genomic repertoire of more than 1000 Variant Surface Glycoprotein-encoding genes (VSGs, T. brucei can change its protein coat by "switching" from the expression of one VSG to another. Each active VSG is monoallelically expressed from only one of approximately 15 subtelomeric sites. Switching VSG expression occurs by three predominant mechanisms, arguably the most significant of which is the non-reciprocal exchange of VSG containing DNA by duplicative gene conversion (GC. How T. brucei orchestrates its complex switching mechanisms remains to be elucidated. Recent work has demonstrated that an exogenous DNA break in the active site could initiate a GC based switch, yet the source of the switch-initiating DNA lesion under natural conditions is still unknown. Here we investigated the hypothesis that telomere length directly affects VSG switching. We demonstrate that telomerase deficient strains with short telomeres switch more frequently than genetically identical strains with long telomeres and that, when the telomere is short, switching preferentially occurs by GC. Our data supports the hypothesis that a short telomere at the active VSG expression site results in an increase in subtelomeric DNA breaks, which can initiate GC based switching. In addition to their significance for T. brucei and telomere biology, the findings presented here have implications for the many diverse pathogens that organize their antigenic genes in subtelomeric regions.

  11. Comparative studies on the biochemical properties of the malic enzymes from Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Alejandro E; Maugeri, Dante A; Opperdoes, Fred R; Cazzulo, Juan J; Nowicki, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Comparative studies showed that, like Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei exhibits functional cytosolic and mitochondrial malic enzymes (MEs), which are specifically linked to NADP. Kinetic studies provided evidence that T. cruzi and T. brucei MEs display similarly high affinities towards NADP(+) and are also almost equally efficient in catalyzing the production of NADPH. Nevertheless, in contrast to the cytosolic ME from T. cruzi, which is highly activated by l-aspartate (over 10-fold), the T. brucei homologue is slightly more active (50%) in the presence of this amino acid. In T. brucei, both isozymes appear to be clearly more abundant in the insect stage, although they can be immunodetected in the bloodstream forms. By contrast, in T. cruzi the expression of the mitochondrial ME seems to be clearly upregulated in amastigotes, whereas the cytosolic isoform appears to be more abundant in the insect stages of the parasite. It might be hypothesized that in those environments where glucose is very low or absent, these pathogens depend on NADP-linked dehydrogenases such as the MEs for NADPH production, as in those conditions the pentose phosphate pathway cannot serve as a source of essential reducing power. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei do not use Krebs cycle activity for energy generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weelden, van S.W.H.; Fast, B.; Vogt, A.; Meer, van der P.; Saas, J.; Hellemond, van J.J.; Tielens, A.G.M.; Boshart, M.

    2003-01-01

    The importance of a functional Krebs cycle for energy generation in the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei was investigated under physiological conditions during logarithmic phase growth of a pleomorphic parasite strain. Wild type procyclic cells and mutants with targeted deletion of the gene

  13. Dynamic Modelling under Uncertainty : The Case of Trypanosoma brucei Energy Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achcar, Fiona; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Barrett, Michael P.; Breitling, Rainer; Papin, Jason A.

    Kinetic models of metabolism require detailed knowledge of kinetic parameters. However, due to measurement errors or lack of data this knowledge is often uncertain. The model of glycolysis in the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei is a particularly well analysed example of a quantitative

  14. 3D Architecture of the Trypanosoma brucei Flagella Connector, a Mobile Transmembrane Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höög, Johanna L.; Lacomble, Sylvain; Bouchet-Marquis, Cedric; Briggs, Laura; Park, Kristin; Hoenger, Andreas; Gull, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Background Cellular junctions are crucial for the formation of multicellular organisms, where they anchor cells to each other and/or supportive tissue and enable cell-to-cell communication. Some unicellular organisms, such as the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei, also have complex cellular junctions. The flagella connector (FC) is a three-layered transmembrane junction that moves with the growing tip of a new flagellum and attaches it to the side of the old flagellum. The FC moves via an unknown molecular mechanism, independent of new flagellum growth. Here we describe the detailed 3D architecture of the FC suggesting explanations for how it functions and its mechanism of motility. Methodology/Principal Findings We have used a combination of electron tomography and cryo-electron tomography to reveal the 3D architecture of the FC. Cryo-electron tomography revealed layers of repetitive filamentous electron densities between the two flagella in the interstitial zone. Though the FC does not change in length and width during the growth of the new flagellum, the interstitial zone thickness decreases as the FC matures. This investigation also shows interactions between the FC layers and the axonemes of the new and old flagellum, sufficiently strong to displace the axoneme in the old flagellum. We describe a novel filament, the flagella connector fibre, found between the FC and the axoneme in the old flagellum. Conclusions/Significance The FC is similar to other cellular junctions in that filamentous proteins bridge the extracellular space and are anchored to underlying cytoskeletal structures; however, it is built between different portions of the same cell and is unique because of its intrinsic motility. The detailed description of its structure will be an important tool to use in attributing structure / function relationships as its molecular components are discovered in the future. The FC is involved in the inheritance of cell shape, which is important for the life

  15. 3D Architecture of the Trypanosoma brucei Flagella Connector, a Mobile Transmembrane Junction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna L Höög

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular junctions are crucial for the formation of multicellular organisms, where they anchor cells to each other and/or supportive tissue and enable cell-to-cell communication. Some unicellular organisms, such as the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei, also have complex cellular junctions. The flagella connector (FC is a three-layered transmembrane junction that moves with the growing tip of a new flagellum and attaches it to the side of the old flagellum. The FC moves via an unknown molecular mechanism, independent of new flagellum growth. Here we describe the detailed 3D architecture of the FC suggesting explanations for how it functions and its mechanism of motility.We have used a combination of electron tomography and cryo-electron tomography to reveal the 3D architecture of the FC. Cryo-electron tomography revealed layers of repetitive filamentous electron densities between the two flagella in the interstitial zone. Though the FC does not change in length and width during the growth of the new flagellum, the interstitial zone thickness decreases as the FC matures. This investigation also shows interactions between the FC layers and the axonemes of the new and old flagellum, sufficiently strong to displace the axoneme in the old flagellum. We describe a novel filament, the flagella connector fibre, found between the FC and the axoneme in the old flagellum.The FC is similar to other cellular junctions in that filamentous proteins bridge the extracellular space and are anchored to underlying cytoskeletal structures; however, it is built between different portions of the same cell and is unique because of its intrinsic motility. The detailed description of its structure will be an important tool to use in attributing structure / function relationships as its molecular components are discovered in the future. The FC is involved in the inheritance of cell shape, which is important for the life cycle of this human parasite.

  16. Virulence and pathogenicity of three Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense stabilates in a Swiss white mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kariuki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: A key objective in basic research on human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is developing a cheap and reliable experimental model of the disease for use in pathogenesis and drug studies. Objective: With a view to improving current models, a study was undertaken to characterise the virulence and pathogenicity of three Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense stabilates, labelled as International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI-2918, ILRI-3953, and Institute of Primate Research (IPR-001, infected into Swiss white mice. Methods: Swiss white mice were infected intraperitoneally with trypanosomes and observedfor parasitaemia using wet blood smears obtained by tail snipping. Induction of late-stagedisease was undertaken using diminazene aceturate (40 mg/kg, Berenil with curativetreatment done using melarsoprol (3.6 mg/kg, Arsobal. Results: The prepatent period for the stabilates ranged from three to four days with mean peak parasitaemia ranging from Log10 6.40 to 8.36. First peak parasitaemia for all stabilates varied between six and seven days post infection (DPI followed by secondary latency in ILRI-2918 (15–17 DPI and IPR-001 (17–19 DPI. Survival times ranged from six DPI (ILRI-3953 to 86 DPI (IPR-001. Hindleg paresis was observed in both ILRI-3953 (at peak parasitaemia and ILRI-2918 (after relapse parasitaemia. Mice infected with IPR-001 survived until 54 DPI when curative treatment was undertaken. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the stabilates ILRI-2918 and ILRI-3953 were unsuitable for modelling late-stage HAT in mice. The stabilate IPR-001 demonstrated the potential to induce chronic trypanosomiasis in Swiss white mice for use in development of a late-stage model of HAT.

  17. Differential virulence and tsetse fly transmissibility of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitonga, Purity K; Ndung'u, Kariuki; Murilla, Grace A; Thande, Paul C; Wamwiri, Florence N; Auma, Joanna E; Ngae, Geoffrey N; Kibugu, James K; Kurgat, Richard; Thuita, John K

    2017-06-27

    African animal trypanosomiasis causes significant economic losses in sub-Saharan African countries because of livestock mortalities and reduced productivity. Trypanosomes, the causative agents, are transmitted by tsetse flies (Glossina spp.). In the current study, we compared and contrasted the virulence characteristics of five Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei isolates using groups of Swiss white mice (n = 6). We further determined the vectorial capacity of Glossina pallidipes, for each of the trypanosome isolates. Results showed that the overall pre-patent (PP) periods were 8.4 ± 0.9 (range, 4-11) and 4.5 ± 0.2 (range, 4-6) for T. congolense and T. brucei isolates, respectively (p < 0.01). Despite the longer mean PP, T. congolense-infected mice exhibited a significantly (p < 0.05) shorter survival time than T. brucei-infected mice, indicating greater virulence. Differences were also noted among the individual isolates with T. congolense KETRI 2909 causing the most acute infection of the entire group with a mean ± standard error survival time of 9 ± 2.1 days. Survival time of infected tsetse flies and the proportion with mature infections at 30 days post-exposure to the infective blood meals varied among isolates, with subacute infection-causing T. congolense EATRO 1829 and chronic infection-causing T. brucei EATRO 2267 isolates showing the highest mature infection rates of 38.5% and 23.1%, respectively. Therefore, our study provides further evidence of occurrence of differences in virulence and transmissibility of eastern African trypanosome strains and has identified two, T. congolense EATRO 1829 and T. brucei EATRO 2267, as suitable for tsetse infectivity and transmissibility experiments.

  18. Megazol and its bioisostere 4H-1,2,4-triazole: comparing the trypanocidal, cytotoxic and genotoxic activities and their in vitro and in silico interactions with the Trypanosoma brucei nitroreductase enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcione Silva de Carvalho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Megazol (7 is a 5-nitroimidazole that is highly active against Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei, as well as drug-resistant forms of trypanosomiasis. Compound 7 is not used clinically due to its mutagenic and genotoxic properties, but has been largely used as a lead compound. Here, we compared the activity of 7 with its 4H-1,2,4-triazole bioisostere (8 in bloodstream forms of T. brucei and T. cruzi and evaluated their activation by T. brucei type I nitroreductase (TbNTR enzyme. We also analysed the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of these compounds in whole human blood using Comet and fluorescein diacetate/ethidium bromide assays. Although the only difference between 7 and 8 is the substitution of sulphur (in the thiadiazole in 7 for nitrogen (in the triazole in 8, the results indicated that 8 had poorer antiparasitic activity than 7 and was not genotoxic, whereas 7 presented this effect. The determination of Vmax indicated that although 8 was metabolised more rapidly than 7, it bounds to the TbNTR with better affinity, resulting in equivalent kcat/KM values. Docking assays of 7 and 8 performed within the active site of a homology model of the TbNTR indicating that 8 had greater affinity than 7.

  19. Control and regulation of gene expression: quantitative analysis of the expression of phosphoglycerate kinase in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, J.R.; Stewart, M.; Luu, V.-D.; van Tuijl, J.H.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Clayton, C.; Bakker, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Isoenzymes of phosphoglycerate kinase in Trypanosoma brucei are differentially expressed in its two main life stages. This study addresses how the organism manages to make sufficient amounts of the isoenzyme with the correct localization, which processes (transcription, splicing, and RNA

  20. Kenyan purple tea anthocyanins and coenzyme-Q10 ameliorate post treatment reactive encephalopathy associated with cerebral human African trypanosomiasis in murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Khalid; Wachira, Francis N; Nyariki, James N; Isaac, Alfred O

    2014-04-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a tropical disease caused by two subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei, the East African variant T. b. rhodesiense and the West African variant T. b. gambiense. Melarsoprol, an organic arsenical, is the only drug used to treat late stage T. b. rhodesiense infection. Unfortunately, this drug induces an extremely severe post treatment reactive encephalopathy (PTRE) in up to 10% of treated patients, half of whom die from this complication. A highly reproducible mouse model was adapted to assess the use of Kenyan purple tea anthocyanins and/or coenzyme-Q10 in blocking the occurrence of PTRE. Female Swiss white mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with approximately 10(4) trypanosome isolate T. b. rhodesiense KETRI 2537 and treated sub-curatively 21days post infection with 5mg/kg diminazene aceturate (DA) daily for 3days to induce severe late CNS infection that closely mirrors PTRE in human subjects. Thereafter mice were monitored for relapse of parasitemia after which they were treated with melarsoprol at a dosage of 3.6mg/kg body weight for 4days and sacrificed 24h post the last dosage to obtain brain samples. Brain sections from mice with PTRE that did not receive any antioxidant treatment showed a more marked presence of inflammatory cells, microglial activation and disruption of the brain parenchyma when compared to PTRE mice supplemented with either coenzyme-Q10, purple tea anthocyanins or a combination of the two. The mice group that was treated with coenzyme-Q10 or purple tea anthocyanins had higher levels of GSH and aconitase-1 in the brain compared to untreated groups, implying a boost in brain antioxidant capacity. Overall, coenzyme-Q10 treatment produced more beneficial effects compared to anthocyanin treatment. These findings demonstrate that therapeutic intervention with coenzyme-Q10 and/or purple tea anthocyanins can be used in an experimental mouse model to ameliorate PTRE associated with cerebral HAT. Copyright

  1. Comparative parasitaemia and haematology of mice, rats and rabbits experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei and their responses to diminazene diaceturate (Veriben® therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Ibrahim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare parasitaemia and haematological changes of Trypanosoma brucei brucei infection in mice, rats and rabbits and their chemotherapeutic responses to diminazene diaceturate (Veriben® therapy under the same experimental conditions. Methods: A total of 20 adult BALB/c mice, 20 Wister albino rats and 20 New Zealand rabbits of both sexes were used for this study. Each rodent group was divided into four groups (A, B, C and D of five animals each. Animals in Groups A and C were individually infected with 0.5 mL of blood from donor rats containing 1.5 × 106 Trypanosoma brucei brucei, while Groups B and D remained uninfected. Experimental animals were treated thus [Group A (infected and untreated control, Group B (uninfected and untreated control, Group C (infected and treated and Group D (uninfected and treated]. All treatments commenced 12 days after infection. Parasitaemia and haematological parameters were determined every four days till the end of the experiment. Results: The prepatent period for mice and rats was 4 days while that of rabbits was 8 days. Observed clinical signs consisted of pallor of mucous membranes, lethargy and starry hair coat observed mainly among mice and rats, while the rabbits had mainly mild pallor of the ocular mucous membranes. Parasitaemia in Groups A rose significantly by Day 20 post-infection (p.i. in the mice, Day 24 in the rats and Day 28 in rabbits. By these respective days, all the infected untreated animals in Group A died of the infection. However in Group C, parasitaemia declined significantly (P < 0.05 among mice, rats and rabbits and were completely eliminated from peripheral circulation by Days 20, 20 and 24 (p.i. respectively, with no death. An inverse relationship was observed between parasitaemia and the haematological parameters for all the species of the rodents. As parasitaemia increased, the packed cell volume, red blood cell count, haemoglobin concentrations and white blood cell

  2. Differential virulence and tsetse fly transmissibility of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purity K. Gitonga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available African animal trypanosomiasis causes significant economic losses in sub-Saharan African countries because of livestock mortalities and reduced productivity. Trypanosomes, the causative agents, are transmitted by tsetse flies (Glossina spp.. In the current study, we compared and contrasted the virulence characteristics of five Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei isolates using groups of Swiss white mice (n = 6. We further determined the vectorial capacity of Glossina pallidipes, for each of the trypanosome isolates. Results showed that the overall pre-patent (PP periods were 8.4 ± 0.9 (range, 4–11 and 4.5 ± 0.2 (range, 4–6 for T. congolense and T. brucei isolates, respectively (p < 0.01. Despite the longer mean PP, T. congolense–infected mice exhibited a significantly (p < 0.05 shorter survival time than T. brucei–infected mice, indicating greater virulence. Differences were also noted among the individual isolates with T. congolense KETRI 2909 causing the most acute infection of the entire group with a mean ± standard error survival time of 9 ± 2.1 days. Survival time of infected tsetse flies and the proportion with mature infections at 30 days post-exposure to the infective blood meals varied among isolates, with subacute infection–causing T. congolense EATRO 1829 and chronic infection–causing T. brucei EATRO 2267 isolates showing the highest mature infection rates of 38.5% and 23.1%, respectively. Therefore, our study provides further evidence of occurrence of differences in virulence and transmissibility of eastern African trypanosome strains and has identified two, T. congolense EATRO 1829 and T. brucei EATRO 2267, as suitable for tsetse infectivity and transmissibility experiments.

  3. A monoclonal antibody marker for the exclusion-zone filaments of Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Bonhivers, Mélanie; Landrein, Nicolas; Decossas, Marion; Robinson, Derrick R

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Trypanosoma brucei is a haemoflagellate pathogen of man, wild animals and domesticated livestock in central and southern Africa. In all life cycle stages this parasite has a single mitochondrion that contains a uniquely organised genome that is condensed into a flat disk-like structure called the kinetoplast. The kinetoplast is essential for insect form procyclic cells and therefore is a potential drug target. The kinetoplast is unique in nature because it consists of nove...

  4. Differential virulence and tsetse fly transmissibility of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purity K. Gitonga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available African animal trypanosomiasis causes significant economic losses in sub-Saharan African countries because of livestock mortalities and reduced productivity. Trypanosomes, the causative agents, are transmitted by tsetse flies (Glossina spp.. In the current study, we compared and contrasted the virulence characteristics of five Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei isolates using groups of Swiss white mice (n = 6. We further determined the vectorial capacity of Glossina pallidipes, for each of the trypanosome isolates. Results showed that the overall pre-patent (PP periods were 8.4 ± 0.9 (range, 4–11 and 4.5 ± 0.2 (range, 4–6 for T. congolense and T. brucei isolates, respectively (p < 0.01. Despite the longer mean PP, T. congolense–infected mice exhibited a significantly (p < 0.05 shorter survival time than T. brucei–infected mice, indicating greater virulence. Differences were also noted among the individual isolates with T. congolense KETRI 2909 causing the most acute infection of the entire group with a mean ± standard error survival time of 9 ± 2.1 days. Survival time of infected tsetse flies and the proportion with mature infections at 30 days post-exposure to the infective blood meals varied among isolates, with subacute infection–causing T. congolense EATRO 1829 and chronic infection–causing T. brucei EATRO 2267 isolates showing the highest mature infection rates of 38.5% and 23.1%, respectively. Therefore, our study provides further evidence of occurrence of differences in virulence and transmissibility of eastern African trypanosome strains and has identified two, T. congolense EATRO 1829 and T. brucei EATRO 2267, as suitable for tsetse infectivity and transmissibility experiments.

  5. Mitochondrial tRNA import in Trypanosoma brucei is independent of thiolation and the Rieske protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paris, Zdeněk; RUBIO, M. A. T.; Lukeš, Julius; Alfonzo, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 7 (2009), s. 1398-1406 ISSN 1355-8382 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/06/1558; GA MŠk LC07032; GA MŠk 2B06129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : T. brucei * tRNA import * 2-thiolation * RIC * Rieske * Fe-S cluster Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.198, year: 2009

  6. The Small Chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei Involved in Antigenic Variation Are Constructed Around Repetitive Palindromes

    OpenAIRE

    Wickstead, Bill; Ersfeld, Klaus; Gull, Keith

    2004-01-01

    Most eukaryotic genomes contain large regions of satellite DNA. These arrays are often associated with essential chromosomal functions, but remain largely absent from genome projects because of difficulties in cloning and sequence assembly. The numerous small chromosomes of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei fall into this category, yet are critical to understanding the genome because of their role in antigenic variation. Their relatively small size, however, makes them particularly amenable to ...

  7. An Atypical Mitochondrial Carrier That Mediates Drug Action in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P de Macêdo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating the mechanism of action of trypanocidal compounds is an important step in the development of more efficient drugs against Trypanosoma brucei. In a screening approach using an RNAi library in T. brucei bloodstream forms, we identified a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, TbMCP14, as a prime candidate mediating the action of a group of anti-parasitic choline analogs. Depletion of TbMCP14 by inducible RNAi in both bloodstream and procyclic forms increased resistance of parasites towards the compounds by 7-fold and 3-fold, respectively, compared to uninduced cells. In addition, down-regulation of TbMCP14 protected bloodstream form mitochondria from a drug-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Conversely, over-expression of the carrier in procyclic forms increased parasite susceptibility more than 13-fold. Metabolomic analyses of parasites over-expressing TbMCP14 showed increased levels of the proline metabolite, pyrroline-5-carboxylate, suggesting a possible involvement of TbMCP14 in energy production. The generation of TbMCP14 knock-out parasites showed that the carrier is not essential for survival of T. brucei bloodstream forms, but reduced parasite proliferation under standard culture conditions. In contrast, depletion of TbMCP14 in procyclic forms resulted in growth arrest, followed by parasite death. The time point at which parasite proliferation stopped was dependent on the major energy source, i.e. glucose versus proline, in the culture medium. Together with our findings that proline-dependent ATP production in crude mitochondria from TbMCP14-depleted trypanosomes was reduced compared to control mitochondria, the study demonstrates that TbMCP14 is involved in energy production in T. brucei. Since TbMCP14 belongs to a trypanosomatid-specific clade of mitochondrial carrier family proteins showing very poor similarity to mitochondrial carriers of mammals, it may represent an interesting target for drug

  8. [Human African trypanosomiasis in mangrove epidemiologic area. Presentation, diagnosis and treatment in Guinea, 2005-2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhecke, C; Guevart, E; Ezzedine, K; Receveur, M-C; Jamonneau, V; Bucheton, B; Camara, M; Vincendeau, P; Malvy, D

    2010-02-01

    Gambiense human African trypanosomiasis is still assumed to be endemic in many part of West Africa, particularly in Guinea coastal area with mangrove swamp. Diagnosis is usually made during active medical screening or by passive initiative. To describe clinical and epidemiological characteristics of Gambiense human African trypanosomiasis in the coastal area of Guinea. Exhaustive and retrospective analysis of all patients attending the trypanosomiasis center in the coastal area of Guinea between January 2005 and December 2007 with a diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis. A total of 196 patients were recruited for the study. Out of them, 55 % of the 73 patients diagnosed during active screening were classified stage 1 (haemolymphatic stage) or early stage 2 (meningoencephalitic stage). Contrarily, 115 of the 120 diagnosed by passive procedure were classified late stage 2, which features more specific signs and neurological symptoms, and leads to coma and death. More than 90 % of all cases presented cervical lymph nodes with identification of trypanosome on direct examination of fluid puncture. Less than one third of the patients were reexamined three months later. In the coastal area of Guinea with mangrove swamp, direct examination of lymph node fluid puncture seems to be the most contributive test for the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis. Hence, associating clinical examination of cervical lymph nodes area and direct examination of fluid puncture may allow an early diagnosis of Gambiense human African trypanosomiasis and favor the implementation of efficient therapeutic strategies. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei do not use Krebs cycle activity for energy generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weelden, Susanne W H; Fast, Beate; Vogt, Achim; van der Meer, Pieter; Saas, Joachim; van Hellemond, Jaap J; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Boshart, Michael

    2003-04-11

    The importance of a functional Krebs cycle for energy generation in the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei was investigated under physiological conditions during logarithmic phase growth of a pleomorphic parasite strain. Wild type procyclic cells and mutants with targeted deletion of the gene coding for aconitase were derived by synchronous in vitro differentiation from wild type and mutant (Delta aco::NEO/Delta aco::HYG) bloodstream stage parasites, respectively, where aconitase is not expressed and is dispensable. No differences in intracellular levels of glycolytic and Krebs cycle intermediates were found in procyclic wild type and mutant cells, except for citrate that accumulated up to 90-fold in the mutants, confirming the absence of aconitase activity. Surprisingly, deletion of aconitase did not change differentiation nor the growth rate or the intracellular ATP/ADP ratio in those cells. Metabolic studies using radioactively labeled substrates and NMR analysis demonstrated that glucose and proline were not degraded via the Krebs cycle to CO(2). Instead, glucose was degraded to acetate, succinate, and alanine, whereas proline was degraded to succinate. Importantly, there was absolutely no difference in the metabolic products released by wild type and aconitase knockout parasites, and both were for survival strictly dependent on respiration via the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Hence, although the Krebs cycle enzymes are present, procyclic T. brucei do not use Krebs cycle activity for energy generation, but the mitochondrial respiratory chain is essential for survival and growth. We therefore propose a revised model of the energy metabolism of procyclic T. brucei.

  10. Chemical constituents from Waltheria indica exert in vitro activity against Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretton, Sylvian; Bréant, Lise; Pourrez, Lucie; Ambuehl, Chiara; Perozzo, Remo; Marcourt, Laurence; Kaiser, Marcel; Cuendet, Muriel; Christen, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Six extracts from the roots and the aerial parts of Waltheria indica L. (Malvaceae) were screened for their in vitro antitrypanosomal activity towards Trypanosoma brucei brucei STIB 427 strain, T. brucei rhodesiense STIB 900 and Trypanosoma cruzi Tulahuen C4. The dichloromethane extract from the roots showed the highest activity against T. cruzi (IC50=0.74 μg/mL) as well as a good selectivity index (SI value of 35). Based on these results, this extract was fractionated and led to the isolation of three alkaloids (adouetin X (1), waltheriones A (2) and C (3)) and three pentacyclic triterpene derivatives (betulinic acid (4), 3β-acetoxy-27-trans-caffeoyloxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid methyl ester (5) and 3β-acetoxy-27-cis-caffeoyloxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid methyl ester (6)) identified by 1D and 2D NMR, UV, IR and MS analyses. Among these, waltherione C exhibited the highest and selective antitrypanosomal activity towards T. cruzi (IC50=1.93 μM) with low cytotoxicity (IC50=101.23 μM), resulting in a selectivity index value of 52. Waltherione C conforms to hit activity criteria with respect to T. cruzi as required by the WHO/TDR. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. NLP is a novel transcription regulator involved in VSG expression site control in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Mani Shankar; Kushwaha, Manish; Ersfeld, Klaus; Fullbrook, Alexander; Stanne, Tara M; Rudenko, Gloria

    2011-03-01

    Trypanosoma brucei mono-allelically expresses one of approximately 1500 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes while multiplying in the mammalian bloodstream. The active VSG is transcribed by RNA polymerase I in one of approximately 15 telomeric VSG expression sites (ESs). T. brucei is unusual in controlling gene expression predominantly post-transcriptionally, and how ESs are mono-allelically controlled remains a mystery. Here we identify a novel transcription regulator, which resembles a nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP) with an AT-hook motif. NLP is key for ES control in bloodstream form T. brucei, as NLP knockdown results in 45- to 65-fold derepression of the silent VSG221 ES. NLP is also involved in repression of transcription in the inactive VSG Basic Copy arrays, minichromosomes and procyclin loci. NLP is shown to be enriched on the 177- and 50-bp simple sequence repeats, the non-transcribed regions around rDNA and procyclin, and both active and silent ESs. Blocking NLP synthesis leads to downregulation of the active ES, indicating that NLP plays a role in regulating appropriate levels of transcription of ESs in both their active and silent state. Discovery of the unusual transcription regulator NLP provides new insight into the factors that are critical for ES control.

  12. Probing the metabolic network in bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei using untargeted metabolomics with stable isotope labelled glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creek, Darren J; Mazet, Muriel; Achcar, Fiona; Anderson, Jana; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kamour, Ruwida; Morand, Pauline; Millerioux, Yoann; Biran, Marc; Kerkhoven, Eduard J; Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Weidt, Stefan K; Burgess, Karl E V; Breitling, Rainer; Watson, David G; Bringaud, Frédéric; Barrett, Michael P

    2015-03-01

    Metabolomics coupled with heavy-atom isotope-labelled glucose has been used to probe the metabolic pathways active in cultured bloodstream form trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Glucose enters many branches of metabolism beyond glycolysis, which has been widely held to be the sole route of glucose metabolism. Whilst pyruvate is the major end-product of glucose catabolism, its transamination product, alanine, is also produced in significant quantities. The oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway is operative, although the non-oxidative branch is not. Ribose 5-phosphate generated through this pathway distributes widely into nucleotide synthesis and other branches of metabolism. Acetate, derived from glucose, is found associated with a range of acetylated amino acids and, to a lesser extent, fatty acids; while labelled glycerol is found in many glycerophospholipids. Glucose also enters inositol and several sugar nucleotides that serve as precursors to macromolecule biosynthesis. Although a Krebs cycle is not operative, malate, fumarate and succinate, primarily labelled in three carbons, were present, indicating an origin from phosphoenolpyruvate via oxaloacetate. Interestingly, the enzyme responsible for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was shown to be essential to the bloodstream form trypanosomes, as demonstrated by the lethal phenotype induced by RNAi-mediated downregulation of its expression. In addition, glucose derivatives enter pyrimidine biosynthesis via oxaloacetate as a precursor to aspartate and orotate.

  13. Probing the metabolic network in bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei using untargeted metabolomics with stable isotope labelled glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J Creek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics coupled with heavy-atom isotope-labelled glucose has been used to probe the metabolic pathways active in cultured bloodstream form trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Glucose enters many branches of metabolism beyond glycolysis, which has been widely held to be the sole route of glucose metabolism. Whilst pyruvate is the major end-product of glucose catabolism, its transamination product, alanine, is also produced in significant quantities. The oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway is operative, although the non-oxidative branch is not. Ribose 5-phosphate generated through this pathway distributes widely into nucleotide synthesis and other branches of metabolism. Acetate, derived from glucose, is found associated with a range of acetylated amino acids and, to a lesser extent, fatty acids; while labelled glycerol is found in many glycerophospholipids. Glucose also enters inositol and several sugar nucleotides that serve as precursors to macromolecule biosynthesis. Although a Krebs cycle is not operative, malate, fumarate and succinate, primarily labelled in three carbons, were present, indicating an origin from phosphoenolpyruvate via oxaloacetate. Interestingly, the enzyme responsible for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was shown to be essential to the bloodstream form trypanosomes, as demonstrated by the lethal phenotype induced by RNAi-mediated downregulation of its expression. In addition, glucose derivatives enter pyrimidine biosynthesis via oxaloacetate as a precursor to aspartate and orotate.

  14. IL-6 is Upregulated in Late-Stage Disease in Monkeys Experimentally Infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Nyawira Maranga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is constrained by lack of simple-to-use diagnostic, staging, and treatment tools. The search for novel biomarkers is, therefore, essential in the fight against HAT. The current study aimed at investigating the potential of IL-6 as an adjunct parameter for HAT stage determination in vervet monkey model. Four adult vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops were experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and treated subcuratively at 28 days after infection (dpi to induce late stage disease. Three noninfected monkeys formed the control group. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and blood samples were obtained at weekly intervals and assessed for various biological parameters. A typical HAT-like infection was observed. The late stage was characterized by significant (P<0.05 elevation of CSF IL-6, white blood cell count, and total protein starting 35 dpi with peak levels of these parameters coinciding with relapse parasitaemia. Brain immunohistochemical staining revealed an increase in brain glial fibrillary acidic protein expression indicative of reactive astrogliosis in infected animals which were euthanized in late-stage disease. The elevation of IL-6 in CSF which accompanied other HAT biomarkers indicates onset of parasite neuroinvasion and show potential for use as an adjunct late-stage disease biomarker in the Rhodesian sleeping sickness.

  15. IL-6 is Upregulated in Late-Stage Disease in Monkeys Experimentally Infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyawira Maranga, Dawn; Kagira, John Maina; Kinyanjui, Christopher Kariuki; Muturi Karanja, Simon; Wangari Maina, Naomi; Ngotho, Maina

    2013-01-01

    The management of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is constrained by lack of simple-to-use diagnostic, staging, and treatment tools. The search for novel biomarkers is, therefore, essential in the fight against HAT. The current study aimed at investigating the potential of IL-6 as an adjunct parameter for HAT stage determination in vervet monkey model. Four adult vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) were experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and treated subcuratively at 28 days after infection (dpi) to induce late stage disease. Three noninfected monkeys formed the control group. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood samples were obtained at weekly intervals and assessed for various biological parameters. A typical HAT-like infection was observed. The late stage was characterized by significant (P < 0.05) elevation of CSF IL-6, white blood cell count, and total protein starting 35 dpi with peak levels of these parameters coinciding with relapse parasitaemia. Brain immunohistochemical staining revealed an increase in brain glial fibrillary acidic protein expression indicative of reactive astrogliosis in infected animals which were euthanized in late-stage disease. The elevation of IL-6 in CSF which accompanied other HAT biomarkers indicates onset of parasite neuroinvasion and show potential for use as an adjunct late-stage disease biomarker in the Rhodesian sleeping sickness. PMID:24194772

  16. Genome-wide analysis of chromatin structures in Trypanosoma brucei using high-resolution MNase-ChIP-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedel, Carolin; Siegel, T Nicolai

    2017-09-01

    Specific DNA-protein interactions are the basis for many important cellular mechanisms like the regulation of gene expression or replication. Knowledge about the precise genomic locations of DNA-protein interactions is important because it provides insight into the regulation of these processes. Recently, we have adapted an approach that combines micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion of chromatin with chromatin immunoprecipitation in Trypanosoma brucei. Here, we describe in detail how this method can be used to map the genome-wide distribution of nucleosomes or other DNA-binding proteins at high resolution in T. brucei. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The orthologue of Sjögren's syndrome nuclear autoantigen 1 (SSNA1 in Trypanosoma brucei is an immunogenic self-assembling molecule.

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    Helen P Price

    Full Text Available Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (PSS is a highly prevalent autoimmune disease, typically manifesting as lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands leading to chronically impaired lacrimal and salivary secretion. Sjögren's Syndrome nuclear autoantigen 1 (SSNA1 or NA14 is a major specific target for autoantibodies in PSS but the precise function and clinical relevance of this protein are largely unknown. Orthologues of the gene are absent from many of the commonly used model organisms but are present in Chlamyodomonas reinhardtii (in which it has been termed DIP13 and most protozoa. We report the functional characterisation of the orthologue of SSNA1 in the kinetoplastid parasite, Trypanosoma brucei. Both TbDIP13 and human SSNA1 are small coiled-coil proteins which are predicted to be remote homologues of the actin-binding protein tropomyosin. We use comparative proteomic methods to identify potential interacting partners of TbDIP13. We also show evidence that TbDIP13 is able to self-assemble into fibril-like structures both in vitro and in vivo, a property which may contribute to its immunogenicity. Endogenous TbDIP13 partially co-localises with acetylated α-tubulin in the insect procyclic stage of the parasite. However, deletion of the DIP13 gene in cultured bloodstream and procyclic stages of T. brucei has little effect on parasite growth or morphology, indicating either a degree of functional redundancy or a function in an alternative stage of the parasite life cycle.

  18. SHORT COMMUNICATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-05-02

    May 2, 2007 ... caused by morphologically indistinguishable subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei. The two forms are West African sleeping sickness, caused by. T. brucei gambiense and East African sleeping sickness, caused by T. brucei rhodesiense. In Tanzania HAT is one of the major public health problems and was ...

