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Sample records for brucei causative agent

  1. The Phosphoproteome of Bloodstream Form Trypanosoma brucei, Causative Agent of African Sleeping Sickness

    OpenAIRE

    Nett, Isabelle R. E.; Martin, David M. A.; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Lamont, Douglas; Barber, Jonathan D.; Mehlert, Angela; Ferguson, Michael A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of human African sleeping sickness and related animal diseases, and it has over 170 predicted protein kinases. Protein phosphorylation is a key regulatory mechanism for cellular function that, thus far, has been studied in T.brucei principally through putative kinase mRNA knockdown and observation of the resulting phenotype. However, despite the relatively large kinome of this organism and the demonstrated essentiality of severa...

  2. The phosphoproteome of bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei, causative agent of African sleeping sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nett, Isabelle R E; Martin, David M A; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Lamont, Douglas; Barber, Jonathan D; Mehlert, Angela; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2009-07-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of human African sleeping sickness and related animal diseases, and it has over 170 predicted protein kinases. Protein phosphorylation is a key regulatory mechanism for cellular function that, thus far, has been studied in T.brucei principally through putative kinase mRNA knockdown and observation of the resulting phenotype. However, despite the relatively large kinome of this organism and the demonstrated essentiality of several T. brucei kinases, very few specific phosphorylation sites have been determined in this organism. Using a gel-free, phosphopeptide enrichment-based proteomics approach we performed the first large scale phosphorylation site analyses for T.brucei. Serine, threonine, and tyrosine phosphorylation sites were determined for a cytosolic protein fraction of the bloodstream form of the parasite, resulting in the identification of 491 phosphoproteins based on the identification of 852 unique phosphopeptides and 1204 phosphorylation sites. The phosphoproteins detected in this study are predicted from their genome annotations to participate in a wide variety of biological processes, including signal transduction, processing of DNA and RNA, protein synthesis, and degradation and to a minor extent in metabolic pathways. The analysis of phosphopeptides and phosphorylation sites was facilitated by in-house developed software, and this automated approach was validated by manual annotation of spectra of the kinase subset of proteins. Analysis of the cytosolic bloodstream form T. brucei kinome revealed the presence of 44 phosphorylated protein kinases in our data set that could be classified into the major eukaryotic protein kinase groups by applying a multilevel hidden Markov model library of the kinase catalytic domain. Identification of the kinase phosphorylation sites showed conserved phosphorylation sequence motifs in several kinase activation segments, supporting the view that

  3. First Draft Genome Sequence of the Dourine Causative Agent: Trypanosoma Equiperdum Strain OVI

    OpenAIRE

    H?bert, Laurent; Moumen, Bouziane; Madeline, Anthony; Steinbiss, Sascha; Lakhdar, Latifa; Van Reet, Nick; B?scher, Philippe; Laugier, Claire; Cauchard, Julien; Petry, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma equiperdum is the causative agent of dourine, a sexually-transmitted infection of horses. This parasite belongs to the subgenus Trypanozoon that also includes the agent of sleeping sickness (Trypanosoma brucei) and surra (Trypanosoma evansi). We herein report the genome sequence of a T. equiperdum strain OVI, isolated from a horse in South-Africa in 1976. This is the first genome sequence of the T. equiperdum species, and its availability will provide important insights for future...

  4. First Draft Genome Sequence of the Dourine Causative Agent: Trypanosoma Equiperdum Strain OVI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Laurent; Moumen, Bouziane; Madeline, Anthony; Steinbiss, Sascha; Lakhdar, Latifa; Van Reet, Nick; Büscher, Philippe; Laugier, Claire; Cauchard, Julien; Petry, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma equiperdum is the causative agent of dourine, a sexually-transmitted infection of horses. This parasite belongs to the subgenus Trypanozoon that also includes the agent of sleeping sickness (Trypanosoma brucei) and surra (Trypanosoma evansi). We herein report the genome sequence of a T. equiperdum strain OVI, isolated from a horse in South-Africa in 1976. This is the first genome sequence of the T. equiperdum species, and its availability will provide important insights for future studies on genetic classification of the subgenus Trypanozoon. PMID:28138343

  5. First Draft Genome Sequence of the Dourine Causative Agent:Trypanosoma EquiperdumStrain OVI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Laurent; Moumen, Bouziane; Madeline, Anthony; Steinbiss, Sascha; Lakhdar, Latifa; Van Reet, Nick; Büscher, Philippe; Laugier, Claire; Cauchard, Julien; Petry, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma equiperdum is the causative agent of dourine, a sexually-transmitted infection of horses. This parasite belongs to the subgenus Trypanozoon that also includes the agent of sleeping sickness ( Trypanosoma brucei ) and surra ( Trypanosoma evansi ). We herein report the genome sequence of a T. equiperdum strain OVI, isolated from a horse in South-Africa in 1976. This is the first genome sequence of the T. equiperdum species, and its availability will provide important insights for future studies on genetic classification of the subgenus Trypanozoon.

  6. About Trypanosoma brucei gambiense , the causative agent of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This must consider it within the whole context of "most-neglected diseases" but some findings obtained through biotechnology are discussed in terms of epidemiology and control applications. Key words: Human African Trypanosomiasis, neglected disease, biotechnologies. African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 2 (12), pp.

  7. About Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, the causative agent of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    Since the discovery of this pathology at the beginning of 20th century (e.g. Bruce and Nabarro, 1903),. HAT has killed several hundred thousands of individuals in Africa, mainly in Central part of the continent (Martin et al., 1909; W.H.O., 1998). Although the epidemic of 1920-. 1930's was successfully controlled thanks to Dr.

  8. CAUSATIVE AGENTS OF KERATOMYCOSIS IN IBADAN: REVIEW ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Introduction: Fungi are responsible for less than 2.0 % of corneal infection around the globe. Trauma to the cornea is the leading cause of fungal keratitis especially with history of corneal trauma with vegetable or organic matter. Because of the dearth of data on the aetiological agents of Keratomycosis in this hospital, this ...

  9. Helicobacter pylori : the causative agent of peptic ulcer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review examines Helicobacter pylori as an organism and as the causative agent of peptic ulcers. The review also examined the classification of ulcers, how the bacterium produces the ulcer, some of the virulence factors possessed by the organism, its metabolism and growth requirements. The incidence and ...

  10. Genome sequence of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhill, J; Wren, B W; Thomson, N R; Titball, R W; Holden, M T; Prentice, M B; Sebaihia, M; James, K D; Churcher, C; Mungall, K L; Baker, S; Basham, D; Bentley, S D; Brooks, K; Cerdeño-Tárraga, A M; Chillingworth, T; Cronin, A; Davies, R M; Davis, P; Dougan, G; Feltwell, T; Hamlin, N; Holroyd, S; Jagels, K; Karlyshev, A V; Leather, S; Moule, S; Oyston, P C; Quail, M; Rutherford, K; Simmonds, M; Skelton, J; Stevens, K; Whitehead, S; Barrell, B G

    2001-10-04

    The Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of the systemic invasive infectious disease classically referred to as plague, and has been responsible for three human pandemics: the Justinian plague (sixth to eighth centuries), the Black Death (fourteenth to nineteenth centuries) and modern plague (nineteenth century to the present day). The recent identification of strains resistant to multiple drugs and the potential use of Y. pestis as an agent of biological warfare mean that plague still poses a threat to human health. Here we report the complete genome sequence of Y. pestis strain CO92, consisting of a 4.65-megabase (Mb) chromosome and three plasmids of 96.2 kilobases (kb), 70.3 kb and 9.6 kb. The genome is unusually rich in insertion sequences and displays anomalies in GC base-composition bias, indicating frequent intragenomic recombination. Many genes seem to have been acquired from other bacteria and viruses (including adhesins, secretion systems and insecticidal toxins). The genome contains around 150 pseudogenes, many of which are remnants of a redundant enteropathogenic lifestyle. The evidence of ongoing genome fluidity, expansion and decay suggests Y. pestis is a pathogen that has undergone large-scale genetic flux and provides a unique insight into the ways in which new and highly virulent pathogens evolve.

  11. Mycetoma in Iran: Causative Agents and Geographic Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiri-Jahromi, Shahindokht

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mycetoma is a chronic granulomatous disease caused by true fungi (eumycetoma) or filamentous bacteria (actinomycetoma). It usually involves the subcutaneous tissue after a traumatic inoculation of the causative organism. We reviewed retrospectively 13 patients with mycetoma. Materials and Methods: This study reports the etiologic agents and distribution of mycetoma in 35 cases from 1994 to2009 in Iran. The diagnostic of mycetoma were confirmed by histopathology and direct preparation, culture techniques, and histopathology of granules and surgical biopsies, radiological examination of the affected site. Results: Mycetoma was identified in 35 patients of 168 suspected patients (20.8%). They occurred in 22 male and 13 females. Their ages ranged from 14 to 80 years. The duration of the disease ranged from two months to 38 years. Sixteen patients had eumycetoma, and 19 patients had actinomycetoma, one of them had mix infections by eumycetoma and actinomycetoma. The majority of the patients were from central and states in south and north of Iran. The feet were most affected site (65.7%) of the cases, followed by hands (25.7%), face (2.8%), and trunk (2.8%), and buttock (2.8%). Most patients (68.5%) were more than 40 year-old. The male to female ratio was 5:3. The disease was abundant among housewife in urban and farmer in rural area of Iran. The most common prevalent mycetoma agents in this study were Actinomyces sp. There was a history of risk factors in 28.6% of patients in this study. Conclusion: Mycetoma occasionally occurs particularly in the South, Central, and North of Iran, and seen most often in persons, who live in hot, humid climates. If there are risk factors for invasive fungal infections traumatic inoculation with any fungus may result in rapid local spread and systemic disease, often with fatal outcome. PMID:25284877

  12. Mycetoma in Iran: Causative agents and geographic distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahindokht Bassiri-Jahromi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mycetoma is a chronic granulomatous disease caused by true fungi (eumycetoma or filamentous bacteria (actinomycetoma. It usually involves the subcutaneous tissue after a traumatic inoculation of the causative organism. We reviewed retrospectively 13 patients with mycetoma. Materials and Methods: This study reports the etiologic agents and distribution of mycetoma in 35 cases from 1994 to2009 in Iran. The diagnostic of mycetoma were confirmed by histopathology and direct preparation, culture techniques, and histopathology of granules and surgical biopsies, radiological examination of the affected site. Results: Mycetoma was identified in 35 patients of 168 suspected patients (20.8%. They occurred in 22 male and 13 females. Their ages ranged from 14 to 80 years. The duration of the disease ranged from two months to 38 years. Sixteen patients had eumycetoma, and 19 patients had actinomycetoma, one of them had mix infections by eumycetoma and actinomycetoma. The majority of the patients were from central and states in south and north of Iran. The feet were most affected site (65.7% of the cases, followed by hands (25.7%, face (2.8%, and trunk (2.8%, and buttock (2.8%. Most patients (68.5% were more than 40 year-old. The male to female ratio was 5:3. The disease was abundant among housewife in urban and farmer in rural area of Iran. The most common prevalent mycetoma agents in this study were Actinomyces sp. There was a history of risk factors in 28.6% of patients in this study. Conclusion: Mycetoma occasionally occurs particularly in the South, Central, and North of Iran, and seen most often in persons, who live in hot, humid climates. If there are risk factors for invasive fungal infections traumatic inoculation with any fungus may result in rapid local spread and systemic disease, often with fatal outcome.

  13. Malleable mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verner, Zdeněk; Basu, Somsuvro; Benz, Corinna; Dixit, Sameer; Dobáková, Eva; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Hashimi, Hassan; Horáková, Eva; Huang, Zhenqiu; Paris, Zdeněk; Peña-Diaz, Priscila; Ridlon, Lucie; Týč, Jiří; Wildridge, David; Zíková, Alena; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    The importance of mitochondria for a typical aerobic eukaryotic cell is undeniable, as the list of necessary mitochondrial processes is steadily growing. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of mitochondrial biology of an early-branching parasitic protist, Trypanosoma brucei, a causative agent of serious human and cattle diseases. We present a comprehensive survey of its mitochondrial pathways including kinetoplast DNA replication and maintenance, gene expression, protein and metabolite import, major metabolic pathways, Fe-S cluster synthesis, ion homeostasis, organellar dynamics, and other processes. As we describe in this chapter, the single mitochondrion of T. brucei is everything but simple and as such rivals mitochondria of multicellular organisms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. APPROUSH TO SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTICS OF CAUSATIVE AGENTS OF INFECTIOUS ENDOCARDIDIS

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    Katsapov D.V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Increased level of morbidity of infective endocarditis (IE connected with new risk factors: intravenous drug use, cardiosurgical interventions, hemodialysis brought new clinical forms of the disease. As it shown in a literature main pathogenetic factors of IE are bacteraemia, trauma of endocardium and invasive medical procedures. Very typical pathogens are streptococci and staphylococci. Most typically mitral and aortal valves are affected with spreading of vegetations on surrounding media. Discussion. IE is polyetiologic disease caused by more than 128 microorganisms, and still a challenge for medical professionals. Detection a causative agent is critical for proper specific treatment. In different sources data on percentage of proven cases very according to country and different medical centres reflecting different local epidemiology of IE, diagnostic criteria and protocols. Culture negative infectious endocarditis (CNIE is considered in case of obtaining of three negative results of cultivation of samples on a standard blood agar during 7 days and subculturing. CNIE incidence very form 2% to 33% according to different researches and higher in cases of community acquired infection and reseeding antibacterial treatment. Some of cases of CNIE caused by gram - negative fastidious microorganisms - Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Actinobacillus, Actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, Kingella kingae, with united in HACEK group according to their properties to colonize oropharynx and requirement in special conditions and duration of incubation. Detection of some intracellular bacteria, such as C. burnetti and Bartonella spp. require immunological methods of detection, histological methods and of PCR. Conclusion. In case of diagnostics of patients with CNIE it is necessary to use a combination of prolonged subculturing of serum, emboli and histologic material on blood agar with microscopy by Warthin

  15. Bacterial Keratitis: Risk Factors and Causative Agents | Bataineh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: to describe the clinical, microbiological characteristics and risk factors of. Bacterial Keratitis at Prince Zeid and Rashed ... Offending organisms were isolated in 17(50%) cases only. Pseudomonas in 10(58.8%) cases ... Pseudomonas was the major causative organism. Proper sampling and microbiological ...

  16. Steroid Alkaloids from Holarrhena africana with Strong Activity against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    OpenAIRE

    Charles Okeke Nnadi; Ngozi Justina Nwodo; Marcel Kaiser; Reto Brun; Thomas J. Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    In our continued search for natural compounds with activity against Trypanosoma brucei, causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, “sleeping sickness”), we have investigated extracts from the leaves and bark of the West African Holarrhena africana (syn. Holarrhena floribunda; Apocynaceae). The extracts and their alkaloid-enriched fractions displayed promising in vitro activity against bloodstream forms of T. brucei rhodesiense (Tbr; East African HAT). Bioactivity-guided chromatogr...

  17. Mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense resistance to human serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uzureau, Pierrick; Uzureau, Sophie; Lecordier, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    The African parasite Trypanosoma brucei gambiense accounts for 97% of human sleeping sickness cases. T. b. gambiense resists the specific human innate immunity acting against several other tsetse-fly-transmitted trypanosome species such as T. b. brucei, the causative agent of nagana disease......GP), which prevents APOL1 toxicity and induces stiffening of membranes upon interaction with lipids. Two additional features contribute to resistance to TLFs: reduction of sensitivity to APOL1 requiring cysteine protease activity, and TbHpHbR inactivation due to a L210S substitution. According...

  18. BAPTA-AM decreases cellular pH, inhibits acidocalcisome acidification and autophagy in amino acid-starved T. brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng-Jun; Tan, Kevin S W; He, Cynthia Y

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the role of Ca2+ signaling in starvation-induced autophagy in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, we used cell-permeant Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM and cell impermeant chelator EGTA, and examined the potential involvement of several intracellular Ca2+ signaling pathways in T. brucei autophagy. The results showed an unexpected effect of BAPTA-AM in decreasing cellular pH and inhibiting acidocalcisome acidification in starved cells. The implication of these results in the role of Ca2+ signaling and cellular/organellar pH in T. brucei autophagy is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Solanum torvum as a causative agent of enzootic calcinosis in Papua, New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, K M; Simonite, J P; Pullen, L; Simpson, J A

    1979-09-01

    Inclusion of dried powdered leaves of Solanum torvum Swartz (collected in Papua, New Guinea) in the diet of rats induced hypercalcaemai rapidly and hyperphosphataemia more slowly; soft tissue calcification was most evident in the kidney and lung. Solanum torvum may be a causative agent of enzootic calcinosis in cattle in Papua, New Guinea.

  20. Evaluation of patch test in identification of causative agent in drug rashes due to antiepileptics

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    Vatve Maneesha

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Patch test was evaluated for the identification of causative agent in cutaneous eruptions due to antiepileptics. Patch tests were carried out in twenty patients and ten controls with carbamazepine, phenytoin sodium, phenobarbitone and sodium valproate. Sodium valproate was found tobe irritant in 1 and 5% concentration and further dilution is recommended for patch testing. Patch test was positive in 14 (70% patients and in 7 with suspected drug alone, and remaining 7 were positive with more than one antiepileptic drug. We recommended patch test for identification of causative drug in rashes due to antiepileptics.

  1. In Silico Prediction and Experimental Evaluation of Furanoheliangolide Sesquiterpene Lactones as Potent Agents against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Fernando B.; Lopes, Norberto P.; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto

    2014-01-01

    As a continuation of our earlier study on the in vitro antiprotozoal activity of 40 natural sesquiterpene lactones (STLs), we extended the set of tested compounds from our laboratories to 59. On the basis of this extended data set, further enriched by literature data for 10 compounds tested under the same conditions, our quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses for activity against T. brucei rhodesiense (etiologic agent of human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness) were continued, and the QSAR model thus obtained with 69 structures was used to predict the activity of a virtual library of 1,750 STL structures. As a major result from these calculations, furanoheliangolide-type compounds, a subclass of STLs hitherto untested against T. brucei rhodesiense, were predicted to have an exceptionally high level of in vitro activity. Four representative compounds of this type, goyazensolide, 4,5-dihydro-2′,3′-epoxy-15-deoxygoyazensolide, budlein A, and 4,15-isoatriplicolide tiglate, were therefore tested. They displayed 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of 0.07, 0.20, 0.07, and 0.015 μM, respectively, so that the in silico prediction was experimentally confirmed. 4,15-Isoatriplicolide tiglate is the most potent STL against T. b. rhodesiense found. Furanoheliangolide STLs were thus identified as interesting leads against this parasite which deserve more detailed investigations. PMID:24165182

  2. INFECTED WITH TRYPANOSOMA BRUCEI BRUCEI

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    v brucei infection where for example tant components of extra-cellular the parasite infectivity potential and toxicological effects have been sues in animal. They are ... homeostasis (1,2, 3). With a unique ability to main- tain the cellular contents and ions stable concentrations, Trypano- soma b. brucei, to which humans.

  3. [Study of sensitivity of laboratory animals to a causative agent of argentine hemorrhagic fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syromiatnikova, S I; Pantiukhov, V B; Shatokhina, I V; Timofeev, M A; Sizikova, T E; Borisevich, S V

    2014-01-01

    Study sensitivity of laboratory animals to a causative agent ofArgentine hemorrhagic fever. Junin virus strain XJ P37 was obtained from the State Collection of Causative Agents of Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers of the Pathogenicity Group I of Scientific Research Center of the 33rd Central Scientific Research Test Institute (SRC of the 33rd CSRTI). Junin virus strain XJ P37 culture with biological activity of 5.2 1g PFU x ml was used in the experiments. Mice (2 - 4 and 7 - 14 days old), guinea pigs (250 - 300 g), 1.8 - 2.5 kg shinshilla breed rabbits, 2.0 - 3.0 kg javanese macaque monkeys were obtained from vivarium of the SRC of the 33rd CSRTI. Vero (B) and GMK-AH-1 (D) cell cultures were obtained from cell culture collection of the SRC of the 33rd CSRTI. Biological activity calculation of Junin virus was carried out by Kerber in I.P. Amsharin modification. Lethality in animals was from 12.5 to 50% after intranasal and intraperitoneal infection of guinea pigs, intramuscular, intraperitoneal and subcutaneous infection of rabbits, intracerebral and intranasal infection of mice at the doses from 0.4 to 1.0 x 10(5) PFU. Death of infected monkeys after intramuscular administration of the virus at 1.0 x 10(4) PFU dose was not observed. In 100% of surviving animals formation of virus-neutralizing antibodies was registered. Evaluation of sensitivity of laboratory animals to Junin virus has shown that intracerebrally infected mice may be used to maintain causative agent culture, infected guinea pigs - to prepare virus-containing cultures and modelling infection exacerbation in humans. Intramuscularly infected rabbits may be used to obtain hyper-immune sera.

  4. ANTIBACTERIAL PROPERTIES OF HOLMIUM TO CAUSATIVE AGENTS OF SUPPURATIVE -INFLAMMATORY COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poddubnaya H. N.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Article denotes to determination of antibacterial action of polyoxometalate holmium to causative agents of suppurative-inflammatory process in wounds of patients, which were suffered from trauma. Method of serial dilutions was used for determination of minimal inhibiting concentration (MIC of holmium to staphylococci, enterococci and E. coli. Registration of holmium action shows the strong antibacterial influence to staphylococci and enterococci (MIC of holmium action to staphylococcal and enterococcal strains same 1 10 M, to strains of E.coli – 2,5 10 M. Solutions of holmium don’t have antibacterial action to strains of E.coli.

  5. Rapid Identification of Black Grain Eumycetoma Causative Agents Using Rolling Circle Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sarah A.; van den Ende, Bert H. G. Gerrits; Fahal, Ahmed H.; van de Sande, Wendy W. J.; de Hoog, G. S.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate identification of mycetoma causative agent is a priority for treatment. However, current identification tools are far from being satisfactory for both reliable diagnosis and epidemiological investigations. A rapid, simple, and highly efficient molecular based method for identification of agents of black grain eumycetoma is introduced, aiming to improve diagnostic in endemic areas. Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA) uses species-specific padlock probes and isothermal DNA amplification. The tests were based on ITS sequences and developed for Falciformispora senegalensis, F. tompkinsii, Madurella fahalii, M. mycetomatis, M. pseudomycetomatis, M. tropicana, Medicopsis romeroi, and Trematosphaeria grisea. With the isothermal RCA assay, 62 isolates were successfully identified with 100% specificity and no cross reactivity or false results. The main advantage of this technique is the low-cost, high specificity, and simplicity. In addition, it is highly reproducible and can be performed within a single day. PMID:25474355

  6. Rapid identification of black grain eumycetoma causative agents using rolling circle amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Ahmed

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate identification of mycetoma causative agent is a priority for treatment. However, current identification tools are far from being satisfactory for both reliable diagnosis and epidemiological investigations. A rapid, simple, and highly efficient molecular based method for identification of agents of black grain eumycetoma is introduced, aiming to improve diagnostic in endemic areas. Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA uses species-specific padlock probes and isothermal DNA amplification. The tests were based on ITS sequences and developed for Falciformispora senegalensis, F. tompkinsii, Madurella fahalii, M. mycetomatis, M. pseudomycetomatis, M. tropicana, Medicopsis romeroi, and Trematosphaeria grisea. With the isothermal RCA assay, 62 isolates were successfully identified with 100% specificity and no cross reactivity or false results. The main advantage of this technique is the low-cost, high specificity, and simplicity. In addition, it is highly reproducible and can be performed within a single day.

  7. Pacific Broad Tapeworm Adenocephalus pacificus as a Causative Agent of Globally Reemerging Diphyllobothriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchta, Roman; Serrano-Martínez, Marcus Enrique; Scholz, Tomas

    2015-10-01

    The Pacific broad tapeworm Adenocephalus pacificus (syn. Diphyllobothrium pacificum) is the causative agent of the third most common fish-borne cestodosis among humans. Although most of the nearly 1,000 cases among humans have been reported in South America (Peru, Chile, and Ecuador), cases recently imported to Europe demonstrate the potential for spread of this tapeworm throughout the world as a result of global trade of fresh or chilled marine fish and travel or migration of humans. We provide a comprehensive survey of human cases of infection with this zoonotic parasite, summarize the history of this re-emerging disease, and identify marine fish species that may serve as a source of human infection when eaten raw or undercooked.

  8. Surveillance of some bacterial causative agents of nosocomial infections during the war and peace period

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    Šuljagić Vesna

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Surveillance based on laboratory findings of bacteria isolated from hospitalized patients is an important activity in epidemiologic surveillance of nosocomial infections. It provides the insight into the circulation and management of some causative agents of nosocomial infections in hospitals which facilitates defining of proper measures for the prevention and suppression of nosocomial infections caused by these agents. The aim of this study was to analyze and compare surveillance data collected in Military Medical Academy (MMA during June 1999 (the period of war and June 2000 (the period of peace. Isolation frequency of bacteria that were the most common agents of nosocomial: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter spp. and Enterococcus spp., was monitored in patients from 5 various surgical wards of MMA. In the war period, the increase of number of isolates of all these bacteria was registered, but the increase of isolated Acinetobacter spp. was the most significant. The total number of isolates was greater in June 1999 in comparison to June 2000. Most isolates were recovered from wound cultures when the increased number of Enterococcus spp. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the blood was registered. In the period of peace isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa manifested reduced resistance to quinolones, imipenem and 3rd generation cephalosporins. Barrier infection control measures are necessary in preventing nosocomial transmission particularly in the wartime. Thus, preventive medicine is important for performing efficient surveillance, and suggesting the adequate measures for prevention and repression of nosocomial infections, particularly in the period of war.

  9. Trypanosoma brucei CYP51: Essentiality and Targeting Therapy in an Experimental Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauchy, Frédéric-Antoine; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Landrein, Nicolas; Dacheux, Denis; Courtois, Pierrette; Lauruol, Florian; Daulouède, Sylvie; Vincendeau, Philippe; Robinson, Derrick R

    2016-11-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is the main causative agent of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness. Because of limited alternatives and treatment toxicities, new therapeutic options are urgently needed for patients with HAT. Sterol 14alpha-demethylase (CYP51) is a potential drug target but its essentiality has not been determined in T. brucei. We used a tetracycline-inducible RNAi system to assess the essentiality of CYP51 in T. brucei bloodstream form (BSF) cells and we evaluated the effect of posaconazole, a well-tolerated triazole drug, within a panel of virulent strains in vitro and in a murine model. Expression of CYP51 in several T. brucei cell lines was demonstrated by western blot and its essentiality was demonstrated by RNA interference (CYP51RNAi) in vitro. Following reduction of TbCYP51 expression by RNAi, cell growth was reduced and eventually stopped compared to WT or non-induced cells, showing the requirement of CYP51 in T. brucei. These phenotypes were rescued by addition of ergosterol. Additionally, CYP51RNAi induction caused morphological defects with multiflagellated cells (pnifurtimox-eflornithine combinations showed similar improvement in mice survival (p≤0.001). Our results provide support for a CYP51 targeting based treatment in HAT. Thus posaconazole used in combination may represent a therapeutic alternative for trypanosomiasis.

  10. The history of the plague and the research on the causative agent Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietz, Björn P; Dunkelberg, Hartmut

    2004-02-01

    The plague is an infectious bacterial disease having a high fatality rate without treatment. It has occurred in three huge pandemics since the 6th century with millions of deaths and numerous smaller epidemics and sporadic cases. Referring to specific clinical symptoms of pulmonary plague the disease became known as the Black Death. This pandemic probably originated in central Asia and began spreading westward along major trade routes. Upon the arrival in the eastern Mediterranean the disease quickly spread especially by sea traffic to Italy, Greece and France and later throughout Europe by land. Until the 18th century many European cities were frequently affected by other great plague epidemics. The worldwide spread of the third pandemic began when the plague reached Hong Kong and Canton in the year 1894. The gram-negative coccobacillus now designated as Yersinia pestis has been discovered as the causative agent of plague in this Hong Kong outbreak. In the following years the role of rats and fleas and their detailed role in the transmission of plague has been discovered and experimentally verified. Today the plague is still endemic in many countries of the world.

  11. Acanthamoeba genotypes T3 and T4 as causative agents of amoebic keratitis in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Vanzzini-Zago, Virginia; Hernandez-Martinez, Dolores; Gonzalez-Robles, Arturo; Salazar-Villatoro, Lizbeth; Ramirez-Flores, Elizabeth; Oregon-Miranda, Eric; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Martinez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2016-02-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are widely distributed worldwide. Some genera included in this group act as opportunistic pathogens causing fatal encephalitis and Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), a sight-threatening infection of the cornea associated with the use of soft contact lenses that could even end in blindness if an early diagnosis and treatment are not achieved. Furthermore, the numbers of AK cases keep rising worldwide mainly due to an increase of contact lens wearers and lack of hygiene in the maintenance of lenses and their cases. In Mexico, no cases of AK have been described so far although the isolation of other pathogenic FLA such as Naegleria fowleri and Balamuthia mandrillaris from both clinical and environmental sources has been reported. The present study reports two cases of Acanthamoeba keratitis diagnosed in two patients admitted to the Hospital "Luis Sánchez Bulnes" for Blindness Prevention in Mexico City, Mexico. Corneal scrapes and contact lenses were checked for the presence of Acanthamoeba strains in both patients. Strains were axenized after initial isolation to classify at the genotype level. After sequencing the diagnostic fragment 3 (DF3) region located on the 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene of Acanthamoeba, genotype T3 and genotype T4 were identified in clinical case 1 and 2, respectively. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of AK in Mexico in the literature and the first description of Acanthamoeba genotypes T3 and T4 as causative agents of amoebic infection.

  12. Babesia ovis as the main causative agent of sheep babesiosis in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar-Bahadori, Shahrokh; Eckert, Brigitte; Omidian, Zahra; Shirazi, Nastran Sadr; Shayan, Parviz

    2012-04-01

    Babesiosis is a haemoparasitic disease with high economical losses in livestock industry worldwide. The early diagnosis and successful therapy of babesiosis belong to the key steps of control and health management of livestock. Ethanol-fixed blood samples of 400 sheep were analyzed for Babesia infection. Reverse line blot (RLB) was established specifically for Theileria lestoquardi, Theileria (China 1), Theileria (China 2), Theileria ovis, Theileria separata, Babesia ovis, Babesia motasi, Babesia crassa, and Babesia (Lintan). The DNA was extracted from the ethanol-fixed blood samples and amplified with a common primer pair derived from 18S rRNA gene, amplifying both Theileria spp. as well as Babesia spp. Regarding the differences in the length of nucleotide sequences of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products obtained from Theileria spp. and Babesia spp., the PCR products derived from Babesia spp. were out screened and analyzed by RLB. The RLB analysis showed that 28 samples within the 400 blood samples were B. ovis positive. No B. motasi, B. crassa, or Babesia (Lintan) could be detected. The sequence analysis of one PCR product as a representative for other B. ovis-positive PCR products confirmed the results of RLB. Our results and the results of other investigators showed that B. ovis could be considered as a main causative agent of sheep babesiosis in Iran. Furthermore, our results also showed that RLB can be used as a reliable method for a simultaneous differentiation of Theileria and Babesia species from each other.

  13. Pathology of camel tuberculosis and molecular characterization of its causative agents in pastoral regions of Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gezahegne Mamo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross sectional study was conducted on 906 apparently healthy camels slaughtered at Akaki and Metehara abattoirs to investigate the pathology of camel tuberculosis (TB and characterize its causative agents using postmortem examination, mycobacteriological culturing, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR, region of difference-4 (RD4-based PCR and spoligotyping. The prevalence of camel TB was 10.04% (91/906 on the basis of pathology and it was significantly higher in females (χ(2 = 4.789; P = 0.029. The tropism of TB lesions was significantly different among the lymph nodes (χ(2 = 22.697; P = 0.002 and lung lobes (χ(2 = 17.901; P = 0.006. Mycobacterial growth was observed in 34% (31/91 of camels with grossly suspicious TB lesions. Upon further molecular characterization using multiplex PCR, 68% (21/31 of the colonies showed a positive signal for the genus Mycobacterium, of which two were confirmed Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis by RD4 deletion typing. Further characterization of the two M. bovis at strains level revealed that one of the strains was SB0133 while the other strain was new and had not been reported to the M. bovis database prior to this study. Hence, it has now been reported to the database, and designated as SB1953. In conclusion, the results of the present study have shown that the majority of camel TB lesions are caused by mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. And hence further identification and characterization of these species would be useful towards the efforts made to control TB in camels.

  14. Pharmacodynamics of antimicrobials against Mycoplasma mycoides mycoides small colony, the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Mitchell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies mycoides Small Colony (MmmSC is the causative agent of Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBPP, a disease of substantial economic importance in sub-Saharan Africa. Failure of vaccination to curtail spread of this disease has led to calls for evaluation of the role of antimicrobials in CBPP control. Three major classes of antimicrobial are effective against mycoplasmas, namely tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones and macrolides. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the effector kinetics of oxytetracycline, danofloxacin and tulathromycin against two MmmSC field strains in artificial medium and adult bovine serum. METHODS: Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC were determined for oxytetracycline, danofloxacin and tulathromycin against MmmSC strains B237 and Tan8 using a macrodilution technique, and time-kill curves were constructed for various multiples of the MIC over a 24 hour period in artificial medium and serum. Data were fitted to sigmoid E(max models to obtain 24 hour-area under curve/MIC ratios for mycoplasmastasis and, where appropriate, for mycoplasmacidal activity and virtual mycoplasmal elimination. RESULTS: Minimum inhibitory concentrations against B237 were 20-fold higher, 2-fold higher and approximately 330-fold lower in serum than in artificial medium for oxytetracycline, danofloxacin and tulathromycin, respectively. Such differences were mirrored in experiments using Tan8. Oxytetracycline was mycoplasmastatic against both strains in both matrices. Danofloxacin elicited mycoplasmacidal activity against B237 and virtual elimination of Tan8; similar maximum antimycoplasmal effects were observed in artificial medium and serum. Tulathromycin effected virtual elimination of B237 but was mycoplasmastatic against Tan8 in artificial medium. However, this drug was mycoplasmastatic against both strains in the more physiologically relevant matrix of serum. CONCLUSIONS: Oxytetracycline

  15. Pathology of camel tuberculosis and molecular characterization of its causative agents in pastoral regions of Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Gezahegne; Bayleyegn, Gizachew; Sisay Tessema, Tesfaye; Legesse, Mengistu; Medhin, Girmay; Bjune, Gunnar; Abebe, Fekadu; Ameni, Gobena

    2011-01-24

    A cross sectional study was conducted on 906 apparently healthy camels slaughtered at Akaki and Metehara abattoirs to investigate the pathology of camel tuberculosis (TB) and characterize its causative agents using postmortem examination, mycobacteriological culturing, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), region of difference-4 (RD4)-based PCR and spoligotyping. The prevalence of camel TB was 10.04% (91/906) on the basis of pathology and it was significantly higher in females (χ(2) = 4.789; P = 0.029). The tropism of TB lesions was significantly different among the lymph nodes (χ(2) = 22.697; P = 0.002) and lung lobes (χ(2) = 17.901; P = 0.006). Mycobacterial growth was observed in 34% (31/91) of camels with grossly suspicious TB lesions. Upon further molecular characterization using multiplex PCR, 68% (21/31) of the colonies showed a positive signal for the genus Mycobacterium, of which two were confirmed Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) by RD4 deletion typing. Further characterization of the two M. bovis at strains level revealed that one of the strains was SB0133 while the other strain was new and had not been reported to the M. bovis database prior to this study. Hence, it has now been reported to the database, and designated as SB1953. In conclusion, the results of the present study have shown that the majority of camel TB lesions are caused by mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. And hence further identification and characterization of these species would be useful towards the efforts made to control TB in camels.

  16. [Detection of causative bacteria for bovine mastitis and their susceptibility to beta-lactam antibacterial agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, S; Matsunaga, T; Uchida, K; Uchida, K

    1990-10-01

    During the period from November 1988 to May 1989, causative bacteria in a total of 172 clinical mastitis cases observed in 66 farms in 5 districts with 6 areas in Japan were examined and frequencies of their occurrences were determined. Susceptibilities (in MICs) of the isolates to 6 beta-lactam antibacterial agents were also determined. As a result, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) was identified in 94 out of 172 cases (54.7%) and were the most prevalent. Corynebacterium spp., Gram-negative bacteria and Staphylococcus aureus were found in 52 (30.2%), 49 (28.5%) and 43 (25.0%) cases, respectively. Four species of Streptococcus family (S. agalactiae, S. dysgalactiae, S. uberis and S. bovis) were identified in a total of 58 cases (33.7%). Susceptibility testing of CNS to cefoperazone (CPZ), cefazolin (CEZ), benzylpenicillin (PCG), ampicillin (ABPC), methicillin (DMPPC) and cloxacillin (MCIPC) showed that all MIC80's (inhibiting bacterial growth of 80% of all isolates) were within a range from 0.10 to 3.13 micrograms/ml and that there was no marked differences in antibacterial effects among the antibiotics used. The highest antibacterial effect on S. aureus was exhibited by MCIPC, which inhibited the growth of all isolates at 0.39 microgram/ml. The MICs of DMPPC against all isolates of S. aureus were 3.13 micrograms/ml or less and no methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was detected. There was no difference in antibacterial activities against Streptococcus family between penicillin antibiotics (DMPPC, MCIPC, ABPC and PCG) and cephem antibiotics (CPZ and CEZ), both of which showed excellent antibacterial activities. Cephem antibiotics exhibited higher activities against Gram-negative bacteria than penicillin antibiotics. Especially CPZ, the third generation cephem, showed excellent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., as well as against other Enterobacteriaceae.

  17. Long-Term Trends in the Epidemiology of Neonatal Sepsis and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Causative Agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoogen, Agnes; Gerards, Leo J.; Verboon-Maciolek, Malgorzata A.; Fleer, Andre; Krediet, Tannette G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In an era with increased maternal antibiotic use, patterns in early- and late-onset sepsis and antibiotic susceptibility may have changed. Objectives: To identify longitudinal trends in causative microorganisms for neonatal sepsis and analyze antibiotic susceptibility of all blood

  18. Aquaglyceroporins Are the Entry Pathway of Boric Acid in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsiccobetre, Sabrina; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis; Lang, Florian; Figarella, Katherine; Uzcátegui, Néstor L

    2017-05-01

    The boron element possesses a range of different effects on living beings. It is essential to beneficial at low concentrations, but toxic at excessive concentrations. Recently, some boron-based compounds have been identified as promising molecules against Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of sleeping sickness. However, until now, the boron metabolism and its access route into the parasite remained elusive. The present study addressed the permeability of T. brucei aquaglyceroporins (TbAQPs) for boric acid, the main natural boron species. To this end, the three TbAQPs were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Xenopus laevis oocytes. Our findings in both expression systems showed that all three TbAQPs are permeable for boric acid. Especially TbAQP2 is highly permeable for this compound, displaying one of the highest conductances reported for a solute in these channels. Additionally, T. brucei aquaglyceroporin activities were sensitive to pH. Taken together, these results establish that TbAQPs are channels for boric acid and are highly efficient entry pathways for boron into the parasite. Our findings stress the importance of studying the physiological functions of boron and their derivatives in T. brucei, as well as the pharmacological implications of their uptake by trypanosome aquaglyceroporins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Use of infusoria Paramecium caudatum for the evaluation of the toxicity of antigens of different causative quarantine agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukova, S I; Adel'shin, F K; Khrapova, N P; Piven', N N; Proshina, O B; Zasiadkina, A V; Plekhanova, N G; Avrorova, I V

    2005-01-01

    The results of the evaluation of the toxicity of bacterial antigens obtained from the causative agents of plaque, glanders, melioidosis, cholera on infusoria of the species P. caudatum, as well as on cell lines L-929, CHO K-1 and peritoneal macrophages of BALB/c mice, are presented. As revealed in this study, the method of toxicity determination on infusoria is similar in its sensitivity to the methods of testing on. CHO K-1 and L-929 cells, but the former is simpler, more available and permits the determination of toxic doses producing disturbances in the vital activity of the infusoria, but not leading to their death.

  20. [The characteristics of biological properties of E. coli O104:H4--the causative agent of large-scale alimentary ictus in Germany may 2001].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaftyreva, L A; Egorova, S A; Makarova, M A; Zabrovskaia, A V; Matveeva, Z N; Syzhaeva, L V; Artamononva, Iu A

    2012-01-01

    The review presents the characteristics of E. coli O104:H4, the causative agent of large-scale alimentary ictus in Germany in spring time 2011. The antigenic characteristics and factors of E. coli pathogenicity are taken into account. The causative agent has a combination of pathogenic factors of two groups of diarrheigenic Escherichia: shigella similar toxin, specific for entero-hemorrhagic E. coli and adhesins of enteroaggregative E. coli.

  1. Not All Drugs Are Created Equal: The Importance of Causative Agent in Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Ryan; Beck, Anna; Gonzalez, Beverly; Gamelli, Richard L; Mosier, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), Steven-Johnson Syndrome (SJS), and SJS/TEN overlap make up a spectrum of severe mucocutaneous disease that is an adverse reaction to a large number of medications and various infectious agents. Little is known about the differences in acute course of illness depending on the inciting agent, which prompted the authors to further explore their experience with TEN. In a retrospective analysis, 88 patients ≥18 years old were identified with biopsy-confirmed TEN and a variety of variables were analyzed. The authors evaluated for differences in presentation and hospital course between drug class and medication half-life using Kruskal-Wallis for continuous variables and χ or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables. Those subjects with the inciting agent of allopurinol had 100% incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI), significantly higher than other drug classes with antibiotics having the second highest incidence at 14%. Medications with a half-life of <6 hours were also associated with a higher incidence of AKI. Acutely there are significant clinical differences in TEN patients depending on the drug class and medication half-life of the inciting agent. Allopurinol, drugs with a short half-life, and a diagnosis of TEN were all associated with greater incidence of AKI. This is the first time that the relationship between clinical course and inciting agent has been examined in a United States population.

  2. Genetic diversity of the causative agent of ice-ice disease of the seaweed Kappaphycus alvarezii from Karimunjawa island, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafitri, E.; Prayitno, S. B.; Ma'ruf, W. F.; Radjasa, O. K.

    2017-02-01

    An essential step in investigating the bacterial role in the occurrence of diseases in Kappaphycus alvarezii is the characterization of bacteria associated with this seaweed. A molecular characterization was conducted on the genetic diversity of the causative agents of ice-ice disease associated with K. alvarezii widely known as the main source of kappa carrageenan. K. alvrezii infected with ice-ice were collected from the Karimunjawa island, North Java Sea, Indonesia. Using Zobell 2216E marine agar medium, nine bacterial species were isolated from the infected seaweed. The molecular characterizations revealed that the isolated bacteria causing ice-ice disease were closely related to the genera of Alteromonas, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Glaciecola, Aurantimonas, and Rhodococcus. In order to identify the symptoms causative organisms, the isolated bacterial species were cultured and were evaluated for their pathogenity. Out of 9 species, only 3 isolates were able to cause the ice-ice symptoms and consisted of Alteromonas macleodii, Pseudoalteromonas issachenkonii and Aurantimonas coralicida. A. macleodii showed the highest pathogenity.

  3. Adverse cutaneous drug reactions: Clinical pattern and causative agents in a tertiary care center in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pudukadan David

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDRs are caused by a wide variety of agents. Aims: Our objective was to ascertain the clinical spectrum of ACDRs and the causative drugs in this part of India and to find any risk factors. Methods: Ninety patients with adverse cutaneous drug reactions were recruited for this study during 2001-2003. Hematological and biochemical investigations were done in all of them. The VDRL and HIV (ELISA tests were performed where the underlying risk factors were present. Patch testing, intradermal testing and oral provocation tests were done wherever feasible. Results: The mean age of the patients with cutaneous drug eruptions was 37.06 years. Most of them (52.2% were in the age group of 20-39 years. The male to female ratio was 0.87: 1. The most common eruptions observed were fixed drug eruption (31.1% and maculopapular rash (12.2%, and the most common causes were co-trimoxazole (22.2% and dapsone (17.7%. Conclusion: The pattern of ACDRs and the drugs causing them is remarkably different in our population. Knowledge of these drug eruptions, the causative drugs and the prognostic indicators is essential for the clinician.

  4. Identification of the human paragonimiasis causative agent in Lao People's Democratic Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiro, S; Habe, S; Duong, V; Odermatt, P; Barennes, H; Strobel, M; Nakamura, S

    2008-10-01

    To assess the species of human paragonimiasis in Lao People's Democratic Republic, 6 ovum samples from 6 native confirmed paragonimiasis patients were examined with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifying the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2). The PCR products were sequenced, and a homology search was performed using the GenBank. All 6 sequences were identical with Paragonimus heterotremus ITS2. Our work suggests that P. heterotremus may be the main etiological agent of human paragonimiasis in this locality.

  5. Odds of hospitalization among Marine Corps personnel by military occupational specialty and causative agents during OEF and OIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronroos, Noelle N; Zouris, James M; Wade, Amber L

    2009-07-01

    This study investigated the risk of hospitalization among Marines deployed during Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom by military occupational specialty (MOS). Trends in risk of hospitalization as a function of injury cause (explosive munitions and small arms [EM/SA]), anatomical location, and injury type were analyzed to identify which MOSs were more likely to have open wound injuries or trauma to the extremities. The study population consisted of 163,939 Marines deployed at any time during the study period (September 11, 2001-January 31, 2007). Hospitalized Marines (n=2718) were matched to nonhospitalized Marines on rank, time deployed, and number of deployments. Noninfantry MOSs had lower risk of hospitalization compared with infantry, regardless of injury cause or location. Trends differed for EM/SA versus other injury causative agents, but did not differ by anatomical location among EM/SA. This information allows for quantitative assessment of risk by MOS in combat situations.

  6. Infection of Parainfluenza type 3 (PI-3 as one of the causative agent of pneumonia in sheep and goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrawati Sendow

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Serological survey was conducted to obtain the prevalence of Parainfluenza type 3 (PI-3 reactor as one of the causative agent of pneumonia in sheep and goats in abatoir at Jakarta and some small holder farms in Indonesia. Serological test using serum neutralization from 724 goat sera and 109 sheep sera indicated that only 1% of goats were serologically reactors and none of sheep sera had antibodies against PI-3 virus. Isolation of the virus from 56 bronchus and trachea swab and 345 lungs indicated that only one sampel from lung showed cythopathic effect (CPE in Madin Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK cell lines identification of the virus using serum neutralization test indicated that the virus neutralized reference PI-3 antisera. The isolate came from one lung (7% of 24 that showed histopathologically pneumonia intertitialis that usually caused by viral infection.

  7. In Vitro Antifungal Activity of Hexahydropyrimidine Derivatives against the Causative Agents of Dermatomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francislene J. Martins

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogenated heterocyclic compounds are present in both natural and synthetic drugs, and hexahydropyrimidine derivatives may prove to be efficient in treating dermatomycosis causing fungi. This study evaluated the antifungal activity of four hexahydropyrimidine derivatives against the dermatomycosis causing fungi. These derivatives were synthesized, characterized, and assessed in terms of their activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Microsporum canis, Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton rubrum, Fusarium oxysporum, and Epidermophyton floccosum between concentrations 7.8 and 1,000 μg mL−1. Scanning electron micrographs were assessed for the active derivatives and reference drugs, and these micrographs revealed that new agents cause morphological changes in fungi. The derivatives HHP1, HHP3, and HHP4 revealed poor activity against the four fungal strains (MICs range 500–1000 μg mL−1. Compound HHP3 was found to be the best potential antifungal agent among those tested and was the most effective among all the active derivatives that caused morphological changes in the susceptible strains.

  8. Non-radioactive method for labelling Trypanosoma brucei brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was observed that (i) the biological activities of the T.brucei brucei like the motility, viability, and growth were not affected adversely by the biotinylation; (ii) as little as 100ug Sulfo-NHS-LC-Biotin was enough to label about 6x106 Trypanosoma Brucei Brucei; (iii) high temperature appears to have adverse effect on the ...

  9. Trypanosoma brucei CYP51: Essentiality and Targeting Therapy in an Experimental Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric-Antoine Dauchy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is the main causative agent of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT, also known as sleeping sickness. Because of limited alternatives and treatment toxicities, new therapeutic options are urgently needed for patients with HAT. Sterol 14alpha-demethylase (CYP51 is a potential drug target but its essentiality has not been determined in T. brucei. We used a tetracycline-inducible RNAi system to assess the essentiality of CYP51 in T. brucei bloodstream form (BSF cells and we evaluated the effect of posaconazole, a well-tolerated triazole drug, within a panel of virulent strains in vitro and in a murine model. Expression of CYP51 in several T. brucei cell lines was demonstrated by western blot and its essentiality was demonstrated by RNA interference (CYP51RNAi in vitro. Following reduction of TbCYP51 expression by RNAi, cell growth was reduced and eventually stopped compared to WT or non-induced cells, showing the requirement of CYP51 in T. brucei. These phenotypes were rescued by addition of ergosterol. Additionally, CYP51RNAi induction caused morphological defects with multiflagellated cells (p<0.05, suggesting cytokinesis dysfunction. The survival of CYP51RNAi Doxycycline-treated mice (p = 0.053 and of CYP51RNAi 5-day pre-induced Doxycycline-treated mice (p = 0.008 were improved compared to WT showing a CYP51 RNAi effect on trypanosomal virulence in mice. The posaconazole concentrations that inhibited parasite growth by 50% (IC50 were 8.5, 2.7, 1.6 and 0.12 μM for T. b. brucei 427 90-13, T. b. brucei Antat 1.1, T. b. gambiense Feo (Feo/ITMAP/1893 and T. b. gambiense Biyamina (MHOM/SD/82, respectively. During infection with these last three virulent strains, posaconazole-eflornithine and nifurtimox-eflornithine combinations showed similar improvement in mice survival (p≤0.001. Our results provide support for a CYP51 targeting based treatment in HAT. Thus posaconazole used in combination may represent a therapeutic

  10. Inhibition of Xanthomonas fragariae, Causative Agent of Angular Leaf Spot of Strawberry, through Iron Deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Henry

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In commercial production settings, few options exist to prevent or treat angular leaf spot of strawberry, a disease of economic importance and caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas fragariae (Xfr. In the process of isolating and identifying Xfr bacteria from symptomatic plants, we observed growth inhibition of Xfr by bacterial isolates from the same leaf macerates. Identified as species of Pseudomonas and Rhizobium, these isolates were confirmed to suppress growth of Xfr in agar overlay plates and in microtiter plate cultures, as did our reference strain Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Screening of a transposon mutant library of KT2440 revealed that disruption of the biosynthetic pathway for the siderophore pyoverdine resulted in complete loss of Xfr antagonism, suggesting iron competition as a mode of action. Antagonism could be replicated on plate and in culture by addition of purified pyoverdine or by addition of the chelating agents tannic acid and dipyridyl, while supplementing the medium with iron negated the inhibitory effects of pyoverdine, tannic acid and dipyridyl. When co-inoculated with tannic acid onto strawberry plants, Xfr’s ability to cause foliar symptoms was greatly reduced, suggesting a possible opportunity for iron-based management of angular leaf spot. We discuss our findings in the context of ‘nutritional immunity’, the idea that plant hosts restrict pathogens access to iron, either directly, or indirectly through their associated microbiota.

  11. Evidence of exotoxin secretion of Piscirickettsia salmonis, the causative agent of piscirickettsiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, M E; Galleguillos, M; Díaz, S; Machuca, A; Carbonero, A; Smith, P A

    2013-08-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is the aetiological agent of piscirickettsiosis, a disease which affects a variety of teleost species and that is particularly severe in salmonid fish. Bacterial-free supernatants, obtained from cultures of three isolates of Piscirickettsia salmonis, were inoculated in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., and in three continuous cell lines in an effort to determine the presence of secretion of extracellular products (ECPs) by this microorganism. Although steatosis was found in some liver samples, no mortalities or clinical signs occurred in the inoculated fish. Clear cytotoxicity was observed after inoculation in the cell lines CHSE-214 and ASK, derived from salmonid tissues, but not in MDBK, which is of mammalian origin. The degree of cytotoxicity of the ECPs was different among the P. salmonis isolates tested. The isolate that evidenced the highest cytotoxicity in its ECPs exhibited only an intermediate virulence level after challenging fish with bacterial suspensions of the three P. salmonis isolates. Almost complete inhibition of the cytotoxic activity of ECPs was seen after proteinase K treatment, indicating their peptidic nature, and a total preclusion of the cytotoxicity was shown after their incubation at 50 °C for 30 min. Results show that P. salmonis can produce ECPs and at least some of them are thermolabile exotoxins that probably play a role in the pathogenesis of piscirickettsiosis. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Survey of causative agents for acute respiratory infections among patients in Khartoum- State, Sudan, 2010–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to determine causative agents of acute respiratory illness of patients in Khartoum State, Sudan. Methods Four hundred patients experiencing respiratory infections within January-March 2010 and January-March 2011 were admitted at Khartoum Hospital and had their throat swab samples subjected to multiplex real-time RT-PCR to detect influenza viruses (including subtypes) and other viral agents. Isolation, nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic analysis on some influenza viruses based on the HA gene were done. Results Out of 400 patients, 66 were found to have influenza viruses (35, 27, 2, and 2 with types A, B, C, and A and B co-infections, respectively). Influenza viruses were detected in 28, 33 and 5 patients in the age groups Sudan strains belong to the same clade and are related to those strains from several countries such as USA, Japan, Italy, United Kingdom, Germany, Russia, Greece, Denmark, Taiwan, Turkey and Kenya. Seasonal A H3 subtypes have close similarity to strains from Singapore, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, USA and Nicaragua. For influenza B, Sudan strains belong to two different clades, and just like influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 and A H3 subtypes, seem to be part of worldwide endemic population (Kenya, USA, Brazil, Russia, Taiwan and Singapore). Conclusions In Sudan, the existence of respiratory viruses in patients with acute respiratory infection was confirmed and characterized for the first time by using molecular techniques. PMID:24160894

  13. Genetic diversity and antifungal susceptibility profiles in causative agents of sporotrichosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Sporotrichosis is a chronic subcutaneous mycosis of humans and animals, which is typically acquired by traumatic inoculation of plant material contaminated with Sporothrix propagules, or via animals, mainly felines. Sporothrix infections notably occur in outbreaks, with large epidemics currently taking place in southeastern Brazil and northeastern China. Pathogenic species include Sporothrix brasiliensis, Sporothrix schenckii s. str., Sporothrix globosa, and Sporothrix luriei, which exhibit differing geographical distribution, virulence, and resistance to antifungals. The phylogenetically remote species Sporothrix mexicana also shows a mild pathogenic potential. Methods We assessed a genetically diverse panel of 68 strains. Susceptibility profiles of medically important Sporothrix species were evaluated by measuring the MICs and MFCs for amphotericin B (AMB), fluconazole (FLC), itraconazole (ITC), voriconazole (VRC), posaconazole (PCZ), flucytosine (5FC), and caspofungin (CAS). Haplotype networks were constructed to reveal interspecific divergences within clinical Sporothrix species to evaluate genetically deviant isolates. Results ITC and PCZ were moderately effective against S. brasiliensis (MIC90 = 2 and 2 μg/mL, respectively) and S. schenckii (MIC90 = 4 and 2 μg/mL, respectively). PCZ also showed low MICs against the rare species S. mexicana. 5FC, CAS, and FLC showed no antifungal activity against any Sporothrix species. The minimum fungicidal concentration ranged from 2 to >16 μg/mL for AMB against S. brasiliensis and S. schenckii, while the MFC90 was >16 μg/mL for ITC, VRC, and PCZ. Conclusion Sporothrix species in general showed high degrees of resistance against antifungals. Evaluating a genetically diverse panel of strains revealed evidence of multidrug resistant phenotypes, underlining the need for molecular identification of etiologic agents to predict therapeutic outcome. PMID:24755107

  14. Isolation and analysis of the genetic diversity of repertoires of VSG expression site containing telomeres from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, T. b. brucei and T. equiperdum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Marion

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African trypanosomes (including Trypanosoma brucei are unicellular parasites which multiply in the mammalian bloodstream. T. brucei has about twenty telomeric bloodstream form Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG expression sites (BESs, of which one is expressed at a time in a mutually exclusive fashion. BESs are polycistronic transcription units, containing a variety of families of expression site associated genes (ESAGs in addition to the telomeric VSG. These polymorphic ESAG families are thought to play a role in parasite-host adaptation, and it has been proposed that ESAG diversity might be related to host range. Analysis of the genetic diversity of these telomeric gene families has been confounded by the underrepresentation of telomeric sequences in standard libraries. We have previously developed a method to selectively isolate sets of trypanosome BES containing telomeres using Transformation associated recombination (TAR cloning in yeast. Results Here we describe the isolation of repertoires of BES containing telomeres from three trypanosome subspecies: Trypanosoma brucei gambiense DAL 972 (causative agent of West-African trypanosomiasis, T. b. brucei EATRO 2340 (a nonhuman infective strain and T. equiperdum STIB 818 (which causes a sexually transmitted disease in equines. We have sequenced and analysed the genetic diversity at four BES loci (BES promoter region, ESAG6, ESAG5 and ESAG2 from these three trypanosome BES repertoires. Conclusion With the exception of ESAG2, the BES sequence repertoires derived from T. b. gambiense are both less diverse than and nearly reciprocally monophyletic relative to those from T. b. brucei and T. equiperdum. Furthermore, although we find evidence for adaptive evolution in all three ESAG repertoires in T. b. brucei and T. equiperdum, only ESAG2 appears to be under diversifying selection in T. b. gambiense. This low level of variation in the T. b. gambiense BES sequence repertoires is

  15. Isolation and analysis of the genetic diversity of repertoires of VSG expression site containing telomeres from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, T. b. brucei and T. equiperdum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rosanna; Taylor, Jesse E; Kurioka, Ayako; Becker, Marion; Louis, Edward J; Rudenko, Gloria

    2008-08-12

    African trypanosomes (including Trypanosoma brucei) are unicellular parasites which multiply in the mammalian bloodstream. T. brucei has about twenty telomeric bloodstream form Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) expression sites (BESs), of which one is expressed at a time in a mutually exclusive fashion. BESs are polycistronic transcription units, containing a variety of families of expression site associated genes (ESAGs) in addition to the telomeric VSG. These polymorphic ESAG families are thought to play a role in parasite-host adaptation, and it has been proposed that ESAG diversity might be related to host range. Analysis of the genetic diversity of these telomeric gene families has been confounded by the underrepresentation of telomeric sequences in standard libraries. We have previously developed a method to selectively isolate sets of trypanosome BES containing telomeres using Transformation associated recombination (TAR) cloning in yeast. Here we describe the isolation of repertoires of BES containing telomeres from three trypanosome subspecies: Trypanosoma brucei gambiense DAL 972 (causative agent of West-African trypanosomiasis), T. b. brucei EATRO 2340 (a nonhuman infective strain) and T. equiperdum STIB 818 (which causes a sexually transmitted disease in equines). We have sequenced and analysed the genetic diversity at four BES loci (BES promoter region, ESAG6, ESAG5 and ESAG2) from these three trypanosome BES repertoires. With the exception of ESAG2, the BES sequence repertoires derived from T. b. gambiense are both less diverse than and nearly reciprocally monophyletic relative to those from T. b. brucei and T. equiperdum. Furthermore, although we find evidence for adaptive evolution in all three ESAG repertoires in T. b. brucei and T. equiperdum, only ESAG2 appears to be under diversifying selection in T. b. gambiense. This low level of variation in the T. b. gambiense BES sequence repertoires is consistent both with the relatively narrow host range

  16. A comparison of DNA extraction procedures for the detection of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, in clinical and environmental specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durnez, Lies; Stragier, Pieter; Roebben, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans is the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, the third most common mycobacterial disease in humans after tuberculosis and leprosy. Although the disease is associated with aquatic ecosystems, cultivation of the bacillus from the environment is difficult to achieve. Therefore...