  19. Chemical characterisation of Nigerian red propolis and its biological activity against Trypanosoma Brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ruwida M K; Igoli, John; Gray, Alexander I; Ebiloma, Godwin Unekwuojo; Clements, Carol; Fearnley, James; Ebel, Ru Angeli Edrada; Zhang, Tong; De Koning, Harry P; Watson, David G

    2016-01-01

    A previous study showed the unique character of Nigerian red propolis from Rivers State, Nigeria (RSN), with regards to chemical composition and activity against Trypanosoma brucei in comparison with other African propolis. To carry out fractionation and biological testing of Nigerian propolis in order to isolate compounds with anti-trypanosomal activity. To compare the composition of the RSN propolis with the composition of Brazilian red propolis. Profiling was carried out using HPLC-UV-ELSD and HPLC-Orbitrap-FTMS on extracts of two samples collected from RSN with data extraction using MZmine software. Isolation was carried out by normal phase and reversed phase MPLC. Elucidation of the compounds with a purity > 95% was performed by 1D/2D NMR HRMS and HRLC-MS(n) . Ten phenolic compounds were isolated or in the case of liquiritigenin partially purified. Data for nine of these correlated with literature reports of known compounds i.e. one isoflavanone, calycosin (1); two flavanones, liquiritigenin (2) and pinocembrin (5); an isoflavan, vestitol (3); a pterocarpan, medicarpin (4); two prenylflavanones, 8-prenylnaringenin (7) and 6-prenylnaringenin (8); and two geranyl flavonoids, propolin D (9) and macarangin (10). The tenth was elucidated as a previously undescribed dihydrobenzofuran (6). The isolated compounds were tested against Trypanosoma brucei and displayed moderate to high activity. Some of the compounds tested had similar activity against wild type T. brucei and two strains displaying pentamidine resistance. Nigerian propolis from RSN has some similarities with Brazilian red propolis. The propolis displayed anti-trypanosomal activity at a potentially useful level. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Trypanosoma brucei Co-opts NK Cells to Kill Splenic B2 B Cells.

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    Deborah Frenkel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available After infection with T. brucei AnTat 1.1, C57BL/6 mice lost splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed poor parasite-specific antibody responses, lost weight, became anemic and died with fulminating parasitemia within 35 days. In contrast, infected C57BL/6 mice lacking the cytotoxic granule pore-forming protein perforin (Prf1-/- retained splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed high-titer antibody responses against many trypanosome polypeptides, rapidly suppressed parasitemia and did not develop anemia or lose weight for at least 60 days. Several lines of evidence show that T. brucei infection-induced splenic B cell depletion results from natural killer (NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity: i B2 B cells were depleted from the spleens of infected intact, T cell deficient (TCR-/- and FcγRIIIa deficient (CD16-/- C57BL/6 mice excluding a requirement for T cells, NKT cell, or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity; ii administration of NK1.1 specific IgG2a (mAb PK136 but not irrelevant IgG2a (myeloma M9144 prevented infection-induced B cell depletion consistent with a requirement for NK cells; iii splenic NK cells but not T cells or NKT cells degranulated in infected C57BL/6 mice co-incident with B cell depletion evidenced by increased surface expression of CD107a; iv purified NK cells from naïve C57BL/6 mice killed purified splenic B cells from T. brucei infected but not uninfected mice in vitro indicating acquisition of an NK cell activating phenotype by the post-infection B cells; v adoptively transferred C57BL/6 NK cells prevented infection-induced B cell population growth in infected Prf1-/- mice consistent with in vivo B cell killing; vi degranulated NK cells in infected mice had altered gene and differentiation antigen expression and lost cytotoxic activity consistent with functional exhaustion, but increased in number as infection progressed indicating continued generation. We conclude that NK cells in T. brucei

  1. Role of Cytokines in Trypanosoma brucei -Induced Anaemia: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A number of studies have implicated inflammatory cytokines, but these data are limited and inconsistent. In this article, we reviewed the published literature on ... The mechanism of anaemia is multifactorial and therefore requires further, more elaborate research. Data from human subjects would also shed more light.

  2. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of oligopeptidase B from Trypanosoma brucei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rea, Dean; Hazell, Carole; Andrews, Norma W.; Morty, Rory E.; Fülöp, Vilmos

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant oligopeptidase B from T. brucei has been prepared and crystallized. Data were collected to 2.7 Å. Heavy-atom soaks and preparation of selenomethionine-substituted protein are in progress for structure determination by MAD or MIR. African sleeping sickness, also called trypanosomiasis, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Peptidases from Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent, include the serine peptidase oligopeptidase B, a documented virulence factor and therapeutic target. Determination of the three-dimensional structure of oligopeptidase B is desirable to facilitate the development of novel inhibitors. Oligopeptidase B was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as an N-terminally hexahistidine-tagged fusion protein, purified using metal-affinity chromatography and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique in 7%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 6000, 1 M LiCl, 0.1 M bis-tris propane pH 7.5. Diffraction data to 2.7 Å resolution were collected using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to space group P3 1 21 or P3 2 21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 124.5, c = 249.9 Å. A complete data set to 2.7 Å was collected using synchrotron radiation

  3. KREX2 is not essential for either procyclic or bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Carnes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most mitochondrial mRNAs in Trypanosoma brucei require RNA editing for maturation and translation. The edited RNAs primarily encode proteins of the oxidative phosphorylation system. These parasites undergo extensive changes in energy metabolism between the insect and bloodstream stages which are mirrored by alterations in RNA editing. Two U-specific exonucleases, KREX1 and KREX2, are both present in protein complexes (editosomes that catalyze RNA editing but the relative roles of each protein are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The requirement for KREX2 for RNA editing in vivo was assessed in both procyclic (insect and bloodstream form parasites by methods that use homologous recombination for gene elimination. These studies resulted in null mutant cells in which both alleles were eliminated. The viability of these cells demonstrates that KREX2 is not essential in either life cycle stage, despite certain defects in RNA editing in vivo. Furthermore, editosomes isolated from KREX2 null cells require KREX1 for in vitro U-specific exonuclease activity. CONCLUSIONS: KREX2 is a U-specific exonuclease that is dispensable for RNA editing in vivo in T. brucei BFs and PFs. This result suggests that the U deletion activity, which is required for RNA editing, is primarily mediated in vivo by KREX1 which is normally found associated with only one type of editosome. The retention of the KREX2 gene implies a non-essential role or a role that is essential in other life cycle stages or conditions.

  4. The Chemical Characterization of Nigerian Propolis samples and Their Activity Against Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ruwida; Igoli, John O; Zhang, Tong; Gray, Alexander I; Ebiloma, Godwin U; Clements, Carol J; Fearnley, James; Edrada Ebel, RuAngeli; Paget, Tim; de Koning, Harry P; Watson, David G

    2017-04-19

    Profiling of extracts from twelve propolis samples collected from eight regions in Nigeria was carried out using high performance liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with evaporative light scattering (ELSD), ultraviolet detection (UV) and mass spectrometry (MS), gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Principal component analysis (PCA) of the processed LC-MS data demonstrated the varying chemical composition of the samples. Most of the samples were active against Trypanosoma b. brucei with the highest activity being in the samples from Southern Nigeria. The more active samples were fractionated in order to isolate the component(s) responsible for their activity using medium pressure liquid chromatography (MPLC). Three xanthones, 1,3,7-trihydroxy-2,8-di-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)xanthone, 1,3,7-trihydroxy-4,8-di-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)xanthone a previously undescribed xanthone and three triterpenes: ambonic acid, mangiferonic acid and a mixture of α-amyrin with mangiferonic acid (1:3) were isolated and characterised by NMR and LC-MS. These compounds all displayed strong inhibitory activity against T.b. brucei but none of them had higher activity than the crude extracts. Partial least squares (PLS) modelling of the anti-trypanosomal activity of the sample extracts using the LC-MS data indicated that high activity in the extracts, as judged from LCMS 2 data, could be correlated to denticulatain isomers in the extracts.

  5. Secondary metabolites from Vietnamese marine invertebrates with activity against Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; No, Joo Hwan; Luyen, Bui Thi Thuy; Yang, Gyongseon; Byun, Soo Young; Goo, Junghyun; Kim, Kyung Tae; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Van Minh, Chau; Schmidt, Thomas J; Kang, Jong Seong; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-06-11

    Marine-derived natural products from invertebrates comprise an extremely diverse and promising source of the compounds from a wide variety of structural classes. This study describes the discovery of five marine natural products with activity against Trypanosoma species by natural product library screening using whole cell in vitro assays. We investigated the anti-trypanosomal activity of the extracts from the soft corals and echinoderms living in Vietnamese seas. Of the samples screened, the methanolic extracts of several marine organisms exhibited potent activities against cultures of Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi (EC50 activity against T. brucei with EC50 values ranging from 1.57 ± 0.14 to 14.6 ± 1.36 μM, relative to the positive control, pentamidine (EC50 = 0.015 ± 0.003 μM). Laevigatol B (1) and 5α-cholest-8(14)-ene-3β,7α-diol (5) exhibited also significant inhibitory effects on T. cruzi. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds on mammalian cells was also assessed and found to be insignificant in all cases. This is the first report on the inhibitory effects of marine organisms collected in Vietnamese seas against Trypanosoma species responsible for neglected tropical diseases.

  6. Investigating the Chaperone Properties of a Novel Heat Shock Protein, Hsp70.c, from Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adélle Burger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neglected tropical disease, African Trypanosomiasis, is fatal and has a crippling impact on economic development. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 is an important molecular chaperone that is expressed in response to stress and Hsp40 acts as its co-chaperone. These proteins play a wide range of roles in the cell and they are required to assist the parasite as it moves from a cold blooded insect vector to a warm blooded mammalian host. A novel cytosolic Hsp70, from Trypanosoma brucei, TbHsp70.c, contains an acidic substrate binding domain and lacks the C-terminal EEVD motif. The ability of a cytosolic Hsp40 from Trypanosoma brucei J protein 2, Tbj2, to function as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c was investigated. The main objective was to functionally characterize TbHsp70.c to further expand our knowledge of parasite biology. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 were heterologously expressed and purified and both proteins displayed the ability to suppress aggregation of thermolabile MDH and chemically denatured rhodanese. ATPase assays revealed a 2.8-fold stimulation of the ATPase activity of TbHsp70.c by Tbj2. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 both demonstrated chaperone activity and Tbj2 functions as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c. In vivo heat stress experiments indicated upregulation of the expression levels of TbHsp70.c.

  7. Studies on the localization of Trypanosoma brucei in the female reproductive tract of bka mice and hooded lister rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipepa, J.A.S.; Brown, H.; Holmes, P.

    1991-01-01

    A study was conducted to establish whether Trypanosoma brucei migrated preferentially to the reproductive tracts of female BKA mice, or Hooded Lister rats and lodged there as the site of choice compared to other organs. Blood flow to the reproductive tracts, the liver and spleen was measured using red blood cells labelled with chromium- 51. The distribution of trypanosomes labelled with 75 Se-methionine. The average percentage of the blood flow to the reproductive tract was 0.21Plus or minus0.08 in mice, while the mean concentration of trypanosomes there was 0.30% in both mice and rats. Blood flow to the liver was lower than the percentage distribution of Se-labelled T.Brucei(5.17Plus or minus1.34 versus 8.1Plus or Minus1.2). There were, on the contrary, less labelled trypanosomes as compared to the mean blood flow to the spleen (0.54% plus or minus0.18 versus 2.10%pPlus or minus0.88). After 24 hours there were adequate numbers of T. brucei in the reproductive tract to cause parasitaemia in recipient mice. From these preliminary data it was concluded that T. brucei did not lodge in the reproductive organ system a site of choice. (author). 9 refs., 3 tabs

  8. THE CYTOSOLIC AND GLYCOSOMAL GLYCERALDEHYDE-3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE FROM TRYPANOSOMA-BRUCEI - KINETIC-PROPERTIES AND COMPARISON WITH HOMOLOGOUS ENZYMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LAMBEIR, AM; LOISEAU, AM; KUNTZ, DA; VELLIEUX, FM; MICHELS, PAM; OPPERDOES, FR

    1991-01-01

    The protozoan haemoflagellate Trypanosoma brucei has two NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzymes, each with a different localization within the cell. One isoenzyme is found in the cytosol, as in other eukaryotes, while the other is found in the glycosome, a microbody-like

  9. Mitochondrial translation factors of Trypanosoma brucei: elongation factor-Tu has a unique subdomain that is essential for its function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cristodero, M.; Mani, J.; Oeljeklaus, S.; Aeberhard, L.; Hashimi, Hassan; Ramrath, D.J.F.; Lukeš, Julius; Warscheid, B.; Schneider, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 4 (2013), s. 744-755 ISSN 0950-382X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2261 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : mitochondrial translation * Trypanosoma brucei * EF-Tu Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.026, year: 2013

  10. A variant surface glycoprotein of Trypanosoma brucei is synthesized with a hydrophobic carboxy-terminal extension from purified glycoprotein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Boothroyd; G.A.M. Cross; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P. Borst (Piet)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractSequential expression of variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs) enables the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei to evade the immune response of its mammalian hosts. Studies of several VSGs, which have been isolated as soluble molecules following disruption of cells in the absence of

  11. The Importance of the 45 S Ribosomal Small Subunit-related Complex for Mitochondrial Translation in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ridlon, L.; Škodová, I.; Pan, S.; Lukeš, Julius; Maslov, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 288, č. 46 (2013), s. 32963-32978 ISSN 1083-351X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179; GA MŠk LH12104 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Leish * Mitochondria * Protein Synthesis * Ribonuclear Protein (RNP) * Trypanosoma brucei * Trypanosome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  12. Variations in maxi-circle and mini-circle sequences in kinetoplast DNAs from different Trypanosoma brucei strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Borst (Piet); F. Fase-Fowler; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A.C.C. Frasch

    1980-01-01

    textabstractWe have compared a total of 30 recognition sites for eight restriction endonucleases on the 20-kilobase-pair maxi-circle of kinetoplast DNAs from five different Trypanosoma brucei strains. In addition to three polymorphic sites were have found a 5 kilobase-pair region that is not cleaved

  13. Adaptations in the glucose metabolism of procyclic Trypanosoma brucei isolates from Tsetse flies and during differentiation of bloodstream forms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grinsven, K.W.A.; van den Abbeele, J.; van den Bossche, P.; van Hellemond, J.J.; Tielens, A.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Procyclic forms of Trypanosoma brucei isolated from the midguts of infected tsetse flies, or freshly transformed from a strain that is close to field isolates, do not use a complete Krebs cycle. Furthermore, short stumpy bloodstream forms produce acetate and are apparently metabolically preadapted

  14. Haematological indices in Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Federe isolate infected Nigerian donkeys (Equus asinus treated with homidium and isometamidium chloride of ciprofloxacin in broiler chickens after single intravenous and intraingluvial administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queen Nneka Oparah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of intramuscular administration of Homidium chloride (Novidium® and Isometamidium chloride (Sécuridium® in Nigerian donkeys (Equus asinus experimentally infected with T. b. brucei (Federe isolate was investigated. Changes in haematological and serum biochemical indices were evaluated using clinical haematology and biochemistry methods. Red blood cell (RBC count for the negative control group was significantly higher than for the positive control, Novidium® and Sécuridium®-treatment groups. Haemoglobin (Hb concentration significantly reduced in the infected untreated group compared with other groups. Packed cell volume (PCV was significantly different between negative and positive controls, and also between the infected untreated and treatment groups. There was significant reduction in platelet counts post-infection and post-treatment. Mean corpuscular volume (MCV increased significantly in the treatment groups while mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC significantly reduced only in the Sécuridium®-treatment group. Lymphocyte count for infected untreated was non-significantly higher than for the uninfected controls, but treatment with both trypanocides recorded further increases, which were higher compared with that of the uninfected group. Post infection and treatment, aspartate aminotransferase (AST levels increased significantly. There were non-significant differences in electrolyte ion concentrations across the groups except for chloride ion which recorded a significant reduction in the Novidium®-treatment group. This experiment revealed that Nigerian donkeys infected with T. brucei brucei (Federe isolate developed symptoms of trypanosomosis; anaemia, lymphocytosis and thrombocytopenia. Treatment with the trypanocides ameliorated effects of the infection, and results suggest that immunosuppression may not be a substantial clinical manifestation of T. brucei brucei (Federe isolate trypanosomosis in Nigerian

  15. Diverse effects on mitochondrial and nuclear functions elicited by drugs and genetic knockdowns in bloodstream stage Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Christal Worthen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The options for treating the fatal disease human African trypanosomiasis are limited to a few drugs that are toxic or facing increasing resistance. New drugs that kill the causative agents, subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei, are therefore urgently needed. Little is known about the cellular mechanisms that lead to death of the pathogenic bloodstream stage.We therefore conducted the first side by side comparison of the cellular effects of multiple death inducers that target different systems in bloodstream form parasites, including six drugs (pentamidine, prostaglandin D(2, quercetin, etoposide, camptothecin, and a tetrahydroquinoline and six RNAi knockdowns that target distinct cellular functions. All compounds tested were static at low concentrations and killed at high concentrations. Dead parasites were rapidly quantified by forward and side scatter during flow cytometry, as confirmed by ethidium homodimer and esterase staining, making these assays convenient for quantitating parasite death. The various treatments yielded different combinations of defects in mitochondrial potential, reactive oxygen species, cell cycle, and genome segregation. No evidence was seen for phosphatidylserine exposure, a marker of apoptosis. Reduction in ATP levels lagged behind decreases in live cell number. Even when the impact on growth was similar at 24 hours, drug-treated cells showed dramatic differences in their ability to further proliferate, demonstrating differences in the reversibility of effects induced by the diverse compounds.Parasites showed different phenotypes depending on the treatment, but none of them were clear predictors of whether apparently live cells could go on to proliferate after drugs were removed. We therefore suggest that clonal proliferation assays may be a useful step in selecting anti-trypanosomal compounds for further development. Elucidating the genetic or biochemical events initiated by the compounds with the most profound effects

  16. Functional and structural insights revealed by molecular dynamics simulations of an essential RNA editing ligase in Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Rommie E Amaro

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA editing ligase 1 (TbREL1 is required for the survival of both the insect and bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for the devastating tropical disease African sleeping sickness. The type of RNA editing that TbREL1 is involved in is unique to the trypanosomes, and no close human homolog is known to exist. In addition, the high-resolution crystal structure revealed several unique features of the active site, making this enzyme a promising target for structure-based drug design. In this work, two 20 ns atomistic molecular dynamics (MD simulations are employed to investigate the dynamics of TbREL1, both with and without the ATP substrate present. The flexibility of the active site, dynamics of conserved residues and crystallized water molecules, and the interactions between TbREL1 and the ATP substrate are investigated and discussed in the context of TbREL1's function. Differences in local and global motion upon ATP binding suggest that two peripheral loops, unique to the trypanosomes, may be involved in interdomain signaling events. Notably, a significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme's active site occurs during the apo simulations, opening an additional cavity adjacent to the ATP binding site that could be exploited in the development of effective inhibitors directed against this protozoan parasite. Finally, ensemble averaged electrostatics calculations over the MD simulations reveal a novel putative RNA binding site, a discovery that has previously eluded scientists. Ultimately, we use the insights gained through the MD simulations to make several predictions and recommendations, which we anticipate will help direct future experimental studies and structure-based drug discovery efforts against this vital enzyme.

  17. Interaction between the flagellar pocket collar and the hook complex via a novel microtubule-binding protein in Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Anna Albisetti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei belongs to a group of unicellular, flagellated parasites that are responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. An essential aspect of parasite pathogenicity is cytoskeleton remodelling, which occurs during the life cycle of the parasite and is accompanied by major changes in morphology and organelle positioning. The flagellum originates from the basal bodies and exits the cell body through the flagellar pocket (FP but remains attached to the cell body via the flagellum attachment zone (FAZ. The FP is an invagination of the pellicular membrane and is the sole site for endo- and exocytosis. The FAZ is a large complex of cytoskeletal proteins, plus an intracellular set of four specialised microtubules (MtQ that elongate from the basal bodies to the anterior end of the cell. At the distal end of the FP, an essential, intracellular, cytoskeletal structure called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC circumvents the flagellum. Overlapping the FPC is the hook complex (HC (a sub-structure of the previously named bilobe that is also essential and is thought to be involved in protein FP entry. BILBO1 is the only functionally characterised FPC protein and is necessary for FPC and FP biogenesis. Here, we used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to identify and characterize a new BILBO1 partner protein-FPC4. We demonstrate that FPC4 localises to the FPC, the HC, and possibly to a proximal portion of the MtQ. We found that the C-terminal domain of FPC4 interacts with the BILBO1 N-terminal domain, and we identified the key amino acids required for this interaction. Interestingly, the FPC4 N-terminal domain was found to bind microtubules. Over-expression studies highlight the role of FPC4 in its association with the FPC, HC and FPC segregation. Our data suggest a tripartite association between the FPC, the HC and the MtQ.

  18. Ethyl Pyruvate Emerges as a Safe and Fast Acting Agent against Trypanosoma brucei by Targeting Pyruvate Kinase Activity.

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    Netsanet Worku

    Full Text Available Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT also called sleeping sickness is an infectious disease in humans caused by an extracellular protozoan parasite. The disease, if left untreated, results in 100% mortality. Currently available drugs are full of severe drawbacks and fail to escape the fast development of trypanosoma resistance. Due to similarities in cell metabolism between cancerous tumors and trypanosoma cells, some of the current registered drugs against HAT have also been tested in cancer chemotherapy. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the simple ester, ethyl pyruvate, comprises such properties.The current study covers the efficacy and corresponding target evaluation of ethyl pyruvate on T. brucei cell lines using a combination of biochemical techniques including cell proliferation assays, enzyme kinetics, phasecontrast microscopic video imaging and ex vivo toxicity tests. We have shown that ethyl pyruvate effectively kills trypanosomes most probably by net ATP depletion through inhibition of pyruvate kinase (Ki = 3.0±0.29 mM. The potential of ethyl pyruvate as a trypanocidal compound is also strengthened by its fast acting property, killing cells within three hours post exposure. This has been demonstrated using video imaging of live cells as well as concentration and time dependency experiments. Most importantly, ethyl pyruvate produces minimal side effects in human red cells and is known to easily cross the blood-brain-barrier. This makes it a promising candidate for effective treatment of the two clinical stages of sleeping sickness. Trypanosome drug-resistance tests indicate irreversible cell death and a low incidence of resistance development under experimental conditions.Our results present ethyl pyruvate as a safe and fast acting trypanocidal compound and show that it inhibits the enzyme pyruvate kinase. Competitive inhibition of this enzyme was found to cause ATP depletion and cell death. Due to its ability to easily cross

  19. Mapping replication dynamics in Trypanosoma brucei reveals a link with telomere transcription and antigenic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Rebecca; Marques, Catarina A; Paape, Daniel; Prorocic, Marko; Zurita-Leal, Andrea C; Campbell, Samantha J; Lapsley, Craig; Dickens, Nicholas; McCulloch, Richard

    2016-05-26

    Survival of Trypanosoma brucei depends upon switches in its protective Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) coat by antigenic variation. VSG switching occurs by frequent homologous recombination, which is thought to require locus-specific initiation. Here, we show that a RecQ helicase, RECQ2, acts to repair DNA breaks, including in the telomeric site of VSG expression. Despite this, RECQ2 loss does not impair antigenic variation, but causes increased VSG switching by recombination, arguing against models for VSG switch initiation through direct generation of a DNA double strand break (DSB). Indeed, we show DSBs inefficiently direct recombination in the VSG expression site. By mapping genome replication dynamics, we reveal that the transcribed VSG expression site is the only telomeric site that is early replicating - a differential timing only seen in mammal-infective parasites. Specific association between VSG transcription and replication timing reveals a model for antigenic variation based on replication-derived DNA fragility.

  20. KREPA4, an RNA binding protein essential for editosome integrity and survival of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavati, Reza; Ernst, Nancy Lewis; O'Rear, Jeff; Gilliam, Troy; Tarun, Salvador; Stuart, Kenneth

    2006-05-01

    The 20S editosome, a multiprotein complex, catalyzes the editing of most mitochondrial mRNAs in trypanosomatids by uridylate insertion and deletion. RNAi mediated inactivation of expression of KREPA4 (previously TbMP24), a component of the 20S editosome, in procyclic form Trypanosoma brucei resulted in inhibition of cell growth, loss of RNA editing, and disappearance of 20S editosomes. Levels of MRP1 and REAP-1 proteins, which may have roles in editing but are not editosome components, were unaffected. Tagged KREPA4 protein is incorporated into 20S editosomes in vivo with no preference for either insertion or deletion subcomplexes. Consistent with its S1-like motif, recombinant KREPA4 protein binds synthetic gRNA with a preference for the 3' oligo (U) tail. These data suggest that KREPA4 is an RNA binding protein that may be specific for the gRNA Utail and also is important for 20S editosome stability.

  1. Secondary Metabolites from Vietnamese Marine Invertebrates with Activity against Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi

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    Nguyen Phuong Thao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine-derived natural products from invertebrates comprise an extremely diverse and promising source of the compounds from a wide variety of structural classes. This study describes the discovery of five marine natural products with activity against Trypanosoma species by natural product library screening using whole cell in vitro assays. We investigated the anti-trypanosomal activity of the extracts from the soft corals and echinoderms living in Vietnamese seas. Of the samples screened, the methanolic extracts of several marine organisms exhibited potent activities against cultures of Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi (EC50 < 5.0 μg/mL. Among the compounds isolated from these extracts, laevigatol B (1 from Lobophytum crassum and L. laevigatum, (24S-ergost-4-ene-3-one (2 from Sinularia dissecta, astropectenol A (3 from Astropecten polyacanthus, and cholest-8-ene-3β,5α,6β,7α-tetraol (4 from Diadema savignyi showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei with EC50 values ranging from 1.57 ± 0.14 to 14.6 ± 1.36 μM, relative to the positive control, pentamidine (EC50 = 0.015 ± 0.003 μM. Laevigatol B (1 and 5α-cholest-8(14-ene-3β,7α-diol (5 exhibited also significant inhibitory effects on T. cruzi. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds on mammalian cells was also assessed and found to be insignificant in all cases. This is the first report on the inhibitory effects of marine organisms collected in Vietnamese seas against Trypanosoma species responsible for neglected tropical diseases.

  2. Processing of the glycosomal matrix-protein import receptor PEX5 of Trypanosoma brucei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualdrón-López, Melisa; Michels, Paul A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Most eukaryotic cells have a single gene for the peroxin PEX5. ► PEX5 is sensitive to in vitro proteolysis in distantly related organisms. ► TbPEX5 undergoes N-terminal truncation in vitro and possibly in vivo. ► Truncated TbPEX5 is still capable of binding PTS1-containing proteins. ► PEX5 truncation is physiologically relevant or an evolutionary conserved artifact. -- Abstract: Glycolysis in kinetoplastid protists such as Trypanosoma brucei is compartmentalized in peroxisome-like organelles called glycosomes. Glycosomal matrix-protein import involves a cytosolic receptor, PEX5, which recognizes the peroxisomal-targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) present at the C-terminus of the majority of matrix proteins. PEX5 appears generally susceptible to in vitro proteolytic processing. On western blots of T. brucei, two PEX5 forms are detected with apparent M r of 100 kDa and 72 kDa. 5′-RACE-PCR showed that TbPEX5 is encoded by a unique transcript that can be translated into a protein of maximally 72 kDa. However, recombinant PEX5 migrates aberrantly in SDS–PAGE with an apparent M r of 100 kDa, similarly as observed for the native peroxin. In vitro protease susceptibility analysis of native and 35 S-labelled PEX5 showed truncation of the 100 kDa form at the N-terminal side by unknown parasite proteases, giving rise to the 72 kDa form which remains functional for PTS1 binding. The relevance of these observations is discussed

  3. No gold standard estimation of the sensitivity and specificity of two molecular diagnostic protocols for Trypanosoma brucei spp. in Western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barend Mark de Clare Bronsvoort

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available African animal trypanosomiasis is caused by a range of tsetse transmitted protozoan parasites includingTrypanosoma vivax, Trypanosoma congolense and Trypansoma brucei. In Western Kenya and other parts of East Africa two subspecies of T. brucei, T.b. brucei and the zoonoticT.b. rhodesiense, co-circulate in livestock. A range of polymerase chain reactions (PCR have been developed as important molecular diagnostic tools for epidemiological investigations of T. brucei s.l. in the animal reservoir and of its zoonotic potential. Quantification of the relative performance of different diagnostic PCRs is essential to ensure comparability of studies. This paper describes an evaluation of two diagnostic test systems for T. brucei using a T. brucei s.l. specific PCR [1] and a single nested PCR targeting the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS regions of trypanosome ribosomal DNA [2]. A Bayesian formulation of the Hui-Walter latent class model was employed to estimate their test performance in the absence of a gold standard test for detecting T.brucei s.l. infections in ear-vein blood samples from cattle, pig, sheep and goat populations in Western Kenya, stored on Whatman FTA cards. The results indicate that the system employing the T. brucei s.l. specific PCR (Se1=0.760 had a higher sensitivity than the ITS-PCR (Se2=0.640; both have high specificity (Sp1=0.998; Sp2=0.997. The true prevalences for livestock populations were estimated (pcattle=0.091, ppigs=0.066, pgoats=0.005, psheep=0.006, taking into account the uncertainties in the specificity and sensitivity of the two test systems. Implications of test performance include the required survey sample size; due to its higher sensitivity and specificity, the T. brucei s.l. specific PCR requires a consistently smaller sample size than the ITS-PCR for the detection of T. brucei s.l. However the ITS-PCR is able to simultaneously screen samples for other pathogenic trypanosomes and may thus be, overall, a better

  4. Inhibitors of the mitochondrial cytochrome b-c1 complex inhibit the cyanide-insensitive respiration of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrens, J F; Bickar, D; Lehninger, A L

    1986-06-01

    The cyanide-insensitive respiration of bloodstream trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma brucei (75 +/- 8 nmol O2 min-1(mg protein)-1) is completely inhibited by the mitochondrial ubiquinone-like inhibitors 2-hydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (UHNQ) and 5-n-undecyl-6-hydroxy-4,7-dioxobenzothiazole (UHDBT). The Ki values for UHDBT (30 nM) and UHNQ (2 microM) are much lower than the reported Ki for salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) (5 microM), a widely used inhibitor of the cyanide-insensitive oxidase. UHNQ also stimulated the glycerol-3-phosphate-dependent reduction of phenazine methosulfate, demonstrating that the site of UHNQ inhibition is on the terminal oxidase of the cyanide-insensitive respiration of T. brucei. These results suggest that a ubiquinone-like compound may act as an electron carrier between the two enzymatic components of the cyanide-insensitive glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase.

  5. Trypanosoma brucei 29-13 strain is inducible in but not permissive for the tsetse fly vector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herder, S.; Votýpka, Jan; Jirků, Milan; Rádrová, J.; Janzen, C. J.; Lukeš, Julius

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 1 (2007), s. 111-114 ISSN 0014-4894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009; GA MŠk 2B06129 Grant - others:MŠk(CZ) Barrande 2-06-28 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei * tsetse * Glossina * GFP * Transmission * midgut infection * tetracycline Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.597, year: 2007

  6. Dynamics of Mitochondrial RNA-Binding Protein Complex in Trypanosoma brucei and Its Petite Mutant under Optimized Immobilization Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huang, Zhenqiu; Kaltenbrunner, S.; Šimková, Eva; Staněk, David; Lukeš, Julius; Hashimi, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 9 (2014), s. 1232-1240 ISSN 1535-9778 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2261; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : mitochondrion * Trypanosoma brucei * YFP Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UMG-J) Impact factor: 2.820, year: 2014

  7. The F1 -ATPase from Trypanosoma brucei is elaborated by three copies of an additional p18-subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahura, Ondřej; Šubrtová, Karolína; Váchová, Hana; Panicucci, Brian; Fearnley, Ian M; Harbour, Michael E; Walker, John E; Zíková, Alena

    2018-02-01

    The F-ATPases (also called the F 1 F o -ATPases or ATP synthases) are multi-subunit membrane-bound molecular machines that produce ATP in bacteria and in eukaryotic mitochondria and chloroplasts. The structures and enzymic mechanisms of their F 1 -catalytic domains are highly conserved in all species investigated hitherto. However, there is evidence that the F-ATPases from the group of protozoa known as Euglenozoa have novel features. Therefore, we have isolated pure and active F 1 -ATPase from the euglenozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, and characterized it. All of the usual eukaryotic subunits (α, β, γ, δ, and ε) were present in the enzyme, and, in addition, two unique features were detected. First, each of the three α-subunits in the F 1 -domain has been cleaved by proteolysis in vivo at two sites eight residues apart, producing two assembled fragments. Second, the T. brucei F 1 -ATPase has an additional subunit, called p18, present in three copies per complex. Suppression of expression of p18 affected in vitro growth of both the insect and infectious mammalian forms of T. brucei. It also reduced the levels of monomeric and multimeric F-ATPase complexes and diminished the in vivo hydrolytic activity of the enzyme significantly. These observations imply that p18 plays a role in the assembly of the F 1 domain. These unique features of the F 1 -ATPase extend the list of special characteristics of the F-ATPase from T. brucei, and also, demonstrate that the architecture of the F 1 -ATPase complex is not strictly conserved in eukaryotes. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Human African trypanosomiasis in non-endemic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarshi, Darshan; Brown, Mike

    2015-02-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) or sleeping sickness is a parasitic disease, acquired by the bite of an infected tsetse fly. In non-endemic countries HAT is rare, and therefore the diagnosis may be delayed leading to potentially fatal consequences. In this article the clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of the two forms of HAT are outlined. Rhodesiense HAT is an acute illness that presents in tourists who have recently visited game parks in Eastern or Southern Africa, whereas Gambiense HAT has a more chronic clinical course, in individuals from West or Central Africa. © 2015 Royal College of Physicians.

  9. The role of domestic animals in the epidemiology of human African trypanosomiasis in Ngorongoro conservation area, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Juan P; Nyingilili, Hamisi S; Mbata, Geofrey H; Malele, Imna I

    2015-10-06

    Trypanosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by the trypanosome parasite and transmitted by the tsetse fly vector. In Sub-saharan Africa, both the human and animal variants of the disease are a great obstacle towards agriculture, development, and health. In order to better understand and therefore combat Trypanosomiasis, characterizing disease hotspots across species is critical. In this study, 193 samples from cattle, sheep, and goats were collected from eight sites. Samples were taken from animals belonging mostly to Maasai herdsmen in the Ngorongoro Crater Conservation Area (NCA) and analysed for the presence of trypanosomiasis infection using PCR techniques. Those that tested positive for T. brucei parasite were further tested using SRA LAMP technique to check for T. brucei rhodesiense, the human infective subspecies of parasite. Our study found a high incidence of Trypanosoma brucei infections across species. Of animals tested, 47 % of cattle, 91.7 % of sheep, and 60.8 % of goats were infected. Most of the infections were of the T. brucei species. We also identified sheep and goats as carriers of the T. brucei rhodesiense subspecies, which causes acute human trypanosomiasis. Together, these results point toward the need for stricter control strategies in the area to prevent disease outbreak.