  17. Survey and molecular detection of Melissococcus plutonius, the causative agent of European Foulbrood in honeybees in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javed Ansari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A large-scale field survey was conducted to screen major Saudi Arabian beekeeping locations for infection by Melissococcus plutonius. M. plutonius is one of the major bacterial pathogens of honeybee broods and is the causative agent of European Foulbrood disease (EFB. Larvae from samples suspected of infection were collected from different apiaries and homogenized in phosphate buffered saline (PBS. Bacteria were isolated on MYPGP agar medium. Two bacterial isolates, ksuMP7 and ksuMP9 (16S rRNA GenBank accession numbers, KX417565 and KX417566, respectively, were subjected to molecular identification using M. plutonius -specific primers, a BLAST sequence analysis revealed that the two isolates were M. plutonius with more than 98% sequence identity. The molecular detection of M. plutonius from honeybee is the first recorded incidence of this pathogen in Saudi Arabia. This study emphasizes the need for official authorities to take immediate steps toward treating and limiting the spread of this disease throughout the country.

  18. Antifungal activity of essential oils of lemon balm, manuka and tansy to the causative agents of otomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Đorđe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Otomycosis is a superficial fungal infection of the external ear canal. One of the therapeutic approaches that became topical in treatment of otomycosis is the application of essential oils, which is shown to have different biological properties, including the antimicrobial effect. Aim: The objective of the research is to examine antimycotic effects of essential oils of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis, manuka (Leptospermum scoparium and tansy (Tanacetum vulgare on the causative agents of otomycosis. Materials and Methods: In this study, we investigated the sensitivity of 20 randomly selected strains of Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. isolated from swabs taken from the external ear canal of patients with signs and symptoms of otitis externa. Antifungal activity of essential oils of lemon balm, manuka and tansy was tested by using the microdilution method by determining the value of the Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and Minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC. Results: MIC values of lemon balm were in the range of 0.39- 50 μl/ml, manuka of 0.39-50 μL/mL and tansy of 1.56-50 μL/mL. The MFC values were 2-4 times higher than the MIC values, except in the case of a strain of Aspergillus niger, which was tolerant of the lemon balm essential oil. Conclusion: The investigation has shown that essential oil activities of lemon balm, manuka and tansy to the strains of Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp, using the microdilution method, have antifungal effect.

  19. Differential virulence and tsetse fly transmissibility of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei strains

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    Purity K. Gitonga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available African animal trypanosomiasis causes significant economic losses in sub-Saharan African countries because of livestock mortalities and reduced productivity. Trypanosomes, the causative agents, are transmitted by tsetse flies (Glossina spp.. In the current study, we compared and contrasted the virulence characteristics of five Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei isolates using groups of Swiss white mice (n = 6. We further determined the vectorial capacity of Glossina pallidipes, for each of the trypanosome isolates. Results showed that the overall pre-patent (PP periods were 8.4 ± 0.9 (range, 4–11 and 4.5 ± 0.2 (range, 4–6 for T. congolense and T. brucei isolates, respectively (p < 0.01. Despite the longer mean PP, T. congolense–infected mice exhibited a significantly (p < 0.05 shorter survival time than T. brucei–infected mice, indicating greater virulence. Differences were also noted among the individual isolates with T. congolense KETRI 2909 causing the most acute infection of the entire group with a mean ± standard error survival time of 9 ± 2.1 days. Survival time of infected tsetse flies and the proportion with mature infections at 30 days post-exposure to the infective blood meals varied among isolates, with subacute infection–causing T. congolense EATRO 1829 and chronic infection–causing T. brucei EATRO 2267 isolates showing the highest mature infection rates of 38.5% and 23.1%, respectively. Therefore, our study provides further evidence of occurrence of differences in virulence and transmissibility of eastern African trypanosome strains and has identified two, T. congolense EATRO 1829 and T. brucei EATRO 2267, as suitable for tsetse infectivity and transmissibility experiments.

  20. Identification of actinomycetes from plant rhizospheric soils with inhibitory activity against Colletotrichum spp., the causative agent of anthracnose disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mungsuntisuk Isada

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colletotrichum is one of the most widespread and important genus of plant pathogenic fungi worldwide. Various species of Colletotrichum are the causative agents of anthracnose disease in plants, which is a severe problem to agricultural crops particularly in Thailand. These phytopathogens are usually controlled using chemicals; however, the use of these agents can lead to environmental pollution. Potential non-chemical control strategies for anthracnose disease include the use of bacteria capable of producing anti-fungal compounds such as actinomycetes spp., that comprise a large group of filamentous, Gram positive bacteria from soil. The aim of this study was to isolate actinomycetes capable of inhibiting the growth of Colletotrichum spp, and to analyze the diversity of actinomycetes from plant rhizospheric soil. Results A total of 304 actinomycetes were isolated and tested for their inhibitory activity against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides strains DoA d0762 and DoA c1060 and Colletotrichum capsici strain DoA c1511 which cause anthracnose disease as well as the non-pathogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain IFO 10217. Most isolates (222 out of 304, 73.0% were active against at least one indicator fungus or yeast. Fifty four (17.8% were active against three anthracnose fungi and 17 (5.6% could inhibit the growth of all three fungi and S. cerevisiae used in the test. Detailed analysis on 30 selected isolates from an orchard at Chanthaburi using the comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that most of the isolates (87% belong to the genus Streptomyces sp., while one each belongs to Saccharopolyspora (strain SB-2 and Nocardiopsis (strain CM-2 and two to Nocardia (strains BP-3 and LK-1. Strains LC-1, LC-4, JF-1, SC-1 and MG-1 exerted high inhibitory activity against all three anthracnose fungi and yeast. In addition, the organic solvent extracts prepared from these five strains inhibited conidial growth of the three

  1. The complete genome sequence of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP31758, the causative agent of Far East scarlet-like fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Eppinger

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The first reported Far East scarlet-like fever (FESLF epidemic swept the Pacific coastal region of Russia in the late 1950s. Symptoms of the severe infection included erythematous skin rash and desquamation, exanthema, hyperhemic tongue, and a toxic shock syndrome. The term FESLF was coined for the infection because it shares clinical presentations with scarlet fever caused by group A streptococci. The causative agent was later identified as Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, although the range of morbidities was vastly different from classical pseudotuberculosis symptoms. To understand the origin and emergence of the peculiar clinical features of FESLF, we have sequenced the genome of the FESLF-causing strain Y. pseudotuberculosis IP31758 and compared it with that of another Y. pseudotuberculosis strain, IP32953, which causes classical gastrointestinal symptoms. The unique gene pool of Y pseudotuberculosis IP31758 accounts for more than 260 strain-specific genes and introduces individual physiological capabilities and virulence determinants, with a significant proportion horizontally acquired that likely originated from Enterobacteriaceae and other soil-dwelling bacteria that persist in the same ecological niche. The mobile genome pool includes two novel plasmids phylogenetically unrelated to all currently reported Yersinia plasmids. An icm/dot type IVB secretion system, shared only with the intracellular persisting pathogens of the order Legionellales, was found on the larger plasmid and could contribute to scarlatinoid fever symptoms in patients due to the introduction of immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive capabilities. We determined the common and unique traits resulting from genome evolution and speciation within the genus Yersinia and drew a more accurate species border between Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis. In contrast to the lack of genetic diversity observed in the evolutionary young descending Y. pestis lineage, the population

  2. The In Vitro Antifungal Activity of Sudanese Medicinal Plants against Madurella mycetomatis, the Eumycetoma Major Causative Agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Elfadil (Hassabelrasoul); A.H. Fahal (Ahmed); W. Kloezen (Wendy); E.M. Ahmed (Elhadi M.); W.W.J. van de Sande (Wendy)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractEumycetoma is a debilitating chronic inflammatory fungal infection that exists worldwide but it is endemic in many tropical and subtropical regions. The major causative organism is the fungus Madurella mycetomatis. The current treatment of eumycetoma is suboptimal and characterized by

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: Trypanosoma brucei [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei Trypanosoma brucei Trypanosoma_brucei_L.png Trypanosoma_brucei_NL.png Trypanosoma_bruce...i_S.png Trypanosoma_brucei_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+bruce...i&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=NL http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp.../taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=121 ...

  4. The transcriptome of the human pathogen Trypanosoma brucei at single-nucleotide resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay G Kolev

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The genome of Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African trypanosomiasis, was published five years ago, yet identification of all genes and their transcripts remains to be accomplished. Annotation is challenged by the organization of genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II (Pol II into long unidirectional gene clusters with no knowledge of how transcription is initiated. Here we report a single-nucleotide resolution genomic map of the T. brucei transcriptome, adding 1,114 new transcripts, including 103 non-coding RNAs, confirming and correcting many of the annotated features and revealing an extensive heterogeneity of 5' and 3' ends. Some of the new transcripts encode polypeptides that are either conserved in T. cruzi and Leishmania major or were previously detected in mass spectrometry analyses. High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq was sensitive enough to detect transcripts at putative Pol II transcription initiation sites. Our results, as well as recent data from the literature, indicate that transcription initiation is not solely restricted to regions at the beginning of gene clusters, but may occur at internal sites. We also provide evidence that transcription at all putative initiation sites in T. brucei is bidirectional, a recently recognized fundamental property of eukaryotic promoters. Our results have implications for gene expression patterns in other important human pathogens with similar genome organization (Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania sp. and revealed heterogeneity in pre-mRNA processing that could potentially contribute to the survival and success of the parasite population in the insect vector and the mammalian host.

  5. An Overview of Trypanosoma brucei Infections: An Intense Host-Parasite Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte-Sucre, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and T. brucei gambiense, the causative agents of Human African Trypanosomiasis, are transmitted by tsetse flies. Within the vector, the parasite undergoes through transformations that prepares it to infect the human host. Sequentially these developmental stages are the replicative procyclic (in which the parasite surface is covered by procyclins) and trypo-epimastigote forms, as well as the non-replicative, infective, metacyclic form that develops in the vector salivary glands. As a pre-adaptation to their life in humans, metacyclic parasites begin to express and be densely covered by the Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG). Once the metacyclic form invades the human host the parasite develops into the bloodstream form. Herein the VSG triggers a humoral immune response. To avoid this humoral response, and essential for survival while in the bloodstream, the parasite changes its cover periodically and sheds into the surroundings the expressed VSG, thus evading the consequences of the immune system activation. Additionally, tools comparable to quorum sensing are used by the parasite for the successful parasite transmission from human to insect. On the other hand, the human host promotes clearance of the parasite triggering innate and adaptive immune responses and stimulating cytokine and chemokine secretion. All in all, the host-parasite interaction is extremely active and leads to responses that need multiple control sites to develop appropriately.

  6. Hepatic response in Trypanosomia brucei brucei infected-rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethanol leaf extract of Tithonia diversifolia was investigated for its hepato-curative activity in Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected-rats. The phytochemical compositions of the plant extract were also evaluated. The leaf extract was administered 14 days post-infection at dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg orally once daily.

  7. Potential causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in households with preschool children : prevalence, risk factors, clinical relevance and household transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, M.; Mughini-Gras, L.; Pijnacker, R.; Vennema, H.; Scholts, R.; van Huisstede-Vlaanderen, K. W.; Kortbeek, T.; Kooistra-Smid, M.; van Pelt, W.

    2016-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) morbidity remains high amongst preschool children, posing a significant societal burden. Empirical data on AGE-causing agents is needed to gauge their clinical relevance and identify agent-specific targets for control. We assessed the prevalence, risk factors and

  8. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions: clinical pattern and causative agents--a 6 year series from Chandigarh, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma V

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the different clinical spectrum of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (ADR and to determine the causative drugs. MATERIALS & METHODS: A prospective, hospital based study was carried out over a period of 6 years recording various cutaneous ADR. RESULTS: A total of 500 patients with cutaneous ADR were enrolled in the study. The most common types of cutaneous ADR patterns were maculopapular rash (34.6%, fixed drug eruption (FDE (30% and urticaria (14%. The drugs most often incriminated for the various cutaneous ADR were antimicrobials (42.6%, anticonvulsants (22.2% and NSAIDs (18%. Anticonvulsants were implicated in 41.6% of maculopapular rashes. Sulfonamides accounted for 43.3% and NSAIDs for 30.7% of FDE. Urticaria was caused mainly by NSAIDs(24.3% and penicillins(20%. Anticonvulsants were responsible for 43.8% of life-threatening toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens Johnson syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical pattern and drugs causing cutaneous ADR are similar to those observed in other countries except for minor variations. Cutaneous ADR patterns and the drugs causing various reactions are changing every year, which may be due to the emergence of newer molecules and changing trends in the use of drugs.

  9. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification as an emerging technology for detection of Yersinia ruckeri the causative agent of enteric red mouth disease in fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soliman Hatem

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enteric Redmouth (ERM disease also known as Yersiniosis is a contagious disease affecting salmonids, mainly rainbow trout. The causative agent is the gram-negative bacterium Yersinia ruckeri. The disease can be diagnosed by isolation and identification of the causative agent, or detection of the Pathogen using fluorescent antibody tests, ELISA and PCR assays. These diagnostic methods are laborious, time consuming and need well trained personnel. Results A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay was developed and evaluated for detection of Y. ruckeri the etiological agent of enteric red mouth (ERM disease in salmonids. The assay was optimised to amplify the yruI/yruR gene, which encodes Y. ruckeri quorum sensing system, in the presence of a specific primer set and Bst DNA polymerase at an isothermal temperature of 63°C for one hour. Amplification products were detected by visual inspection, agarose gel electrophoresis and by real-time monitoring of turbidity resulted by formation of LAMP amplicons. Digestion with HphI restriction enzyme demonstrated that the amplified product was unique. The specificity of the assay was verified by the absence of amplification products when tested against related bacteria. The assay had 10-fold higher sensitivity compared with conventional PCR and successfully detected Y. ruckeri not only in pure bacterial culture but also in tissue homogenates of infected fish. Conclusion The ERM-LAMP assay represents a practical alternative to the microbiological approach for rapid, sensitive and specific detection of Y. ruckeri in fish farms. The assay is carried out in one hour and needs only a heating block or water bath as laboratory furniture. The advantages of the ERM-LAMP assay make it a promising tool for molecular detection of enteric red mouth disease in fish farms.

  10. SUMOylation in Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Andrea Klein

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Small ubiquitin like modifier (SUMO proteins are involved in many processes in eukaryotes. We here show that Trypanosoma brucei SUMO (Tb927.5.3210 modifies many proteins. The levels of SUMOylation were unaffected by temperature changes but were increased by severe oxidative stress. We obtained evidence that trypanosome homologues of the SUMO conjugating enzyme Ubc9 (Tb927.2.2460 and the SUMO-specific protease SENP (Tb927.9.2220 are involved in SUMOylation and SUMO removal, respectively.

  11. Ludwik Fleck and the causative agent of syphilis: sociology or pathology of science? A rejoider to Jean Lindenmann

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belt, van den H.

    2002-01-01

    In 1905 two different microbes were proposed to fill the vacant role of etiologic agent for syphilis, one, the Cytorrhyctes luis, by John Siegel, the other, Spirochaeta pallida, by Fritz Schaudinn. After gathering and reviewing the evidence the majority of medical scientists decided in favor of

  12. The in vitro antifungal activity of sudanese medicinal plants against Madurella mycetomatis, the eumycetoma major causative agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassabelrasoul Elfadil

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Eumycetoma is a debilitating chronic inflammatory fungal infection that exists worldwide but it is endemic in many tropical and subtropical regions. The major causative organism is the fungus Madurella mycetomatis. The current treatment of eumycetoma is suboptimal and characterized by low cure rate and high recurrence rates. Hence, an alternative therapy is needed to address this. Here we determined the antifungal activity of seven Sudanese medicinal plant species against Madurella mycetomatis. Of these, only three species; Boswellia papyrifera, Acacia nubica and Nigella sativa, showed some antifungal activity against M. mycetomatis and were further studied. Crude methanol, hexane and defatted methanol extracts of these species were tested for their antifungal activity. B. papyrifera had the highest antifungal activity (MIC50 of 1 ug/ml and it was further fractionated. The crude methanol and the soluble ethyl acetate fractions of B. papyrifera showed some antifungal activity. The Gas-Liquid-Chromatography hybrid Mass-Spectrophotometer analysis of these two fractions showed the existence of beta-amyrin, beta-amyrone, beta-Sitosterol and stigmatriene. Stigmatriene had the best antifungal activity, compared to other three phytoconstituents, with an MIC-50 of 32 μg/ml. Although the antifungal activity of the identified phytoconstituents was only limited, the antifungal activity of the complete extracts is more promising, indicating synergism. Furthermore these plant extracts are also known to have anti-inflammatory activity and can stimulate wound-healing; characteristics which might also be of great value in the development of novel therapeutic drugs for this chronic inflammatory disease. Therefore further exploration of these plant species in the treatment of mycetoma is encouraging.

  13. The In Vitro Antifungal Activity of Sudanese Medicinal Plants against Madurella mycetomatis, the Eumycetoma Major Causative Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfadil, Hassabelrasoul; Fahal, Ahmed; Kloezen, Wendy; Ahmed, Elhadi M.; van de Sande, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Eumycetoma is a debilitating chronic inflammatory fungal infection that exists worldwide but it is endemic in many tropical and subtropical regions. The major causative organism is the fungus Madurella mycetomatis. The current treatment of eumycetoma is suboptimal and characterized by low cure rate and high recurrence rates. Hence, an alternative therapy is needed to address this. Here we determined the antifungal activity of seven Sudanese medicinal plant species against Madurella mycetomatis. Of these, only three species; Boswellia papyrifera, Acacia nubica and Nigella sativa, showed some antifungal activity against M. mycetomatis and were further studied. Crude methanol, hexane and defatted methanol extracts of these species were tested for their antifungal activity. B. papyrifera had the highest antifungal activity (MIC50 of 1 ug/ml) and it was further fractionated. The crude methanol and the soluble ethyl acetate fractions of B. papyrifera showed some antifungal activity. The Gas-Liquid-Chromatography hybrid Mass-Spectrophotometer analysis of these two fractions showed the existence of beta-amyrin, beta-amyrone, beta-Sitosterol and stigmatriene. Stigmatriene had the best antifungal activity, compared to other three phytoconstituents, with an MIC-50 of 32 μg/ml. Although the antifungal activity of the identified phytoconstituents was only limited, the antifungal activity of the complete extracts is more promising, indicating synergism. Furthermore these plant extracts are also known to have anti-inflammatory activity and can stimulate wound-healing; characteristics which might also be of great value in the development of novel therapeutic drugs for this chronic inflammatory disease. Therefore further exploration of these plant species in the treatment of mycetoma is encouraging. PMID:25768115

  14. The reliability of serogroup determination in the detection of Escherichia coli as a causative agent of sporadic and epidemic occurrence of enterocolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Valentina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of virulence factors (heat-labile, heat-stable enterotoxin, verotoxin, invasiveness, localized, aggregative and diffuse adherence among E. coli strains isolated from sporadic cases and outbreaks of enterocolitis, which belonged to serogroups characteristic for enteropathogenic E. coli. Serogroup was determined in 57.2% of 622 strains isolated from sporadic cases, and among them virulence factors were detected in 23.6%. Serogroup was also determined in 73.3% of 90 outbreaks isolates tested and virulence factors were detected in 97% of them. The detection rate of virulence factors rarely exceeded 50% among strains belonging to any of serogroup that was determined. The obtained data suggested that the identification of E. coli as a causative agent of enterocolitis by serogroup determination was a reliable method in outbreaks, but not in sporadic cases of this disease.

  15. Evidences of the Low Implication of Mosquitoes in the Transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the Causative Agent of Buruli Ulcer

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    Rousseau Djouaka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Buruli ulcer (BU continues to be a serious public health threat in wet tropical regions and the mode of transmission of its etiological agent, Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU, remains poorly understood. In this study, mosquito species collected in endemic villages in Benin were screened for the presence of MU. In addition, the ability of mosquitoes larvae to pick up MU from their environment and remain colonized through the larval developmental stages to the adult stage was investigated. Methods. 7,218 adults and larvae mosquitoes were sampled from endemic and nonendemic villages and screened for MU DNA targets (IS2404, IS2606, and KR-B using qPCR. Results. MU was not detected in any of the field collected samples. Additional studies of artificially infected larvae of Anopheles kisumu with MU strains revealed that mosquitoes larvae are able to ingest and host MU during L1, L2, L3, and L4 developmental stages. However, we noticed an absence of these bacteria at both pupae and adult stages, certainly revealing the low ability of infected or colonized mosquitoes to vertically transmit MU to their offspring. Conclusion. The overall findings highlight the low implication of mosquitoes as biological vectors in the transmission cycle of MU from the risk environments to humans.

  16. Potential of Microbispora sp. V2 as biocontrol agent against Sclerotium rolfsii, the causative agent of southern blight of Zea mays L (Baby corn)--in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, N N; Waghmode, M S; Gaikwad, P S; Gajbhiye, M H; Gunjal, A B; Nawani, N N; Kapadnis, B P

    2014-11-01

    The study was undertaken with the aim of exploring novel and beneficial agro activities of rare actinomycetes like Microbispora sp. V2. The antagonistic activity of Microbispora sp. V2 was evaluated as a biocontrol agents against Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-borne fungal plant pathogen. The methodology performed for evaluation of biocontrol agent was in vitro evaluation assay which comprised of three tests viz., cellophane overlay technique, seed germination test and Thiram (fungicide) tolerance of Microbispora sp. V2. The isolate was found to inhibit the fungal pathogen Sclerotium rolfsii to 91.43% in cellophane assay. In seed germination assay, Microbispora sp. V2 treated seeds resulted in 25.75% increased germination efficiency, as compared to seeds infected by Sclerotium rolfsii. The isolate Microbispora sp. V2 could tolerate 1000 microg mL(-1) of Thiram (fungicide). The in vitro assay studies proved that Microbispora sp. V2 can be used as antifungal antagonist and thus posses' great potential as biocontrol agent against southern blight caused by Sclerotium rolfsii in Zea mays L (Baby corn) which causes large economical losses.

  17. Adaptations of Trypanosoma brucei to gradual loss of kinetoplast DNA: Trypanosoma equiperdum and Trypanosoma evansi are petite mutants of T. brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, De-Hua; Hashimi, Hassan; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Ayala, Francisco J; Lukes, Julius

    2008-02-12

    Trypanosoma brucei is a kinetoplastid flagellate, the agent of human sleeping sickness and ruminant nagana in Africa. Kinetoplastid flagellates contain their eponym kinetoplast DNA (kDNA), consisting of two types of interlocked circular DNA molecules: scores of maxicircles and thousands of minicircles. Maxicircles have typical mitochondrial genes, most of which are translatable only after RNA editing. Minicircles encode guide RNAs, required for decrypting the maxicircle transcripts. The life cycle of T. brucei involves a bloodstream stage (BS) in vertebrates and a procyclic stage (PS) in the tsetse fly vector. Partial [dyskinetoplastidy (Dk)] or total [akinetoplastidy (Ak)] loss of kDNA locks the trypanosome in the BS form. Transmission between vertebrates becomes mechanical without PS and tsetse mediation, allowing the parasite to spread outside the African tsetse belt. Trypanosoma equiperdum and Trypanosoma evansi are agents of dourine and surra, diseases of horses, camels, and water buffaloes. We have characterized representative strains of T. equiperdum and T. evansi by numerous molecular and classical parasitological approaches. We show that both species are actually strains of T. brucei, which lost part (Dk) or all (Ak) of their kDNA. These trypanosomes are not monophyletic clades and do not qualify for species status. They should be considered two subspecies, respectively T. brucei equiperdum and T. brucei evansi, which spontaneously arose recently. Dk/Ak trypanosomes may potentially emerge repeatedly from T. brucei.

  18. Incrimination of Schistosoma spindale as a causative agent of farmer's dermatitis in Assam with a note on liver pathology in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narain, K; Rajguru, S K; Mahanta, J

    1998-03-01

    Cercarial dermatitis of paddy field workers in Assam is very common. However, it is not known which species of animal schistosomes, is its causative agent in Assam. Studies in two dermatitis affected villages of Dibrugarh district revealed that cercariae of Schistosoma spindale were involved in its aetiology. Indoplanorbis exustus was the only snail species found infected with apharyngeate brevifurcate schistosome cercarie. Experimental infection of the laboratory animals with the dermatitis causing schistosome cercariae revealed that duckling and chicken were refractory to infection. However, Swiss albino mice were successfully infected. The number of adult flukes per infected mice ranged from 6-321 (mean intensity = 68.1; S.D. = +/- 112.96). Histopathological study of infected mice liver revealed that there was mild inflammation of infected portal triads towards the presence of male flukes in the intra hepatic portal vessels. Kuppffer cells showed hyperplasia and contained large amounts of black pigment. No eggs or egg granulomas were detected in the liver parenchyma. There was no evidence of thrombophlebitis, septal fibrosis or pipe stem fibrosis.

  19. Variability in triactinomyxon production from Tubifex tubifex populations from the same mitochondrial DNA lineage infected with Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease in salmonids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, C.; Zickovich, J.; Winton, J.R.; Kerans, B.L.

    2008-01-01

    Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease, infects both salmonid fish and an aquatic oligochaete, Tubifex tubifex. Although M. cerebralis has been detected in river drainages throughout the United States, disease severity among wild fish populations has been highly variable. Tubifex tubifex populations have been genetically characterized using sequences from the 16S mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene, the 18S ribosomal RNA gene, the internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1), and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Our earlier work indicated that large differences in compatibility between the parasite and populations of T. tubifex may play a substantial role in the distribution of whirling disease and resulting mortality in different watersheds. In the present study, we examined 4 laboratory populations of T. tubifex belonging to 16S mtDNA lineage III and 1 population belonging to 16S mtDNA lineage I for triactinomyxon (TAM) production after infection with M. cerebralis myxospores. All 4 16S mtDNA lineage III populations produced TAMs, but statistically significant differences in TAM production were observed. Most individuals in the 16S mtDNA lineage III-infected populations produced TAMs. The 16S mtDNA lineage I population produced few TAMs. Further genetic characterization of the 16S mtDNA lineage III populations with RAPD markers indicated that populations producing similar levels of TAMs had more genetic similarity. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2008.

  20. Molecular identification of the causative agent of human strongyloidiasis acquired in Tanzania: dispersal and diversity of Strongyloides spp. and their hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Sato, Hiroshi; Fujita, Shiho; Nguema, Pierre Philippe Mbehang; Nobusue, Kenichi; Miyagi, Kei; Kooriyama, Takanori; Takenoshita, Yuji; Noda, Shohei; Sato, Akiko; Morimoto, Azusa; Ikeda, Yatsukaho; Nishida, Toshisada

    2010-09-01

    In order to identify the causative agent of imported strongyloidiasis found in a Japanese mammalogist, who participated in a field survey in Tanzania, the hyper-variable region IV (HVR-IV) of 18S ribosomal DNA and partial mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase subunit 1 gene (cox1) were analyzed and compared with Strongyloides fuelleborni collected from apes and monkeys of Africa and Japan, and S. stercoralis from humans, apes and dogs. The HVR-IV and cox1 of the patient's worms were identical to or only slightly differed from those of worms parasitic in Tanzanian chimpanzees and yellow baboons, demonstrating that the patient acquired the infection during her field survey in Tanzania. Phylogenetic analysis with the maximum-likelihood method largely divided isolates of S. fuelleborni into three groups, which corresponded to geographical localities but not to host species. Meanwhile, isolates of S. stercoralis were grouped by the phylogenetic analysis into dog-parasitic and primate-parasitic clades, and not to geographical regions. It is surmised that subspeciation has occurred in S. fuelleborni during the dispersal of primates in Africa and Asia, while worldwide dispersal of S. stercoralis seems to have occurred more recently by migration and the activities of modern humans.

  1. Minimum Information Loss Based Multi-kernel Learning for Flagellar Protein Recognition in Trypanosoma Brucei

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-12-01

    Trypanosma brucei (T. Brucei) is an important pathogen agent of African trypanosomiasis. The flagellum is an essential and multifunctional organelle of T. Brucei, thus it is very important to recognize the flagellar proteins from T. Brucei proteins for the purposes of both biological research and drug design. In this paper, we investigate computationally recognizing flagellar proteins in T. Brucei by pattern recognition methods. It is argued that an optimal decision function can be obtained as the difference of probability functions of flagella protein and the non-flagellar protein for the purpose of flagella protein recognition. We propose to learn a multi-kernel classification function to approximate this optimal decision function, by minimizing the information loss of such approximation which is measured by the Kull back-Leibler (KL) divergence. An iterative multi-kernel classifier learning algorithm is developed to minimize the KL divergence for the problem of T. Brucei flagella protein recognition, experiments show its advantage over other T. Brucei flagellar protein recognition and multi-kernel learning methods. © 2014 IEEE.

  2. Proteomic study of a model causative agent of harmful red tide, Prorocentrum triestinum I: Optimization of sample preparation methodologies for analyzing with two-dimensional electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Leo Lai; Lo, Samuel Chun-Lap; Hodgkiss, Ivor John

    2002-09-01

    A comprehensive study to find the optimal sample preparation conditions for two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis of Prorocentrum triestinum, a model causative agent of harmful algal blooms (HABs) was carried out. The four major sample preparation steps for 2-DE: (a) cell disruption: i.e. sonication and homogenization with glass beads; (b) protein extraction : i.e. sequential and independent extraction procedures; (c) pre-electrophoretic treatment: these included (i) treatment with RNAase/DNAase or benzonase; (ii) ultracentrifugation to sediment large macromolecules such as DNA; (iii) desalting and concentration by ultrafiltration through a Microcon centrifugal filter device (MWCO: 3000 daltons); and (iv) desalting by a micro BioSpin chromatography column (MWCO: 6000 daltons); and (d) rehydration buffers, reducing agents and sample application in the first dimension isoelectric focussing were studied. Our results showed that sonication is easy to perform and resulted in a higher protein yield. Among the four extraction buffers, the urea containing buffers resulted in the extraction of the highest amount of protein while tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane buffers and trichloroacetic acid (TCA)/acetone precipitation allowed detection of a higher number of protein species (i.e. protein spots). Desalting by BioSpin and ultrafiltration have improved the 2-DE resolution of the water soluble fraction but have less effect on urea containing fractions. TCA/acetone precipitation was able to desalt all protein fractions independent of the extraction media, however extended exposure to this low pH medium has caused protein modification. Introduction of either DNase/RNase or benzonase treatment did not improve the discriminatory power of the 2-DE but this treatment did yield 2-DE with the clearest background. Proteolytic digestion was inhibited by addition of a protease inhibitor cocktail. Taken overall, a combination of sequential extraction and desalting by Bio

  3. Protein functional links in Trypanosoma brucei, identified by gene fusion analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trimpalis Philip

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domain or gene fusion analysis is a bioinformatics method for detecting gene fusions in one organism by comparing its genome to that of other organisms. The occurrence of gene fusions suggests that the two original genes that participated in the fusion are functionally linked, i.e. their gene products interact either as part of a multi-subunit protein complex, or in a metabolic pathway. Gene fusion analysis has been used to identify protein functional links in prokaryotes as well as in eukaryotic model organisms, such as yeast and Drosophila. Results In this study we have extended this approach to include a number of recently sequenced protists, four of which are pathogenic, to identify fusion linked proteins in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. We have also examined the evolution of the gene fusion events identified, to determine whether they can be attributed to fusion or fission, by looking at the conservation of the fused genes and of the individual component genes across the major eukaryotic and prokaryotic lineages. We find relatively limited occurrence of gene fusions/fissions within the protist lineages examined. Our results point to two trypanosome-specific gene fissions, which have recently been experimentally confirmed, one fusion involving proteins involved in the same metabolic pathway, as well as two novel putative functional links between fusion-linked protein pairs. Conclusions This is the first study of protein functional links in T. brucei identified by gene fusion analysis. We have used strict thresholds and only discuss results which are highly likely to be genuine and which either have already been or can be experimentally verified. We discuss the possible impact of the identification of these novel putative protein-protein interactions, to the development of new trypanosome therapeutic drugs.

  4. Testing of four Leishmania vaccine candidates in a mouse model of infection with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, the main causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the New World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salay, G; Dorta, M L; Santos, N M; Mortara, R A; Brodskyn, C; Oliveira, C I; Barbiéri, C L; Rodrigues, M M

    2007-09-01

    We evaluated whether four recombinant antigens previously used for vaccination against experimental infection with Leishmania (Leishmania) major could also induce protective immunity against a challenge with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, the species responsible for 90% of the 28,712 annual cases of cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis recorded in Brazil during the year of 2004. Initially, we isolated the homolog genes encoding four L. (V.) braziliensis antigens: (i) homologue of receptor for activated C kinase, (ii) thiol-specific antioxidant, (iii) Leishmania elongation and initiation factor, and (iv) L. (L.) major stress-inducible protein 1. At the deduced amino acid level, all four open reading frames had a high degree of identity with the previously described genes of L. (L.) major being expressed on promastigotes and amastigotes of L. (V.) braziliensis. These genes were inserted into the vector pcDNA3 or expressed as bacterial recombinant proteins. After immunization with recombinant plasmids or proteins, BALB/c mice generated specific antibody or cell-mediated immune responses (gamma interferon production). After an intradermal challenge with L. (V.) braziliensis infective promastigotes, no significant reduction on the lesions was detected. We conclude that the protective immunity afforded by these four vaccine candidates against experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. (L.) major could not be reproduced against a challenge with L. (V.) braziliensis. Although negative, we consider our results important since they suggest that studies aimed at the development of an effective vaccine against L. (V.) braziliensis, the main causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the New World, should be redirected toward distinct antigens or different vaccination strategies.

  5. Essential Oils of Myrtaceae Species Growing Wild in Tunisia: Chemical Variability and Antifungal Activity Against Biscogniauxia mediterranea, the Causative Agent of Charcoal Canker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangui, Islem; Zouaoui Boutiti, Meriem; Boussaid, Mohamed; Messaoud, Chokri

    2017-07-01

    The chemical composition of five Eucalyptus species and five Myrtus communis L. populations was investigated using GC/MS and GC-FID. For Eucalyptus essential oils, 32 compounds, representing 88.56 - 96.83% of the total oil according to species, were identified. The main compounds were 1,8-cineole, α-pinene, p-cymene, γ-gurjunene, α-aromadendrene, and β-phellandrene. For Myrtle essential oils, 26 compounds, representing 93.13 - 98.91% of the total oil were identified. α-Pinene, 1,8-cineole, linalool, and myrtenyl acetate were found to be the major compounds. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed chemical differentiation between Eucalyptus species and between Myrtle populations. Biscogniauxia mediterranea, the causative agent of charcoal canker, was identified according to its morphological and molecular characteristics. Essential oils of the investigated Eucalyptus species and Myrtle populations were tested for their antifungal capacity against this fungus. The antifungal activity varied according to the essential oil composition. Biscogniauxia mediterranea exhibited powerful resistance to some essential oils including them of Eucalyptus lehmannii and Eucalyptus sideroxylon but it was very sensitive to Eucalyptus camaldulensis oil (IC 50  = 3.83 mg/ml) and M. communis oil from Zaghouan (IC 50  = 1 mg/ml). This sensitivity was found to be correlated to some essential oil compounds such as p-cymene, carvacrol, cuminaldehyde, and linalool. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  6. Potent Inhibition of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the Causative Agent of White-Nose Syndrome in Bats, by Cold-Pressed, Terpeneless, Valencia Orange Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boire, Nicholas; Zhang, Sean; Khuvis, Joshua; Lee, Rick; Rivers, Jennifer; Crandall, Philip; Keel, M Kevin; Parrish, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The causative agent of White-nose Syndrome (WNS), Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has been shown to be fatal to several species of bats in North America. To date, no compounds or chemical control measures have been developed which eliminates the growth of the fungus in the environment or in affected animals. In the current study, we evaluated the activity of cold-pressed, terpeneless orange oil (CPT) against multiple isolates of P. destructans in vitro. For all assays, a modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay was used. Standardized spore suspensions were prepared, adjusted to a specific optical density, and used to plate fungal lawns. Plates were incubated at either 15°C or 4°C for up to 6 months and checked at regular intervals for growth. Once controls had grown, zones of inhibition were measured (mm) on test plates and compared to those obtained using current antifungal drugs. All P. destructans isolates were completely inhibited by 100% CPT (10 μL) at 1 month of incubation regardless of temperature (4°C and 15°C). Complete inhibition persisted up to 6 months following a single exposure at this concentration. Of the standard antifungals, only amphotericin B demonstrated any activity, resulting in zone diameters ranging from 58 mm to 74 mm. CPT, at the highest concentration tested (100%), had no significant effect against a variety of other environmental organisms including various filamentous fungi, bacteria and aerobic actinomycetes. Given that CPT is relatively non-toxic, the possibility exists that the all-natural, mixture could be used as an environmental pre-treatment to eradicate P. destructans from bat habitats. Additional studies are needed to assess any undesirable effects of CPT on bat behavior and health and overall impacts on other members of the interconnected ecosystem(s).

  7. Potent Inhibition of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the Causative Agent of White-Nose Syndrome in Bats, by Cold-Pressed, Terpeneless, Valencia Orange Oil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Boire

    Full Text Available The causative agent of White-nose Syndrome (WNS, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has been shown to be fatal to several species of bats in North America. To date, no compounds or chemical control measures have been developed which eliminates the growth of the fungus in the environment or in affected animals. In the current study, we evaluated the activity of cold-pressed, terpeneless orange oil (CPT against multiple isolates of P. destructans in vitro. For all assays, a modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay was used. Standardized spore suspensions were prepared, adjusted to a specific optical density, and used to plate fungal lawns. Plates were incubated at either 15°C or 4°C for up to 6 months and checked at regular intervals for growth. Once controls had grown, zones of inhibition were measured (mm on test plates and compared to those obtained using current antifungal drugs. All P. destructans isolates were completely inhibited by 100% CPT (10 μL at 1 month of incubation regardless of temperature (4°C and 15°C. Complete inhibition persisted up to 6 months following a single exposure at this concentration. Of the standard antifungals, only amphotericin B demonstrated any activity, resulting in zone diameters ranging from 58 mm to 74 mm. CPT, at the highest concentration tested (100%, had no significant effect against a variety of other environmental organisms including various filamentous fungi, bacteria and aerobic actinomycetes. Given that CPT is relatively non-toxic, the possibility exists that the all-natural, mixture could be used as an environmental pre-treatment to eradicate P. destructans from bat habitats. Additional studies are needed to assess any undesirable effects of CPT on bat behavior and health and overall impacts on other members of the interconnected ecosystem(s.

  8. Bluetongue serotype 2 and 9 modified live vaccine viruses as causative agents of abortion in livestock: a retrospective analysis in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, G; Lorusso, A; Paladini, C; Migliaccio, P; Di Gennaro, A; Di Provvido, A; Scacchia, M; Monaco, F

    2014-02-01

    The recent outbreak caused by Schmallenberg virus, which affected sheep, goats and cattle in Europe, highlighted the importance of having a robust surveillance plan capable of monitoring abortions and malformations in the livestock offspring. In this context, bluetongue viruses (BTVs) represented and represent one of the major threats to the European livestock industry. Aiming to improve the understanding on BTV cross placental transmission and serotype involvement, in this retrospective study foetal spleens and/or brains of 663 ovines, 429 bovines, 155 goats and 17 buffaloes were tested for the presence of BTV by virus isolation. BTV vaccine strains were isolated from 31 foetuses (2.4%; 95% CI: 1.7-3.4%): 24 (3.6%; 95% CI: 2.4-5.3%) from ovine foetal tissues; 6 (1.4%; 95% CI: 0.6-3.0%) from bovine foetal tissues and 1 (0.6%; 95% CI: 0.2-3.5%) from the spleen of a caprine foetus. All foetuses were from animals vaccinated with either BTV-2 or BTV-2, and BTV-9 modified live vaccines (MLVs) produced by Onderstepoort Biological Products (OBP), South Africa. Among the 31 isolated vaccine strains, serotype 9 (n = 28) was more frequently isolated (P < 0.05) than serotype 2 (n = 3). In two cases infectious vaccine strains were found in the foetal tissues 2 months after the vaccine administration. Other pathogens known to be causative agents of abortion in ruminants were not detected nor isolated. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that BTV-2 and BTV-9 vaccine strains are able to cross the placental barrier of sheep, cattle and goats. BTV-2 and BTV-9 vaccine strains are able to infect foetuses and cause abortions or malformations depending on the period of pregnancy at the time of vaccination. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. [On the origin of Yersinia pestis, a causative agent of the plague: A concept of population-genetic macroevolution in transitive environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntsov, V V

    2015-01-01

    An ecological scenario is proposed for the origin of causative agent of the plague (the bacterium Yersenia pestis) from the clone of pseudotuberculous microbe of the first serotype Y. pseudotuberculosis O:1b. Disclosed are the conditions of gradual intrusion of psychrophile saprozoonosis ancestor into the blood of the primary host, Mongolian tarbagan marmot Marmota sibirica. As an inductor of speciation acted the Sartan cooling that occurred in the end of late Pleistocene under conditions of arid ultra-continental climate in Central Asia. Soil freezing down to the level of hibernating chambers in marmot burrows initiated the transition of marmot flea, Oropsylla silantiewi, larvae to optional hemophagy on the mucous coat inside the mouth cavity of sleeping marmots. In its turn, this promoted the conditions of mass traumatic intrusion of Y pseudotuberculosis into marmots bloodstream from faecal particles getting in their mouth cavity in course of building up a plug in a burrow for hibernating. In marmot populations, the selection of bacteria underwent under conditions of heterothermy with repeated changes of hibernating marmots body temperature within the range of 5-37 degrees C (torpor-euthermy). During the warm season, when pseudotuberculous microbes are totally eliminated from the bloodstream of healthy marmots with body temperature about 37 degrees C, bacteria could survive in fleas' digestive tract in the form of biofilm developing in proventriculus as a so called blockage. Final isolation between ancestral and daughter species was helped by the development of intrapopulation antagonism related with the beginning of full-scale synthesis of bacteriocin pesticin. Population-genetic processes in the "marmot-flea" system have led to a macroevolutionary event, that is, to passage of bacteria in a new ecological niche and adaptive zone that are principally different from those of the ancestor. All the present intraspecies forms of Y. pestis that appeared due to

  10. Seroprevalence and risk factors for Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever in the dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) population in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaissa, Mohammed H; Ansel, Samir; Mohamed-Cherif, Abdallah; Benfodil, Karima; Khelef, Djamel; Youngs, Curtis R; Kaidi, Rachid; Ait-Oudhia, Khatima

    2017-08-31

    Query (Q) fever is a globally distributed zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii, a bacterial agent for which ruminants are the most prevalent natural reservoir. Data regarding Q fever infection in camels in Algeria are limited. Therefore, a survey to detect seroprevalence of C. burnetii antibodies was conducted among healthy camel populations in a vast area in southeastern Algeria to determine distribution of the Q fever causative organism and to identify risk factors associated with infection. Between January and March 2016, blood samples were collected from 184 camels and serum samples were subsequently analysed using a commercial Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kit. At the time of blood collection, a questionnaire investigating 13 potential predisposing factors associated with C. burnetii seropositivity was completed for every dromedary camel and herd. Results were analysed by a chi-square (χ2) test and multivariate logistic regression. The seroprevalence of C. burnetii at the animal level was 71.2% (95% CI: 65.2-78.3) and 85.3% (95% CI: 72.8-97.8) at the herd level. At the animal level, differences in seroprevalence were observed because of herd size, animal age, animal sex, presence of ticks and contact with other herds. A multivariable logistic regression model identified three main risk factors associated with individual seropositivity: (1) age class > 11 years (OR = 8.81, 95% CI: 2.55-30.41), (2) herd size > 50 head (OR = 4.46, 95% CI: 1.01-19.59) and (3) infestation with ticks (OR 2.2; 95% CI: 1.1-4.5). This study of seroprevalence of C. burnetii infection in camels in Algeria revealed a high seroprevalence of Q fever in camel populations in southeastern Algeria and provided strong evidence that Q fever represents an economic, public health and veterinary concern. Appropriate measures should be taken to prevent the spread of C. burnetii and to reduce the risk of Q fever in farm animals and humans in this agro-ecologically and

  11. Seroprevalence and risk factors for Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever in the dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius population in Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed H. Benaissa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Query (Q fever is a globally distributed zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii, a bacterial agent for which ruminants are the most prevalent natural reservoir. Data regarding Q fever infection in camels in Algeria are limited. Therefore, a survey to detect seroprevalence of C. burnetii antibodies was conducted among healthy camel populations in a vast area in southeastern Algeria to determine distribution of the Q fever causative organism and to identify risk factors associated with infection. Between January and March 2016, blood samples were collected from 184 camels and serum samples were subsequently analysed using a commercial Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA kit. At the time of blood collection, a questionnaire investigating 13 potential predisposing factors associated with C. burnetii seropositivity was completed for every dromedary camel and herd. Results were analysed by a chi-square (χ2 test and multivariate logistic regression. The seroprevalence of C. burnetii at the animal level was 71.2% (95% CI: 65.2–78.3 and 85.3% (95% CI: 72.8–97.8 at the herd level. At the animal level, differences in seroprevalence were observed because of herd size, animal age, animal sex, presence of ticks and contact with other herds. A multivariable logistic regression model identified three main risk factors associated with individual seropositivity: (1 age class > 11 years (OR = 8.81, 95% CI: 2.55–30.41, (2 herd size > 50 head (OR = 4.46, 95% CI: 1.01–19.59 and (3 infestation with ticks (OR 2.2; 95% CI: 1.1–4.5. This study of seroprevalence of C. burnetii infection in camels in Algeria revealed a high seroprevalence of Q fever in camel populations in southeastern Algeria and provided strong evidence that Q fever represents an economic, public health and veterinary concern. Appropriate measures should be taken to prevent the spread of C. burnetii and to reduce the risk of Q fever in farm animals and humans in this agro

  12. Structural Characterization of CYP51 from Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei Bound to the Antifungal Drugs Posaconazole and Fluconazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiung-Kuang; Leung, Siegfried S. F.; Guilbert, Christophe; Jacobson, Matthew P.; McKerrow, James H.; Podust, Larissa M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Chagas Disease is the leading cause of heart failure in Latin America. Current drug therapy is limited by issues of both efficacy and severe side effects. Trypansoma cruzi, the protozoan agent of Chagas Disease, is closely related to two other major global pathogens, Leishmania spp., responsible for leishmaniasis, and Trypansoma brucei, the causative agent of African Sleeping Sickness. Both T. cruzi and Leishmania parasites have an essential requirement for ergosterol, and are thus vulnerable to inhibitors of sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51), which catalyzes the conversion of lanosterol to ergosterol. Clinically employed anti-fungal azoles inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis in fungi, and specific azoles are also effective against both Trypanosoma and Leishmania parasites. However, modification of azoles to enhance efficacy and circumvent potential drug resistance has been problematic for both parasitic and fungal infections due to the lack of structural insights into drug binding. Methodology/Principal Findings We have determined the crystal structures for CYP51 from T. cruzi (resolutions of 2.35 Å and 2.27 Å), and from the related pathogen T. brucei (resolutions of 2.7 Å and 2.6 Å), co-crystallized with the antifungal drugs fluconazole and posaconazole. Remarkably, both drugs adopt multiple conformations when binding the target. The fluconazole 2,4-difluorophenyl ring flips 180° depending on the H-bonding interactions with the BC-loop. The terminus of the long functional tail group of posaconazole is bound loosely in the mouth of the hydrophobic substrate binding tunnel, suggesting that the major contribution of the tail to drug efficacy is for pharmacokinetics rather than in interactions with the target. Conclusions/Significance The structures provide new insights into binding of azoles to CYP51 and mechanisms of potential drug resistance. Our studies define in structural detail the CYP51 therapeutic target in T. cruzi, and offer a starting point for

  13. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense group 1 is distinguished by a unique amino acid substitution in the HpHb receptor implicated in human serum resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E Symula

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (Tbr and T. b. gambiense (Tbg, causative agents of Human African Trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness in Africa, have evolved alternative mechanisms of resisting the activity of trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs, components of innate immunity in human serum that protect against infection by other African trypanosomes. In Tbr, lytic activity is suppressed by the Tbr-specific serum-resistance associated (SRA protein. The mechanism in Tbg is less well understood but has been hypothesized to involve altered activity and expression of haptoglobin haemoglobin receptor (HpHbR. HpHbR has been shown to facilitate internalization of TLF-1 in T.b. brucei (Tbb, a member of the T. brucei species complex that is susceptible to human serum. By evaluating the genetic variability of HpHbR in a comprehensive geographical and taxonomic context, we show that a single substitution that replaces leucine with serine at position 210 is conserved in the most widespread form of Tbg (Tbg group 1 and not found in related taxa, which are either human serum susceptible (Tbb or known to resist lysis via an alternative mechanism (Tbr and Tbg group 2. We hypothesize that this single substitution contributes to reduced uptake of TLF and thus may play a key role in conferring serum resistance to Tbg group 1. In contrast, similarity in HpHbR sequence among isolates of Tbg group 2 and Tbb/Tbr provides further evidence that human serum resistance in Tbg group 2 is likely independent of HpHbR function.

  14. Digital gene expression analysis of two life cycle stages of the human-infective parasite, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense reveals differentially expressed clusters of co-regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wildridge David

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionarily ancient parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, is unusual in that the majority of its genes are regulated post-transcriptionally, leading to the suggestion that transcript abundance of most genes does not vary significantly between different life cycle stages despite the fact that the parasite undergoes substantial cellular remodelling and metabolic changes throughout its complex life cycle. To investigate this in the clinically relevant sub-species, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, which is the causative agent of the fatal human disease African sleeping sickness, we have compared the transcriptome of two different life cycle stages, the potentially human-infective bloodstream forms with the non-human-infective procyclic stage using digital gene expression (DGE analysis. Results Over eleven million unique tags were generated, producing expression data for 7360 genes, covering 81% of the genes in the genome. Compared to microarray analysis of the related T. b. brucei parasite, approximately 10 times more genes with a 2.5-fold change in expression levels were detected. The transcriptome analysis revealed the existence of several differentially expressed gene clusters within the genome, indicating that contiguous genes, presumably from the same polycistronic unit, are co-regulated either at the level of transcription or transcript stability. Conclusions DGE analysis is extremely sensitive for detecting gene expression differences, revealing firstly that a far greater number of genes are stage-regulated than had previously been identified and secondly and more importantly, this analysis has revealed the existence of several differentially expressed clusters of genes present on what appears to be the same polycistronic units, a phenomenon which had not previously been observed in microarray studies. These differentially regulated clusters of genes are in addition to the previously identified RNA polymerase I polycistronic

  15. Coxsackievirus B4 as a Causative Agent of Diabetes Mellitus Type 1: Is There a Role of Inefficiently Treated Drinking Water and Sewage in Virus Spreading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Senousy, Waled M; Abdel-Moneim, Adel; Abdel-Latif, Mahmoud; El-Hefnawy, Mohamed H; Khalil, Rehab G

    2018-03-01

    for isolation of separate EV isolates from treated and untreated water and sewage samples. Characterization of the EV amplicons by RT-PCR followed by sequencing of these isolates revealed high homology (97%) with human coxsackievirus B4 (CV B4) in 60% of the isolates, while the rest of the isolates belonged to poliovirus type 1 and type 2 vaccine strains. On the other hand, characterization of the EV amplicons by RT-PCR followed by sequencing for T1D-EV + children specimens indicated that all samples contained CV B4 with the same sequence characterized in the environmental samples. CV B4-contaminated drinking water or treated sewage may play a role as a causative agent of T1D in children.