  10. Crassiflorone derivatives that inhibit Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TbGAPDH) and Trypanosoma cruzi trypanothione reductase (TcTR) and display trypanocidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uliassi, Elisa; Fiorani, Giulia; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Bergamini, Christian; Fato, Romana; Bianchini, Giulia; Carlos Menéndez, J; Molina, Maria Teresa; López-Montero, Eulogio; Falchi, Federico; Cavalli, Andrea; Gul, Sheraz; Kuzikov, Maria; Ellinger, Bernhard; Witt, Gesa; Moraes, Carolina B; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H; Borsari, Chiara; Costi, Maria Paola; Bolognesi, Maria Laura

    2017-12-01

    Crassiflorone is a natural product with anti-mycobacterial and anti-gonorrhoeal properties, isolated from the stem bark of the African ebony tree Diospyros crassiflora. We noticed that its pentacyclic core possesses structural resemblance to the quinone-coumarin hybrid 3, which we reported to exhibit a dual-targeted inhibitory profile towards Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TbGAPDH) and Trypanosoma cruzi trypanothione reductase (TcTR). Following this basic idea, we synthesized a small library of crassiflorone derivatives 15-23 and investigated their potential as anti-trypanosomatid agents. 19 is the only compound of the series showing a balanced dual profile at 10 μM (% inhibition TbGAPDH  = 64% and % inhibition TcTR  = 65%). In phenotypic assay, the most active compounds were 18 and 21, which at 5 μM inhibited Tb bloodstream-form growth by 29% and 38%, respectively. Notably, all the newly synthesized compounds at 10 μM did not affect viability and the status of mitochondria in human A549 and 786-O cell lines, respectively. However, further optimization that addresses metabolic liabilities including solubility, as well as cytochromes P450 (CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2D6) inhibition, is required before this class of natural product-derived compounds can be further progressed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural characterization reveals a novel bilobed architecture for the ectodomains of insect stage expressed Trypanosoma brucei PSSA-2 and Trypanosoma congolense ISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Raghavendran; Goomeshi Nobary, Sarah; Eyford, Brett A; Pearson, Terry W; Boulanger, Martin J

    2016-12-01

    African trypanosomiasis, caused by parasites of the genus Trypanosoma, is a complex of devastating vector-borne diseases of humans and livestock in sub-Saharan Africa. Central to the pathogenesis of African trypanosomes is their transmission by the arthropod vector, Glossina spp. (tsetse fly). Intriguingly, the efficiency of parasite transmission through the vector is reduced following depletion of Trypanosoma brucei Procyclic-Specific Surface Antigen-2 (TbPSSA-2). To investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of TbPSSA-2, we determined the crystal structures of its ectodomain and that of its homolog T. congolense Insect Stage Antigen (TcISA) to resolutions of 1.65 Å and 2.45 Å, respectively using single wavelength anomalous dispersion. Both proteins adopt a novel bilobed architecture with the individual lobes displaying rotational flexibility around the central tether that suggest a potential mechanism for coordinating a binding partner. In support of this hypothesis, electron density consistent with a bound peptide was observed in the inter-lob cleft of a TcISA monomer. These first reported structures of insect stage transmembrane proteins expressed by African trypanosomes provide potentially valuable insight into the interface between parasite and tsetse vector. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  12. Identification of a bacterial-like HslVU protease in the mitochondria of Trypanosoma brucei and its role in mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyin Li

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent protease complexes are present in all living organisms, including the 26S proteasome in eukaryotes, Archaea, and Actinomycetales, and the HslVU protease in eubacteria. The structure of HslVU protease resembles that of the 26S proteasome, and the simultaneous presence of both proteases in one organism was deemed unlikely. However, HslVU homologs have been identified recently in some primordial eukaryotes, though their potential function remains elusive. We characterized the HslVU homolog from Trypanosoma brucei, a eukaryotic protozoan parasite and the causative agent of human sleeping sickness. TbHslVU has ATP-dependent peptidase activity and, like its bacterial counterpart, has essential lysine and N-terminal threonines in the catalytic subunit. By epitope tagging, TbHslVU localizes to mitochondria and is associated with the mitochondrial genome, kinetoplast DNA (kDNA. RNAi of TbHslVU dramatically affects the kDNA by causing over-replication of the minicircle DNA. This leads to defects in kDNA segregation and, subsequently, to continuous network growth to an enormous size. Multiple discrete foci of nicked/gapped minicircles are formed on the periphery of kDNA disc, suggesting a failure in repairing the gaps in the minicircles for kDNA segregation. TbHslVU is a eubacterial protease identified in the mitochondria of a eukaryote. It has a novel function in regulating mitochondrial DNA replication that has never been observed in other organisms.

  13. Both human ferredoxins equally efficiently rescue ferredoxin deficiency in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Changmai, Piya; Horáková, Eva; Long, Shaojun; Černotíková, Eva; McDonald, Lindsay M.; Bontempi, Esteban J.; Lukeš, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 1 (2013), s. 135-151 ISSN 0950-382X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179; GA MŠk LH12104 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : IRON-SULFUR CLUSTERS * CYTOCHROME-C-OXIDASE * BLOOD-STREAM FORM Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.026, year: 2013

  14. The molecular basis of livestock disease as illustrated by African trypanosomiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donelson, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    African trypanosomes are protozoan parasites, most species of which are transmitted by tsetse flies. They reside in the mammalian bloodstream and evade the immune system by periodically switching the major protein on their surface - a phenomenon called antigenic variation, mediated by gene rearrangements in the trypanosome genome. The trypanosomes eventually enter the central nervous system and cause a fatal disease, commonly called ngana in domestic cattle and sleeping sickness in humans. Two sub-species of Trypanosoma brucei infect humans (T. b. rhodesiense and T. b. gambiense) and one sub-species does not survive in humans (T. b. brucei) because it is lysed by the human-specific serum protein, apolipoprotein L-I. Wild animals in Africa have other (less well understood) molecular mechanisms of suppressing the number of African trypanosomes in the blood, and some indigenous breeds of African cattle also display a partial 'trypanotolerance' whose genetic loci have recently been mapped. (author)

  15. Determinants of Human African Trypanosomiasis Elimination via Paratransgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jennifer A; Medlock, Jan; Townsend, Jeffrey P; Aksoy, Serap; Ndeffo Mbah, Martial; Galvani, Alison P

    2016-03-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), transmitted by tsetse flies, has historically infected hundreds of thousands of individuals annually in sub-Saharan Africa. Over the last decade, concerted control efforts have reduced reported cases to below 10,000 annually, bringing complete elimination within reach. A potential technology to eliminate HAT involves rendering the flies resistant to trypanosome infection. This approach can be achieved through the introduction of transgenic Sodalis symbiotic bacteria that have been modified to produce a trypanocide, and propagated via Wolbachia symbionts, which confer a reproductive advantage to the paratransgenic tsetse. However, the population dynamics of these symbionts within tsetse flies have not yet been evaluated. Specifically, the key factors that determine the effectiveness of paratransgenesis have yet to be quantified. To identify the impact of these determinants on T.b. gambiense and T.b. rhodesiense transmission, we developed a mathematical model of trypanosome transmission that incorporates tsetse and symbiont population dynamics. We found that fecundity and mortality penalties associated with Wolbachia or recombinant Sodalis colonization, probabilities of vertical transmission, and tsetse migration rates are fundamental to the feasibility of HAT elimination. For example, we determined that HAT elimination could be sustained over 25 years when Wolbachia colonization minimally impacted fecundity or mortality, and when the probability of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission exceeded 99.9%. We also found that for a narrow range of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission probability (99.9-90.6% for T.b. gambiense and 99.9-85.8% for T.b. rhodesiense), cumulative HAT incidence was reduced between 30% and 1% for T.b. gambiense and between 21% and 3% for T.b. rhodesiense, although elimination was not predicted. Our findings indicate that fitness and mortality penalties associated with paratransgenic symbionts, as well

  16. Determinants of Human African Trypanosomiasis Elimination via Paratransgenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Gilbert

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, transmitted by tsetse flies, has historically infected hundreds of thousands of individuals annually in sub-Saharan Africa. Over the last decade, concerted control efforts have reduced reported cases to below 10,000 annually, bringing complete elimination within reach. A potential technology to eliminate HAT involves rendering the flies resistant to trypanosome infection. This approach can be achieved through the introduction of transgenic Sodalis symbiotic bacteria that have been modified to produce a trypanocide, and propagated via Wolbachia symbionts, which confer a reproductive advantage to the paratransgenic tsetse. However, the population dynamics of these symbionts within tsetse flies have not yet been evaluated. Specifically, the key factors that determine the effectiveness of paratransgenesis have yet to be quantified. To identify the impact of these determinants on T.b. gambiense and T.b. rhodesiense transmission, we developed a mathematical model of trypanosome transmission that incorporates tsetse and symbiont population dynamics. We found that fecundity and mortality penalties associated with Wolbachia or recombinant Sodalis colonization, probabilities of vertical transmission, and tsetse migration rates are fundamental to the feasibility of HAT elimination. For example, we determined that HAT elimination could be sustained over 25 years when Wolbachia colonization minimally impacted fecundity or mortality, and when the probability of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission exceeded 99.9%. We also found that for a narrow range of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission probability (99.9-90.6% for T.b. gambiense and 99.9-85.8% for T.b. rhodesiense, cumulative HAT incidence was reduced between 30% and 1% for T.b. gambiense and between 21% and 3% for T.b. rhodesiense, although elimination was not predicted. Our findings indicate that fitness and mortality penalties associated with paratransgenic

  17. Flux Analysis of the Trypanosoma brucei Glycolysis Based on a Multiobjective-Criteria Bioinformatic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Ghozlane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite of major of interest in discovering new genes for drug targets. This parasite alternates its life cycle between the mammal host(s (bloodstream form and the insect vector (procyclic form, with two divergent glucose metabolism amenable to in vitro culture. While the metabolic network of the bloodstream forms has been well characterized, the flux distribution between the different branches of the glucose metabolic network in the procyclic form has not been addressed so far. We present a computational analysis (called Metaboflux that exploits the metabolic topology of the procyclic form, and allows the incorporation of multipurpose experimental data to increase the biological relevance of the model. The alternatives resulting from the structural complexity of networks are formulated as an optimization problem solved by a metaheuristic where experimental data are modeled in a multiobjective function. Our results show that the current metabolic model is in agreement with experimental data and confirms the observed high metabolic flexibility of glucose metabolism. In addition, Metaboflux offers a rational explanation for the high flexibility in the ratio between final products from glucose metabolism, thsat is, flux redistribution through the malic enzyme steps.

  18. Polysomes of Trypanosoma brucei: Association with Initiation Factors and RNA-Binding Proteins.

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    Cornelia Klein

    Full Text Available We report here the results of experiments designed to identify RNA-binding proteins that might be associated with Trypanosoma brucei polysomes. After some preliminary mass spectrometry of polysomal fractions, we investigated the distributions of selected tagged proteins using sucrose gradients and immunofluorescence. As expected, the polysomal fractions contained nearly all annotated ribosomal proteins, the translation-associated protein folding complex, and many translation factors, but also many other abundant proteins. Results suggested that cap-binding proteins EIF4E3 and EIF4E4 were associated with both free and membrane-bound polysomes. The EIF4E binding partners EIF4G4 and EIF4G3 were present but the other EIF4E and EIF4G paralogues were not detected. The dominant EIF4E in the polysomal fraction is EIF4E4 and very few polysomal mRNAs are associated with EIF4G. Thirteen potential mRNA-binding proteins were detected in the polysomes, including the known polysome-associated protein RBP42. The locations of two of the other proteins were tested after epitope tagging: RBP29 was in the nucleus and ZC3H29 was in the cytoplasm. Quantitative analyses showed that specific association of an RNA-binding protein with the polysome fraction in sucrose gradients will not be detected if the protein is in more than 25-fold molar excess over its target binding sites.

  19. The small chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei involved in antigenic variation are constructed around repetitive palindromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickstead, Bill; Ersfeld, Klaus; Gull, Keith

    2004-06-01

    Most eukaryotic genomes contain large regions of satellite DNA. These arrays are often associated with essential chromosomal functions, but remain largely absent from genome projects because of difficulties in cloning and sequence assembly. The numerous small chromosomes of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei fall into this category, yet are critical to understanding the genome because of their role in antigenic variation. Their relatively small size, however, makes them particularly amenable to physical mapping. We have produced fine-resolution maps of 17 complete minichromosomes and partial maps of two larger intermediate-sized chromosomes. This revealed a canonical structure shared by both chromosomal classes based around a large central core of 177-bp repeats. Around the core are variable-length genic regions, the lengths of which define chromosomal class. We show the core region to be a repetitive palindrome with a single inversion point common to all the chromosomes of both classes, suggesting a mechanism of genesis for these chromosomes. Moreover, palindromy appears to be a feature of (peri)centromeres in other species that can be easily overlooked. We propose that sequence inversion is one of the higher-order sequence motifs that confer chromosomal stability. Copyright 2004 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press

  20. Antiparasitic compounds from Cupania cinerea with activities against Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachet, M Salomé; Kunert, Olaf; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; Zehl, Martin; Keller, Walter; Muñoz, Ricardo A; Bauer, Rudolf; Schuehly, Wolfgang

    2011-04-25

    In a survey of plants from Ecuador with antiprotozoal activity, Cupania cinerea was found to show significant in vitro activity against the Plasmodium falciparum K1 strain and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. Subsequently, activity-guided isolation of the n-hexane and dichloromethane extracts from the bark of C. cinerea afforded two diterpene glycosides (1 and 2), named cupacinoside and 6'-de-O-acetylcupacinoside, and a lactonized triterpene bearing an oxepin moiety named cupacinoxepin (3), together with the known compounds scopoletin (4), caryophyllene oxide (5), two bisabolane sesquiterpenes (6 and 7), lichexanthone (8), gustastatin (9), lupenone (10), betulone (11), 17β,21β-epoxyhopan-3-one (12), taraxerol (13), and taraxerone (14). For compound 3, X-ray crystallography was employed to elucidate the relative configuration. For cupacinosides (1) and (2) and cupacinoxepin (3), in vitro activities against the P. falciparum K1 strain (IC(50)1, 1.3; 2, 1.8; and 3, 8.7 μM) and T. b. rhodesiense (IC(50)1, 4.5; 2, 15.8; and 3, 71.6 μM) were found. Cytotoxicity toward L-6 cells is discussed for all the compounds isolated.

  1. Molecular model of the mitochondrial genome segregation machinery inTrypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Anneliese; Käser, Sandro; Jakob, Martin; Amodeo, Simona; Peitsch, Camille; Týč, Jiří; Vaughan, Sue; Zuber, Benoît; Schneider, André; Ochsenreiter, Torsten

    2018-02-20

    In almost all eukaryotes, mitochondria maintain their own genome. Despite the discovery more than 50 y ago, still very little is known about how the genome is correctly segregated during cell division. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei contains a single mitochondrion with a singular genome, the kinetoplast DNA (kDNA). Electron microscopy studies revealed the tripartite attachment complex (TAC) to physically connect the kDNA to the basal body of the flagellum and to ensure correct segregation of the mitochondrial genome via the basal bodies movement, during the cell cycle. Using superresolution microscopy, we precisely localize each of the currently known TAC components. We demonstrate that the TAC is assembled in a hierarchical order from the base of the flagellum toward the mitochondrial genome and that the assembly is not dependent on the kDNA itself. Based on the biochemical analysis, the TAC consists of several nonoverlapping subcomplexes, suggesting an overall size of the TAC exceeding 2.8 mDa. We furthermore demonstrate that the TAC is required for correct mitochondrial organelle positioning but not for organelle biogenesis or segregation. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  2. Differential Editosome Protein Function between Life Cycle Stages of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Suzanne M; Guo, Xuemin; Carnes, Jason; Stuart, Kenneth

    2015-10-09

    Uridine insertion and deletion RNA editing generates functional mitochondrial mRNAs in Trypanosoma brucei. The mRNAs are differentially edited in bloodstream form (BF) and procyclic form (PF) life cycle stages, and this correlates with the differential utilization of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation between the stages. The mechanism that controls this differential editing is unknown. Editing is catalyzed by multiprotein ∼20S editosomes that contain endonuclease, 3'-terminal uridylyltransferase, exonuclease, and ligase activities. These editosomes also contain KREPB5 and KREPA3 proteins, which have no functional catalytic motifs, but they are essential for parasite viability, editing, and editosome integrity in BF cells. We show here that repression of KREPB5 or KREPA3 is also lethal in PF, but the effects on editosome structure differ from those in BF. In addition, we found that point mutations in KREPB5 or KREPA3 differentially affect cell growth, editosome integrity, and RNA editing between BF and PF stages. These results indicate that the functions of KREPB5 and KREPA3 editosome proteins are adjusted between the life cycle stages. This implies that these proteins are involved in the processes that control differential editing and that the 20S editosomes differ between the life cycle stages. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Overview of the Diagnostic Methods Used in the Field for Human African Trypanosomiasis: What Could Change in the Next Years?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Bonnet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleeping sickness is a parasitic infection caused by two species of trypanosomes (Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and rhodesiense, transmitted by the tsetse fly. The disease eventually affects the central nervous system, resulting in severe neurological symptoms. Without treatment, death is inevitable. During the first stage of the disease, infected patients are mildly symptomatic and early detection of infection allows safer treatment (administered on an outpatient basis which can avoid death; routine screening of the exposed population is necessary, especially in areas of high endemicity. The current therapeutic treatment of this disease, especially in stage 2, can cause complications and requires a clinical surveillance for several days. A good stage diagnosis of the disease is the cornerstone for delivering the adequate treatment. The task faced by the medical personnel is further complicated by the lack of support from local health infrastructure, which is at best weak, but often nonexistent. Therefore it is crucial to look for new more efficient technics for the diagnosis of stage which are also best suited to use in the field, in areas not possessing high-level health facilities. This review, after an overview of the disease, summarizes the current diagnosis procedures and presents the advances in the field.

  4. New functions for parts of the Krebs cycle in procyclic Trypanosoma brucei, a cycle not operating as a cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weelden, Susanne W H; van Hellemond, Jaap J; Opperdoes, Fred R; Tielens, Aloysius G M

    2005-04-01

    We investigated whether substrate availability influences the type of energy metabolism in procyclic Trypanosoma brucei. We show that absence of glycolytic substrates (glucose and glycerol) does not induce a shift from a fermentative metabolism to complete oxidation of substrates. We also show that glucose (and even glycolysis) is not essential for normal functioning and proliferation of pleomorphic procyclic T. brucei cells. Furthermore, absence of glucose did not result in increased degradation of amino acids. Variations in availability of glucose and glycerol did result, however, in adaptations in metabolism in such a way that the glycosome was always in redox balance. We argue that it is likely that, in procyclic cells, phosphoglycerate kinase is located not only in the cytosol, but also inside glycosomes, as otherwise an ATP deficit would occur in this organelle. We demonstrate that procyclic T. brucei uses parts of the Krebs cycle for purposes other than complete degradation of mitochondrial substrates. We suggest that citrate synthase plus pyruvate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase are used to transport acetyl-CoA units from the mitochondrion to the cytosol for the biosynthesis of fatty acids, a process we show to occur in proliferating procyclic cells. The part of the Krebs cycle consisting of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA synthetase was used for the degradation of proline and glutamate to succinate. We also demonstrate that the subsequent enzymes of the Krebs cycle, succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase, are most likely used for conversion of succinate into malate, which can then be used in gluconeogenesis.

  5. Trypanosoma brucei TbIF1 inhibits the essential F1-ATPase in the infectious form of the parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Panicucci

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial (mt FoF1-ATP synthase of the digenetic parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, generates ATP during the insect procyclic form (PF, but becomes a perpetual consumer of ATP in the mammalian bloodstream form (BF, which lacks a canonical respiratory chain. This unconventional dependence on FoF1-ATPase is required to maintain the essential mt membrane potential (Δψm. Normally, ATP hydrolysis by this rotary molecular motor is restricted to when eukaryotic cells experience sporadic hypoxic conditions, during which this compulsory function quickly depletes the cellular ATP pool. To protect against this cellular treason, the highly conserved inhibitory factor 1 (IF1 binds the enzyme in a manner that solely inhibits the hydrolytic activity. Intriguingly, we were able to identify the IF1 homolog in T. brucei (TbIF1, but determined that its expression in the mitochondrion is tightly regulated throughout the life cycle as it is only detected in PF cells. TbIF1 appears to primarily function as an emergency brake in PF cells, where it prevented the restoration of the Δψm by FoF1-ATPase when respiration was chemically inhibited. In vitro, TbIF1 overexpression specifically inhibits the hydrolytic activity but not the synthetic capability of the FoF1-ATP synthase in PF mitochondria. Furthermore, low μM amounts of recombinant TbIF1 achieve the same inhibition of total mt ATPase activity as the FoF1-ATPase specific inhibitors, azide and oligomycin. Therefore, even minimal ectopic expression of TbIF1 in BF cells proved lethal as the indispensable Δψm collapsed due to inhibited FoF1-ATPase. In summary, we provide evidence that T. brucei harbors a natural and potent unidirectional inhibitor of the vital FoF1-ATPase activity that can be exploited for future structure-based drug design.

  6. Tsetse Flies (Glossina as Vectors of Human African Trypanosomiasis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Njeri Wamwiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT transmitted by the tsetse fly continues to be a public health issue, despite more than a century of research. There are two types of the disease, the chronic gambiense and the acute rhodesiense-HAT. Fly abundance and distribution have been affected by changes in land-use patterns and climate. However, disease transmission still continues. Here, we review some aspects of HAT ecoepidemiology in the context of altered infestation patterns and maintenance of the transmission cycle as well as emerging options in disease and vector control.

  7. Tsetse Flies (Glossina) as Vectors of Human African Trypanosomiasis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamwiri, Florence Njeri; Changasi, Robert Emojong

    2016-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) transmitted by the tsetse fly continues to be a public health issue, despite more than a century of research. There are two types of the disease, the chronic gambiense and the acute rhodesiense-HAT. Fly abundance and distribution have been affected by changes in land-use patterns and climate. However, disease transmission still continues. Here, we review some aspects of HAT ecoepidemiology in the context of altered infestation patterns and maintenance of the transmission cycle as well as emerging options in disease and vector control.

  8. Use of Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism of 18S rRNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) pattern of PCR products obtained was the same for T. brucei subspecies: T.b. brucei and T.b. gambiense but different for other trypanosome species and L. donovani. RFLP analysis was also done with genomic DNA from different trypanosome species, subspecies and ...

  9. A monoclonal antibody marker for the exclusion-zone filaments of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhivers, Mélanie; Landrein, Nicolas; Decossas, Marion; Robinson, Derrick R

    2008-07-10

    Trypanosoma brucei is a haemoflagellate pathogen of man, wild animals and domesticated livestock in central and southern Africa. In all life cycle stages this parasite has a single mitochondrion that contains a uniquely organised genome that is condensed into a flat disk-like structure called the kinetoplast. The kinetoplast is essential for insect form procyclic cells and therefore is a potential drug target. The kinetoplast is unique in nature because it consists of novel structural proteins and thousands of circular, interlocking, DNA molecules (kDNA). Secondly, kDNA replication is critically timed to coincide with nuclear S phase and new flagellum biogenesis. Thirdly, the kinetoplast is physically attached to the flagellum basal bodies via a structure called the tripartite attachment complex (TAC). The TAC consists of unilateral filaments (within the mitochondrion matrix), differentiated mitochondrial membranes and exclusion-zone filaments that extend from the distal end of the basal bodies. To date only one protein, p166, has been identified to be a component of the TAC. In the work presented here we provide data based on a novel EM technique developed to label and characterise cytoskeleton structures in permeabilised cells without extraction of mitochondrion membranes. We use this protocol to provide data on a new monoclonal antibody reagent (Mab 22) and illustrate the precise localisation of basal body-mitochondrial linker proteins. Mab 22 binds to these linker proteins (exclusion-zone filaments) and provides a new tool for the characterisation of cytoskeleton mediated kinetoplast segregation. The antigen(s) recognised by Mab 22 are cytoskeletal, insensitive to extraction by high concentrations of non-ionic detergent, extend from the proximal region of basal bodies and bind to the outer mitochondrial membrane. This protein(s) is the first component of the TAC exclusion-zone fibres to be identified. Mab 22 will therefore be important in characterising TAC

  10. A monoclonal antibody marker for the exclusion-zone filaments of Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decossas Marion

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosoma brucei is a haemoflagellate pathogen of man, wild animals and domesticated livestock in central and southern Africa. In all life cycle stages this parasite has a single mitochondrion that contains a uniquely organised genome that is condensed into a flat disk-like structure called the kinetoplast. The kinetoplast is essential for insect form procyclic cells and therefore is a potential drug target. The kinetoplast is unique in nature because it consists of novel structural proteins and thousands of circular, interlocking, DNA molecules (kDNA. Secondly, kDNA replication is critically timed to coincide with nuclear S phase and new flagellum biogenesis. Thirdly, the kinetoplast is physically attached to the flagellum basal bodies via a structure called the tripartite attachment complex (TAC. The TAC consists of unilateral filaments (within the mitochondrion matrix, differentiated mitochondrial membranes and exclusion-zone filaments that extend from the distal end of the basal bodies. To date only one protein, p166, has been identified to be a component of the TAC. Results In the work presented here we provide data based on a novel EM technique developed to label and characterise cytoskeleton structures in permeabilised cells without extraction of mitochondrion membranes. We use this protocol to provide data on a new monoclonal antibody reagent (Mab 22 and illustrate the precise localisation of basal body-mitochondrial linker proteins. Mab 22 binds to these linker proteins (exclusion-zone filaments and provides a new tool for the characterisation of cytoskeleton mediated kinetoplast segregation. Conclusion The antigen(s recognised by Mab 22 are cytoskeletal, insensitive to extraction by high concentrations of non-ionic detergent, extend from the proximal region of basal bodies and bind to the outer mitochondrial membrane. This protein(s is the first component of the TAC exclusion-zone fibres to be identified. Mab 22

  11. Regulation of Trypanosoma brucei Total and Polysomal mRNA during Development within Its Mammalian Host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Capewell

    Full Text Available The gene expression of Trypanosoma brucei has been examined extensively in the blood of mammalian hosts and in forms found in the midgut of its arthropod vector, the tsetse fly. However, trypanosomes also undergo development within the mammalian bloodstream as they progress from morphologically 'slender forms' to transmissible 'stumpy forms' through morphological intermediates. This transition is temporally progressive within the first wave of parasitaemia such that gene expression can be monitored in relatively pure slender and stumpy populations as well as during the progression between these extremes. The development also represents the progression of cells from translationally active forms adapted for proliferation in the host to translationally quiescent forms, adapted for transmission. We have used metabolic labelling to quantitate translational activity in slender forms, stumpy forms and in forms undergoing early differentiation to procyclic forms in vitro. Thereafter we have examined the cohort of total mRNAs that are enriched throughout development in the mammalian bloodstream (slender, intermediate and stumpy forms, irrespective of strain, revealing those that exhibit consistent developmental regulation rather than sample specific changes. Transcripts that cosediment with polysomes in stumpy forms and slender forms have also been enriched to identify transcripts that escape translational repression prior to transmission. Combined, the expression and polysomal association of transcripts as trypanosomes undergo development in the mammalian bloodstream have been defined, providing a resource for trypanosome researchers. This facilitates the identification of those that undergo developmental regulation in the bloodstream and therefore those likely to have a role in the survival and capacity for transmission of stumpy forms.

  12. Simulating the complex cell design of Trypanosoma brucei and its motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davod Alizadehrad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The flagellate Trypanosoma brucei, which causes the sleeping sickness when infecting a mammalian host, goes through an intricate life cycle. It has a rather complex propulsion mechanism and swims in diverse microenvironments. These continuously exert selective pressure, to which the trypanosome adjusts with its architecture and behavior. As a result, the trypanosome assumes a diversity of complex morphotypes during its life cycle. However, although cell biology has detailed form and function of most of them, experimental data on the dynamic behavior and development of most morphotypes is lacking. Here we show that simulation science can predict intermediate cell designs by conducting specific and controlled modifications of an accurate, nature-inspired cell model, which we developed using information from live cell analyses. The cell models account for several important characteristics of the real trypanosomal morphotypes, such as the geometry and elastic properties of the cell body, and their swimming mechanism using an eukaryotic flagellum. We introduce an elastic network model for the cell body, including bending rigidity and simulate swimming in a fluid environment, using the mesoscale simulation technique called multi-particle collision dynamics. The in silico trypanosome of the bloodstream form displays the characteristic in vivo rotational and translational motility pattern that is crucial for survival and virulence in the vertebrate host. Moreover, our model accurately simulates the trypanosome's tumbling and backward motion. We show that the distinctive course of the attached flagellum around the cell body is one important aspect to produce the observed swimming behavior in a viscous fluid, and also required to reach the maximal swimming velocity. Changing details of the flagellar attachment generates less efficient swimmers. We also simulate different morphotypes that occur during the parasite's development in the tsetse fly, and

  13. Human African trypanosomiasis: a review of non-endemic cases in the past 20 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Migchelsen, Stephanie J.; Büscher, Philippe; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Schallig, Henk D. F. H.; Adams, Emily R.

    2011-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is caused by sub-species of the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei and is transmitted by tsetse flies, both of which are endemic only to sub-Saharan Africa. Several cases have been reported in non-endemic areas, such as North America and Europe, due to

  14. Human African trypanosomiasis : a review of non-endemic cases in the past 20 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Migchelsen, Stephanie J.; Buescher, Philippe; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Schallig, Henk D. F. H.; Adams, Emily R.

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is caused by sub-species of the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei and is transmitted by tsetse flies, both of which are endemic only to sub-Saharan Africa. Several cases have been reported in non-endemic areas, such as North America and Europe, due to

  15. Detection of human-infective trypanosomes in acutely-infected Jack ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A diagnosis of acute canine African trypanosomosis was made by microscopic examination of blood smear. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) analysis, using primers specifically targeting the human serum resistanceassociated (SRA) gene, revealed a monolytic infection with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense ...

  16. Independent Analysis of the Flagellum Surface and Matrix Proteomes Provides Insight into Flagellum Signaling in Mammalian-infectious Trypanosoma brucei*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholzer, Michael; Langousis, Gerasimos; Nguyen, HoangKim T.; Saada, Edwin A.; Shimogawa, Michelle M.; Jonsson, Zophonias O.; Nguyen, Steven M.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Hill, Kent L.

    2011-01-01

    The flagellum of African trypanosomes is an essential and multifunctional organelle that functions in motility, cell morphogenesis, and host-parasite interaction. Previous studies of the trypanosome flagellum have been limited by the inability to purify flagella without first removing the flagellar membrane. This limitation is particularly relevant in the context of studying flagellum signaling, as signaling requires surface-exposed proteins in the flagellar membrane and soluble signaling proteins in the flagellar matrix. Here we employ a combination of genetic and mechanical approaches to purify intact flagella from the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, in its mammalian-infectious stage. We combined flagellum purification with affinity-purification of surface-exposed proteins to conduct independent proteomic analyses of the flagellum surface and matrix fractions. The proteins identified encompass a broad range of molecular functionalities, including many predicted to function in signaling. Immunofluorescence and RNA interference studies demonstrate flagellum localization and function for proteins identified and provide insight into mechanisms of flagellum attachment and motility. The flagellum surface proteome includes many T. brucei-specific proteins and is enriched for proteins up-regulated in the mammalian-infectious stage of the parasite life-cycle. The combined results indicate that the flagellum surface presents a diverse and dynamic host-parasite interface that is well-suited for host-parasite signaling. PMID:21685506

  17. In Silico Identification and in Vitro Activity of Novel Natural Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian C. Herrmann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As part of our ongoing efforts to identify natural products with activity against pathogens causing neglected tropical diseases, we are currently performing an extensive screening of natural product (NP databases against a multitude of protozoan parasite proteins. Within this project, we screened a database of NPs from a commercial supplier, AnalytiCon Discovery (Potsdam, Germany, against Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TbGAPDH, a glycolytic enzyme whose inhibition deprives the parasite of energy supply. NPs acting as potential inhibitors of the mentioned enzyme were identified using a pharmacophore-based virtual screening and subsequent docking of the identified hits into the active site of interest. In a set of 700 structures chosen for the screening, 13 (1.9% were predicted to possess significant affinity towards the enzyme and were therefore tested in an in vitro enzyme assay using recombinant TbGAPDH. Nine of these in silico hits (69% showed significant inhibitory activity at 50 µM, of which two geranylated benzophenone derivatives proved to be particularly active with IC50 values below 10 µM. These compounds also showed moderate in vitro activity against T. brucei rhodesiense and may thus represent interesting starting points for further optimization.

  18. In Silico Identification and in Vitro Activity of Novel Natural Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Fabian C; Lenz, Mairin; Jose, Joachim; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; Schmidt, Thomas J

    2015-09-03

    As part of our ongoing efforts to identify natural products with activity against pathogens causing neglected tropical diseases, we are currently performing an extensive screening of natural product (NP) databases against a multitude of protozoan parasite proteins. Within this project, we screened a database of NPs from a commercial supplier, AnalytiCon Discovery (Potsdam, Germany), against Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TbGAPDH), a glycolytic enzyme whose inhibition deprives the parasite of energy supply. NPs acting as potential inhibitors of the mentioned enzyme were identified using a pharmacophore-based virtual screening and subsequent docking of the identified hits into the active site of interest. In a set of 700 structures chosen for the screening, 13 (1.9%) were predicted to possess significant affinity towards the enzyme and were therefore tested in an in vitro enzyme assay using recombinant TbGAPDH. Nine of these in silico hits (69%) showed significant inhibitory activity at 50 µM, of which two geranylated benzophenone derivatives proved to be particularly active with IC50 values below 10 µM. These compounds also showed moderate in vitro activity against T. brucei rhodesiense and may thus represent interesting starting points for further optimization.

  19. Interaction between Gallotannin and a Recombinant Form of Arginine Kinase of Trypanosoma brucei: Thermodynamic and Spectrofluorimetric Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Adeyemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current chemotherapies against trypanosomiasis are beset with diverse challenges, a situation which underscores the numerous research efforts aimed at finding newer and effective treatments. Arginine kinase of trypanosome has been validated as target for drug development against trypanosomiasis. The present study investigated the interaction between a recombinant form of the arginine kinase (rTbAK of trypanosome and gallotannin. The interaction between gallotannin and recombinant arginine kinase of Trypanosoma brucei caused significant decrease of enzyme activity. Kinetic analysis revealed the interaction to be of noncompetitive inhibition. Further thermodynamic analysis showed that the interaction between gallotannin and the recombinant arginine kinase was nonspontaneous and involved hydrophobic forces. The Ksv values and the FRET analysis suggest that static quenching of fluorescence intensity by gallotannin was static. Data revealed inhibitory interactions between gallotannin and rTbAK of trypanosome. Although the mechanism of inhibition is not clear yet, molecular docking studies are ongoing to clearly define the inhibitory interactions between the gallotannin and rTbAK. The knowledge of such binding properties would enrich development of selective inhibitors for the arginine kinase of Trypanosoma brucei.

  20. Proximity Interactions among Basal Body Components in Trypanosoma brucei Identify Novel Regulators of Basal Body Biogenesis and Inheritance

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    Hung Quang Dang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The basal body shares similar architecture with centrioles in animals and is involved in nucleating flagellar axonemal microtubules in flagellated eukaryotes. The early-branching Trypanosoma brucei possesses a motile flagellum nucleated from the basal body that consists of a mature basal body and an adjacent pro-basal body. Little is known about the basal body proteome and its roles in basal body biogenesis and flagellar axoneme assembly in T. brucei. Here, we report the identification of 14 conserved centriole/basal body protein homologs and 25 trypanosome-specific basal body proteins. These proteins localize to distinct subdomains of the basal body, and several of them form a ring-like structure surrounding the basal body barrel. Functional characterization of representative basal body proteins revealed distinct roles in basal body duplication/separation and flagellar axoneme assembly. Overall, this work identified novel proteins required for basal body duplication and separation and uncovered new functions of conserved basal body proteins in basal body duplication and separation, highlighting an unusual mechanism of basal body biogenesis and inheritance in this early divergent eukaryote.

  1. Analysis of cosmid clones of nuclear DNA from Trypanosome brucei shows that the genes for variant surface glycoproteins are clustered in the genome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Valerio (Dinko); T. de Lange; P. Borst (Piet); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); L.H.T. van der Ploeg

    1982-01-01

    textabstractTrypanosoma brucei contains more than a hundred genes coding for the different variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs). Activation of some of these genes involves the duplication of the gene (the basic copy or BC) and transposition of the duplicate to an expression site (yielding the

  2. The mitochondrial FAD-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Trypanosomatidae and the glycocomal redox balance of insect stages of Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerra, D.G.; Decottignies, A.; Bakker, B.M.; Michels, P.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The genes for the mitochondrial FAD-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were identified in Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major genomes. We have expressed the L. major gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and confirmed the subcellular localization and activity of the produced enzyme. Using

  3. Trypanosoma brucei TBRGG1, a mitochondrial oligo(U)-binding protein that co-localizes with an in vitro RNA editing activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhamme, L.; Perez-Morga, D.; Marchal, C.; Speijer, D.; Lambert, L.; Geuskens, M.; Alexandre, S.; Ismaïli, N.; Göringer, U.; Benne, R.; Pays, E.

    1998-01-01

    We report the characterization of a Trypanosoma brucei 75-kDa protein of the RGG (Arg-Gly-Gly) type, termed TBRGG1. Dicistronic and monocistronic transcripts of the TBRGG1 gene were produced by both alternative splicing and polyadenylation. TBRGG1 was found in two or three forms that differ in their

  4. 3-(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)-5,6-Dihydrouridine is one of two novel post-transcriptional modifications in tRNALys(UUU) from Trypanosoma brucei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, Jesper Schak; Español, Yaiza; Giessing, Anders M B

    2011-01-01

    . Furthermore, the tRNA has to be investigated with single-nucleotide resolution in order to ensure complete mapping of all modifications. In the present work, we characterized tRNA(Lys) (UUU) from Trypanosoma brucei, and provide a complete overview of its post-transcriptional modifications. The first step...

  5. The 2’-O-ribose methyltransferase for cap 1 of spliced leader RNA and U1 small nuclear RNA in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zamudio, J. R.; Mittra, B.; Foldynová-Trantírková, Silvie; Zeiner, G. M.; Lukeš, Julius; Bujnicki, J. M.; Sturm, N. R.; Campbell, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 17 (2007), s. 6084-6092 ISSN 0270-7306 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06129; GA MŠk LC07032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : methylation * Trypanosoma brucei * methyltransferase * RNA interference Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.420, year: 2007

  6. Brazilian Cerrado Qualea grandiflora Mart. Leaves Exhibit Antiplasmodial and Trypanocidal Activities In vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Thuany de Moura; Borghetti, Fabian; Caldas Oliveira, Sarah C.; Bastos, Izabela Marques Dourado; de Santana, Jaime Martins; Grellier, Philippe; Charneau, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Background: The rapid spread of drug-resistant strains of protozoan parasites required the urgent need for new effective drugs. Natural products offer a variety of chemical structures, which make them a valuable source of lead compounds for the development of such new drugs. Cerrado is the second largest biome in Brazil and has the richest flora of all the world savannahs. We selected Qualea grandiflora, a plant species known for its proprieties in folk medicine and its antibacterial activity. Objective: However, its antiprotozoal activity was not yet explored. Materials and Methods: We investigated the activities of fractions from the ethyl acetate extract of Q. grandiflora leaves against human life forms of Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, and for its cytotoxicity upon the rat L6-myoblast cell line. Ten fractions were produced by ethyl acetate:hexane chromatography. Results and Conclusion: The fractions showed no cytotoxicity against L-6 cells (IC50 > 100 μg/mL) and no hemolysis propriety. Three fractions had a moderate activity against P. falciparum, anyone was active against T. cruzi but four fractions demonstrated a high activity against bloodstream forms of T. brucei gambiense (8.0Cerrado, which presents medicinal propertiesTen fractions of the ethyl acetate extract of Q. grandiflora leaves were assessed against Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma Cruzi, and Trypanosoma brucei gambienseNo fraction showed relevant cytotoxicity and hemolysis activityAll the fractions presented antiplasmodial and trypanocidal activitiesThree fractions with moderate antiplasmodial activity (49< IC50 <56 μg/mL)Four fractions with high activity against bloodstream forms of T. brucei gambiense (8.0< IC50 <15 μg/mL). Abbreviations used: CQ: Chloroquine, DMSO: Dimethyl sulfoxide, HEPES: 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid, HMI: Modified Iscove's medium, IC50: Concentration inhibiting 50% of parasite growth, IC90

  7. Structure determination of glycogen synthase kinase-3 from Leishmania major and comparative inhibitor structure-activity relationships with Trypanosoma brucei GSK-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojo, Kayode K; Arakaki, Tracy L; Napuli, Alberto J; Inampudi, Krishna K; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Zhang, Li; Hol, Wim G.J.; Verlind, Christophe L.M.J.; Merritt, Ethan A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C [UWASH

    2012-04-24

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a drug target under intense investigation in pharmaceutical companies and constitutes an attractive piggyback target for eukaryotic pathogens. Two different GSKs are found in trypanosomatids, one about 150 residues shorter than the other. GSK-3 short (GeneDB: Tb927.10.13780) has previously been validated genetically as a drug target in Trypanosoma brucei by RNAi induced growth retardation; and chemically by correlation between enzyme and in vitro growth inhibition. Here, we report investigation of the equivalent GSK-3 short enzymes of L. major (LmjF18.0270) and L. infantum (LinJ18_V3.0270, identical in amino acid sequences to LdonGSK-3 short) and a crystal structure of LmajGSK-3 short at 2 Å resolution. The inhibitor structure-activity relationships (SARs) of L. major and L. infantum are virtually identical, suggesting that inhibitors could be useful for both cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. Leishmania spp. GSK-3 short has different inhibitor SARs than TbruGSK-3 short, which can be explained mostly by two variant residues in the ATP-binding pocket. Indeed, mutating these residues in the ATP-binding site of LmajGSK-3 short to the TbruGSK-3 short equivalents results in a mutant LmajGSK-3 short enzyme with SAR more similar to that of TbruGSK-3 short. The differences between human GSK-3β (HsGSK-3β) and LmajGSK-3 short SAR suggest that compounds which selectively inhibit LmajGSK-3 short may be found.

  8. The use of yellow fluorescent hybrids to indicate mating in Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferris Vanessa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosoma brucei undergoes genetic exchange in its insect vector, the tsetse fly, by an unknown mechanism. The difficulties of working with this experimental system of genetic exchange have hampered investigation, particularly because the trypanosome life cycle stages involved cannot be cultured in vitro and therefore must be examined in the insect. Searching for small numbers of hybrid trypanosomes directly in the fly has become possible through the incorporation of fluorescent reporter genes, and we have previously carried out a successful cross using a reporter-repressor strategy. However, we could not be certain that all fluorescent trypanosomes observed in that cross were hybrids, due to mutations of the repressor leading to spontaneous fluorescence, and we have therefore developed an alternative strategy. Results To visualize the production of hybrids in the fly, parental trypanosome clones were transfected with a gene encoding Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP or Red Fluorescent Protein (RFP. Co-infection of flies with red and green fluorescent parental trypanosomes produced yellow fluorescent hybrids, which were easily visualized in the fly salivary glands. Yellow trypanosomes were not seen in midgut or proventricular samples and first appeared in the glands as epimastigotes as early as 13 days after fly infection. Cloned progeny originating from individual salivary glands had yellow, red, green or no fluorescence and were confirmed as hybrids by microsatellite, molecular karyotype and kinetoplast (mitochondrial DNA analyses. Hybrid clones showed biparental inheritance of both nuclear and kinetoplast genomes. While segregation and reassortment of the reporter genes and microsatellite alleles were consistent with Mendelian inheritance, flow cytometry measurement of DNA content revealed both diploid and polyploid trypanosomes among the hybrid progeny clones. Conclusion The strategy of using production of yellow hybrids

  9. Dynamics of gamete production and mating in the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Lori; Bailey, Mick; Gibson, Wendy

    2016-07-20

    Sexual reproduction in Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma brucei occurs in the insect vector and is important in generating hybrid strains with different combinations of parental characteristics. Production of hybrid parasite genotypes depends on the likelihood of co-infection of the vector with multiple strains. In mosquitoes, existing infection with Plasmodium facilitates the establishment of a second infection, although the asynchronicity of gamete production subsequently prevents mating. In the trypanosome/tsetse system, flies become increasingly refractory to infection as they age, so the likelihood of a fly acquiring a second infection also decreases. This effectively restricts opportunities for trypanosome mating to co-infections picked up by the fly on its first feed, unless an existing infection increases the chance of successful second infection as in the Plasmodium/mosquito system. Using green and red fluorescent trypanosomes, we compared the rates of trypanosome infection and hybrid production in flies co-infected on the first feed, co-infected on a subsequent feed 18 days after emergence, or fed sequentially with each trypanosome clone 18 days apart. Infection rates were highest in the midguts and salivary glands (SG) of flies that received both trypanosome clones in their first feed, and were halved when the infected feed was delayed to day 18. In flies fed the two trypanosome clones sequentially, the second clone often failed to establish a midgut infection and consequently was not present in the SG. Nevertheless, hybrids were recovered from all three groups of infected flies. Meiotic stages and gametes were produced continuously from day 11 to 42 after the infective feed, and in sequentially infected flies, the co-occurrence of gametes led to hybrid formation. We found that a second trypanosome strain can establish infection in the tsetse SG 18 days after the first infected feed, with co-mingling of gametes and production of trypanosome hybrids

  10. Regulation of vsg expression site transcription and switching in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, G A; Wirtz, L E; Navarro, M

    1998-03-01

    Current understanding of expression-site transcription in Trypanosoma brucei, has been refined by recent results of promoter manipulations at vsg expression sites (ES) and examination of the behavior of ES promoters in ectopic locations both within the ES and at other loci. In summary, ES promoter sequences inserted into non-transcribed rRNA spacers are generally inactive, or have low activity, in bloodstream and procyclic forms. Some mechanism apparently operates to ensure full activation of a single ES in bloodstream-form trypanosomes and the inactivity of all ES promoters in procyclic forms. As previously shown, a rRNA promoter can replace an ES promoter. In bloodstream forms, the replacement rRNA promoter was down-regulated in a 'silent' ES but it was active in procyclic forms. In addition to manipulations of endogenous promoters, we have recently shown that, when an ES promoter is replaced by a T7 promoter, the T7 promoter is unregulated but transcription is attenuated before the vsg, and another ES switches on to maintain cell viability. However, T7 transcription is repressed in the context of core ES-promoter sequences in both stages, particularly in procyclic forms. These observations strongly argue that sequences in the vicinity of the ES core promoter play a role in ES control by nucleating critical events in silencing as well as in activation. Deletions of sequences surrounding the ES core promoter, in situ, did not affect its activity or regulation. In bloodstream forms, rRNA or ES promoters inserted adjacent to silent telomeres or to a non-telomeric 'basic-copy' vsg were > 98% repressed. After transformation to procyclic forms, the sub-telomeric rRNA promoter regained about 10% of its maximal activity but the 'basic-copy' rRNA promoter was fully active. Similarly-positioned ES promoters remained silent in procyclic forms. These results suggest that telomere-proximal or vsg-proximal sequences might mediate suppression of transcription via position

  11. The Aurora Kinase in Trypanosoma brucei plays distinctive roles in metaphase-anaphase transition and cytokinetic initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyin Li

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aurora B kinase is an essential regulator of chromosome segregation with the action well characterized in eukaryotes. It is also implicated in cytokinesis, but the detailed mechanism remains less clear, partly due to the difficulty in separating the latter from the former function in a growing cell. A chemical genetic approach with an inhibitor of the enzyme added to a synchronized cell population at different stages of the cell cycle would probably solve this problem. In the deeply branched parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, an Aurora B homolog, TbAUK1, was found to control both chromosome segregation and cytokinetic initiation by evidence from RNAi and dominant negative mutation. To clearly separate these two functions, VX-680, an inhibitor of TbAUK1, was added to a synchronized T. brucei procyclic cell population at different cell cycle stages. The unique trans-localization pattern of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC, consisting of TbAUK1 and two novel proteins TbCPC1 and TbCPC2, was monitored during mitosis and cytokinesis by following the migration of the proteins tagged with enhanced yellow fluorescence protein in live cells with time-lapse video microscopy. Inhibition of TbAUK1 function in S-phase, prophase or metaphase invariably arrests the cells in the metaphase, suggesting an action of TbAUK1 in promoting metaphase-anaphase transition. TbAUK1 inhibition in anaphase does not affect mitotic exit, but prevents trans-localization of the CPC from the spindle midzone to the anterior tip of the new flagellum attachment zone for cytokinetic initiation. The CPC in the midzone is dispersed back to the two segregated nuclei, while cytokinesis is inhibited. In and beyond telophase, TbAUK1 inhibition has no effect on the progression of cytokinesis or the subsequent G1, S and G2 phases until a new metaphase is attained. There are thus two clearly distinct points of TbAUK1 action in T. brucei: the metaphase-anaphase transition and

  12. APOL1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Anneli; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Alibu, V Pius; Ravel, Sophie; Enyaru, John; Weir, William; Noyes, Harry; Capewell, Paul; Camara, Mamadou; Milet, Jacqueline; Jamonneau, Vincent; Camara, Oumou; Matovu, Enock; Bucheton, Bruno; MacLeod, Annette

    2017-05-24

    Reduced susceptibility to infectious disease can increase the frequency of otherwise deleterious alleles. In populations of African ancestry, two apolipoprotein-L1 (APOL1 ) variants with a recessive kidney disease risk, named G1 and G2, occur at high frequency. APOL1 is a trypanolytic protein that confers innate resistance to most African trypanosomes, but not Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense or T.b. gambiense, which cause human African trypanosomiasis. In this case-control study, we test the prevailing hypothesis that these APOL1 variants reduce trypanosomiasis susceptibility, resulting in their positive selection in sub-Saharan Africa. We demonstrate a five-fold dominant protective association for G2 against T.b. rhodesiense infection. Furthermore, we report unpredicted strong opposing associations with T.b. gambiense disease outcome. G2 associates with faster progression of T.b. gambiense trypanosomiasis, while G1 associates with asymptomatic carriage and undetectable parasitemia. These results implicate both forms of human African trypanosomiasis in the selection and persistence of otherwise detrimental APOL1 kidney disease variants.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of selenophosphate synthetases from Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faim, Lívia Maria; Rosa e Silva, Ivan; Bertacine Dias, Marcio Vinicius; D'Muniz Pereira, Humberto; Brandao-Neto, José; Alves da Silva, Marco Túlio; Thiemann, Otavio Henrique

    2013-08-01

    Selenophosphate synthetase (SPS) plays an indispensable role in selenium metabolism, being responsible for catalyzing the activation of selenide with adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) to generate selenophosphate, the essential selenium donor for selenocysteine synthesis. Recombinant full-length Leishmania major SPS (LmSPS2) was recalcitrant to crystallization. Therefore, a limited proteolysis technique was used and a stable N-terminal truncated construct (ΔN-LmSPS2) yielded suitable crystals. The Trypanosoma brucei SPS orthologue (TbSPS2) was crystallized by the microbatch method using paraffin oil. X-ray diffraction data were collected to resolutions of 1.9 Å for ΔN-LmSPS2 and 3.4 Å for TbSPS2.

  14. A metacaspase of Trypanosoma brucei causes loss of respiration competence and clonal death in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szallies, Alexander; Kubata, Bruno K; Duszenko, Michael

    2002-04-24

    Metacaspases constitute a new group of cysteine proteases homologous to caspases. Heterologous expression of Trypanosoma brucei metacaspase TbMCA4 in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in growth inhibition, mitochondrial dysfunction and clonal death. The metacaspase orthologue of yeast, ScMCA1 (YOR197w), exhibited genetic interaction with WWM1 (YFL010c), which encodes a small WW domain protein. WWM1 overexpression resulted in growth arrest and clonal death, which was suppressed by concomitant overexpression of ScMCA1. GFP-fusion reporters of WWM1, ScMCA1 and TbMCA4 localized to the nucleus. Taken together, we suggest that metacaspases may play a role in nuclear function controlling cellular proliferation coupled to mitochondrial biogenesis.

  15. Oligopeptidases B from Trypanossoma cruzi and Trypanossoma brucei inhibit inflammatory pain in mice by targeting serotoninergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahão, Rafaela Quintanilha; Franciosi, Adriano Cardoso; Andrade, Douglas; Juliano, Luiz; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Giorgi, Renata; Dale, Camila Squarzoni

    2013-06-01

    In the present study, the antinociceptive profile of oligopeptidases B from Trypanosoma cruzi (OPTc) and Trypanosoma brucei (OPTb) were examined in mice evaluated by the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Both OPTc and OPTb injected intraperitoneally attenuated the writhing numbers in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. This effect was not dependent on the enzymatic activity, but the enzyme structure was important for this purpose. Intraperitoneal pretreatment with methysergide (5-HT serotonergic receptor antagonist) attenuated antinociceptive effect induced by both OPTc and OPTb in the writhing test. However, naloxone (opioid receptor antagonist) or yohimbine (α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist) did not affect antinociception induced by both oligopeptidases. Our results suggest that OPTc and OPTb show antinociceptive property in the writhing test. Furthermore, this antinociceptive effect may be mediated by serotonergic receptor but not opioidergic or α2-adrenergic receptors.

  16. The nuclear RNA binding protein RBP33 influences mRNA and spliced leader RNA abundance in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirovic, Olivera; Trikin, Roman; Hoffmann, Anneliese; Doiron, Nicholas; Jakob, Martin; Ochsenreiter, Torsten

    2017-03-01

    RNA recognition motif (RRM) containing proteins are important regulators of gene expression in trypanosomes. Here we expand our current knowledge on the exclusively nuclear localized RRM domain containing protein RBP33 of Trypanosoma brucei. Overexpression of RBP33 leads to a quick growth arrest in G2/M in bloodstream form cells likely due to an overall mRNA- and spliced leader abundance decrease while the ribosomal RNAs remain unaffected. The recombinant RBP33 binds to poly(A) and random sequence RNA in vitro confirming its role as a RNA binding protein. Finally super-resolution microscopy detects RBP33 in small punctae throughout the nucleus and surrounding the nucleolus, however the signal is depleted inside the nucleolus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Spliced leader RNA silencing (SLS - a programmed cell death pathway in Trypanosoma brucei that is induced upon ER stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaeli Shulamit

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. The parasite cycles between its insect (procyclic form and mammalian hosts (bloodstream form. Trypanosomes lack conventional transcription regulation, and their genes are transcribed in polycistronic units that are processed by trans-splicing and polyadenylation. In trans-splicing, which is essential for processing of each mRNA, an exon, the spliced leader (SL is added to all mRNAs from a small RNA, the SL RNA. Trypanosomes lack the machinery for the unfolded protein response (UPR, which in other eukaryotes is induced under endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Trypanosomes respond to such stress by changing the stability of mRNAs, which are essential for coping with the stress. However, under severe ER stress that is induced by blocking translocation of proteins to the ER, treatment of cells with chemicals that induce misfolding in the ER, or extreme pH, trypanosomes elicit the spliced leader silencing (SLS pathway. In SLS, the transcription of the SL RNA gene is extinguished, and tSNAP42, a specific SL RNA transcription factor, fails to bind to its cognate promoter. SLS leads to complete shut-off of trans-splicing. In this review, I discuss the UPR in mammals and compare it to the ER stress response in T. brucei leading to SLS. I summarize the evidence supporting the notion that SLS is a programmed cell death (PCD pathway that is utilized by the parasites to substitute for the apoptosis observed in higher eukaryotes under prolonged ER stress. I present the hypothesis that SLS evolved to expedite the death process, and rapidly remove from the population unfit parasites that, by elimination via SLS, cause minimal damage to the parasite population.

  18. Effects of Trypanosoma brucei infection and diminazene aceturate therapy on testicular morphology and function of Nigerian local dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obi, C F; Obidike, R I; Ezeh, I O; Omoja, V U; Iheagwam, C N; Idika, I K; Ezeokonkwo, R C

    2013-09-23

    The effects of Trypanosoma brucei infection on testicular morphology and function and the changes associated with treatment of infected dogs with diminazene aceturate were studied using fifteen Nigerian adult male dogs. The dogs were randomly assigned into three groups A, B and C consisting of five dogs each. Groups A and B were infected with 1 × 10(6) trypanosomes and group C was the uninfected control. Following infection, parasitaemia levels were monitored daily whereas the rectal temperature, body weight, packed cell volume, scrotal circumference and serum testosterone levels were monitored weekly. At parasitaemia peak, dogs in group A were orchidectomised while dogs in group B were treated with 7.0mg/kg body weight of diminazene aceturate (DA). Dogs in groups B and C were later orchidectomised on day 73 of the experiment. The harvested testes and epididymides were weighed and the epididymal sperm reserves of all the dogs determined. Also the sperm quality (mass activity, sperm motility and sperm morphology) were determined. The testes were sectioned after processing and studied histomorphologically. Acute trypanosomosis was observed following infection. The low serum testosterone levels observed from day 14 post infection (pi) gradually improved following treatment. Testicular weight, epididymal weight and sperm quality were significantly low (pdogs when compared to the control group but gradually improved following treatment. Histomorphological studies revealed testicular degeneration characterized by depopulation of seminiferous tubules and depletion of spermatogenic cells in dogs of group A whereas the tissue sections of the testes of dogs in group B were similar to those of the control group. It was therefore concluded that infection of dogs with T. brucei adversely affected testicular morphology and function. Treatment with diminazene aceturate reversed the reproductive abnormalities caused by the parasite. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  19. Control and surveillance of human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In the 1960s, it appeared that human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) could be effectively controlled, but by the beginning of the twenty-first century several decades of neglect had led to alarming numbers of reported new cases, with an estimated 300 000 people infected. The World Health Organization (WHO) responded with a series of initiatives aimed at bringing HAT under control again. Since 2001, the pharmaceutical companies that produce drugs for HAT have committed themselves to providing them free of charge to WHO for distribution for the treatment of patients. In addition, funds have been provided to WHO to support national sleeping sickness control programmes to boost control and surveillance of the disease. That, coupled with bilateral cooperation and the work of nongovernmental organizations, helped reverse the upward trend in HAT prevalence. By 2012, the number of reported cases was fewer than 8000. This success in bringing HAT under control led to its inclusion in the WHO Roadmap for eradication, elimination and control of neglected tropical diseases, with a target set to eliminate the disease as a public health problem by 2020. A further target has been set, by countries in which HAT is endemic, to eliminate gambiense HAT by reducing the incidence of infection to zero in a defined geographical area. This report provides information about new diagnostic approaches, new therapeutic regimens and better understanding of the distribution of the disease with high-quality mapping. The roles of human and animal reservoirs and the tsetse fly vectors that transmit the parasites are emphasized. The new information has formed the basis for an integrated strategy with which it is hoped that elimination of gambiense HAT will be achieved. The report also contains recommendations on the approaches that will lead to elimination of the disease.

  20. Comparative proteomics of two life cycle stages of stable isotope-labeled Trypanosoma brucei reveals novel components of the parasite's host adaptation machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butter, Falk; Bucerius, Ferdinand; Michel, Margaux; Cicova, Zdenka; Mann, Matthias; Janzen, Christian J

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei developed a sophisticated life cycle to adapt to different host environments. Although developmental differentiation of T. brucei has been the topic of intensive research for decades, the mechanisms responsible for adaptation to different host environments are not well understood. We developed stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture in trypanosomes to compare the proteomes of two different life cycle stages. Quantitative comparison of 4364 protein groups identified many proteins previously not known to be stage-specifically expressed. The identification of stage-specific proteins helps to understand how parasites adapt to different hosts and provides new insights into differences in metabolism, gene regulation, and cell architecture. A DEAD-box RNA helicase, which is highly up-regulated in the bloodstream form of this parasite and which is essential for viability and proper cell cycle progression in this stage is described as an example.

  1. Trypanosoma brucei TbIF1 inhibits the essential Finf1/inf-ATPase in the infectious form of the parasite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Panicucci, Brian; Gahura, Ondřej; Zíková, Alena

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 4 (2017), č. článku e0005552. ISSN 1935-2735 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA ČR GA17-22248S; GA MŠk LL1205 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : mt * TblF1 * Trypanosoma brucei Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Infectious Diseases Impact factor: 3.834, year: 2016

  2. Trypanosoma brucei aquaglyceroporin 2 is a high-affinity transporter for pentamidine and melaminophenyl arsenic drugs and the main genetic determinant of resistance to these drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Jane C.; Eze, Anthonius A.; Baker, Nicola; Glover, Lucy; Clucas, Caroline; Aguinaga Andrés, David; Natto, Manal J.; Teka, Ibrahim A.; McDonald, Jennifer; Lee, Rebecca S.; Graf, Fabrice E.; Ludin, Philipp; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Turner, C. Michael R.; Tait, Andy; MacLeod, Annette; Mäser, Pascal; Barrett, Michael P.; Horn, David; De Koning, Harry P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Trypanosoma brucei drug transporters include the TbAT1/P2 aminopurine transporter and the high-affinity pentamidine transporter (HAPT1), but the genetic identity of HAPT1 is unknown. We recently reported that loss of T. brucei aquaglyceroporin 2 (TbAQP2) caused melarsoprol/pentamidine cross-resistance (MPXR) in these parasites and the current study aims to delineate the mechanism by which this occurs. Methods The TbAQP2 loci of isogenic pairs of drug-susceptible and MPXR strains of T. brucei subspecies were sequenced. Drug susceptibility profiles of trypanosome strains were correlated with expression of mutated TbAQP2 alleles. Pentamidine transport was studied in T. brucei subspecies expressing TbAQP2 variants. Results All MPXR strains examined contained TbAQP2 deletions or rearrangements, regardless of whether the strains were originally adapted in vitro or in vivo to arsenicals or to pentamidine. The MPXR strains and AQP2 knockout strains had lost HAPT1 activity. Reintroduction of TbAQP2 in MPXR trypanosomes restored susceptibility to the drugs and reinstated HAPT1 activity, but did not change the activity of TbAT1/P2. Expression of TbAQP2 sensitized Leishmania mexicana promastigotes 40-fold to pentamidine and >1000-fold to melaminophenyl arsenicals and induced a high-affinity pentamidine transport activity indistinguishable from HAPT1 by Km and inhibitor profile. Grafting the TbAQP2 selectivity filter amino acid residues onto a chimeric allele of AQP2 and AQP3 partly restored susceptibility to pentamidine and an arsenical. Conclusions TbAQP2 mediates high-affinity uptake of pentamidine and melaminophenyl arsenicals in trypanosomes and TbAQP2 encodes the previously reported HAPT1 activity. This finding establishes TbAQP2 as an important drug transporter. PMID:24235095

  3. Genetically Distinct Glossina fuscipes fuscipes Populations in the Lake Kyoga Region of Uganda and Its Relevance for Human African Trypanosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Echodu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tsetse flies (Glossina spp. are the sole vectors of Trypanosoma brucei—the agent of human (HAT and animal (AAT trypanosomiasis. Glossina fuscipes fuscipes (Gff is the main vector species in Uganda—the only country where the two forms of HAT disease (rhodesiense and gambiense occur, with gambiense limited to the northwest. Gff populations cluster in three genetically distinct groups in northern, southern, and western Uganda, respectively, with a contact zone present in central Uganda. Understanding the dynamics of this contact zone is epidemiologically important as the merger of the two diseases is a major health concern. We used mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA data from Gff samples in the contact zone to understand its spatial extent and temporal stability. We show that this zone is relatively narrow, extending through central Uganda along major rivers with south to north introgression but displaying no sex-biased dispersal. Lack of obvious vicariant barriers suggests that either environmental conditions or reciprocal competitive exclusion could explain the patterns of genetic differentiation observed. Lack of admixture between northern and southern populations may prevent the sympatry of the two forms of HAT disease, although continued control efforts are needed to prevent the recolonization of tsetse-free regions by neighboring populations.

  4. A Core MRB1 Complex Component Is Indispensable for RNA Editing in Insect and Human Infective Stages of Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ammerman, M. L.; Tomasello, D. L.; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Kafková, L.; Hashimi, Hassan; Lukeš, Julius; Read, L. K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2013), e78015 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179; GA ČR GAP305/12/2261 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : inducible expression system * life cycle stages * accessory factor * binding factor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  5. Identification of different trypanosome species in the mid-guts of tsetse flies of the Malanga (Kimpese sleeping sickness focus of the Democratic Republic of Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simo Gustave

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Malanga sleeping sickness focus of the Democratic Republic of Congo has shown an epidemic evolution of disease during the last century. However, following case detection and treatment, the prevalence of the disease decreased considerably. No active survey has been undertaken in this focus for a couple of years. To understand the current epidemiological status of sleeping sickness as well as the animal African trypanosomiasis in the Malanga focus, we undertook the identification of tsetse blood meals as well as different trypanosome species in flies trapped in this focus. Methods Pyramidal traps were use to trap tsetse flies. All flies caught were identified and live flies were dissected and their mid-guts collected. Fly mid-gut was used for the molecular identification of the blood meal source, as well as for the presence of different trypanosome species. Results About 949 Glossina palpalis palpalis were trapped; 296 (31.2% of which were dissected, 60 (20.3% blood meals collected and 57 (19.3% trypanosome infections identified. The infection rates were 13.4%, 5.1%, 3.5% and 0.4% for Trypanosoma congolense savannah type, Trypanosoma brucei s.l., Trypanosoma congolense forest type and Trypanosoma vivax, respectively. Three mixed infections including Trypanosoma brucei s.l. and Trypanosoma congolense savannah type, and one mixed infection of Trypanosoma vivax and Trypanosoma congolense savannah type were identified. Eleven Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infections were identified; indicating an active circulation of this trypanosome subspecies. Of all the identified blood meals, about 58.3% were identified as being taken on pigs, while 33.3% and 8.3% were from man and other mammals, respectively. Conclusion The presence of Trypanosoma brucei in tsetse mid-guts associated with human blood meals is indicative of an active transmission of this parasite between tsetse and man. The considerable number of pig blood meals combined

  6. Identification of different trypanosome species in the mid-guts of tsetse flies of the Malanga (Kimpese) sleeping sickness focus of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo, Gustave; Silatsa, Barberine; Flobert, Njiokou; Lutumba, Pascal; Mansinsa, Philemon; Madinga, Joule; Manzambi, Emile; De Deken, Reginald; Asonganyi, Tazoacha

    2012-09-19

    The Malanga sleeping sickness focus of the Democratic Republic of Congo has shown an epidemic evolution of disease during the last century. However, following case detection and treatment, the prevalence of the disease decreased considerably. No active survey has been undertaken in this focus for a couple of years. To understand the current epidemiological status of sleeping sickness as well as the animal African trypanosomiasis in the Malanga focus, we undertook the identification of tsetse blood meals as well as different trypanosome species in flies trapped in this focus. Pyramidal traps were use to trap tsetse flies. All flies caught were identified and live flies were dissected and their mid-guts collected. Fly mid-gut was used for the molecular identification of the blood meal source, as well as for the presence of different trypanosome species. About 949 Glossina palpalis palpalis were trapped; 296 (31.2%) of which were dissected, 60 (20.3%) blood meals collected and 57 (19.3%) trypanosome infections identified. The infection rates were 13.4%, 5.1%, 3.5% and 0.4% for Trypanosoma congolense savannah type, Trypanosoma brucei s.l., Trypanosoma congolense forest type and Trypanosoma vivax, respectively. Three mixed infections including Trypanosoma brucei s.l. and Trypanosoma congolense savannah type, and one mixed infection of Trypanosoma vivax and Trypanosoma congolense savannah type were identified. Eleven Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infections were identified; indicating an active circulation of this trypanosome subspecies. Of all the identified blood meals, about 58.3% were identified as being taken on pigs, while 33.3% and 8.3% were from man and other mammals, respectively. The presence of Trypanosoma brucei in tsetse mid-guts associated with human blood meals is indicative of an active transmission of this parasite between tsetse and man. The considerable number of pig blood meals combined with the circulation of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in this focus

  7. Substituted 2-phenylimidazopyridines: a new class of drug leads for human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatipaka, Hari Babu; Gillespie, J Robert; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Norcross, Neil R; Hulverson, Matthew A; Ranade, Ranae M; Nagendar, Pendem; Creason, Sharon A; McQueen, Joshua; Duster, Nicole A; Nagle, Advait; Supek, Frantisek; Molteni, Valentina; Wenzler, Tanja; Brun, Reto; Glynne, Richard; Buckner, Frederick S; Gelb, Michael H

    2014-02-13

    A phenotypic screen of a compound library for antiparasitic activity on Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, led to the identification of substituted 2-(3-aminophenyl)oxazolopyridines as a starting point for hit-to-lead medicinal chemistry. A total of 110 analogues were prepared, which led to the identification of 64, a substituted 2-(3-aminophenyl)imidazopyridine. This compound showed antiparasitic activity in vitro with an EC50 of 2 nM and displayed reasonable druglike properties when tested in a number of in vitro assays. The compound was orally bioavailable and displayed good plasma and brain exposure in mice. Compound 64 cured mice infected with Trypanosoma brucei when dosed orally down to 2.5 mg/kg. Given its potent antiparasitic properties and its ease of synthesis, compound 64 represents a new lead for the development of drugs to treat human African trypanosomiasis.

  8. The Evolution of Trypanosomes Infecting Humans and Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevens Jamie

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on phylogenetic analysis of 18S rRNA sequences and clade taxon composition, this paper adopts a biogeographical approach to understanding the evolutionary relationships of the human and primate infective trypanosomes, Trypanosoma cruzi, T. brucei, T. rangeli and T. cyclops. Results indicate that these parasites have divergent origins and fundamentally different patterns of evolution. T. cruzi is placed in a clade with T. rangeli and trypanosomes specific to bats and a kangaroo. The predominantly South American and Australian origins of parasites within this clade suggest an ancient southern super-continent origin for ancestral T. cruzi, possibly in marsupials. T. brucei clusters exclusively with mammalian, salivarian trypanosomes of African origin, suggesting an evolutionary history confined to Africa, while T. cyclops, from an Asian primate appears to have evolved separately and is placed in a clade with T. (Megatrypanum species. Relating clade taxon composition to palaeogeographic evidence, the divergence of T. brucei and T. cruzi can be dated to the mid-Cretaceous, around 100 million years before present, following the separation of Africa, South America and Euramerica. Such an estimate of divergence time is considerably more recent than those of most previous studies based on molecular clock methods. Perhaps significantly, Salivarian trypanosomes appear, from these data, to be evolving several times faster than Schizotrypanum species, a factor which may have contributed to previous anomalous estimates of divergence times.

  9. Human African trypanosomiasis in a Belgian traveller returning from the Masai Mara area, Kenya, February 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerinx, J; Vlieghe, E; Asselman, V; Van de Casteele, S; Maes, M B; Lejon, V

    2012-03-08

    A Belgian traveller was diagnosed with human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) due to Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense nine days after visiting the Masai Mara area in Kenya. He presented with an inoculation chancre and was treated with suramin within four days of fever onset. Two weeks earlier, HAT was also reported in a German traveller who had visited the Masai Mara area. Because no cases have occurred in the area for over 12 years, this may indicate a focal cluster of HAT.