  16. Spliced leader RNA silencing (SLS - a programmed cell death pathway in Trypanosoma brucei that is induced upon ER stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaeli Shulamit

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. The parasite cycles between its insect (procyclic form and mammalian hosts (bloodstream form. Trypanosomes lack conventional transcription regulation, and their genes are transcribed in polycistronic units that are processed by trans-splicing and polyadenylation. In trans-splicing, which is essential for processing of each mRNA, an exon, the spliced leader (SL is added to all mRNAs from a small RNA, the SL RNA. Trypanosomes lack the machinery for the unfolded protein response (UPR, which in other eukaryotes is induced under endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Trypanosomes respond to such stress by changing the stability of mRNAs, which are essential for coping with the stress. However, under severe ER stress that is induced by blocking translocation of proteins to the ER, treatment of cells with chemicals that induce misfolding in the ER, or extreme pH, trypanosomes elicit the spliced leader silencing (SLS pathway. In SLS, the transcription of the SL RNA gene is extinguished, and tSNAP42, a specific SL RNA transcription factor, fails to bind to its cognate promoter. SLS leads to complete shut-off of trans-splicing. In this review, I discuss the UPR in mammals and compare it to the ER stress response in T. brucei leading to SLS. I summarize the evidence supporting the notion that SLS is a programmed cell death (PCD pathway that is utilized by the parasites to substitute for the apoptosis observed in higher eukaryotes under prolonged ER stress. I present the hypothesis that SLS evolved to expedite the death process, and rapidly remove from the population unfit parasites that, by elimination via SLS, cause minimal damage to the parasite population.

  17. Steroid Alkaloids from Holarrhena africana with Strong Activity against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnadi, Charles Okeke; Nwodo, Ngozi Justina; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; Schmidt, Thomas J

    2017-07-06

    In our continued search for natural compounds with activity against Trypanosoma brucei, causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, "sleeping sickness"), we have investigated extracts from the leaves and bark of the West African Holarrhenaafricana (syn. Holarrhena floribunda; Apocynaceae). The extracts and their alkaloid-enriched fractions displayed promising in vitro activity against bloodstream forms of T. brucei rhodesiense (Tbr; East African HAT). Bioactivity-guided chromatographic fractionation of the alkaloid-rich fractions resulted in the isolation of 17 steroid alkaloids, one nitrogen-free steroid and one alkaloid-like non-steroid. Impressive activities (IC50 in µM) against Tbr were recorded for 3β-holaphyllamine (0.40 ± 0.28), 3α-holaphyllamine (0.37 ± 0.16), 3β-dihydroholaphyllamine (0.67 ± 0.03), N-methylholaphyllamine (0.08 ± 0.01), conessimine (0.17 ± 0.08), conessine (0.42 ± 0.09), isoconessimine (0.17 ± 0.11) and holarrhesine (0.12 ± 0.08) with selectivity indices ranging from 13 to 302. Based on comparison of the structures of this congeneric series of steroid alkaloids and their activities, structure-activity relationships (SARs) could be established. It was found that a basic amino group at position C-3 of the pregnane or pregn-5-ene steroid nucleus is required for a significant anti-trypanosomal activity. The mono-methylated amino group at C-3 represents an optimum for activity. ∆(5,6) unsaturation slightly increased the activity while hydrolysis of C-12β ester derivatives led to a loss of activity. An additional amino group at C-20 engaged in a pyrrolidine ring closed towards C-18 significantly increased the selectivity index of the compounds. Our findings provide useful empirical data for further development of steroid alkaloids as a novel class of anti-trypanosomal compounds which represent a promising starting point towards new drugs to combat human African trypanosomiasis.

  18. Steroid Alkaloids from Holarrhena africana with Strong Activity against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Okeke Nnadi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In our continued search for natural compounds with activity against Trypanosoma brucei, causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, “sleeping sickness”, we have investigated extracts from the leaves and bark of the West African Holarrhena africana (syn. Holarrhena floribunda; Apocynaceae. The extracts and their alkaloid-enriched fractions displayed promising in vitro activity against bloodstream forms of T. brucei rhodesiense (Tbr; East African HAT. Bioactivity-guided chromatographic fractionation of the alkaloid-rich fractions resulted in the isolation of 17 steroid alkaloids, one nitrogen-free steroid and one alkaloid-like non-steroid. Impressive activities (IC50 in µM against Tbr were recorded for 3β-holaphyllamine (0.40 ± 0.28, 3α-holaphyllamine (0.37 ± 0.16, 3β-dihydroholaphyllamine (0.67 ± 0.03, N-methylholaphyllamine (0.08 ± 0.01, conessimine (0.17 ± 0.08, conessine (0.42 ± 0.09, isoconessimine (0.17 ± 0.11 and holarrhesine (0.12 ± 0.08 with selectivity indices ranging from 13 to 302. Based on comparison of the structures of this congeneric series of steroid alkaloids and their activities, structure-activity relationships (SARs could be established. It was found that a basic amino group at position C-3 of the pregnane or pregn-5-ene steroid nucleus is required for a significant anti-trypanosomal activity. The mono-methylated amino group at C-3 represents an optimum for activity. ∆5,6 unsaturation slightly increased the activity while hydrolysis of C-12β ester derivatives led to a loss of activity. An additional amino group at C-20 engaged in a pyrrolidine ring closed towards C-18 significantly increased the selectivity index of the compounds. Our findings provide useful empirical data for further development of steroid alkaloids as a novel class of anti-trypanosomal compounds which represent a promising starting point towards new drugs to combat human African trypanosomiasis.

  19. Russell on Mnemic Causation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Bernecker

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the standard view, the causal process connecting a past representation and its subsequent recall involves intermediary memory traces. Yet Bertrand Russell and Ludwig Wittgenstein held that since the physiological evidence for memory traces isn't quite conclusive, it is prudent to come up with an account of memory causation-referred to as nmemic causation—that manages without the stipulation of memory traces. Given mnemic causation, a past representation is directly causally active over a temporal distance. I argue that the stipulation of memory traces is indeed indispensable for analyzing memory causation.

  20. Non-cytochrome mediated mitochondrial ATP production in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bienen, E. J.; Maturi, R. K.; Pollakis, G.; Clarkson, A. B.

    1993-01-01

    The life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei brucei involves a series of differentiation steps characterized by marked changes in mitochondrial development and function. The bloodstream forms of this parasite completely lack cytochromes and have not been considered to have any Krebs cycle function. It has

  1. Stearoyl-CoA desaturase is an essential enzyme for the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alloatti, Andres [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Gupta, Shreedhara; Gualdron-Lopez, Melisa; Nguewa, Paul A. [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute and Laboratory of Biochemistry, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Altabe, Silvia G. [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Deumer, Gladys; Wallemacq, Pierre [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, LTAP, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Michels, Paul A.M. [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute and Laboratory of Biochemistry, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Uttaro, Antonio D., E-mail: toniuttaro@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Inhibiting {Delta}9 desaturase drastically changes T. brucei's fatty-acid composition. {yields} Isoxyl specifically inhibits the {Delta}9 desaturase causing a growth arrest. {yields} RNA interference of desaturase expression causes a similar effect. {yields} Feeding T. brucei-infected mice with Isoxyl decreases the parasitemia. {yields} 70% of Isoxyl-treated mice survived the trypanosome infection. -- Abstract: Trypanosoma brucei, the etiologic agent of sleeping sickness, is exposed to important changes in nutrients and temperature during its life cycle. To adapt to these changes, the fluidity of its membranes plays a crucial role. This fluidity, mediated by the fatty-acid composition, is regulated by enzymes named desaturases. We have previously shown that the oleoyl desaturase is essential for Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei. In this work, we present experimental support for the relevance of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) for T. brucei's survival, in both its insect or procyclic-form (PCF) and bloodstream-form (BSF) stages. We evaluated this essentiality in two different ways: by generating a SCD knocked-down parasite line using RNA interference, and by chemical inhibition of the enzyme with two compounds, Isoxyl and a thiastearate with the sulfur atom at position 10 (10-TS). The effective concentration for 50% growth inhibition (EC{sub 50}) of PCF was 1.0 {+-} 0.2 {mu}M for Isoxyl and 5 {+-} 2 {mu}M for 10-TS, whereas BSF appeared more susceptible with EC{sub 50} values 0.10 {+-} 0.03 {mu}M (Isoxyl) and 1.0 {+-} 0.6 {mu}M (10-TS). RNA interference showed to be deleterious for both stages of the parasite. In addition, T. brucei-infected mice were fed with Isoxyl, causing a reduction of the parasitemia and an increase of the rodents' survival.

  2. Ligand tunnels in T. brucei and human CYP51: Insights for parasite-specific drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaofeng; Nandekar, Prajwal; Mustafa, Ghulam; Cojocaru, Vlad; Lepesheva, Galina I; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) is an essential enzyme for sterol biosynthesis and a target for anti-parasitic drug design. However, the design of parasite-specific drugs that inhibit parasitic CYP51 without severe side effects remains challenging. The active site of CYP51 is situated in the interior of the protein. Here, we characterize the potential ligand egress routes and mechanisms in Trypanosoma brucei and human CYP51 enzymes. We performed Random Acceleration Molecular Dynamics simulations of the egress of four different ligands from the active site of models of soluble and membrane-bound T. brucei CYP51 and of soluble human CYP51. In the simulations, tunnel 2f, which leads to the membrane, was found to be the predominant ligand egress tunnel for all the ligands studied. Tunnels S, 1 and W, which lead to the cytosol, were also used in T. brucei CYP51, whereas tunnel 1 was the only other tunnel used significantly in human CYP51. The common tunnels found previously in other CYPs were barely used. The ligand egress times were shorter for human than T. brucei CYP51, suggesting lower barriers to ligand passage. Two gating residues, F105 and M460, in T. brucei CYP51 that modulate the opening of tunnels 2f and S were identified. Although the main egress tunnel was the same, differences in the tunnel-lining residues, ligand passage and tunnel usage were found between T. brucei and human CYP51s. The results provide a basis for the design of selective anti-parasitic agents targeting the ligand tunnels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Post-operative central nervous system infections after cranial surgery in China: incidence, causative agents, and risk factors in 1,470 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, R; Zhu, Y; Shen, Y; Shen, J; Tong, Y; Yu, H; Wen, L

    2014-05-01

    A post-operative central nervous system infection (PCNSI) is a dangerous complication after cranial surgery. Although a large number of neurosurgical procedures are performed in hospitals in China, PCNSI-related data from this country are rarely reported. To address this issue, we examined the incidence of PCNSI after cranial surgery, the potential risk factors, and the offending etiologic agents in a large Chinese population. The medical records and post-operative courses for patients >16 years of age who underwent elective or emergency cranial surgeries between May 2010 and May 2012 and who survived for >7 days were reviewed retrospectively. Pre-operative data, surgery-related records, and post-operative variables were evaluated as risk factors for PCNSI after cranial surgery. Among 1,470 surgeries, 1,340 were craniotomies and 130 involved the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). There were 109 patients with PCNSIs, resulting in a total infection rate of 7.4 %. The dominant Gram-positive organism isolated (Staphylococcus aureus) was the most common pathogen isolated. Based on multivariate analysis, the risk of PCNSI was increased by a CSF leak [odds ratio (OR), 3.545; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 2.053-6.122; p China. CSF leakage, CSF drainage of any kind, subsequent short-term surgery, and surgery duration were major risk factors, indicating that surgery-focused management might be the most effective way to minimize the risk for PCNSI after cranial surgery.

  4. The filamentous phage XacF1 causes loss of virulence in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the causative agent of citrus canker disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmonim Ali Ahmad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, filamentous phage XacF1, which can infect Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac strains, was isolated and characterized. Electron microscopy showed that XacF1 is a member of the family Inoviridae and is about 1000 nm long and 16 nm in width. The genome of XacF1 is 7325 nucleotides in size, containing 13 predicted open reading frames (ORFs, some of which showed significant homology to Ff-like phage proteins such as ORF1 (pII, ORF2 (pV, ORF6 (pIII, and ORF8 (pVI. XacF1 showed a relatively wide host range, infecting seven out of 11 strains tested in this study. Frequently, XacF1 was found to be integrated into the genome of Xac strains. This integration occurred at the host dif site (attB and was mediated by the host XerC/D recombination system. The attP sequence was identical to that of Xanthomonas phage Cf1c. Interestingly, infection by XacF1 phage caused several physiological changes to the bacterial host cells, including lower levels of extracellular polysaccharide production, reduced motility, slower growth rate, and a dramatic reduction in virulence. In particular, the reduction in virulence suggested possible utilization of XacF1 as a biological control agent against citrus canker disease.

  5. Experimental infection of several fish species with the causative agent of Kuchijirosho (snout ulcer disease) derived from the tiger puffer Takifugu rubripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyadai, T; Kitamura, S I; Uwaoku, H; Tahara, D

    2001-12-05

    Kuchijirosho (snout ulcer disease) is a fatal epidemic disease which affects the tiger puffer, Takifugu rubripes, a commercial fish species in Japan and Korea. To assess the possibility that non-tiger puffer fish can serve as reservoirs of infection, 5 fish species were challenged by infection with the extracts of Kuchijirosho-affected brains from cultured tiger puffer: grass puffer T. niphobles, fine-patterned puffer T. poecilonotus, panther puffer T. pardalis, red sea bream Pagrus major, and black rockfish Sebastes schlegeli. When slightly irritated, all these species, especially the puffer fish, exhibited typical signs of Kuchijirosho, i.e., erratic swimming, biting together and bellying out (swelling of belly), as generally observed in tiger puffers affected by Kuchijirosho. Although the mortalities of the 2 non-puffer species were lower, injection of the extracts prepared from the brains of both inoculated fish into tiger puffer resulted in death, indicating that the inoculated fish used in this experiment have the potential to be infected with the Kuchijirosho agent. Condensations of nuclei or chromatin in the large nerve cells, which is a major characteristic of Kuchijirosho, were histopathologically observed to some extent in the brains of all kinds of puffer fish species infected. These findings suggest that the virus can spread horizontally among wild and cultured puffers and even among fishes belonging to different orders.

  6. What happens when Trypanosoma brucei leaves Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Robert E; Simpson, Larry; Englund, Paul T

    2008-10-01

    Julius Lukes and co-workers evaluated the evolutionary origin of Trypanosoma equiperdum and Trypanosoma evansi, parasites that cause horse and camel diseases. Although similar to T. brucei, the sleeping-sickness parasite, these trypanosomes do not cycle through the tsetse fly and have been able to spread beyond Africa. Transmission occurs sexually, or via blood-sucking flies or vampire bats. They concluded that these parasites, which resemble yeast petite mutants, are T. brucei sub-species, which have evolved recently through changes in mitochondrial DNA.

  7. Economics, History, and Causation

    OpenAIRE

    Randall Morck; Bernard Yeung

    2011-01-01

    Economics and history both strive to understand causation: economics using instrumental variables econometrics and history by weighing the plausibility of alternative narratives. Instrumental variables can lose value with repeated use because of an econometric tragedy of the commons bias: each successful use of an instrument potentially creates an additional latent variable bias problem for all other uses of that instrument - past and future. Economists should therefore consider historians' a...

  8. Interaction between Trypanosoma brucei and Haemonchus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to investigate the immunomodulatory influence of concurrent T. brucei and H. contortus infection in West African Dwarf (WAD) goats, 28 infected and 7 uninfected (control) of 8-9 months old male WAD goats were studied. The infected goats were separated into resistant (Class 1) and susceptible (Class 2) Faecal ...

  9. Haematology of experimental Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haematological aberrations associated with human infective trypanosomes were investigated in the vervet monkey model of the Rhodesian sleeping sickness. Four monkeys were infected intravenously with 104 Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and monitored for changes in the blood profile using a haematological ...

  10. A Protein Complex Map of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid H Gazestani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The functions of the majority of trypanosomatid-specific proteins are unknown, hindering our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of Trypanosomatida. While protein-protein interactions are highly informative about protein function, a global map of protein interactions and complexes is still lacking for these important human parasites. Here, benefiting from in-depth biochemical fractionation, we systematically interrogated the co-complex interactions of more than 3354 protein groups in procyclic life stage of Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Using a rigorous methodology, our analysis led to identification of 128 high-confidence complexes encompassing 716 protein groups, including 635 protein groups that lacked experimental annotation. These complexes correlate well with known pathways as well as for proteins co-expressed across the T. brucei life cycle, and provide potential functions for a large number of previously uncharacterized proteins. We validated the functions of several novel proteins associated with the RNA-editing machinery, identifying a candidate potentially involved in the mitochondrial post-transcriptional regulation of T. brucei. Our data provide an unprecedented view of the protein complex map of T. brucei, and serve as a reliable resource for further characterization of trypanosomatid proteins. The presented results in this study are available at: www.TrypsNetDB.org.

  11. Characterization of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense stocks isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense stocks isolated from humans by RAPD fingerprinting in Côte d'Ivoire: another evidence for multiple infections. ... a given isoenzyme profile (zymodeme), confirming that this fingerprinting method has a higher discriminative power (faster molecular clock) than isoenzymes.

  12. Wild chimpanzees are infected by Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Jirků

    2015-12-01

    Finally, we demonstrated that the mandrill serum was able to efficiently lyse T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, and to some extent T. b. gambiense, while the chimpanzee serum failed to lyse any of these subspecies.

  13. Genetic control of resistance to Trypanosoma brucei brucei infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matyáš Síma

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei brucei infects livestock, with severe effects in horses and dogs. Mouse strains differ greatly in susceptibility to this parasite. However, no genes controlling these differences were mapped.We studied the genetic control of survival after T. b. brucei infection using recombinant congenic (RC strains, which have a high mapping power. Each RC strain of BALB/c-c-STS/A (CcS/Dem series contains a different random subset of 12.5% genes from the parental "donor" strain STS/A and 87.5% genes from the "background" strain BALB/c. Although BALB/c and STS/A mice are similarly susceptible to T. b. brucei, the RC strain CcS-11 is more susceptible than either of them. We analyzed genetics of survival in T. b. brucei-infected F(2 hybrids between BALB/c and CcS-11. CcS-11 strain carries STS-derived segments on eight chromosomes. They were genotyped in the F(2 hybrid mice and their linkage with survival was tested by analysis of variance.We mapped four Tbbr (Trypanosoma brucei brucei response loci that influence survival after T. b. brucei infection. Tbbr1 (chromosome 3 and Tbbr2 (chromosome 12 have effects on survival independent of inter-genic interactions (main effects. Tbbr3 (chromosome 7 influences survival in interaction with Tbbr4 (chromosome 19. Tbbr2 is located on a segment 2.15 Mb short that contains only 26 genes.This study presents the first identification of chromosomal loci controlling susceptibility to T. b. brucei infection. While mapping in F(2 hybrids of inbred strains usually has a precision of 40-80 Mb, in RC strains we mapped Tbbr2 to a 2.15 Mb segment containing only 26 genes, which will enable an effective search for the candidate gene. Definition of susceptibility genes will improve the understanding of pathways and genetic diversity underlying the disease and may result in new strategies to overcome the active subversion of the immune system by T. b. brucei.

  14. Social mechanisms and social causation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedel Weinert

    2014-01-01

    .... Taking as an example of social causation the abolition of the slave trade, this paper argues that social mechanisms should be incorporated in Weber's wider notion of adequate causation in order...

  15. HELICOBACTER PYLORI: THE CAUSATIVE AGENT OF PEPTIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    room temperature, and in this state it fails to grow on subculture. .... H. pylori weaken the protective mucous coating of the stomach and duodenum, which allows acid to get through to the sensitive lining beneath. Both the acid and the bacteria irritate the ... the organism from gastric acid by converting urea to ammonia and ...

  16. Trypanosoma brucei: two steps to spread out from Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Zhao-Rong; Lai, De-Hua; Li, Feng-Jun; Lukes, Julius; Ayala, Francisco J

    2010-09-01

    Trypanosoma brucei equiperdum and Trypanosoma brucei evansi are typically considered separate species, although a recent study suggested that these organisms can be classified as subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei, which we also favor. Here we present a scenario that attempts to explain the continuing evolution of the dyskinetoplastic and akinetoplastic strains, as a consequence of loss of selective pressure(s) leading to the loss of kinetoplast DNA. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of Trypanosoma evansi, Trypanosoma equiperdum and Trypanosoma brucei brucei using repetitive DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z Q; Baltz, T

    1994-06-01

    The phylogenetic relatedness of 15 stocks of Trypanosoma evansi, three stocks of Trypanosoma equiperdum and one stock of Trypanosoma brucei brucei was determined using Southern blot analysis of restriction enzyme digested DNA, probed with two repetitive DNA sequences from T. b. brucei. A dendrogram derived by cluster analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) revealed three groups of related stocks. Group 1 included 14 stocks of T. evansi and one stock of T. equiperdum. Group 2 included two stocks of T. equiperdum and one stock of T. evansi. Group 3 included the one stock of T. brucei brucei. Group 2 is more closely related to Group 3 than Group 1, by analysis of the banding patterns. Further analysis of the T. evansi in Group 1 revealed that the patterns of isolates from different provinces in China were identical, but differed from T. evansi isolated from Africa, South America and the Philippines. These results provide insight into the origins of T. evansi and suggest that RFLP may be a useful means of distinguishing closely related trypanosomes.

  18. A review of the Mycrocylus ulei Ascomycetes fungus, causative agent of South American rubber-leaf blight Revisión sobre el hongo Microcyclus ulei, agente causal del mal suramericano de la hoja del caucho

    OpenAIRE

    Ancízar Aristizábar Fabio; Montoya Castaño Dolly; García Romero Ibonne Aydee

    2006-01-01

    The Microcyclus ulei Ascomycetes fungus is the causal agent of south-American leaf blight (SALB), this being one of the most important diseases affecting the natural rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) in Latina-America and has been responsible for numerous economic losses. This fungus has presented high physiological variability, suggesting its great adaptability. HCN tolerance has been described as being one of the mechanisms associated with its virulence. Resistant Hevea clones have been obta...

  19. Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense in Glossina fuscipes fuscipes ( Diptera: Glossinidae ) and Stomoxys flies using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique in southern Sudan.

  20. Onicomicosis: epidemiología, agentes causales y evaluación de los métodos diagnósticos de laboratorio Onychomycoses: epidemiology, causative agents and assessment of diagnostic laboratory methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier R Nazar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Desde marzo de 2007 hasta marzo de 2011 se estudiaron prospectivamente 414 pacientes con onicodistrofias en un laboratorio privado de Esquel. La prevalencia de onicomicosis de pie fue del 78 %; la de mano, del 58 %. Los principales agentes etiológicos fueron Trichophyton rubrum, Candida spp. y Trichophyton mentagrophytes. El desarrollo de dermatofitos prevaleció en las onicopatías de pie y el de Candida spp. en las de uñas de mano (ambos, p Since March 2007 to March 2011, 414 patients with onychopathies were prospectively analyzed. Prevalence of the toenail and fingernail mycoses was 78 % and 58 %, respectively. The major etiological agents were Trichophyton rubrum, Candida spp. and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Dermatophytes were more frequently cultured from toenails, whereas Candida spp. from fingernails (both, p < 0.05. In candidal onychomycosis, species different from C. albicans were prevalent. A higher prevalence of toenail and fingernail mycoses, a predominance of T. rubrum in toenails (p < 0.05, and greater positivity in the direct examination (DE and in culture (both, p < 0.05 were more frequently observed in men than in women. The correlation between DE and culture was 68 %. DE and culture yields were associated with a greater size lesion. DE was more effective in onycodystrophies with duration of more than 5 years. Culture positivity was independent of nail affection chronicity.

  1. Identification of a bacterial-like HslVU protease in the mitochondria of Trypanosoma brucei and its role in mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyin Li

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent protease complexes are present in all living organisms, including the 26S proteasome in eukaryotes, Archaea, and Actinomycetales, and the HslVU protease in eubacteria. The structure of HslVU protease resembles that of the 26S proteasome, and the simultaneous presence of both proteases in one organism was deemed unlikely. However, HslVU homologs have been identified recently in some primordial eukaryotes, though their potential function remains elusive. We characterized the HslVU homolog from Trypanosoma brucei, a eukaryotic protozoan parasite and the causative agent of human sleeping sickness. TbHslVU has ATP-dependent peptidase activity and, like its bacterial counterpart, has essential lysine and N-terminal threonines in the catalytic subunit. By epitope tagging, TbHslVU localizes to mitochondria and is associated with the mitochondrial genome, kinetoplast DNA (kDNA. RNAi of TbHslVU dramatically affects the kDNA by causing over-replication of the minicircle DNA. This leads to defects in kDNA segregation and, subsequently, to continuous network growth to an enormous size. Multiple discrete foci of nicked/gapped minicircles are formed on the periphery of kDNA disc, suggesting a failure in repairing the gaps in the minicircles for kDNA segregation. TbHslVU is a eubacterial protease identified in the mitochondria of a eukaryote. It has a novel function in regulating mitochondrial DNA replication that has never been observed in other organisms.

  2. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Infections in Mice Lead to Tropism to the Reproductive Organs, and Horizontal and Vertical Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Biteau

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, transmitted by the tsetse fly, is the main causative agent of Human African trypanosomosis in West Africa and poses a significant health risk to 70 million people. Disease progression varies depending on host immunity, but usually begins with a haemo-lymphatic phase, followed by parasite invasion of the central nervous system. In the current study, the tropism of T. b. gambiense 1135, causing a low level chronic 'silent' infection, was monitored in a murine model using bioluminescence imaging and PCR. A tropism to the reproductive organs, in addition to the central nervous system, after 12-18 months of infection was observed. Bioluminescent analysis of healthy females crossed with infected males showed that 50%, 62.5% and 37.5% of the female mice were subsequently positive for parasites in their ovaries, uteri and brain respectively. Although PCR confirmed the presence of parasites in the uterus of one of these mice, the blood of all mice was negative by PCR and LAMP. Subsequently, bioluminescent imaging of the offspring of infected female mice crossed with healthy males indicated parasites were present in the reproductive organs of both male (80% and female (60% offspring. These findings imply that transmission of T. b. gambiense 1135 occurs horizontally, most probably via sexual contact, and vertically in a murine model, which raises the possibility of a similar transmission in humans. This has wide reaching implications. Firstly, the observations made in this study are likely to be valid for wild animals acting as a reservoir for T. b. gambiense. Also, the reproductive organs may act as a refuge for parasites during drug treatment in a similar manner to the central nervous system. This could leave patients at risk of a relapse, ultimately allowing them to act as a reservoir for subsequent transmission by tsetse and possibly, horizontally and vertically.

  3. (Berenil(B)) in the Treatment of Experimental Trypanosoma brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Animal welfare was observed in accordance with. International guidelines for the use of laboratory animals for biomedical research (EC, 1996). Trypanosomes: Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Federe strain) obtained from NITR, Vom, was used and the parasites were maintained by serial passages in rats. One millilitre of.

  4. The Effect of Garlic Extracts on Experimental Trypanosoma brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-trypanosomal effect of aqueous and methanolic extracts of garlic were studied in Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected rabbits. With the establishment of infection, parasitaemia, anaemia, leucopenia, neutropenia and lymphocytosis developed. There was decrease in total serum protein, albumin and increase in ...

  5. Pathogenicity of Trypanosoma brucei in African giant rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pathogenicity of Trypanosoma brucei in African giant rats ( Cricetomys gambianus , Water House) ... The course of trypanosomosis was investigated over a period of two weeks in six African giant rats (Cricetomys gambianus) experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei. Six other rats served as uninfected control.

  6. Trypanosoma evansi is alike to Trypanosoma brucei brucei in the subcellular localisation of glycolytic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Andrea Moreno

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi, which causes surra, is descended from Trypanosoma brucei brucei, which causes nagana. Although both parasites are presumed to be metabolically similar, insufficient knowledge of T. evansi precludes a full comparison. Herein, we provide the first report on the subcellular localisation of the glycolytic enzymes in T. evansi, which is a alike to that of the bloodstream form (BSF of T. b. brucei: (i fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, phosphoglycerate kinase, triosephosphate isomerase (glycolytic enzymes and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (a glycolysis-auxiliary enzyme in glycosomes, (ii enolase, phosphoglycerate mutase, pyruvate kinase (glycolytic enzymes and a GAPDH isoenzyme in the cytosol, (iii malate dehydrogenase in cytosol and (iv glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in both glycosomes and the cytosol. Specific enzymatic activities also suggest that T. evansi is alike to the BSF of T. b. brucei in glycolytic flux, which is much faster than the pentose phosphate pathway flux, and in the involvement of cytosolic GAPDH in the NAD+/NADH balance. These similarities were expected based on the close phylogenetic relationship of both parasites.

  7. Licensing of Instrumental Case in Hindi/Urdu Causatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Ramchand

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I revisit the licensing and interpretation of instrumental case-marked nominals in Hindi/Urdu causative constructions to argue against the hypothesis that the se-marked phrase corresponds to a demoted agent. Rather, I will argue that a more unified analysis of se-phrases can be achieved through an event-structural analysis, in line with the standard interpretation of other adverbials in the syntax. Since the ‘intermediate agent’ interpretation is only possible with indirect causatives in Hindi/Urdu, the event structural analysis proposed here also has implications for the direct vs. indirect causation distinction in the syntax.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIPARASITIC ACTIVITY OF BENZOPHENONE THIOSEMICARBAZONES ON Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges C. Accrombessi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The structure of four synthesized thiosemicarbazones, substituted or not, of benzophenone has been confirmed by spectrometrical analysis IR, NMR 1H and 13C. Their anti-trypanosomal activities were evaluated on Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among these compounds, benzophenone 4 phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 4 has the highest activity with the half-inhibitory concentration (IC50 = 8.48 micromolar (µM. Benzophenone 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 3 and benzophenone thiosemicarbazone 1 showed moderate anti-trypanosomal activity with IC50 values equal to 23.27 µM and 67.17 µM respectively. Benzophenone 2 methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 2 showed no activity up to IC50 = 371.74 µM.

  9. Cultivation in a semi-defined medium of animal infective forms of Trypanosoma brucei, T. equiperdum, T. evansi, T. rhodesiense and T. gambiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltz, T; Baltz, D; Giroud, C; Crockett, J

    1985-05-01

    A semi-defined medium for the cultivation of bloodstream forms of the African trypanosome brucei subgroup was developed. Out of 14 different strains tested, 10 could be cultured including Trypanosoma brucei, T. equiperdum, T. evansi, T. rhodesiense and T. gambiense. The presence of a reducing agent (2-mercaptoethanol or thioglycerol) was found to be essential for growth. The standard medium consisted of Hepes buffered minimum essential medium with Earle's salts supplemented with 0.2 mM 2-mercaptoethanol, 2 mM pyruvate and 10% inactivated serum either from rabbit (T. brucei, T. equiperdum, T. evansi and T. rhodesiense) or human (T. gambiense). Although a general medium could be defined for the long-term maintenance of trypanosome cultures, the initiation to culture nevertheless required particular conditions for the different strains. The cultured trypanosomes had all the characteristics of the in vivo bloodstream forms including: morphology, infectivity, antigenic variation and glucose metabolism.

  10. Quinol derivatives as potential trypanocidal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capes, Amy; Patterson, Stephen; Wyllie, Susan; Hallyburton, Irene; Collie, Iain T; McCarroll, Andrew J; Stevens, Malcolm F G; Frearson, Julie A; Wyatt, Paul G; Fairlamb, Alan H; Gilbert, Ian H

    2012-02-15

    Quinols have been developed as a class of potential anti-cancer compounds. They are thought to act as double Michael acceptors, forming two covalent bonds to their target protein(s). Quinols have also been shown to have activity against the parasite Trypanosoma brucei, the causative organism of human African trypanosomiasis, but they demonstrated little selectivity over mammalian MRC5 cells in a counter-screen. In this paper, we report screening of further examples of quinols against T. brucei. We were able to derive an SAR, but the compounds demonstrated little selectivity over MRC5 cells. In an approach to increase selectivity, we attached melamine and benzamidine motifs to the quinols, because these moieties are known to be selectively concentrated in the parasite by transporter proteins. In general these transporter motif-containing analogues showed increased selectivity; however they also showed reduced levels of potency against T. brucei. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanisms Mediating Antigenic Variation in Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudenko Gloria

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Antigenic variation in Trypanosoma brucei is a highly sophisticated survival strategy involving switching between the transcription of one of an estimated thousand variant surface glycoprotein (VSG genes. Switching involves either transcriptional control, resulting in switching between different VSG expression sites; or DNA rearrangement events slotting previously inactive VSG genes into an active VSG expression site. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in techniques allowing us to genetically modify infective bloodstream form trypanosomes. This is allowing us to reengineer VSG expression sites, and look at the effect on the mechanisms subsequently used for antigenic variation. We can now begin a dissection of a highly complicated survival strategy mediated by many different mechanisms operating simultaneously.

  12. Combinations of alkaloids affecting different molecular targets with the saponin digitonin can synergistically enhance trypanocidal activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krstin, Sonja; Peixoto, Herbenya Silva; Wink, Michael

    2015-01-01

    .... In this study, the potential synergism of mutual combinations of bioactive alkaloids and alkaloids with a membrane-active steroidal saponin, digitonin, was explored with regard to their effect on T. b. brucei...

  13. Beliefs about Drinking Problem Causation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Bullers

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Research has found that “internal” or personal attributions about the causes of problem drinking increase the likelihood of seeking treatment and treatment efficacy, while “external” attributions, such as environmental, social or cultural causations, may hinder treatment efforts. Results of survey data from a sample of 152 US college students found three main causation belief factors, which were differentially associated with age, heavy drinking, protestant religion, and exposure to problem drinkers. The "Social Cause" factor was the most strongly endorsed belief suggesting external, but surmountable attributions for problem drinking. Implications of attributions for treatment efficacy are discussed.

  14. Social mechanisms and social causation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedel Weinert

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to examine the notion of social mechanisms by comparison with the notions of evolutionary and physical mechanisms. It is argued that social mechanisms are based on trends, and not lawlike regularities, so that social mechanisms are different from mechanisms in the natural sciences. Taking as an example of social causation the abolition of the slave trade, this paper argues that social mechanisms should be incorporated in Weber’s wider notion of adequate causation in order to achieve their explanatory purpose

  15. Phenolic Constituents of Medicinal Plants with Activity against Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Nan Sun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs affect over one billion people all over the world. These diseases are classified as neglected because they impact populations in areas with poor financial conditions and hence do not attract sufficient research investment. Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is one of the NTDs. The current therapeutic interventions for T. brucei infections often have toxic side effects or require hospitalization so that they are not available in the rural environments where HAT occurs. Furthermore, parasite resistance is increasing, so that there is an urgent need to identify novel lead compounds against this infection. Recognizing the wide structural diversity of natural products, we desired to explore and identify novel antitrypanosomal chemotypes from a collection of natural products obtained from plants. In this study, 440 pure compounds from various medicinal plants were tested against T. brucei by in a screening using whole cell in vitro assays. As the result, twenty-two phenolic compounds exhibited potent activity against cultures of T. brucei. Among them, eight compounds—4, 7, 11, 14, 15, 18, 20, and 21—showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei, with IC50 values below 5 µM, ranging from 0.52 to 4.70 μM. Based on these results, we attempt to establish some general trends with respect to structure-activity relationships, which indicate that further investigation and optimization of these derivatives might enable the preparation of potentially useful compounds for treating HAT.

  16. Regulation and spatial organization of PCNA in Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, Doris; Gassen, Alwine [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology I, Genetics, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Maiser, Andreas; Leonhardt, Heinrich [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology II, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Janzen, Christian J., E-mail: christian.janzen@uni-wuerzburg.de [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology I, Genetics, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in Trypanosoma brucei (TbPCNA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TbPCNA is a suitable marker to detect replication in T. brucei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TbPCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to closely related parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania donovani. -- Abstract: As in most eukaryotic cells, replication is regulated by a conserved group of proteins in the early-diverged parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Only a few components of the replication machinery have been described in this parasite and regulation, sub-nuclear localization and timing of replication are not well understood. We characterized the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in T. brucei (TbPCNA) to establish a spatial and temporal marker for replication. Interestingly, PCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to the closely related parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania donovani. TbPCNA foci are clearly detectable during S phase of the cell cycle but in contrast to T. cruzi they are not preferentially located at the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, PCNA seems to be degraded when cells enter G2 phase in T. brucei suggesting different modes of replication regulation or functions of PCNA in these closely related eukaryotes.

  17. Evaluation of In Vitro Activity of Essential Oils against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Habila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils (EOs from Cymbopogon citratus (CC, Eucalyptus citriodora (EC, Eucalyptus camaldulensis (ED, and Citrus sinensis (CS were obtained by hydrodistillation process. The EOs were evaluated in vitro for activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Tbb and Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi. The EOs were found to possess antitrypanosomal activity in vitro in a dose-dependent pattern in a short period of time. The drop in number of parasite over time was achieved doses of 0.4 g/ml, 0.2 g/mL, and 0.1 g/mL for all the EOs. The concentration of 0.4 g/mL CC was more potent at 3 minutes and 2 minutes for Tbb and T. evansi, respectively. The GC-MS analysis of the EOs revealed presence of Cyclobutane (96.09% in CS, 6-octenal (77.11% in EC, Eucalyptol (75% in ED, and Citral (38.32% in CC among several other organic compounds. The results are discussed in relation to trypanosome chemotherapy.

  18. Nucleoside analysis of DNA from Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma equiperdum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozatier, M; De Brij, R J; Den Engelse, L; Johnson, P J; Borst, P

    1988-11-01

    We have digested trypanosome DNA with a combination of pancreatic DNase I, nuclease P1 and bovine alkaline phosphatase and fractionated the resulting nucleosides on a Supelcosil LC-18-S column by high pressure liquid chromatography. We find less than 0.1% unusual nucleosides, both in Trypanosoma brucei and in a Trypanosoma equiperdum stock, in contrast to a previous report of an unusual nucleoside replacing dC at 1.3% of total nucleosides in T. equiperdum. Our results agree with previous suggestions that the modification of inactive telomeric expression sites for variant-specific surface glycoprotein genes in T. brucei only affects a very small fraction of the total DNA.

  19. Nitroheterocyclic drug resistance mechanisms in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyllie, Susan; Foth, Bernardo J; Kelner, Anna; Sokolova, Antoaneta Y; Berriman, Matthew; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the mechanisms of resistance to nifurtimox and fexinidazole in African trypanosomes. Bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei were selected for resistance to nifurtimox and fexinidazole by stepwise exposure to increasing drug concentrations. Clones were subjected to WGS to identify putative resistance genes. Transgenic parasites modulating expression of genes of interest were generated and drug susceptibility phenotypes determined. Nifurtimox-resistant (NfxR) and fexinidazole-resistant (FxR) parasites shared reciprocal cross-resistance suggestive of a common mechanism of action. Previously, a type I nitroreductase (NTR) has been implicated in nitro drug activation. WGS of resistant clones revealed that NfxR parasites had lost >100 kb from one copy of chromosome 7, rendering them hemizygous for NTR as well as over 30 other genes. FxR parasites retained both copies of NTR, but lost >70 kb downstream of one NTR allele, decreasing NTR transcription by half. A single knockout line of NTR displayed 1.6- and 1.9-fold resistance to nifurtimox and fexinidazole, respectively. Since NfxR and FxR parasites are ∼6- and 20-fold resistant to nifurtimox and fexinidazole, respectively, additional factors must be involved. Overexpression and knockout studies ruled out a role for a putative oxidoreductase (Tb927.7.7410) and a hypothetical gene (Tb927.1.1050), previously identified in a genome-scale RNAi screen. NTR was confirmed as a key resistance determinant, either by loss of one gene copy or loss of gene expression. Further work is required to identify which of the many dozens of SNPs identified in the drug-resistant cell lines contribute to the overall resistance phenotype. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  20. Effects of Morinda lucida leaf extract on Trypanosoma brucei brucei infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuzu, I U; Chineme, C N

    1990-10-01

    The dried leaves of Morinda lucida were extracted with 50% methanol and the extract was recovered in a 9.7% w/w yield. Acute toxicity tests were performed in mice and the intraperitoneal LD50 of the extract was 2000 mg/kg. The extract induced purgation in mice from the first hour after oral administration and reached its peak between the third and fourth hour. The purgation was not dose-dependent. M. lucida leaf extract i.p. significantly suppressed the level of parasitemia after Trypanosoma brucei infection in mice. Suppression of existing parasitemia appeared dose-dependent with 1000 mg/kg i.p. producing the maximum effect. The best trypanocidal activity was obtained when treatment with M. lucida extract commenced simultaneously with trypanosome inoculation.

  1. The absence of high-risk HPV combined with specific p53 and p16INK4a expression patterns points to the HPV-independent pathway as the causative agent for vulvar squamous cell carcinoma and its precursor simplex VIN in a young patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Arnold-Jan; Bottenberg, Marcel J H; Tosserams, Janna; Slangen, Brigitte; van Marion, Ariënne M W; van Trappen, Philippe O

    2008-10-01

    Simplex vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) is an important precursor of vulvar invasive squamous cell carcinoma and characteristically occurs in postmenopausal women. In this report, the absence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) combined with specific p53 and p16INK4a expression patterns points to the HPV-independent pathway as the causative agent for vulvar squamous cell carcinoma in a 28-year-old woman. Its precursor simplex VIN was initially interpreted as eczema. Although simplex VIN has a predilection for postmenopausal women, it can occur in young patients. The development of invasive vulvar squamous cell carcinoma underlines the importance of including simplex VIN in the differential diagnosis of vulvar lesions, even at a young age. Furthermore, knowledge about the HPV status in the tumor and thus the underlying causative pathway can alert the gynecologist for the presence or absence of multicentric lower genital tract disease, as this is frequent in the HPV-dependent and not in the HPV-independent pathway.

  2. Immunomodulatory activity of Buchholzia coriacea seed methanol extract on Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, James I; Ekelozie, Chioma F; Nweze, Nwakego E

    2017-12-01

    The seeds of Buchholzia coriacea Engler (Capparaceae) are used in Eastern Nigeria to treat feverish conditions, and to treat malaria and sleeping sickness that cause fever. The current study assesses the immunomodulatory activity of Buchholzia coriacea seed extract on Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected mice. Delayed hypersensitivity reaction, humoral antibody response and in-vivo leucocyte mobilization tests were assessed in three different experiments to determine the effect of the extract on immune response. Seventy-five (75) mice (25 mice per experiment) were used for the study and were each infected with 1.00 × 106 trypanosomes intra-peritoneally. Groups A, B and C were given 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg of the extract, respectively, group D received 7.5 mg/kg body weight of levamisole and group E was the control. Sheep RBCs were used as antigen. The acute toxicity tests did not cause clinical signs or death within 24 h post treatment at all the doses tested. The extract inhibited delayed hypersensitivity reaction by 20.9 and 20.8% at 250 and 500 mg/kg, respectively, while at 1000 mg/kg, the paw size increased (-101.9%) when compared with the control. The extract elevated the antibody titre from 1.60 ± 0.40 for control to 8.00 ± 3.58 for 500 mg/kg group. The extract increased in total leucocytes counts. The extract has a very wide safety margin and was able to improve immune response. The results of the present study showed that Buchholzia coriacea seed methanol extract possesses immunostimulatory activity on trypanosome-infected mice.

  3. ( Nigella sativa ) oil on Trypanosoma brucei -infected rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of black seed oil (Nigella sativa oil) on parasitaemia, some serum and liver enzymes as well as some haematological parameters in Trypanosoma brucei-infected rats were investigated. The results show there was low parasitaemia and extension of life span of rats from 12 days of the infected untreated (control) ...

  4. The genome of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berriman, Matthew; Ghedin, Elodie; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Blandin, Gaëlle; Renauld, Hubert; Bartholomeu, Daniella C; Lennard, Nicola J; Caler, Elisabet; Hamlin, Nancy E; Haas, Brian; Böhme, Ulrike; Hannick, Linda; Aslett, Martin A; Shallom, Joshua; Marcello, Lucio; Hou, Lihua; Wickstead, Bill; Alsmark, U Cecilia M; Arrowsmith, Claire; Atkin, Rebecca J; Barron, Andrew J; Bringaud, Frederic; Brooks, Karen; Carrington, Mark; Cherevach, Inna; Chillingworth, Tracey-Jane; Churcher, Carol; Clark, Louise N; Corton, Craig H; Cronin, Ann; Davies, Rob M; Doggett, Jonathon; Djikeng, Appolinaire; Feldblyum, Tamara; Field, Mark C; Fraser, Audrey; Goodhead, Ian; Hance, Zahra; Harper, David; Harris, Barbara R; Hauser, Heidi; Hostetler, Jessica; Ivens, Al; Jagels, Kay; Johnson, David; Johnson, Justin; Jones, Kristine; Kerhornou, Arnaud X; Koo, Hean; Larke, Natasha; Landfear, Scott; Larkin, Christopher; Leech, Vanessa; Line, Alexandra; Lord, Angela; Macleod, Annette; Mooney, Paul J; Moule, Sharon; Martin, David M A; Morgan, Gareth W; Mungall, Karen; Norbertczak, Halina; Ormond, Doug; Pai, Grace; Peacock, Chris S; Peterson, Jeremy; Quail, Michael A; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Rajandream, Marie-Adele; Reitter, Chris; Salzberg, Steven L; Sanders, Mandy; Schobel, Seth; Sharp, Sarah; Simmonds, Mark; Simpson, Anjana J; Tallon, Luke; Turner, C Michael R; Tait, Andrew; Tivey, Adrian R; Van Aken, Susan; Walker, Danielle; Wanless, David; Wang, Shiliang; White, Brian; White, Owen; Whitehead, Sally; Woodward, John; Wortman, Jennifer; Adams, Mark D; Embley, T Martin; Gull, Keith; Ullu, Elisabetta; Barry, J David; Fairlamb, Alan H; Opperdoes, Fred; Barrell, Barclay G; Donelson, John E; Hall, Neil; Fraser, Claire M; Melville, Sara E; El-Sayed, Najib M

    2005-07-15

    African trypanosomes cause human sleeping sickness and livestock trypanosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. We present the sequence and analysis of the 11 megabase-sized chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei. The 26-megabase genome contains 9068 predicted genes, including approximately 900 pseudogenes and approximately 1700 T. brucei-specific genes. Large subtelomeric arrays contain an archive of 806 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes used by the parasite to evade the mammalian immune system. Most VSG genes are pseudogenes, which may be used to generate expressed mosaic genes by ectopic recombination. Comparisons of the cytoskeleton and endocytic trafficking systems with those of humans and other eukaryotic organisms reveal major differences. A comparison of metabolic pathways encoded by the genomes of T. brucei, T. cruzi, and Leishmania major reveals the least overall metabolic capability in T. brucei and the greatest in L. major. Horizontal transfer of genes of bacterial origin has contributed to some of the metabolic differences in these parasites, and a number of novel potential drug targets have been identified.

  5. Roles of triosephosphate isomerase and aerobic metabolism in Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helfert, S.; Estevez, A.M.; Bakker, B.M.; Michels, P.A.M.; Clayton, C.

    2001-01-01

    Kinetoplastid protozoa compartmentalize the first seven enzymes of glycolysis and two enzymes of glycerol metabolism in a microbody, the glycosome. While in its mammalian host, Trypanosoma brucei depends entirely on glucose for ATP generation. Under aerobic conditions, most of the glucose is

  6. Population genetic structure and cladistic analysis of Trypanosoma brucei isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agbo, E.C.; Clausen, P.H.; Buscher, P.; Majiwa, P.A.O.; Pas, te M.F.W.; Claassen, E.

    2003-01-01

    Using a novel multilocus DNA marker analysis method, we studied the population genetic structure of Trypansoma brucei stocks and derived clones isolated from animal and rhodesiense sleeping sickness patients during a national sleeping sickness control program in Mukono district, Uganda. We then

  7. Role of cytokines in Trypanosoma brucei-induced anaemia: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the blood-brain barrier. The subspecies Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in eastern and southern Africa generally causes a more acute form of ... The persistence of anaemia beyond the initial wave of parasitaemia (after which low numbers of parasites are in circulation) indicates that anaemia may be directly induced.

  8. Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial respiratome: Composition and organization in procyclic form

    KAUST Repository

    Acestor, Nathalie

    2011-05-24

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is comprised of four different protein complexes (I-IV), which are responsible for electron transport and generation of proton gradient in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. This proton gradient is then used by F oF 1-ATP synthase (complex V) to produce ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. In this study, the respiratory complexes I, II, and III were affinity purified from Trypanosoma brucei procyclic form cells and their composition was determined by mass spectrometry. The results along with those that we previously reported for complexes IV and V showed that the respiratome of Trypanosoma is divergent because many of its proteins are unique to this group of organisms. The studies also identified two mitochondrial subunit proteins of respiratory complex IV that are encoded by edited RNAs. Proteomics data from analyses of complexes purified using numerous tagged component proteins in each of the five complexes were used to generate the first predicted protein-protein interaction network of the Trypanosoma brucei respiratory chain. These results provide the first comprehensive insight into the unique composition of the respiratory complexes in Trypanosoma brucei, an early diverged eukaryotic pathogen. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Crystal structure of arginine methyltransferase 6 from Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Chongyuan Wang

    Full Text Available Arginine methylation plays vital roles in the cellular functions of the protozoan Trypanosoma brucei. The T. brucei arginine methyltransferase 6 (TbPRMT6 is a type I arginine methyltransferase homologous to human PRMT6. In this study, we report the crystal structures of apo-TbPRMT6 and its complex with the reaction product S-adenosyl-homocysteine (SAH. The structure of apo-TbPRMT6 displays several features that are different from those of type I PRMTs that were structurally characterized previously, including four stretches of insertion, the absence of strand β15, and a distinct dimerization arm. The comparison of the apo-TbPRMT6 and SAH-TbPRMT6 structures revealed the fine rearrangements in the active site upon SAH binding. The isothermal titration calorimetry results demonstrated that SAH binding greatly increases the affinity of TbPRMT6 to a substrate peptide derived from bovine histone H4. The western blotting and mass spectrometry results revealed that TbPRMT6 methylates bovine histone H4 tail at arginine 3 but cannot methylate several T. brucei histone tails. In summary, our results highlight the structural differences between TbPRMT6 and other type I PRMTs and reveal that the active site rearrangement upon SAH binding is important for the substrate binding of TbPRMT6.

  10. Trypanocidal action of bisphosphonium salts through a mitochondrial target in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsalam A.M. Alkhaldi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipophilic bisphosphonium salts are among the most promising antiprotozoal leads currently under investigation. As part of their preclinical evaluation we here report on their mode of action against African trypanosomes, the etiological agents of sleeping sickness. The bisphosphonium compounds CD38 and AHI-9 exhibited rapid inhibition of Trypanosoma brucei growth, apparently the result of cell cycle arrest that blocked the replication of mitochondrial DNA, contained in the kinetoplast, thereby preventing the initiation of S-phase. Incubation with either compound led to a rapid reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP levels decreased by approximately 50% within 1 h. Between 4 and 8 h, cellular calcium levels increased, consistent with release from the depolarized mitochondria. Within the mitochondria, the Succinate Dehydrogenase complex (SDH was investigated as a target for bisphosphonium salts, but while its subunit 1 (SDH1 was present at low levels in the bloodstream form trypanosomes, the assembled complex was hardly detectable. RNAi knockdown of the SDH1 subunit produced no growth phenotype, either in bloodstream or in the procyclic (insect forms and we conclude that in trypanosomes SDH is not the target for bisphosphonium salts. Instead, the compounds inhibited ATP production in intact mitochondria, as well as the purified F1 ATPase, to a level that was similar to 1 mM azide. Co-incubation with azide and bisphosphonium compounds did not inhibit ATPase activity more than either product alone. The results show that, in T. brucei, bisphosphonium compounds do not principally act on succinate dehydrogenase but on the mitochondrial FoF1 ATPase.

  11. Trypanocidal action of bisphosphonium salts through a mitochondrial target in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhaldi, Abdulsalam A.M.; Martinek, Jan; Panicucci, Brian; Dardonville, Christophe; Zíková, Alena; de Koning, Harry P.

    2015-01-01

    Lipophilic bisphosphonium salts are among the most promising antiprotozoal leads currently under investigation. As part of their preclinical evaluation we here report on their mode of action against African trypanosomes, the etiological agents of sleeping sickness. The bisphosphonium compounds CD38 and AHI-9 exhibited rapid inhibition of Trypanosoma brucei growth, apparently the result of cell cycle arrest that blocked the replication of mitochondrial DNA, contained in the kinetoplast, thereby preventing the initiation of S-phase. Incubation with either compound led to a rapid reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP levels decreased by approximately 50% within 1 h. Between 4 and 8 h, cellular calcium levels increased, consistent with release from the depolarized mitochondria. Within the mitochondria, the Succinate Dehydrogenase complex (SDH) was investigated as a target for bisphosphonium salts, but while its subunit 1 (SDH1) was present at low levels in the bloodstream form trypanosomes, the assembled complex was hardly detectable. RNAi knockdown of the SDH1 subunit produced no growth phenotype, either in bloodstream or in the procyclic (insect) forms and we conclude that in trypanosomes SDH is not the target for bisphosphonium salts. Instead, the compounds inhibited ATP production in intact mitochondria, as well as the purified F1 ATPase, to a level that was similar to 1 mM azide. Co-incubation with azide and bisphosphonium compounds did not inhibit ATPase activity more than either product alone. The results show that, in T. brucei, bisphosphonium compounds do not principally act on succinate dehydrogenase but on the mitochondrial FoF1 ATPase. PMID:27054061

  12. Effect of diminazene aceturate, levamisole and vitamin C combination therapy in rats experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekwube, Adieme Ijeoma; Onyema, Ezeh Ikenna; Ikenna, Ugochukwu Emmanuel; Ezeokonkwo, Romanus Chukwuduruo

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the effect of diminazene aceturate (DA) alone or in combination with either levamisole and/or Vitamin C in albino rats experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Thirty adult male albino rats, randomly assigned into 6 groups (A-F) of 5 rats each were used. They were either infected with 1×10(6) trypanosomes intraperitoneally (groups A-E) or uninfected (group F). The different groups were treated respectively as follows: group A-with 3.5 mg/kg DA; group B-3.5 mg/kg DA and 7.5 mg/kg levamisole; group C-3.5 mg/kg DA and 100 mg/kg vitamin C; and group D-3.5 mg/kg DA and 7.5 mg/kg levamisole and 100 mg/kg vitamin C. Group E was left untreated. Parameters assessed include: rectal temperature, body weight changes, packed cell volume (PCV), Haemoglobin concentration (Hb), total leucocyte count (TLC) differential leucocyte count (DLC), parasitaemia, clinical signs and survivability. Average pre-patent period of 5 days was recorded. Parasites in the blood were cleared in all treated groups (A-D) within 48 hours post treatment (PT). Untreated rats in group E died between 25 and 32 days post infection (PI). Relapse was not recorded in all the treated groups (A-D). The initial reduction in PCV, Hb, TLC and increases in rectal temperature following infection were reversed by the treatments. The rats that received drug combinations (groups B, C and D) showed faster and higher recovery rates than the uninfected control and group A. Levamisole and/or Vitamin C combination with DA were more effective in the treatment of rats infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. New antiprotozoal agents: their synthesis and biological evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhayaya, Ram Shankar; Dixit, Shailesh S; Földesi, Andras; Chattopadhyaya, Jyoti

    2013-05-01

    Here we report identification of new lead compounds based on quinoline and indenoquinolines with variable side chains as antiprotozoal agents. Quinolines 32, 36 and 37 (Table 1) and indenoquinoline derivatives 14 and 23 (Table 2) inhibit the in vitro growth of the Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense subspecies and Leishmania infantum with IC50=0.25 μM. These five compounds have superior activity to that of the front-line drugs such as benznidazole, nifurtimox and comparable to amphotericin B. Thus these compounds constitute new 'leads' for further structure-activity studies as potential active antiprotozoal agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Causative agents of keratomycosis in Ibadan: review of laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A retrospective review of the laboratory reports of corneal scrapings of patients that presented with signs and symptoms suggestive of Keratomycosis was carried out. The scrapings were subjected to wet preparation with 10.0 % KOH, Gram staining and Giemsa staining to rule out inclusion bodies. The diagnosis of ...