  10. Costs Of Using “Tiny Targets” to Control Glossina fuscipes fuscipes, a Vector of Gambiense Sleeping Sickness in Arua District of Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Alexandra P. M.; Tirados, Inaki; Mangwiro, Clement T. N.; Esterhuizen, Johan; Lehane, Michael J.; Torr, Stephen J.; Kovacic, Vanja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the relative effectiveness of tsetse control methods, their costs need to be analysed alongside their impact on tsetse populations. Very little has been published on the costs of methods specifically targeting human African trypanosomiasis Methodology/Principal Findings In northern Uganda, a 250 km2 field trial was undertaken using small (0.5 X 0.25 m) insecticide-treated targets (“tiny targets”). Detailed cost recording accompanied every phase of the work. Costs were calculated for this operation as if managed by the Ugandan vector control services: removing purely research components of the work and applying local salaries. This calculation assumed that all resources are fully used, with no spare capacity. The full cost of the operation was assessed at USD 85.4 per km2, of which USD 55.7 or 65.2% were field costs, made up of three component activities (target deployment: 34.5%, trap monitoring: 10.6% and target maintenance: 20.1%). The remaining USD 29.7 or 34.8% of the costs were for preliminary studies and administration (tsetse surveys: 6.0%, sensitisation of local populations: 18.6% and office support: 10.2%). Targets accounted for only 12.9% of the total cost, other important cost components were labour (24.1%) and transport (34.6%). Discussion Comparison with the updated cost of historical HAT vector control projects and recent estimates indicates that this work represents a major reduction in cost levels. This is attributed not just to the low unit cost of tiny targets but also to the organisation of delivery, using local labour with bicycles or motorcycles. Sensitivity analyses were undertaken, investigating key prices and assumptions. It is believed that these costs are generalizable to other HAT foci, although in more remote areas, with denser vegetation and fewer people, costs would increase, as would be the case for other tsetse control techniques. PMID:25811956

  11. Biochemical characterization of the bi-lobe reveals a continuous structural network linking the bi-lobe to other single-copied organelles in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheiratmand, Ladan; Brasseur, Anais; Zhou, Qing; He, Cynthia Y

    2013-02-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, a unicellular parasite, contains several single-copied organelles that duplicate and segregate in a highly coordinated fashion during the cell cycle. In the procyclic stage, a bi-lobed structure is found adjacent to the single ER exit site and Golgi apparatus, forming both stable and dynamic association with other cytoskeletal components including the basal bodies that seed the flagellum and the flagellar pocket collar that is critical for flagellar pocket biogenesis. To further understand the bi-lobe and its association with adjacent organelles, we performed proteomic analyses on the immunoisolated bi-lobe complex. Candidate proteins were localized to the flagellar pocket, the basal bodies, a tripartite attachment complex linking the basal bodies to the kinetoplast, and a segment of microtubule quartet linking the flagellar pocket collar and bi-lobe to the basal bodies. These results supported an extensive connection among the single-copied organelles in T. brucei, a strategy employed by the parasite for orderly organelle assembly and inheritance during the cell cycle.

  12. RNA interference analyses suggest a transcript-specific regulatory role for mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins MRP1 and MRP2 in RNA editing and other RNA processing in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáková, Eva; Van Den Burg, J.; Zíková, Alena; Ernst, N. L.; Stuart, K.; Benne, R.; Lukeš, Julius

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 280, č. 4 (2005), s. 2429-2438 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6022903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei * RNA editing * interference RNA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.854, year: 2005

  13. RNA interference analyses suggest a transcript-specific regulatory role for mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins MRP1 and MRP2 in RNA editing and other RNA processing in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vondrusková, Eva; van den Burg, Janny; Zíková, Alena; Ernst, Nancy Lewis; Stuart, Kenneth; Benne, Rob; Lukes, Julius

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins MRP1 and MRP2 occur in a heteromeric complex that appears to play a role in U-insertion/deletion editing in trypanosomes. Reduction in the levels of MRP1 (gBP21) and/or MRP2 (gBP25) mRNA by RNA interference in procyclic Trypanosoma brucei resulted in severe growth

  14. Evaluation of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) as therapeutic leads for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Angela K; Guiguemde, W Armand; Guy, R Kiplin

    2015-08-15

    Two of the histone deacetylases, TbDAC1 and TbDAC3, have been reported to be essential genes in trypanosomes. Therefore, we tested the activity of a panel of human histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) for their ability to block proliferation of Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among the HDACi's, the hydroxamic acid derivatives panobinostat and belinostat exhibited potency that appeared to make them viable candidates for development due to their reported pharmacokinetic characteristics. However, cellular pharmacodynamic analysis demonstrated that these drugs were unable to kill cultured parasites at exposures seen in patients at their tolerated doses and additionally failed to show any synergistic effects in combination with pentamidine, suramin, melarsoprol, or nifurtimox. Analysis of the potency of the entire HDACi panel revealed no correlations between potency against any human HDAC isoform and inhibition of T. brucei proliferation, suggesting that the trypanosome histone deacetylases possess a unique specificity. These studies confirmed that HDAC inhibitors have potential as leads against human African trypanosomiasis but that none of the current clinical candidates can be directly repurposed. Therefore, development of HDACi's with appropriate specificity and potency may be a viable route to a new class of anti-trypanosomal drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhibition of trypanosome alternative oxidase without its N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signal (ΔMTS-TAO) by cationic and non-cationic 4-hydroxybenzoate and 4-alkoxybenzaldehyde derivatives active against T. brucei and T. congolense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebiloma, Godwin U; Ayuga, Teresa Díaz; Balogun, Emmanuel O; Gil, Lucía Abad; Donachie, Anne; Kaiser, Marcel; Herraiz, Tomás; Inaoka, Daniel K; Shiba, Tomoo; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi; de Koning, Harry P; Dardonville, Christophe

    2018-04-25

    African trypanosomiasis is a neglected parasitic disease that is still of great public health relevance, and a severe impediment to agriculture in endemic areas. The pathogens possess certain unique metabolic features that can be exploited for the development of new drugs. Notably, they rely on an essential, mitochondrially-localized enzyme, Trypanosome Alternative Oxidase (TAO) for their energy metabolism, which is absent in the mammalian hosts and therefore an attractive target for the design of safe drugs. In this study, we cloned, expressed and purified the physiologically relevant form of TAO, which lacks the N-terminal 25 amino acid mitochondrial targeting sequence (ΔMTS-TAO). A new class of 32 cationic and non-cationic 4-hydroxybenzoate and 4-alkoxybenzaldehyde inhibitors was designed and synthesized, enabling the first structure-activity relationship studies on ΔMTS-TAO. Remarkably, we obtained compounds with enzyme inhibition values (IC 50 ) as low as 2 nM, which were efficacious against wild type and multidrug-resistant strains of T. brucei and T. congolense. The inhibitors 13, 15, 16, 19, and 30, designed with a mitochondrion-targeting lipophilic cation tail, displayed trypanocidal potencies comparable to the reference drugs pentamidine and diminazene, and showed no cross-resistance with the critical diamidine and melaminophenyl arsenical classes of trypanocides. The cationic inhibitors 15, 16, 19, 20, and 30 were also much more selective (900 - 344,000) over human cells than the non-targeted neutral derivatives (selectivity >8-fold). A preliminary in vivo study showed that modest doses of 15 and 16 reduced parasitaemia of mice infected with T. b. rhodesiense (STIB900). These compounds represent a promising new class of potent and selective hits against African trypanosomes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Glossina fuscipes populations provide insights for human African trypanosomiasis transmission in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Serap; Caccone, Adalgisa; Galvani, Alison P; Okedi, Loyce M

    2013-08-01

    Uganda has both forms of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT): the chronic gambiense disease in the northwest and the acute rhodesiense disease in the south. The recent spread of rhodesiense into central Uganda has raised concerns given the different control strategies the two diseases require. We present knowledge on the population genetics of the major vector species Glossina fuscipes fuscipes in Uganda with a focus on population structure, measures of gene flow between populations, and the occurrence of polyandry. The microbiome composition and diversity is discussed, focusing on their potential role on trypanosome infection outcomes. We discuss the implications of these findings for large-scale tsetse control programs, including suppression or eradication, being undertaken in Uganda, and potential future genetic applications. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Pentamidine Is Not a Permeant but a Nanomolar Inhibitor of the Trypanosoma brucei Aquaglyceroporin-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Song

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The chemotherapeutic arsenal against human African trypanosomiasis, sleeping sickness, is limited and can cause severe, often fatal, side effects. One of the classic and most widely used drugs is pentamidine, an aromatic diamidine compound introduced in the 1940s. Recently, a genome-wide loss-of-function screen and a subsequently generated trypanosome knockout strain revealed a specific aquaglyceroporin, TbAQP2, to be required for high-affinity uptake of pentamidine. Yet, the underlying mechanism remained unclear. Here, we show that TbAQP2 is not a direct transporter for the di-basic, positively charged pentamidine. Even though one of the two common cation filters of aquaglyceroporins, i.e. the aromatic/arginine selectivity filter, is unconventional in TbAQP2, positively charged compounds are still excluded from passing the channel. We found, instead, that the unique selectivity filter layout renders pentamidine a nanomolar inhibitor of TbAQP2 glycerol permeability. Full, non-covalent inhibition of an aqua(glyceroporin in the nanomolar range has not been achieved before. The remarkable affinity derives from an electrostatic interaction with Asp265 and shielding from water as shown by structure-function evaluation and point mutation of Asp265. Exchange of the preceding Leu264 to arginine abolished pentamidine-binding and parasites expressing this mutant were pentamidine-resistant. Our results indicate that TbAQP2 is a high-affinity receptor for pentamidine. Taken together with localization of TbAQP2 in the flagellar pocket of bloodstream trypanosomes, we propose that pentamidine uptake is by endocytosis.

  18. Comparative analysis of respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation in Leishmania tarentolae, Crithidia fasciculata, Phytomonas serpens and procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verner, Zdeněk; Cermáková, Petra; Skodová, Ingrid; Kováčová, Bianka; Lukeš, Julius; Horváth, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are unicellular parasites living in a wide range of host environments, which to large extent shaped their mitochondrial energy metabolism, resulting in quite large differences even among closely related flagellates. In a comparative manner, we analyzed the activities and composition of mitochondrial respiratory complexes in four species (Leishmania tarentolae, Crithidia fasciculata, Phytomonas serpens and Trypanosoma brucei), which represent the main model trypanosomatids. Moreover, we measured the activity of mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, the overall oxygen consumption and the mitochondrial membrane potential in each species. The comparative analysis suggests an inverse relationship between the activities of respiratory complexes I and II, as well as the overall activity of the canonical complexes and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Our comparative analysis shows that mitochondrial functions are highly variable in these versatile parasites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. In vitro activity of commercial formulation and active principle of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The in vitro trypanocidal activities of 4 commercial formulations Ornidyl®, Pentamidine isethionate®, Germanin® and Lampit® and their corresponding active principles (Dl-difluoromethylornithine, pentamidine isethionate, suramine and 5-nitrofuran) were compared against Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. Differences of ...

  20. 2018-02-23T03:04:41Z https://www.ajol.info/index.php/all/oai oai:ojs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gambian trypanosomosis; Trypanosoma brucei gambiense; animal reservoir hosts; biotechnologies Gambian trypanosomosis (Sleeping Sickness) is a complex and debilitating disease of man. For many years the disease has been ravaging in several parts of sub-saharan Africa despite decades of therapeutic control.

  1. Serum total proteins and creatinine levels in experimental gambian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attempt was therefore made to evaluate the effect of two strains of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense on total proteins and other serum biochemical parameters using vervet monkeys as a model. The outcome of both strains in vervet monkeys was traumatic as the monkeys died from infection 12 – 15 weeks post infection while ...

  2. Lipid-drug conjugate nanoparticles of the hydrophilic drug diminazene-cytotoxicity testing and mouse serum adsorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olbrich, C.; Gessner, A.; Schroder, W.; Kayser, Oliver; Muller, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    Sleeping sickness is a widely distributed disease in great parts of Africa. It is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and rhodiense, transmitted by the Tse-Tse fly. After a hemolymphatic stage, the parasites enter the central nervous system where they cannot be reached by hydrophilic drugs. To

  3. Downregulation of the nuclear-encoded subunits of the complexes III and IV disrupts their respective complexes but not complex I in procyclic Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Anton; Horáková, Eva; Dunajcíková, Petra; Verner, Zdenek; Pravdová, Eliska; Slapetová, Iveta; Cuninková, L'udmila; Lukes, Julius

    2005-10-01

    The function, stability and mutual interactions of selected nuclear-encoded subunits of respiratory complexes III and IV were studied in the Trypanosoma brucei procyclics using RNA interference (RNAi). The growth rates and oxygen consumption of clonal cell lines of knock-downs for apocytochrome c1 (apoc1) and the Rieske Fe-S protein (Rieske) of complex III, and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 6 (cox6) of complex IV were markedly decreased after RNAi induction. Western analysis of mitochondrial lysates using specific antibodies confirmed complete elimination of the targeted proteins 4-6 days after induction. The Rieske protein was reduced in the apoc1 knock-down and vice versa, indicating a mutual interdependence of these components of complex III. However, another subunit of complex IV remained at the wild-type level in the cox6 knock-down. As revealed by two-dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, silencing of a single subunit resulted in the disruption of the respective complex, while the other complex remained unaffected. Membrane potential was reproducibly decreased in the knock-downs and the activities of complex III and/or IV, but not complex I, were drastically reduced, as measured by activity assays and histochemical staining. Using specific inhibitors, we have shown that in procyclics with depleted subunits of the respiratory complexes the flow of electrons was partially re-directed to the alternative oxidase. The apparent absence in T. brucei procyclics of a supercomplex composed of complexes I and III may represent an ancestral state of the respiratory chain.

  4. The role of the PI(3,5)P2kinase TbFab1 in endo/lysosomal trafficking in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilden, Julia K; Umaer, Khan; Kruzel, Emilia K; Hecht, Oliver; Correa, Renan O; Mansfield, John M; Bangs, James D

    2017-06-01

    Protein trafficking through endo/lysosomal compartments is critically important to the biology of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, but the routes material may take to the lysosome, as well as the molecular factors regulating those routes, remain incompletely understood. Phosphoinositides are signaling phospholipids that regulate many trafficking events by recruiting specific effector proteins to discrete membrane subdomains. In this study, we investigate the role of one phosphoinositide, PI(3,5)P 2 in T. brucei. We find a low steady state level of PI(3,5)P 2 in bloodstream form parasites comparable to that of other organisms. RNAi knockdown of the putative PI(3)P-5 kinase TbFab1 decreases the PI(3,5)P 2 pool leading to rapid cell death. TbFab1 and PI(3,5)P 2 both localize strongly to late endo/lysosomes. While most trafficking functions were intact in TbFab1 deficient cells, including both endocytic and biosynthetic trafficking to the lysosome, lysosomal turnover of an endogenous ubiquitinylated membrane protein, ISG65, was completely blocked suggesting that TbFab1 plays a role in the ESCRT-mediated late endosomal/multivesicular body degradative pathways. Knockdown of a second component of PI(3,5)P 2 metabolism, the PI(3,5)P 2 phosphatase TbFig4, also resulted in delayed turnover of ISG65. Together, these results demonstrate an essential role for PI(3,5)P 2 in the turnover of ubiquitinylated membrane proteins and in trypanosome endomembrane biology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of a Novel Class I Transcription Factor A (CITFA) Subunit That Is Indispensable for Transcription by the Multifunctional RNA Polymerase I of Trypanosoma brucei

    KAUST Repository

    Nguyen, T. N.

    2012-10-26

    Trypanosoma brucei is the only organism known to have evolved a multifunctional RNA polymerase I (pol I) system that is used to express the parasite\\'s ribosomal RNAs, as well as its major cell surface antigens, namely, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) and procyclin, which are vital for establishing successful infections in the mammalian host and the tsetse vector, respectively. Thus far, biochemical analyses of the T. brucei RNA pol I transcription machinery have elucidated the subunit structure of the enzyme and identified the class I transcription factor A (CITFA). CITFA binds to RNA pol I promoters, and its CITFA-2 subunit was shown to be absolutely essential for RNA pol I transcription in the parasite. Tandem affinity purification (TAP) of CITFA revealed the subunits CITFA-1 to -6, which are conserved only among kinetoplastid organisms, plus the dynein light chain DYNLL1. Here, by tagging CITFA-6 instead of CITFA-2, a complex was purified that contained all known CITFA subunits, as well as a novel proline-rich protein. Functional studies carried out in vivo and in vitro, as well as a colocalization study, unequivocally demonstrated that this protein is a bona fide CITFA subunit, essential for parasite viability and indispensable for RNA pol I transcription of ribosomal gene units and the active VSG expression site in the mammalian-infective life cycle stage of the parasite. Interestingly, CITFA-7 function appears to be species specific, because expression of an RNA interference (RNAi)-resistant CITFA-7 transgene from Trypanosoma cruzi could not rescue the lethal phenotype of silencing endogenous CITFA-7.

  6. Cytosolic NADPH Homeostasis in Glucose-starved Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei Relies on Malic Enzyme and the Pentose Phosphate Pathway Fed by Gluconeogenic Flux*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmann, Stefan; Morand, Pauline; Ebikeme, Charles; Gales, Lara; Biran, Marc; Hubert, Jane; Brennand, Ana; Mazet, Muriel; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Michels, Paul A. M.; Portais, Jean-Charles; Boshart, Michael; Bringaud, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms depend on NADPH production to feed essential biosyntheses and for oxidative stress defense. Protozoan parasites such as the sleeping sickness pathogen Trypanosoma brucei adapt to different host environments, carbon sources, and oxidative stresses during their infectious life cycle. The procyclic stage develops in the midgut of the tsetse insect vector, where they rely on proline as carbon source, although they prefer glucose when grown in rich media. Here, we investigate the flexible and carbon source-dependent use of NADPH synthesis pathways in the cytosol of the procyclic stage. The T. brucei genome encodes two cytosolic NADPH-producing pathways, the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and the NADP-dependent malic enzyme (MEc). Reverse genetic blocking of those pathways and a specific inhibitor (dehydroepiandrosterone) of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase together established redundancy with respect to H2O2 stress management and parasite growth. Blocking both pathways resulted in ∼10-fold increase of susceptibility to H2O2 stress and cell death. Unexpectedly, the same pathway redundancy was observed in glucose-rich and glucose-depleted conditions, suggesting that gluconeogenesis can feed the PPP to provide NADPH. This was confirmed by (i) a lethal phenotype of RNAi-mediated depletion of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (PGI) in the glucose-depleted Δmec/Δmec null background, (ii) an ∼10-fold increase of susceptibility to H2O2 stress observed for the Δmec/Δmec/RNAiPGI double mutant when compared with the single mutants, and (iii) the 13C enrichment of glycolytic and PPP intermediates from cells incubated with [U-13C]proline, in the absence of glucose. Gluconeogenesis-supported NADPH supply may also be important for nucleotide and glycoconjugate syntheses in the insect host. PMID:23665470

  7. From Cells to Mice to Target: Characterization of NEU-1053 (SB-443342) and Its Analogues for Treatment of Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, William G; Diaz-Gonzalez, Rosario; Ceballos-Perez, Gloria; Rojas, Domingo; Satoh, Takashi; Tear, Westley; Ranade, Ranae M; Barros-Álvarez, Ximena; Hol, Wim G J; Buckner, Frederick S; Navarro, Miguel; Pollastri, Michael P

    2017-03-10

    Human African trypanosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease that is lethal if left untreated. Existing therapeutics have limited efficacy and severe associated toxicities. 2-(2-(((3-((1H-Benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)amino)propyl)amino)methyl)-4,6-dichloro-1H-indol-1-yl)ethan-1-ol (NEU-1053) has recently been identified from a high-throughput screen of >42,000 compounds as a highly potent and fast-acting trypanocidal agent capable of curing a bloodstream infection of Trypanosoma brucei in mice. We have designed a library of analogues to probe the structure-activity relationship and improve the predicted central nervous system (CNS) exposure of NEU-1053. We report the activity of these inhibitors of T. brucei, the efficacy of NEU-1053 in a murine CNS model of infection, and identification of the target of NEU-1053 via X-ray crystallography.

  8. A sensitive and reproducible in vivo imaging mouse model for evaluation of drugs against late-stage human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell-Saward, Hollie; Rodgers, Jean; Bradley, Barbara; Croft, Simon L; Ward, Theresa H

    2015-02-01

    To optimize the Trypanosoma brucei brucei GVR35 VSL-2 bioluminescent strain as an innovative drug evaluation model for late-stage human African trypanosomiasis. An IVIS® Lumina II imaging system was used to detect bioluminescent T. b. brucei GVR35 parasites in mice to evaluate parasite localization and disease progression. Drug treatment was assessed using qualitative bioluminescence imaging and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). We have shown that drug dose-response can be evaluated using bioluminescence imaging and confirmed quantification of tissue parasite load using qPCR. The model was also able to detect drug relapse earlier than the traditional blood film detection and even in the absence of any detectable peripheral parasites. We have developed and optimized a new, efficient method to evaluate novel anti-trypanosomal drugs in vivo and reduce the current 180 day drug relapse experiment to a 90 day model. The non-invasive in vivo imaging model reduces the time required to assess preclinical efficacy of new anti-trypanosomal drugs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Revisiting zoonotic human African trypanosomiasis control in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Sonia; Rossi, Rodolfo; Nshimyumukiza, Leon; Zinszer, Kate

    2016-02-01

    Human migration and concomitant HIV infections are likely to bring about major changes in the epidemiology of zoonotic parasitic infections. Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) control is particularly fraught with intricacies. The primarily zoonotic form, T.b. rhodesiense, and the non-zoonotic T.b. gambiense co-exist in Northern Uganda, leading to a potential geographic and genetic overlap of the two foci. This region also has the highest HIV prevalence in Uganda plus poor food security. We examine the bottlenecks facing the control program in a changed political and economic context. We searched the literature in July 2015 using three databases: MEDLINE, Google Scholar, and Web of Science. Decentralized zoonotic HAT control for animal reservoirs and vectors compromise sustainability of the control programs. Human transmission potential may be underestimated in a region with other endemic diseases and where an HIV-HAT epidemic, could merge two strains. Our comprehensive literature review concludes that enhanced collaboration is imperative not only between human and animal health specialists, but also with political science. Multi-sectorial collaborations may need to be nurtured within existing operational national HIV prevention frameworks, with an integrated surveillance framework.

  10. Escaping Deleterious Immune Response in Their Hosts: Lessons from Trypanosomatids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Anne; Bossard, Géraldine; Sereno, Denis; Pissarra, Joana; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Vincendeau, Philippe; Holzmuller, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Trypanosomatidae family includes the genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania, protozoan parasites displaying complex digenetic life cycles requiring a vertebrate host and an insect vector. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp. are important human pathogens causing human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness), Chagas’ disease, and various clinical forms of Leishmaniasis, respectively. They are transmitted to humans by tsetse flies, triatomine bugs, or sandflies, and affect millions of people worldwide. In humans, extracellular African trypanosomes (T. brucei) evade the hosts’ immune defenses, allowing their transmission to the next host, via the tsetse vector. By contrast, T. cruzi and Leishmania sp. have developed a complex intracellular lifestyle, also preventing several mechanisms to circumvent the host’s immune response. This review seeks to set out the immune evasion strategies developed by the different trypanosomatids resulting from parasite–host interactions and will focus on: clinical and epidemiological importance of diseases; life cycles: parasites–hosts–vectors; innate immunity: key steps for trypanosomatids in invading hosts; deregulation of antigen-presenting cells; disruption of efficient specific immunity; and the immune responses used for parasite proliferation. PMID:27303406

  11. Evaluating the impact of targeting livestock for the prevention of human and animal trypanosomiasis, at village level, in districts newly affected with T. b. rhodesiense in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Louise; Picozzi, Kim; Fyfe, Jenna; von Wissmann, Beatrix; Wastling, Sally; Wardrop, Nicola; Selby, Richard; Acup, Christine Amongi; Bardosh, Kevin L; Muhanguzi, Dennis; Kabasa, John D; Waiswa, Charles; Welburn, Susan C

    2017-02-06

    Uganda has suffered from a series of epidemics of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), a tsetse transmitted disease, also known as sleeping sickness. The area affected by acute Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense HAT (rHAT) has been expanding, driven by importation of infected cattle into regions previously free of the disease. These regions are also affected by African Animal Trypanosomiasis (AAT) demanding a strategy for integrated disease control. In 2008, the Public Private Partnership, Stamp Out Sleeping Sickness (SOS) administered a single dose of trypanocide to 31 486 head of cattle in 29 parishes in Dokolo and Kaberamaido districts. This study examines the impact of this intervention on the prevalence of rHAT and AAT trypanosomes in cattle from villages that had (HAT +ve ) or had not (HAT -ve ) experienced a recent case of rHAT. Cattle herds from 20 villages were sampled and screened by PCR, pre-intervention and 6-months post-intervention, for the presence or absence of: Trypanosoma brucei s.l.; human infective T. b. rhodesiense; Trypanosoma vivax; and Trypanosoma congolense savannah. Post-intervention, there was a significant decrease in the prevalence of T. brucei s.l. and the human infective sub-species T. b. rhodesiense in village cattle across all 20 villages. The prevalence of T. b. rhodesiense was reduced from 2.4% to 0.74% (P impact in HAT -ve villages. The number of villages containing cattle harbouring human infective parasites decreased from 15/20 to 8/20, with T. b. rhodesiense infection mainly persisting within cattle in HAT +ve villages (six/eight). The proportion of T. brucei s.l. infections identified as human infective T. b. rhodesiense decreased after the intervention from 8.3% (95% CI = 11.1-5.9%) to 4.1% (95% CI = 6.8-2.3%). Villages that had experienced a recent human case (HAT +ve villages) showed a significantly higher prevalence for AAT both pre- and post-intervention. For AAT the prevalence of T. vivax was

  12. Spatial dependence of genetic data related to human health and livestock disease resistance: a role for geography to support the One Health approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Joost

    2017-06-01

    Index (TDI, a composite measure of deprivation based on unemployment, non-car ownership, non-home ownership and household overcrowding. The analysis permits to identify clusters where a high GRS depends on a high mean of the TDI calculated within a spatial lag of 800m. Compared with a previous analysis applied to BMI in Lausanne, we were able to delimit areas where genetic susceptibility and deprivation result in observed obesity. The second example is an application of landscape genomics (Joost et al. 2007 to goat breeds in Europe and to cattle in Uganda to show how measures of spatial autocorrelation can be used to identify similarities or differences in genotype occurrences between neighboring individuals that cannot be explained by chance (Stucki et al. 2016. In Uganda, LISA indicators applied to genomic data in the Ankole cattle breed reveal a pattern corresponding to the known geographic distribution of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

  13. The Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-PLC in Trypanosoma brucei Forms a Linear Array on the Exterior of the Flagellar Membrane Before and After Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Orla; Webb, Helena; O'Byrne, Robert; Brabazon, Elaine; Treumann, Achim; Sunter, Jack D.; Carrington, Mark; Voorheis, H. Paul

    2009-01-01

    Bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei contain a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (GPI-PLC) that cleaves the GPI-anchor of the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG). Its location in trypanosomes has been controversial. Here, using confocal microscopy and surface labelling techniques, we show that the GPI-PLC is located exclusively in a linear array on the outside of the flagellar membrane, close to the flagellar attachment zone, but does not co-localize with the flagellar attachment zone protein, FAZ1. Consequently, the GPI-PLC and the VSG occupy the same plasma membrane leaflet, which resolves the topological problem associated with the cleavage reaction if the VSG and the GPI-PLC were on opposite sides of the membrane. The exterior location requires the enzyme to be tightly regulated to prevent VSG release under basal conditions. During stimulated VSG release in intact cells, the GPI-PLC did not change location, suggesting that the release mechanism involves lateral diffusion of the VSG in the plane of the membrane to the fixed position of the GPI-PLC. PMID:19503825

  14. Transcriptome and proteome analyses and the role of atypical calpain protein and autophagy in the spliced leader silencing pathway in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Ronen; Egarmina, Katarina; Voloshin, Konstantin; Waldman Ben-Asher, Hiba; Carmi, Shai; Eliaz, Dror; Drori, Yaron; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2016-10-01

    Under persistent ER stress, Trypanosoma brucei parasites induce the spliced leader silencing (SLS) pathway. In SLS, transcription of the SL RNA gene, the SL donor to all mRNAs, is extinguished, arresting trans-splicing and leading to programmed cell death (PCD). In this study, we investigated the transcriptome following silencing of SEC63, a factor essential for protein translocation across the ER membrane, and whose silencing induces SLS. The proteome of SEC63-silenced cells was analyzed with an emphasis on SLS-specific alterations in protein expression, and modifications that do not directly result from perturbations in trans-splicing. One such protein identified is an atypical calpain SKCRP7.1/7.2. Co-silencing of SKCRP7.1/7.2 and SEC63 eliminated SLS induction due its role in translocating the PK3 kinase. This kinase initiates SLS by migrating to the nucleus and phosphorylating TRF4 leading to shut-off of SL RNA transcription. Thus, SKCRP7.1 is involved in SLS signaling and the accompanying PCD. The role of autophagy in SLS was also investigated; eliminating autophagy through VPS34 or ATG7 silencing demonstrated that autophagy is not essential for SLS induction, but is associated with PCD. Thus, this study identified factors that are used by the parasite to cope with ER stress and to induce SLS and PCD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Genome of the avirulent human-infective trypanosome--Trypanosoma rangeli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Hermes Stoco

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma rangeli is a hemoflagellate protozoan parasite infecting humans and other wild and domestic mammals across Central and South America. It does not cause human disease, but it can be mistaken for the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. We have sequenced the T. rangeli genome to provide new tools for elucidating the distinct and intriguing biology of this species and the key pathways related to interaction with its arthropod and mammalian hosts.The T. rangeli haploid genome is ∼ 24 Mb in length, and is the smallest and least repetitive trypanosomatid genome sequenced thus far. This parasite genome has shorter subtelomeric sequences compared to those of T. cruzi and T. brucei; displays intraspecific karyotype variability and lacks minichromosomes. Of the predicted 7,613 protein coding sequences, functional annotations could be determined for 2,415, while 5,043 are hypothetical proteins, some with evidence of protein expression. 7,101 genes (93% are shared with other trypanosomatids that infect humans. An ortholog of the dcl2 gene involved in the T. brucei RNAi pathway was found in T. rangeli, but the RNAi machinery is non-functional since the other genes in this pathway are pseudogenized. T. rangeli is highly susceptible to oxidative stress, a phenotype that may be explained by a smaller number of anti-oxidant defense enzymes and heat-shock proteins.Phylogenetic comparison of nuclear and mitochondrial genes indicates that T. rangeli and T. cruzi are equidistant from T. brucei. In addition to revealing new aspects of trypanosome co-evolution within the vertebrate and invertebrate hosts, comparative genomic analysis with pathogenic trypanosomatids provides valuable new information that can be further explored with the aim of developing better diagnostic tools and/or therapeutic targets.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Intact Flagella of Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei Cells Identifies Novel Flagellar Proteins with Unique Sub-localization and Dynamics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subota, Ines; Julkowska, Daria; Vincensini, Laetitia; Reeg, Nele; Buisson, Johanna; Blisnick, Thierry; Huet, Diego; Perrot, Sylvie; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Duchateau, Magalie; Hourdel, Véronique; Rousselle, Jean-Claude; Cayet, Nadège; Namane, Abdelkader; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are complex organelles made of hundreds of proteins of highly variable structures and functions. Here we report the purification of intact flagella from the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei using mechanical shearing. Structural preservation was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy that showed that flagella still contained typical elements such as the membrane, the axoneme, the paraflagellar rod, and the intraflagellar transport particles. It also revealed that flagella severed below the basal body, and were not contaminated by other cytoskeletal structures such as the flagellar pocket collar or the adhesion zone filament. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 751 proteins with high confidence, including 88% of known flagellar components. Comparison with the cell debris fraction revealed that more than half of the flagellum markers were enriched in flagella and this enrichment criterion was taken into account to identify 212 proteins not previously reported to be associated to flagella. Nine of these were experimentally validated including a 14-3-3 protein not yet reported to be associated to flagella and eight novel proteins termed FLAM (FLAgellar Member). Remarkably, they localized to five different subdomains of the flagellum. For example, FLAM6 is restricted to the proximal half of the axoneme, no matter its length. In contrast, FLAM8 is progressively accumulating at the distal tip of growing flagella and half of it still needs to be added after cell division. A combination of RNA interference and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching approaches demonstrated very different dynamics from one protein to the other, but also according to the stage of construction and the age of the flagellum. Structural proteins are added to the distal tip of the elongating flagellum and exhibit slow turnover whereas membrane proteins such as the arginine kinase show rapid turnover without a detectible polarity. PMID:24741115

  17. Proteomic analysis of intact flagella of procyclic Trypanosoma brucei cells identifies novel flagellar proteins with unique sub-localization and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subota, Ines; Julkowska, Daria; Vincensini, Laetitia; Reeg, Nele; Buisson, Johanna; Blisnick, Thierry; Huet, Diego; Perrot, Sylvie; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Duchateau, Magalie; Hourdel, Véronique; Rousselle, Jean-Claude; Cayet, Nadège; Namane, Abdelkader; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    Cilia and flagella are complex organelles made of hundreds of proteins of highly variable structures and functions. Here we report the purification of intact flagella from the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei using mechanical shearing. Structural preservation was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy that showed that flagella still contained typical elements such as the membrane, the axoneme, the paraflagellar rod, and the intraflagellar transport particles. It also revealed that flagella severed below the basal body, and were not contaminated by other cytoskeletal structures such as the flagellar pocket collar or the adhesion zone filament. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 751 proteins with high confidence, including 88% of known flagellar components. Comparison with the cell debris fraction revealed that more than half of the flagellum markers were enriched in flagella and this enrichment criterion was taken into account to identify 212 proteins not previously reported to be associated to flagella. Nine of these were experimentally validated including a 14-3-3 protein not yet reported to be associated to flagella and eight novel proteins termed FLAM (FLAgellar Member). Remarkably, they localized to five different subdomains of the flagellum. For example, FLAM6 is restricted to the proximal half of the axoneme, no matter its length. In contrast, FLAM8 is progressively accumulating at the distal tip of growing flagella and half of it still needs to be added after cell division. A combination of RNA interference and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching approaches demonstrated very different dynamics from one protein to the other, but also according to the stage of construction and the age of the flagellum. Structural proteins are added to the distal tip of the elongating flagellum and exhibit slow turnover whereas membrane proteins such as the arginine kinase show rapid turnover without a detectible polarity. © 2014 by The

  18. Escape mechanisms of African trypanosomes: why trypanosomosis is keeping us awake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnops, Jennifer; Magez, Stefan; De Trez, Carl

    2015-03-01

    African trypanosomes have been around for more than 100 million years, and have adapted to survival in a very wide host range. While various indigenous African mammalian host species display a tolerant phenotype towards this parasitic infection, and hence serve as perpetual reservoirs, many commercially important livestock species are highly disease susceptible. When considering humans, they too display a highly sensitive disease progression phenotype for infections with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense or Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, while being intrinsically resistant to infections with other trypanosome species. As extracellular trypanosomes proliferate and live freely in the bloodstream and lymphatics, they are constantly exposed to the immune system. Due to co-evolution, this environment however no longer poses a hostile threat, but has become the niche environment where trypanosomes thrive and obligatory await transmission through the bites of tsetse flies or other haematophagic vectors, ideally without causing severe side infection-associated pathology to their host. Hence, African trypanosomes have acquired various mechanisms to manipulate and control the host immune response, evading effective elimination. Despite the extensive research into trypanosomosis over the past 40 years, many aspects of the anti-parasite immune response remain to be solved and no vaccine is currently available. Here we review the recent work on the different escape mechanisms employed by African Trypanosomes to ensure infection chronicity and transmission potential.