  15. In vitro inhibition of tomato Fusarium wilt causative agent by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The responsible compound was purified using column chromatography and the chemical structure of the purified compound was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques. A known compound, zearalenone, was found to be responsible for the antifungal activity, with a minimum ...

  16. Detection and diagnosis of prions, the causative agent for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While in Nigeria, many of our cattle and sheep have not been screened and no awareness exist for TSEs. Preliminary work is already underway. Also screening studies are just commencing at a very slow pace in Jos. Given the globalized nature of the present world, where infections move across continents at a rapid pace, ...

  17. Salmonella Alachua: causative agent of a foodborne disease outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Aparecida Zago Castanheira de Almeida

    2015-05-01

    Conclusion: The data presented herein confirm the foodborne disease outbreak. They also allowed for the identification of the source of infection, and suggest that products from poultry are potential reservoirs for this serotype, reinforcing the importance of warning consumers about the danger of possible contamination.

  18. APPROUSH TO SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTICS OF CAUSATIVE AGENTS OF INFECTIOUS ENDOCARDIDIS

    OpenAIRE

    Katsapov D.V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Increased level of morbidity of infective endocarditis (IE) connected with new risk factors: intravenous drug use, cardiosurgical interventions, hemodialysis brought new clinical forms of the disease. As it shown in a literature main pathogenetic factors of IE are bacteraemia, trauma of endocardium and invasive medical procedures. Very typical pathogens are streptococci and staphylococci. Most typically mitral and aortal valves are affected with spreading...

  19. Rationality, mental causation and social sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the role of mental causation in the context of rational choice theory. The author defends psychological aspect of rational explanation against the challenge of contemporary reductive materialism.

  20. Rab23 is a flagellar protein in Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Field Mark C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rab small GTPases are important mediators of membrane transport, and orthologues frequently retain similar locations and functions, even between highly divergent taxa. In metazoan organisms Rab23 is an important negative regulator of Sonic hedgehog signaling and is crucial for correct development and differentiation of cellular lineages by virtue of an involvement in ciliary recycling. Previously, we reported that Trypanosoma brucei Rab23 localized to the nuclear envelope 1, which is clearly inconsistent with the mammalian location and function. As T. brucei is unicellular the potential that Rab23 has no role in cell signaling was possible. Here we sought to further investigate the role(s of Rab23 in T. brucei to determine if Rab23 was an example of a Rab protein with divergent function in distinct taxa. Methods/major findings The taxonomic distribution of Rab23 was examined and compared with the presence of flagella/cilia in representative taxa. Despite evidence for considerable secondary loss, we found a clear correlation between a conventional flagellar structure and the presence of a Rab23 orthologue in the genome. By epitope-tagging, Rab23 was localized and found to be present at the flagellum throughout the cell cycle. However, RNAi knockdown did not result in a flagellar defect, suggesting that Rab23 is not required for construction or maintenance of the flagellum. Conclusions The location of Rab23 at the flagellum is conserved between mammals and trypanosomes and the Rab23 gene is restricted to flagellated organisms. These data may suggest the presence of a Rab23-mediated signaling mechanism in trypanosomes.

  1. Telomeric expression sites are highly conserved in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Hertz-Fowler

    Full Text Available Subtelomeric regions are often under-represented in genome sequences of eukaryotes. One of the best known examples of the use of telomere proximity for adaptive purposes are the bloodstream expression sites (BESs of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei. To enhance our understanding of BES structure and function in host adaptation and immune evasion, the BES repertoire from the Lister 427 strain of T. brucei were independently tagged and sequenced. BESs are polymorphic in size and structure but reveal a surprisingly conserved architecture in the context of extensive recombination. Very small BESs do exist and many functioning BESs do not contain the full complement of expression site associated genes (ESAGs. The consequences of duplicated or missing ESAGs, including ESAG9, a newly named ESAG12, and additional variant surface glycoprotein genes (VSGs were evaluated by functional assays after BESs were tagged with a drug-resistance gene. Phylogenetic analysis of constituent ESAG families suggests that BESs are sequence mosaics and that extensive recombination has shaped the evolution of the BES repertoire. This work opens important perspectives in understanding the molecular mechanisms of antigenic variation, a widely used strategy for immune evasion in pathogens, and telomere biology.

  2. Antitrypanosomal effect of methanolic extract of Zingiber officinale (ginger on Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected Wistar mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Kobo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was carried out to determine the in vivo antitrypanosomal effect of methanolic extract of Zingiber officinale (ginger in Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected mice. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five mice were randomly allocated into five groups of five animals each. Group I and II were given Tween 80 (1 ml/kg and diminazene aceturate (3.5 mg/kg to serve as untreated and treated controls, respectively. Groups III-V received the extract at 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg body weight, respectively. All treatments were given for 6 consecutive days and through the oral route. The mean body weight, mean survival period and daily level of parasitaemia were evaluated. Results: Acute toxicity showed the extract to be relatively safe. There was an insignificant increase in body weight and survival rate of mice treated with the extract. The level of parasitaemia in the extract treated groups was decreased. Conclusion: This study shows the in vivo potential of methanolic extract of Z. officinale in the treatment of trypanosomiasis.

  3. [Causation, prevention and treatment of dust explosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Maolong; Jia, Wenbin; Wang, Hongtao; Han, Fei; Li, Xiao-Qiang; Hu, Dahai

    2014-10-01

    With the development of industrial technology, dust explosion accidents have increased, causing serious losses of people's lives and property. With the development of economy, we should lay further emphasis on causation, prevention, and treatment of dust explosion. This article summarizes the background, mechanism, prevention, and treatment of dust explosion, which may provide some professional knowledge and reference for the treatment of dust explosion.

  4. In or out? On the tightness of glycosomal compartmentalizatin of metabolites and enzymes in Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, J.R.; Bakker, B.M.; Michels, P.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids sequester large parts of glucose metabolism inside specialised peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Many studies have shown that correct glycosomal compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei. The recent finding of pore-forming

  5. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignment of Urm1 from Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Ding, Husheng; Zhang, Jiahai; Tu, Xiaoming

    2008-06-01

    Urm1 (ubiquitin-related modifier), involved in diverse biological processes in yeast, is proved to be a "molecular fossil" in ubiquitin superfamily. Here we report the resonance assignment of Urm1 from Trypanosoma brucei.

  6. A Flagellar Pocket Membrane Fraction from Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense: Immunogold Localization and Nonvariant Immunoprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    membrane components. specific glycoproteins from Trypanosoma equiperdum variants. Exp. Parasitol. 64:1-11. FEBS Lett. 82:93-96. 20. Melton, D. W., D. S...Fraction from Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense: Immunogold Localization and Nonvariant Immunoprotection JOHN G. OLENICK,* RUTH WOLFF,’ ROBERT K. NAUMAN...obtained for each of three distinct variable antigenic types (VATs) of a serodeme of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense Wellcome strain. Products of

  7. Characterization of Trypanosoma brucei dihydroorotate dehydrogenase as a possible drug target; structural, kinetic and RNAi studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Tracy L; Buckner, Frederick S; Gillespie, J Robert; Malmquist, Nicholas A; Phillips, Margaret A; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Luft, Joseph R; Detitta, George T; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Hol, Wim G J; Merritt, Ethan A

    2008-04-01

    Nucleotide biosynthesis pathways have been reported to be essential in some protozoan pathogens. Hence, we evaluated the essentiality of one enzyme in the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) from the eukaryotic parasite Trypanosoma brucei through gene knockdown studies. RNAi knockdown of DHODH expression in bloodstream form T. brucei did not inhibit growth in normal medium, but profoundly retarded growth in pyrimidine-depleted media or in the presence of the known pyrimidine uptake antagonist 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). These results have significant implications for the development of therapeutics to combat T. brucei infection. Specifically, a combination therapy including a T. brucei-specific DHODH inhibitor plus 5-FU may prove to be an effective therapeutic strategy. We also show that this trypanosomal enzyme is inhibited by known inhibitors of bacterial Class 1A DHODH, in distinction to the sensitivity of DHODH from human and other higher eukaryotes. This selectivity is supported by the crystal structure of the T. brucei enzyme, which is reported here at a resolution of 1.95 A. Additional research, guided by the crystal structure described herein, is needed to identify potent inhibitors of T. brucei DHODH.

  8. Semantic prioritization of novel causative genomic variants

    OpenAIRE

    Imane Boudellioua; Rozaimi B Mahamad Razali; Maxat Kulmanov; Yasmeen Hashish; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Eva Goncalves-Serra; Nadia Schoenmakers; Gkoutos, Georgios V.; Schofield, Paul N.; Robert Hoehndorf

    2017-01-01

    Discriminating the causative disease variant(s) for individuals with inherited or de novo mutations presents one of the main challenges faced by the clinical genetics community today. Computational approaches for variant prioritization include machine learning methods utilizing a large number of features, including molecular information, interaction networks, or phenotypes. Here, we demonstrate the PhenomeNET Variant Predictor (PVP) system that exploits semantic technologies and automated rea...

  9. Semantic prioritization of novel causative genomic variants

    KAUST Repository

    Boudellioua, Imene

    2017-04-17

    Discriminating the causative disease variant(s) for individuals with inherited or de novo mutations presents one of the main challenges faced by the clinical genetics community today. Computational approaches for variant prioritization include machine learning methods utilizing a large number of features, including molecular information, interaction networks, or phenotypes. Here, we demonstrate the PhenomeNET Variant Predictor (PVP) system that exploits semantic technologies and automated reasoning over genotype-phenotype relations to filter and prioritize variants in whole exome and whole genome sequencing datasets. We demonstrate the performance of PVP in identifying causative variants on a large number of synthetic whole exome and whole genome sequences, covering a wide range of diseases and syndromes. In a retrospective study, we further illustrate the application of PVP for the interpretation of whole exome sequencing data in patients suffering from congenital hypothyroidism. We find that PVP accurately identifies causative variants in whole exome and whole genome sequencing datasets and provides a powerful resource for the discovery of causal variants.

  10. Disentangling causation: complex roles of coral-associated microorganisms in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera, Hanaka; Bourne, David G

    2017-10-13

    Rapidly changing climate regimes combined with other anthropogenic pressures are implicated in increased disease epizootics among reef building corals, resulting in changing habitat structure. These accumulated stressors directly contribute to disease outbreaks by compromising the coral host immune system, modulating virulence of microbial pathogens and/or disrupting the balance within the microbiome of the holobiont. Disentangling coral disease causation has been challenging, and while progress has been made for certain diseases in terms of the roles the associated microorganisms play, it is evident that like in other marine or terrestrial systems, compromised host health cannot always be attributed to a single causative agent. Here, we summarize the current state in knowledge of microbial induced coral diseases, and discuss challenges and strategies to further disentangle disease causation. With the major environmental pressures coral reefs face over the next century, understanding interactions between host, environmental and microbial causative agent(s) that lead to disease, is still a priority to enable development of effective strategies for building resilience into coral populations. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Odds of Hospitalization Among Marine Corps Personnel by Military Occupational Specialty and Causative Agends During OEF and OIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    OEF and OIF N. N. Gronroos J. M. Zouris A. L. Wade Report No. 08-29 . Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited...Specialty and Causative Agents During OEF and OIF Noelle N. Gronroos , MA * † ; James M. Zouris, BS † ; Amber L. Wade, MPH † ABSTRACT...Military Occupational Specialty and Causative Agends During OEF and OIF 6. AUTHORS Noelle Gronroos , James M. Zouris, Amber L. Wade 5a. Contract

  12. Crystal Structures of TbCatB and rhodesain, potential chemotherapeutic targets and major cysteine proteases of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain D Kerr

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is the etiological agent of Human African Trypanosomiasis, an endemic parasitic disease of sub-Saharan Africa. TbCatB and rhodesain are the sole Clan CA papain-like cysteine proteases produced by the parasite during infection of the mammalian host and are implicated in the progression of disease. Of considerable interest is the exploration of these two enzymes as targets for cysteine protease inhibitors that are effective against T. brucei.We have determined, by X-ray crystallography, the first reported structure of TbCatB in complex with the cathepsin B selective inhibitor CA074. In addition we report the structure of rhodesain in complex with the vinyl-sulfone K11002.The mature domain of our TbCat*CA074 structure contains unique features for a cathepsin B-like enzyme including an elongated N-terminus extending 16 residues past the predicted maturation cleavage site. N-terminal Edman sequencing reveals an even longer extension than is observed amongst the ordered portions of the crystal structure. The TbCat*CA074 structure confirms that the occluding loop, which is an essential part of the substrate-binding site, creates a larger prime side pocket in the active site cleft than is found in mammalian cathepsin B-small molecule structures. Our data further highlight enhanced flexibility in the occluding loop main chain and structural deviations from mammalian cathepsin B enzymes that may affect activity and inhibitor design. Comparisons with the rhodesain*K11002 structure highlight key differences that may impact the design of cysteine protease inhibitors as anti-trypanosomal drugs.

  13. Role of centrins 2 and 3 in organelle segregation and cytokinesis in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angamuthu Selvapandiyan

    Full Text Available Centrins are calcium binding proteins involved in cell division in eukaryotes. Previously, we have shown that depletion of centrin1 in Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei displayed arrested organelle segregation resulting in loss of cytokinesis. In this study we analyzed the role of T. brucei centrin2 (TbCen2 and T. brucei 3 (TbCen3 in the early events of T. brucei procyclic cell cycle. Both the immunofluorescence assay and electron microscopy showed that TbCen2 and 3-deficient cells were enlarged in size with duplicated basal bodies, multinuclei and new flagella that are detached along the length of the cell body. In both TbCen2 and TbCen3 depleted cells segregation of the organelles i.e. basal bodies, kinetoplast and nucleus was disrupted. Further analysis of the cells with defective organelle segregation identified three different sub configurations of organelle mis-segregations (Type 1-3. In addition, in majority of the TbCen2 depleted cells and in nearly half of the TbCen3 depleted cells, the kinetoplasts were enlarged and undivided. The abnormal segregations ultimately led to aborted cytokinesis and hence affected growth in these cells. Therefore, both centrin2 and 3 are involved in organelle segregation similar to centrin1 as was previously observed. In addition, we identified their role in kinetoplast division which may be also linked to overall mis-segregation.

  14. Causation and Responsibility: A New Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Mortellaro

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In “Property, Causality, and Liability” and “Causation and Aggression,” Hans-Hermann Hoppe and Stephan Kinsella & Patrick Tinsley, respectively, argue against the Rothbardian position on criminal liability, especially with regard to the issue of incitement. This essay takes a critical look at the suggested approaches of both and attempts to defend the Rothbardian position on incitement from their criticisms. Further, this essay examines the views of Walter Block on incitement and attempts to correct inconsistencies in his position with regard to murder contracts and threats.

  15. High-throughput Gene Tagging in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Philip; Dean, Samuel; Sunter, Jack

    2016-08-12

    Improvements in mass spectrometry, sequencing and bioinformatics have generated large datasets of potentially interesting genes. Tagging these proteins can give insights into their function by determining their localization within the cell and enabling interaction partner identification. We recently published a fast and scalable method to generate Trypanosoma brucei cell lines that express a tagged protein from the endogenous locus. The method was based on a plasmid we generated that, when coupled with long primer PCR, can be used to modify a gene to encode a protein tagged at either terminus. This allows the tagging of dozens of trypanosome proteins in parallel, facilitating the large-scale validation of candidate genes of interest. This system can be used to tag proteins for localization (using a fluorescent protein, epitope tag or electron microscopy tag) or biochemistry (using tags for purification, such as the TAP (tandem affinity purification) tag). Here, we describe a protocol to perform the long primer PCR and the electroporation in 96-well plates, with the recovery and selection of transgenic trypanosomes occurring in 24-well plates. With this workflow, hundreds of proteins can be tagged in parallel; this is an order of magnitude improvement to our previous protocol and genome scale tagging is now possible.

  16. Protective effect of humus extract against Trypanosoma brucei infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Hiroshi; Denso; Okazaki, Fumi; Ishida, Saeko

    2008-11-01

    Humic substances are formed during the decomposition of organic matter in humus, and are found in many natural environments in which organic materials and microorganisms are present. Oral administration of humus extract to mice successfully induced effective protection against experimental challenge by the two subspecies, Trypanosoma brucei brucei and T. brucei gambiense. Mortality was most reduced among mice who received a 3% humus extract for 21 days in drinking water ad libitum. Spleen cells from humus-administered mice exhibited significant non-specific cytotoxic activity against L1210 mouse leukemia target cells. Also, spleen cells produced significantly higher amounts of Interferon-gamma when stimulated in vitro with Concanavalin A than cells from normal controls. These results clearly show that administration to mice of humus extract induced effective resistance against Trypanosoma infection. Enhancement of the innate immune system may be involved in host defense against trypanosomiasis.

  17. A novel antiamoebic agent against Acanthamoeba sp. - A causative agent for eye keratitis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusrini, Eny; Hashim, Fatimah; Azmi, Wan Nor Nadhirah Wan Noor; Amin, Nakisah Mat; Estuningtyas, Ari

    2016-01-01

    The terbium trinitrate.trihydrate.18-crown ether-6, Tb(NO3)3(OH2)3.(18C6) complex has been characterized by elemental analysis, photoluminescence and single X-ray diffraction. The IC50 values were determined based on MTT assay while light and fluorescence microscopy imaging were employed to evaluate the cellular morphological changes. Alkaline comet assay was performed to analyze the DNA damage. The photoluminescence spectrum of the Tb complex excited at 325 nm displayed seven luminescence peaks corresponding to the 5D4 → 7F0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 transitions. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies indicated that the Tb(NO3)3(OH2)3.(18C6) complex and its salt form as well as the 18C6 molecule have excellent anti-amoebic activity with very low IC50 values are 7, 2.6 and 1.2 μg/mL, respectively, with significant decrease (p keratitis infection.

  18. Arterial blood pressure changes in acute T. brucei infection of dogs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to find out the usefulness of serial arterial blood pressure measurements in predicting severity and outcome of acute Trypanosoma brucei infection in dogs. Twenty adult dogs of mixed sexes and aged between 2 and 5 years were used for this study. The dogs were of good cardiac health and were ...

  19. Biosynthesis of SUMOylated Proteins in Bacteria Using the Trypanosoma brucei Enzymatic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, Paula Ana; Berazategui, María Agustina; Cazzulo, Juan José; Alvarez, Vanina Eder

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modification with the Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) is conserved in eukaryotic organisms and plays important regulatory roles in proteins affecting diverse cellular processes. In Trypanosoma brucei, member of one of the earliest branches in eukaryotic evolution, SUMO is essential for normal cell cycle progression and is likely to be involved in the epigenetic control of genes crucial for parasite survival, such as those encoding the variant surface glycoproteins. Molecular pathways modulated by SUMO have started to be discovered by proteomic studies; however, characterization of functional consequences is limited to a reduced number of targets. Here we present a bacterial strain engineered to produce SUMOylated proteins, by transferring SUMO from T. brucei together with the enzymes essential for its activation and conjugation. Due to the lack of background in E. coli, this system is useful to express and identify SUMOylated proteins directly in cell lysates by immunoblotting, and SUMOylated targets can be eventually purified for biochemical or structural studies. We applied this strategy to describe the ability of TbSUMO to form chains in vitro and to detect SUMOylation of a model substrate, PCNA both from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and from T. brucei. To further validate targets, we applied an in vitro deconjugation assay using the T. brucei SUMO-specific protease capable to revert the pattern of modification. This system represents a valuable tool for target validation, mutant generation and functional studies of SUMOylated proteins in trypanosomatids. PMID:26258470

  20. Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III-beta is required for Golgi maintenance and cytokinesis in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Melissa J; Albanesi, Joseph P; Phillips, Margaret A

    2007-07-01

    The parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei contains two type III phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases (alpha and beta). We have cloned the gene encoding the T. brucei type III phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase beta (TbPI4KIII-beta), expressed the protein in COS-7 cells, and confirmed that the protein catalyzes the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol. Depletion of TbPI4KIII-beta in procyclic T. brucei by RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in inhibition of cell growth and a distorted cellular morphology. RNAi cells had a distorted Golgi apparatus, and lysosomal and flagellar pocket proteins were mislocalized. Ultrastructural analysis revealed the internal accumulation of a heterogeneous population of vesicles, abnormal positioning of organelles, and a loss of cell polarity. Scanning electron microcopy revealed a twisted phenotype, and dividing cells often exhibited a detached daughter flagellum and lacked a cleavage furrow. Cell cycle analysis confirmed that cells depleted of TbPI4KIII-beta have a postmitotic cytokinesis block that occurs after a single round of mitosis, suggestive of a specific cell cycle block. In summary, TbPI4KIII-beta is an essential protein in procyclic T. brucei, required for maintenance of Golgi structure, protein trafficking, normal cellular shape, and cytokinesis.

  1. The Flagellar Arginine Kinase in Trypanosoma brucei Is Important for Infection in Tsetse Flies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cher-Pheng Ooi

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes are flagellated parasites that cause sleeping sickness. Parasites are transmitted from one mammalian host to another by the bite of a tsetse fly. Trypanosoma brucei possesses three different genes for arginine kinase (AK including one (AK3 that encodes a protein localised to the flagellum. AK3 is characterised by the presence of a unique amino-terminal insertion that specifies flagellar targeting. We show here a phylogenetic analysis revealing that flagellar AK arose in two independent duplication events in T. brucei and T. congolense, the two species of African trypanosomes that infect the tsetse midgut. In T. brucei, AK3 is detected in all stages of parasite development in the fly (in the midgut and in the salivary glands as well as in bloodstream cells, but with predominance at insect stages. Genetic knockout leads to a slight reduction in motility and impairs parasite infectivity towards tsetse flies in single and competition experiments, both phenotypes being reverted upon expression of an epitope-tagged version of AK3. We speculate that this flagellar arginine kinase is important for T. brucei infection of tsetse, especially in the context of mixed infections and that its flagellar targeting relies on a system equivalent to that discovered for calflagins, a family of trypanosome flagellum calcium binding proteins.

  2. The Flagellar Arginine Kinase in Trypanosoma brucei Is Important for Infection in Tsetse Flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Cher-Pheng; Rotureau, Brice; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Georgikou, Christina; Julkowska, Daria; Blisnick, Thierry; Perrot, Sylvie; Subota, Ines; Bastin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomes are flagellated parasites that cause sleeping sickness. Parasites are transmitted from one mammalian host to another by the bite of a tsetse fly. Trypanosoma brucei possesses three different genes for arginine kinase (AK) including one (AK3) that encodes a protein localised to the flagellum. AK3 is characterised by the presence of a unique amino-terminal insertion that specifies flagellar targeting. We show here a phylogenetic analysis revealing that flagellar AK arose in two independent duplication events in T. brucei and T. congolense, the two species of African trypanosomes that infect the tsetse midgut. In T. brucei, AK3 is detected in all stages of parasite development in the fly (in the midgut and in the salivary glands) as well as in bloodstream cells, but with predominance at insect stages. Genetic knockout leads to a slight reduction in motility and impairs parasite infectivity towards tsetse flies in single and competition experiments, both phenotypes being reverted upon expression of an epitope-tagged version of AK3. We speculate that this flagellar arginine kinase is important for T. brucei infection of tsetse, especially in the context of mixed infections and that its flagellar targeting relies on a system equivalent to that discovered for calflagins, a family of trypanosome flagellum calcium binding proteins.

  3. Particle-bound enzymes in the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opperdoes, F. R.; Borst, P.; Spits, H.

    1977-01-01

    We have screened the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei for the presence of enzymes that could serve as markers for the microbodies and the highly repressed mitochondrion of this organism. None of seven known microbody enzymes were detected at all, but glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase, ATPase,

  4. Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei do not use Krebs cycle activity for energy generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weelden, van S.W.H.; Fast, B.; Vogt, A.; Meer, van der P.; Saas, J.; Hellemond, van J.J.; Tielens, A.G.M.; Boshart, M.

    2003-01-01

    The importance of a functional Krebs cycle for energy generation in the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei was investigated under physiological conditions during logarithmic phase growth of a pleomorphic parasite strain. Wild type procyclic cells and mutants with targeted deletion of the gene

  5. Contribution of glucose transport to the control of the glycolytic flux in Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, B.M.; Walsh, M.C.; ter Kuile, B.; Mensonides, F.I.C.; Michels, P.A.M.; Opperdoes, F.R.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    1999-01-01

    The rate of glucose transport across the plasma membrane of the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei was modulated by titration of the hexose transporter with the inhibitor phloretin, and the effect on the glycolytic flux was measured. A rapid glucose uptake assay was developed to measure the

  6. The promoter for a variant surface glycoprotein gene expression site in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomerdijk, J. C.; Ouellette, M.; ten Asbroek, A. L.; Kieft, R.; Bommer, A. M.; Clayton, C. E.; Borst, P.

    1990-01-01

    The variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene 221 of Trypanosoma brucei is transcribed as part of a 60 kb expression site (ES). We have identified the promoter controlling this multigene transcription unit by the use of 221 chromosome-enriched DNA libraries and VSG gene 221 expression site

  7. Maf1 is a negative regulator of transcription in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Meza, Gabriela; Vélez-Ramírez, Daniel E; Florencio-Martínez, Luis E; Román-Carraro, Fiordaliso C; Manning-Cela, Rebeca; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura; Martínez-Calvillo, Santiago

    2017-02-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) produces small RNA molecules that play essential roles in mRNA processing and translation. Maf1, originally described as a negative regulator of Pol III transcription, has been studied from yeast to human. Here we characterized Maf1 in the parasitic protozoa Trypanosoma brucei (TbMaf1), representing the first report to analyse Maf1 in an early-diverged eukaryote. While Maf1 is generally encoded by a single-copy gene, the T. brucei genome contains two almost identical TbMaf1 genes. The TbMaf1 protein has the three conserved sequences and is predicted to fold into a globular structure. Unlike in yeast, TbMaf1 localizes to the nucleus in procyclic forms of T. brucei under normal growth conditions. Cell lines that either downregulate or overexpress TbMaf1 were generated, and growth curve analysis with them suggested that TbMaf1 participates in the regulation of cell growth of T. brucei. Nuclear run-on and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated that TbMaf1 represses Pol III transcription of tRNA and U2 snRNA genes by associating with their promoters. Interestingly, 5S rRNA levels do not change after TbMaf1 ablation or overexpression. Notably, our data also revealed that TbMaf1 regulates Pol I transcription of procyclin gene and Pol II transcription of SL RNA genes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Isolation and characterization of kinetoplast DNA from the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Fairlamb; P.O. Weislogel; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P. Borst (Piet)

    1978-01-01

    textabstractWe have used restriction endonucleases PstI, EcoRI, HapII, HhaI, and S1 nuclease to demonstrate the presence of a large complex component, the maxi-circle, in addition to the major mini-circle component in kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) networks of Trypanosoma brucei (East African

  9. Deletion of the Trypanosoma brucei Superoxide Dismutase Gene sodb1 Increases Sensitivity to Nifurtimox and Benznidazole▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathalingham, S. Radhika; Wilkinson, Shane R.; Horn, David; Kelly, John M.

    2007-01-01

    It has been more than 25 years since it was first reported that nifurtimox and benznidazole promote superoxide production in trypanosomes. However, there has been no direct evidence of an association between the drug-induced free radicals and trypanocidal activity. Here, we identify a superoxide dismutase required to protect Trypanosoma brucei from drug-generated superoxide. PMID:17145786

  10. Deletion of the Trypanosoma brucei superoxide dismutase gene sodb1 increases sensitivity to nifurtimox and benznidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathalingham, S Radhika; Wilkinson, Shane R; Horn, David; Kelly, John M

    2007-02-01

    It has been more than 25 years since it was first reported that nifurtimox and benznidazole promote superoxide production in trypanosomes. However, there has been no direct evidence of an association between the drug-induced free radicals and trypanocidal activity. Here, we identify a superoxide dismutase required to protect Trypanosoma brucei from drug-generated superoxide.

  11. Trypanosoma brucei Infection in a herd of sedentary cattle in Danja ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trypanosoma brucei Infection in a herd of sedentary cattle in Danja Local Government Area, Katsina State, Northern Nigeria– A possible resurgence of Tsetse flies ... resulted in advocacy for pastoralists to settle down into productive cattle production compared to the nomadic behavior which does not enhance productivity.

  12. Novel molecular mechanism for targeting the parasite Trypanosoma brucei with snake venom toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martos Esteban, Andrea; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Carrington, Mark

    Trypanosoma brucei is a parasitic protozoan species capable to infecting insect vectors whose bite further produces African sleeping sickness inhuman beings. During parasites’extracellular lives in the mammalian host, its outer coat, mainly composedof Variable surface glycoproteins (VSGs)[2], und...

  13. Biosynthesis of SUMOylated Proteins in Bacteria Using the Trypanosoma brucei Enzymatic System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Ana Iribarren

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification with the Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO is conserved in eukaryotic organisms and plays important regulatory roles in proteins affecting diverse cellular processes. In Trypanosoma brucei, member of one of the earliest branches in eukaryotic evolution, SUMO is essential for normal cell cycle progression and is likely to be involved in the epigenetic control of genes crucial for parasite survival, such as those encoding the variant surface glycoproteins. Molecular pathways modulated by SUMO have started to be discovered by proteomic studies; however, characterization of functional consequences is limited to a reduced number of targets. Here we present a bacterial strain engineered to produce SUMOylated proteins, by transferring SUMO from T. brucei together with the enzymes essential for its activation and conjugation. Due to the lack of background in E. coli, this system is useful to express and identify SUMOylated proteins directly in cell lysates by immunoblotting, and SUMOylated targets can be eventually purified for biochemical or structural studies. We applied this strategy to describe the ability of TbSUMO to form chains in vitro and to detect SUMOylation of a model substrate, PCNA both from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and from T. brucei. To further validate targets, we applied an in vitro deconjugation assay using the T. brucei SUMO-specific protease capable to revert the pattern of modification. This system represents a valuable tool for target validation, mutant generation and functional studies of SUMOylated proteins in trypanosomatids.

  14. Entropy and Information Transmission in Causation and Retrocausation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moddel, Garret

    2006-10-01

    Although experimental evidence for retrocausation exists, there are clearly subtleties to the phenomenon. The bilking paradox, in which one intervenes to eliminate a subsequent cause after a preceding effect has occurred, appears on the surface to show that retrocausation is logically impossible. In a previous paper, the second law of thermodynamics was invoked to show that the entropy in each process of a psi interaction (presentience, telepathy, remote perception, and psychokinesis) cannot decrease, prohibiting psi processes in which signals condense from background fluctuations. Here it is shown, perhaps contrary to one's intuition, that reversible processes cannot be influenced through retrocausation, but irreversible processes can. The increase in thermodynamic entropy in irreversible processes — which are generally described by Newtonian mechanics but not Lagrangian dynamics and Hamilton's Principle — is required for causation. Thermodynamically reversible processes cannot be causal and hence also cannot be retrocausal. The role of entropy in psi interactions is extended by using the bilking paradox to consider information transmission in retroactive psychokinesis (PK). PK efficiency, ηPK, is defined. A prediction of the analysis is that ηPK ⩽ H/H0, where H is the information uncertainty or entropy in the retro-PK agent's knowledge of the event that is to be influenced retrocausally. The information entropy can provide the necessary ingredient for non-reversibility, and hence retrocausation. Noise and bandwidth limitations in the communication to the agent of the outcome of the event increase the maximum PK efficiency. Avoidance of the bilking paradox does not bar a subject from using the premonition of an event to prevent it from occurring. The necessity for large information entropy, which is the expected value of the surprisal, is likely to be essential for any successful PK process, not just retro-PK processes. Hence uncertainty in the

  15. A neural network model of causative actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Hand, Jeremy; Knott, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    A common idea in models of action representation is that actions are represented in terms of their perceptual effects (see e.g., Prinz, 1997; Hommel et al., 2001; Sahin et al., 2007; Umiltà et al., 2008; Hommel, 2013). In this paper we extend existing models of effect-based action representations to account for a novel distinction. Some actions bring about effects that are independent events in their own right: for instance, if John smashes a cup, he brings about the event of the cup smashing. Other actions do not bring about such effects. For instance, if John grabs a cup, this action does not cause the cup to "do" anything: a grab action has well-defined perceptual effects, but these are not registered by the perceptual system that detects independent events involving external objects in the world. In our model, effect-based actions are implemented in several distinct neural circuits, which are organized into a hierarchy based on the complexity of their associated perceptual effects. The circuit at the top of this hierarchy is responsible for actions that bring about independently perceivable events. This circuit receives input from the perceptual module that recognizes arbitrary events taking place in the world, and learns movements that reliably cause such events. We assess our model against existing experimental observations about effect-based motor representations, and make some novel experimental predictions. We also consider the possibility that the "causative actions" circuit in our model can be identified with a motor pathway reported in other work, specializing in "functional" actions on manipulable tools (Bub et al., 2008; Binkofski and Buxbaum, 2013).

  16. 66 Causative Constructions: A Descriptive Analysis Philip Manda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NGOZI

    Imoh: Causative Constructions: A Descriptive Analysis. 68 abstracts of the Bible. This, they did by devising ... introduction to the study, section two reviews the causative literature, section three presents the data and analysis .... lexical categories form the basis for this grammatical processes namely, verbs and adjectives.

  17. Top-down causation and emergence: some comments on mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, George F R

    2012-02-06

    Both bottom-up and top-down causation occur in the hierarchy of structure and causation. A key feature is multiple realizability of higher level functions, and consequent existence of equivalence classes of lower level variables that correspond to the same higher level state. Five essentially different classes of top-down influence can be identified, and their existence demonstrated by many real-world examples. They are: algorithmic top-down causation; top-down causation via non-adaptive information control, top-down causation via adaptive selection, top-down causation via adaptive information control and intelligent top-down causation (the effect of the human mind on the physical world). Through the mind, abstract entities such as mathematical structures have causal power. The causal slack enabling top-down action to take place lies in the structuring of the system so as to attain higher level functions; in the way the nature of lower level elements is changed by context, and in micro-indeterminism combined with adaptive selection. Understanding top-down causation can have important effects on society. Two cases will be mentioned: medical/healthcare issues, and education-in particular, teaching reading and writing. In both cases, an ongoing battle between bottom-up and top-down approaches has important consequences for society.

  18. The Kihema causative construction within Baker's theory of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Baker (1988) states that the causative verb is a morpheme that needs to be attached to a host. A base verb must move cyclically and fuses with the causative verb in a higher clause. By the projection principle, this movement should not destroy thematically relevant structures; hence, the moved verb root must leave a trace to ...

  19. Median Light Rail Crossing: Accident Causation And Countermeasures

    OpenAIRE

    Coifman, Benjamin; Bertini, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper focuses on accident causation and countermeasures at arterial median light rail grade crossings. It synthesizes accident causation and prevention literature from several fields, including traffic engineering, human factors and cognitive psychology, as it relates to the complex LRT grade crossing.

  20. Historical Perspectives of the Causation of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy A. Ruegg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Less-known forces are involved in the etiology of lung cancer and have relevant implications for providers in ameliorating care. The purpose of this article is to discuss theories of causation of lung cancer using historical analyses of the evolution of the disease and incorporating related explanations integrating the relationships of science, nursing, medicine, and society. Literature from 160 years was searched and Thagard’s model of causation networks was used to exhibit how nursing and medicine were significant influences in lung cancer causation theory. Disease causation interfaces with sociological norms of behavior to form habits and rates of health behavior. Historically, nursing was detrimentally manipulated by the tobacco industry, engaging in harmful smoking behaviors, thus negatively affecting patient care. Understanding the underlying history behind lung cancer causation may empower nurses to play an active role in a patient’s health.

  1. On the causation of pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, L G; Berger, G S; Edelman, D A; Newton, W; Fullan, N; Bailey, R; Friberg, J

    1984-05-15

    The classic descriptive model of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) omits any direct statement that sexual intercourse leads to the development of the lower genital or cervical infection which ultimately leads to upper genital or tubal infection. Despite this, clinicians treating patients with PID frequently, either implicity or explicitly, link its onset to sexual activity. In the past decade numerous authors have commented on the strong association between the widespread changes in sexual attitudes and behavior (without describing them in detail) and the enormous rise in sexually transmitted diseases and PID. With the advent of the case control study, the epidemiologist viewed sexual activity as only 1 of many risk factors for the development of PID. Yet, the clinician often maintanied that this relationship was too obvious to require case control studies to prove the point. The sum, the classic hypothesis on the pathogenesis of PID has remained virtually unchanged for nearly 8 decades in spite of its limitations, such as the failure to consider the endogenous and exogenous risk factors for the development of PID in a given patient. Possibly the greatest defect of the classic theory is its failure to address the precise mechanisms by which the infectious agents that cause PID travel from the lower to the upper genital tract. Existing literature suggests that 3 mechanisms may be operative. The 1st mechanism is that motile trichomonads are capable of ascending from the vagina to the level of the fallopian tubes and may carry with them a variety of infectious agents. The 2nd suspected mechanism for transport of microorganisms to the fallopian tubes is by attachment to sperm. If this occurs, then clearly spermatozoa may serve as vectors of pelvic infection. Abundant evidence exists to support the concept that sperm intimately associate with a variety of infectious agents, many of which are unrecognized as pathogens in the female. The 3rd suspected mechanism for

  2. Essential Assembly Factor Rpf2 Forms Novel Interactions within the 5S RNP in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamina, Anyango D; Jaremko, Daniel; Christen, Linda; Williams, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex and conserved cellular process that is responsible for making ribosomes. During this process, there are several assembly steps that function as regulators to ensure proper ribosome formation. One of these steps is the assembly of the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP) in the central protuberance of the 60S ribosomal subunit. In eukaryotes, the 5S RNP is composed of 5S rRNA, ribosomal proteins L5 and L11, and assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1. Our laboratory previously showed that in Trypanosoma brucei, the 5S RNP is composed of 5S rRNA, L5, and trypanosome-specific RNA binding proteins P34 and P37. In this study, we characterize an additional component of the 5S RNP, the T. brucei homolog of Rpf2. This is the first study to functionally characterize interactions mediated by Rpf2 in an organism other than fungi. T. brucei Rpf2 (TbRpf2) was identified from tandem affinity purification using extracts prepared from protein A-tobacco etch virus (TEV)-protein C (PTP)-tagged L5, P34, and P37 cell lines, followed by mass spectrometry analysis. We characterized the binding interactions between TbRpf2 and the previously characterized members of the T. brucei 5S RNP. Our studies show that TbRpf2 mediates conserved binding interactions with 5S rRNA and L5 and that TbRpf2 also interacts with trypanosome-specific proteins P34 and P37. We performed RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown of TbRpf2 and showed that this protein is essential for the survival of the parasites and is critical for proper ribosome formation. These studies provide new insights into a critical checkpoint in the ribosome biogenesis pathway in T. brucei. IMPORTANCETrypanosoma brucei is the parasitic protozoan that causes African sleeping sickness. Ribosome assembly is essential for the survival of this parasite through the different host environments it encounters during its life cycle. The assembly of the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP) functions as one of the

  3. Alkaloids Induce Programmed Cell Death in Bloodstream Forms of Trypanosomes (Trypanosoma b. brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wink

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The potential induction of a programmed cell death (PCD in Trypanosoma b. brucei by 55 alkaloids of the quinoline, quinolizidine, isoquinoline, indole, terpene, tropane, steroid, and piperidine type was studied by measuring DNA fragmentation and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. For comparison, the induction of apoptosis by the same alkaloids in human leukemia cells (Jurkat APO-S was tested. Several alkaloids of the isoquinoline, quinoline, indole and steroidal type (berberine, chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, quinine, ajmalicine, ergotamine, harmine, vinblastine, vincristine, colchicine, chaconine, demissidine and veratridine induced programmed cell death, whereas quinolizidine, tropane, terpene and piperidine alkaloids were mostly inactive. Effective PCD induction (EC50 below 10 µM was caused in T. brucei by chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, and chaconine. The active alkaloids can be characterized by their general property to inhibit protein biosynthesis, to intercalate DNA, to disturb membrane fluidity or to inhibit microtubule formation.

  4. Aparasitemic serological suspects in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis : a potential human reservoir of parasites ?

    OpenAIRE

    Koffi, Mathurin; Solano, Philippe; Denizot, M.; Courtin, D.; Garcia, André; Lejon, V.; Buscher, P.; Cuny, Gérard; Jamonneau, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    The serological and parasitological tests used for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) diagnosis have low specificity and sensitivity, respectively, and in the field, control program teams are faced with subjects with positive serology but negative parasitology who remain untreated. The aim of this work was to explore, using PCR tool, the significance of these aparasitemic serological suspects. Since discordant PCR results have been observed earlier with different...

  5. An Atypical Mitochondrial Carrier That Mediates Drug Action in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P de Macêdo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating the mechanism of action of trypanocidal compounds is an important step in the development of more efficient drugs against Trypanosoma brucei. In a screening approach using an RNAi library in T. brucei bloodstream forms, we identified a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, TbMCP14, as a prime candidate mediating the action of a group of anti-parasitic choline analogs. Depletion of TbMCP14 by inducible RNAi in both bloodstream and procyclic forms increased resistance of parasites towards the compounds by 7-fold and 3-fold, respectively, compared to uninduced cells. In addition, down-regulation of TbMCP14 protected bloodstream form mitochondria from a drug-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Conversely, over-expression of the carrier in procyclic forms increased parasite susceptibility more than 13-fold. Metabolomic analyses of parasites over-expressing TbMCP14 showed increased levels of the proline metabolite, pyrroline-5-carboxylate, suggesting a possible involvement of TbMCP14 in energy production. The generation of TbMCP14 knock-out parasites showed that the carrier is not essential for survival of T. brucei bloodstream forms, but reduced parasite proliferation under standard culture conditions. In contrast, depletion of TbMCP14 in procyclic forms resulted in growth arrest, followed by parasite death. The time point at which parasite proliferation stopped was dependent on the major energy source, i.e. glucose versus proline, in the culture medium. Together with our findings that proline-dependent ATP production in crude mitochondria from TbMCP14-depleted trypanosomes was reduced compared to control mitochondria, the study demonstrates that TbMCP14 is involved in energy production in T. brucei. Since TbMCP14 belongs to a trypanosomatid-specific clade of mitochondrial carrier family proteins showing very poor similarity to mitochondrial carriers of mammals, it may represent an interesting target for drug

  6. Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei do not use Krebs cycle activity for energy generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weelden, Susanne W H; Fast, Beate; Vogt, Achim; van der Meer, Pieter; Saas, Joachim; van Hellemond, Jaap J; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Boshart, Michael

    2003-04-11

    The importance of a functional Krebs cycle for energy generation in the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei was investigated under physiological conditions during logarithmic phase growth of a pleomorphic parasite strain. Wild type procyclic cells and mutants with targeted deletion of the gene coding for aconitase were derived by synchronous in vitro differentiation from wild type and mutant (Delta aco::NEO/Delta aco::HYG) bloodstream stage parasites, respectively, where aconitase is not expressed and is dispensable. No differences in intracellular levels of glycolytic and Krebs cycle intermediates were found in procyclic wild type and mutant cells, except for citrate that accumulated up to 90-fold in the mutants, confirming the absence of aconitase activity. Surprisingly, deletion of aconitase did not change differentiation nor the growth rate or the intracellular ATP/ADP ratio in those cells. Metabolic studies using radioactively labeled substrates and NMR analysis demonstrated that glucose and proline were not degraded via the Krebs cycle to CO(2). Instead, glucose was degraded to acetate, succinate, and alanine, whereas proline was degraded to succinate. Importantly, there was absolutely no difference in the metabolic products released by wild type and aconitase knockout parasites, and both were for survival strictly dependent on respiration via the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Hence, although the Krebs cycle enzymes are present, procyclic T. brucei do not use Krebs cycle activity for energy generation, but the mitochondrial respiratory chain is essential for survival and growth. We therefore propose a revised model of the energy metabolism of procyclic T. brucei.

  7. Mapping of branch sites in trans-spliced pre-mRNAs of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, E; Perry, K L; Agabian, N

    1989-01-01

    The process of trans splicing is essential to the maturation of all mRNAs in the Trypanosomatidae, a family of protozoan parasites, and to specific mRNAs in several species of nematode. In Trypanosoma brucei, a 39-nucleotide (nt) leader sequence originating from a small, 139-nt donor RNA (the spliced leader [SL] RNA) is spliced to the 5' end of mRNAs. An intermediate in this trans-splicing process is a Y structure which contains the 3' 100 nt of the SL RNA covalently linked to the pre-mRNA via a 2'-5' phosphodiester bond at the branch point residue. We mapped the branch points in T. brucei alpha- and beta-tubulin pre-mRNAs. The primary branch acceptors for the alpha- and beta-tubulins are 44 and 56 nt upstream of the 3' splice sites, respectively, and are A residues. Minor branch acceptors were detected 42 and 49 nt upstream of the alpha-tubulin splice site and 58 nt upstream of the splice site in beta-tubulin. The regions surrounding these branch points lack homology to the consensus sequences determined for mammalian cells and yeasts; there is also no conservation among the sequences themselves. Thus, the identified sequences suggest that the mechanism of branch point recognition in T. brucei differs from the mechanism of recognition by U2 RNA that has been proposed for other eucaryotes. Images PMID:2479824

  8. The inositol pyrophosphate synthesis pathway in Trypanosoma brucei is linked to polyphosphate synthesis in acidocalcisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Ciro D; Saiardi, Adolfo; Docampo, Roberto

    2017-10-01

    Inositol pyrophosphates are novel signaling molecules possessing high-energy pyrophosphate bonds and involved in a number of biological functions. Here, we report the correct identification and characterization of the kinases involved in the inositol pyrophosphate biosynthetic pathway in Trypanosoma brucei: inositol polyphosphate multikinase (TbIPMK), inositol pentakisphosphate 2-kinase (TbIP5K) and inositol hexakisphosphate kinase (TbIP6K). TbIP5K and TbIP6K were not identifiable by sequence alone and their activities were validated by enzymatic assays with the recombinant proteins or by their complementation of yeast mutants. We also analyzed T. brucei extracts for the presence of inositol phosphates using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and high-performance liquid chromatography. Interestingly, we could detect inositol phosphate (IP), inositol 4,5-bisphosphate (IP2 ), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 ), and inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6 ) in T. brucei different stages. Bloodstream forms unable to produce inositol pyrophosphates, due to downregulation of TbIPMK expression by conditional knockout, have reduced levels of polyphosphate and altered acidocalcisomes. Our study links the inositol pyrophosphate pathway to the synthesis of polyphosphate in acidocalcisomes, and may lead to better understanding of these organisms and provide new targets for drug discovery. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Molecular variation of Trypanosoma brucei subspecies as revealed by AFLP fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbo, E E C; Majiwa, P A O; Claassen, H J H M; te Pas, M F W

    2002-04-01

    Genetic analysis of Trypanosoma spp. depends on the detection of variation between strains. We have used the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technique to develop a convenient and reliable method for genetic characterization of Trypanosome (sub)species. AFLP accesses multiple independent sites within the genome and would allow a better definition of the relatedness of different Trypanosome (sub)species. Nine isolates (3 from each T. brucei subspecies) were tested with 40 AFLP primer combinations to identify the most appropriate pairs of restriction endonucleases and selective primers. Primers based on the recognition sequences of EcoRI and BglII were chosen and used to analyse 31 T. brucei isolates. Similarity levels calculated with the Pearson correlation coefficient ranged from 15 to 98%, and clusters were determined using the unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic averages (UPGMA). At the intraspecific level, AFLP fingerprints were grouped by numerical analysis in 2 main clusters, allowing a clear separation of T. b. gambiense (cluster I) from T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense isolates (cluster II). Interspecies evaluation of this customized approach produced heterogeneous AFLP patterns, with unique genetic markers, except for T. evansi and T. equiperdum, which showed identical patterns and clustered together.

  10. NLP is a novel transcription regulator involved in VSG expression site control in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Mani Shankar; Kushwaha, Manish; Ersfeld, Klaus; Fullbrook, Alexander; Stanne, Tara M; Rudenko, Gloria

    2011-03-01

    Trypanosoma brucei mono-allelically expresses one of approximately 1500 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes while multiplying in the mammalian bloodstream. The active VSG is transcribed by RNA polymerase I in one of approximately 15 telomeric VSG expression sites (ESs). T. brucei is unusual in controlling gene expression predominantly post-transcriptionally, and how ESs are mono-allelically controlled remains a mystery. Here we identify a novel transcription regulator, which resembles a nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP) with an AT-hook motif. NLP is key for ES control in bloodstream form T. brucei, as NLP knockdown results in 45- to 65-fold derepression of the silent VSG221 ES. NLP is also involved in repression of transcription in the inactive VSG Basic Copy arrays, minichromosomes and procyclin loci. NLP is shown to be enriched on the 177- and 50-bp simple sequence repeats, the non-transcribed regions around rDNA and procyclin, and both active and silent ESs. Blocking NLP synthesis leads to downregulation of the active ES, indicating that NLP plays a role in regulating appropriate levels of transcription of ESs in both their active and silent state. Discovery of the unusual transcription regulator NLP provides new insight into the factors that are critical for ES control.

  11. NIMA-related kinase TbNRKC is involved in basal body separation in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradel, Lydie C; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Landrein, Nicolas; Robinson, Derrick R

    2006-05-01

    The NIMA-related kinase 2 (NEK 2) has important cell cycle functions related to centriole integrity and splitting. Trypanosoma brucei does not possess centrioles, however, cytokinesis is coupled to basal body separation events. Here we report the first functional characterisation of a T. brucei basal body-cytoskeletal NIMA-related kinase (NRK) protein, TbNRKC. The TbNRKC kinase domain has high amino acid identity with the human NEK1 kinase domain (50%) but also shares 42% identity with human NEK2. TbNRKC is expressed in bloodstream and procyclic cells and functions as a bona fide kinase in vitro. Remarkably, RNAi knockdown of TbNRKC and overexpression of kinase-dead TbNRKC in procyclic forms induces the accumulation of cells with four basal bodies, whereas overexpression of active protein produces supernumary basal bodies and blocks cytokinesis. TbNRKC is located on mature and immature basal bodies and is the first T. brucei NRK to be found associated with the basal body cytokinesis pathway.

  12. in vivo antitrypanosomal evaluation of some medicinal plant extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Morinda morindiodes root bark extract. Keywords: Antitrypanosomal, evaluation, medicinal plants, in vivo, Ogun. State, Nigeria. INTRODUCTION. Trypanosoma brucei brucei are unicellular parasites transmitted by the tse-tse fly. They are the causative agent of African Animal. Trypanosomosis (AAT) (Antia et al., 2009).

  13. A Pre-clinical Animal Model of Trypanosoma brucei Infection Demonstrating Cardiac Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte S McCarroll

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomiasis (AT, caused by Trypanosoma brucei species, results in both neurological and cardiac dysfunction and can be fatal if untreated. Research on the pathogenesis and treatment of the disease has centred to date on the characteristic neurological symptoms, whereas cardiac dysfunction (e.g. ventricular arrhythmias in AT remains largely unstudied. Animal models of AT demonstrating cardiac dysfunction similar to that described in field cases of AT are critically required to transform our understanding of AT-induced cardiac pathophysiology and identify future treatment strategies. We have previously shown that T. brucei can interact with heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes to induce ventricular arrhythmias in ex vivo adult rat hearts. However, it is unknown whether the arrhythmias observed ex vivo are also present during in vivo infection in experimental animal models. Here we show for the first time the characterisation of ventricular arrhythmias in vivo in two animal models of AT infection using electrocardiographic (ECG monitoring. The first model utilised a commonly used monomorphic laboratory strain, Trypanosoma brucei brucei Lister 427, whilst the second model used a pleomorphic laboratory strain, T. b. brucei TREU 927, which demonstrates a similar chronic infection profile to clinical cases. The frequency of ventricular arrhythmias and heart rate (HR was significantly increased at the endpoint of infection in the TREU 927 infection model, but not in the Lister 427 infection model. At the end of infection, hearts from both models were isolated and Langendorff perfused ex vivo with increasing concentrations of the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (ISO. Interestingly, the increased frequency of arrhythmias observed in vivo in the TREU 927 infection model was lost upon isolation of the heart ex vivo, but re-emerged with the addition of ISO. Our results demonstrate that TREU 927 infection modifies the substrate of the myocardium

  14. Nocardia harenae, an uncommon causative organism of mycetoma: report on two patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresch-Tronik, Nicole S; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Arenas, Roberto; Atoche, Carlos; Ochoa-Carrera, Luis A; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Manjarrez-Hernández, Angel H; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto

    2012-08-01

    Mycetoma is the most frequently diagnosed deep mycosis in Mexico and is caused, in 86% of cases, by Nocardia brasiliensis. Worldwide, Nocardia harenae has not been previously reported as a causative agent of human mycetoma. Herein we report, to our knowledge, the first two human cases of mycetoma due to N. harenae in a clinical setting. The strains were identified by phenotypic and molecular techniques. Both cases were characterized by long-lasting mycetoma that had previously been failed to be cured and had shown resistance to therapy. However, in our hospital, a multidrug therapy proved to be effective in these cases.

  15. Immunization with recombinant actin from Trypanosoma evansi induces protective immunity against T. evansi, T. equiperdum and T. b. brucei infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, San-Qiang; Yang, Wu-Biao; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Ma, Ling-Jun; Xi, Shou-Min; Chen, Qun-Li; Song, Xiao-Wei; Kang, Jian; Yang, Lan-Ze

    2009-01-01

    Actin gene of Trypanosoma evansi (STIB 806) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The predicted amino acid sequence of T. evansi actin shows 100%, 98.7%, and 93.1%, homology with Trypanosoma equiperdum, Trypanosoma brucei brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi. Recombinant actin was expressed as inclusion bodies in E. coli. It was purified and renatured for immunological studies. Mice immunized with the renatured recombinant actin were protected from lethal challenge with T. evansi STIB 806, T. equiperdum STIB 818, and T. b. brucei STIB 940, showing 63.3%, 56.7%, and 53.3% protection, respectively. Serum collected from the rabbit immunized with recombinant actin inhibited the growth of T. evansi, T. equiperdum, and T. b. brucei in vitro cultivation. Serum from mice and rabbits immunized with recombinant actin only recognized T. evansi actin but not mouse actin. The results of this study suggest that the recombinant T. evansi actin induces protective immunity against T. evansi, T. equiperdum, and T. b. brucei infection and may be useful in the development of a vaccine with other cytoskeletal proteins to prevent animal trypanosomiasis caused by these three trypanosome species.

  16. Chemopreventive effect of methanolic extract of Azadirachta indica on experimental Trypanosoma brucei induced oxidative stress in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omobowale, Temidayo O; Oyagbemi, Ademola A; Oyewunmi, Oyefunbi A; Adejumobi, Olumuyiwa A

    2015-01-01

    The medicinal properties of Azadirachta indica have been harnessed for many years in the treatment of many diseases in both humans and animals. Twenty-five apparently healthy dogs weighing between 3 and 8 kg were randomly divided into five groups with five dogs in each group. Ameliorative effect of A. indica on erythrocyte antioxidant status and markers of oxidative stress were assessed. Liver and kidney function tests were also performed. Pre-treatment with methanolic extract of Azadirachta indica (MEAI) at different doses did not significantly alter the values of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activity in Trypanosoma brucei infection. Although, serum creatinine significantly (P indica, after 2 weeks of T. brucei infection. However, the reduced glutathione (GSH) content of the erythrocyte increased significantly in animals pre-treated with 50 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg of A. indica respectively. Markers of oxidative stress such as malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide generated were higher in animals infected with T. brucei with no significant (P >0.05) difference compared to the values obtained in pre-treated animals. Pre-treatment with 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg of A. indica significantly (P < 0.05) decreased serum myeloperoxidase activity at 2 weeks post-infection with T. brucei. From this study, MEAI showed significant ability to attenuate oxidative stress and inflammation during experimental T. brucei infection.

  17. The nucleotide sequence of the variable region in Trypanosoma brucei completes the sequence analysis of the maxicircle component of mitochondrial kinetoplast DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, P.; de Haan, A.; Eier, W.; van Iersel, M.; Boel, E.; van Steeg, H.; Benne, R.

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of two non-contiguous DNA fragments of 4.0 and 2.2 kb, respectively, of the kinetoplast maxicircle of Trypanosoma brucei brucei EATRO strain 427 has been determined, completing the sequence analysis of the so-called variable region (see also de Vries et al., 1988, Mol.

  18. PCR approach for the detection of Trypanosoma brucei and T. equiperdum and their differentiation from T. evansi based on maxicircle kinetoplast DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng-Jun; Gasser, Robin B; Lai, De-Hua; Claes, Filip; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Lun, Zhao-Rong

    2007-02-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a PCR approach based on the sequence of maxicircle kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) of Trypanosoma brucei to distinguish T. brucei/T. equiperdum from T. evansi and to evaluate its diagnostic use for their detection in blood samples. Primers derived from the sequence of the maxicircle kDNA of T. brucei, encoding the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 (nad5) gene, were used to test the PCR-amplification from T. brucei (including T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense), T. equiperdum, T. evansi, T. vivax and T. congolense. A primer pair to a nuclear DNA region incorporated into a separate PCR was employed to control for the presence of amplifiable genomic DNA (representing the subgenus Trypanozoon) in each sample subjected to the PCR. Products of approximately 395bp were amplified from all T. brucei and T. equiperdum samples tested using the nad5-PCR, but not from T. evansi DNA samples or any of the control samples representing T. vivax, T. congolense, or host. The current PCR approach allows the rapid differentiation of T. brucei/T.equiperdum from T. evansi and can detect the equivalent of 20-25 cells of T. brucei or T. equiperdum in purified genomic DNA or infected blood samples.

  19. A theory of biological relativity: no privileged level of causation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Denis

    2012-02-06

    Must higher level biological processes always be derivable from lower level data and mechanisms, as assumed by the idea that an organism is completely defined by its genome? Or are higher level properties necessarily also causes of lower level behaviour, involving actions and interactions both ways? This article uses modelling of the heart, and its experimental basis, to show that downward causation is necessary and that this form of causation can be represented as the influences of initial and boundary conditions on the solutions of the differential equations used to represent the lower level processes. These insights are then generalized. A priori, there is no privileged level of causation. The relations between this form of 'biological relativity' and forms of relativity in physics are discussed. Biological relativity can be seen as an extension of the relativity principle by avoiding the assumption that there is a privileged scale at which biological functions are determined.

  20. The phosphoarginine energy-buffering system of trypanosoma brucei involves multiple arginine kinase isoforms with different subcellular locations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Voncken

    Full Text Available Phosphagen energy-buffering systems play an essential role in regulating the cellular energy homeostasis in periods of high-energy demand or energy supply fluctuations. Here we describe the phosphoarginine/arginine kinase system of the kinetoplastid parasite Trypanosoma brucei, consisting of three highly similar arginine kinase isoforms (TbAK1-3. Immunofluorescence microscopy using myc-tagged protein versions revealed that each isoform is located in a specific subcellular compartment: TbAK1 is exclusively found in the flagellum, TbAK2 in the glycosome, and TbAK3 in the cytosol of T. brucei. The flagellar location of TbAK1 is dependent on a 22 amino acid long N-terminal sequence, which is sufficient for targeting a GFP-fusion protein to the trypanosome flagellum. The glycosomal location of TbAK2 is in agreement with the presence of a conserved peroxisomal targeting signal, the C-terminal tripeptide 'SNL'. TbAK3 lacks any apparent targeting sequences and is accordingly located in the cytosol of the parasite. Northern blot analysis indicated that each TbAK isoform is differentially expressed in bloodstream and procyclic forms of T. brucei, while the total cellular arginine kinase activity was 3-fold higher in bloodstream form trypanosomes. These results suggest a substantial change in the temporal and spatial energy requirements during parasite differentiation. Increased arginine kinase activity improved growth of procyclic form T. brucei during oxidative challenges with hydrogen peroxide. Elimination of the total cellular arginine kinase activity by RNA interference significantly decreased growth (>90% of procyclic form T. brucei under standard culture conditions and was lethal for this life cycle stage in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The putative physiological roles of the different TbAK isoforms in T. brucei are further discussed.

  1. The Phosphoarginine Energy-Buffering System of Trypanosoma brucei Involves Multiple Arginine Kinase Isoforms with Different Subcellular Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadforth, Cath; Harley, Maggie; Colasante, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Phosphagen energy-buffering systems play an essential role in regulating the cellular energy homeostasis in periods of high-energy demand or energy supply fluctuations. Here we describe the phosphoarginine/arginine kinase system of the kinetoplastid parasite Trypanosoma brucei, consisting of three highly similar arginine kinase isoforms (TbAK1-3). Immunofluorescence microscopy using myc-tagged protein versions revealed that each isoform is located in a specific subcellular compartment: TbAK1 is exclusively found in the flagellum, TbAK2 in the glycosome, and TbAK3 in the cytosol of T. brucei. The flagellar location of TbAK1 is dependent on a 22 amino acid long N-terminal sequence, which is sufficient for targeting a GFP-fusion protein to the trypanosome flagellum. The glycosomal location of TbAK2 is in agreement with the presence of a conserved peroxisomal targeting signal, the C-terminal tripeptide ‘SNL’. TbAK3 lacks any apparent targeting sequences and is accordingly located in the cytosol of the parasite. Northern blot analysis indicated that each TbAK isoform is differentially expressed in bloodstream and procyclic forms of T. brucei, while the total cellular arginine kinase activity was 3-fold higher in bloodstream form trypanosomes. These results suggest a substantial change in the temporal and spatial energy requirements during parasite differentiation. Increased arginine kinase activity improved growth of procyclic form T. brucei during oxidative challenges with hydrogen peroxide. Elimination of the total cellular arginine kinase activity by RNA interference significantly decreased growth (>90%) of procyclic form T. brucei under standard culture conditions and was lethal for this life cycle stage in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The putative physiological roles of the different TbAK isoforms in T. brucei are further discussed. PMID:23776565

  2. Genome and phylogenetic analyses of Trypanosoma evansi reveal extensive similarity to T. brucei and multiple independent origins for dyskinetoplasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Carnes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two key biological features distinguish Trypanosoma evansi from the T. brucei group: independence from the tsetse fly as obligatory vector, and independence from the need for functional mitochondrial DNA (kinetoplast or kDNA. In an effort to better understand the molecular causes and consequences of these differences, we sequenced the genome of an akinetoplastic T. evansi strain from China and compared it to the T. b. brucei reference strain. The annotated T. evansi genome shows extensive similarity to the reference, with 94.9% of the predicted T. b. brucei coding sequences (CDS having an ortholog in T. evansi, and 94.6% of the non-repetitive orthologs having a nucleotide identity of 95% or greater. Interestingly, several procyclin-associated genes (PAGs were disrupted or not found in this T. evansi strain, suggesting a selective loss of function in the absence of the insect life-cycle stage. Surprisingly, orthologous sequences were found in T. evansi for all 978 nuclear CDS predicted to represent the mitochondrial proteome in T. brucei, although a small number of these may have lost functionality. Consistent with previous results, the F1FO-ATP synthase γ subunit was found to have an A281 deletion, which is involved in generation of a mitochondrial membrane potential in the absence of kDNA. Candidates for CDS that are absent from the reference genome were identified in supplementary de novo assemblies of T. evansi reads. Phylogenetic analyses show that the sequenced strain belongs to a dominant group of clonal T. evansi strains with worldwide distribution that also includes isolates classified as T. equiperdum. At least three other types of T. evansi or T. equiperdum have emerged independently. Overall, the elucidation of the T. evansi genome sequence reveals extensive similarity of T. brucei and supports the contention that T. evansi should be classified as a subspecies of T. brucei.

  3. Genome and phylogenetic analyses of Trypanosoma evansi reveal extensive similarity to T. brucei and multiple independent origins for dyskinetoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Jason; Anupama, Atashi; Balmer, Oliver; Jackson, Andrew; Lewis, Michael; Brown, Rob; Cestari, Igor; Desquesnes, Marc; Gendrin, Claire; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Imamura, Hideo; Ivens, Alasdair; Kořený, Luděk; Lai, De-Hua; MacLeod, Annette; McDermott, Suzanne M; Merritt, Chris; Monnerat, Severine; Moon, Wonjong; Myler, Peter; Phan, Isabelle; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Sivam, Dhileep; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Lukeš, Julius; Stuart, Ken; Schnaufer, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Two key biological features distinguish Trypanosoma evansi from the T. brucei group: independence from the tsetse fly as obligatory vector, and independence from the need for functional mitochondrial DNA (kinetoplast or kDNA). In an effort to better understand the molecular causes and consequences of these differences, we sequenced the genome of an akinetoplastic T. evansi strain from China and compared it to the T. b. brucei reference strain. The annotated T. evansi genome shows extensive similarity to the reference, with 94.9% of the predicted T. b. brucei coding sequences (CDS) having an ortholog in T. evansi, and 94.6% of the non-repetitive orthologs having a nucleotide identity of 95% or greater. Interestingly, several procyclin-associated genes (PAGs) were disrupted or not found in this T. evansi strain, suggesting a selective loss of function in the absence of the insect life-cycle stage. Surprisingly, orthologous sequences were found in T. evansi for all 978 nuclear CDS predicted to represent the mitochondrial proteome in T. brucei, although a small number of these may have lost functionality. Consistent with previous results, the F1FO-ATP synthase γ subunit was found to have an A281 deletion, which is involved in generation of a mitochondrial membrane potential in the absence of kDNA. Candidates for CDS that are absent from the reference genome were identified in supplementary de novo assemblies of T. evansi reads. Phylogenetic analyses show that the sequenced strain belongs to a dominant group of clonal T. evansi strains with worldwide distribution that also includes isolates classified as T. equiperdum. At least three other types of T. evansi or T. equiperdum have emerged independently. Overall, the elucidation of the T. evansi genome sequence reveals extensive similarity of T. brucei and supports the contention that T. evansi should be classified as a subspecies of T. brucei.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of chromatin structures in Trypanosoma brucei using high-resolution MNase-ChIP-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedel, Carolin; Siegel, T Nicolai

    2017-09-01

    Specific DNA-protein interactions are the basis for many important cellular mechanisms like the regulation of gene expression or replication. Knowledge about the precise genomic locations of DNA-protein interactions is important because it provides insight into the regulation of these processes. Recently, we have adapted an approach that combines micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion of chromatin with chromatin immunoprecipitation in Trypanosoma brucei. Here, we describe in detail how this method can be used to map the genome-wide distribution of nucleosomes or other DNA-binding proteins at high resolution in T. brucei. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pyrimidine Salvage Enzymes Are Essential for De Novo Biosynthesis of Deoxypyrimidine Nucleotides in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Leija

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogenic parasite Trypanosoma brucei possess both de novo and salvage routes for the biosynthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. Consequently, they do not require salvageable pyrimidines for growth. Thymidine kinase (TK catalyzes the formation of dTMP and dUMP and is one of several salvage enzymes that appear redundant to the de novo pathway. Surprisingly, we show through analysis of TK conditional null and RNAi cells that TK is essential for growth and for infectivity in a mouse model, and that a catalytically active enzyme is required for its function. Unlike humans, T. brucei and all other kinetoplastids lack dCMP deaminase (DCTD, which provides an alternative route to dUMP formation. Ectopic expression of human DCTD resulted in full rescue of the RNAi growth phenotype and allowed for selection of viable TK null cells. Metabolite profiling by LC-MS/MS revealed a buildup of deoxypyrimidine nucleosides in TK depleted cells. Knockout of cytidine deaminase (CDA, which converts deoxycytidine to deoxyuridine led to thymidine/deoxyuridine auxotrophy. These unexpected results suggested that T. brucei encodes an unidentified 5'-nucleotidase that converts deoxypyrimidine nucleotides to their corresponding nucleosides, leading to their dead-end buildup in TK depleted cells at the expense of dTTP pools. Bioinformatics analysis identified several potential candidate genes that could encode 5'-nucleotidase activity including an HD-domain protein that we show catalyzes dephosphorylation of deoxyribonucleotide 5'-monophosphates. We conclude that TK is essential for synthesis of thymine nucleotides regardless of whether the nucleoside precursors originate from the de novo pathway or through salvage. Reliance on TK in the absence of DCTD may be a shared vulnerability among trypanosomatids and may provide a unique opportunity to selectively target a diverse group of pathogenic single-celled eukaryotes with a single drug.

  6. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase A renders Trypanosoma brucei auxotrophic to asparagine.

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    Inês Loureiro

    Full Text Available Asparagine synthetase (AS catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of aspartate into asparagine using ammonia or glutamine as nitrogen source. There are two distinct types of AS, asparagine synthetase A (AS-A, known as strictly ammonia-dependent, and asparagine synthetase B (AS-B, which can use either ammonia or glutamine. The absence of AS-A in humans, and its presence in trypanosomes, suggested AS-A as a potential drug target that deserved further investigation. We report the presence of functional AS-A in Trypanosoma cruzi (TcAS-A and Trypanosoma brucei (TbAS-A: the purified enzymes convert L-aspartate into L-asparagine in the presence of ATP, ammonia and Mg(2+. TcAS-A and TbAS-A use preferentially ammonia as a nitrogen donor, but surprisingly, can also use glutamine, a characteristic so far never described for any AS-A. TbAS-A knockdown by RNAi didn't affect in vitro growth of bloodstream forms of the parasite. However, growth was significantly impaired when TbAS-A knockdown parasites were cultured in medium with reduced levels of asparagine. As expected, mice infections with induced and non-induced T. brucei RNAi clones were similar to those from wild-type parasites. However, when induced T. brucei RNAi clones were injected in mice undergoing asparaginase treatment, which depletes blood asparagine, the mice exhibited lower parasitemia and a prolonged survival in comparison to similarly-treated mice infected with control parasites. Our results show that TbAS-A can be important under in vivo conditions when asparagine is limiting, but is unlikely to be suitable as a drug target.

  7. Chemical characterisation of Nigerian red propolis and its biological activity against Trypanosoma Brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ruwida M K; Igoli, John; Gray, Alexander I; Ebiloma, Godwin Unekwuojo; Clements, Carol; Fearnley, James; Ebel, Ru Angeli Edrada; Zhang, Tong; De Koning, Harry P; Watson, David G

    2016-01-01

    A previous study showed the unique character of Nigerian red propolis from Rivers State, Nigeria (RSN), with regards to chemical composition and activity against Trypanosoma brucei in comparison with other African propolis. To carry out fractionation and biological testing of Nigerian propolis in order to isolate compounds with anti-trypanosomal activity. To compare the composition of the RSN propolis with the composition of Brazilian red propolis. Profiling was carried out using HPLC-UV-ELSD and HPLC-Orbitrap-FTMS on extracts of two samples collected from RSN with data extraction using MZmine software. Isolation was carried out by normal phase and reversed phase MPLC. Elucidation of the compounds with a purity > 95% was performed by 1D/2D NMR HRMS and HRLC-MS(n) . Ten phenolic compounds were isolated or in the case of liquiritigenin partially purified. Data for nine of these correlated with literature reports of known compounds i.e. one isoflavanone, calycosin (1); two flavanones, liquiritigenin (2) and pinocembrin (5); an isoflavan, vestitol (3); a pterocarpan, medicarpin (4); two prenylflavanones, 8-prenylnaringenin (7) and 6-prenylnaringenin (8); and two geranyl flavonoids, propolin D (9) and macarangin (10). The tenth was elucidated as a previously undescribed dihydrobenzofuran (6). The isolated compounds were tested against Trypanosoma brucei and displayed moderate to high activity. Some of the compounds tested had similar activity against wild type T. brucei and two strains displaying pentamidine resistance. Nigerian propolis from RSN has some similarities with Brazilian red propolis. The propolis displayed anti-trypanosomal activity at a potentially useful level. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Trypanosoma brucei Co-opts NK Cells to Kill Splenic B2 B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Frenkel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available After infection with T. brucei AnTat 1.1, C57BL/6 mice lost splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed poor parasite-specific antibody responses, lost weight, became anemic and died with fulminating parasitemia within 35 days. In contrast, infected C57BL/6 mice lacking the cytotoxic granule pore-forming protein perforin (Prf1-/- retained splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed high-titer antibody responses against many trypanosome polypeptides, rapidly suppressed parasitemia and did not develop anemia or lose weight for at least 60 days. Several lines of evidence show that T. brucei infection-induced splenic B cell depletion results from natural killer (NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity: i B2 B cells were depleted from the spleens of infected intact, T cell deficient (TCR-/- and FcγRIIIa deficient (CD16-/- C57BL/6 mice excluding a requirement for T cells, NKT cell, or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity; ii administration of NK1.1 specific IgG2a (mAb PK136 but not irrelevant IgG2a (myeloma M9144 prevented infection-induced B cell depletion consistent with a requirement for NK cells; iii splenic NK cells but not T cells or NKT cells degranulated in infected C57BL/6 mice co-incident with B cell depletion evidenced by increased surface expression of CD107a; iv purified NK cells from naïve C57BL/6 mice killed purified splenic B cells from T. brucei infected but not uninfected mice in vitro indicating acquisition of an NK cell activating phenotype by the post-infection B cells; v adoptively transferred C57BL/6 NK cells prevented infection-induced B cell population growth in infected Prf1-/- mice consistent with in vivo B cell killing; vi degranulated NK cells in infected mice had altered gene and differentiation antigen expression and lost cytotoxic activity consistent with functional exhaustion, but increased in number as infection progressed indicating continued generation. We conclude that NK cells in T. brucei

  9. Variation of G-rich mitochondrial transcripts among stocks of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmer, D P; Feagin, J E; Payne, M; Stuart, K

    1987-01-15

    We have compared maxicircle transcripts from eight stocks of subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei. Transcripts from the rRNA and protein genes have a constant size among stocks and exhibit only minor variation in abundance. In contrast, four of the G+C rich sequences encode multiple transcripts that very markedly in size or abundance. Maxicircle nucleotide sequence comparison of three stocks shows very limited sequence divergence suggesting that sequence divergence may not explain the transcript variability. These results suggest that the G-rich transcripts do not encode proteins and that their variability among stocks may result from posttranscriptional processing events.

  10. The causative construction in Lingála | Meeuwis | Annales Aequatoria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mots-clés: lingála, dérivation verbale, causatif, applicatif. This study of the causative verbal derivation in ... Subsequently, the interaction of the causative and applicative is analysed, and attention is devoted to the behaviour of the complements in a causative construction. Keywords: Lingála, verbal dérivation, causative, ...

  11. Diabetes Causation Beliefs Among Spanish-Speaking Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha, Jeannie Belinda; Mayer, Sallie D; Mezuk, Briana R; Avula, Danielle

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how the inquiry of cultural diabetes causation beliefs can improve Hispanic/Latino patient self-management. Two semistructured focus groups were conducted with 13 Hispanic/Latinos adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Prior to taking part in the group discussion, participants completed a demographic survey and the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised. The top 5 diabetes causation items endorsed by participants per the questionnaire included stress or worry, behavior, hereditary, diet/eating habits, and family problems/worries. The qualitative analysis revealed stress as a recurring theme for a cause of diabetes. Work stress was specifically identified as a contributor to unhealthy eating and diabetes. Most participants were aware of and believed in susto and referred to it as coraje (anger). Participants believed that asking patients about their diabetes causation beliefs and emotional status can help health professionals (1) better understand the patient and (2) identify and prioritize diabetes treatments. Participants also indicated that the role of doctors is important and the encouragement that they give to patients is clinically and spiritually valued. Stress was identified as a cause of diabetes in addition to unhealthy diets and heredity. Asking patients about diabetes causation beliefs and emotional status may help prioritize treatment and management goals. © 2015 The Author(s).

  12. ChiShona periphrastic causatives as syntactic complex predicates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ChiShona periphrastic causatives as syntactic complex predicates: An HPSG analysis. ... We utilise analytical insights from the notion of Argument Composition (AC) and Head-Driven Phrase Structure Grammar (HPSG) theory. Since AC is considered as a lexical process, its account of complex predicates satisfies strict ...

  13. Transitivity and the ontology of causation | Unwin | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is argued that it is very hard to analyse causation in such a way that prevents everything from causing everything else. This is particularly true if we assume that the causal relation is transitive, for it all too often happens that causal chains that we wish to keep separate pass through common intermediate events. It is also ...

  14. CGRP may play a causative role in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L H; Haderslev, P A; Jacobsen, V B

    2002-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been detected in increased amounts in external jugular venous blood during migraine attacks. However, it is unknown whether this is secondary to migraine or whether CGRP may cause headache. In a double-blind crossover study, the effect of human alphaCGRP...... attacks may play a causative role....

  15. Concepts Concerning 'Disease\\' Causation, Control, and the current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is an ethical necessity that doctors understand the complex social, political, environmental and economic dynamics involved in infectious disease outbreaks. This article discusses some important concepts concerning 'disease' causation and control with specific reference to the current cholera outbreak in Zimbabwe ...

  16. Integrating causation in investigative ecological weight of evidence assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Ryan W; Chapman, Peter M

    2017-07-01

    Weight of evidence (WOE) frameworks integrate environmental assessment data to reach conclusions regarding relative certainty of adverse environmental effects due to stressors, possible causation, and key uncertainties. Such studies can be investigative (i.e., determining whether adverse impact is occurring to identify a need for management) or retrospective (i.e., determining the cause of a detected impact such that management efforts focus on the correct stressor). Such WOE assessments do not themselves definitively establish causation; they provide the basis for subsequent follow-up studies to further investigate causation. We propose a modified investigative WOE framework that includes an additional weighting step, which we term "direction weighting." This additional step allows for the examination of alternative hypotheses and provides improved certainty regarding possible causation. To our knowledge, this approach has not been previously applied in investigative ecological WOE assessments. We provide a generic example of 2 conflicting hypotheses related to a mine discharging treated effluent to a freshwater lake: chemical toxicity versus nutrient enrichment. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:702-713. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  17. Standard Javanese Causatives in online editorials and short stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Malihah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the distinctive features of the standard Javanese causatives in on-line editorials and short stories. This research is based on written corpus. This written corpus was compiled from articles published in an online newspaper Solo Pos. To analyze the corpus, I have developed a system of manual annotation to identify the features of verb transitivity, the animacy and humanness of the verb, the presence of active, passive and ergative-like clauses and the number of other grammatical and semantic features using a system of tags. Using this annotation, I analyze the data based on dua anlaysis: genre analysis, functional analysis using a quantitative method. The findings show that genre influences the selection of causative types (markers. Also, there exists gawe used as a verb of causation in both editorials and short stories which contradicts to the canonical rule of the Javanese active verb and Malihah’s (2014 findings. The finding also shows that the standard Javanese causative in online editorials and short stories occurs with intransitive verbs. The last finding is that active clause is the relative prominent type of clause which occurs in all marker. In conclusion, the above findings have made contributions to knowledge to Javanese grammar.

  18. Structural and functional insight into ADF/cofilin from Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Kun; Liao, Shanhui; Zhang, Jiahai; Zhang, Xuecheng; Tu, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    The ADF/cofilin family has been characterized as a group of actin-binding proteins critical for controlling the assembly of actin within the cells. In this study, the solution structure of the ADF/cofilin from Trypanosoma brucei (TbCof) was determined by NMR spectroscopy. TbCof adopts the conserved ADF/cofilin fold with a central β-sheet composed of six β-strands surrounded by five α-helices. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments denoted a submicromolar affinity between TbCof and G-actin, and the affinity between TbCof and ADP-G-actin was five times higher than that between TbCof and ATP-G-actin at low ionic strength. The results obtained from electron microscopy and actin filament sedimentation assays showed that TbCof depolymerized but did not co-sediment with actin filaments and its ability of F-actin depolymerization was pH independent. Similar to actin, TbCof was distributed throughout the cytoplasm. All our data indicate a structurally and functionally conserved ADF/cofilin from Trypanosoma brucei.

  19. Structural and Functional Association of Trypanosoma brucei MIX Protein with Cytochrome c Oxidase Complex ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zíková, Alena; Panigrahi, Aswini K.; Uboldi, Alessandro D.; Dalley, Rachel A.; Handman, Emanuela; Stuart, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    A mitochondrial inner membrane protein, designated MIX, seems to be essential for cell viability. The deletion of both alleles was not possible, and the deletion of a single allele led to a loss of virulence and aberrant mitochondrial segregation and cell division in Leishmania major. However, the mechanism by which MIX exerts its effect has not been determined. We show here that MIX is also expressed in the mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei, and using RNA interference, we found that its loss leads to a phenotype that is similar to that described for Leishmania. The loss of MIX also had a major effect on cytochrome c oxidase activity, on the mitochondrial membrane potential, and on the production of mitochondrial ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. Using a tandem affinity purification tag, we found that MIX is associated with a multiprotein complex that contains subunits of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase complex (respiratory complex IV), the composition of which was characterized in detail. The specific function of MIX is unknown, but it appears to be important for the function of complex IV and for mitochondrial segregation and cell division in T. brucei. PMID:18776036

  20. Base J and H3.V Regulate Transcriptional Termination in Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Danae Schulz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite that lacks many transcription factors found in other eukaryotes, such as those whose binding demarcates enhancers. T. brucei retains histone variants and modifications, however, and it is hypothesized that it relies on epigenetic marks to define transcription-related boundaries. The histone H3 variant (H3.V and an alternate nucleotide, base J (ß-D-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil, are two chromatin marks found at both transcription termination sites (TTSs and telomeres. Here, we report that the absence of both base J and H3.V result in transcription readthrough and the appearance of antisense transcripts near TTSs. Additionally, we find that maintaining the transcriptional silencing of pol I-transcribed telomeric Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG genes appears to be dependent on deposition of H3.V alone. Our study reveals that gene expression depends on different epigenetic cues depending on chromosomal location and on the transcribing polymerase. This work provides insight into how these signals may have evolved into the more nuanced and fine-tuned gene regulatory mechanisms observed in other model systems.

  1. Tail characteristics of Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial transcripts are developmentally altered in a transcript-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazestani, Vahid H; Hampton, Marshall; Shaw, Aubie K; Salavati, Reza; Zimmer, Sara L

    2018-02-01

    The intricate life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei requires extensive regulation of gene expression levels of the mtRNAs for adaptation. Post-transcriptional gene regulatory programs, including unencoded mtRNA 3' tail additions, potentially play major roles in this adaptation process. Intriguingly, T. brucei mitochondrial transcripts possess two distinct unencoded 3' tails, each with a differing functional role; i.e., while one type is implicated in RNA stability (in-tails), the other type appears associated with translation (ex-tails). We examined the degree to which tail characteristics differ among cytochrome c oxidase subunits I and III (CO1 and CO3), and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1) transcripts, and to what extent these characteristics differ developmentally. We found that CO1, CO3 and ND1 transcripts possess longer in-tails in the mammalian life stage. By mathematically modelling states of in-tail and ex-tail addition, we determined that the typical length at which an in-tail is extended to become an ex-tail differs by transcript and, in the case of ND1, by life stage. To the best of our knowledge, we provide the first evidence that developmental differences exist in tail length distributions of mtRNAs, underscoring the potential involvement of in-tail and ex-tail populations in mitochondrial post-transcriptional regulation mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Australian Society for Parasitology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigating the Chaperone Properties of a Novel Heat Shock Protein, Hsp70.c, from Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adélle Burger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neglected tropical disease, African Trypanosomiasis, is fatal and has a crippling impact on economic development. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 is an important molecular chaperone that is expressed in response to stress and Hsp40 acts as its co-chaperone. These proteins play a wide range of roles in the cell and they are required to assist the parasite as it moves from a cold blooded insect vector to a warm blooded mammalian host. A novel cytosolic Hsp70, from Trypanosoma brucei, TbHsp70.c, contains an acidic substrate binding domain and lacks the C-terminal EEVD motif. The ability of a cytosolic Hsp40 from Trypanosoma brucei J protein 2, Tbj2, to function as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c was investigated. The main objective was to functionally characterize TbHsp70.c to further expand our knowledge of parasite biology. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 were heterologously expressed and purified and both proteins displayed the ability to suppress aggregation of thermolabile MDH and chemically denatured rhodanese. ATPase assays revealed a 2.8-fold stimulation of the ATPase activity of TbHsp70.c by Tbj2. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 both demonstrated chaperone activity and Tbj2 functions as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c. In vivo heat stress experiments indicated upregulation of the expression levels of TbHsp70.c.

  3. KREX2 is not essential for either procyclic or bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Carnes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most mitochondrial mRNAs in Trypanosoma brucei require RNA editing for maturation and translation. The edited RNAs primarily encode proteins of the oxidative phosphorylation system. These parasites undergo extensive changes in energy metabolism between the insect and bloodstream stages which are mirrored by alterations in RNA editing. Two U-specific exonucleases, KREX1 and KREX2, are both present in protein complexes (editosomes that catalyze RNA editing but the relative roles of each protein are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The requirement for KREX2 for RNA editing in vivo was assessed in both procyclic (insect and bloodstream form parasites by methods that use homologous recombination for gene elimination. These studies resulted in null mutant cells in which both alleles were eliminated. The viability of these cells demonstrates that KREX2 is not essential in either life cycle stage, despite certain defects in RNA editing in vivo. Furthermore, editosomes isolated from KREX2 null cells require KREX1 for in vitro U-specific exonuclease activity. CONCLUSIONS: KREX2 is a U-specific exonuclease that is dispensable for RNA editing in vivo in T. brucei BFs and PFs. This result suggests that the U deletion activity, which is required for RNA editing, is primarily mediated in vivo by KREX1 which is normally found associated with only one type of editosome. The retention of the KREX2 gene implies a non-essential role or a role that is essential in other life cycle stages or conditions.

  4. Secondary metabolites from Vietnamese marine invertebrates with activity against Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; No, Joo Hwan; Luyen, Bui Thi Thuy; Yang, Gyongseon; Byun, Soo Young; Goo, Junghyun; Kim, Kyung Tae; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Van Minh, Chau; Schmidt, Thomas J; Kang, Jong Seong; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-06-11

    Marine-derived natural products from invertebrates comprise an extremely diverse and promising source of the compounds from a wide variety of structural classes. This study describes the discovery of five marine natural products with activity against Trypanosoma species by natural product library screening using whole cell in vitro assays. We investigated the anti-trypanosomal activity of the extracts from the soft corals and echinoderms living in Vietnamese seas. Of the samples screened, the methanolic extracts of several marine organisms exhibited potent activities against cultures of Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi (EC50 activity against T. brucei with EC50 values ranging from 1.57 ± 0.14 to 14.6 ± 1.36 μM, relative to the positive control, pentamidine (EC50 = 0.015 ± 0.003 μM). Laevigatol B (1) and 5α-cholest-8(14)-ene-3β,7α-diol (5) exhibited also significant inhibitory effects on T. cruzi. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds on mammalian cells was also assessed and found to be insignificant in all cases. This is the first report on the inhibitory effects of marine organisms collected in Vietnamese seas against Trypanosoma species responsible for neglected tropical diseases.

  5. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments for a putative ADF/Cofilin from Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Kun; Yuan, Guangfa; Liao, Shanhui; Zhang, Jiahai; Tu, Xiaoming

    2011-10-01

    Actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin proteins are a family of actin-binding proteins expressed in almost all eukaryotic cells, and play a significant role in regulating actin-filament dynamics. Here we report the resonance assignments of a putative ADF/cofilin from Trypanosoma brucei for further understanding of the relationship between its structure and function.

  6. Variations in maxi-circle and mini-circle sequences in kinetoplast DNAs from different Trypanosoma brucei strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Borst (Piet); F. Fase-Fowler; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A.C.C. Frasch

    1980-01-01

    textabstractWe have compared a total of 30 recognition sites for eight restriction endonucleases on the 20-kilobase-pair maxi-circle of kinetoplast DNAs from five different Trypanosoma brucei strains. In addition to three polymorphic sites were have found a 5 kilobase-pair region that is not cleaved

  7. THE CYTOSOLIC AND GLYCOSOMAL GLYCERALDEHYDE-3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE FROM TRYPANOSOMA-BRUCEI - KINETIC-PROPERTIES AND COMPARISON WITH HOMOLOGOUS ENZYMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LAMBEIR, AM; LOISEAU, AM; KUNTZ, DA; VELLIEUX, FM; MICHELS, PAM; OPPERDOES, FR

    1991-01-01

    The protozoan haemoflagellate Trypanosoma brucei has two NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzymes, each with a different localization within the cell. One isoenzyme is found in the cytosol, as in other eukaryotes, while the other is found in the glycosome, a microbody-like

  8. A tropical tale: how Naja nigricollis venom beats Trypanosoma brucei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martos Esteban, Andrea; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Carrington, Mark

    Trypanosoma brucei is a parasitic protozoan species capable to infecting insect vectors whose bite further produces African sleeping sickness inhuman beings [1]. During the parasite’s extracellular life in the mammalian host,its outer coat, mainly composed of Variable Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs...

  9. Haematological indices in Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Federe isolate infected Nigerian donkeys (Equus asinus treated with homidium and isometamidium chloride of ciprofloxacin in broiler chickens after single intravenous and intraingluvial administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queen Nneka Oparah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of intramuscular administration of Homidium chloride (Novidium® and Isometamidium chloride (Sécuridium® in Nigerian donkeys (Equus asinus experimentally infected with T. b. brucei (Federe isolate was investigated. Changes in haematological and serum biochemical indices were evaluated using clinical haematology and biochemistry methods. Red blood cell (RBC count for the negative control group was significantly higher than for the positive control, Novidium® and Sécuridium®-treatment groups. Haemoglobin (Hb concentration significantly reduced in the infected untreated group compared with other groups. Packed cell volume (PCV was significantly different between negative and positive controls, and also between the infected untreated and treatment groups. There was significant reduction in platelet counts post-infection and post-treatment. Mean corpuscular volume (MCV increased significantly in the treatment groups while mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC significantly reduced only in the Sécuridium®-treatment group. Lymphocyte count for infected untreated was non-significantly higher than for the uninfected controls, but treatment with both trypanocides recorded further increases, which were higher compared with that of the uninfected group. Post infection and treatment, aspartate aminotransferase (AST levels increased significantly. There were non-significant differences in electrolyte ion concentrations across the groups except for chloride ion which recorded a significant reduction in the Novidium®-treatment group. This experiment revealed that Nigerian donkeys infected with T. brucei brucei (Federe isolate developed symptoms of trypanosomosis; anaemia, lymphocytosis and thrombocytopenia. Treatment with the trypanocides ameliorated effects of the infection, and results suggest that immunosuppression may not be a substantial clinical manifestation of T. brucei brucei (Federe isolate trypanosomosis in Nigerian

  10. Sulfhydryl reagent susceptibility in proteins with high sequence similarity--triosephosphate isomerase from Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania mexicana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-Ramos, G; Cabrera, N; Saavedra-Lira, E; Tuena de Gómez-Puyou, M; Ostoa-Saloma, P; Pérez-Montfort, R; Gómez-Puyou, A

    1998-05-01

    The amino acid sequence of triosephosphate isomerase from Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania mexicana have an identity of 68%. Using the numbering system for the T. brucei enzyme, in their aligned sequences, the T. cruzi and leishmanial enzymes have cysteine residues at positions 14, 40, 117 and 126. T. brucei triosephosphate isomerase has cysteine residues at positions 14, 40 and 126, and a valine residue at position 117. Dithionitrobenzoic acid and methylmethane thiosulfonate inhibited the three enzymes, but T. cruzi triosephosphate isomerase was more than 100-fold more sensitive. The sensitivity of wild type triosephosphate isomerase from T. cruzi and T. brucei to the reagents was equal to that of the Cys117Val and Val117Cys mutant enzymes, respectively. Triosephosphate isomerases that have cysteine residues at positions 40 and 126, but lack a cysteine residue at position 14 are insensitive to methylmethane thiosulfonate. Thus, sulfhydryl reagents act on Cys14. At stoichiometric concentrations, the reagents inhibited the three enzymes as a consequence of structural alterations as measured by binding of 8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonic acid to previously buried hydrophobic regions. However, the times for half-maximal alterations were 10 min, 15 hours and over 30 hours for T. cruzi, T. brucei and L. mexicana triosephosphate isomerase, respectively. The effect of pH on the action of the sulfhydryl reagents and molecular modeling showed no differences in the solvent accessibility of Cys14. As Cys14 forms part of the dimer interface, the data indicate that, in the three enzymes, barriers of different magnitude hinder the interaction between the sulfhydryl reagents and Cys14. The barrier is lower in T. cruzi triosephosphate isomerase which makes its dimer interface more susceptible for perturbation.

  11. Molecular profiles of Trypanosoma brucei, T. evansi and T. equiperdum stocks revealed by the random amplified polymorphic DNA method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Zhao-Rong; Li, An-Xing; Chen, Xiao-Guang; Lu, Li-Xin; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2004-03-01

    A total of 20 random primers (10-mers) were used to amplify RAPD markers from the genomic DNA of four Trypanosoma brucei stocks from East and West Africa, four T. evansi stocks from Africa, Asia and South America and one T. equiperdum stock from Asia. Between 65 and 88 reproducible fragments ranging from 0.25 to 2.15 kb were generated from these stocks depending on the stock/primer combination. The similarity coefficient (SC) among the stocks of T. brucei from Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania and Zambia ranged from 62.9% to 74.0% (average: 67.6%). The SC among the stocks of T. evansi from Kenya, China and Brazil was 76.4%-95.5% (average: 86.4%), while the SC between T. evansi stock from China and Brazil was 95.5%. For T. evansi and T. equiperdum, the SC among the stocks ranged from 81.2% to 94.4% (average: 87.6%). As for the SC among the stocks of T. brucei and T. evansi, it was found to be from 54.7% to 80.3% (average: 68.0%) and the SC among stocks of T. brucei and T. equiperdum was from 59.4% to 76.9% (average: 68.1%). Our results indicate that the stocks of T. evansi from China and from Brazil are more closely related to the stock of T. equiperdum from China than to the stocks of T. evansi isolated from Kenya and to the stocks of T. brucei. In addition, our results further support the hypothesis that T. evansi stocks from China and Brazil could have arisen from a single lineage. The possible evolution of T. evansi and T. equiperdum is also discussed.

  12. ATG24 Represses Autophagy and Differentiation and Is Essential for Homeostasy of the Flagellar Pocket in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Brennand

    Full Text Available We have previously identified homologs for nearly half of the approximately 30 known yeast Atg's in the genome database of the human sleeping sickness parasite Trypanosoma brucei. So far, only a few of these homologs have their role in autophagy experimentally confirmed. Among the candidates was the ortholog of Atg24 that is involved in pexophagy in yeast. In T. brucei, the peroxisome-like organelles named glycosomes harbor core metabolic processes, especially glycolysis. In the autotrophic yeast, autophagy is essential for adaptation to different nutritional environments by participating in the renewal of the peroxisome population. We hypothesized that autophagic turnover of the parasite's glycosomes plays a role in differentiation during its life cycle, which demands adaptation to different host environments and associated dramatic changes in nutritional conditions. We therefore characterized T. brucei ATG24, the T. brucei ortholog of yeast Atg24 and mammalian SNX4, and found it to have a regulatory role in autophagy and differentiation as well as endocytic trafficking. ATG24 partially localized on endocytic membranes where it was recruited via PI3-kinase III/VPS34. ATG24 silencing severely impaired receptor-mediated endocytosis of transferrin, but not adsorptive uptake of a lectin, and caused a major enlargement of the flagellar pocket. ATG24 silencing approximately doubled the number of autophagosomes, suggesting a role in repressing autophagy, and strongly accelerated differentiation, in accordance with a role of autophagy in parasite differentiation. Overexpression of the two isoforms of T. brucei ATG8 fused to GFP slowed down differentiation, possibly by a dominant-negative effect. This was overcome by ATG24 depletion, further supporting its regulatory role.

  13. Community acquired pneumonia in diabetic and non-diabetic hospitalized patients: presentation, causative pathogens and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibal, M A A; Rahman, S H Z; Nishat, L; Sikder, N H; Begum, S A; Islam, M J; Uddin, K N

    2012-12-01

    Both community acquired pneumonia (CAP) and diabetes mellitus are common in Bangladesh. Though hospitalization of diabetic patients with CAP is increasing, data regarding their clinical presentation, microbial characteristics, antimicrobial susceptibility and outcome are lacking. This study was aimed at finding any difference in clinical presentation, bacterial causes, antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of isolated bacteria and outcome in diabetic and non-diabetic hospitalized patients with CAP. In this study total 47 diabetic and 43 non-diabetic adult hospitalized patients with CAP were enrolled. Clinical presentation of CAP differed in diabetics and non-diabetics. Frequency of atypical presentation and CURB-65 score were significantly higher in diabetics. Pleural effusion with multilobar infiltration was also common feature for CAP in diabetic patients. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most frequent causative pathogen for CAP in diabetic patients, whereas Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequent causative agent for non-diabetic patients. Bacteria isolated from sputum sample of diabetic patients with CAP were resistant to almost all recommended antibiotics used for CAP but 100% of isolates were sensitive to Carbapenems. Pulmonary complications were relatively more in diabetics than in non-diabetics. Hospitalized diabetics with CAP required referral to intensive care unit more than that of non-diabetics. So, diabetic patients with CAP need extra attention.

  14. The Perfect Storm: Preterm Birth, Neurodevelopmental Mechanisms, and Autism Causation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Carmina; Dammann, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    A unifying model of autism causation remains elusive, and thus well-designed explanatory models are needed to develop appropriate therapeutic and preventive interventions. This essay argues that autism is not a static disorder, but rather an ongoing process. We discuss the link between preterm birth and autism and briefly review the evidence supporting the link between immune system characteristics and both prematurity and autism. We then propose a causation process model of autism etiology and pathogenesis, in which both neurodevelopment and ongoing/prolonged neuroinflammation are necessary pathogenetic component mechanisms. We suggest that an existing model of sufficient cause and component causes can be interpreted as a mechanistic view of etiology and pathogenesis and can serve as an explanatory model for autism causal pathways.

  15. Game of Objects: vicarious causation and multi-modal media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Pedinotti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper applies philosopher Graham Harman's object-oriented theory of "vicarious causation" to an analysis of the multi-modal media phenomenon known as "Game of Thrones." Examining the manner in which George R.R. Martin's best-selling series of fantasy novels has been adapted into a board game, a video game, and a hit HBO television series, it uses the changes entailed by these processes to trace the contours of vicariously generative relations. In the course of the resulting analysis, it provides new suggestions concerning the eidetic dimensions of Harman's causal model, particularly with regard to causation in linear networks and in differing types of game systems.

  16. Proving Causation With Epidemiological Evidence in Tobacco Lawsuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Goo Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a series of lawsuits were filed in Korea claiming tort liability against tobacco companies. The Supreme Court has already issued decisions in some cases, while others are still pending. The primary issue in these cases is whether the epidemiological evidence submitted by the plaintiffs clearly proves the causal relationship between smoking and disease as required by civil law. Proving causation is difficult in tobacco lawsuits because factors other than smoking are involved in the development of a disease, and also because of the lapse of time between smoking and the manifestation of the disease. The Supreme Court (Supreme Court Decision, 2011Da22092, April 10, 2014 has imposed some limitations on using epidemiological evidence to prove causation in tobacco lawsuits filed by smokers and their family members, but these limitations should be reconsidered. First, the Court stated that a disease can be categorized as specific or non-specific, and for each disease type, causation can be proven by different types of evidence. However, the concept of specific diseases is not compatible with multifactor theory, which is generally accepted in the field of public health. Second, when the epidemiological association between the disease and the risk factor is proven to be significant, imposing additional burdens of proof on the plaintiff may considerably limit the plaintiff’s right to recovery, but the Court required the plaintiffs to provide additional information such as health condition and lifestyle. Third, the Supreme Court is not giving greater weight to the evidential value of epidemiological study results because the Court focuses on the fact that these studies were group-level, not individual-level. However, group-level studies could still offer valuable information about individual members of the group, e.g., probability of causation.

  17. Causative factors and rehabilitation of patellar tendinopathy: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanell Morgan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patellar tendinopathy (PT is a common chronic pathology of the knee, with a high prevalence in athletes and the general population.Objectives: The objectives of this article were to systematically investigate all the evidence applicable to the intrinsic and extrinsic causative factors and rehabilitation of PT, and then integrate and link rehabilitation with the main causative factors identified.Method: The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were followed. Various tools were used to evaluate the methodological quality of the eligible articles. Data were interpreted descriptively, and the causative factors and rehabilitation of PT were analysed.Results: Twenty studies were included in the review. The distinctive factor responsible for PT is the mechanical theory. Seven intrinsic and four extrinsic risk factors were identified, with the main intrinsic risk factors being muscle flexibility and strength, and extrinsic risk factors being acquisition and level of skills. PT can be treated with numerous different therapeutic modalities, although eccentric muscle training showed exceptional results. The intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors can only be transformed and reduced by rehabilitation, which is inevitable to improve PT pain and function.Conclusion: The essence of an integrated management protocol for PT is to identify the dominant contributing factors, whether intrinsic or extrinsic, and to reduce the load on the patellar tendon by modifying these factors by either rehabilitation intervention or direct modification of the equipment or environment to obtain a positive outcome towards pain management and function.

  18. Aggregated analysis of in-depth accident causation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Davide Shingo; Giustiniani, Gabriele; Persia, Luca; Gigli, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    Data collected from in-depth road accident investigations are very informative and may contain more than 500 accident-related variables for a single investigated case. These data may be used to get a more detailed knowledge on accident and injury causation associated with a specific accident scenario. However, due to their complexity, studies using in-depth data at aggregated levels are not common. The objective of this paper is to propose a methodology to analyse aggregated accident causation charts in order to highlight strong and weak relationships between crash causes and pre-crash scenarios. These relationships can be taken into account when developing or assessing new road safety measures (e.g. in-vehicle systems). The methodology has been applied to an in-depth accident dataset derived from the European project SafetyNet. Four different pre-crash scenarios associated with the accident scenario 'vehicles encountering something while remaining in their lane' have been investigated. Even if generalization of these results should be done with care because of database representativeness issues, the methodology is promising, highlighting, for example, a well-defined causation pattern related to vehicles striking a vehicle in rear-end accidents.

  19. Downward Causation and the Neurobiology of Free Will

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Nancey; O’Connor, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    How is free will possible in the light of the physical and chemical underpinnings of brain activity and recent neurobiological experiments? How can the emergence of complexity in hierarchical systems such as the brain, based at the lower levels in physical interactions, lead to something like genuine free will? The nature of our understanding of free will in the light of present-day neuroscience is becoming increasingly important because of remarkable discoveries on the topic being made by neuroscientists at the present time, on the one hand, and its crucial importance for the way we view ourselves as human beings, on the other. A key tool in understanding how free will may arise in this context is the idea of downward causation in complex systems, happening coterminously with bottom up causation, to form an integral whole. Top-down causation is usually neglected, and is therefore emphasized in the other part of the book’s title. The concept is explored in depth, as are the ethical and legal implications of...

  20. Distribution territories and causative mechanisms of ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira, A.; Grive, E.; Alvarez-Sabin, J. [Unidad de Resonancia Magnetica, Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic stroke prognosis, risk of recurrence, clinical assessment, and treatment decisions are influenced by stroke subtype (anatomic distribution and causative mechanism of infarction). Stroke subtype diagnosis is better achieved in the early phase of acute ischemia with the use of multimodal MR imaging. The pattern of brain lesions as shown by brain MR imaging can be classified according to a modified Oxfordshire method, based on the anatomic distribution of the infarcts into six groups: (1) total anterior circulation infarcts, (2) partial anterior circulation infarcts, (3) posterior circulation infarcts, (4) watershed infarcts, (5) centrum ovale infarcts, and (6) lacunar infarcts. The subtype of stroke according to its causative mechanism is based on the TOAST method, which classifies stroke into five major etiologic groups: (1) large-vessel atherosclerotic disease, (2) small-vessel atherosclerotic disease, (3) cardioembolic source, (4) other determined etiologies, and (5) undetermined or multiple possible etiologies. The different MR imaging patterns of acute ischemic brain lesions visualized using diffusion-weighted imaging and the pattern of vessel involvement demonstrated with MR angiography are essential factors that can suggest the most likely causative mechanism of infarction. This information may have an impact on decisions regarding therapy and the performance of additional diagnostic tests. (orig.)

  1. Chimerization at the AQP2–AQP3 locus is the genetic basis of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in clinical Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice E. Graf

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aquaglyceroporin-2 is a known determinant of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in Trypanosoma brucei brucei laboratory strains. Recently, chimerization at the AQP2–AQP3 tandem locus was described from melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistant Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates from sleeping sickness patients in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Here, we demonstrate that reintroduction of wild-type AQP2 into one of these isolates fully restores drug susceptibility while expression of the chimeric AQP2/3 gene in aqp2–aqp3 null T. b. brucei does not. This proves that AQP2–AQP3 chimerization is the cause of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in the T. b. gambiense isolates.

  2. Crassiflorone derivatives that inhibit Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TbGAPDH) and Trypanosoma cruzi trypanothione reductase (TcTR) and display trypanocidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uliassi, Elisa; Fiorani, Giulia; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Bergamini, Christian; Fato, Romana; Bianchini, Giulia; Carlos Menéndez, J; Molina, Maria Teresa; López-Montero, Eulogio; Falchi, Federico; Cavalli, Andrea; Gul, Sheraz; Kuzikov, Maria; Ellinger, Bernhard; Witt, Gesa; Moraes, Carolina B; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H; Borsari, Chiara; Costi, Maria Paola; Bolognesi, Maria Laura

    2017-12-01

    Crassiflorone is a natural product with anti-mycobacterial and anti-gonorrhoeal properties, isolated from the stem bark of the African ebony tree Diospyros crassiflora. We noticed that its pentacyclic core possesses structural resemblance to the quinone-coumarin hybrid 3, which we reported to exhibit a dual-targeted inhibitory profile towards Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TbGAPDH) and Trypanosoma cruzi trypanothione reductase (TcTR). Following this basic idea, we synthesized a small library of crassiflorone derivatives 15-23 and investigated their potential as anti-trypanosomatid agents. 19 is the only compound of the series showing a balanced dual profile at 10 μM (% inhibition TbGAPDH  = 64% and % inhibition TcTR  = 65%). In phenotypic assay, the most active compounds were 18 and 21, which at 5 μM inhibited Tb bloodstream-form growth by 29% and 38%, respectively. Notably, all the newly synthesized compounds at 10 μM did not affect viability and the status of mitochondria in human A549 and 786-O cell lines, respectively. However, further optimization that addresses metabolic liabilities including solubility, as well as cytochromes P450 (CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2D6) inhibition, is required before this class of natural product-derived compounds can be further progressed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. [ON THE ORIGIN OF HYPERVIRULENCE OF THE CAUSATIVE AGENT OF PLAGUE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, N V; Kislichkina, A A; Platonov, M E; Evseeva, V V; Kadnikova, L A; Lipatnikova, N A; Bogun, A G; Dentovskaya, S V; Anisimov, A P

    2016-01-01

    The attempt to combine Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis into one species has been unsupported by microbiologists due to the specific features of the epidemiology and clinical presentations of their induced diseases and to basic differences in their virulence. Pseudotuberculosis is predominantly a relatively mild human intestinal infection transmitted through contaminated food and plague is an acute generalized disease with high mortality, which is most frequently transmitted by the bites of infected fleas. Y. pestis hypervirulence, the ability of single bacteria to ensure the development of predagonal bacteriemia in rodents, which is sufficient to contaminate the fleas, is one of the main events during pathogen adaptation to a new ecological niche. By analyzing the data of molecular typing of the representative kits of naturally occurring Y. pestis isolates, the authois consider the issues of formation of intraspecies groups with universal hypervirulence, as well as biovars that are highly virulent only to their major host. A strategy for searching for selective virulence factors, the potential molecular targets for vaccination and etiotropic treatment of plague, is discussed.

  4. Genetic diversity and antifungal susceptibility profiles in causative agents of sporotrichosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; de Hoog, G Sybren; de Cássia Pires, Débora; Brihante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Sidrim, José Júlio da Costa; Gadelha, Marcos Fabio; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sporotrichosis is a chronic subcutaneous mycosis of humans and animals, which is typically acquired by traumatic inoculation of plant material contaminated with Sporothrix propagules, or via animals, mainly felines. Sporothrix infections notably occur in outbreaks, with large epidemics

  5. The etiological structure, biological properties of causative agents of peri-implant mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Faustova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to examine the peri-implant mucositis microflora and sensitivity of dominant pathogens to antibiotics and antiseptics. Materials and methods. The study involved 43 patients with peri-implant mucositis. During the study 162 clinical strains of microorganisms were isolated and identified. Cultivation of clinical isolates was performed by the standard method, final identification was carried out with using bacteriological automatic analyzer Vitec – 2compact bioMérieux (France. Determination of sensitivity to antibiotics of pathogens was carried with disc-diffusion method; the study of sensitivity to antiseptics was carried by means of double serial dilutions method by the standard procedure approved by the Order № 167 of the Ministry of Public Health of Ukraine on “On Approval of Training Guidance “Assessment of the sensitivity of microorganisms to antibiotics”, dated by April, 5, 2007. Results. It is The microflora of peri-implant area of patients with mucositis was revealed to consist of opportunistic species. Representatives of Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were dominating among them, although Kocuria spp., Enterobacter spp. and yeast-like fungi Candida spp. were detected quite common. Investigated clinical strains of microorganisms had different sensitivity to antibiotics. All cultures were sensitive to fluoroquinolones, but very significant number of them showed resistance to penicillins, macrolides and lincosamides. In turn, horosten, dekasan and chlorhexidine had powerful antimicrobial effect on dominant pathogens of periimplant mucositis in patients. Moreover, the effect of decametoxine-based antiseptics on some of them significantly exceeded the activity of chlorhexidine. Conclusions. Microflora from peri-implant area of patients with peri-implant mucositis consists mainly of aerobic and facultative anaerobic microorganisms, belonging to normal oral microflora. Most of pathogens of mucositis obtaine resistance to antibiotics (penicillins, macrolides, lincosamides. Modern antiseptics horosten, decasan and chlorhexidine provide a strong antimicrobial activity against etiological pathogens of mucositis, that makes them promising for use in dental implantology.