  19. Detection of Trypanosoma brucei parasites in blood samples using real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugasa, Claire M.; Schoone, Gerard J.; Ekangu, Rosine A.; Lubega, George W.; Kager, Piet A.; Schallig, Henk D. F. H.

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the conventional diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is by microscopic demonstration of trypomastigotes in blood, lymph, and/or cerebrospinal fluid. However, microscopic diagnosis of HAT is not sensitive enough and may give false-negative results, thus, denying the patient

  20. Future treatment options for human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amy J; Avery, Vicky M

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 17 years, the number of reported cases of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) has declined by over 90%, a significant result since the disease was highlighted as a public health problem by the WHO in 1995. However, if the goal of eliminating HAT by 2020 is to be achieved, then new treatments need to be identified and developed. A plethora of compound collections has been screened against Trypanosoma brucei spp, the etiological agents of HAT, resulting in three compounds progressing to clinical development. However, due to the high attrition rates in drug discovery, it is essential that research continues to identify novel molecules. Failure to do so, will result in the absence of molecules in the pipeline to fall back on should the current clinical trials be unsuccessful. This could seriously compromise control efforts to date, resulting in a resurgence in the number of HAT cases.

  1. Monitoring the elimination of human African trypanosomiasis: Update to 2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José R Franco

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO has targeted the elimination of Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT 'as a public health problem' by 2020. The selected indicators of elimination should be monitored every two years, and we provide here a comprehensive update to 2014. The monitoring system is underpinned by the Atlas of HAT.With 3,797 reported cases in 2014, the corresponding milestone (5,000 cases was surpassed, and the 2020 global target of 'fewer than 2,000 reported cases per year' seems within reach. The areas where HAT is still a public health problem (i.e. > 1 HAT reported case per 10,000 people per year have halved in less than a decade, and in 2014 they corresponded to 350 thousand km2. The number and potential coverage of fixed health facilities offering diagnosis and treatment for HAT has expanded, and approximately 1,000 are now operating in 23 endemic countries. The observed trends are supported by sustained surveillance and improved reporting.HAT elimination appears to be on track. For gambiense HAT, still accounting for the vast majority of reported cases, progress continues unabated in a context of sustained intensity of screening activities. For rhodesiense HAT, a slow-down was observed in the last few years. Looking beyond the 2020 target, innovative tools and approaches will be increasingly needed. Coordination, through the WHO network for HAT elimination, will remain crucial to overcome the foreseeable and unforeseeable challenges that an elimination process will inevitably pose.

  2. Monitoring the elimination of human African trypanosomiasis: Update to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, José R; Cecchi, Giuliano; Priotto, Gerardo; Paone, Massimo; Diarra, Abdoulaye; Grout, Lise; Mattioli, Raffaele C; Argaw, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has targeted the elimination of Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) 'as a public health problem' by 2020. The selected indicators of elimination should be monitored every two years, and we provide here a comprehensive update to 2014. The monitoring system is underpinned by the Atlas of HAT. With 3,797 reported cases in 2014, the corresponding milestone (5,000 cases) was surpassed, and the 2020 global target of 'fewer than 2,000 reported cases per year' seems within reach. The areas where HAT is still a public health problem (i.e. > 1 HAT reported case per 10,000 people per year) have halved in less than a decade, and in 2014 they corresponded to 350 thousand km2. The number and potential coverage of fixed health facilities offering diagnosis and treatment for HAT has expanded, and approximately 1,000 are now operating in 23 endemic countries. The observed trends are supported by sustained surveillance and improved reporting. HAT elimination appears to be on track. For gambiense HAT, still accounting for the vast majority of reported cases, progress continues unabated in a context of sustained intensity of screening activities. For rhodesiense HAT, a slow-down was observed in the last few years. Looking beyond the 2020 target, innovative tools and approaches will be increasingly needed. Coordination, through the WHO network for HAT elimination, will remain crucial to overcome the foreseeable and unforeseeable challenges that an elimination process will inevitably pose.

  3. Preclinical assessment of the treatment of second-stage African trypanosomiasis with cordycepin and deoxycoformycin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman K Vodnala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is an urgent need to substitute the highly toxic compounds still in use for treatment of the encephalitic stage of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT. We here assessed the treatment with the doublet cordycepin and the deaminase inhibitor deoxycoformycin for this stage of infection with Trypanosoma brucei (T.b.. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cordycepin was selected as the most efficient drug from a direct parasite viability screening of a compound library of nucleoside analogues. The minimal number of doses and concentrations of the drugs effective for treatment of T.b. brucei infections in mice were determined. Oral, intraperitoneal or subcutaneous administrations of the compounds were successful for treatment. The doublet was effective for treatment of late stage experimental infections with human pathogenic T.b. rhodesiense and T.b. gambiense isolates. Late stage infection treatment diminished the levels of inflammatory cytokines in brains of infected mice. Incubation with cordycepin resulted in programmed cell death followed by secondary necrosis of the parasites. T.b. brucei strains developed resistance to cordycepin after culture with increasing concentrations of the compound. However, cordycepin-resistant parasites showed diminished virulence and were not cross-resistant to other drugs used for treatment of HAT, i.e. pentamidine, suramin and melarsoprol. Although resistant parasites were mutated in the gene coding for P2 nucleoside adenosine transporter, P2 knockout trypanosomes showed no altered resistance to cordycepin, indicating that absence of the P2 transporter is not sufficient to render the trypanosomes resistant to the drug. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether, our data strongly support testing of treatment with a combination of cordycepin and deoxycoformycin as an alternative for treatment of second-stage and/or melarsoprol-resistant HAT.

  4. Stage-specific requirement for Isa1 and Isa2 proteins in the mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei and heterologous rescue by human and Blastocystis orthologues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Long, Shaojun; Changmai, Piya; Tsaousis, A.D.; Skalický, Tomáš; Verner, Zdeněk; Wen, Yan-Zi; Roger, A. J.; Lukeš, Julius

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 6 (2011), 1403-1418 ISSN 0950-382X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667; GA MŠk LC07032; GA MŠk 2B06129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : IRON-SULFUR CLUSTER * ESCHERICHIA-COLI * ASSEMBLY PROTEIN * SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE * AZOTOBACTER-VINELANDII * CYSTEINE DESULFURASE * CRYSTAL-STRUCTURE * BINDING ACTIVITY * GENE-CLUSTER Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.010, year: 2011

  5. Aquaglyceroporin-null trypanosomes display glycerol transport defects and respiratory-inhibitor sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Jeacock

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aquaglyceroporins (AQPs transport water and glycerol and play important roles in drug-uptake in pathogenic trypanosomatids. For example, AQP2 in the human-infectious African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, is responsible for melarsoprol and pentamidine-uptake, and melarsoprol treatment-failure has been found to be due to AQP2-defects in these parasites. To further probe the roles of these transporters, we assembled a T. b. brucei strain lacking all three AQP-genes. Triple-null aqp1-2-3 T. b. brucei displayed only a very moderate growth defect in vitro, established infections in mice and recovered effectively from hypotonic-shock. The aqp1-2-3 trypanosomes did, however, display glycerol uptake and efflux defects. They failed to accumulate glycerol or to utilise glycerol as a carbon-source and displayed increased sensitivity to salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, octyl gallate or propyl gallate; these inhibitors of trypanosome alternative oxidase (TAO can increase intracellular glycerol to toxic levels. Notably, disruption of AQP2 alone generated cells with glycerol transport defects. Consistent with these findings, AQP2-defective, melarsoprol-resistant clinical isolates were sensitive to the TAO inhibitors, SHAM, propyl gallate and ascofuranone, relative to melarsoprol-sensitive reference strains. We conclude that African trypanosome AQPs are dispensable for viability and osmoregulation but they make important contributions to drug-uptake, glycerol-transport and respiratory-inhibitor sensitivity. We also discuss how the AQP-dependent inverse sensitivity to melarsoprol and respiratory inhibitors described here might be exploited.

  6. A static-cidal assay for Trypanosoma brucei to aid hit prioritisation for progression into drug discovery programmes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu De Rycker

    Full Text Available Human African Trypanosomiasis is a vector-borne disease of sub-Saharan Africa that causes significant morbidity and mortality. Current therapies have many drawbacks, and there is an urgent need for new, better medicines. Ideally such new treatments should be fast-acting cidal agents that cure the disease in as few doses as possible. Screening assays used for hit-discovery campaigns often do not distinguish cytocidal from cytostatic compounds and further detailed follow-up experiments are required. Such studies usually do not have the throughput required to test the large numbers of hits produced in a primary high-throughput screen. Here, we present a 384-well assay that is compatible with high-throughput screening and provides an initial indication of the cidal nature of a compound. The assay produces growth curves at ten compound concentrations by assessing trypanosome counts at 4, 24 and 48 hours after compound addition. A reduction in trypanosome counts over time is used as a marker for cidal activity. The lowest concentration at which cell killing is seen is a quantitative measure for the cidal activity of the compound. We show that the assay can identify compounds that have trypanostatic activity rather than cidal activity, and importantly, that results from primary high-throughput assays can overestimate the potency of compounds significantly. This is due to biphasic growth inhibition, which remains hidden at low starting cell densities and is revealed in our static-cidal assay. The assay presented here provides an important tool to follow-up hits from high-throughput screening campaigns and avoid progression of compounds that have poor prospects due to lack of cidal activity or overestimated potency.

  7. Human African Trypanosomiasis And Human Immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In contrast, the patients from the local STD clinic showed that 52% (n=53) were seropositive for both HIV type 1 and 2 infections. No patient from the STD clinic was seropositive for HIV type 2 alone. Calculated Yates Chi square value of 17.31 (P>0.001) indicated a significant increase in HIV type 2 antibodies in T. brucei ...

  8. Delivery of antihuman African trypanosomiasis drugs across the blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Gayathri N; Watson, Christopher P; Fidanboylu, Mehmet; Sanderson, Lisa; Thomas, Sarah A

    2014-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness) is a potentially fatal disease caused by the parasite, Trypanosoma brucei sp. The parasites are transmitted by the bite of insect vectors belonging to the genus Glossina (tsetse flies) and display a life cycle strategy that is equally spread between human and insect hosts. T.b. gambiense is found in western and central Africa whereas, T.b. rhodesiense is found in eastern and southern Africa. The disease has two clinical stages: a blood stage after the bite of an infected tsetse fly, followed by a central nervous system (CNS) stage where the parasite penetrates the brain; causing death if left untreated. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) makes the CNS stage difficult to treat because it prevents 98% of all known compounds from entering the brain, including some anti-HAT drugs. Those that do enter the brain are toxic compounds in their own right and have serious side effects. There are only a few drugs available to treat HAT and those that do are stage specific. This review summarizes the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of HAT and provides a close examination of the BBB transport of anti-HAT drugs and an overview of the latest drugs in development. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Plasma neuronal specific enolase: a potential stage diagnostic marker in human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Jeremy M; Mitchell, Julia A

    2014-07-01

    This study was carried out to determine the potential of neuronal specific enolase (NSE) as a stage diagnostic marker in human African trypanosomiasis. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid were obtained from a cohort of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense-infected patients and non-infected controls. Neuronal specific enolase concentrations were measured by ELISA and analysed in relation to diagnosis and disease-stage data. Plasma NSE concentration was significantly increased in late-stage patients (median 21 ng/ml), compared to the control (median 11 ng/ml), but not in early-stage patients (median 5.3 ng/ml). Cerebrospinal fluid NSE concentration did not vary between stages. Plasma NSE is a potential stage diagnostic in this cohort and merits further investigation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Zoonotic trypanosomes in South East Asia: Attempts to control Trypanosoma lewisi using human and animal trypanocidal drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desquesnes, Marc; Yangtara, Sarawut; Kunphukhieo, Pawinee; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Herder, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    Beside typical human trypanosomes responsible of sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in Latin America, there is a growing number of reported atypical human infections due to Trypanosoma evansi, a livestock parasite, or Trypanosoma lewisi, a rat parasite, especially in Asia. Drugs available for the treatment of T. brucei ssp. in humans are obviously of choice for the control of T. evansi because it is derived from T. brucei. However, concerning T. lewisi, there is an urgent need to determine the efficacy of trypanocidal drugs for the treatment in humans. In a recent study, pentamidine and fexinidazole were shown to have the best efficacy against one stock of T. lewisi in rats. In the present study suramin, pentamidine, eflornitine, nifurtimox, benznidazole and fexinidazole, were evaluated at low and high doses, in single day administration to normal rats experimentally infected with a stock of T. lewisi recently isolated in Thailand. Because none of these treatments was efficient, a trial was made with the most promising trypanocide identified in a previous study, fexinidazole 100mg/kg, in 5 daily administrations. Results observed were unclear. To confirm the efficacy of fexinidazole, a mixed infection protocol was set up in cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed rats. Animals were infected successively by T. lewisi and T. evansi, and received 10 daily PO administrations of 200mg/kg fexinidazole. Drastic effects were observed against T. evansi which was cleared from the rat's blood within 24 to 48h; however, the treatment did not affect T. lewisi which remained in high number in the blood until the end of the experiment. This mixed infection/treatment protocol clearly demonstrated the efficacy of fexinidazole against T. evansi and its inefficacy against T. lewisi. Since animal trypanocides were also recently shown to be inefficient, other protocols as well as other T. lewisi stocks should be investigated in further studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by

  11. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2016-03-15

    30] appears to also occur in humans as some individuals are able to somehow control T. b. Gambiense infections [26]. This phenomenon probably may have occurred among residents of the grazing reserve who at one time.

  12. Kynurenine Pathway Activation in Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Jeremy M; Forrest, Caroline M; Dalton, R Neil; Turner, Charles; Rodgers, Jean; Stone, Trevor W; Kennedy, Peter G E

    2017-03-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan oxidation is associated with central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory pathways. Inhibition of this pathway ameliorates CNS inflammation in rodent models of the late (meningoencephalitic) stage of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). In this study, we evaluate whether the kynurenine pathway is activated in clinical HAT and associated with CNS inflammatory responses. We measured cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tryptophan and kynurenine metabolite concentrations in patients infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Kynurenine concentration in CSF was increased in both the early and late stages of disease, with a progressive increase in tryptophan oxidation associated with stage progression. Kynurenine pathway activation was associated with increases in neuroinflammatory markers, but there was no clear relationship to neurological symptoms. CNS kynurenine pathway activation occurs during HAT, including cases prior to the current diagnostic cutoff for late-stage infection, providing evidence for early CNS involvement in HAT. Metabolite data demonstrate that the kynurenine-3-monooxygenase and kynurenine aminotransferase branches of the kynurenine pathway are active. The association between tryptophan oxidation and CNS inflammatory responses as measured by CSF interleukin 6 (IL-6) concentration supports a role of kynurenine metabolites in the inflammatory pathogenesis of late-stage HAT. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  13. Trypanosoma vivax, T. congolense “forest type” and T. simiae: prevalence in domestic animals of sleeping sickness foci of Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimpaye, H.; Njiokou, F.; Njine, T.; Njitchouang, G.R.; Cuny, G.; Herder, S.; Asonganyi, T.; Simo, G.

    2011-01-01

    In order to better understand the epidemiology of Human and Animal trypanosomiasis that occur together in sleeping sickness foci, a study of prevalences of animal parasites (Trypanosoma vivax, T. congolense “forest type”, and T. simiae) infections was conducted on domestic animals to complete the previous work carried on T. brucei gambiense prevalence using the same animal sample. 875 domestic animals, including 307 pigs, 264 goats, 267 sheep and 37 dogs were sampled in the sleeping sickness foci of Bipindi, Campo, Doumé and Fontem in Cameroon. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based method was used to identify these trypanosome species. A total of 237 (27.08%) domestic animals were infected by at least one trypanosome species. The prevalence of T. vivax, T. congolense “forest type” and T. simiae were 20.91%, 11.42% and 0.34% respectively. The prevalences of T. vivax and T. congolense “forest type” differed significantly between the animal species and between the foci (p < 0.0001); however, these two trypanosomes were found in all animal species as well as in all the foci subjected to the study. The high prevalences of T. vivax and T. congolense “forest type” in Bipindi and Fontem-Center indicate their intense transmission in these foci. PMID:21678793

  14. A tsetse and tabanid fly survey of African great apes habitats reveals the presence of a novel trypanosome lineage but the absence of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votýpka, Jan; Rádrová, Jana; Skalický, Tomáš; Jirků, Milan; Jirsová, Dagmar; Mihalca, Andrei D; D'Amico, Gianluca; Petrželková, Klára J; Modrý, David; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-10-01

    Tsetse and tabanid flies transmit several Trypanosoma species, some of which are human and livestock pathogens of major medical and socioeconomic impact in Africa. Recent advances in molecular techniques and phylogenetic analyses have revealed a growing diversity of previously unidentified tsetse-transmitted trypanosomes potentially pathogenic to livestock and/or other domestic animals as well as wildlife, including African great apes. To map the distribution, prevalence and co-occurrence of known and novel trypanosome species, we analyzed tsetse and tabanid flies collected in the primary forested part of the Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas, Central African Republic, which hosts a broad spectrum of wildlife including primates and is virtually devoid of domestic animals. Altogether, 564 tsetse flies and 81 tabanid flies were individually screened for the presence of trypanosomes using 18S rRNA-specific nested PCR. Herein, we demonstrate that wildlife animals are parasitized by a surprisingly wide range of trypanosome species that in some cases may circulate via these insect vectors. While one-third of the examined tsetse flies harbored trypanosomes either from the Trypanosoma theileri, Trypanosoma congolense or Trypanosoma simiae complex, or one of the three new members of the genus Trypanosoma (strains 'Bai', 'Ngbanda' and 'Didon'), more than half of the tabanid flies exclusively carried T. theileri. To establish the putative vertebrate hosts of the novel trypanosome species, we further analyzed the provenance of blood meals of tsetse flies. DNA individually isolated from 1033 specimens of Glossina spp. and subjected to high-throughput library-based screening proved that most of the examined tsetse flies engorged on wild ruminants (buffalo, sitatunga, bongo), humans and suids. Moreover, they also fed (albeit more rarely) on other vertebrates, thus providing indirect but convincing evidence that trypanosomes can be transmitted via these vectors among a wide range of

  15. Discovery of Infection Associated Metabolic Markers in Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamour, Sabrina D; Gomez-Romero, Maria; Vorkas, Panagiotis A; Alibu, Vincent P; Saric, Jasmina; Holmes, Elaine; Sternberg, Jeremy M

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) remains a major neglected tropical disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. As clinical symptoms are usually non-specific, new diagnostic and prognostic markers are urgently needed to enhance the number of identified cases and optimise treatment. This is particularly important for disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, where indirect immunodiagnostic approaches have to date been unsuccessful. We have conducted global metabolic profiling of plasma from T.b.rhodesiense HAT patients and endemic controls, using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ultra-performance liquid chromatography, coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and identified differences in the lipid, amino acid and metabolite profiles. Altogether 16 significantly disease discriminatory metabolite markers were found using NMR, and a further 37 lipid markers via UPLC-MS. These included significantly higher levels of phenylalanine, formate, creatinine, N-acetylated glycoprotein and triglycerides in patients relative to controls. HAT patients also displayed lower concentrations of histidine, sphingomyelins, lysophosphatidylcholines, and several polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines. While the disease metabolite profile was partially consistent with previous data published in experimental rodent infection, we also found unique lipid and amino acid profile markers highlighting subtle but important differences between the host response to trypanosome infections between animal models and natural human infections. Our results demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiling in the identification of novel diagnostic biomarkers and the elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms in this disease.

  16. Candidate genes-based investigation of susceptibility to Human African Trypanosomiasis in Côte d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahouty, Bernardin; Koffi, Mathurin; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Simo, Gustave; Matovu, Enock; Mulindwa, Julius; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Bucheton, Bruno; Sidibé, Issa; Jamonneau, Vincent; MacLeod, Annette; Noyes, Harry; N'Guetta, Simon-Pierre

    2017-10-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) or sleeping sickness is a Neglected Tropical Disease. Long regarded as an invariably fatal disease, there is increasing evidence that infection by T. b. gambiense can result in a wide range of clinical outcomes, including latent infections, which are long lasting infections with no parasites detectable by microscopy. The determinants of this clinical diversity are not well understood but could be due in part to parasite or host genetic diversity in multiple genes, or their interactions. A candidate gene association study was conducted in Côte d'Ivoire using a case-control design which included a total of 233 subjects (100 active HAT cases, 100 controls and 33 latent infections). All three possible pairwise comparisons between the three phenotypes were tested using 96 SNPs in16 candidate genes (IL1, IL4, IL4R, IL6, IL8, IL10, IL12, IL12R, TNFA, INFG, MIF, APOL1, HPR, CFH, HLA-A and HLA-G). Data from 77 SNPs passed quality control. There were suggestive associations at three loci in IL6 and TNFA in the comparison between active cases and controls, one SNP in each of APOL1, MIF and IL6 in the comparison between latent infections and active cases and seven SNP in IL4, HLA-G and TNFA between latent infections and controls. No associations remained significant after Bonferroni correction, but the Benjamini Hochberg false discovery rate test indicated that there were strong probabilities that at least some of the associations were genuine. The excess of associations with latent infections despite the small number of samples available suggests that these subjects form a distinct genetic cluster different from active HAT cases and controls, although no clustering by phenotype was observed by principle component analysis. This underlines the complexity of the interactions existing between host genetic polymorphisms and parasite diversity.

  17. Iron-associated biology of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Basu, Somsuvro; Horáková, Eva; Lukeš, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1860, č. 2 (2016), s. 363-370 ISSN 0304-4165 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S; GA ČR GAP305/12/2261; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) COST Action CM1307; European Commission(XE) 316304 - MODBIOLIN Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200961204 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : iron * Fe/S cluster * heme * Trypanosoma * TAO Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.702, year: 2016

  18. A unique, highly conserved secretory invertase is differentially expressed by promastigote developmental forms of all species of the human pathogen, Leishmania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyda, Todd A.; Joshi, Manju B.; Andersen, John F.; Kelada, Andrew Y.; Owings, Joshua P.; Bates, Paul A.; Dwyer, Dennis M.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania are protozoan pathogens of humans that exist as extracellular promastigotes in the gut of their sand fly vectors and as obligate intracellular amastigotes within phagolysosomes of infected macrophages. Between infectious blood meal feeds, sand flies take plant juice meals that contain sucrose and store these sugars in their crop. Such sugars are regurgitated into the sand fly anterior midgut where they impact the developing promastigote parasite population. In this report we showed that promastigotes of all Leishmania species secreted an invertase/sucrase enzyme during their growth in vitro. In contrast, neither L. donovani nor L. mexicana amastigotes possessed any detectable invertase activity. Importantly, no released/secreted invertase activity was detected in culture supernatants from either Trypanosoma brucei or Trypanosoma cruzi. Using HPLC, the L. donovani secretory invertase was isolated and subjected to amino acid sequencing. Subsequently, we used a molecular approach to identify the LdINV and LmexINV genes encoding the ~72 kDa invertases produced by these organisms. Interestingly, we identified high fidelity LdINV-like homologs in the genomes of all Leishmania sp. but none were present in either T. brucei or T. cruzi. Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses showed that these genes were developmentally/differentially expressed in promastigotes but not amastigotes of these parasites. Homologous transfection studies demonstrated that these genes in fact encoded the functional secretory invertases produced by these parasites. Cumulatively, our results suggest that these secretory enzymes play critical roles in the survival/growth/development and transmission of all Leishmania parasites within their sand fly vector hosts. PMID:25763714

  19. Biology of Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) evansi in experimental heterologous mammalian hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, K K; Roy, S; Choudhury, A

    2016-09-01

    Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) evansi is a causative agent of the dreadful mammalian disease trypanosomiasis or 'Surra' and carried as a latent parasite in domestic cattle but occasionally proves fatal when transmitted to horses and camel. Sporadic outbreak of 'Surra' to different animals (beside their natural hosts) reminds that T. evansi may be zoonotic, as their close relative cause sleeping sickness to human being. This haemoflagellate is mechanically transmitted by horse fly and its effect on different host varies depending on certain factors including the effectiveness of transmission by mechanical vector, the suitability and susceptibility of the host as well as most importantly the ability of the disease establishment of parasite to adapt itself to the host's resistance, etc. The course of the disease caused by T. evansi is similar to that of human sleeping sickness caused by T. (T.) brucei gambiense. The target organs and symptoms show close similarity. T. evansi can successfully be transmitted among unnatural hosts i.e., other classes of vertebrates, like chicken. In transmission experiments, the unnatural hosts may sometimes induce profound changes in the biology of trypanosomes. Hence, in present study the observations are the biology of different morphological changes of T. evansi as well as its ability of disease formation within some heterologous mammal viz., albino rat, guineapig, bandicoot, mongoose, domestic cat and common monkey. Blood smears of infected albino rats, bandicoot, and mongoose revealed only monomorphic form. Interestingly, blood smears of infected cat and monkey, T. evansi shows slender trypomastigote form and short intermediate form whereas organ smears shows other two forms of haemoflagellate viz., sphaeromastigote and amastigote form. The haemoflagellate maintains a common reproductive cycle in all the experimental heterologous hosts whereas disease symptoms differ. T. evansi infected cat and monkey shows nervous symptoms. Infected

  20. Estimating and mapping the population at risk of sleeping sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere P Simarro

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, also known as sleeping sickness, persists as a public health problem in several sub-Saharan countries. Evidence-based, spatially explicit estimates of population at risk are needed to inform planning and implementation of field interventions, monitor disease trends, raise awareness and support advocacy. Comprehensive, geo-referenced epidemiological records from HAT-affected countries were combined with human population layers to map five categories of risk, ranging from "very high" to "very low," and to estimate the corresponding at-risk population.Approximately 70 million people distributed over a surface of 1.55 million km(2 are estimated to be at different levels of risk of contracting HAT. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense accounts for 82.2% of the population at risk, the remaining 17.8% being at risk of infection from T. b. rhodesiense. Twenty-one million people live in areas classified as moderate to very high risk, where more than 1 HAT case per 10,000 inhabitants per annum is reported.Updated estimates of the population at risk of sleeping sickness were made, based on quantitative information on the reported cases and the geographic distribution of human population. Due to substantial methodological differences, it is not possible to make direct comparisons with previous figures for at-risk population. By contrast, it will be possible to explore trends in the future. The presented maps of different HAT risk levels will help to develop site-specific strategies for control and surveillance, and to monitor progress achieved by ongoing efforts aimed at the elimination of sleeping sickness.

  1. Human parasitic protozoan infection to infertility: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiadeh, Malihe Nourollahpour; Niyyati, Maryam; Fallahi, Shirzad; Rostami, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Protozoan parasitic diseases are endemic in many countries worldwide, especially in developing countries, where infertility is a major burden. It has been reported that such infections may cause infertility through impairment in male and female reproductive systems. We searched Medline, PubMed, and Scopus databases and Google scholar to identify the potentially relevant studies on protozoan parasitic infections and their implications in human and animal model infertility. Literature described that some of the protozoan parasites such as Trichomonas vaginalis may cause deformities of the genital tract, cervical neoplasia, and tubal and atypical pelvic inflammations in women and also non-gonoccocal urethritis, asthenozoospermia, and teratozoospermia in men. Toxopalasma gondii could cause endometritis, impaired folliculogenesis, ovarian and uterine atrophy, adrenal hypertrophy, vasculitis, and cessation of estrus cycling in female and also decrease in semen quality, concentration, and motility in male. Trypanosoma cruzi inhibits cell division in embryos and impairs normal implantation and development of placenta. Decrease in gestation rate, infection of hormone-producing glands, parasite invasion of the placenta, and overproduction of inflammatory cytokines in the oviducts and uterine horns are other possible mechanisms induced by Trypanosoma cruzi to infertility. Plasmodium spp. and Trypanosoma brucei spp. cause damage in pituitary gland, hormonal disorders, and decreased semen quality. Entamoeba histolytica infection leads to pelvic pain, salpingitis, tubo-ovarian abscess, and genital ulcers. Cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis can induce genital lesion, testicular amyloidosis, inflammation of epididymis, prostatitis, and sperm abnormality in human and animals. In addition, some epidemiological studies have reported that rates of protozoan infections in infertile patients are higher than healthy controls. The current review indicates that protozoan parasitic

  2. Human African trypanosomiasis in the Democratic Republic of the Congo: disease distribution and risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbala, Crispin; Simarro, Pere P; Cecchi, Giuliano; Paone, Massimo; Franco, José R; Kande Betu Ku Mesu, Victor; Makabuza, Jacquies; Diarra, Abdoulaye; Chansy, Shampa; Priotto, Gerardo; Mattioli, Raffaele C; Jannin, Jean G

    2015-06-06

    For the past three decades, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) has been the country reporting the highest number of cases of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). In 2012, DRC continued to bear the heaviest burden of gambiense HAT, accounting for 84 % of all cases reported at the continental level (i.e., 5,968/7,106). This paper reviews the status of sleeping sickness in DRC between 2000 and 2012, with a focus on spatio-temporal patterns. Epidemiological trends at the national and provincial level are presented. The number of HAT cases reported yearly from DRC decreased by 65 % from 2000 to 2012, i.e., from 16,951 to 5,968. At the provincial level a more complex picture emerges. Whilst HAT control in the Equateur province has had a spectacular impact on the number of cases (97 % reduction), the disease has proved more difficult to tackle in other provinces, most notably in Bandundu and Kasai, where, despite substantial progress, HAT remains entrenched. HAT prevalence presents its highest values in the northern part of the Province Orientale, where a number of constraints hinder surveillance and control. Significant coordinated efforts by the National Sleeping Sickness Control Programme and the World Health Organization in data collection, reporting, management and mapping, culminating in the Atlas of HAT, have enabled HAT distribution and risk in DRC to be known with more accuracy than ever before. Over 18,000 locations of epidemiological interest have been geo-referenced (average accuracy ≈ 1.7 km), corresponding to 93.6 % of reported cases (period 2000-2012). The population at risk of contracting sleeping sickness has been calculated for two five-year periods (2003-2007 and 2008-2012), resulting in estimates of 33 and 37 million people respectively. The progressive decrease in HAT cases reported since 2000 in DRC is likely to reflect a real decline in disease incidence. If this result is to be sustained, and if further progress is to be made

  3. Nanobody conjugated PLGA nanoparticles for active targeting of African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, José L; Unciti-Broceta, Juan D; Maceira, José; Del Castillo, Teresa; Hernández-Quero, José; Magez, Stefan; Soriano, Miguel; García-Salcedo, José A

    2015-01-10

    Targeted delivery of therapeutics is an alternative approach for the selective treatment of infectious diseases. The surface of African trypanosomes, the causative agents of African trypanosomiasis, is covered by a surface coat consisting of a single variant surface glycoprotein, termed VSG. This coat is recycled by endocytosis at a very high speed, making the trypanosome surface an excellent target for the delivery of trypanocidal drugs. Here, we report the design of a drug nanocarrier based on poly ethylen glycol (PEG) covalently attached (PEGylated) to poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) to generate PEGylated PLGA nanoparticles. This nanocarrier was coupled to a single domain heavy chain antibody fragment (nanobody) that specifically recognizes the surface of the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma brucei. Nanoparticles were loaded with pentamidine, the first-line drug for T. b. gambiense acute infection. An in vitro effectiveness assay showed a 7-fold decrease in the half-inhibitory concentration (IC50) of the formulation relative to free drug. Furthermore, in vivo therapy using a murine model of African trypanosomiasis demonstrated that the formulation cured all infected mice at a 10-fold lower dose than the minimal full curative dose of free pentamidine and 60% of mice at a 100-fold lower dose. This nanocarrier has been designed with components approved for use in humans and loaded with a drug that is currently in use to treat the disease. Moreover, this flexible nanobody-based system can be adapted to load any compound, opening a range of new potential therapies with application to other diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Estimating the burden of rhodesiense sleeping sickness during an outbreak in Serere, eastern Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleman Paul G

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zoonotic sleeping sickness, or HAT (Human African Trypanosomiasis, caused by infection with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, is an under-reported and neglected tropical disease. Previous assessments of the disease burden expressed as Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs for this infection have not distinguished T.b. rhodesiense from infection with the related, but clinically distinct Trypanosoma brucei gambiense form. T.b. rhodesiense occurs focally, and it is important to assess the burden at the scale at which resource-allocation decisions are made. Methods The burden of T.b. rhodesiense was estimated during an outbreak of HAT in Serere, Uganda. We identified the unique characteristics affecting the burden of rhodesiense HAT such as age, severity, level of under-reporting and duration of hospitalisation, and use field data and empirical estimates of these to model the burden imposed by this and other important diseases in this study population. While we modelled DALYs using standard methods, we also modelled uncertainty of our parameter estimates through a simulation approach. We distinguish between early and late stage HAT morbidity, and used disability weightings appropriate for the T.b. rhodesiense form of HAT. We also use a model of under-reporting of HAT to estimate the contribution of un-reported mortality to the overall disease burden in this community, and estimate the cost-effectiveness of hospital-based HAT control. Results Under-reporting accounts for 93% of the DALY estimate of rhodesiense HAT. The ratio of reported malaria cases to reported HAT cases in the same health unit was 133:1, however, the ratio of DALYs was 3:1. The age productive function curve had a close correspondence with the HAT case distribution, and HAT cases occupied more patient admission time in Serere during 1999 than all other infectious diseases other than malaria. The DALY estimate for HAT in Serere shows that the burden is much greater

  5. A Brief Review of Drug Discovery Research for Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Danica R; Mocerino, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), a neglected disease endemic in Sub- Saharan Africa, is usually fatal if left untreated. It is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei, and is spread by the tsetse fly. The drugs currently available to treat HAT are few, and limited in efficacy. Furthermore, resistance towards these drugs is beginning to grow. In the last 25 years, only one advance has been made into HAT treatment and consequently, there is an increasing need for new drugs to be sought that are able to effectively treat this disease. This review provides a brief overview of drug discovery research for HAT, focusing on research published in the last four years, identifying new molecules with the potential to be developed into anti-HAT agents. The methods of drug discovery have been grouped into three key areas; new molecules inspired by known antitrypanosomal agents, target-based screening, and phenotypic screening. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. The relationship of endotoxaemia to peripheral and central nervous system inflammatory responses in Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Lorna; Aboubaker, Eltayb A; Kennedy, Peter G E; Sternberg, Jeremy M

    2017-04-01

    Endotoxaemia has been described in cases of Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), but it is unclear if this phenomenon influences inflammatory pathology either in the periphery or central nervous system (CNS). We studied endotoxin concentrations in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense patients using the chromogenic Limulus Amoebocyte lysate assay. The relationship of endotoxin concentration to the presentation of gross signs of inflammation and the inflammatory/counter-inflammatory cytokine profile of the relevant compartments were analysed. We demonstrate that HAT patients exhibit parasitaemia-independent plasma endotoxaemia, and that this is associated with splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Endotoxin concentrations normalize rapidly after treatment. There was no evidence of endotoxin release in the CNS. A rapid normalization of endotoxin levels after treatment and lack of association with parasitaemia suggest that gut leakage is the main source of endotoxin in the circulation. Low CSF endotoxin concentrations and a lack of any association with neuroinflammatory markers or neurological sequelae suggest that endotoxin does not play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease in the CNS.