  6. A Field-expedient Method for Detection of Leptospirosis Causative Agents in Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Negative Shigella sonnei Negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa Negative Klebsiella pneumoniae Negative Enterobacter aerogenes Negative Staphylococcus aureus...Negative Staphylococcus typhimurium Negative Streptococcus pyogenes Negative Bartonella doshiae Negative Plasmodium falciparum Negative Plasmodium...strains tested by Leptospira pathogenic spp (LPS) PCR Serogroup Serovar Strain LPS Results* (mean Ct)† Pathogenic L. interrogans Australis Bratislava

  7. Genomic analysis of the causative agents of coccidiosis in domestic chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Adam J.; Blake, Damer P.; Ansari, Hifzur R.; Billington, Karen; Browne, Hilary P.; Bryant, Josephine; Dunn, Matt; Hung, Stacy S.; Kawahara, Fumiya; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Malas, Tareq B.; Mourier, Tobias; Naghra, Hardeep; Nair, Mridul; Otto, Thomas D.; Rawlings, Neil D.; Rivailler, Pierre; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Sanders, Mandy; Subramaniam, Chandra; Tay, Yea-Ling; Woo, Yong; Wu, Xikun; Barrell, Bart; Dear, Paul H.; Doerig, Christian; Gruber, Arthur; Ivens, Alasdair C.; Parkinson, John; Rajandream, Marie-Adèle; Shirley, Martin W.; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Berriman, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Global production of chickens has trebled in the past two decades and they are now the most important source of dietary animal protein worldwide. Chickens are subject to many infectious diseases that reduce their performance and productivity. Coccidiosis, caused by apicomplexan protozoa of the genus Eimeria, is one of the most important poultry diseases. Understanding the biology of Eimeria parasites underpins development of new drugs and vaccines needed to improve global food security. We have produced annotated genome sequences of all seven species of Eimeria that infect domestic chickens, which reveal the full extent of previously described repeat-rich and repeat-poor regions and show that these parasites possess the most repeat-rich proteomes ever described. Furthermore, while no other apicomplexan has been found to possess retrotransposons, Eimeria is home to a family of chromoviruses. Analysis of Eimeria genes involved in basic biology and host-parasite interaction highlights adaptations to a relatively simple developmental life cycle and a complex array of co-expressed surface proteins involved in host cell binding. PMID:25015382

  8. On the origin of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doig Kenneth D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium ulcerans is an unusual bacterial pathogen with elusive origins. While closely related to the aquatic dwelling M. marinum, M. ulcerans has evolved the ability to produce the immunosuppressive polyketide toxin mycolactone and cause the neglected tropical disease Buruli ulcer. Other mycolactone-producing mycobacteria (MPM have been identified in fish and frogs and given distinct species designations (M. pseudoshottsii, M. shinshuense, M. liflandii and M. marinum, however the evolution of M. ulcerans and its relationship to other MPM has not been defined. Here we report the comparative analysis of whole genome sequences from 30 MPM and five M. marinum. Results A high-resolution phylogeny based on genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs showed that M. ulcerans and all other MPM represent a single clonal group that evolved from a common M. marinum progenitor. The emergence of the MPM was driven by the acquisition of the pMUM plasmid encoding genes for the biosynthesis of mycolactones. This change was accompanied by the loss of at least 185 genes, with a significant overrepresentation of genes associated with cell wall functions. Cell wall associated genes also showed evidence of substantial adaptive selection, suggesting cell wall remodeling has been critical for the survival of MPM. Fine-grain analysis of the MPM complex revealed at least three distinct lineages, one of which comprised a highly clonal group, responsible for Buruli ulcer in Africa and Australia. This indicates relatively recent transfer of M. ulcerans between these continents, which represent the vast majority of the global Buruli ulcer burden. Our data provide SNPs and gene sequences that can differentiate M. ulcerans lineages, suitable for use in the diagnosis and surveillance of Buruli ulcer. Conclusions M. ulcerans and all mycolactone-producing mycobacteria are specialized variants of a common Mycobacterium marinum progenitor that have adapted to live in restricted environments. Examination of genes lost or retained and now under selective pressure suggests these environments might be aerobic, and extracellular, where slow growth, production of an immune suppressor, cell wall remodeling, loss or modification of cell wall antigens, and biofilm-forming ability provide a survival advantage. These insights will guide our efforts to find the elusive reservoir(s of M. ulcerans and to understand transmission of Buruli ulcer.

  9. Genomic analysis of the causative agents of coccidiosis in domestic chickens

    KAUST Repository

    Reid, Adam J.

    2014-10-01

    Global production of chickens has trebled in the past two decades and they are now the most important source of dietary animal protein worldwide. Chickens are subject to many infectious diseases that reduce their performance and productivity. Coccidiosis, caused by apicomplexan protozoa of the genus Eimeria, is one of the most important poultry diseases. Understanding the biology of Eimeria parasites underpins development of new drugs and vaccines needed to improve global food security. We have produced annotated genome sequences of all seven species of Eimeria that infect domestic chickens, which reveal the full extent of previously described repeat-rich and repeat-poor regions and show that these parasites possess the most repeat-rich proteomes ever described. Furthermore, while no other apicomplexan has been found to possess retrotransposons, Eimeria is home to a family of chromoviruses. Analysis of Eimeria genes involved in basic biology and host-parasite interaction highlights adaptations to a relatively simple developmental life cycle and a complex array of co-expressed surface proteins involved in host cell binding.

  10. New Species of Madurella, Causative Agents of Black-Grain Mycetoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoog, G Sybren; van Diepeningen, Anne D; Mahgoub, El-Sheikh; van de Sande, Wendy W J

    A new species of nonsporulating fungus, isolated in a case of black-grain mycetoma in Sudan, is described as Madurella fahalii. The species is characterized by phenotypic and molecular criteria. Multigene phylogenies based on the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS), the partial

  11. New Species of Madurella, Causative Agents of Black-Grain Mycetoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hoog, G. Sybren; van Diepeningen, Anne D.; Mahgoub, El-Sheikh

    2012-01-01

    A new species of nonsporulating fungus, isolated in a case of black-grain mycetoma in Sudan, is described as Madurella fahalii. The species is characterized by phenotypic and molecular criteria. Multigene phylogenies based on the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS), the partial β-tubulin gene (BT2), and the RNA polymerase II subunit 2 gene (RPB2) indicate that M. fahalii is closely related to Madurella mycetomatis and M. pseudomycetomatis; the latter name is validated according to the rules of botanical nomenclature. Madurella ikedae was found to be synonymous with M. mycetomatis. An isolate from Indonesia was found to be different from all known species based on multilocus analysis and is described as Madurella tropicana. Madurella is nested within the order Sordariales, with Chaetomium as its nearest neighbor. Madurella fahalii has a relatively low optimum growth temperature (30°C) and is less susceptible to the azoles than other Madurella species, with voriconazole and posaconazole MICs of 1 μg/ml, a ketoconazole MIC of 2 μg/ml, and an itraconazole MIC of >16 μg/ml. Since eumycetoma is still treated only with azoles, correct species identification is important for the optimal choice of antifungal therapy. PMID:22205798

  12. New Species of Madurella, Causative Agents of Black-Grain Mycetoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoog, G.S.; van Diepeningen, A.D.; Mahgoub, E.-S.; van de Sande, W.W.J.

    2012-01-01

    A new species of nonsporulating fungus, isolated in a case of black-grain mycetoma in Sudan, is described as Madurella fahalii. The species is characterized by phenotypic and molecular criteria. Multigene phylogenies based on the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS), the partial

  13. Debromoaplysiatoxin as the Causative Agent of Dermatitis in a Dog after Exposure to Freshwater in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschner, Birgit; Bautista, Adrienne C; Wong, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Contamination of recreational waters with cyanobacterial toxins continues to increase and presents a risk to animals and humans. Although cases of acute hepato- and neurotoxicoses in dogs following cyanotoxin exposure exist, no reports of skin-related reactions in dogs exist. A 5-year-old female spayed 34 kg Bracco Italiano was initially presented for rapid onset of severe pruritus and urticaria. Marked excoriation and erythema were noted over the chest and neck, while urticaria was noted in the inguinal regions and ventral abdomen. Initial basic dermatology work-up excluded parasitic, fungal, and bacterial organisms. Due to the severity and progression of urticaria, the dog received IV dexamethasone and IM diphenhydramine. Improvement of the urticaria and the dog's clinical status was noted over the next 45 min. Assessment of the dog's environment revealed access to a lake on the property with visible algal bloom. Water from the lake was submitted for toxicology testing and revealed the presence of debromoaplysiatoxin. Access to the lake was discontinued and follow-up evaluation over the next few weeks revealed a complete resolution of the skin irritation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report of debromoaplysiatoxin exposure in a dog after swimming in cyanobacteria-contaminated water. Veterinarians should recognize the potential harm that contaminated waters may cause in terms of dermal, hepatic, and neurological conditions. In addition, more prudent oversight of contaminated recreational waters is recommended for animals and humans to prevent adverse events and intoxications.

  14. Vibrio tapetis, the causative agent of Brown Ring Disease, forms biofilms with spherical components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eRodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio tapetis is a marine bacterium causing Brown Ring Disease (BRD in the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum. V. tapetis biofilm formation remains unexplored although it might be linked to pathogenicity. Our objectives were to characterize the in vitro biofilm formation of V. tapetis and evaluate the effects of culture conditions. Biofilm structure and its matrix composition were examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. V. tapetis was able to form biofilms on a glass substratum within 24 h. Polysaccharides and eDNA of the biofilm matrixes were differently distributed depending on the V. tapetis strains. Spherical components of about 1-2 µm diameter were found at the biofilm surface. They contain DNA, proteins, and seemed to be physically linked to bacteria and of cellular nature. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the spherical components seemed to lack a central nucleoid and were devoid of internal compartment. Temperatures > 21°C inhibit BRD whereas low salinity (2% favor it, none of the both conditions altered V. tapetis ability to form biofilms in vitro. We suggested therefore that biofilm could play a role more in the persistence of the pathogen in clam than in BRD symptoms.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis Virulence Strains as Causative Agents of Persistent Infections in Breast Implants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Chessa

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus are currently considered two of the most important pathogens in nosocomial infections associated with catheters and other medical implants and are also the main contaminants of medical instruments. However because these species of Staphylococcus are part of the normal bacterial flora of human skin and mucosal surfaces, it is difficult to discern when a microbial isolate is the cause of infection or is detected on samples as a consequence of contamination. Rapid identification of invasive strains of Staphylococcus infections is crucial for correctly diagnosing and treating infections. The aim of the present study was to identify specific genes to distinguish between invasive and contaminating S. epidermidis and S. aureus strains isolated on medical devices; the majority of our samples were collected from breast prostheses. As a first step, we compared the adhesion ability of these samples with their efficacy in forming biofilms; second, we explored whether it is possible to determine if isolated pathogens were more virulent compared with international controls. In addition, this work may provide additional information on these pathogens, which are traditionally considered harmful bacteria in humans, and may increase our knowledge of virulence factors for these types of infections.

  16. Genomic analysis of the causative agents of coccidiosis in domestic chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Adam J; Blake, Damer P; Ansari, Hifzur R; Billington, Karen; Browne, Hilary P; Bryant, Josephine; Dunn, Matt; Hung, Stacy S; Kawahara, Fumiya; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Malas, Tareq B; Mourier, Tobias; Naghra, Hardeep; Nair, Mridul; Otto, Thomas D; Rawlings, Neil D; Rivailler, Pierre; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Sanders, Mandy; Subramaniam, Chandra; Tay, Yea-Ling; Woo, Yong; Wu, Xikun; Barrell, Bart; Dear, Paul H; Doerig, Christian; Gruber, Arthur; Ivens, Alasdair C; Parkinson, John; Rajandream, Marie-Adèle; Shirley, Martin W; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Berriman, Matthew; Tomley, Fiona M; Pain, Arnab

    2014-10-01

    Global production of chickens has trebled in the past two decades and they are now the most important source of dietary animal protein worldwide. Chickens are subject to many infectious diseases that reduce their performance and productivity. Coccidiosis, caused by apicomplexan protozoa of the genus Eimeria, is one of the most important poultry diseases. Understanding the biology of Eimeria parasites underpins development of new drugs and vaccines needed to improve global food security. We have produced annotated genome sequences of all seven species of Eimeria that infect domestic chickens, which reveal the full extent of previously described repeat-rich and repeat-poor regions and show that these parasites possess the most repeat-rich proteomes ever described. Furthermore, while no other apicomplexan has been found to possess retrotransposons, Eimeria is home to a family of chromoviruses. Analysis of Eimeria genes involved in basic biology and host-parasite interaction highlights adaptations to a relatively simple developmental life cycle and a complex array of co-expressed surface proteins involved in host cell binding. © 2014 Reid et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. Incidence, CauSative Agents and Strategy of Control of Mastitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Involving 40,cows in';tiieir last trimester was done to evaluate the ~se'o:r dry cowtiiirapy with or. : {vi(hpu(q ... Worldwide, about 50% of the dairy cows ...... commonly found ,on the skirr l and cuts; tick bites ease has to be elUCidated for each particular en-" ",' and the warm water used to .wash udders. Simi-. -,. , - , . . -. -"...) - .. -.

  18. Eggs as a Suitable Tool for Species Diagnosis of Causative Agents of Human Diphyllobothriosis (Cestoda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Leštinová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tapeworms of the order Diphyllobothriidea are parasites of tetrapods and several species may infect man and cause neglected human disease called diphyllobothriosis. Identification of human-infecting diphyllobothriid cestodes is difficult because of their morphological uniformity, which concerns also their eggs in stool samples.In the present study, we analysed by far the largest dataset of more than 2,000 eggs of 8 species of diphyllobothriid cestodes that may infect humans, including the most frequent human parasites Diphyllobothrium latum, D. nihonkaiense and Adenocephalus pacificus (syn. Diphyllobothrium pacificum. Size (length, width and length/width ratio and the surface of the egg shell from naturally and experimentally infected hosts were studied using light and scanning electron microscopy.A high degree of intraspecific and host-related size variability has been detected, but combination of morphometrical and ultrastructural data made it possible to distinguish all of the studied species, including otherwise quite similar eggs of the 3 most common species infecting man, i.e. D. latum, D. nihonkaiense and D. dendriticum. The surface of all marine species is covered by numerous deep pits with species-specific density, whereas the surface of freshwater species is smooth or with isolated shallow hollows or wrinkles.

  19. Eggs as a Suitable Tool for Species Diagnosis of Causative Agents of Human Diphyllobothriosis (Cestoda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leštinová, Kateřina; Soldánová, Miroslava; Scholz, Tomáš; Kuchta, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Background Tapeworms of the order Diphyllobothriidea are parasites of tetrapods and several species may infect man and cause neglected human disease called diphyllobothriosis. Identification of human-infecting diphyllobothriid cestodes is difficult because of their morphological uniformity, which concerns also their eggs in stool samples. Methods In the present study, we analysed by far the largest dataset of more than 2,000 eggs of 8 species of diphyllobothriid cestodes that may infect humans, including the most frequent human parasites Diphyllobothrium latum, D. nihonkaiense and Adenocephalus pacificus (syn. Diphyllobothrium pacificum). Size (length, width and length/width ratio) and the surface of the egg shell from naturally and experimentally infected hosts were studied using light and scanning electron microscopy. Results A high degree of intraspecific and host-related size variability has been detected, but combination of morphometrical and ultrastructural data made it possible to distinguish all of the studied species, including otherwise quite similar eggs of the 3 most common species infecting man, i.e. D. latum, D. nihonkaiense and D. dendriticum. The surface of all marine species is covered by numerous deep pits with species-specific density, whereas the surface of freshwater species is smooth or with isolated shallow hollows or wrinkles. PMID:27224015

  20. Detection of single bacteria - causative agents of meningitis using raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikova, T. V.; Minaeva, S. A.; Sundukov, A. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Bagratashvili, V. N.; Alushin, M. V.; Gonchukov, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnostics of meningitis is a very topical problem as it is a fulminant disease with a high level of mortality. The progress of this disease is, as a rule, accompanied by the appearance of bacteria in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition. The examination of the CSF is well known to be the only reliable approach to the identification of meningitis. However, the traditional biochemical analyses are time consuming and not always reliable, simple, and inexpensive, whereas the optical methods are poorly developed. This work is devoted to the study of Raman spectra of several bacterial cultures which are mainly present during meningitis. Raman microscopy is a prompt and noninvasive technique capable of providing reliable information about molecular-level alterations of biological objects at their minimal quantity and size. It was shown that there are characteristic lines in Raman spectra which can be the reliable markers for determination of bacterial form of meningitis at a level of a single bacterium.

  1. Schizophyllum Commune a Causative Agent of Fungal Sinusitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Premamalini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of maxillary sinusitis caused by Schizophyllum commune, in a 50-year-old female. The patient presented with nasal obstruction, purulent nasal discharge from right side of the nose, cough, headache, and sneezing. Computed tomography revealed extensive opacity of the right maxillary sinus as well as erosion of the nasal wall and maxillary bone. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery was done, and fungal debris present on right side of the maxillary sinus was removed and sent to laboratory. Potassium hydroxide (KOH examination of the nasal discharge showed hyaline, septate hyphae. Primary isolation on Sabouraud's dextrose agar (SDA yielded a white woolly mould. Banana peel culture after 8 weeks showed macroscopically visible fan-shaped fruiting bodies. Lactophenol cotton blue (LPCB mount of the same revealed hyaline septate hyphae, often with clamp connections. Identification was confirmed by the presence of clamp connections formed on the hyphae and by vegetative compatibility with known isolates.

  2. Allergic and non-allergic skin reactions associated with growth hormone therapy: elucidation of causative agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shilpa; Oza, Vikash; Potashner, Renee; Zamora, Patricia; Raisingani, Manish; Shah, Bina

    2018-01-26

    Allergic and non-allergic skin reactions to recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) are uncommon and infrequently reported. However, physicians should be aware of these potential side effects to determine whether the reactions constitute true allergies and how to proceed with growth hormone therapy. To review allergic and non-allergic skin reactions caused by rhGH and subsequent diagnostic workup and management options. We report the case of a 12-year-old healthy male presenting with idiopathic short stature. He developed an itchy skin rash over the chest and abdomen, 15 min after administration of the first dose of rhGH, leading us to review allergic and non-allergic skin reactions to rhGH. In our patient, an immediate skin reaction after administration of rhGH prompted a concern about a type I hypersensitivity reaction (HS) and the discontinuation of rhGH. However, after a dermatologic evaluation and observed administration of rhGH without subsequent rash, the initial eruption was likely an exacerbation of his underlying atopic dermatitis and a type I HS was felt to be unlikely. The rhGH was resumed and he has been on rhGH for the past 1 year with no recurrence of rash and with improvement in growth velocity. Though rare, allergic and non-allergic skin reactions are known to occur with rhGH. It is important to know if the allergic reaction was due to the growth hormone molecule or one of the preservatives. It is also important to consider a non-allergic reaction due to flare up of underlying skin disorders as in our patient.

  3. VNTR analysis reveals unexpected genetic diversity within Mycoplasma agalactiae, the main causative agent of contagious agalactia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayling Roger D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma agalactiae is the main cause of contagious agalactia, a serious disease of sheep and goats, which has major clinical and economic impacts. Previous studies of M. agalactiae have shown it to be unusually homogeneous and there are currently no available epidemiological techniques which enable a high degree of strain differentiation. Results We have developed variable number tandem repeat (VNTR analysis using the sequenced genome of the M. agalactiae type strain PG2. The PG2 genome was found to be replete with tandem repeat sequences and 4 were chosen for further analysis. VNTR 5 was located within the hypothetical protein MAG6170 a predicted lipoprotein. VNTR 14 was intergenic between the hypothetical protein MAG3350 and the hypothetical protein MAG3340. VNTR 17 was intergenic between the hypothetical protein MAG4060 and the hypothetical protein MAG4070 and VNTR 19 spanned the 5' end of the pseudogene for a lipoprotein MAG4310 and the 3' end of the hypothetical lipoprotein MAG4320. We have investigated the genetic diversity of 88 M. agalactiae isolates of wide geographic origin using VNTR analysis and compared it with pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis. Simpson's index of diversity was calculated to be 0.324 for PFGE and 0.574 for VNTR analysis. VNTR analysis revealed unexpected diversity within M. agalactiae with 9 different VNTR types discovered. Some correlation was found between geographical origin and the VNTR type of the isolates. Conclusion VNTR analysis represents a useful, rapid first-line test for use in molecular epidemiological analysis of M. agalactiae for outbreak tracing and control.

  4. Lactobacilli and tartrazine as causative agents of red-color spoilage in cucumber pickle products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Díaz, I M; Kelling, R E; Hale, S; Breidt, F; McFeeters, R F

    2007-09-01

    The cucumber pickling industry has sporadically experienced spoilage outbreaks in pickled cucumber products characterized by development of red color on the surface of the fruits. Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus paracasei were isolated from 2 outbreaks of this spoilage that occurred about 15 y apart during the last 3 decades. Both organisms were shown to produce this spoilage when inoculated into pickled cucumbers while concomitantly degrading the azo dye tartrazine (FD&C yellow nr 5). This food dye is used as a yellow coloring in the brine cover solutions of commercial pickled cucumber products. The red color does not occur in the absence of tartrazine, nor when turmeric is used as a yellow coloring in the pickles. Addition of sodium benzoate to the brine cover solutions of a pickled cucumber product, more specifically hamburger dill pickles, prevented growth of these lactic acid bacteria and the development of the red spoilage.

  5. Antimycobacterial activity of medicinal plants against the causative agent of buruli ulcer: Mycobacterium ulcerans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Keumoe

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The obtained results further strengthened the exploitation of these extracts as potent hits in the treatment of Buruli ulcer. Meanwhile, further studies are required to fully characterize the bioactive compounds.

  6. Rapid Quantitative Serological Test for Detection of Infection with Mycobacterium leprae, the Causative Agent of Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagon, Marivic F.; Maghanoy, Armi; Orcullo, Florenda M.; Cang, Marjorie; Dias, Ronaldo Ferreira; Collovati, Marco; Reed, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy remains an important health problem in a number of regions. Early detection of infection, followed by effective treatment, is critical to reduce disease progression. New sensitive and specific tools for early detection of infection will be a critical component of an effective leprosy elimination campaign. Diagnosis is made by recognizing clinical signs and symptoms, but few clinicians are able to confidently identify these. Simple tests to facilitate referral to leprosy experts are not widely available, and the correct diagnosis of leprosy is often delayed. In this report, we evaluate the performance of a new leprosy serological test (NDO-LID). As expected, the test readily detected clinically confirmed samples from patients with multibacillary (MB) leprosy, and the rate of positive results declined with bacterial burden. NDO-LID detected larger proportions of MB and paucibacillary (PB) leprosy than the alternative, the Standard Diagnostics leprosy test (87.0% versus 81.7% and 32.3% versus 6.5%, respectively), while also demonstrating improved specificity (97.4% versus 90.4%). Coupled with a new cell phone-based test reader platform (Smart Reader), the NDO-LID test provided consistent, objective test interpretation that could facilitate wider use in nonspecialized settings. In addition, results obtained from sera at the time of diagnosis, versus at the end of treatment, indicated that the quantifiable nature of this system can also be used to monitor treatment efficacy. Taken together, these data indicate that the NDO-LID/Smart Reader system can assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of MB leprosy and can detect a significant number of earlier-stage infections. PMID:24478496

  7. Causative agents of nosocomial bloodstream infections and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirturk, Nese; Demiturk, Nese; Demirdal, Tuna

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively investigate nosocomial bloodstream infections (NBI) and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns at Afyon Kocatepe University (AKU) Hospital, Turkey, from January 2006 to December 2011 and to determine the risk factors for nosocomial BSI. Subjects were aged > or = 18 years. The data were obtained from patient files. Five hundred seventy-nine nosocomial infections in 461 patients were included in the study. Eighty-four point six percent was primary and 15.4% were secondary infections. Gram-positive cocci were the most common organisms. When compared year by year there was an increasing trend in antibacterial resistant gram-negative bacilli. The most common infection risk factors were H2 histamine receptor blocker use and blood transfusions. Regular surveillance of BSI is important to monitor changes in the types of microorganisms and their resistance patterns.

  8. Genomic analysis of the causative agents of coccidiosis in domestic chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reid, Adam J.; Blake, Damer P.; Ansari, Hifzur R.

    2014-01-01

    Global production of chickens has trebled in the past two decades and they are now the most important source of dietary animal protein worldwide. Chickens are subject to many infectious diseases that reduce their performance and productivity. Coccidiosis, caused by apicomplexan protozoa of the ge...

  9. Pacific Broad Tapeworm Adenocephalus pacificus as a Causative Agent of Globally Reemerging Diphyllobothriosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuchta, Roman; Serrano-Martínez, M.E.; Scholz, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 10 (2015), s. 1697-1703 ISSN 1080-6040 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/12/1632 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : megaloblastic anemia * identification * populations Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 6.994, year: 2015

  10. A mobile genetic element in Serratia marcescens, a causative agent of onion disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reva O. N.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To screen mobile genetic elements (MGE in the bacterium which caused decay of field-grown onion bulb and to study an integron and gene cassettes associated. Methods. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR and PCR products sequencing were used for both the bacterium and MGE identification. Terminally-labeled Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (TRFLP analysis was performed for detection of any bacterium in the onion bulb tissue. Results. The bacterium, which caused field-grown onion decay, was identified by nucleotide sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes to be S. marcescens known as phytopathogen. However, this isolate did not respond to specific primers designed for pathogenic strains. Inoculation of onion (Allium cepa L., Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heyhn, and lettuce (Lactuca sativa seeds resulted in biomass promotion of symptomless plants. PCR revealed the presence of a class 1 integron in S. marcescens IMBG291 which represents the first isolation of this integron in phytopathogenic Serratia species. The gene cassettes harbored by the integron have been represented with the promoterless genes encoded formimino-glutamate deiminase and ascorbate-specific phosphotransferase system enzyme IIC, and with additional three senseless sequences flanked by a 59-bp element. Conclusion. S. marcescens IMBG291 exhibited plant growth promotion or pathogenicity, depending on the environmental situation, due to horizontally acquired new gene cassettes located in the integron.

  11. Viruses as Sole Causative Agents of Severe Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesker, Fleur M; van Kampen, Jeroen J A; van Rossum, Annemarie M C; de Hoog, Matthijs; Koopmans, Marion P G; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fraaij, Pieter L A

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A viruses are known to cause severe acute respiratory tract infections (SARIs) in children. For other viruses like human rhinoviruses (HRVs) this is less well established. Viral or bacterial co-infections are often considered essential for severe manifestations of these virus infections. The study aims at identifying viruses that may cause SARI in children in the absence of viral and bacterial co-infections, at identifying disease characteristics associated with these single virus infections, and at identifying a possible correlation between viral loads and disease severities. Between April 2007 and March 2012, we identified children (acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) (controls). Data were extracted from the clinical and laboratory databases of our tertiary care paediatric hospital. Patient specimens were tested for fifteen respiratory viruses with real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assays and we selected patients with a single virus infection only. Typical bacterial co-infections were considered unlikely to have contributed to the PICU or MC admission based on C-reactive protein-levels or bacteriological test results if performed. We identified 44 patients admitted to PICU with SARI and 40 patients admitted to MC with ARTI. Twelve viruses were associated with SARI, ten of which were also associated with ARTI in the absence of typical bacterial and viral co-infections, with RSV and HRV being the most frequent causes. Viral loads were not different between PICU-SARI patients and MC-ARTI patients. Both SARI and ARTI may be caused by single viral pathogens in previously healthy children as well as in children with a medical history. No relationship between viral load and disease severity was identified.

  12. Emerging infectious diseases: a guide to diseases, causative agents, and surveillance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beltz, Lisa A

    2011-01-01

    "This important resource offers a comprehensive introduction to emerging and reemerging infectious disease, including the underlying mechanisms of microbial emergence, the technology used to detect...

  13. Purification of a Recombinant Glutathione Transferase from the Causative Agent of Hydatidosis, "Echinococcus granulosus"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleitas, Andrea L.; Randall, Lía M.; Möller, Matías N.; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This practical class activity was designed to introduce students to recombinant protein expression and purification. The principal goal is to shed light on basic aspects concerning recombinant protein production, in particular protein expression, chromatography methods for protein purification, and enzyme activity as a tool to evaluate purity and…

  14. Draft genome of neurotropic nematode parasite Angiostrongylus cantonensis, causative agent of human eosinophilic meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Hoi-Sen; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Razali, Rozaimi; Aziz, Farhanah Abdul; Rosli, Nurul Shielawati Mohamed; Poole-Johnson, Johan; Anwar, Arif

    2015-08-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a bursate nematode parasite that causes eosinophilic meningitis (or meningoencephalitis) in humans in many parts of the world. The genomic data from A. cantonensis will form a useful resource for comparative genomic and chemogenomic studies to aid the development of diagnostics and therapeutics. We have sequenced, assembled and annotated the genome of A. cantonensis. The genome size is estimated to be ∼260 Mb, with 17,280 genomic scaffolds, 91X coverage, 81.45% for complete and 93.95% for partial score based on CEGMA analysis of genome completeness. The number of predicted genes of ≥300 bp was 17,482. A total of 7737 predicted protein-coding genes of ≥50 amino acids were identified in the assembled genome. Among the proteins of known function, kinases are the most abundant followed by transferases. The draft genome contains 34 excretory-secretory proteins (ES), a minimum of 44 Nematode Astacin (NAS) metalloproteases, 12 Homeobox (HOX) genes, and 30 neurotransmitters. The assembled genome size (260 Mb) is larger than those of Pristionchus pacificus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Necator americanus, Caenorhabditis briggsae, Trichinella spiralis, Brugia malayi and Loa loa, but smaller than Haemonchus contortus and Ascaris suum. The repeat content (25%) is similar to H. contortus. The GC content (41.17%) is lower compared to P. pacificus (42.7%) and H. contortus (43.1%) but higher compared to C. briggsae (37.69%), A. suum (37.9%) and N. americanus (40.2%) while the scaffold N50 is 42,191. This draft genome will facilitate the understanding of many unresolved issues on the parasite and the disorder it causes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. H3N2 Virus as Causative Agent of ARDS Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Peris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pandemic influenza virus A(H1N1 2009 was associated with a higher risk of viral pneumonia in comparison with seasonal influenza viruses. The influenza season 2011-2012 was characterized by the prevalent circulation of influenza A(H3N2 viruses. Whereas most H3N2 patients experienced mild, self-limited influenza-like illness, some patients were at increased risk for influenza complications because of age or underlying medical conditions. Cases presented were patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of ECMO referral center (Careggi Teaching Hospital, Florence, Italy. Despite extracorporeal membrane oxygenation treatment (ECMO, one patient with H3N2-induced ARDS did not survive. Our experience suggests that viral aetiology is becoming more important and hospitals should be able to perform a fast differential diagnosis between bacterial and viral aetiology.

  16. Mycobacterium asiaticum as the probable causative agent in a case of olecranon bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, D J; Blacklock, Z M; Ashdown, L R; Böttger, E C

    1995-01-01

    Mycobacterium asiaticum was isolated from fluid aspirated from an olecranon bursa that had become inflamed following a superficial injury. Other possible causes of the inflammation were excluded. No specific antimycobacterial therapy was given. The infection responded to drainage, regular dressing, and immobilization. Our experience suggests that M. asiaticum is a potential cause of infection of the joints and surrounding tissues. PMID:7790435

  17. Further evidence from SSCP and ITS DNA sequencing support Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma equiperdum as subspecies or even strains of Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Y; Lun, Z; Zhu, X; Hide, G; Lai, D

    2016-01-01

    The subgenus Trypanozoon includes three species Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma equiperdum, which are morphologically identical and indistinguishable even using some molecular methods. In this study, PCR-based single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) was used to analyze the ribosomal DNA of the Trypanozoon species. Data indicate different patterns of ITS2 fragments between T. brucei, T. evansi and T. equiperdum by SSCP. Furthermore, analysis of total ITS seque...

  18. Trypanosoma brucei FKBP12 differentially controls motility and cytokinesis in procyclic and bloodstream forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, Anaïs; Rotureau, Brice; Vermeersch, Marjorie; Blisnick, Thierry; Salmon, Didier; Bastin, Philippe; Pays, Etienne; Vanhamme, Luc; Pérez-Morga, David

    2013-02-01

    FKBP12 proteins are able to inhibit TOR kinases or calcineurin phosphatases upon binding of rapamycin or FK506 drugs, respectively. The Trypanosoma brucei FKBP12 homologue (TbFKBP12) was found to be a cytoskeleton-associated protein with specific localization in the flagellar pocket area of the bloodstream form. In the insect procyclic form, RNA interference-mediated knockdown of TbFKBP12 affected motility. In bloodstream cells, depletion of TbFKBP12 affected cytokinesis and cytoskeleton architecture. These last effects were associated with the presence of internal translucent cavities limited by an inside-out configuration of the normal cell surface, with a luminal variant surface glycoprotein coat lined up by microtubules. These cavities, which recreated the streamlined shape of the normal trypanosome cytoskeleton, might represent unsuccessful attempts for cell abscission. We propose that TbFKBP12 differentially affects stage-specific processes through association with the cytoskeleton.

  19. Sec16 determines the size and functioning of the Golgi in the protist parasite, Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealey-Cardona, Marco; Schmidt, Katy; Demmel, Lars; Hirschmugl, Tatjana; Gesell, Tanja; Dong, Gang; Warren, Graham

    2014-06-01

    The Sec16 homologue in Trypanosoma brucei has been identified and characterized. TbSec16 colocalizes with COPII components at the single endoplasmic reticulum exit site (ERES), which is next to the single Golgi stack in the insect (procyclic) form of this organism. Depletion of TbSec16 reduces the size of the ERES and the Golgi, and slows growth and transport of a secretory marker to the cell surface; conversely, overexpression of TbSec16 increases the size of the ERES and Golgi but has no effect on growth or secretion. Together these data suggest that TbSec16 regulates the size of the ERES and Golgi and this size is set for optimal growth of the organism. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Enhanced succinic acid production in Aspergillus saccharolyticus by heterologous expression of fumarate reductase from Trypanosoma brucei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Lei; Lübeck, Mette; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2015-01-01

    production medium as well as the complete medium, but the measured enzyme activities were different depending on the media. Furthermore, a soluble NADH-dependent fumarate reductase gene (frd) from Trypanosoma brucei was inserted and expressed in A. saccharolyticus. The expression of the frd gene led......Aspergillus saccharolyticus exhibits great potential as a cell factory for industrial production of dicarboxylic acids. In the analysis of the organic acid profile, A. saccharolyticus was cultivated in an acid production medium using two different pH conditions. The specific activities...... on the pattern and the amount of organic acids produced by A. saccharolyticus. The wild-type strain produced higher amount of malic acid and succinic acid in the pH buffered condition (pH 6.5) compared with the pH non-buffered condition. The enzyme assays showed that the rTCA branch was active in the acid...

  1. Extracellular Vesicles from Trypanosoma brucei Mediate Virulence Factor Transfer and Cause Host Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szempruch, Anthony J; Sykes, Steven E; Kieft, Rudo; Dennison, Lauren; Becker, Allison C; Gartrell, Anzio; Martin, William J; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Almeida, Igor C; Hajduk, Stephen L; Harrington, John M

    2016-01-14

    Intercellular communication between parasites and with host cells provides mechanisms for parasite development, immune evasion, and disease pathology. Bloodstream African trypanosomes produce membranous nanotubes that originate from the flagellar membrane and disassociate into free extracellular vesicles (EVs). Trypanosome EVs contain several flagellar proteins that contribute to virulence, and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense EVs contain the serum resistance-associated protein (SRA) necessary for human infectivity. T. b. rhodesiense EVs transfer SRA to non-human infectious trypanosomes, allowing evasion of human innate immunity. Trypanosome EVs can also fuse with mammalian erythrocytes, resulting in rapid erythrocyte clearance and anemia. These data indicate that trypanosome EVs are organelles mediating non-hereditary virulence factor transfer and causing host erythrocyte remodeling, inducing anemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Compositional compartmentalization of the nuclear genomes of Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma equiperdum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isacchi, A; Bernardi, G; Bernardi, G

    1993-12-06

    High molecular weight DNA preparations from Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma equiperdum were fractionated by preparative centrifugation in a Cs2SO4 density gradient in the presence of BAMD, bis(acetatomercurimethyl)dioxane, a sequence-specific DNA ligand. Analytical centrifugation in CsCl of the DNA fractions so obtained showed that both DNAs had a bimodal distribution with two major peaks banding at 1.702-1.703 and 1.708 g/cm3 and representing 1/3 and 2/3 of total DNA, respectively. Several minor components were also detected. These results indicate that a compositional compartmentalization is not only found in the genome of vertebrates and plants, as already described, but also in those of protozoa such as Trypanosomes.

  3. Zinc finger nuclease technology: A stable tool for high efficiency transformation in bloodstream form T. brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Gabriela; Kangussu-Marcolino, Monica M; Doiron, Nicholas; Käser, Sandro; de Assis Burle-Caldas, Gabriela; DaRocha, Wanderson D; Teixeira, Santuza M; Roditi, Isabel

    2017-04-01

    In Trypanosoma brucei, the generation of knockout mutants is relatively easy compared to other organisms as transfection methods are well established. These methods have their limitations, however, when it comes to the generation of genome-wide libraries that require a minimum of several hundred thousand transformants. Double-strand breaks with the meganuclease ISce-I dramatically increase transformation efficiency, but are not widely in use as cell lines need to be generated de novo before each transfection. Here we show that zinc finger nucleases are a robust and stable tool that can enhance transformation in bloodstream forms by more than an order of magnitude. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Population genetics of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense: clonality and diversity within and between foci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig W Duffy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes are unusual among pathogenic protozoa in that they can undergo their complete morphological life cycle in the tsetse fly vector with mating as a non-obligatory part of this development. Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, which infects humans and livestock in East and Southern Africa, has classically been described as a host-range variant of the non-human infective Trypanosoma brucei that occurs as stable clonal lineages. We have examined T. b. rhodesiense populations from East (Uganda and Southern (Malawi Africa using a panel of microsatellite markers, incorporating both spatial and temporal analyses. Our data demonstrate that Ugandan T. b. rhodesiense existed as clonal populations, with a small number of highly related genotypes and substantial linkage disequilibrium between pairs of loci. However, these populations were not stable as the dominant genotypes changed and the genetic diversity also reduced over time. Thus these populations do not conform to one of the criteria for strict clonality, namely stability of predominant genotypes over time, and our results show that, in a period in the mid 1990s, the previously predominant genotypes were not detected but were replaced by a novel clonal population with limited genetic relationship to the original population present between 1970 and 1990. In contrast, the Malawi T. b. rhodesiense population demonstrated significantly greater diversity and evidence for frequent genetic exchange. Therefore, the population genetics of T. b. rhodesiense is more complex than previously described. This has important implications for the spread of the single copy T. b. rhodesiense gene that allows human infectivity, and therefore the epidemiology of the human disease, as well as suggesting that these parasites represent an important organism to study the influence of optional recombination upon population genetic dynamics.

  5. Secondary Metabolites from Vietnamese Marine Invertebrates with Activity against Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Phuong Thao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine-derived natural products from invertebrates comprise an extremely diverse and promising source of the compounds from a wide variety of structural classes. This study describes the discovery of five marine natural products with activity against Trypanosoma species by natural product library screening using whole cell in vitro assays. We investigated the anti-trypanosomal activity of the extracts from the soft corals and echinoderms living in Vietnamese seas. Of the samples screened, the methanolic extracts of several marine organisms exhibited potent activities against cultures of Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi (EC50 < 5.0 μg/mL. Among the compounds isolated from these extracts, laevigatol B (1 from Lobophytum crassum and L. laevigatum, (24S-ergost-4-ene-3-one (2 from Sinularia dissecta, astropectenol A (3 from Astropecten polyacanthus, and cholest-8-ene-3β,5α,6β,7α-tetraol (4 from Diadema savignyi showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei with EC50 values ranging from 1.57 ± 0.14 to 14.6 ± 1.36 μM, relative to the positive control, pentamidine (EC50 = 0.015 ± 0.003 μM. Laevigatol B (1 and 5α-cholest-8(14-ene-3β,7α-diol (5 exhibited also significant inhibitory effects on T. cruzi. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds on mammalian cells was also assessed and found to be insignificant in all cases. This is the first report on the inhibitory effects of marine organisms collected in Vietnamese seas against Trypanosoma species responsible for neglected tropical diseases.

  6. Regularity and counterfactuality in Hume's treatment of causation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Oscar de Almeida Marques

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Of the several theories of causation current in our days, Hume is said to be the inspiration of two of the most influential and accepted: the regularity theory, first clearly formulated by Thomas Brown in 1822, and the counterfactual theory, proposed by David Lewis in 1973. After a brief outline of the comparative merits and difficulties of these two views, I proceed to examine whether Hume's own treatment of causation actually corresponds to any of them. I will show that his first definition of cause, coupled with his rules by which to judge about causes and effects, contains elements that, properly developed, allow us to address successfully some traditional difficulties of the regularity view of causation, without resorting to the conceptual resources employed in the counterfactual approach. Therefore, we can properly classify Hume as an advocate of the conception of causation as regularity, noting however that his primary goal in his research and definitions of the concept was to provide not so much an analysis of causation as such, but of causation as we apprehend it, in the form of our ability to make causal inferences and refine them to reach the more sophisticated causal reasonings that are required in the theoretical and practical issues of life.Das diversas teorias da causação existentes em nossos dias, Hume pode ser considerado o precursor de duas das mais influentes e aceitas: a teoria regularista, formulada claramente pela primeira vez por Thomas Brown, em 1822, e a teoria contrafatualista, proposta por David Lewis em 1973. Depois de um breve resumo dos méritos e dificuldades comparativos dessas duas perspectivas, passo a examinar se o tratamento de Hume da causação corresponde, na verdade a algum deles. Mostro que a sua primeira definição de causa, juntamente com suas regras para julgar sobre as causas e efeitos, contém elementos que, devidamente desenvolvidos, permitem-nos abordar com sucesso algumas dificuldades

  7. Alerta Empreendedor e as Abordagens Causation e Effectuation sobre Empreendedorismo/Entrepreneurial Alertness and the Causation and Effectuation Approaches to Entrepreneurship

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valter da Silva Faia; Marco Aurélio Garcia Rosa; Hilka Pelizza Vier Machado

    2014-01-01

    .... This study aimed to relate the level of entrepreneurial alertness to entrepreneurial approaches causation, consistent with the concept of planning and analysis, and effectuation, consistent with the...

  8. Bias and Causation Models and Judgment for Valid Comparisons

    CERN Document Server

    Weisberg, Herbert I

    2010-01-01

    A one-of-a-kind resource on identifying and dealing with bias in statistical research on causal effects. Do cell phones cause cancer? Can a new curriculum increase student achievement? Determining what the real causes of such problems are, and how powerful their effects may be, are central issues in research across various fields of study. Some researchers are highly skeptical of drawing causal conclusions except in tightly controlled randomized experiments, while others discount the threats posed by different sources of bias, even in less rigorous observational studies. Bias and Causation pre

  9. Coherence, causation, and the future of cognitive neuroscience research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Christopher H; Chrysikou, Evangelia G

    2014-01-01

    Nachev and Hacker's conceptual analysis of the neural antecedents of voluntary action underscores the real danger of ignoring the meta-theoretical apparatus of cognitive neuroscience research. In this response, we temper certain claims (e.g., whether or not certain research questions are incoherent), consider a more extreme consequence of their argument against cognitive neuroscience (i.e., whether or not one can speak about causation with neural antecedents at all), and, finally, highlight recent methodological developments that exemplify cognitive neuroscientists' focus on studying the brain as a parallel, dynamic, and highly complex biological system.

  10. Causation at Different Levels: Tracking the Commitments of Mechanistic Explanations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazekas, Peter; Kertész, Gergely

    2011-01-01

    This paper tracks the commitments of mechanistic explanations focusing on the relation between activities at different levels. It is pointed out that the mechanistic approach is inherently committed to identifying causal connections at higher levels with causal connections at lower levels......, whereas, in a recent paper, Craver and Bechtel argue that the mechanistic approach is able to make downward causation intelligible. The paper concludes that the mechanistic approach imbued with identity statements is no better candidate for anchoring higher levels to lower ones while maintaining...

  11. 77 FR 5711 - Guidelines for Determining Probability of Causation Under the Energy Employees Occupational...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 81 RIN 0920-AA39 Guidelines for Determining Probability of Causation Under... proposed amendment to the probability of causation guidelines.\\2\\ All of the comments offered support for... probability of causation value of ``zero.'' There were two related scientific reasons for designating CLL as...

  12. Reduced Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Is a Late Adaptation of Trypanosoma brucei brucei to Isometamidium Preceded by Mutations in the γ Subunit of the F1Fo-ATPase.

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    Anthonius A Eze

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Isometamidium is the main prophylactic drug used to prevent the infection of livestock with trypanosomes that cause Animal African Trypanosomiasis. As well as the animal infective trypanosome species, livestock can also harbor the closely related human infective subspecies T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. Resistance to isometamidium is a growing concern, as is cross-resistance to the diamidine drugs diminazene and pentamidine.Two isometamidium resistant Trypanosoma brucei clones were generated (ISMR1 and ISMR15, being 7270- and 16,000-fold resistant to isometamidium, respectively, which retained their ability to grow in vitro and establish an infection in mice. Considerable cross-resistance was shown to ethidium bromide and diminazene, with minor cross-resistance to pentamidine. The mitochondrial membrane potentials of both resistant cell lines were significantly reduced compared to the wild type. The net uptake rate of isometamidium was reduced 2-3-fold but isometamidium efflux was similar in wild-type and resistant lines. Fluorescence microscopy and PCR analysis revealed that ISMR1 and ISMR15 had completely lost their kinetoplast DNA (kDNA and both lines carried a mutation in the nuclearly encoded γ subunit gene of F1 ATPase, truncating the protein by 22 amino acids. The mutation compensated for the loss of the kinetoplast in bloodstream forms, allowing near-normal growth, and conferred considerable resistance to isometamidium and ethidium as well as significant resistance to diminazene and pentamidine, when expressed in wild type trypanosomes. Subsequent exposure to either isometamidium or ethidium led to rapid loss of kDNA and a further increase in isometamidium resistance.Sub-lethal exposure to isometamidium gives rise to viable but highly resistant trypanosomes that, depending on sub-species, are infective to humans and cross-resistant to at least some diamidine drugs. The crucial mutation is in the F1 ATPase γ subunit, which

  13. Schistosoma mansoni c-AMP-dependent Protein Kinase (PKA): A Potential New Drug Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-07

    damage during infection by Trypanosoma cruzi . Antimicrob Agents Chemother 49: 5160- 5161. 64. Cioli D, Valle C, Angelucci F, Miele AE (2008) Will new...analysis of the kinomes of three pathogenic trypanosomatids: Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi . BMC Genomics 6: 127. 94...Trypansoma brucei and T. cruzi (causative agents of African and American Trypanosomiasis respectively) have identified numerous PKs to which there

  14. No gold standard estimation of the sensitivity and specificity of two molecular diagnostic protocols for Trypanosoma brucei spp. in Western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barend Mark de Clare Bronsvoort

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available African animal trypanosomiasis is caused by a range of tsetse transmitted protozoan parasites includingTrypanosoma vivax, Trypanosoma congolense and Trypansoma brucei. In Western Kenya and other parts of East Africa two subspecies of T. brucei, T.b. brucei and the zoonoticT.b. rhodesiense, co-circulate in livestock. A range of polymerase chain reactions (PCR have been developed as important molecular diagnostic tools for epidemiological investigations of T. brucei s.l. in the animal reservoir and of its zoonotic potential. Quantification of the relative performance of different diagnostic PCRs is essential to ensure comparability of studies. This paper describes an evaluation of two diagnostic test systems for T. brucei using a T. brucei s.l. specific PCR [1] and a single nested PCR targeting the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS regions of trypanosome ribosomal DNA [2]. A Bayesian formulation of the Hui-Walter latent class model was employed to estimate their test performance in the absence of a gold standard test for detecting T.brucei s.l. infections in ear-vein blood samples from cattle, pig, sheep and goat populations in Western Kenya, stored on Whatman FTA cards. The results indicate that the system employing the T. brucei s.l. specific PCR (Se1=0.760 had a higher sensitivity than the ITS-PCR (Se2=0.640; both have high specificity (Sp1=0.998; Sp2=0.997. The true prevalences for livestock populations were estimated (pcattle=0.091, ppigs=0.066, pgoats=0.005, psheep=0.006, taking into account the uncertainties in the specificity and sensitivity of the two test systems. Implications of test performance include the required survey sample size; due to its higher sensitivity and specificity, the T. brucei s.l. specific PCR requires a consistently smaller sample size than the ITS-PCR for the detection of T. brucei s.l. However the ITS-PCR is able to simultaneously screen samples for other pathogenic trypanosomes and may thus be, overall, a better

  15. Beliefs and perception of ill-health causation: a socio-cultural qualitative study in rural North-Eastern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahissay, Mesfin H; Fenta, Teferi G; Boon, Heather

    2017-01-26

    Understanding perceptions of the causes of ill-health common in indigenous communities may help policy makers to design effective integrated primary health care strategies to serve these communities. This study explored the indigenous beliefs of ill-health causation among those living in the Tehuledere Woreda /district/ in North East Ethiopia from a socio-cultural perspective. The study employed a qualitative ethnographic method informed by Murdock's Theory of Illness. Participatory observation, over a total of 5 months during the span of one year, was supplemented by focus group discussions (n = 96 participants in 10 groups) and in-depth interviews (n = 20) conducted with key informants. Data were analyzed thematically using narrative strategies. In these communities, illness is perceived to have supernatural (e.g., almighty God/ Allah, nature spirits, and human agents of the supernatural), natural (e.g., environmental sanitation and personal hygiene, poverty, biological and psychological factors) and societal causes (e.g., social trust, experiences of family support and harmony; and violation of social taboos). Therefore, the explanatory model of illness causation in this community was very similar to that of the Murdock model with one key difference: social elements need to be added to the model. Members of the study community believes that supernatural, natural and social elements are linked to ill-health causation. A successful integrated primary health care strategy should include strategies for supporting patients' needs in all three of these domains.

  16. Diagnosis of human trypanosomiasis, due to Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in central Africa, by the polymerase chain reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Penchenier, Laurent; Simo, G.; Grébaut, Pascal; Nkinin, S.; Laveissière, Claude; Herder, Stéphane

    2000-01-01

    During a mass screening of sleeping sickness conducted in 1998 and 1999, and involving 27,932 persons in Cameroon and the Central African Republic, we tested the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on whole blood for the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis due to #Trypanosoma brucei gambiense$. The 1858 samples obtained were from 4 groups : 155 infected patients, 1432 serological suspects detected by the card agglutination test for trypanosomiasis (CATT), 222 negative controls living in th...

  17. T. brucei infection reduces B lymphopoiesis in bone marrow and truncates compensatory splenic lymphopoiesis through transitional B-cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viki Bockstal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes of the Trypanosoma brucei species are extracellular protozoan parasites that cause the deadly disease African trypanosomiasis in humans and contribute to the animal counterpart, Nagana. Trypanosome clearance from the bloodstream is mediated by antibodies specific for their Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG coat antigens. However, T. brucei infection induces polyclonal B cell activation, B cell clonal exhaustion, sustained depletion of mature splenic Marginal Zone B (MZB and Follicular B (FoB cells, and destruction of the B-cell memory compartment. To determine how trypanosome infection compromises the humoral immune defense system we used a C57BL/6 T. brucei AnTat 1.1 mouse model and multicolor flow cytometry to document B cell development and maturation during infection. Our results show a more than 95% reduction in B cell precursor numbers from the CLP, pre-pro-B, pro-B, pre-B and immature B cell stages in the bone marrow. In the spleen, T. brucei induces extramedullary B lymphopoiesis as evidenced by significant increases in HSC-LMPP, CLP, pre-pro-B, pro-B and pre-B cell populations. However, final B cell maturation is abrogated by infection-induced apoptosis of transitional B cells of both the T1 and T2 populations which is not uniquely dependent on TNF-, Fas-, or prostaglandin-dependent death pathways. Results obtained from ex vivo co-cultures of living bloodstream form trypanosomes and splenocytes demonstrate that trypanosome surface coat-dependent contact with T1/2 B cells triggers their deletion. We conclude that infection-induced and possibly parasite-contact dependent deletion of transitional B cells prevents replenishment of mature B cell compartments during infection thus contributing to a loss of the host's capacity to sustain antibody responses against recurring parasitemic waves.

  18. Apocytochrome b and other mitochondrial DNA sequences are differentially expressed during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei.

    OpenAIRE

    Feagin, J E; Jasmer, D P; Stuart, K

    1985-01-01

    Cytochromes and Krebs cycle enzymes are not detected in bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei but are present in procyclic forms. We have analyzed transcription of mitochondrial sequences which contain the apocytochrome b gene and several other open reading frames (ORFs). Multiple transcripts map to individual DNA sequences located on both DNA strands. Larger low abundance transcripts map to multiple ORFs and may be precursor RNAs. Small abundant transcripts map to G + C rich sequences that...

  19. A target-based high throughput screen yields Trypanosoma brucei hexokinase small molecule inhibitors with antiparasitic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R Sharlow

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei utilizes glycolysis exclusively for ATP production during infection of the mammalian host. The first step in this metabolic pathway is mediated by hexokinase (TbHK, an enzyme essential to the parasite that transfers the gamma-phospho of ATP to a hexose. Here we describe the identification and confirmation of novel small molecule inhibitors of bacterially expressed TbHK1, one of two TbHKs expressed by T. brucei, using a high throughput screening assay.Exploiting optimized high throughput screening assay procedures, we interrogated 220,233 unique compounds and identified 239 active compounds from which ten small molecules were further characterized. Computation chemical cluster analyses indicated that six compounds were structurally related while the remaining four compounds were classified as unrelated or singletons. All ten compounds were approximately 20-17,000-fold more potent than lonidamine, a previously identified TbHK1 inhibitor. Seven compounds inhibited T. brucei blood stage form parasite growth (0.03brucei parasites, Leishmania promastigotes, and mammalian cell lines. Analysis of two structurally related compounds, ebselen and SID 17387000, revealed that both were mixed inhibitors of TbHK1 with respect to ATP. Additionally, both compounds inhibited parasite lysate-derived HK activity. None of the compounds displayed structural similarity to known hexokinase inhibitors or human African trypanosomiasis therapeutics.The novel chemotypes identified here could represent leads for future therapeutic development against the African trypanosome.

  20. Downward causation by information control in micro-organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Luc; Calkins, Erin R

    2012-02-06

    The concepts of functional equivalence classes and information control in living systems are useful to characterize downward (or top-down) causation by feedback information control in synthetic biology. Herein, we re-analyse published experiments of microbiology and synthetic biology that demonstrate the existence of several classes of functional equivalence in microbial organisms. Classes of functional equivalence from the bacterial operating system, which processes and controls the information encoded in the genome, can readily be interpreted as strong evidence, if not demonstration, of top-down causation (TDC) by information control. The proposed biological framework reveals how this type of causality is put in action in the cellular operating system. Considerations on TDC by information control and adaptive selection can be useful for synthetic biology by delineating the irreducible set of properties that characterizes living systems. Through a 'retro-synthetic' biology approach, these considerations could contribute to identifying the constraints behind the emergence of molecular complexity during the evolution of an ancient RNA/peptide world into a modern DNA/RNA/protein world. In conclusion, we propose TDCs by information control and adaptive selection as the two types of downward causality absolutely necessary for life.

  1. Deletion Mutagenesis and Identification of Causative Mutations in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shangang; Li, Aixia; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David

    2018-01-01

    We describe a method for gamma-irradiation of mature maize seeds to generate mutants with opaque endosperm and reduced kernel fill phenotypes. We also describe methods for mapping mutants and identifying causal gene mutations. Using this method, a population of 1788M2 families and 47 Mo17 × F2s showing stable, segregating, and viable kernel phenotypes was developed. For molecular characterization of the mutants, we utilized a novel functional genomics platform that combines separate Bulked Segregant RNA and exome sequencing data sets (BSREx-seq) to map causative mutations and identify candidate genes within mapping intervals. We also describe the use of exome capture sequencing of F2 mutant and normal pools to perform mapping and candidate gene identification without the need for separate RNA-seq (BSEx-seq). To exemplify the utility of the deletion mutants for functional genomics and provide proof-of-concept for the bioinformatics platform, we summarize the identification of the causative deletion in two mutants. Mutant 937, which was characterized by BSREx-seq, harbors a 6203-bp in-frame deletion covering six exons within the Opaque-1 gene on chromosome 4. Preliminary investigation of opaque mutant 1486 with BSEx-seq shows a tight mapping interval and associated deletion on chromosome 10.

  2. Extracellular-signal regulated kinase 8 of Trypanosoma brucei uniquely phosphorylates its proliferating cell nuclear antigen homolog and reveals exploitable properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenciano, Ana L; Knudsen, Giselle M; Mackey, Zachary B

    2016-10-17

    The Trypanosoma brucei subspecies T. brucei gambiense and T. brucei rhodesiense are vector-borne pathogens that cause sleeping sickness also known as Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), which is fatal if left untreated. The drugs that treat HAT are ineffective and cause toxic side effects. One strategy for identifying safer and more effective HAT drugs is to therapeutically exploit essential gene targets in T. brucei. Genes that make up a basic mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) network are present in T. brucei. Tb927.10.5140 encodes an essential MAPK that is homologous to the human extracellular-signal regulated kinase 8 (HsERK8) which forms a tight complex with the replication factor proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) to stabilize intracellular PCNA levels. Here we demonstrate that (TbPCNA) is uniquely phos-phorylated on serine (S) and threonine (T) residues in T. brucei and that TbERK8 phosphorylates TbPCNA at each of these residues. The ability of an ERK8 homolog to phosphorylate a PCNA homolog is a novel biochemical property that is first demonstrated here in T. brucei and may be unique to this pathogen. We demonstrate that the potent HsERK8 inhibitor Ro318220, has an IC50 for TbERK8 that is several hundred times higher than its reported IC50 for HsERK8. This indicated that the active sites of TbERK8 and HsERK8 can be selectively inhibited, which provides a rational basis for discovering inhibitors that specifically target this essential parasite MAPK to kill the parasite.

  3. Public awareness of human papillomavirus as a causative factor for oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael U; Carr, Michele M; Goldenberg, David

    2015-06-01

    To assess the public's awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) as a causative factor for oropharyngeal cancer. Twenty-three-item survey. Local shopping malls and Maxwell Air Force Base in 2012. Respondents were randomly chosen to participate in 23-item survey at various local shopping malls and at Maxwell Air Force Base in 2012. The χ(2) test was used in statistical analysis. The majority of respondents (n = 319) were civilians; 158 were military officer trainees (MOTs). All MOTs had a bachelor's degree or higher, while 37% of civilian respondents had a bachelor's degree or higher. Most MOTs (82%) were aware of oropharyngeal cancer, and 53% of civilians had not heard of oropharyngeal cancer (P < .0001). Most respondents (73% civilian and 91% military) were aware of the association between HPV and cervical cancer. Conversely, 75% of civilian population and 49% of MOTs were not aware of the association between HPV and oropharyngeal cancer (P < .0001). The majority of respondents (61% military and 81% civilian) did not know that both sexes were eligible for HPV vaccine (P < .0001). Most respondents were aware that HPV is a causative agent of cervical cancer. However, the majority were not aware of the association between oropharyngeal cancer and HPV. Furthermore, many respondents were not aware that HPV equally affects males and females and that the vaccine is available for both sexes. This underscores the need to educate the public on the availability of HPV vaccine and the association between HPV and oropharyngeal cancer. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  4. Channel-forming activities in the glycosomal fraction from the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Melisa Gualdron-López

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glycosomes are a specialized form of peroxisomes (microbodies present in unicellular eukaryotes that belong to the Kinetoplastea order, such as Trypanosoma and Leishmania species, parasitic protists causing severe diseases of livestock and humans in subtropical and tropical countries. The organelles harbour most enzymes of the glycolytic pathway that is responsible for substrate-level ATP production in the cell. Glycolysis is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei and enzymes comprising this pathway have been validated as drug targets. Glycosomes are surrounded by a single membrane. How glycolytic metabolites are transported across the glycosomal membrane is unclear. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We hypothesized that glycosomal membrane, similarly to membranes of yeast and mammalian peroxisomes, contains channel-forming proteins involved in the selective transfer of metabolites. To verify this prediction, we isolated a glycosomal fraction from bloodstream-form T. brucei and reconstituted solubilized membrane proteins into planar lipid bilayers. The electrophysiological characteristics of the channels were studied using multiple channel recording and single channel analysis. Three main channel-forming activities were detected with current amplitudes 70-80 pA, 20-25 pA, and 8-11 pA, respectively (holding potential +10 mV and 3.0 M KCl as an electrolyte. All channels were in fully open state in a range of voltages ±150 mV and showed no sub-conductance transitions. The channel with current amplitude 20-25 pA is anion-selective (P(K+/P(Cl-∼0.31, while the other two types of channels are slightly selective for cations (P(K+/P(Cl- ratios ∼1.15 and ∼1.27 for the high- and low-conductance channels, respectively. The anion-selective channel showed an intrinsic current rectification that may suggest a functional asymmetry of the channel's pore. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that the membrane of glycosomes

  5. Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Agents | Okolie | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article gives a brief review of anti-retroviral agents with activity against the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) the causative agen of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). It also outlines the principles, mode of action of anti-HIV agents and their sites of therapeutic intervention. Zidovudine or Azidothymidine ...

  6. Perceptions of Older People Regarding Their Vision and Incident Causation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Mei Ying; Chu, Byoung Sun; Lee, Pei-Chu; Chiang, Te-Ju; Alshamli, Nasser; Alghamdi, Waleed; Lai, Jennifer; Yeung, Wendy; Bridge, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    It is widely known that visual impairment (VI) is a risk factor for falls, but patients or their eye care practitioners may not recognize other kinds of incidents as being problematic because of their vision. Consequently, older people with VI may have unmet needs for advice on how to carry out activities of daily living safely. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to understand whether older people with VI consider their vision as a causative factor of incidents they experience and their perceptions regarding the prevention of future incidents. If sample size permitted, a secondary aim was to evaluate whether quantitative findings supported their perceptions. The study design was a prospective cohort study evaluating injurious and damaging incidents and related near misses using open questions in a written 2-weekly large-print diary with active follow-up over 8 weeks in older people (>60 years, n = 80) with and without VI. Baseline measures included habitual binocular visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, visual fields, 3-m walk test, and Short Form 12 physical and mental component scores. Participants' diary entries were coded. Factor analysis and binary logistic analysis were used to investigate whether baseline measures were predictive of incident occurrence. Risk and preventative factors identified were compared. Participants perceived that their vision was implicated in bump and fall incidents. Quantitative analysis indicated that contrast sensitivity and fitness were significant predictors of incident occurrence. Six vision-related and five non-vision-related causative factors were identified by participants as contributing factors. Participants frequently stated "don't know" when asked to identify solutions to prevent incident recurrence. Participants had unmet needs for advice in relation to incident prevention. It would be prudent for eye care practitioners to raise incident prevention in eye care consultations regardless of voiced patient concerns.

  7. Why are educated adults slim-Causation or selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hippel, Paul T; Lynch, Jamie L

    2014-03-01

    More educated adults tend to have lower body mass index (BMI) and a lower risk of overweight and obesity. We contrast two explanations for this education gradient in BMI. One explanation is selection: adolescents with high BMI are less likely to plan for, attend, and complete higher levels of education. An alternative explanation is causation: higher education confers lifelong social, economic, and psychological benefits that help adults to restrain BMI growth. We test the relative importance of selection and causation using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 cohort (NLSY97), which tracks self-reported BMI from adolescence (age 15) through young adulthood (age 29). Ordinal regression models confirm the selection hypothesis that high-BMI adolescents are less likely to complete higher levels of education. Selection has primarily to do with the fact that high-BMI adolescents tend to come from socioeconomically disadvantaged families and tend to have low grades and test scores. Among high-BMI girls there is also some evidence that educational attainment is limited by bullying, poor health, and early pregnancy. About half the selection of high-BMI girls out of higher education remains unexplained. Fixed-effects models control for selection and suggest that the causal effect of education on BMI, though significant, accounts for only one-quarter of the mean BMI differences between more and less educated adults at age 29. Among young adults, it appears that most of the education gradient in BMI is due to selection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Polysomes of Trypanosoma brucei: Association with Initiation Factors and RNA-Binding Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Klein

    Full Text Available We report here the results of experiments designed to identify RNA-binding proteins that might be associated with Trypanosoma brucei polysomes. After some preliminary mass spectrometry of polysomal fractions, we investigated the distributions of selected tagged proteins using sucrose gradients and immunofluorescence. As expected, the polysomal fractions contained nearly all annotated ribosomal proteins, the translation-associated protein folding complex, and many translation factors, but also many other abundant proteins. Results suggested that cap-binding proteins EIF4E3 and EIF4E4 were associated with both free and membrane-bound polysomes. The EIF4E binding partners EIF4G4 and EIF4G3 were present but the other EIF4E and EIF4G paralogues were not detected. The dominant EIF4E in the polysomal fraction is EIF4E4 and very few polysomal mRNAs are associated with EIF4G. Thirteen potential mRNA-binding proteins were detected in the polysomes, including the known polysome-associated protein RBP42. The locations of two of the other proteins were tested after epitope tagging: RBP29 was in the nucleus and ZC3H29 was in the cytoplasm. Quantitative analyses showed that specific association of an RNA-binding protein with the polysome fraction in sucrose gradients will not be detected if the protein is in more than 25-fold molar excess over its target binding sites.

  9. Dynamic modelling under uncertainty: the case of Trypanosoma brucei energy metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Achcar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic models of metabolism require detailed knowledge of kinetic parameters. However, due to measurement errors or lack of data this knowledge is often uncertain. The model of glycolysis in the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei is a particularly well analysed example of a quantitative metabolic model, but so far it has been studied with a fixed set of parameters only. Here we evaluate the effect of parameter uncertainty. In order to define probability distributions for each parameter, information about the experimental sources and confidence intervals for all parameters were collected. We created a wiki-based website dedicated to the detailed documentation of this information: the SilicoTryp wiki (http://silicotryp.ibls.gla.ac.uk/wiki/Glycolysis. Using information collected in the wiki, we then assigned probability distributions to all parameters of the model. This allowed us to sample sets of alternative models, accurately representing our degree of uncertainty. Some properties of the model, such as the repartition of the glycolytic flux between the glycerol and pyruvate producing branches, are robust to these uncertainties. However, our analysis also allowed us to identify fragilities of the model leading to the accumulation of 3-phosphoglycerate and/or pyruvate. The analysis of the control coefficients revealed the importance of taking into account the uncertainties about the parameters, as the ranking of the reactions can be greatly affected. This work will now form the basis for a comprehensive Bayesian analysis and extension of the model considering alternative topologies.

  10. Functional analysis of TOEFAZ1 uncovers protein domains essential for cytokinesis in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair-Davis, Amy N; McAllaster, Michael R; de Graffenried, Christopher L

    2017-10-09

    The parasite Trypanosoma brucei is highly polarized, including a flagellum that is attached along the cell surface by the flagellum attachment zone (FAZ). During cell division, the new FAZ positions the cleavage furrow, which ingresses from the anterior tip of the cell towards the posterior. We recently identified Tip Of the Extending FAZ protein 1 (TOEFAZ1) as an essential protein in trypanosome cytokinesis. We analyzed the localization and function of TOEFAZ1 domains using overexpression and RNAi complementation. TOEFAZ1 comprises three domains with separable functions: an N-terminal α-helical domain that may be involved in FAZ recruitment, a central intrinsically disordered domain that retains the morphogenic kinase TbPLK at the new FAZ tip, and a C-terminal zinc finger domain necessary for TOEFAZ1 oligomerization. Both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains are essential for TOEFAZ1 function, but TbPLK retention at the FAZ is not necessary for cytokinesis. The feasibility of alternate cytokinetic pathways that do not employ TOEFAZ1 are also assessed. Our results show that TOEFAZ1 is a multimeric scaffold for recruiting proteins that control the timing and location of cleavage furrow ingression. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Spliced leader trapping reveals widespread alternative splicing patterns in the highly dynamic transcriptome of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nilsson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Trans-splicing of leader sequences onto the 5'ends of mRNAs is a widespread phenomenon in protozoa, nematodes and some chordates. Using parallel sequencing we have developed a method to simultaneously map 5'splice sites and analyze the corresponding gene expression profile, that we term spliced leader trapping (SLT. The method can be applied to any organism with a sequenced genome and trans-splicing of a conserved leader sequence. We analyzed the expression profiles and splicing patterns of bloodstream and insect forms of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. We detected the 5' splice sites of 85% of the annotated protein-coding genes and, contrary to previous reports, found up to 40% of transcripts to be differentially expressed. Furthermore, we discovered more than 2500 alternative splicing events, many of which appear to be stage-regulated. Based on our findings we hypothesize that alternatively spliced transcripts present a new means of regulating gene expression and could potentially contribute to protein diversity in the parasite. The entire dataset can be accessed online at TriTrypDB or through: http://splicer.unibe.ch/.

  12. Isothermal microcalorimetry, a new tool to monitor drug action against Trypanosoma brucei and Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Wenzler

    Full Text Available Isothermal microcalorimetry is an established tool to measure heat flow of physical, chemical or biological processes. The metabolism of viable cells produces heat, and if sufficient cells are present, their heat production can be assessed by this method. In this study, we investigated the heat flow of two medically important protozoans, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Plasmodium falciparum. Heat flow signals obtained for these pathogens allowed us to monitor parasite growth on a real-time basis as the signals correlated with the number of viable cells. To showcase the potential of microcalorimetry for measuring drug action on pathogenic organisms, we tested the method with three antitrypanosomal drugs, melarsoprol, suramin and pentamidine and three antiplasmodial drugs, chloroquine, artemether and dihydroartemisinin, each at two concentrations on the respective parasite. With the real time measurement, inhibition was observed immediately by a reduced heat flow compared to that in untreated control samples. The onset of drug action, the degree of inhibition and the time to death of the parasite culture could conveniently be monitored over several days. Microcalorimetry is a valuable element to be added to the toolbox for drug discovery for protozoal diseases such as human African trypanosomiasis and malaria. The method could probably be adapted to other protozoan parasites, especially those growing extracellularly.

  13. Flux Analysis of the Trypanosoma brucei Glycolysis Based on a Multiobjective-Criteria Bioinformatic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Ghozlane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite of major of interest in discovering new genes for drug targets. This parasite alternates its life cycle between the mammal host(s (bloodstream form and the insect vector (procyclic form, with two divergent glucose metabolism amenable to in vitro culture. While the metabolic network of the bloodstream forms has been well characterized, the flux distribution between the different branches of the glucose metabolic network in the procyclic form has not been addressed so far. We present a computational analysis (called Metaboflux that exploits the metabolic topology of the procyclic form, and allows the incorporation of multipurpose experimental data to increase the biological relevance of the model. The alternatives resulting from the structural complexity of networks are formulated as an optimization problem solved by a metaheuristic where experimental data are modeled in a multiobjective function. Our results show that the current metabolic model is in agreement with experimental data and confirms the observed high metabolic flexibility of glucose metabolism. In addition, Metaboflux offers a rational explanation for the high flexibility in the ratio between final products from glucose metabolism, thsat is, flux redistribution through the malic enzyme steps.

  14. A transcription-independent epigenetic mechanism is associated with antigenic switching in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aresta-Branco, Francisco; Pimenta, Silvia; Figueiredo, Luisa M

    2016-04-20

    Antigenic variation in Trypanosoma brucei relies on periodic switching of variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs), which are transcribed monoallelically by RNA polymerase I from one of about 15 bloodstream expression sites (BES). Chromatin of the actively transcribed BES is depleted of nucleosomes, but it is unclear if this open conformation is a mere consequence of a high rate of transcription, or whether it is maintained by a transcription-independent mechanism. Using an inducible BES-silencing reporter strain, we observed that chromatin of the active BES remains open for at least 24 hours after blocking transcription. This conformation is independent of the cell-cycle stage, but dependent upon TDP1, a high mobility group box protein. For two days after BES silencing, we detected a transient and reversible derepression of several silent BESs within the population, suggesting that cells probe other BESs before commitment to one, which is complete by 48 hours. FACS sorting and subsequent subcloning confirmed that probing cells are switching intermediates capable of returning to the original BES, switch to the probed BES or to a different BES. We propose that regulation of BES chromatin structure is an epigenetic mechanism important for successful antigenic switching. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Duplicated paralogous genes subject to positive selection in the genome of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D Emes

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Whole genome studies have highlighted duplicated genes as important substrates for adaptive evolution. We have investigated adaptive evolution in this class of genes in the human parasite Trypanosoma brucei, as indicated by the ratio of non-synonymous (amino-acid changing to synonymous (amino acid retaining nucleotide substitution rates.We have identified duplicated genes that are most rapidly evolving in this important human parasite. This is the first attempt to investigate adaptive evolution in this species at the codon level. We identify 109 genes within 23 clusters of paralogous gene expansions to be subject to positive selection.Genes identified include surface antigens in both the mammalian and insect host life cycle stage suggesting that competitive interaction is not solely with the adaptive immune system of the mammalian host. Also surface transporters related to drug resistance and genes related to developmental progression are detected. We discuss how adaptive evolution of these genes may highlight lineage specific processes essential for parasite survival. We also discuss the implications of adaptive evolution of these targets for parasite biology and control.

  16. Further evidence from SSCP and ITS DNA sequencing support Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma equiperdum as subspecies or even strains of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yan-Zi; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Hide, Geoff; Lai, De-Hua

    2016-07-01

    The subgenus Trypanozoon includes three species Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma equiperdum, which are morphologically identical and indistinguishable even using some molecular methods. In this study, PCR-based single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) was used to analyze the ribosomal DNA of the Trypanozoon species. Data indicate different patterns of ITS2 fragments between T. brucei, T. evansi and T. equiperdum by SSCP. Furthermore, analysis of total ITS sequences within these three members of the subgenus Trypanozoon showed a high degree of homology using phylogenetic analysis but were polyphyletic in haplotype networks. These data provide novel nuclear evidence to further support the notion that T. evansi and T. equiperdum should be subspecies or even strains of T. brucei. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of Isothermal Amplification Techniques for Identification of Madurella mycetomatis, the Prevalent Agent of Human Mycetoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Sarah A; van de Sande, Wendy W J; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Fahal, Ahmed H; Mhmoud, Najwa A; de Hoog, G S

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate diagnosis and treatment of eumycetoma may vary significantly depending on the causative agent. To date, the most common fungus causing mycetoma worldwide is Madurella mycetomatis. This species fails to express any recognizable morphological characteristics, and reliable identification

  18. Commensal Koch's postulates: establishing causation in human microbiota research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, B Anne; Forster, Samuel C; Lawley, Trevor D

    2017-11-04

    Advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies and the development of sophisticated bioinformatics analysis methods, algorithms, and pipelines to handle the large amounts of data generated have driven the field of human microbiome research forward. This specialist knowledge has been crucial to thoroughly mine the human gut microbiota, particularly in the absence of methods for the routine cultivation of most enteric microorganisms. In recent years, however, significant efforts have been made to address the 'great plate count anomaly' and to overcome the barriers to cultivation of the fastidious and mostly strictly anaerobic bacteria that reside in the human gut. As a result, many new species have been discovered, characterised, genome sequenced, and deposited in culture collections. These continually expanding resources enable experimental investigation of the human gut microbiota, validation of hypotheses made with sequence-based analyses, and phenotypic characterisation of its constituent microbes. Herein we propose a variant of Koch's postulates, aimed at providing a framework to establish causation in microbiome studies, with a particular focus on demonstrating the health-promoting role of the commensal gut microbiota. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Human factors in the causation of road traffic crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridou, E; Moustaki, M

    2000-01-01

    Road traffic crashes (RTCs) are responsible for a substantial fraction of morbidity and mortality and are responsible for more years of life lost than most of human diseases. In this review, we have tried to delineate behavioral factors that collectively represent the principal cause of three out of five RTCs and contribute to the causation of most of the remaining. Although sharp distinctions are not always possible, a classification of behavioral factors is both necessary and feasible. Thus, behavioral factors can be distinguished as (i) those that reduce capability on a long-term basis (inexperience, aging, disease and disability, alcoholism, drug abuse), (ii) those that reduce capability on a short-term basis (drowsiness, fatigue, acute alcohol intoxication, short term drug effects, binge eating, acute psychological stress, temporary distraction), (iii) those that promote risk taking behavior with long-term impact (overestimation of capabilities, macho attitude, habitual speeding, habitual disregard of traffic regulations, indecent driving behavior, non-use of seat belt or helmet, inappropriate sitting while driving, accident proneness) and (iv) those that promote risk taking behavior with short-term impact (moderate ethanol intake, psychotropic drugs, motor vehicle crime, suicidal behavior, compulsive acts). The classification aims to assist in the conceptualization of the problem that may also contribute to behavior modification-based efforts.

  20. Assigning the causative lightning to the whistlers observed on satellites

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    J. Chum

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We study the penetration of lightning induced whistler waves through the ionosphere by investigating the correspondence between the whistlers observed on the DEMETER and MAGION-5 satellites and the lightning discharges detected by the European lightning detection network EUCLID. We compute all the possible differences between the times when the whistlers were observed on the satellite and times when the lightning discharges were detected. We show that the occurrence histogram for these time differences exhibits a distinct peak for a particular characteristic time, corresponding to the sum of the propagation time and a possible small time shift between the absolute time assigned to the wave record and the clock of the lightning detection network. Knowing this characteristic time, we can search in the EUCLID database for locations, currents, and polarities of causative lightning discharges corresponding to the individual whistlers. We demonstrate that the area in the ionosphere through which the electromagnetic energy induced by a lightning discharge enters into the magnetosphere as whistler mode waves is up to several thousands of kilometres wide.

  1. Causation as Strategy: Interpreting Humours among Tibetan Refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prost, Audrey

    2006-08-01

    The article focuses on the incidence of humoural wind ( rlung ) disorders among Tibetan exiles in India. It investigates the reasons behind the emergence of rlung as a significant problem among Tibetan exiles, and seeks to unpack some of the local meanings of this 'epidemic'. Previous studies have generally described rlung disorders as symptomatic of political and moral concerns, highlighting the connections that Tibetans make between physical, moral and psychological states in the context of Buddhist practice and everyday life. This paper aims to further nuance these findings by showing that, while Tibetan exiles include complex causes linked to morality and psychosocial wellbeing in their explanations of rlung disorders, they also 'cut' into this explanatory network in strategic ways, sometimes bypassing religious or psychosocial interpretations of illness altogether. Drawing on this analysis, the article warns researchers against literal readings of general religious precepts when analysing people's everyday negotiations of illness and wellbeing: the attribution of causation is always strategic, and religious observance should never be assumed to be uniform, or taken as a given.

  2. Illness Causation and Interpretation in a Newar Town

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudan Subedi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the core concerns of medical anthropology is to explore how people in different cultures and social groups explain the causes of ill health, the type of treatment they believe in, and to whom they turn if they do become ill. This article focuses on the understanding of illness causation by the Newars in Kirtipur and their concern about biological and socio-cultural aspects of healthy behavior, and particularly with the ways in which they have been coping in everyday life. The basic method of data collection for this study was formal and informal discussions with the elderly Newar males and females, followed by discussions with youths to explore the variations in their perceptions. The findings show that the understanding of illness etiology is multi-causal. The individual, natural, social, and supernatural causes are not mutually exclusive but are usually linked together in a particular case. In any specific case of illness, moreover, people’s explanatory model varies in how they explain its etiology.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/dsaj.v5i0.6358 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol. 5, 2011: 101-120    

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of loopamp Trypanosoma brucei detection kit for diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis in clinical samples.

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    Patrick Mitashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular methods have great potential for sensitive parasite detection in the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, but the requirements in terms of laboratory infrastructure limit their use to reference centres. A recently developed assay detects the Trypanozoon repetitive insertion mobile element (RIME DNA under isothermal amplification conditions and has been transformed into a ready-to-use kit format, the Loopamp Trypanosoma brucei. In this study, we have evaluated the diagnostic performance of the Loopamp Trypanosoma brucei assay (hereafter called LAMP in confirmed T.b. gambiense HAT patients, HAT suspects and healthy endemic controls from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 142 T.b. gambiense HAT patients, 111 healthy endemic controls and 97 HAT suspects with unconfirmed status were included in this retrospective evaluation. Reference standard tests were parasite detection in blood, lymph or cerebrospinal fluid. Archived DNA from blood of all study participants was analysed in duplicate with LAMP. Sensitivity of LAMP in parasitologically confirmed cases was 87.3% (95% CI 80.9-91.8% in the first run and 93.0% (95% CI 87.5-96.1% in the second run. Specificity in healthy controls was 92.8% (95% CI 86.4-96.3% in the first run and 96.4% (95% CI 91.1-98.6% in the second run. Reproducibility was excellent with a kappa value of 0.81. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this laboratory-based study, the Loopamp Trypanosoma brucei Detection Kit showed good diagnostic accuracy and excellent reproducibility. Further studies are needed to assess the feasibility of its routine use for diagnosis of HAT under field conditions.

  4. New functions for parts of the Krebs cycle in procyclic Trypanosoma brucei, a cycle not operating as a cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weelden, Susanne W H; van Hellemond, Jaap J; Opperdoes, Fred R; Tielens, Aloysius G M

    2005-04-01

    We investigated whether substrate availability influences the type of energy metabolism in procyclic Trypanosoma brucei. We show that absence of glycolytic substrates (glucose and glycerol) does not induce a shift from a fermentative metabolism to complete oxidation of substrates. We also show that glucose (and even glycolysis) is not essential for normal functioning and proliferation of pleomorphic procyclic T. brucei cells. Furthermore, absence of glucose did not result in increased degradation of amino acids. Variations in availability of glucose and glycerol did result, however, in adaptations in metabolism in such a way that the glycosome was always in redox balance. We argue that it is likely that, in procyclic cells, phosphoglycerate kinase is located not only in the cytosol, but also inside glycosomes, as otherwise an ATP deficit would occur in this organelle. We demonstrate that procyclic T. brucei uses parts of the Krebs cycle for purposes other than complete degradation of mitochondrial substrates. We suggest that citrate synthase plus pyruvate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase are used to transport acetyl-CoA units from the mitochondrion to the cytosol for the biosynthesis of fatty acids, a process we show to occur in proliferating procyclic cells. The part of the Krebs cycle consisting of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA synthetase was used for the degradation of proline and glutamate to succinate. We also demonstrate that the subsequent enzymes of the Krebs cycle, succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase, are most likely used for conversion of succinate into malate, which can then be used in gluconeogenesis.

  5. Trypanosoma brucei TbIF1 inhibits the essential F1-ATPase in the infectious form of the parasite.

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    Brian Panicucci

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial (mt FoF1-ATP synthase of the digenetic parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, generates ATP during the insect procyclic form (PF, but becomes a perpetual consumer of ATP in the mammalian bloodstream form (BF, which lacks a canonical respiratory chain. This unconventional dependence on FoF1-ATPase is required to maintain the essential mt membrane potential (Δψm. Normally, ATP hydrolysis by this rotary molecular motor is restricted to when eukaryotic cells experience sporadic hypoxic conditions, during which this compulsory function quickly depletes the cellular ATP pool. To protect against this cellular treason, the highly conserved inhibitory factor 1 (IF1 binds the enzyme in a manner that solely inhibits the hydrolytic activity. Intriguingly, we were able to identify the IF1 homolog in T. brucei (TbIF1, but determined that its expression in the mitochondrion is tightly regulated throughout the life cycle as it is only detected in PF cells. TbIF1 appears to primarily function as an emergency brake in PF cells, where it prevented the restoration of the Δψm by FoF1-ATPase when respiration was chemically inhibited. In vitro, TbIF1 overexpression specifically inhibits the hydrolytic activity but not the synthetic capability of the FoF1-ATP synthase in PF mitochondria. Furthermore, low μM amounts of recombinant TbIF1 achieve the same inhibition of total mt ATPase activity as the FoF1-ATPase specific inhibitors, azide and oligomycin. Therefore, even minimal ectopic expression of TbIF1 in BF cells proved lethal as the indispensable Δψm collapsed due to inhibited FoF1-ATPase. In summary, we provide evidence that T. brucei harbors a natural and potent unidirectional inhibitor of the vital FoF1-ATPase activity that can be exploited for future structure-based drug design.

  6. Trypanosoma brucei RAP1 maintains telomere and subtelomere integrity by suppressing TERRA and telomeric RNA:DNA hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanavaty, Vishal; Sandhu, Ranjodh; Jehi, Sanaa E; Pandya, Unnati M; Li, Bibo

    2017-06-02

    Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis and regularly switches its major surface antigen, VSG, thereby evading the host's immune response. VSGs are monoallelically expressed from subtelomeric expression sites (ESs), and VSG switching exploits subtelomere plasticity. However, subtelomere integrity is essential for T. brucei viability. The telomeric transcript, TERRA, was detected in T. brucei previously. We now show that the active ES-adjacent telomere is transcribed. We find that TbRAP1, a telomere protein essential for VSG silencing, suppresses VSG gene conversion-mediated switching. Importantly, TbRAP1 depletion increases the TERRA level, which appears to result from longer read-through into the telomere downstream of the active ES. Depletion of TbRAP1 also results in more telomeric RNA:DNA hybrids and more double strand breaks (DSBs) at telomeres and subtelomeres. In TbRAP1-depleted cells, expression of excessive TbRNaseH1, which cleaves the RNA strand of the RNA:DNA hybrid, brought telomeric RNA:DNA hybrids, telomeric/subtelomeric DSBs and VSG switching frequency back to WT levels. Therefore, TbRAP1-regulated appropriate levels of TERRA and telomeric RNA:DNA hybrid are fundamental to subtelomere/telomere integrity. Our study revealed for the first time an important role of a long, non-coding RNA in antigenic variation and demonstrated a link between telomeric silencing and subtelomere/telomere integrity through TbRAP1-regulated telomere transcription. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Classification, causation and treatment of masticatory myogenous pain and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Glenn T

    2008-05-01

    This article focuses on chronic myogenous pains affecting the masticatory muscles, including focal myalgia, regional myalgia, myofascial pain, and fibromyalgia. The probable mechanisms are discussed and treatment options, including self-directed treatment, physical medicine modalities, and several types of pharmacologic agents, are presented.

  8. 3D Architecture of the Trypanosoma brucei Flagella Connector, a Mobile Transmembrane Junction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna L Höög

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular junctions are crucial for the formation of multicellular organisms, where they anchor cells to each other and/or supportive tissue and enable cell-to-cell communication. Some unicellular organisms, such as the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei, also have complex cellular junctions. The flagella connector (FC is a three-layered transmembrane junction that moves with the growing tip of a new flagellum and attaches it to the side of the old flagellum. The FC moves via an unknown molecular mechanism, independent of new flagellum growth. Here we describe the detailed 3D architecture of the FC suggesting explanations for how it functions and its mechanism of motility.We have used a combination of electron tomography and cryo-electron tomography to reveal the 3D architecture of the FC. Cryo-electron tomography revealed layers of repetitive filamentous electron densities between the two flagella in the interstitial zone. Though the FC does not change in length and width during the growth of the new flagellum, the interstitial zone thickness decreases as the FC matures. This investigation also shows interactions between the FC layers and the axonemes of the new and old flagellum, sufficiently strong to displace the axoneme in the old flagellum. We describe a novel filament, the flagella connector fibre, found between the FC and the axoneme in the old flagellum.The FC is similar to other cellular junctions in that filamentous proteins bridge the extracellular space and are anchored to underlying cytoskeletal structures; however, it is built between different portions of the same cell and is unique because of its intrinsic motility. The detailed description of its structure will be an important tool to use in attributing structure / function relationships as its molecular components are discovered in the future. The FC is involved in the inheritance of cell shape, which is important for the life cycle of this human parasite.

  9. Glucose uptake occurs by facilitated diffusion in procyclic forms of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, U; Seyfang, A; Duszenko, M

    1996-02-15

    The glucose transporter of Trypanosoma brucei procyclic forms was characterized and compared with its bloodstream form counterpart. Measuring the glucose consumption enzymatically, we determined a saturable uptake process of relatively high affinity (Km = 80 microM, Vmax = 4 nmol min-1 10(-8) cells), which showed substrate inhibition at glucose concentrations above 1.5 mM (Ki = 21 mM). Control experiments measuring deoxy-D-[3H]Glc uptake under zero-trans conditions indicated that substrate inhibition occurred on the level of glycolysis. Temperature-dependent kinetics revealed a temperature quotient of Q10 = 2.33 and an activation energy of Ea = 64 kJ mol-1. As shown by trans-stimulation experiments, glucose uptake was stereospecific for the D isomer, whereas L-glucose was not recognized. Inhibitor studies using either the uncoupler carbonylcyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (5 microM), the H+/ATPase inhibitor N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (20 microM), the ionophor monensin (1 microM), or the Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitor ouabain (1 mM) showed insignificant effects on transport efficiency. The procyclic glucose transporter was subsequently enriched in a plasma-membrane fraction and functionally reconstituted into proteoliposomes. Using Na+-free conditions in the absence of a proton gradient, the specific activity of D-[14C]glucose transport was determined as 2.9 nmol min-1 (mg protein)-1 at 0.2 mM glucose. From these cumulative results, we conclude that glucose uptake by the procyclic insect form of the parasite occurs by facilitated diffusion, similar to the hexose-transport system expressed in bloodstream forms. However, the markedly higher substrate affinity indicates a differential expression of different transporter isoforms throughout the lifecycle.

  10. Regulation of Trypanosoma brucei Total and Polysomal mRNA during Development within Its Mammalian Host.

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    Paul Capewell

    Full Text Available The gene expression of Trypanosoma brucei has been examined extensively in the blood of mammalian hosts and in forms found in the midgut of its arthropod vector, the tsetse fly. However, trypanosomes also undergo development within the mammalian bloodstream as they progress from morphologically 'slender forms' to transmissible 'stumpy forms' through morphological intermediates. This transition is temporally progressive within the first wave of parasitaemia such that gene expression can be monitored in relatively pure slender and stumpy populations as well as during the progression between these extremes. The development also represents the progression of cells from translationally active forms adapted for proliferation in the host to translationally quiescent forms, adapted for transmission. We have used metabolic labelling to quantitate translational activity in slender forms, stumpy forms and in forms undergoing early differentiation to procyclic forms in vitro. Thereafter we have examined the cohort of total mRNAs that are enriched throughout development in the mammalian bloodstream (slender, intermediate and stumpy forms, irrespective of strain, revealing those that exhibit consistent developmental regulation rather than sample specific changes. Transcripts that cosediment with polysomes in stumpy forms and slender forms have also been enriched to identify transcripts that escape translational repression prior to transmission. Combined, the expression and polysomal association of transcripts as trypanosomes undergo development in the mammalian bloodstream have been defined, providing a resource for trypanosome researchers. This facilitates the identification of those that undergo developmental regulation in the bloodstream and therefore those likely to have a role in the survival and capacity for transmission of stumpy forms.

  11. 3D Architecture of the Trypanosoma brucei Flagella Connector, a Mobile Transmembrane Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höög, Johanna L.; Lacomble, Sylvain; Bouchet-Marquis, Cedric; Briggs, Laura; Park, Kristin; Hoenger, Andreas; Gull, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Background Cellular junctions are crucial for the formation of multicellular organisms, where they anchor cells to each other and/or supportive tissue and enable cell-to-cell communication. Some unicellular organisms, such as the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei, also have complex cellular junctions. The flagella connector (FC) is a three-layered transmembrane junction that moves with the growing tip of a new flagellum and attaches it to the side of the old flagellum. The FC moves via an unknown molecular mechanism, independent of new flagellum growth. Here we describe the detailed 3D architecture of the FC suggesting explanations for how it functions and its mechanism of motility. Methodology/Principal Findings We have used a combination of electron tomography and cryo-electron tomography to reveal the 3D architecture of the FC. Cryo-electron tomography revealed layers of repetitive filamentous electron densities between the two flagella in the interstitial zone. Though the FC does not change in length and width during the growth of the new flagellum, the interstitial zone thickness decreases as the FC matures. This investigation also shows interactions between the FC layers and the axonemes of the new and old flagellum, sufficiently strong to displace the axoneme in the old flagellum. We describe a novel filament, the flagella connector fibre, found between the FC and the axoneme in the old flagellum. Conclusions/Significance The FC is similar to other cellular junctions in that filamentous proteins bridge the extracellular space and are anchored to underlying cytoskeletal structures; however, it is built between different portions of the same cell and is unique because of its intrinsic motility. The detailed description of its structure will be an important tool to use in attributing structure / function relationships as its molecular components are discovered in the future. The FC is involved in the inheritance of cell shape, which is important for the life

  12. Virulence and pathogenicity of three Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense stabilates in a Swiss white mouse model

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    Christopher Kariuki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: A key objective in basic research on human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is developing a cheap and reliable experimental model of the disease for use in pathogenesis and drug studies.Objective: With a view to improving current models, a study was undertaken to characterise the virulence and pathogenicity of three Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense stabilates, labelled as International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI-2918, ILRI-3953, and Institute of Primate Research (IPR-001, infected into Swiss white mice.Methods: Swiss white mice were infected intraperitoneally with trypanosomes and observedfor parasitaemia using wet blood smears obtained by tail snipping. Induction of late-stagedisease was undertaken using diminazene aceturate (40 mg/kg, Berenil with curativetreatment done using melarsoprol (3.6 mg/kg, Arsobal.Results: The prepatent period for the stabilates ranged from three to four days with mean peak parasitaemia ranging from Log10 6.40 to 8.36. First peak parasitaemia for all stabilates varied between six and seven days post infection (DPI followed by secondary latency in ILRI-2918 (15–17 DPI and IPR-001 (17–19 DPI. Survival times ranged from six DPI (ILRI-3953 to 86 DPI (IPR-001. Hindleg paresis was observed in both ILRI-3953 (at peak parasitaemia and ILRI-2918 (after relapse parasitaemia. Mice infected with IPR-001 survived until 54 DPI when curative treatment was undertaken.Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the stabilates ILRI-2918 and ILRI-3953 were unsuitable for modelling late-stage HAT in mice. The stabilate IPR-001 demonstrated the potential to induce chronic trypanosomiasis in Swiss white mice for use in development of a late-stage model of HAT.

  13. Beliefs and perception of ill-health causation: a socio-cultural qualitative study in rural North-Eastern Ethiopia

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    Mesfin H. Kahissay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding perceptions of the causes of ill-health common in indigenous communities may help policy makers to design effective integrated primary health care strategies to serve these communities. This study explored the indigenous beliefs of ill-health causation among those living in the Tehuledere Woreda /district/ in North East Ethiopia from a socio-cultural perspective. Methods The study employed a qualitative ethnographic method informed by Murdock’s Theory of Illness. Participatory observation, over a total of 5 months during the span of one year, was supplemented by focus group discussions (n = 96 participants in 10 groups and in-depth interviews (n = 20 conducted with key informants. Data were analyzed thematically using narrative strategies. Results In these communities, illness is perceived to have supernatural (e.g., almighty God/ Allah, nature spirits, and human agents of the supernatural, natural (e.g., environmental sanitation and personal hygiene, poverty, biological and psychological factors and societal causes (e.g., social trust, experiences of family support and harmony; and violation of social taboos. Therefore, the explanatory model of illness causation in this community was very similar to that of the Murdock model with one key difference: social elements need to be added to the model. Conclusion Members of the study community believes that supernatural, natural and social elements are linked to ill-health causation. A successful integrated primary health care strategy should include strategies for supporting patients’ needs in all three of these domains.

  14. Is chronic rhinosinusitis related to allergic rhinitis in adults and children? Applying epidemiological guidelines for causation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgalas, C.; Vlastos, I.; Picavet, V.; van Drunen, C.; Garas, G.; Prokopakis, E.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis has been assessed in a number of observational and experimental studies. In this review, we attempt their synthesis and evaluation using the modified Bradford Hill guidelines for causation. Although there is no proof of causation,

  15. 76 FR 36891 - Guidelines for Determining Probability of Causation Under the Energy Employees Occupational...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 81 RIN 0920-AA39 Guidelines for Determining Probability of Causation Under... proposed rule entitled ``Guidelines for Determining Probability of Causation Under the Energy Employees...

  16. Prediction of causative genomic relationships using sequence data of five French and Danish dairy cattle breeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Berg, Irene; Boichard, Didier; Lund, Mogens Sandø

    Jersey, 28 Montbéliarde, 23 Normande and 24 Danish Red bulls. Different scenarios varying the number of causative mutations (10, 50, 100 or 250), minor allele frequency of causative mutations and prediction markers, and sets of prediction markers were used. Prediction markers were either SNP on the 50K...

  17. Interaction between Gallotannin and a Recombinant Form of Arginine Kinase of Trypanosoma brucei: Thermodynamic and Spectrofluorimetric Evaluation

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    O. S. Adeyemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current chemotherapies against trypanosomiasis are beset with diverse challenges, a situation which underscores the numerous research efforts aimed at finding newer and effective treatments. Arginine kinase of trypanosome has been validated as target for drug development against trypanosomiasis. The present study investigated the interaction between a recombinant form of the arginine kinase (rTbAK of trypanosome and gallotannin. The interaction between gallotannin and recombinant arginine kinase of Trypanosoma brucei caused significant decrease of enzyme activity. Kinetic analysis revealed the interaction to be of noncompetitive inhibition. Further thermodynamic analysis showed that the interaction between gallotannin and the recombinant arginine kinase was nonspontaneous and involved hydrophobic forces. The Ksv values and the FRET analysis suggest that static quenching of fluorescence intensity by gallotannin was static. Data revealed inhibitory interactions between gallotannin and rTbAK of trypanosome. Although the mechanism of inhibition is not clear yet, molecular docking studies are ongoing to clearly define the inhibitory interactions between the gallotannin and rTbAK. The knowledge of such binding properties would enrich development of selective inhibitors for the arginine kinase of Trypanosoma brucei.

  18. In Silico Identification and in Vitro Activity of Novel Natural Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase

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    Fabian C. Herrmann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As part of our ongoing efforts to identify natural products with activity against pathogens causing neglected tropical diseases, we are currently performing an extensive screening of natural product (NP databases against a multitude of protozoan parasite proteins. Within this project, we screened a database of NPs from a commercial supplier, AnalytiCon Discovery (Potsdam, Germany, against Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TbGAPDH, a glycolytic enzyme whose inhibition deprives the parasite of energy supply. NPs acting as potential inhibitors of the mentioned enzyme were identified using a pharmacophore-based virtual screening and subsequent docking of the identified hits into the active site of interest. In a set of 700 structures chosen for the screening, 13 (1.9% were predicted to possess significant affinity towards the enzyme and were therefore tested in an in vitro enzyme assay using recombinant TbGAPDH. Nine of these in silico hits (69% showed significant inhibitory activity at 50 µM, of which two geranylated benzophenone derivatives proved to be particularly active with IC50 values below 10 µM. These compounds also showed moderate in vitro activity against T. brucei rhodesiense and may thus represent interesting starting points for further optimization.

  19. Proximity Interactions among Basal Body Components in Trypanosoma brucei Identify Novel Regulators of Basal Body Biogenesis and Inheritance

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    Hung Quang Dang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The basal body shares similar architecture with centrioles in animals and is involved in nucleating flagellar axonemal microtubules in flagellated eukaryotes. The early-branching Trypanosoma brucei possesses a motile flagellum nucleated from the basal body that consists of a mature basal body and an adjacent pro-basal body. Little is known about the basal body proteome and its roles in basal body biogenesis and flagellar axoneme assembly in T. brucei. Here, we report the identification of 14 conserved centriole/basal body protein homologs and 25 trypanosome-specific basal body proteins. These proteins localize to distinct subdomains of the basal body, and several of them form a ring-like structure surrounding the basal body barrel. Functional characterization of representative basal body proteins revealed distinct roles in basal body duplication/separation and flagellar axoneme assembly. Overall, this work identified novel proteins required for basal body duplication and separation and uncovered new functions of conserved basal body proteins in basal body duplication and separation, highlighting an unusual mechanism of basal body biogenesis and inheritance in this early divergent eukaryote.

  20. In vitro investigation of Brazilian Cerrado plant extract activity against Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei gambiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charneau, Sébastien; de Mesquita, Mariana Laundry; Bastos, Izabela Marques Dourado; Santana, Jaime Martins; de Paula, José Elias; Grellier, Philippe; Espindola, Laila Salmen

    2016-06-01

    The threatened Brazilian Cerrado biome is an important biodiversity hotspot but still few explored that constitutes a potential reservoir of molecules to treat infectious diseases. We selected eight Cerrado plant species for screening against the erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum, human intracellular stages of Trypanosoma cruzi and bloodstream forms of T. brucei gambiense, and for their cytotoxicity upon the rat L6-myoblast cell line. Bioassays were performed with 37 hexane, ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts prepared from different plant organs. Activities against parasites were observed for 24 extracts: 9 with anti-P. falciparum, 4 with anti-T. cruzi and 11 with anti-T. brucei gambiense activities. High anti-protozoal activity (IC50 values < 10 μg/mL) without obvious cytotoxicity to L6 cells was observed for eight extracts from plants: Connarus suberosus, Blepharocalyx salicifolius, Psidium laruotteanum and Myrsine guianensis. Overall, studies of plant extracts will contribute to increase the biodiversity knowledge essential for Cerrado conservation and sustainable development.

  1. Daytime Thermal Anisotropy of Urban Neighbourhoods: Morphological Causation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Scott Krayenhoff

    2016-01-01

    results allow first order estimation of the minimum effective anisotropy magnitude of urban neighbourhoods as a function of building-height-to-spacing ratio, building plan area density, and shortwave irradiance. Finally, four “local climate zones” are simulated at two latitudes. Removal of neighbourhood street orientation regularity for these zones decreases maximum anisotropy by 3%–31%. Furthermore, thermal and radiative material properties are a weaker predictor of anisotropy than neighbourhood morphology. This study is the first systematic evaluation of effective anisotropy magnitude and causation for urban landscapes.

  2. Analysis of cosmid clones of nuclear DNA from Trypanosome brucei shows that the genes for variant surface glycoproteins are clustered in the genome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Valerio (Dinko); T. de Lange; P. Borst (Piet); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); L.H.T. van der Ploeg

    1982-01-01

    textabstractTrypanosoma brucei contains more than a hundred genes coding for the different variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs). Activation of some of these genes involves the duplication of the gene (the basic copy or BC) and transposition of the duplicate to an expression site (yielding the

  3. The mitochondrial FAD-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Trypanosomatidae and the glycocomal redox balance of insect stages of Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerra, D.G.; Decottignies, A.; Bakker, B.M.; Michels, P.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The genes for the mitochondrial FAD-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were identified in Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major genomes. We have expressed the L. major gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and confirmed the subcellular localization and activity of the produced enzyme. Using

  4. Trypanosoma brucei TBRGG1, a mitochondrial oligo(U)-binding protein that co-localizes with an in vitro RNA editing activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhamme, L.; Perez-Morga, D.; Marchal, C.; Speijer, D.; Lambert, L.; Geuskens, M.; Alexandre, S.; Ismaïli, N.; Göringer, U.; Benne, R.; Pays, E.

    1998-01-01

    We report the characterization of a Trypanosoma brucei 75-kDa protein of the RGG (Arg-Gly-Gly) type, termed TBRGG1. Dicistronic and monocistronic transcripts of the TBRGG1 gene were produced by both alternative splicing and polyadenylation. TBRGG1 was found in two or three forms that differ in their

  5. Discovery of novel Trypanosoma brucei phosphodiesterase B1 inhibitors by virtual screening against the unliganded TbrPDEB1 crystal structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, C.; Wang, H.; Kooistra, A.J.; de Graaf, C.; Orrling, K.M.; Tenor, H.; Seebeck, T.; de Esch, I.J.P.; Ke, H.; Leurs, R.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase B1 (TbrPDEB1) and TbrPDEB2 have recently been validated as new therapeutic targets for human African trypanosomiasis by both genetic and pharmacological means. In this study we report the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the

  6. Trypanosoma brucei Plimmer & Bradford, 1899 is a synonym of T. evansi (Steel, 1885) according to current knowledge and by application of nomenclature rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Jesús; Moreno, S Andrea

    2018-02-06

    Proper application of the principles of biological nomenclature is fundamental for scientific and technical communication about organisms. As other scientific disciplines, taxonomy inherently is open to change, thus species names cannot be final and immutable. Nevertheless, altering the names of organisms of high economical, medical, or veterinary importance can become a complex challenge between the scientific need to have correct classifications, and the practical ideal of having fixed classifications. Trypanosoma evansi (Steel, 1885), T. brucei Plimmer & Bradford, 1899 and T. equiperdum Doflein, 1901 are important parasites of mammals. According to current knowledge, the three names are synonyms of a single trypanosome species, the valid name of which should be T. evansi by the mandatory application of the Principle of Priority of zoological nomenclature. Subspecies known as T. brucei brucei Plimmer & Bradford, 1899, T. b. gambiense Dutton, 1902 and T. b. rhodesiense Stephens & Fantham, 1910 should be referred to respectively as T. evansi evansi (Steel, 1885), T. e. gambiense and T. e. rhodesiense. The polyphyletic groupings so far known as T. evansi and T. equiperdum should be referred respectively to as surra- and dourine-causing strains of T. e. evansi. Likewise, trypanosomes so far known as T. b. brucei should be referred to as nagana-causing strains of T. e. evansi. Though it modifies the scientific names of flagship human and animal parasites, the amended nomenclature proposed herein should be adopted because it reflects phylogenetic and biological advancements, fixes errors, and is simpler than the existing classificatory system.

  7. Immunospecific immunoglobulins and IL-10 as markers for Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense late stage disease in experimentally infected vervet monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngotho, Maina; Kagira, J.M.; Jensen, Henrik Michael Elvang

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of IL-10 and immunoglobulin M (IgM) as biomarkers for staging HAT in vervet monkeys, a useful pathogenesis model for humans. METHODS: Vervet monkeys were infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and subsequently given sub-curative and curative treatment 28...

  8. Trypanosoma brucei: analysis of cytoplasmic Ca2+ during differentiation of bloodstream stages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojdl, D F; Clarke, M W

    1996-06-01

    The highly regulated intracellular concentration of calcium (Ca2+) is a well-described regulator of diverse cellular events, including cell cycle control. In the present study we have addressed the regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ in differentiation events in the life cycle of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Bloodstream form (BSF) trypanosomes include the mitotically active long slender forms (LS) which differentiate to two nondividing stages--intermediate (INT) which transform into short stumpy (SS) forms. An axenic in vitro culture system was used to cultivate LS to a density greater than 1.0 x 10(6) cells/ml/day. Populations of the intermediate BSF (INT) and SS were derived from cultured LS by treatment with difluoromethyl ornithine (DFMO, 100 microM) for 2 and 4 days, respectively. A semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-coupled polymerase chain reaction protocol (SQ-RT-PCR) was developed to objectively distinguish the three BSF by monitoring the relative levels of stage-specific mRNAs--cytochrome oxidase II (COXII), variant surface glycoprotein, and procyclin during the differentiation of LS to SS, showing an increase in COXII and procyclin mRNA expression during this process of differentiation. Basal cytosolic Ca2+ levels [Ca2+]i of populations of LS, INT, and SS were studied using Indo-1 dual emission fluorometry. [Ca2+]i was maximal in dividing LS cells and was shown to decrease coincidentally with early events in the process of differentiation to INT and SS. Thapsigargin (1 microM), reported to cause the release of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum, elevated [Ca2+]i by about 30-60 nM in all BSF; however, the total thapsigargin-releasable stores decreased in parallel with the decrease in basal [Ca2+]i. Control treatments verified that elevations in [Ca2+]i in response to thapsigargin were intracellular in origin. These results may reflect the cessation of cytosolic Ca2+ transients involved in the regulation of mitosis as the parasite exits from

  9. The use of yellow fluorescent hybrids to indicate mating in Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferris Vanessa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosoma brucei undergoes genetic exchange in its insect vector, the tsetse fly, by an unknown mechanism. The difficulties of working with this experimental system of genetic exchange have hampered investigation, particularly because the trypanosome life cycle stages involved cannot be cultured in vitro and therefore must be examined in the insect. Searching for small numbers of hybrid trypanosomes directly in the fly has become possible through the incorporation of fluorescent reporter genes, and we have previously carried out a successful cross using a reporter-repressor strategy. However, we could not be certain that all fluorescent trypanosomes observed in that cross were hybrids, due to mutations of the repressor leading to spontaneous fluorescence, and we have therefore developed an alternative strategy. Results To visualize the production of hybrids in the fly, parental trypanosome clones were transfected with a gene encoding Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP or Red Fluorescent Protein (RFP. Co-infection of flies with red and green fluorescent parental trypanosomes produced yellow fluorescent hybrids, which were easily visualized in the fly salivary glands. Yellow trypanosomes were not seen in midgut or proventricular samples and first appeared in the glands as epimastigotes as early as 13 days after fly infection. Cloned progeny originating from individual salivary glands had yellow, red, green or no fluorescence and were confirmed as hybrids by microsatellite, molecular karyotype and kinetoplast (mitochondrial DNA analyses. Hybrid clones showed biparental inheritance of both nuclear and kinetoplast genomes. While segregation and reassortment of the reporter genes and microsatellite alleles were consistent with Mendelian inheritance, flow cytometry measurement of DNA content revealed both diploid and polyploid trypanosomes among the hybrid progeny clones. Conclusion The strategy of using production of yellow hybrids

  10. Laboratory Aspects of Biological Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In 1966 a sixth Brucella species was added, B. canis, which is a causative agent of canine abortion (14). Over the past 10 years, multiple studies...Practitioner 36:161-170. 14. Carmichael LE, Bruner DW. 1968. Characteristics of a newly-recognized species of Brucella responsible for infectious canine ...strains using the polymerase chain reaction. Ann N Y Acad Sci 590:572-581. 35. McCaul TF, Williams JC. 1981. Developmental cycle of Coxiella burnetii

  11. Trypanosoma brucei DHFR-TS Revisited: Characterisation of a Bifunctional and Highly Unstable Recombinant Dihydrofolate Reductase-Thymidylate Synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc W Gibson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS is a chemically and genetically validated target in African trypanosomes, causative agents of sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in cattle. Here we report the kinetic properties and sensitivity of recombinant enzyme to a range of lipophilic and classical antifolate drugs. The purified recombinant enzyme, expressed as a fusion protein with elongation factor Ts (Tsf in ThyA- Escherichia coli, retains DHFR activity, but lacks any TS activity. TS activity was found to be extremely unstable (half-life of 28 s following desalting of clarified bacterial lysates to remove small molecules. Stability could be improved 700-fold by inclusion of dUMP, but not by other pyrimidine or purine (deoxy-nucleosides or nucleotides. Inclusion of dUMP during purification proved insufficient to prevent inactivation during the purification procedure. Methotrexate and trimetrexate were the most potent inhibitors of DHFR (Ki 0.1 and 0.6 nM, respectively and FdUMP and nolatrexed of TS (Ki 14 and 39 nM, respectively. All inhibitors showed a marked drop-off in potency of 100- to 1,000-fold against trypanosomes grown in low folate medium lacking thymidine. The most potent inhibitors possessed a terminal glutamate moiety suggesting that transport or subsequent retention by polyglutamylation was important for biological activity. Supplementation of culture medium with folate markedly antagonised the potency of these folate-like inhibitors, as did thymidine in the case of the TS inhibitors raltitrexed and pemetrexed.