  7. Sleeping sickness in travelers - do they really sleep?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Urech

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The number of imported Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT cases in non-endemic countries has increased over the last years. The objective of this analysis is to describe the clinical presentation of HAT in Caucasian travelers. Literature was screened (MEDLINE, Pubmed using the terms "Human African Trypanosomiasis", "travelers" and "expatriates"; all European languages except Slavic ones were included. Publications without clinical description of patients were only included in the epidemiological analysis. Forty-five reports on Caucasians with T.b. rhodesiense and 15 with T.b. gambiense infections were included in the analysis of the clinical parameters. Both species have presented with fever (T.b. rhodesiense 97.8% and T.b. gambiense 93.3%, headache (50% each and a trypanosomal chancre (T.b. rhodesiense 84.4%, T.b. gambiense 46.7%. While sleeping disorders dominate the clinical presentation of HAT in endemic regions, there have been only rare reports in travelers: insomnia (T.b. rhodesiense 7.1%, T.b. gambiense 21.4%, diurnal somnolence (T.b. rhodesiense 4.8%, T.b. gambiense none. Surprisingly, jaundice has been seen in 24.2% of the Caucasian T.b. rhodesiense patients, but has never been described in HAT patients in endemic regions. These results contrast to the clinical presentation of T.b. gambiense and T.b. rhodesiense HAT in Africans in endemic regions, where the presentation of chronic T.b. gambiense and acute T.b. rhodesiense HAT is different. The analysis of 14 reports on T.b. gambiense HAT in Africans living in a non-endemic country shows that neurological symptoms such as somnolence (46.2%, motor deficit (64.3% and reflex anomalies (14.3% as well as psychiatric symptoms such as hallucinations (21.4% or depression (21.4% may dominate the clinical picture. Often, the diagnosis has been missed initially: some patients have even been hospitalized in psychiatric clinics. In travelers T.b. rhodesiense and gambiense present as acute illnesses

  8. STUDIES ON THE TREATMENT OF HUMAN TRYPANOSOMIASIS WITH TRYPARSAMIDE (THE SODIUM SALT OF N-PHENYLGLYCINEAMIDE-p-ARSONIC ACID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, L

    1921-11-30

    The present study of the action of tryparsamide in human trypanosomiasis concludes a series of chemical and biological investigations in a particular problem of chemotherapy and thus represents the final step in a logical method of approach to such a problem. It has been shown that tryparsamide, the sodium salt of N-phenylglycineamide-p-arsonic acid, possesses a marked trypanocidal activity in human trypanosomiasis caused by Tr. gambiense. Single doses of from 0.5 to 5.0 gm. produced a peripheral sterilization of lymph glands and blood in an average of 6 to 12 hours. The duration of the peripheral sterilization following single doses of 17 to 83 mg. per kilo ranged from 17 to 58 days in patients who ultimately showed a return of trypanosomes to the peripheral blood. In a number of patients, however, treated with single doses of 9 to 68 mg. per kilo, no such relapse was detected during an observation period of from 40 to 111 days. The drug is extremely soluble in water and may be administered intramuscularly as well as intravenously. The immediate trypanocidal action after intramuscular administration was as rapid as that following the intravenous route while the duration of peripheral sterilization was appreciably longer. Relatively few repeated doses produced in advanced cases a marked and rapid diminution of the cells of the spinal fluid and were associated with definite improvement of mental and nervous symptoms. The occurrence of visual disturbances in certain advanced cases was the only untoward effect detected during the course of the work, and was apparently related to a too frequent administration of the drug. The condition was transitory in the majority of instances and resumption of treatment was not followed by a recurrence of this symptom. The general beneficial effect of the drug was a noticeable feature of its action in both early and advanced cases as shown by the disappearance of subjective symptoms, by the return of the pulse and temperature to

  9. Urea Derivatives of 2-Aryl-benzothiazol-5-amines: A New Class of Potential Drugs for Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Donald A; Gillespie, J Robert; McQueen, Joshua; Hulverson, Matthew A; Ranade, Ranae M; Creason, Sharon A; Herbst, Zackary M; Gelb, Michael H; Buckner, Frederick S; Tidwell, Richard R

    2017-02-09

    A previous publication from this lab (Patrick, et al. Bioorg. Med. Chem. 2016, 24 , 2451 - 2465 ) explored the antitrypanosomal activities of novel derivatives of 2-(2-benzamido)ethyl-4-phenylthiazole (1), which had been identified as a hit against Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis. While a number of these compounds, particularly the urea analogues, were quite potent, these molecules as a whole exhibited poor metabolic stability. The present work describes the synthesis of 65 new analogues arising from medicinal chemistry optimization at different sites on the molecule. The most promising compounds were the urea derivatives of 2-aryl-benzothiazol-5-amines. One such analogue, (S)-2-(3,4-difluorophenyl)-5-(3-fluoro-N-pyrrolidylamido)benzothiazole (57) was chosen for in vivo efficacy studies based upon in vitro activity, metabolic stability, and brain penetration. This compound attained 5/5 cures in murine models of both early and late stage human African trypanosomiasis, representing a new lead for the development of drugs to combat this neglected disease.

  10. More Human than Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David

    2017-07-01

    Within the literature surrounding nonhuman animals on the one hand and cognitively disabled humans on the other, there is much discussion of where beings that do not satisfy the criteria for personhood fit in our moral deliberations. In the future, we may face a different but related problem: that we might create (or cause the creation of) beings that not only satisfy but exceed these criteria. The question becomes whether these are minimal criteria, or hierarchical, such that those who fulfill them to greater degree should be afforded greater consideration. This article questions the validity and necessity of drawing divisions among beings that satisfy the minimum requirements for personhood; considering how future beings-intelligent androids, synthezoids, even alternate-substrate sentiences-might fit alongside the "baseline" human. I ask whether these alternate beings ought to be considered different to us, and why this may or may not matter in terms of a notion of "human community." The film Blade Runner, concerned in large part with humanity and its key synthezoid antagonist Roy Batty, forms a framing touchstone for my discussion. Batty is stronger, faster, more resilient, and more intelligent than Homo sapiens. His exploits, far beyond the capability of normal humans, are contrasted with his frailty and transient lifespan, his aesthetic appreciation of the sights he has seen, and his burgeoning empathy. Not for nothing does his creator within the mythos term him "more human than human."

  11. [Value of indirect immunofluorescence in the diagnosis of "Trypanosoma gambiense" trypanosomiasis. 46 cases (author's translation)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozais, J P; Giordano, C; Doucet, J; Bertrand, E

    1975-01-01

    Several indirect fluorescents reactions were performed on 46 trypanosomepositive specimens which had been confirmed by parasitologic diagnosis. 38 sera analysed before the commencement of treatment were found to have a G.M.R.T. equal to I:I, 350 and the titer of antibody was, in all cases, greater than I:320. In all cases in the first phase, the titer was I:640 or higher. Four cases were followed beyond the second month and their titers decreased slowly, becoming negative in the fifth month. In 12 cases in the second phase, the cerebrospinal fluid demonstrated fluorescent antibodies although 10 cases in the first phase were negative for these antibodies. Three cerebrospinal fluid were faintly positive and these corresponded to the second phase biologically. In the treatment of individuals (using the analysis of cerebrospinal fluid for antibody) the I.F.A.T. permits the classification of the patient into one of the two phases and enables the clinician to follow the course of therapeutic effectiveness. In mass screening, apparently healthy individuals possessing a serum titer of I:640 or higher are shown to need definitive treatment for trypanosomiasis, while those with titers of I:320 are those who may either be treated with Lomidine or tested regularly for change in serum titer.

  12. Microbial symbiosis and the control of vector-borne pathogens in tsetse flies, human lice, and triatomine bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassera, Davide; Epis, Sara; Pajoro, Massimo; Bandi, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Symbiosis is a widespread biological phenomenon, and is particularly common in arthropods. Bloodsucking insects are among the organisms that rely on beneficial bacterial symbionts to complement their unbalanced diet. This review is focused on describing symbiosis, and possible strategies for the symbiont-based control of insects and insect-borne diseases, in three bloodsucking insects of medical importance: the flies of the genus Glossina, the lice of the genus Pediculus, and triatomine bugs of the subfamily Triatominae. Glossina flies are vector of Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of sleeping sickness and other pathologies. They are also associated with two distinct bacterial symbionts, the primary symbiont Wigglesworthia spp., and the secondary, culturable symbiont Sodalis glossinidius. The primary symbiont of human lice, Riesia pediculicola, has been shown to be fundamental for the host, due to its capacity to synthesize B-group vitamins. An antisymbiotic approach, with antibiotic treatment targeted on the lice symbionts, could represent an alternative strategy to control these ectoparasites. In the case of triatominae bugs, the genetic modification of their symbiotic Rhodococcus bacteria, for production of anti-Trypanosoma molecules, is an example of paratransgenesis, i.e. the use of symbiotic microorganism engineered in order to reduce the vector competence of the insect host. PMID:24188239

  13. Human engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seong Hwan; Park, Bum; Gang, Yeong Sik; Gal, Won Mo; Baek, Seung Ryeol; Choe, Jeong Hwa; Kim, Dae Sung

    2006-07-01

    This book mentions human engineering, which deals with introduction of human engineering, Man-Machine system like system design, and analysis and evaluation of Man-Machine system, data processing and data input, display, system control of man, human mistake and reliability, human measurement and design of working place, human working, hand tool and manual material handling, condition of working circumstance, working management, working analysis, motion analysis working measurement, and working improvement and design in human engineering.

  14. Human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaay Fortman, B. de

    2006-01-01

    Human rights reflect a determined effort to protect the dignity of each and every human being against abuse of power. This endeavour is as old as human history. What is relatively new is the international venture for the protection of human dignity through internationally accepted legal standards

  15. Human reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrey, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Concepts and techniques of human reliability have been developed and are used mostly in probabilistic risk assessment. For this, the major application of human reliability assessment has been to identify the human errors which have a significant effect on the overall safety of the system and to quantify the probability of their occurrence. Some of the major issues within human reliability studies are reviewed and it is shown how these are applied to the assessment of human failures in systems. This is done under the following headings; models of human performance used in human reliability assessment, the nature of human error, classification of errors in man-machine systems, practical aspects, human reliability modelling in complex situations, quantification and examination of human reliability, judgement based approaches, holistic techniques and decision analytic approaches. (UK)

  16. Protease activated receptor signaling is required for African trypanosome traversal of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Grab

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs as an in vitro model for how African trypanosomes cross the human blood-brain barrier (BBB we recently reported that the parasites cross the BBB by generating calcium activation signals in HBMECs through the activity of parasite cysteine proteases, particularly cathepsin L (brucipain. In the current study, we examined the possible role of a class of protease stimulated HBMEC G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs known as protease activated receptors (PARs that might be implicated in calcium signaling by African trypanosomes.Using RNA interference (RNAi we found that in vitro PAR-2 gene (F2RL1 expression in HBMEC monolayers could be reduced by over 95%. We also found that the ability of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense to cross F2RL1-silenced HBMEC monolayers was reduced (39%-49% and that HBMECs silenced for F2RL1 maintained control levels of barrier function in the presence of the parasite. Consistent with the role of PAR-2, we found that HBMEC barrier function was also maintained after blockade of Galpha(q with Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT. PAR-2 signaling has been shown in other systems to have neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective roles and our data implicate a role for proteases (i.e. brucipain and PAR-2 in African trypanosome/HBMEC interactions. Using gene-profiling methods to interrogate candidate HBMEC pathways specifically triggered by brucipain, several pathways that potentially link some pathophysiologic processes associated with CNS HAT were identified.Together, the data support a role, in part, for GPCRs as molecular targets for parasite proteases that lead to the activation of Galpha(q-mediated calcium signaling. The consequence of these events is predicted to be increased permeability of the BBB to parasite transmigration and the initiation of neuroinflammation, events precursory to CNS disease.

  17. Identifying Darwinian selection acting on different human APOL1 variants among diverse African populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wen-Ya; Rajan, Prianka; Gomez, Felicia; Scheinfeldt, Laura; An, Ping; Winkler, Cheryl A; Froment, Alain; Nyambo, Thomas B; Omar, Sabah A; Wambebe, Charles; Ranciaro, Alessia; Hirbo, Jibril B; Tishkoff, Sarah A

    2013-07-11

    Disease susceptibility can arise as a consequence of adaptation to infectious disease. Recent findings have suggested that higher rates of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in individuals with recent African ancestry might be attributed to two risk alleles (G1 and G2) at the serum-resistance-associated (SRA)-interacting-domain-encoding region of APOL1. These two alleles appear to have arisen adaptively, possibly as a result of their protective effects against human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or African sleeping sickness. In order to explore the distribution of potential functional variation at APOL1, we studied nucleotide variation in 187 individuals across ten geographically and genetically diverse African ethnic groups with exposure to two Trypanosoma brucei subspecies that cause HAT. We observed unusually high levels of nonsynonymous polymorphism in the regions encoding the functional domains that are required for lysing parasites. Whereas allele frequencies of G2 were similar across all populations (3%-8%), the G1 allele was only common in the Yoruba (39%). Additionally, we identified a haplotype (termed G3) that contains a nonsynonymous change at the membrane-addressing-domain-encoding region of APOL1 and is present in all populations except for the Yoruba. Analyses of long-range patterns of linkage disequilibrium indicate evidence of recent selection acting on the G3 haplotype in Fulani from Cameroon. Our results indicate that the G1 and G2 variants in APOL1 are geographically restricted and that there might be other functional variants that could play a role in HAT resistance and CKD risk in African populations. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security

    OpenAIRE

    Gasper, D.R.

    2007-01-01

    Human rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and politics; each has emerged within the United Nations world; each relies implicitly on a conceptualisation of human need; each has specific strengths. Yet mutual communication, understanding and co-operation are deficient, espec...

  19. Human niche, human behaviour, human nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Agustin

    2017-10-06

    The concept of a 'human nature' or 'human natures' retains a central role in theorizing about the human experience. In Homo sapiens it is clear that we have a suite of capacities generated via our evolutionary past, and present, and a flexible capacity to create and sustain particular kinds of cultures and to be shaped by them. Regardless of whether we label these capacities 'human natures' or not, humans occupy a distinctive niche and an evolutionary approach to examining it is critical. At present we are faced with a few different narratives as to exactly what such an evolutionary approach entails. There is a need for a robust and dynamic theoretical toolkit in order to develop a richer, and more nuanced, understanding of the cognitively sophisticated genus Homo and the diverse sorts of niches humans constructed and occupied across the Pleistocene, Holocene, and into the Anthropocene. Here I review current evolutionary approaches to 'human nature', arguing that we benefit from re-framing our investigations via the concept of the human niche and in the context of the extended evolutionary synthesis (EES). While not a replacement of standard evolutionary approaches, this is an expansion and enhancement of our toolkit. I offer brief examples from human evolution in support of these assertions.

  20. Human microbiomics

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendhran, J.; Gunasekaran, P.

    2010-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome has driven the study of human biology in a significant way and enabled the genome-wide study to elucidate the molecular basis of complex human diseases. Recently, the role of microbiota on human physiology and health has received much attention. The influence of gut microbiome (the collective genomes of the gut microbiota) in obesity has been demonstrated, which may pave the way for new prophylactic and therapeutic strategies such as bacteriotherapy. The sig...

  1. Human Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2009-01-01

    textabstract‘Human development’ language spread gradually in circles of national and international development policy and planning from the 1970s and acquired a definitive form in the 1990s in the United Nations Development Programme’s Human Development Reports (HDRs). Human development was defined

  2. Human Smuggling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegel - Rozenblit, Dina; Zaitch, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Human smuggling is based on a consensus between smuggler, smuggled, and his/her family (which usually guarantees or effectuates payment). However, unauthorized immigrants are violating immigration laws and human smugglers are profiting from enabling illegal immigration. Both human smuggling and its

  3. Human intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hora, S.; Neill, R.; Williams, R.; Bauser, M.; Channell, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper focused on the possible approaches to evaluating the impacts of human intrusion on nuclear waste disposal. Several major issues were reviewed. First, it was noted that human intrusion could be addressed either quantitatively through performance assessments or qualitatively through design requirements. Second, it was decided that it was impossible to construct a complete set of possible future human intrusion scenarios. Third, the question of when the effect of possible human intrusion should be considered, before or after site selection was reviewed. Finally, the time frame over which human intrusion should be considered was discussed

  4. Human Technology and Human Affects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2009-01-01

    Human Technology and Human Affects  This year Samsung introduced a mobile phone with "Soul". It was made with a human touch and included itself a magical touch. Which function does technology and affects get in everyday aesthetics like this, its images and interactions included this presentation...

  5. Human Rights/Human Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Cynthia

    1978-01-01

    The faculty of Holy Names High School developed an interdisciplinary human rights program with school-wide activities focusing on three selected themes: the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in conjunction with Human Rights Week; Food; and Women. This article outlines major program activities. (SJL)

  6. Factors influencing passive surveillance for T. b. rhodesiense human african trypanosomiasis in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acup, Christine; Bardosh, Kevin Louis; Picozzi, Kim; Waiswa, Charles; Welburn, Susan Christina

    2017-01-01

    Sleeping sickness or Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a neglected tropical disease of public health importance across much of Sub-Saharan Africa. In Uganda, chronic T. b. gambiense HAT (gHAT) and acute T. b. rhodesiense HAT (rHAT) occur in two large but discrete geographical foci. Both forms are difficult to diagnose, expensive to treat and ultimately fatal in the absence of treatment. The area affected by zoonotic rHAT has been steadily expanding, placing a high burden on local health systems. HAT is a disease of neglected populations and is notorious for being under-reported. Here we examine the factors that influence passive rHAT surveillance within the district health system in four Ugandan districts into which the disease had recently been introduced, focusing on staff knowledge, infrastructure and data management. A mixed methods study was undertaken between 2011 and 2013 in Dokolo, Kaberamaido, Soroti and Serere districts to explore health facility capacity and clinical service provision, diagnostic capacity, HAT knowledge and case reporting. Structured interviews were undertaken with 86 medical personnel, including clinicians, nurses, midwives and technicians across 65 HC-II and HC-III medical facilities, where the health infrastructure was also directly observed. Eleven semi-structured interviews were undertaken with medical staff in each of the three designated HAT treatment facilities (Dokolo, Lwala and Serere HC-IV) in the area. HAT treatment centre case records, collected between 2009 and 2012, were analyzed. Most medical staff in HC-II and HC-III facilities had been made aware of HAT from radio broadcasts, newspapers and by word of mouth, suggestive of a lack of formal training. Key knowledge as regards the causative agent, clinical signs and that HAT drugs are provided free of charge was lower amongst HC-II than HC-III staff. Many respondents did not know whether HAT was endemic in their district. In rHAT specialist treatment centres, staff

  7. Socio-economic and cultural determinants of human african trypanosomiasis at the Kenya - Uganda transboundary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Jemeli Rutto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Kenya and Uganda have reported different Human African Trypanosomiasis incidences in the past more than three decades, with the latter recording more cases. This cross-sectional study assessed the demographic characteristics, tsetse and trypanosomiasis control practices, socio-economic and cultural risk factors influencing Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (T.b.r. infection in Teso and Busia Districts, Western Kenya and Tororo and Busia Districts, Southeast Uganda. A conceptual framework was postulated to explain interactions of various socio-economic, cultural and tsetse control factors that predispose individuals and populations to HAT. METHODS: A cross-sectional household survey was conducted between April and October 2008. Four administrative districts reporting T.b.r and lying adjacent to each other at the international boundary of Kenya and Uganda were purposely selected. Household data collection was carried out in two villages that had experienced HAT and one other village that had no reported HAT case from 1977 to 2008 in each district. A structured questionnaire was administered to 384 randomly selected household heads or their representatives in each country. The percent of respondents giving a specific answer was reported. Secondary data was also obtained on socio-economic and political issues in both countries. RESULTS: Inadequate knowledge on the disease cycle and intervention measures contributed considerable barriers to HAT, and more so in Uganda than in Kenya. Gender-associated socio-cultural practices greatly predisposed individuals to HAT. Pesticides-based crop husbandry in the 1970's reportedly reduced vector population while vegetation of coffee and banana's and livestock husbandry directly increased occurrence of HAT. Livestock husbandry practices in the villages were strong predictors of HAT incidence. The residents in Kenya (6.7% applied chemoprophylaxis and chemotherapeutic controls against trypanosomiasis to a

  8. Functional expression of parasite drug targets and their human orthologs in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Bilsland

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The exacting nutritional requirements and complicated life cycles of parasites mean that they are not always amenable to high-throughput drug screening using automated procedures. Therefore, we have engineered the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to act as a surrogate for expressing anti-parasitic targets from a range of biomedically important pathogens, to facilitate the rapid identification of new therapeutic agents.Using pyrimethamine/dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR as a model parasite drug/drug target system, we explore the potential of engineered yeast strains (expressing DHFR enzymes from Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, Homo sapiens, Schistosoma mansoni, Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi to exhibit appropriate differential sensitivity to pyrimethamine. Here, we demonstrate that yeast strains (lacking the major drug efflux pump, Pdr5p expressing yeast ((ScDFR1, human ((HsDHFR, Schistosoma ((SmDHFR, and Trypanosoma ((TbDHFR and (TcDHFR DHFRs are insensitive to pyrimethamine treatment, whereas yeast strains producing Plasmodium ((PfDHFR and (PvDHFR DHFRs are hypersensitive. Reassuringly, yeast strains expressing field-verified, drug-resistant mutants of P. falciparum DHFR ((Pfdhfr(51I,59R,108N are completely insensitive to pyrimethamine, further validating our approach to drug screening. We further show the versatility of the approach by replacing yeast essential genes with other potential drug targets, namely phosphoglycerate kinases (PGKs and N-myristoyl transferases (NMTs.We have generated a number of yeast strains that can be successfully harnessed for the rapid and selective identification of urgently needed anti-parasitic agents.

  9. Socio-Economic and Cultural Determinants of Human African Trypanosomiasis at the Kenya – Uganda Transboundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutto, Jane Jemeli; Osano, Odipo; Thuranira, Elias Gitonga; Kurgat, Richard Kiptum; Odenyo, Victor Agab Omondi

    2013-01-01

    Background Kenya and Uganda have reported different Human African Trypanosomiasis incidences in the past more than three decades, with the latter recording more cases. This cross-sectional study assessed the demographic characteristics, tsetse and trypanosomiasis control practices, socio-economic and cultural risk factors influencing Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (T.b.r.) infection in Teso and Busia Districts, Western Kenya and Tororo and Busia Districts, Southeast Uganda. A conceptual framework was postulated to explain interactions of various socio-economic, cultural and tsetse control factors that predispose individuals and populations to HAT. Methods A cross-sectional household survey was conducted between April and October 2008. Four administrative districts reporting T.b.r and lying adjacent to each other at the international boundary of Kenya and Uganda were purposely selected. Household data collection was carried out in two villages that had experienced HAT and one other village that had no reported HAT case from 1977 to 2008 in each district. A structured questionnaire was administered to 384 randomly selected household heads or their representatives in each country. The percent of respondents giving a specific answer was reported. Secondary data was also obtained on socio-economic and political issues in both countries. Results Inadequate knowledge on the disease cycle and intervention measures contributed considerable barriers to HAT, and more so in Uganda than in Kenya. Gender-associated socio-cultural practices greatly predisposed individuals to HAT. Pesticides-based crop husbandry in the 1970's reportedly reduced vector population while vegetation of coffee and banana's and livestock husbandry directly increased occurrence of HAT. Livestock husbandry practices in the villages were strong predictors of HAT incidence. The residents in Kenya (6.7%) applied chemoprophylaxis and chemotherapeutic controls against trypanosomiasis to a larger extent than

  10. Human evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llamas, Bastien; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    The field of human ancient DNA (aDNA) has moved from mitochondrial sequencing that suffered from contamination and provided limited biological insights, to become a fully genomic discipline that is changing our conception of human history. Recent successes include the sequencing of extinct hominins......, and true population genomic studies of Bronze Age populations. Among the emerging areas of aDNA research, the analysis of past epigenomes is set to provide more new insights into human adaptation and disease susceptibility through time. Starting as a mere curiosity, ancient human genetics has become...

  11. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security - Relationships between four international human discourses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2007-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract: Human rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and

  12. Immune trypanolysis test with blood spotted on filter paper for epidemiological surveillance of sleeping sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Oumou; Camara, Mamadou; Lejon, Veerle; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Sakande, Hassane; Léno, Mamadou; Büscher, Philippe; Bucheton, Bruno; Jamonneau, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    The immune trypanolysis test (TL) is an accurate sero-diagnostic tool increasingly implemented for sleeping sickness medical surveillance, but it is restricted to the reference laboratories. To facilitate storage and transport of the test specimen, we developed a protocol for the examination of blood spotted on filter paper (TL-fp) that can be stored and shipped at ambient temperature. We compared its performance with the classical TL on plasma (TL-pl) that needs to be kept frozen until use. The study was conducted in active foci of the Republic of Guinea. In total, 438 specimens from treated and untreated sleeping sickness patients and serological suspects were tested with both methods. TL-fp gave significantly less positive results than TL-pl, but all the confirmed sleeping sickness cases were positive with the TL-fp protocol. TL-fp appears to offer a good compromise between feasibility and sensitivity to detect currently infected subjects who play a role in the transmission of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and is useful for contributing to the elimination of gambiense sleeping sickness. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Human Rights and Human Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Possenti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available There seems to be two different versions of human rights in Western tradition: say Rationalistic and Christian; the former adopted in revolutionary France, the latter highly developed in Renaissance Spain. Current relativistic criticisms attempt to deny the universality of human rights alleging that this theory has been created in Western countries or it has no strong justification, and therefore cannot have universal approach; but this objection can be dismissed with an alternative justification of human rights.

  14. Think Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    2013-01-01

    years' campaigns suggests that the theory of communication underlying the campaign has its basis in mechanical action rather than in human communication. The practice of 'Communication design' is investigated in relation to this metaphorical 'machine thinking' model of communication and contrasted...... with the human-centered theory of communication advocated by integrationism....

  15. Human trichuriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betson, Martha; Søe, Martin Jensen; Nejsum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human trichuriasis is a neglected tropical disease which affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is particularly prevalent among children living in areas where sanitation is poor. This review examines the current knowledge on the taxonomy, genetics and phylogeography of human Trichuris...

  16. Human kapital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosen, Anders; Nielsen, Peder Harbjerg

    2007-01-01

    finansiel og human kapital. Den traditionelle rådgivnings snævre synsvinkel kan føre til forkerte investeringsråd. Der skal derfor opfordres til, at de finansielle virksomheder i tilrettelæggelsen af deres rådgivning af private kunder systematisk inddrager den humane kapitals størrelse og karakteristika i...

  17. Role of cytokines in Trypanosoma brucei-induced anaemia: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Publications on the cytokines studied in trypanosomiasis-associated anaemia ordered by year. Publication. Infecting trypanosome. Clinical sample. Cytokines. Other factors associated with anaemia. Magez et al. 1999. T.b.b AnTat1.1E. Blood from TNF-α -/-. TNF-α. -. Namangala et al. 2001. T.b.b AnTat1.1E. T.b.b PLC-/-.

  18. Population Size and Diet of Bush Hyrax Hetrohyrax brucei (Gray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Crnokrak, P & Roff, D.A. 1999. Inbreeding depression in the wild. Heredity, 83: 260–270. Estes, R.P. 1991. The behavior guide to African mammals, including hoofed mammals, carnivores, primates. University of California Press, Berkeley, pp. 250-258. Frankham, R. 2003. Genetics and conservation biology. C.R. Biologies ...

  19. Trypanosoma brucei INFECTION IN A HERD OF SEDENTARY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stella

    Savannah, visited the Veterinary Teaching. Hospital of the Ahmadu Bello University,. Zaria (V.T.H-A.B.U-Zaria) and presented a case of emaciation, repeated abortions, pica, and alopecia of the tips of the tails despite supposedly good appetite in a herd of 120 heads of cattle. Furthermore, a report of “swollen” liver in cattle.

  20. Serum Iron and Nitric Oxide Production in Trypanosoma brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JTEkanem

    by centrifugation of the clear part of blood after clotting at 3,000g for 15min and kept frozen until required, usually after 24hrs. Determination of serum iron level. The serum iron level was determined spectrophotometrically by the O- phenanthroline method16. Ferrous iron reacts with o-phenonthroline to form an orange-red ...

  1. Role of cytokines in Trypanosoma brucei-induced anaemia: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with no limitation on date of publishing and study design. Articles in English were searched using keywords ... reported that mice lacking TNF-α were able to control anaemia, and that IFN-γ was linked to severe anaemia ... Immunological mechanisms have also been advanced, related to the removal of erythrocytes, mostly ...

  2. Tissue Lipid Peroxidation in Trypanosoma brucei Infection: Testing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whereas both superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase were significantly reduced in the liver and kidney 28 days post-inoculation; the decrease in SOD activity in the heart was accompanied by an increase in catalase activity in that tissue. Treatment with S. dulcis at a daily oral dose of 200mg/Kg body weight resulted in a ...

  3. Some liver function indices and blood parameters in T. brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JTEkanem

    (RBC), white blood cell (WBC), and platelet count were determined using the automated haematologic analyzer SYSMEX KX21,a product of SYSMEX corporation, Japan employing the method described by Dacie and. Lewis17. Protein concentrations were determined using biuret method18 as described by Plummer19.

  4. Crystal structures of Trypanosoma brucei hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Terán, D.; Hocková, Dana; Česnek, Michal; Keough, D. T.; Guddat, L. W.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 72, Suppl. (2016), S207 ISSN 0108-7673. [European Crystallographic Meeting /30./. 28.08.2016-01.09.2016, Basel] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase * enzyme inhibitors * acyclic nucleoside phosphonates Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  5. Probing for primary functions of prohibitin in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Týč, Jiří; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Kriegová, Eva; Jirků, Milan; Vávrová, Zuzana; Maslov, D. A.; Lukeš, Julius

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 1 (2010), s. 73-83 ISSN 0020-7519 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667; GA AV ČR IAA500960705; GA ČR(CZ) GP204/06/P423 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : prohibitin * mitochondrion * morphology * mitochondrial translation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.822, year: 2010

  6. Digital Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Digital humanities is an umbrella term for theories, methodologies, and practices related to humanities scholarship that use the digital computer as an integrated and essential part of its research and teaching activities. The computer can be used for establishing, finding, collecting, and preser......Digital humanities is an umbrella term for theories, methodologies, and practices related to humanities scholarship that use the digital computer as an integrated and essential part of its research and teaching activities. The computer can be used for establishing, finding, collecting......, and preserving material to study, as an object of study in its own right, as an analytical tool, or for collaborating, and for disseminating results. The term "digital humanities" was coined around 2001, and gained currency within academia in the following years. However, computers had been used within...

  7. Population vulnerability and disability in Kenya's tsetse fly habitats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue C Grady

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT, also referred to as sleeping sickness, and African Animal Trypanosomaisis (AAT, known as nagana, are highly prevalent parasitic vector-borne diseases in sub-Saharan Africa. Humans acquire trypanosomiasis following the bite of a tsetse fly infected with the protozoa Trypanosoma brucei (T.b. spp. -i.e., T.b. gambiense in West and Central Africa and T.b. rhodesiense in East and Southern Africa. Over the last decade HAT diagnostic capacity to estimate HAT prevalence has improved in active case-finding areas but enhanced passive surveillance programs are still lacking in much of rural sub-Saharan Africa.This retrospective-cross-sectional study examined the use of national census data (1999 to estimate population vulnerability and disability in Kenya's 7 tsetse belts to assess the potential of HAT-acquired infection in those areas. A multilevel study design estimated the likelihood of disability in individuals, nested within households, nested within tsetse fly habitats of varying levels of poverty. Residents and recent migrants of working age were studied. Tsetse fly's impact on disability was conceptualised via two exposure pathways: directly from the bite of a pathogenic tsetse fly resulting in HAT infection or indirectly, as the potential for AAT takes land out of agricultural production and diseased livestock leads to livestock morbidity and mortality, contributing to nutritional deficiencies and poverty. Tsetse belts that were significantly associated with increased disability prevalence were identified and the direct and indirect exposure pathways were evaluated.Incorporating reports on disability from the national census is a promising surveillance tool that may enhance future HAT surveillance programs in sub-Saharan Africa. The combined burdens of HAT and AAT and the opportunity costs of agricultural production in AAT areas are likely contributors to disability within tsetse-infested areas. Future research

  8. Human Technology and Human Affects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2009-01-01

    - is the prophecy. This personification or anthropomorphism is important for the branding of new technology. The technology is seen as creating a technotranscendens towards a more qualified humanity, which is in contact with the fundamental human values like intuition, vision, and sensing; all the qualities...

  9. Human Computation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    What if people could play computer games and accomplish work without even realizing it? What if billions of people collaborated to solve important problems for humanity or generate training data for computers? My work aims at a general paradigm for doing exactly that: utilizing human processing power to solve computational problems in a distributed manner. In particular, I focus on harnessing human time and energy for addressing problems that computers cannot yet solve. Although computers have advanced dramatically in many respects over the last 50 years, they still do not possess the basic conceptual intelligence or perceptual capabilities...

  10. Respiration of bloodstream forms of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei brucei is dependent on a plant-like alternative oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarkson, A. B.; Bienen, E. J.; Pollakis, G.; Grady, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    CoQ links the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and oxidase components of the cyanide-insensitive, non-cytochrome-mediated respiratory system of bloodstream African trypanosomes. In this and other characteristics, their respiratory system is similar to the alternative oxidase of plants. The

  11. Human mycoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasić Siniša B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are an independent group of plant kingdom which members do not contain chlorophyll and have no capability of photo synthesizing, meaning that they can not synthesize nutritive compounds, so they exist as the saprophytes or parasites of plants, animals and humans. Between 50.000 and 100.000 species are known, but only about 100 species cause diseases (mycoses of humans or animals, while many other cause diseases of plants. Only the dermatophytes and species of genus Candida are usually transferable from human to human. The importance of fungi was certainly less than that of the bacteria and viruses for the time being, but their role as the opportunist pathogens is unavoiding, especially for immunocompromised patients. Incidence of fungal infections grows steadily, even in the countries with high level of general and health culture. Diagnosis and therapy of fungal infections are many times unadequate. Prophylaxis is still an object of discussion.

  12. Human Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews the human toxicological impacts of chemicals and how to assess these impacts in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA), in order to identify key processes and pollutants. The complete cause-effect pathway – from emissions of toxic substances up to damages on human health...... and their coverage in LCIA methods. Section 4 provides an overview of the main LCIA methods available to address human toxicological impacts. Section 5 presents the range of variation of factor across chemicals, the main sources of uncertainty and good interpretation practice of results from human toxicity...... all chemicals and impact pathways characterizes the contribution of each factor to the total variation of 10–12 orders of magnitude in impacts per kg across all chemicals. This large variation between characterisation factors for different chemicals as well as the 3 orders of magnitude uncertainty...

  13. Human Cloning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Judith A; Williams, Erin D

    2006-01-01

    .... Scientists in other labs, including Harvard University and the University of California at San Francisco, intend to produce cloned human embryos in order to derive stem cells for medical research...

  14. Human phantom

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    This human phantom has been received by CERN on loan from the State Committee of the USSR for the Utilization of Atomic Energy. It is used by the Health Physics Group to study personel radiation doses near the accelerators.

  15. Human brucellosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franco, María Pía; Mulder, Maximilian; Gilman, Robert H.; Smits, Henk L.

    2007-01-01

    Human brucellosis still presents scientists and clinicians with several challenges, such as the understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of Brucella spp, the identification of markers for disease severity, progression, and treatment response, and the development of improved treatment regimens.

  16. Human Echolocation

    OpenAIRE

    Teng, Santani

    2013-01-01

    The use of active natural echolocation as a mobility aid for blind humans has received increased scientific and popular attention in recent years (Engber, 2006; Kreiser, 2006; NPR, 2011), in part due to a focus on several blind individuals who have developed remarkable expertise. However, perhaps surprisingly, the history of empirical human echolocation research is not much younger than the era of echolocation research (cf. Griffin, 1958). Nevertheless, compared to its bat and cetacean count...

  17. Human cognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    The study of human cognition encompasses the study of all mental phenomena, from the receipt and interpretation of sensory information to the final control of the motor system in the performance of action. The cognitive scientist examines all intermediary processes, including thought, decision making, and memory and including the effects of motivation, states of arousal and stress, the study of language, and the effects of social factors. The field therefore ranges over an enormous territory, covering all that is known or that should be known about human behavior. It is not possible to summarize the current state of knowledge about cognition with any great confidence that we know the correct answer about any aspect of the work. Nontheless, models provide good characterizations of certain aspects of the data and situations. Even if these models should prove to be incorrect, they do provide good approximate descriptions of people's behavior in some situations, and these approximations will still apply even when the underlying theories have changed. A quick description is provided of models within a number of areas of human cognition and skill and some general theoretical frameworks with which to view human cognition. The frameworks are qualitative descriptions that provide a way to view the development of more detailed, quantitative models and, most important, a way of thinking about human performance and skill

  18. Beyond Humanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Capurro, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    In the first part of this paper a short history of Western humanisms (Socrates, Pico della Mirandola, Descartes, Kant) is presented. As far as these humanisms rest on a fixation of the ‘humanum’ they are metaphysical, although they might radically differ from each other. The second part deals with the present debate on trans- and posthumanism in the context of some breath-taking developments in science and technology.Angeletics, a theory of messengers and messages, intends to give an answer t...

  19. Human vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Siqueira, José Eduardo; Segre, Marco

    2008-01-01

    We consider essential when addressing human vulnerability, to perceive it under two diverse prisms, therefore, complementary: the individual and the collective. The first part will present the human being as the protagonist isolated from this circumstance and it will be performed in the first person, in a nearly colloquial manner. One's vulnerability, while a part of a social network, will be addressed in the second part of the text. It will not be difficult to realize how the individual on the condition of autonomous being or integrated element in a wide social network dies of the same illness, which seems to be a strong characteristic of post-modernity.

  20. Nothing Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  1. Human waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, Md Nurul; Kroeze, Carolien; Strokal, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    Many people practice open defecation in south Asia. As a result, lot of human waste containing nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) enter rivers. Rivers transport these nutrients to coastal waters, resulting in marine pollution. This source of nutrient pollution is, however, ignored in

  2. Human Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  3. Human Rights and Human Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Javadi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper firstly explores some theories of Human Rights justification and then assents to the theory that Human Rights is based on justified moral values. In order to justify moral values, Aristotle’s approach called “Function Argument” is reviewed. Propounding this argument, the writer attempts to show that all analysis of human identity will directly contribute to the man’s view of his rights. Not only Human rights is really determined by human function or human distinguishing characteristic i.e. human identity, but in the world of knowledge the proper method to know human rights is to know human being himself. n cloning violates man’s rights due to two reasons: damage of human identity and violation of the right to be unique. Attempting to clarify the nature of human cloning, this article examines the aspects to be claimed to violate human rights and evaluates the strength of the reasons for this claim. این مقاله پس از بررسی اجمالی برخی از نظریه‌های توجیه حقوق بشر، نظریة ابتنای آن بر ارزش‌های اخلاقی موجّه را می‌پذیرد. دربارة چگونگی توجیه ارزش اخلاقی، رویکرد ارسطو که به «برهان ارگن» موسوم است، مورد بحث و بررسی قرار می‌گیرد. مؤلف با طرح این برهان می‌کوشد نشان دهد ارائه هرگونه تحلیل از هویت انسان در نگرش آدمی به حقوق خود تأثیر مستقیم خواهد گذاشت. حقوق آدمی نه فقط از ناحیة کارویژه یا فصل ممیز وی (هویت انسان تعیّن واقعی می‌گیرد، بلکه در عالم معرفت هم راه درست شناخت حقوق بشر، شناخت خود انسان است.

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Pafuramidine versus Pentamidine Maleate for Treatment of First Stage Sleeping Sickness in a Randomized, Comparator-Controlled, International Phase 3 Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Pohlig

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sleeping sickness (human African trypanosomiasis [HAT] is a neglected tropical disease with limited treatment options that currently require parenteral administration. In previous studies, orally administered pafuramidine was well tolerated in healthy patients (for up to 21 days and stage 1 HAT patients (for up to 10 days, and demonstrated efficacy comparable to pentamidine.This was a Phase 3, multi-center, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, active control study where 273 male and female patients with first stage Trypanosoma brucei gambiense HAT were treated at six sites: one trypanosomiasis reference center in Angola, one hospital in South Sudan, and four hospitals in the Democratic Republic of the Congo between August 2005 and September 2009 to support the registration of pafuramidine for treatment of first stage HAT in collaboration with the United States Food and Drug Administration. Patients were treated with either 100 mg of pafuramidine orally twice a day for 10 days or 4 mg/kg pentamidine intramuscularly once daily for 7 days to assess the efficacy and safety of pafuramidine versus pentamidine. Pregnant and lactating women as well as adolescents were included. The primary efficacy endpoint was the combined rate of clinical and parasitological cure at 12 months. The primary safety outcome was the frequency and severity of adverse events. The study was registered on the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform at www.clinicaltrials.gov with the number ISRCTN85534673.The overall cure rate at 12 months was 89% in the pafuramidine group and 95% in the pentamidine group; pafuramidine was non-inferior to pentamidine as the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval did not exceed 15%. The safety profile of pafuramidine was superior to pentamidine; however, 3 patients in the pafuramidine group had glomerulonephritis or nephropathy approximately 8 weeks post-treatment. Two of these events were judged as possibly related to

  5. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security : Relationships between four international 'human' discourses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHuman rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and politics; each

  6. Human Rights in the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  7. Human reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubb, H.

    1992-01-01

    This book resulted from the activity of Task Force 4.2 - 'Human Reliability'. This group was established on February 27th, 1986, at the plenary meeting of the Technical Reliability Committee of VDI, within the framework of the joint committee of VDI on industrial systems technology - GIS. It is composed of representatives of industry, representatives of research institutes, of technical control boards and universities, whose job it is to study how man fits into the technical side of the world of work and to optimize this interaction. In a total of 17 sessions, information from the part of ergonomy dealing with human reliability in using technical systems at work was exchanged, and different methods for its evaluation were examined and analyzed. The outcome of this work was systematized and compiled in this book. (orig.) [de

  8. Human Rights

    OpenAIRE

    Schlundt, Marie Gertz

    2011-01-01

    The project intends to investigate to what extent and under what conditions, United Nations human rights conventions have been internalized in the minimally democratic and isolated state of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK). The ‘spiral model’ of Risse et al (1999) will be used as the theoretical framework for the project. This framework sets out to understand the process of socialization by which principled ideas held by individuals become norms in the sense of collective unde...

  9. Human settlements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Niekerk, Cornelia W

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available vulnerability. These factors are location specific, related to particular local climate, topology and human settlement patterns.” (Department of Environmental Affairs 2014b, p.6).Urban settlements across Africa are experiencing immense changes at a swift rate... CSIR calculations based on latest census figures of each SADC country (projected figures used in case of missing census data, e.g. Angola). Urbanisation rates used as reported by UN ESA (2014). Calculations exclude Mauritius and Seychelles. C H A P...

  10. Human paleoneurology

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The book presents an integrative review of paleoneurology, the study of endocranial morphology in fossil species. The main focus is on showing how computed methods can be used to support advances in evolutionary neuroanatomy, paleoanthropology and archaeology and how they have contributed to creating a completely new perspective in cognitive neuroscience. Moreover, thanks to its multidisciplinary approach, the book addresses students and researchers approaching human paleoneurology from different angles and for different purposes, such as biologists, physicians, anthropologists, archaeologists

  11. Human universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Human life is a staggeringly strange thing. On the surface of a ball of rock falling around a nuclear fireball in the blackness of a vacuum the laws of nature conspired to create a naked ape that can look up at the stars and wonder where it came from. What is a human being? Objectively, nothing of consequence. Particles of dust in an infinite arena, present for an instant in eternity. Clumps of atoms in a universe with more galaxies than people. And yet a human being is necessary for the question itself to exist, and the presence of a question in the universe - any question - is the most wonderful thing. Questions require minds, and minds bring meaning. What is meaning? I don't know, except that the universe and every pointless speck inside it means something to me. I am astonished by the existence of a single atom, and find my civilisation to be an outrageous imprint on reality. I don't understand it. Nobody does, but it makes me smile. This book asks questions about our origins, our destiny, and our place i...

  12. Introduction: Digital Humanities, Public Humanities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Christie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available NANO: New American Notes Online: An Interdisciplinary Academic Journal for Big Ideas in a Small World. This special issue shows how both public and digital humanities research can be rendered more persuasive through engagement with cultures beyond the academy. More specifically, the aim of this special issue is to demonstrate how investments in technologies and computation are not necessarily antithetical to investments in critical theory and social justice.

  13. Human Computing, Virtual Humans and Artificial Imperfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruttkay, Z.M.; Reidsma, Dennis; Nijholt, Antinus; Quek, F.; Yang, Y.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we raise the issue whether imperfections, characteristic of human-human communication, should be taken into account when developing virtual humans. We argue that endowing virtual humans with the imperfections of humans can help making them more ‘comfortable’ to interact with. That is,

  14. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  15. Human steroidogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Y; Ezcurra, Diego

    2014-01-01

    to the rupture of the follicle wall and the release of an oocyte. The administration of gonadotropins in controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) leads to supraphysiological steroid concentrations of a very different profile compared with those seen during natural cycles. It has been suggested that these high...... reviews current knowledge of the regulation of progesterone in the human ovary during the follicular phase and highlights areas where knowledge remains limited. In this review, we provide in-depth information outlining the regulation and function of gonadotropins in the complicated area of steroidogenesis...

  16. Humanizing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes the urban digital gallery as an opportunity to explore the relationship between ‘human’ and ‘technology,’ through the programming of media architecture. It takes a curatorial perspective when proposing an ontological shift from considering media facades as visual spectacles...... agency and a sense of being by way of dematerializing architecture. This is achieved by way of programming the symbolic to provide new emotional realizations and situations of enlightenment in the public audience. This reflects a greater potential to humanize the digital in media architecture....

  17. [Human microsporidiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcay, L

    2001-05-01

    This review shows the Microsporidia as unicellular protozoa strictly intracellular eukaryotic parasites of animals and humans. These study concerns life cycles, cytology, host-parasite relationships in animal models experimentally infected with microsporidia from human feces, demonstrating the host-inespecificity and visceral dissemination with histopathological studies in digestive, tract, kidney, liver, spleen, brain, heart, pancreas, thyroid, suprarenal glands. It is presented the microsporidiosis in Venezuela in immunocompetent patients and immunodeficients HIV+, with diarrheic syndromes with keratoconjuntivitis microsporidial punctata diffuse and with disseminated microsporidia in urine, tracheobronchial sputum, nasal and pharyngeal exudates. Also we have found the microsporidia in river and lake waters and in animals relationed with the man: dogs, cats, pigs, monkeys, donkeys, guts. The patients are treated specially with Albendazole and also with Trimethoprim-Sulphametoxazol for the children until two years of age. We use as laboratory diagnosis the technique of Kinyoun stain, in support of the acid resistance property of these parasites, and also the Chromotrope staining. Our recommendations for a proper identification of the Microspora species, should be done with Electron Microscopy and the TCR reaction.

  18. Pharmacology of DB844, an orally active aza analogue of pafuramidine, in a monkey model of second stage human African trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Thuita

    Full Text Available Novel drugs to treat human African trypanosomiasis (HAT are still urgently needed despite the recent addition of nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT to WHO Model Lists of Essential Medicines against second stage HAT, where parasites have invaded the central nervous system (CNS. The pharmacology of a potential orally available lead compound, N-methoxy-6-{5-[4-(N-methoxyamidino phenyl]-furan-2-yl}-nicotinamidine (DB844, was evaluated in a vervet monkey model of second stage HAT, following promising results in mice. DB844 was administered orally to vervet monkeys, beginning 28 days post infection (DPI with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense KETRI 2537. DB844 was absorbed and converted to the active metabolite 6-[5-(4-phenylamidinophenyl-furanyl-2-yl]-nicotinamide (DB820, exhibiting plasma C(max values of 430 and 190 nM for DB844 and DB820, respectively, after the 14th dose at 6 mg/kg qd. A 100-fold reduction in blood trypanosome counts was observed within 24 h of the third dose and, at the end of treatment evaluation performed four days post the last drug dose, trypanosomes were not detected in the blood or cerebrospinal fluid of any monkey. However, some animals relapsed during the 300 days of post treatment monitoring, resulting in a cure rate of 3/8 (37.5% and 3/7 (42.9% for the 5 mg/kg×10 days and the 6 mg/kg×14 days dose regimens respectively. These DB844 efficacy data were an improvement compared with pentamidine and pafuramidine both of which were previously shown to be non-curative in this model of CNS stage HAT. These data show that synthesis of novel diamidines with improved activity against CNS-stage HAT was possible.

  19. Pharmacology of DB844, an Orally Active aza Analogue of Pafuramidine, in a Monkey Model of Second Stage Human African Trypanosomiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuita, John K.; Wang, Michael Z.; Kagira, John M.; Denton, Cathrine L.; Paine, Mary F.; Mdachi, Raymond E.; Murilla, Grace A.; Ching, Shelley; Boykin, David W.; Tidwell, Richard R.; Hall, James E.; Brun, Reto

    2012-01-01

    Novel drugs to treat human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) are still urgently needed despite the recent addition of nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT) to WHO Model Lists of Essential Medicines against second stage HAT, where parasites have invaded the central nervous system (CNS). The pharmacology of a potential orally available lead compound, N-methoxy-6-{5-[4-(N-methoxyamidino) phenyl]-furan-2-yl}-nicotinamidine (DB844), was evaluated in a vervet monkey model of second stage HAT, following promising results in mice. DB844 was administered orally to vervet monkeys, beginning 28 days post infection (DPI) with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense KETRI 2537. DB844 was absorbed and converted to the active metabolite 6-[5-(4-phenylamidinophenyl)-furanyl-2-yl]-nicotinamide (DB820), exhibiting plasma Cmax values of 430 and 190 nM for DB844 and DB820, respectively, after the 14th dose at 6 mg/kg qd. A 100-fold reduction in blood trypanosome counts was observed within 24 h of the third dose and, at the end of treatment evaluation performed four days post the last drug dose, trypanosomes were not detected in the blood or cerebrospinal fluid of any monkey. However, some animals relapsed during the 300 days of post treatment monitoring, resulting in a cure rate of 3/8 (37.5%) and 3/7 (42.9%) for the 5 mg/kg×10 days and the 6 mg/kg×14 days dose regimens respectively. These DB844 efficacy data were an improvement compared with pentamidine and pafuramidine both of which were previously shown to be non-curative in this model of CNS stage HAT. These data show that synthesis of novel diamidines with improved activity against CNS-stage HAT was possible. PMID:22848769

  20. Multiple evolutionary origins of Trypanosoma evansi in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Kamidi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi is the parasite causing surra, a form of trypanosomiasis in camels and other livestock, and a serious economic burden in Kenya and many other parts of the world. Trypanosoma evansi transmission can be sustained mechanically by tabanid and Stomoxys biting flies, whereas the closely related African trypanosomes T. brucei brucei and T. b. rhodesiense require cyclical development in tsetse flies (genus Glossina for transmission. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary origins of T. evansi. We used 15 polymorphic microsatellites to quantify levels and patterns of genetic diversity among 41 T. evansi isolates and 66 isolates of T. b. brucei (n = 51 and T. b. rhodesiense (n = 15, including many from Kenya, a region where T. evansi may have evolved from T. brucei. We found that T. evansi strains belong to at least two distinct T. brucei genetic units and contain genetic diversity that is similar to that in T. brucei strains. Results indicated that the 41 T. evansi isolates originated from multiple T. brucei strains from different genetic backgrounds, implying independent origins of T. evansi from T. brucei strains. This surprising finding further suggested that the acquisition of the ability of T. evansi to be transmitted mechanically, and thus the ability to escape the obligate link with the African tsetse fly vector, has occurred repeatedly. These findings, if confirmed, have epidemiological implications, as T. brucei strains from different genetic backgrounds can become either causative agents of a dangerous, cosmopolitan livestock disease or of a lethal human disease, like for T. b. rhodesiense.

  1. Effect of rearing diet on the infection rate in flies released for the control of tsetse populations by sterile males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maudlin, I.

    1990-01-01

    In areas where sleeping sickness is endemic, it is the practice of sterile insect technique (SIT) programmes to give sterilized males a bloodmeal before release into the wild in order to reduce the risk of these released flies acting as disease vectors. This strategy has been adopted because of experimental evidence which showed that it was essential to infect flies at their first feed to establish a Tripanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b rhodesiense infection in tsetse flies. The aim of the work was to test artificial tsetse diets produced in the IAEA Laboratory at Seibersdorf in order to determine whether they were as effective as whole blood in inhibiting T. brucei sensu lato (sl) infections in flies. Seven artificial diets were tested with T.b. rhodesiense; Glossina morsitans morsitans males were fed one meal of the diet and then starved for 3 days before the infective feed. None of these diets significantly altered the infection rate of the treated flies and the seven groups produced statistically homogeneous results, with a mean midgut rate of 16% (control flies fed pig blood: 17%). Flies infected as tenerals with the same trypanosome stock produced midgut rates of 61%. Three of the diets were also tested with a T. congolense stock. There were no significant differences between flies fed artificial (mean midgut infection rate: 15%) and whole blood diets (19%). G. m. morsitans infected as tenerals with this trypanosome stock produced midgut rates of 66%. As with T. brucei sl infections, teneral flies were far more likely to develop a T. congolense infection than fed flies; this result suggests that all the tsetse flies used in SIT programmes should be fed before release in order to reduce the risk both to man and his livestock. Artificial diets are as effective as whole blood in inhibiting trypanosome infections. The effect of bloodmeal on the fly infection rates is discussed in relation to lectin production in fed flies. (author). 13 refs, 2 tabs

  2. NATO Human View Architecture and Human Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Holly A. H.; Houston, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    The NATO Human View is a system architectural viewpoint that focuses on the human as part of a system. Its purpose is to capture the human requirements and to inform on how the human impacts the system design. The viewpoint contains seven static models that include different aspects of the human element, such as roles, tasks, constraints, training and metrics. It also includes a Human Dynamics component to perform simulations of the human system under design. One of the static models, termed Human Networks, focuses on the human-to-human communication patterns that occur as a result of ad hoc or deliberate team formation, especially teams distributed across space and time. Parameters of human teams that effect system performance can be captured in this model. Human centered aspects of networks, such as differences in operational tempo (sense of urgency), priorities (common goal), and team history (knowledge of the other team members), can be incorporated. The information captured in the Human Network static model can then be included in the Human Dynamics component so that the impact of distributed teams is represented in the simulation. As the NATO militaries transform to a more networked force, the Human View architecture is an important tool that can be used to make recommendations on the proper mix of technological innovations and human interactions.

  3. The Digital Humanities as a Humanities Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that the digital humanities can be seen as a humanities project in a time of significant change in the academy. The background is a number of scholarly, educational and technical challenges, the multiple epistemic traditions linked to the digital humanities, the potential reach of the field across and outside the humanities,…

  4. Modern Human Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Byeong Yong; Lee Dong Kyeong

    2005-08-01

    These are the titles of each chapter. They are as in the following; design of human-centerdness, human machine system, information processing process, sense of human, user interface, elements of human body, vital dynamics, measurement of reaction of human body, estimation and management of working environment, mental characteristic of human, human error, group, organization and leadership, safety supervision, process analysis, time studying, work sampling, work factor and methods time measurement, introduction of muscular skeletal disease and program of preventive management.

  5. Expert Assessment of Human-Human Stigmergy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parunak, H. Van Dyke

    2005-01-01

    Human-Human Stigmergy is pervasive. A wide range of pre-computer social systems fit the pattern of stigmergic coordination, and have provided a rich set of metaphors on which a diverse set of computer-enabled systems for enabling human...

  6. The golden triangle of human dignity: human security, human development and human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaay Fortman, B. de

    2004-01-01

    The success or failure of processes of democratization cannot be detached from processes of development related to the aspirations of people at the grassroots. Human rights, in a more theoretical terminology, require human development in order to enhance human security.

  7. Human Rights, Human Security and Political Theologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Lorite Escorihuela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human rights, particularly in the form of international human rights law, intersect with religion and peace at foundational levels, as symbolically highlighted by the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR. The Preamble to the Declaration proclaims in its very first line that respect for human dignity is the foundation of peace, and proceeds to declare that freedom of belief, alongside freedom of speech and freedom from fear, are the highest aspirations of humankind. One could similarly highlight the special relationship between the project of human rights, peace and religion, particularly religious tolerance, in the texts of the universal, as well as regional, human rights instruments adopted since 1948, as well as the text of the Charter of the United Nations of 1945. The relationship between contemporary human rights, on the one hand, and religion and peace on the other, is arguably determined by the structure of international human rights law as a political discourse, which describes the relationship between individuals, society and the State. The visible influence of social contract theory on the wording of the Universal Declaration reminds us that from its inception, the project of human rights is intimately linked to religious diversity (because of the birth of modern sovereignty in European wars of religion and evangelical imperialism and peace (because of the connection that the Declaration draws between the stability of States and respect for the human dignity of citizens. Against this known conceptual and historical backdrop, this paper starts with the displacement, at the global level, of human rights by the ambiguous discourse of "human security," since the early 1990s. A general idea is that "human security", which has rapidly evolved to become an organizing principle of policy-making for governments as well as non-governmental and inter-governmental organizations, constitutes an alternative, sometimes deliberately

  8. Taking the "human" out of human rights

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, John

    2011-01-01

    Human rights are universally acknowledged to be important, although they are, of course, by no means universally respected. This universality has helped to combat racism and sexism and other arbitrary and vicious forms of discrimination. Unfortunately, as we shall see, the universality of human rights is both too universal and not universal enough. It is time to take the "human" out of human rights. Indeed, it is very probable that in the future there will be no more humans as we know them no...

  9. Localizing human rights

    OpenAIRE

    Feyter, De, Koen

    2007-01-01

    International human rights lawyers tend to focus on establishing the universality of human rights rather than on improving the usefulness of human rights in addressing local problems. This paper draws attention to the need to make human rights more locally relevant, particularly in a context of economic globalisation. Human rights can be made more locally relevant by interpreting existing global norms in the light of needs identified by community organisations, and by developing human rights ...

  10. Human factors in training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, J.W.; Brown, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Human Factors concept is a focused effort directed at those activities which require human involvement. Training is, by its nature, an activity totally dependent on the Human Factor. This paper identifies several concerns significant to training situations and discusses how Human Factor awareness can increase the quality of learning. Psychology in the training arena is applied Human Factors. Training is a method of communication represented by sender, medium, and receiver. Two-thirds of this communications model involves the human element directly

  11. Engineered human vaccines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, J.S. (Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Div. of Immunology and Neurobiology)

    1994-01-01

    The limitations of human vaccines in use at present and the design requirements for a new generation of human vaccines are discussed. The progress in engineering of human vaccines for bacteria, viruses, parasites, and cancer is reviewed, and the data from human studies with the engineered vaccines are discussed, especially for cancer and AIDS vaccines. The final section of the review deals with the possible future developments in the field of engineered human vaccines and the requirement for effective new human adjuvants.

  12. Human-machine interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, J Chris [Sandia Park, NM; Xavier, Patrick G [Albuquerque, NM; Abbott, Robert G [Albuquerque, NM; Brannon, Nathan G [Albuquerque, NM; Bernard, Michael L [Tijeras, NM; Speed, Ann E [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  13. The Human/Machine Humanities: A Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollivier Dyens

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available What does it mean to be human in the 21st century? The pull of engineering on every aspect of our lives, the impact of machines on how we represent ourselves, the influence of computers on our understanding of free-will, individuality and species, and the effect of microorganisms on our behaviour are so great that one cannot discourse on humanity and humanities without considering their entanglement with technology and with the multiple new dimensions of reality that it opens up. The future of humanities should take into account AI, bacteria, software, viruses (both organic and inorganic, hardware, machine language, parasites, big data, monitors, pixels, swarms systems and the Internet. One cannot think of humanity and humanities as distinct from technology anymore.

  14. Special Section: Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenlund, Knut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Eleven articles examine human rights in Europe. Topics include unemployment, human rights legislation, role of the Council of Europe in promoting human rights, labor unions, migrant workers, human dignity in industralized societies, and international violence. Journal available from Council of Europe, Directorate of Press and Information, 67006…

  15. Scalability of human models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodarius, C.; Rooij, L. van; Lange, R. de

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to create a scalable human occupant model that allows adaptation of human models with respect to size, weight and several mechanical parameters. Therefore, for the first time two scalable facet human models were developed in MADYMO. First, a scalable human male was

  16. Preference for human eyes in human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupierrix, Eve; de Boisferon, Anne Hillairet; Méary, David; Lee, Kang; Quinn, Paul C; Di Giorgio, Elisa; Simion, Francesca; Tomonaga, Masaki; Pascalis, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Despite evidence supporting an early attraction to human faces, the nature of the face representation in neonates and its development during the first year after birth remain poorly understood. One suggestion is that an early preference for human faces reflects an attraction toward human eyes because human eyes are distinctive compared with other animals. In accord with this proposal, prior empirical studies have demonstrated the importance of the eye region in face processing in adults and infants. However, an attraction for the human eye has never been shown directly in infants. The current study aimed to investigate whether an attraction for human eyes would be present in newborns and older infants. With the use of a preferential looking time paradigm, newborns and 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month-olds were simultaneously presented with a pair of nonhuman primate faces (chimpanzees and Barbary macaques) that differed only by the eyes, thereby pairing a face with original nonhuman primate eyes with the same face in which the eyes were replaced by human eyes. Our results revealed that no preference was observed in newborns, but a preference for nonhuman primate faces with human eyes emerged from 3months of age and remained stable thereafter. The findings are discussed in terms of how a preference for human eyes may emerge during the first few months after birth. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. ISS Payload Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  18. Economics of human trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Elizabeth M; Schauer, Edward J; Galli, Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Because freedom of choice and economic gain are at the heart of productivity, human trafficking impedes national and international economic growth. Within the next 10 years, crime experts expect human trafficking to surpass drug and arms trafficking in its incidence, cost to human well-being, and profitability to criminals (Schauer and Wheaton, 2006: 164-165). The loss of agency from human trafficking as well as from modern slavery is the result of human vulnerability (Bales, 2000: 15). As people become vulnerable to exploitation and businesses continually seek the lowest-cost labour sources, trafficking human beings generates profit and a market for human trafficking is created. This paper presents an economic model of human trafficking that encompasses all known economic factors that affect human trafficking both across and within national borders. We envision human trafficking as a monopolistically competitive industry in which traffickers act as intermediaries between vulnerable individuals and employers by supplying differentiated products to employers. In the human trafficking market, the consumers are employers of trafficked labour and the products are human beings. Using a rational-choice framework of human trafficking we explain the social situations that shape relocation and working decisions of vulnerable populations leading to human trafficking, the impetus for being a trafficker, and the decisions by employers of trafficked individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide a common ground upon which policymakers and researchers can collaborate to decrease the incidence of trafficking in humans.

  19. Human dignity, bioethics, and human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häyry, Matti; Takala, Tuija

    2005-09-01

    The authors analyse and assess the Universal Draft Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights published by UNESCO. They argue that the Draft has two main weaknesses. It unnecessarily confines the scope of bioethics to life sciences and their practical applications. And it fails to spell out the intended role of human dignity in international ethical regulation.

  20. Using detergent to enhance detection sensitivity of African trypanosomes in human CSF and blood by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Grab

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay, with its advantages of simplicity, rapidity and cost effectiveness, has evolved as one of the most sensitive and specific methods for the detection of a broad range of pathogenic microorganisms including African trypanosomes. While many LAMP-based assays are sufficiently sensitive to detect DNA well below the amount present in a single parasite, the detection limit of the assay is restricted by the number of parasites present in the volume of sample assayed; i.e. 1 per µL or 10(3 per mL. We hypothesized that clinical sensitivities that mimic analytical limits based on parasite DNA could be approached or even obtained by simply adding detergent to the samples prior to LAMP assay.For proof of principle we used two different LAMP assays capable of detecting 0.1 fg genomic DNA (0.001 parasite. The assay was tested on dilution series of intact bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF or blood with or without the addition of the detergent Triton X-100 and 60 min incubation at ambient temperature. With human CSF and in the absence of detergent, the LAMP detection limit for live intact parasites using 1 µL of CSF as the source of template was at best 10(3 parasites/mL. Remarkably, detergent enhanced LAMP assay reaches sensitivity about 100 to 1000-fold lower; i.e. 10 to 1 parasite/mL. Similar detergent-mediated increases in LAMP assay analytical sensitivity were also found using DNA extracted from filter paper cards containing blood pretreated with detergent before card spotting or blood samples spotted on detergent pretreated cards.This simple procedure for the enhanced detection of live African trypanosomes in biological fluids by LAMP paves the way for the adaptation of LAMP for the economical and sensitive diagnosis of other protozoan parasites and microorganisms that cause diseases that plague the developing world.

  1. Using Detergent to Enhance Detection Sensitivity of African Trypanosomes in Human CSF and Blood by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grab, Dennis J.; Nikolskaia, Olga V.; Inoue, Noboru; Thekisoe, Oriel M. M.; Morrison, Liam J.; Gibson, Wendy; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background The loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, with its advantages of simplicity, rapidity and cost effectiveness, has evolved as one of the most sensitive and specific methods for the detection of a broad range of pathogenic microorganisms including African trypanosomes. While many LAMP-based assays are sufficiently sensitive to detect DNA well below the amount present in a single parasite, the detection limit of the assay is restricted by the number of parasites present in the volume of sample assayed; i.e. 1 per µL or 103 per mL. We hypothesized that clinical sensitivities that mimic analytical limits based on parasite DNA could be approached or even obtained by simply adding detergent to the samples prior to LAMP assay. Methodology/Principal Findings For proof of principle we used two different LAMP assays capable of detecting 0.1 fg genomic DNA (0.001 parasite). The assay was tested on dilution series of intact bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or blood with or without the addition of the detergent Triton X-100 and 60 min incubation at ambient temperature. With human CSF and in the absence of detergent, the LAMP detection limit for live intact parasites using 1 µL of CSF as the source of template was at best 103 parasites/mL. Remarkably, detergent enhanced LAMP assay reaches sensitivity about 100 to 1000-fold lower; i.e. 10 to 1 parasite/mL. Similar detergent-mediated increases in LAMP assay analytical sensitivity were also found using DNA extracted from filter paper cards containing blood pretreated with detergent before card spotting or blood samples spotted on detergent pretreated cards. Conclusions/Significance This simple procedure for the enhanced detection of live African trypanosomes in biological fluids by LAMP paves the way for the adaptation of LAMP for the economical and sensitive diagnosis of other protozoan parasites and microorganisms that cause diseases that plague the

  2. Global Law: Humanism and Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilane Serratine Grubba

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the ideal of human rights before globalizatórios inflows. It begins with a general statement about the legal globalization, comparing it with the Global Law in the political and economic implications. Later, it approaches the ideal predicted with transnationalism. Proposes a reflection on the present Human Rights. Also, rethinks the lines of the complex web of Global Law, its institutions and its actors, which circulate between the public and private plans. There is no sense in space maintenance of the ideal of human rights only in the state or territory in international treaties originally linked to the states.

  3. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Why get vaccinated?HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with cause ... at http://www.cdc.gov/hpv. HPV Vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and ...

  4. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... 6348 Email CDC-INFO U.S. Department of Health & Human Services HHS/Open USA.gov TOP

  5. Human bites (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  6. Human Parainfluenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Parainfluenza Viruses (HPIVs) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) commonly cause respiratory illnesses in ...

  7. Human Use Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the...

  8. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women HPV (human papillomavirus) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... outside of the body. To Learn More About HPV Human Papillomavirus Vaccine More in For Women Medication ...

  9. Statement on Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of ... for this statement on human cloning. Ban Reproductive Cloning AAAS endorses a legally enforceable ban on efforts ...

  10. ECONOMICS OF HUMAN RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOANA - JULIETA JOSAN

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze human resources in terms of quantitative and qualitative side with special focus on the human capital accumulation influence. The paper examines the human resources trough human capital accumulation in terms of modern theory of human resources, educational capital, health, unemployment and migration. The findings presented in this work are based on theoretical economy publications and data collected from research materials. Sources of information include: documents from organizations - the EUROSTAT, INSSE - studies from publications, books, periodicals, and the Internet. The paper describes and analyzes human resources characteristics, human resource capacities, social and economic benefits of human capital accumulation based on economy, and the government plans and policies on health, education and labor market.

  11. Evaluating human genetic diversity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    This book assesses the scientific value and merit of research on human genetic differences--including a collection of DNA samples that represents the whole of human genetic diversity--and the ethical...

  12. Human Use Index (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the...

  13. Human Computer Music Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Dannenberg, Roger B.

    2012-01-01

    Human Computer Music Performance (HCMP) is the study of music performance by live human performers and real-time computer-based performers. One goal of HCMP is to create a highly autonomous artificial performer that can fill the role of a human, especially in a popular music setting. This will require advances in automated music listening and understanding, new representations for music, techniques for music synchronization, real-time human-computer communication, music generation, sound synt...

  14. Human papillomavirus molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Mallory E; Munger, Karl

    Human papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses with a tropism for squamous epithelia. A unique aspect of human papillomavirus molecular biology involves dependence on the differentiation status of the host epithelial cell to complete the viral lifecycle. A small group of these viruses are the etiologic agents of several types of human cancers, including oral and anogenital tract carcinomas. This review focuses on the basic molecular biology of human papillomaviruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Human Resource Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Navaz, A. S. Syed; Fiaz, A. S. Syed; Prabhadevi, C.; Sangeetha, V.; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper titled HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM is basically concerned with managing the Administrator of HUMAN RESOURCE Department in a company. A Human Resource Management System, refers to the systems and processes at the intersection between human resource management and information technology. It merges HRM as a discipline and in particular its basic HR activities and processes with the information technology field, whereas the programming of data processing systems evolved into standa...

  16. Human Machine Learning Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kenneth R.; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Williams, Kim H.

    2017-01-01

    Human Machine Learning Symbiosis is a cooperative system where both the human learner and the machine learner learn from each other to create an effective and efficient learning environment adapted to the needs of the human learner. Such a system can be used in online learning modules so that the modules adapt to each learner's learning state both…

  17. Humanities Review Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Humanities Review Journal is published in June and December by Humanities Research Forum. The Journal publishes original, well-researched papers, review essays, interviews, resume, and commentaries, which offer new insights into the various disciplines in the Humanities. The focus is on issues about Africa.

  18. A Human Rights Glossary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Presents a human rights glossary that includes definitions of basic terms, treaties, charters, and groups/organizations that have been featured in previous articles in this edition of "Update on Law-Related Education"; the human rights terms have been compiled as part of the celebration of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights…

  19. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Templeton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  20. Intervention and Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Arthur J.

    1988-01-01

    Defends the right of nations to criticize human rights violations within other nations. Pointing out that the human rights protections cannot be left to domestic jurisdiction, Goldberg cites numerous treaties and declarations which make human rights protection a matter of international law. (GEA)