  12. Trypanosoma brucei DHFR-TS Revisited: Characterisation of a Bifunctional and Highly Unstable Recombinant Dihydrofolate Reductase-Thymidylate Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Marc W; Dewar, Simon; Ong, Han B; Sienkiewicz, Natasha; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    Bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) is a chemically and genetically validated target in African trypanosomes, causative agents of sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in cattle. Here we report the kinetic properties and sensitivity of recombinant enzyme to a range of lipophilic and classical antifolate drugs. The purified recombinant enzyme, expressed as a fusion protein with elongation factor Ts (Tsf) in ThyA- Escherichia coli, retains DHFR activity, but lacks any TS activity. TS activity was found to be extremely unstable (half-life of 28 s) following desalting of clarified bacterial lysates to remove small molecules. Stability could be improved 700-fold by inclusion of dUMP, but not by other pyrimidine or purine (deoxy)-nucleosides or nucleotides. Inclusion of dUMP during purification proved insufficient to prevent inactivation during the purification procedure. Methotrexate and trimetrexate were the most potent inhibitors of DHFR (Ki 0.1 and 0.6 nM, respectively) and FdUMP and nolatrexed of TS (Ki 14 and 39 nM, respectively). All inhibitors showed a marked drop-off in potency of 100- to 1,000-fold against trypanosomes grown in low folate medium lacking thymidine. The most potent inhibitors possessed a terminal glutamate moiety suggesting that transport or subsequent retention by polyglutamylation was important for biological activity. Supplementation of culture medium with folate markedly antagonised the potency of these folate-like inhibitors, as did thymidine in the case of the TS inhibitors raltitrexed and pemetrexed.

  13. The Born Rule and Free Will: why Libertarian Agent-Causal Free Will is not "antiscientific"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Ruth E.

    In the libertarian "agent causation" view of free will, free choices are attributable only to the choosing agent, as opposed to a specific cause or causes outside the agent. An often-repeated claim in the philosophical literature on free will is that agent causation necessarily implies lawlessness, and is therefore "antiscientific." That claim is critiqued and it is argued, on the contrary, that the volitional powers of a free agent need not be viewed as anomic, specifically with regard to the quantum statistical law (the Born Rule). Assumptions about the role and nature of causation, taken as bearing on volitional agency, are examined and found inadequate to the task. Finally, it is suggested that quantum theory may constitute precisely the sort of theory required for a nomic grounding of libertarian free will.

  14. Stepping towards causation in studies of neighborhood and environmental effects: how twin research can overcome problems of selection and reverse causation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Glen E; Mills, Brianna; Strachan, Eric; Hurvitz, Philip; Huang, Ruizhu; Moudon, Anne Vernez; Turkheimer, Eric

    2014-05-01

    No causal evidence is available to translate associations between neighborhood characteristics and health outcomes into beneficial changes to built environments. Observed associations may be causal or result from uncontrolled confounds related to family upbringing. Twin designs can help neighborhood effects studies overcome selection and reverse causation problems in specifying causal mechanisms. Beyond quantifying genetic effects (i.e., heritability coefficients), we provide examples of innovative measures and analytic methods that use twins as quasi-experimental controls for confounding by environmental effects. We conclude that collaboration among investigators from multiple fields can move the field forward by designing studies that step toward causation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Neurodynamics of mind: the arrow illusion of conscious intentionality as downward causation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barutta, Joaquín; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Cornejo, Carlos; Ibáñez, Agustín

    2010-06-01

    In cognitive neuroscience, the reissue of the notion of emergence and downward causation has been used as an interlevel model of mind-brain interactions from different perspectives. Within this perspective, intentionality has been interpreted as global to local determination (downward causation) on the neurophysiological level. Consciousness would act as the large-scale, global activity of the system that governs or constrains local interactions of neurons. This argument seems to solve several difficulties with regard to descriptions of consciousness on a neurophysiological and mental level. Nevertheless, the inconsistencies of this argument are shown, and a contextual and pragmatic explanation of the downward causation of consciousness is given.

  16. Causative alternation in Persian Complex predicates: a Frame-Based Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    SAFARI ALI

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a frame-based description of verbal polysemy is used to answer some questions concerning syntactic behavior and argument structures associated with complex predicates in Persian. In Persian a number of CPs consisting of a light verb (LV) and a preverb (PV) participate in causative alternation. The causative variant is formed with the LV ændaxtæn 'cause to fall' and the anti-causative variant is formed with oftadæn 'fall'. In some contexts these verbs do not participate in causa...

  17. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern of causative organisms of neonatal septicemia in an urban hospital of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjur, Forhad; Rizwan, Farhana; Asaduzzaman, Muhammad; Nasrin, Nishat; Ghosh, Nobo Krishna; Apu, Apurba Sarker; Haque, Fazlul

    2010-06-01

    The information of the sensitivity pattern of the causative organisms is very important for effective control of septicemia in neonates. To determine the proportion and profile of pathogenic bacteria in the blood cultures of the neonates with clinically suspected septicemia and their susceptibility pattern to antimicrobial agents for developing a unified antibiotic treatment protocol. A cross-sectional retrospective study was conducted over a period of 3 year and 4 months (39 months). The study included 1000 patients admitted in the selected hospital in Bangladesh. Blood samples for culture were taken aseptically before starting antibiotic therapy. Microorganisms were isolated and identified by standard microbiological processes which include colony morphology, Gram stain, and biochemical profiles. Antimicrobial sensitivity patterns were performed by Kirby-Bauer's disc diffusion method against imipenem, ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, chloramphenicol, netilmicin, gentamicin, ceftriaxone, aztreonam, cefotaxime, cephalexin, and ampicillin. Among the patients, 633 (63.3%) were males and 367 (36.7%) were females. Blood cultures were found positive in 194 (19.4%) neonates. The organisms isolated were Pseudomonas spp. (31.4%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (23.2%), Staphylococcus aureus (12.4%), Escherichia coli (7.2%), Acinatobactor (5.7%), Gram-negative Bacilli (4.1%), Flavobacterium spp. (3.6%), Serratia spp. (5.7%), Citrobacter fruendi (3.1%), Streptococcus species (2.6%), and Enterobacter spp. (1.0%). A majority of the bacterial isolates in neonatal sepsis were found sensitive to imipenem (91.8%) and ciprofloxacin (57.2%) and resistant to commonly used antibiotics, eg. ampicillin (96.4%) and cephalexin (89.2%). The problem can be mitigated by careful selection and prudent use of available antibiotics.

  18. Photodynamic therapy in combating the causative microorganisms from endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Bruna Paloma; Aguiar, Carlos Menezes; Câmara, Andréa Cruz

    2014-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is presented as a promising antimicrobial therapy that can eliminate microorganisms present in endodontic infections. This treatment is based on the use of a nontoxic photosensitizing agent followed by irradiation of a resonant light source being capable of generating highly reactive species that are harmful to microorganisms. The purpose of this paper is to review the dental literature about the main factors that encompass the use of PDT combined with endodontic treatment for decontamination of the root canal system. A literature search was performed using the following index databases: PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge and MedLine, between 2000 and 2014, looking for studies regarding antimicrobial action of PDT and its application to endodontic therapy. It was observed that despite numerous promising results, it is still necessary to establish different parameters so that PDT can be used with maximum effectiveness in eliminating microorganisms that cause endodontic infections.

  19. Aquaporin 2 mutations in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense field isolates correlate with decreased susceptibility to pentamidine and melarsoprol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice E Graf

    Full Text Available The predominant mechanism of drug resistance in African trypanosomes is decreased drug uptake due to loss-of-function mutations in the genes for the transporters that mediate drug import. The role of transporters as determinants of drug susceptibility is well documented from laboratory-selected Trypanosoma brucei mutants. But clinical isolates, especially of T. b. gambiense, are less amenable to experimental investigation since they do not readily grow in culture without prior adaptation. Here we analyze a selected panel of 16 T. brucei ssp. field isolates that (i have been adapted to axenic in vitro cultivation and (ii mostly stem from treatment-refractory cases. For each isolate, we quantify the sensitivity to melarsoprol, pentamidine, and diminazene, and sequence the genomic loci of the transporter genes TbAT1 and TbAQP2. The former encodes the well-characterized aminopurine permease P2 which transports several trypanocides including melarsoprol, pentamidine, and diminazene. We find that diminazene-resistant field isolates of T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense carry the same set of point mutations in TbAT1 that was previously described from lab mutants. Aquaglyceroporin 2 has only recently been identified as a second transporter involved in melarsoprol/pentamidine cross-resistance. Here we describe two different kinds of TbAQP2 mutations found in T. b. gambiense field isolates: simple loss of TbAQP2, or loss of wild-type TbAQP2 allele combined with the formation of a novel type of TbAQP2/3 chimera. The identified mutant T. b. gambiense are 40- to 50-fold less sensitive to pentamidine and 3- to 5-times less sensitive to melarsoprol than the reference isolates. We thus demonstrate for the first time that rearrangements of the TbAQP2/TbAQP3 locus accompanied by TbAQP2 gene loss also occur in the field, and that the T. b. gambiense carrying such mutations correlate with a significantly reduced susceptibility to pentamidine and melarsoprol.

  20. Direct, Indirect and Inferred Causation: Finite and Infinitive Complements of Deixar and Fazer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Vesterinen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article examines the variation between finite and infinitive complements of the two Portuguese causation verbs deixar and fazer from a cognitive perspective. It is argued that the difference between these complements is mainly semantic and that it can be explained by the notion of linguistic iconicity, i.e. the semantic differences can be seen in the formal differences. Accordingly, a minor formal distance between the main verb and the complement verb in the infinitive complements signals a prototypically direct causation. On the other hand, a greater distance in the finite complements implies an indirect causation. Further, it is claimed that the indirect causation is often of an inferential and more complex character, thus giving rise to a higher degree of subjectification in the finite complements than in the infinitive complements.

  1. National Motor Vehicle Crash Causation Survey (NMVCCS) - NMVCCS XML Case Viewer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The National Motor Vehicle Crash Causation Survey (NMVVCS) was a nationwide survey of crashes involving light passenger vehicles, with a focus on the factors related...

  2. A new approach for annual flood frequency estimation: Hybrid Causative Event Method: Conference Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Thyer, Mark; Li, Jing; Lambert, Martin; Kuczera, George; Metcalfe, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Conference presentation from Engineers Australia, Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium, 2012, Sydney Australia.Summarises the Hybrid Causative Event-based Method for Annual Flood Frequency Estimation, see Li et al(2014,2015) (links provided below)

  3. "Isn't the Trigger the Thing that Sets the Rest of It on Fire?" Causation Maps: Emphasising Chronology in Causation Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Rick

    2011-01-01

    Analogies for teaching about causation abound. Rick Rogers is alert, however, to the risks inherent in drawing on everyday ideas to explain historical processes. What most often gets lost is the importance of the chronological dimension; both the length of time during which some contributory causes may have been present, and the ways in which they…

  4. Is chronic rhinosinusitis related to allergic rhinitis in adults and children? Applying epidemiological guidelines for causation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgalas, C; Vlastos, I; Picavet, V; van Drunen, C; Garas, G; Prokopakis, E

    2014-07-01

    The relationship between allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis has been assessed in a number of observational and experimental studies. In this review, we attempt their synthesis and evaluation using the modified Bradford Hill guidelines for causation. Although there is no proof of causation, especially in the pediatric literature, an evaluation of underlying allergies is recommended at least as an initial measure of symptoms relief. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The changing profile of cutaneous leishmaniasis agent in a central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    90% of cases occur in Afghanistan, Algeria, Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Brazil, and Peru. (Scarisbrick et al., 2006). In Iran, the causative agents of ..... Number 1, January 2013. 5 statements, most of the subjects had history of travelling to villages around the Yazd city such as. Ardekan where the dominant species is L.

  6. Inhibition de Phytophthora palmivora, agent de pourriture brune des ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    La réalisation des essais au champ évaluera l'efficacité en milieu réel des antagonistes naturels sur le développement de la maladie. Mots clés : Pourriture brune, Phytophthora palmivora, lutte biologique, Trichoderma sp, cacaoyer. Abstract. Inhibition of Phytophthora palmivora, causative agent of cacao black pod disease ...

  7. Programmed Cell Death in Procyclic Form Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense - Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes during Con A Induced Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welburn Susan C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense can be induced to undergo apoptosis after stimulation with Con A. As cell death in these parasites is associated with de novo gene expression we have applied a differential display technique, Randomly Amplified Differential Expressed Sequence-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RADES-PCR to the study of gene expression during Con A induced cell death in these organisms. Twenty-two differentially displayed products have been cloned and sequenced. These represent the first endogenous genes to be identified as implicated in cellular death in trypanosomatids (the most primitive eukaryote in which apoptosis has been described. Evidence for an ancestral death machinery, `proto-apoptosis' in single celled organisms is discussed.

  8. High-confidence glycosome proteome for procyclic form Trypanosoma brucei by epitope-tag organelle enrichment and SILAC proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güther, Maria Lucia S; Urbaniak, Michael D; Tavendale, Amy; Prescott, Alan; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2014-06-06

    The glycosome of the pathogenic African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei is a specialized peroxisome that contains most of the enzymes of glycolysis and several other metabolic and catabolic pathways. The contents and transporters of this membrane-bounded organelle are of considerable interest as potential drug targets. Here we use epitope tagging, magnetic bead enrichment, and SILAC quantitative proteomics to determine a high-confidence glycosome proteome for the procyclic life cycle stage of the parasite using isotope ratios to discriminate glycosomal from mitochondrial and other contaminating proteins. The data confirm the presence of several previously demonstrated and suggested pathways in the organelle and identify previously unanticipated activities, such as protein phosphatases. The implications of the findings are discussed.

  9. Regulators of Trypanosoma brucei cell cycle progression and differentiation identified using a kinome-wide RNAi screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel G Jones

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, maintains an integral link between cell cycle regulation and differentiation during its intricate life cycle. Whilst extensive changes in phosphorylation have been documented between the mammalian bloodstream form and the insect procyclic form, relatively little is known about the parasite's protein kinases (PKs involved in the control of cellular proliferation and differentiation. To address this, a T. brucei kinome-wide RNAi cell line library was generated, allowing independent inducible knockdown of each of the parasite's 190 predicted protein kinases. Screening of this library using a cell viability assay identified ≥42 PKs that are required for normal bloodstream form proliferation in culture. A secondary screen identified 24 PKs whose RNAi-mediated depletion resulted in a variety of cell cycle defects including in G1/S, kinetoplast replication/segregation, mitosis and cytokinesis, 15 of which are novel cell cycle regulators. A further screen identified for the first time two PKs, named repressor of differentiation kinase (RDK1 and RDK2, depletion of which promoted bloodstream to procyclic form differentiation. RDK1 is a membrane-associated STE11-like PK, whilst RDK2 is a NEK PK that is essential for parasite proliferation. RDK1 acts in conjunction with the PTP1/PIP39 phosphatase cascade to block uncontrolled bloodstream to procyclic form differentiation, whilst RDK2 is a PK whose depletion efficiently induces differentiation in the absence of known triggers. Thus, the RNAi kinome library provides a valuable asset for functional analysis of cell signalling pathways in African trypanosomes as well as drug target identification and validation.

  10. The acidocalcisome vacuolar transporter chaperone 4 catalyzes the synthesis of polyphosphate in insect-stages of Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Paul N; Lander, Noelia; Kurup, Samarchith P; Reiss, Laura; Brewer, Jessica; Soares Medeiros, Lia C; Miranda, Kildare; Docampo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphate is a polymer of inorganic phosphate found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Polyphosphate typically accumulates in acidic, calcium-rich organelles known as acidocalcisomes, and recent research demonstrated that vacuolar transporter chaperone 4 catalyzes its synthesis in yeast. The human pathogens Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi possess vacuolar transporter chaperone 4 homologs. We demonstrate that T. cruzi vacuolar transporter chaperone 4 localizes to acidocalcisomes of epimastigotes by immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy and that the recombinant catalytic region of the T. cruzi enzyme is a polyphosphate kinase. RNA interference of the T. brucei enzyme in procyclic form parasites reduced short chain polyphosphate levels and resulted in accumulation of pyrophosphate. These results suggest that this trypanosome enzyme is an important component of a polyphosphate synthase complex that utilizes ATP to synthesize and translocate polyphosphate to acidocalcisomes in insect stages of these parasites. © 2013 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2013 International Society of Protistologists.

  11. Trypanosoma brucei aquaglyceroporin 2 is a high-affinity transporter for pentamidine and melaminophenyl arsenic drugs and the main genetic determinant of resistance to these drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Jane C.; Eze, Anthonius A.; Baker, Nicola; Glover, Lucy; Clucas, Caroline; Aguinaga Andrés, David; Natto, Manal J.; Teka, Ibrahim A.; McDonald, Jennifer; Lee, Rebecca S.; Graf, Fabrice E.; Ludin, Philipp; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Turner, C. Michael R.; Tait, Andy; MacLeod, Annette; Mäser, Pascal; Barrett, Michael P.; Horn, David; De Koning, Harry P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Trypanosoma brucei drug transporters include the TbAT1/P2 aminopurine transporter and the high-affinity pentamidine transporter (HAPT1), but the genetic identity of HAPT1 is unknown. We recently reported that loss of T. brucei aquaglyceroporin 2 (TbAQP2) caused melarsoprol/pentamidine cross-resistance (MPXR) in these parasites and the current study aims to delineate the mechanism by which this occurs. Methods The TbAQP2 loci of isogenic pairs of drug-susceptible and MPXR strains of T. brucei subspecies were sequenced. Drug susceptibility profiles of trypanosome strains were correlated with expression of mutated TbAQP2 alleles. Pentamidine transport was studied in T. brucei subspecies expressing TbAQP2 variants. Results All MPXR strains examined contained TbAQP2 deletions or rearrangements, regardless of whether the strains were originally adapted in vitro or in vivo to arsenicals or to pentamidine. The MPXR strains and AQP2 knockout strains had lost HAPT1 activity. Reintroduction of TbAQP2 in MPXR trypanosomes restored susceptibility to the drugs and reinstated HAPT1 activity, but did not change the activity of TbAT1/P2. Expression of TbAQP2 sensitized Leishmania mexicana promastigotes 40-fold to pentamidine and >1000-fold to melaminophenyl arsenicals and induced a high-affinity pentamidine transport activity indistinguishable from HAPT1 by Km and inhibitor profile. Grafting the TbAQP2 selectivity filter amino acid residues onto a chimeric allele of AQP2 and AQP3 partly restored susceptibility to pentamidine and an arsenical. Conclusions TbAQP2 mediates high-affinity uptake of pentamidine and melaminophenyl arsenicals in trypanosomes and TbAQP2 encodes the previously reported HAPT1 activity. This finding establishes TbAQP2 as an important drug transporter. PMID:24235095

  12. Trypanosoma brucei TbIF1 inhibits the essential Finf1/inf-ATPase in the infectious form of the parasite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Panicucci, Brian; Gahura, Ondřej; Zíková, Alena

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 4 (2017), č. článku e0005552. ISSN 1935-2735 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA ČR GA17-22248S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : mt * TblF1 * Trypanosoma brucei Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.834, year: 2016

  13. Human and animal Trypanosomes in Cote d'Ivoire form a single breeding population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Capewell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of African Sleeping Sickness in humans and contributes to the related veterinary disease, Nagana. T. brucei is segregated into three subspecies based on host specificity, geography and pathology. T. b. brucei is limited to animals (excluding some primates throughout sub-Saharan Africa and is non-infective to humans due to trypanolytic factors found in human serum. T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense are human infective sub-species. T. b. gambiense is the more prevalent human, causing over 97% of human cases. Study of T. b. gambiense is complicated in that there are two distinct groups delineated by genetics and phenotype. The relationships between the two groups and local T. b. brucei are unclear and may have a bearing on the evolution of the human infectivity traits. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A collection of sympatric T. brucei isolates from Côte d'Ivoire, consisting of T. b. brucei and both groups of T. b. gambiense have previously been categorized by isoenzymes, RFLPs and Blood Incubation Infectivity Tests. These samples were further characterized using the group 1 specific marker, TgSGP, and seven microsatellites. The relationships between the T. b. brucei and T. b. gambiense isolates were determined using principal components analysis, neighbor-joining phylogenetics, STRUCTURE, FST, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and linkage disequilibrium. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Group 1 T. b. gambiense form a clonal genetic group, distinct from group 2 and T. b. brucei, whereas group 2 T. b. gambiense are genetically indistinguishable from local T. b. brucei. There is strong evidence for mating within and between group 2 T. b. gambiense and T. b. brucei. We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that group 2 T. b. gambiense are hybrids of group 1 and T. b. brucei, suggesting that human infectivity has evolved independently in groups 1 and 2 T. b. gambiense.

  14. Identification and Functional Characterisation of CRK12:CYC9, a Novel Cyclin-Dependent Kinase (CDK-Cyclin Complex in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séverine Monnerat

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, is spread by the tsetse fly and causes trypanosomiasis in humans and animals. Both the life cycle and cell cycle of the parasite are complex. Trypanosomes have eleven cdc2-related kinases (CRKs and ten cyclins, an unusually large number for a single celled organism. To date, relatively little is known about the function of many of the CRKs and cyclins, and only CRK3 has previously been shown to be cyclin-dependent in vivo. Here we report the identification of a previously uncharacterised CRK:cyclin complex between CRK12 and the putative transcriptional cyclin, CYC9. CRK12:CYC9 interact to form an active protein kinase complex in procyclic and bloodstream T. brucei. Both CRK12 and CYC9 are essential for the proliferation of bloodstream trypanosomes in vitro, and we show that CRK12 is also essential for survival of T. brucei in a mouse model, providing genetic validation of CRK12:CYC9 as a novel drug target for trypanosomiasis. Further, functional characterisation of CRK12 and CYC9 using RNA interference reveals roles for these proteins in endocytosis and cytokinesis, respectively.

  15. Detection of Trypanosoma brucei in field-captured tsetse flies and identification of host species fed on by the infected flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konnai, Satoru; Mekata, Hirohisa; Odbileg, Raadan; Simuunza, Martin; Chembensof, Mwelwa; Witola, William Harold; Tembo, Mwase Enala; Chitambo, Harrison; Inoue, Noboru; Onuma, Misao; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2008-08-01

    The prevalence of trypanosome infections in tsetse flies in the Chiawa area of Lower Zambezi in Zambia, with endemic trypanosomosis, was determined by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method that allowed the detection of trypanosome DNA and determination of the type of animal host fed on by the tsetse fly Glossina pallidipes, using tsetse-derived DNA extracts as templates. Ninety G. pallidipes (82 females and 8 males; 18.3%) of the 492 flies captured by baited biconical traps tested positive for the presence of Trypanosoma brucei species genomic DNA. Of the 90 T. brucei-positive flies, 47 (52.2%) also tested positive for vertebrate mitochondrial DNA. Sequence analysis of the vertebrate mitochondrial DNA amplicons established that they originated from 8 different vertebrate species, namely, human (Homo sapiens), African elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis), African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus), roan antelope (Hippotragus equinus), greater kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros), warthog (Phacochoerus africanus), and goat (Capra hircus). Furthermore, to investigate the prevalence of trypanosome infections in domestic goats in the same area where trypanosomes had been detected in tsetse files, a total of 86 goats were randomly selected from 6 different herds. Among the selected goats, 36 (41.9%) were found to be positive for T. brucei species. This combined detection method would be an ideal approach not only for mass screening for infection prevalence in tsetse populations, but also for the prediction of natural reservoirs in areas endemic for trypanosomosis.

  16. Immunization with recombinant beta-tubulin from Trypanosoma evansi induced protection against T. evansi, T. equiperdum and T. b. brucei infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S-Q; Fung, M-C; Reid, S A; Inoue, N; Lun, Z-R

    2007-04-01

    The beta-tubulin gene of Trypanosoma evansi (STIB 806) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The predicted amino acid sequence of T. evansi beta-tubulin shows 100%, 99.8%, 99.1%, and 98.6% homology with T. equiperdum, T. b. brucei, T. cruzi and T. danilewskyi, respectively, but is diverse from that of T. cyclops, showing only 51.6% of homology. Recombinant beta-tubulin was expressed as inclusion bodies in E. coli. It was purified and renatured for immunological studies. Mice immunized with the renatured recombinant beta-tubulin were protected from lethal challenge with T. evansi STIB 806, T. equiperdum STIB 818 and T. b. brucei STIB 940, showing 83.3%, 70% and 76.7% protection, respectively. Serum collected from the rabbit immunized with recombinant beta-tubulin inhibited the growth of T. evansi, T. equiperdum and T. b. brucei in vitro. Serum from mice and rabbits immunized with recombinant beta-tubulin recognized only T. evansi beta-tubulin and not mouse beta-tubulin. The results of this study demonstrated that the recombinant T. evansi beta-tubulin is a potential candidate for the development of a vaccine to prevent animal trypanosomiasis caused by these three trypanosome species.

  17. Trends in peptic ulcer disease and the identification of Helicobacter Pylori as a causative organism: Population-based estimates from the US nationwide inpatient sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislava Bashinskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peptic ulcer disease can lead to serious complications including massive hemorrhage or bowel perforation. The modern treatment of peptic ulcer disease has transitioned from the control of gastric acid secretion to include antibiotic therapy in light of the identification of Helicobacter pylori as a causative infectious organism. We sought to determine trends related to this discovery by using a national database. Materials and Methods: Patient discharges with peptic ulcer disease and associated sequelae were queried from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 1993 to 2007, under the auspices of a data user agreement. To account for the Nationwide Inpatient Sample weighting schema, design-adjusted analyses were used. Standard error was calculated using SUDAAN software (Research Triangle International, NC, USA. Results: Decreases in the incidences of gastrointestinal perforation, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and surgical procedures most specific to peptic ulcer disease were statistically significant over the study period [range of P value (two tailed = 0.000 - 0.00353; significant at P < 0.001 to < 0.01]. The incidence of H. pylori rose dramatically, peaking at an estimated 97,823 cases in 1998 [SE = 3155; 95% CI = 6,184]. Since that time it has decreased and then stabilized. Conclusions: The identification of H. pylori as the causative agent in the majority of peptic ulcer disease has revolutionized the understanding and management of the disease. Medical conditions and surgical procedures associated with end-stage peptic ulcer disease have significantly decreased according to analysis of selected index categories. Resident physician education objectives may need to be modified in light of these trends. Review Criteria: We reviewed patients with peptic ulcer disease. The database used was the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 1993 to 2007. Message for the Clinic: Medical therapy has resulted in decreased morbidity from H. pylori infection as it

  18. [Drinking water regulations in Ukraine and infectious morbidity rate with water pathway of transmission of causative agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmasheva, E V; Korchak, G I; Mikhienkova, A I; Nikonova, N A; Rosada, M A

    2013-01-01

    These are presented drinking water regulations in Ukraine on microbiological indices in the new state document "Hygienic Drinking water regulations intended for human consumption" (State sanitary regulations and standards (GsanPiN) 2.2.4-171-10). There is reported an analysis of both the open waterbodies water quality and water for centralized water supply in 2007-2011 and 1992-1996 also on sanitary-bacteriological indices for performance of comparative retrospective analysis. There has been shown water quality degradation for open waterbodies, the main sources of water supply for population. Against this background, a marked improvement of drinking water quality has been noted, the number of non-standard samples decreased to 3.6 % compared with 8.8% in the preceding 15 years. This index correlates with a decrease in the number of outbreaks of infections transmitted by water. There was noted unsatisfactory registration of viral infections with water pathway of transmission and the increase in morbidity rate of gastroenterocolitides of unknown etiology that may include acute viral intestinal infections. Expediency to keep "fermentation of glucose" test in bacteriological examination of water in the identification scheme of general coliforms has been substantiated.

  19. New microbes as causative agents of Ibuprofen degradation capabilities in the hyporheic zone of a lowland stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njeru, Cyrus; Posselt, Malte; Horn, Marcus A.

    2017-04-01

    Ibuprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain reliever and among pharmaceutical residues detected in aquatic environments. Widespread use of the drug and incomplete removal during waste water treatment results in its persistence in effluents and receiving waters. Potential total removal by microbial activity in the hyporheic zone (HZ) of rivers downstream of wastewater treatment plant discharge sites has been hypothesized. Ibuprofen degradation associated microbial communities in are essentially unknown. To address this hypothesis, two sets of oxic HZ sediment microcosms spiked with ibuprofen only (5, 40, 200 and 400 µM), or ibuprofen and 1 mM acetate were set up under laboratory conditions. Ibuprofen degradation in non-sterile relative to autoclaved sediments indicated removal by microbial degradation. Ibuprofen was completely consumed in the absence and presence of supplemental acetate after approximately 11 and 16 days, respectively. Refeeding of ibuprofen and acetate after the first depletion resulted in complete degradation within 24 hours in all treatments. Metabolites of ibuprofen included 1-, 2-, 3-hydroxy- and carboxyibuprofen. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed no pronounced differences in copy numbers of 16S rRNA gene or transcripts between non-spiked controls and treatments. Time resolved triplicate amplicon Illumina MiSeq sequencing targeting the 16S rRNA genes and transcripts revealed increased relative abundances of Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes in treatments with compared to those without ibuprofen. Alpha-, Beta- and Deltaproteobacteria were most active as indicated by RNA based analyses. Enrichment and isolation yielded new Alphaproteobacteria utilizing ibuprofen as sole carbon and energy source. The collective results indicated that (i) HZ sediments sustain efficient biotic (micro-)pollutant removal and (ii) are a reservoir of hitherto unknown microbial diversity associated with such ecosystem services, including the genera Fodinicola, Hyphobacterium, and subgroup 6 Acidobacteria.

  20. Genomic Patterns of Pathogen Evolution Revealed by Comparison of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the Causative Agent of Melioidosis, to Avirulent Burkholderia thailandensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-26

    10]. Like Bp, Bt is also a soil saprophyte , and until its classifi- cation as a distinct species in 1998 was considered to rep- resent a subtype of...islands in pathogenic and environmental microorganisms . Nat Rev Microbiol 2004, 2:414-424. 5. Chain PS, Carniel E, Larimer FW, Lamerdin J, Stoutland

  1. Leishmania infantum AS A CAUSATIVE AGENT OF CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS IN THE STATE OF MATO GROSSO DO SUL, BRAZIL

    OpenAIRE

    CASTRO, Ludiele Souza; FRANÇA, Adriana de Oliveira; FERREIRA, Eduardo de Castro; HANS FILHO, Günther; HIGA JÚNIOR, Minoru German; GONTIJO, Célia Maria Ferreira; PEREIRA, Agnes Antônia Sampaio; DORVAL, Maria Elizabeth Moraes C.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is caused by different species of theLeishmania genus. Leishmania(Leishmania) infantum, causing cutaneous leishmaniasis, has been described in patients living in areas where visceral leishmaniasis is endemic. In this study, it was possible to characterize this species in seven slides from cutaneous tissue imprints from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.

  2. The evidence of bacilliform virus a causative agent of white spot syndrome of white shrimp Penaeus merguiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Suprapto

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The rod-shape virus particles were found in the hyperthrophied nucleus and cytoplasm of diseased white shrimpPenaeus merguiensis naturally infected by White spot syndrome (WSBV. In natural infection cumulative mortality of shrimp werevery high, 95% of population were dead in 3-7 days, and 5% of shrimp population survived. The disease was outbreak in intensiveculture farms used the closed circulation sea water system. Others crustacean such as crabs and bentatos were not infected by WSBVat time of sampling. The virus particle were rod-shape ranging from 78 ± 10 nm in diameter and 280 ± 10 nm in length. The pathogenicbacteria mainly dominated by genus Vibrio sp were isolated from shrimp.

  3. The mitochondrial genome and a 60-kb nuclear DNA segment from Naegleria fowleri, the causative agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Emily K; Greninger, Alexander L; Visvesvara, Govinda S; Marciano-Cabral, Francine; Dacks, Joel B; Chiu, Charles Y

    2013-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a unicellular eukaryote causing primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, a neuropathic disease killing 99% of those infected, usually within 7-14 days. Naegleria fowleri is found globally in regions including the US and Australia. The genome of the related nonpathogenic species Naegleria gruberi has been sequenced, but the genetic basis for N. fowleri pathogenicity is unclear. To generate such insight, we sequenced and assembled the mitochondrial genome and a 60-kb segment of nuclear genome from N. fowleri. The mitochondrial genome is highly similar to its counterpart in N. gruberi in gene complement and organization, while distinct lack of synteny is observed for the nuclear segments. Even in this short (60-kb) segment, we identified examples of potential factors for pathogenesis, including ten novel N. fowleri-specific genes. We also identified a homolog of cathepsin B; proteases proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of diverse eukaryotic pathogens, including N. fowleri. Finally, we demonstrate a likely case of horizontal gene transfer between N. fowleri and two unrelated amoebae, one of which causes granulomatous amoebic encephalitis. This initial look into the N. fowleri nuclear genome has revealed several examples of potential pathogenesis factors, improving our understanding of a neglected pathogen of increasing global importance. © 2013 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2013 International Society of Protistologists.

  4. Polymerase chain reaction optimization for the detection of Pasteurella multocida B:2, the causative agent of Haemorrhagic septicaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Natalia

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Specific detection of Pasteurella multocida type B:2 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, using a set of DNA primers wasoptimised. Effects of the addition of ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA to the sample preparation, Escherichia coli contamination and the number of P. multocida on the PCR product was assessed. The PCR test was compared to the standard bacteriological method for the detection of P. multocida B:2 in tonsillar swab samples collected from slaughter houses of various regions in Indonesia. Addition of 100 mM EDTA-saline to P. multocida B:2 spiked tonsillar swab samples inhibits the production 350 base pairs (bp PCR product. The inhibitory effect of the EDT A can be eliminated by three times washing with deionised water. The PCR can detect P. multocida as low as I organism and contanimation of 100 CFU of E. coli does not effect the PCR result. The results show that the DNA primers for P. multocida B:2 is sensitive and specific. The inhibitory effect of EDTA in PCR samples can be eliminated by washings.

  5. Protein abundances can distinguish between naturally-occurring and laboratory strains of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D Merkley

    Full Text Available The rapid pace of bacterial evolution enables organisms to adapt to the laboratory environment with repeated passage and thus diverge from naturally-occurring environmental ("wild" strains. Distinguishing wild and laboratory strains is clearly important for biodefense and bioforensics; however, DNA sequence data alone has thus far not provided a clear signature, perhaps due to lack of understanding of how diverse genome changes lead to convergent phenotypes, difficulty in detecting certain types of mutations, or perhaps because some adaptive modifications are epigenetic. Monitoring protein abundance, a molecular measure of phenotype, can overcome some of these difficulties. We have assembled a collection of Yersinia pestis proteomics datasets from our own published and unpublished work, and from a proteomics data archive, and demonstrated that protein abundance data can clearly distinguish laboratory-adapted from wild. We developed a lasso logistic regression classifier that uses binary (presence/absence or quantitative protein abundance measures to predict whether a sample is laboratory-adapted or wild that proved to be ~98% accurate, as judged by replicated 10-fold cross-validation. Protein features selected by the classifier accord well with our previous study of laboratory adaptation in Y. pestis. The input data was derived from a variety of unrelated experiments and contained significant confounding variables. We show that the classifier is robust with respect to these variables. The methodology is able to discover signatures for laboratory facility and culture medium that are largely independent of the signature of laboratory adaptation. Going beyond our previous laboratory evolution study, this work suggests that proteomic differences between laboratory-adapted and wild Y. pestis are general, potentially pointing to a process that could apply to other species as well. Additionally, we show that proteomics datasets (even archived data collected for different purposes contain the information necessary to distinguish wild and laboratory samples. This work has clear applications in biomarker detection as well as biodefense.

  6. Spitting Image: Tick Saliva Assists the Causative Agent of Lyme Disease in Evading Host Skin's Innate Immune Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovius, Joppe W. R.

    2009-01-01

    Lyme disease is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted through ticks. Inhibition of host skin's innate immune response might be instrumental to both tick feeding and B. burgdorferi transmission. The article by Marchal et al. describes how tick saliva suppresses B.

  7. First report of mesalamine (5-aminosalicylic acid) as the causative agent in a case of acute generalized exanthamous pustulosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocci, Erin; Park, Kelly; Hutchens, Kelli; Winterfield, Laura

    2017-01-15

    Acute generalized exanthamous pustulosis (AGEP)is a rare eruption of non-follicular sterile pustuleson a diffuse background of erythema and edema,commonly associated with fever and leukocytosis.Antibiotics are implicated in most cases; however,other drugs have been reported to cause AGEP. Wereport a case of a 73-year-old man with a historyof ulcerative colitis who presented with a diffusepustular rash, renal failure, elevated liver functiontests, and leukocytosis with neutrophilia. A week priorto admission, the patient was started on mesalamineto treat colitis. Upon admission, a workup includinga skin biopsy was performed and was consistentwith AGEP. Mesalamine was discontinued, and thepatient's skin eruption, renal function, liver functiontests, and leukocytosis subsequently improved.Mesalamine has an unknown mechanism of action.However, it is thought to be an anti-inflammatoryagent that blocks the production of leukotrienesand prostaglandins and is an immunosuppressantthat increases the release of adenosine, whichinterferes with leukocyte function. The decrease inprostaglandin synthesis or deregulation of leukocytefunction caused by mesalamine may be the etiologyin this case. Discontinuation of the offending agentleads to resolution of AGEP, as it did in this patient.

  8. Acute suppurative appendicitis associated with Enterobius vermicularis: an incidental finding or a causative agent? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efared, Boubacar; Atsame-Ebang, Gabrielle; Soumana, Boubacar Marou; Tahiri, Layla; Hammas, Nawal; El Fatemi, Hinde; Chbani, Laila

    2017-10-06

    Histological acute appendicitis patterns associated with Enterobius vermicularis is an extremely rare finding. The exact role of this parasite in acute appendicitis is controversial as usually resected specimens show no evidence of histological inflammation. We present herein a case of a 21-year-old male Arabic patient who presented with clinical syndrome of acute appendicitis. Emergency appendectomy was performed and the histopathological examination of the resected specimen showed the presence of E. vermicularis as well as intense acute inflammatory patterns such as mucosal ulceration and suppurative necrosis. The post-operative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged with appropriate anti-helmintic drug prescription. Acute appendicitis due to E. vermicularis is a very rare occurrence. The histopathological analysis of resected specimens should pay special attention to search for this parasite for adequate post-operative treatment of patients.

  9. Validating the identity of Paramoeba invadens, the causative agent of recurrent mass mortality of sea urchins in Nova Scotia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feehan, Colette J; Johnson-Mackinnon, Jessica; Scheibling, Robert E; Lauzon-Guay, Jean-Sébastien; Simpson, Alastair G B

    2013-04-11

    Green sea urchins Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis along the coast of Nova Scotia, Canada, suffer mass mortalities from infection by the pathogenic amoeba Paramoeba invadens Jones, 1985. It has been speculated that P. invadens could be a form of Neoparamoeba pemaquidensis, a species associated with disease in S. droebachiensis and lobsters in the northeast USA. During a disease outbreak in fall 2011, we isolated amoebae from moribund urchins collected from 4 locations along ~200 km of coastline. In laboratory infection trials, we found that timing and rate of morbidity corresponded to that of similar experiments conducted in the early 1980s, when P. invadens was first identified. All isolates had a similar size and morphology to the original description, including an absence of microscales. Sequences of nuclear SSU rDNA show that disease was caused by one 'species' of amoeba across the range sampled. Phylogenetic analyses prove that P. invadens is not conspecific with N. pemaquidensis, but is a distinct species most closely related to N. branchiphila, a suspected pathogen of sea urchins Diadema aff. antillarum in the Canary Islands, Spain. Morphology and closest phylogenetic affinities suggest that P. invadens would be assignable to the genus Neoparamoeba; however, nuclear SSU rDNA trees show that Neoparamoeba and Paramoeba are phylogenetically inseparable. Therefore, we treat Neoparamoeba as a junior synonym of Paramoeba, with P. invadens retaining that name, and N. pemaquidensis and N. aestuarina reverting to their original names (P. pemaquidensis and P. aestuarina), and with new combinations for N. branchiphila Dykova et al., 2005, and N. perurans Young et al., 2007, namely P. branchiphila comb. nov. and P. perurans comb. nov.

  10. Loss of TSS1 in hypervirulent Coxiella burnetii 175, the causative agent of Q fever in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amato, Felicetta; Eldin, Carole; Georgiades, Kalliopi; Edouard, Sophie; Delerce, Jeremy; Labas, Noémie; Raoult, Didier

    2015-08-01

    In French Guiana, the unique Coxiella burnetii circulating genotype 17 causes 24% of community-acquired pneumonia, the highest prevalence ever described. To explain this unusual virulence, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of strain Cb175, which was isolated from a patient from French Guiana. Cb175 has a greater number of mutations in genes involved in metabolism compared with the Nine Mile I strain. We found a 6105bp fragment missing in Cb175, which corresponds to the Type 1 secretion systems (T1SS) hlyCABD operon region. This deletion was detected by a specific qPCR in the 8 other strains available from this territory an in none of 298C.burnetii strains from other areas and other genotypes (8/8 vs 0/298, Fisher's exact test, p<0.0000001). Loss of genes implicated in secretion systems has been observed in other epidemic bacterial strains. Thus, the virulence of Cb175 may be linked to this genome reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Viruses as the causative agent related to 'dampness' and the missing link between allergen exposure and onset of allergic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersoug, Lars-Georg

    2005-01-01

    concentration and symptoms indicate a missing link between allergen exposure and onset of asthma. Respiratory viruses have been identified in up to 85% cases of asthma or exacerbations of asthma. The missing link between respiratory diseases and humid indoor climates could therefore be attributed to viruses....... The infectious effectiveness of respiratory viruses depends strongly on the environment where the viruses are spread. For respiratory viruses, survival and infectivity are dependent on temperature and relative humidity. A direct link between virus-induced inflammation and the asthmatogenic process has been...... proposed. Therefore, a more effective spreading of viral infections in damp indoor climates is likely to represent the main cause for the increased prevalence of asthma in these environments. Moreover, the incidence of viral infections is higher in patients with asthma compared with that in control...

  12. Mechanisms of skin adherence, penetration and tissue necrosis production by Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeck, D; Korting, H C

    1992-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi (H. ducreyi) strains, representing both reference strains and low-passage isolates, were investigated in terms of surface structures and enzymatic equipment. The interaction of these factors with host tissue was analysed using new in vitro- and in vivo-models. By electron microscopy studies there was no evidence of an extracellular capsule or surface appendages such as pili or flagella. Interaction of all isolates tested with the lectin Phaseolus vulgaris suggests N-acetyl-D-glucosamine units as common structural features of H. ducreyi cell envelope polysaccharide. In attachment to epithelial cells more than one hemagglutinin might be implicated as different haemagglutination patterns could be observed whereby the activity was not heat-labile, but was abolished by formaldehyde. Hydrophobic interactions might be of importance as well as strains showed a wide range of reactions from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, low hydrophobicity being more marked with the older strains. No elaboration of degradative enzymes based on the measurement of enzymatic activity using insoluble dye-protein complexes could be detected in case of H. ducreyi, using Azocoll and Remazol Brilliantblue hide powder for detection of proteolytic activity and elastinorcein for detection of elastase activity. In vitro studies using human keratinocytes and Vero cells did not show any morphological changes when incubated with H. ducreyi culture filtrates. In vivo studies with a new mouse model for H. ducreyi infection could confirm the results of the in vitro studies. Mere contact to undamaged skin both of whole cell organisms, live or heat-killed, and of culture filtrates did not lead to any reaction or even damage of mouse skin. However, when the outer epidermal layer was overcome by intradermal injection of shaved mice ulcers developed. Tissue necrosis production was not bound to live organisms as dead ones showed the same effect. There is great evidence that this tissue necrosis is associated with H. ducreyi lipopolysaccharide (LPS) because intradermal injection of purified H. ducreyi LPS lead to the same reaction pattern. For the first time a cell mediated immune response could be demonstrated in case of H. ducreyi infection as different antigen preparations of H. ducreyi isolates induced proliferation of lymphocytes isolated from healthy unexposed individuals and from a chancroid-sensitized male. In the latter case measured cell responses were much stronger. The dose-dependent phenomenon was associated with interleukin-2 production. In summary, H. ducreyi isolates do not exhibit cytotoxic effects on the epithelial cells of the skin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  13. Geomyces and Pseudogymnoascus: Emergence of a primary pathogen, the causative agent of bat white-nose syndrome: Chapter 28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verant, Michelle L.; Minnis, Andrew M.; Lindner, Daniel L.; Blehert, David

    2017-01-01

    Geomyces and Pseudogymnoascus (Fungi, Ascomycota, Leotiomycetes, aff. Thelebolales) are closely related groups of globally occurring soil-associated fungi. Recently, these genera of fungi have received attention because a newly identified species, Pseudogymnoascus (initially classified as Geomyces) destructans, was discovered in association with significant and unusual mortality of hibernating bats in North America (Blehert et al. 2009; Gargas et al. 2009; Minnis and Linder 2013). This emergent disease called bat white-nose syndrome (WNS), has since caused drastic declines in populations of hibernating bats in the United States and Canada (Turner, Reeder, and Coleman 2011; Thogmartin et al. 2012) and threatens some species with regional extinction (Frick et al. 2010; Langwig et al. 2012; Thogmartin et al. 2013). As primary predators of insects and keystone species for cave ecosystems, the loss of bats due to WNS has important economic and ecological implications.

  14. Immunomodulation and disease resistance in postyearling rainbow trout infected with Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Christine L.; Ottinger, C.A.; Blazer, V.S.; Iwanowicz, L.R.; Smith, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    Myxobolus cerebralis, the myxosporean parasite that causes whirling disease, has a number of deleterious effects on its salmonid host. Although it is well established that juvenile salmonids in the active stages of whirling disease mount an immune response to the pathogen, the occurrence and longevity of any related immunomodulatory effects are unknown. In this study, postyearling rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss infected with M. cerebralis were examined for leukocyte functions and for resistance to Yersinia ruckeri, a bacterial pathogen of salmonids. Compared with uninfected controls, M. cerebralis-infected fish showed lower proliferative lymphocyte responses to four mitogens (concanavalin A, pokeweed mitogen, phytohemagglutinin, and lipopolysaccharide). Conversely, M. cerebralis-infected fish displayed greater bactericidal activity of anterior kidney macrophages than did uninfected fish. After bath challenges with K. ruckeri, M. cerebralis-infected fish had slightly lower survival and a more rapid onset of mortality than did the control fish. Renal tissue and fecal samples from M. cerebralis-infected and uninfected survivors were cultured for the presence of K. ruckeri, and no difference in prevalence was noted between the two groups. Because immunomodulatory changes in the M. cerebralis-infected fish involved functional enhancement and suppression of different leukocyte populations, disease resistance among M. cerebralis-infected fish in the later stages of whirling disease will probably vary with the secondary pathogen and the nature of immune response the pathogen evokes.

  15. Antifungal activity of essential oils of lemon balm, manuka and tansy to the causative agents of otomycosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanović Đorđe; Jovanović Vera

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Otomycosis is a superficial fungal infection of the external ear canal. One of the therapeutic approaches that became topical in treatment of otomycosis is the application of essential oils, which is shown to have different biological properties, including the antimicrobial effect. Aim: The objective of the research is to examine antimycotic effects of essential oils of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) on the causati...

  16. Causation and Effectuation Processes: Opportunity Discovery and Exploitation Logics of Habitual Entrepreneurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates how habitual entrepreneurs (i.e. serial and portfolio entrepreneurs) discover and exploit opportunities, deal with risk and uncertainty, predict or control the future, and plan their businesses based on a causation and effectuation perspective. This study thereby uncovered...... the causation and effectuation logics applied by habitual entrepreneurs with regard to four dimensions of the venture creation: View of the future (VF), Opportunity Discovery (OD), Opportunity Exploitation (OE), and Dealing with Risk (DR). Six habitual entrepreneurs, who had to meet three strictly defined...

  17. How can physics underlie the mind? top-down causation in the human context

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, George

    2016-01-01

    Physics underlies all complexity, including our own existence: how is this possible? How can our own lives emerge from interactions of electrons, protons, and neutrons? This book considers the interaction of physical and non-physical causation in complex systems such as living beings, and in particular in the human brain, relating this to the emergence of higher levels of complexity with real causal powers. In particular it explores the idea of top-down causation, which is the key effect allowing the emergence of true complexity and also enables the causal efficacy of non-physical entities, including the value of money, social conventions, and ethical choices.

  18. The complete linkage disequilibrium test: a test that points to causative mutations underlying quantitative traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uleberg Eivind

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically, SNP that are in complete linkage disequilibrium with the causative SNP cannot be distinguished from the causative SNP. The Complete Linkage Disequilibrium (CLD test presented here tests whether a SNP is in complete LD with the causative mutation or not. The performance of the CLD test is evaluated in 1000 simulated datasets. Methods The CLD test consists of two steps i.e. analysis I and analysis II. Analysis I consists of an association analysis of the investigated region. The log-likelihood values from analysis I are next ranked in descending order and in analysis II the CLD test evaluates differences in log-likelihood ratios between the best and second best markers. Under the null-hypothesis distribution, the best SNP is in greater LD with the QTL than the second best, while under the alternative-CLD-hypothesis, the best SNP is alike-in-state with the QTL. To find a significance threshold, the test was also performed on data excluding the causative SNP. The 5th, 10th and 50th highest TCLD value from 1000 replicated analyses were used to control the type-I-error rate of the test at p = 0.005, p = 0.01 and p = 0.05, respectively. Results In a situation where the QTL explained 48% of the phenotypic variance analysis I detected a QTL in 994 replicates (p = 0.001, where 972 were positioned in the correct QTL position. When the causative SNP was excluded from the analysis, 714 replicates detected evidence of a QTL (p = 0.001. In analysis II, the CLD test confirmed 280 causative SNP from 1000 simulations (p = 0.05, i.e. power was 28%. When the effect of the QTL was reduced by doubling the error variance, the power of the test reduced relatively little to 23%. When sequence data were used, the power of the test reduced to 16%. All SNP that were confirmed by the CLD test were positioned in the correct QTL position. Conclusions The CLD test can provide evidence for a causative SNP, but its power may be low in situations

  19. Antitrypanosomal compounds from the essential oil and extracts of Keetia leucantha leaves with inhibitor activity on Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bero, J; Beaufay, C; Hannaert, V; Hérent, M-F; Michels, P A; Quetin-Leclercq, J

    2013-02-15

    Keetia leucantha is a West African tree used in traditional medicine to treat several diseases among which parasitic infections. The dichloromethane extract of leaves was previously shown to possess growth-inhibitory activities on Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Leishmania mexicana mexicana with low or no cytotoxicity (>100 μg/ml on human normal fibroblasts) (Bero et al. 2009, 2011). In continuation of our investigations on the antitrypanosomal compounds from this dichloromethane extract, we analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS the essential oil of its leaves obtained by hydrodistillation and the major triterpenic acids in this extract by LC-MS. Twenty-seven compounds were identified in the oil whose percentages were calculated using the normalization method. The essential oil, seven of its constituents and the three triterpenic acids were evaluated for their antitrypanosomal activity on Trypanosoma brucei brucei bloodstream forms (Tbb BSF) and procyclic forms (Tbb PF) to identify an activity on the glycolytic process of trypanosomes. The oil showed an IC(50) of 20.9 μg/ml on Tbb BSF and no activity was observed on Tbb PF. The best antitrypanosomal activity was observed for ursolic acid with IC(50) of 2.5 and 6.5 μg/ml respectively on Tbb BSF and Tbb PF. The inhibitory activity on a glycolytic enzyme of T. brucei, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), was also evaluated for betulinic acid, olenaolic acid, ursolic acid, phytol, α-ionone and β-ionone. The three triterpenic acids and β-ionone showed inhibitory activities on GAPDH with oleanolic acid being the most active with an inhibition of 72.63% at 20 μg/ml. This paper reports for the first time the composition and antitrypanosomal activity of the essential oil of Keetia leucantha. Several of its constituents and three triterpenic acids present in the dichloromethane leaves extract showed a higher antitrypanosomal activity on bloodstream forms of Tbb as compared to procyclic forms

  20. Bauerenol Acetate, the Pentacyclic Triterpenoid from Tabernaemontana longipes, is an Antitrypanosomal Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carothers, Simira; Nyamwihura, Rogers; Collins, Jasmine; Zhang, Huaisheng; Park, HaJeung; Setzer, William N; Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor

    2018-02-08

    The Latin American plant Tabernaemontana longipes was studied in this work as a potential source of antiparasitic agents. The chloroform extract of T. longipes leaves was separated into several fractions, and tested for antitrypanosomal activity. One of the fractions displayed significant growth inhibitory activity against Trypanosoma brucei . The active principle in the fraction was isolated, purified, and characterized by NMR and mass spectrometry. The antitrypanosomal agent in the CHCl₃ extract of T. longipes leaves is the pentacyclic triterpenoid bauerenol acetate. A metabolite profiling assay suggest that the triterpenoid influences cholesterol metabolism. The molecular target(s) of bauerenol and its acetate, like many other antiparasitic pentacyclic triterpenoids is/are unknown, but they present privileged structural scaffolds that can be explored for structure-based activity optimization studies using phenotypic assays.

  1. Analytic Causative Constructions in Medieval Spanish: The Origins of a Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaphre Villanueva, Monica

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to provide an inventory of the Analytic Causative constructions that were in use in Peninsular Spanish from the 12th to the 16th centuries from the constructional perspective of Cognitive Grammar. A detailed profile of each construction was made including its constructional schema along with relevant semantic, syntactic,…

  2. Etiology in psychiatry: embracing the reality of poly-gene-environmental causation of mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, Rudolf; Zwicker, Alyson

    2017-06-01

    Intriguing findings on genetic and environmental causation suggest a need to reframe the etiology of mental disorders. Molecular genetics shows that thousands of common and rare genetic variants contribute to mental illness. Epidemiological studies have identified dozens of environmental exposures that are associated with psychopathology. The effect of environment is likely conditional on genetic factors, resulting in gene-environment interactions. The impact of environmental factors also depends on previous exposures, resulting in environment-environment interactions. Most known genetic and environmental factors are shared across multiple mental disorders. Schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, in particular, are closely causally linked. Synthesis of findings from twin studies, molecular genetics and epidemiological research suggests that joint consideration of multiple genetic and environmental factors has much greater explanatory power than separate studies of genetic or environmental causation. Multi-factorial gene-environment interactions are likely to be a generic mechanism involved in the majority of cases of mental illness, which is only partially tapped by existing gene-environment studies. Future research may cut across psychiatric disorders and address poly-causation by considering multiple genetic and environmental measures across the life course with a specific focus on the first two decades of life. Integrative analyses of poly-causation including gene-environment and environment-environment interactions can realize the potential for discovering causal types and mechanisms that are likely to generate new preventive and therapeutic tools. © 2017 World Psychiatric Association.

  3. Are All Children Equal? Causative Factors of Child Labour in Selected Districts of South Punjab, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Syed Zubair; Qureshi, Ayesha

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the causative factors of child labour in selected districts of South Punjab, Pakistan. As a member of the International Labour Organization (ILO) Pakistan has a responsibility to stamp out child labour from its regions. Our sample was selected from seven working environments (workshops, hotels, tea stalls,…

  4. Acquiring the English Causative Alternation: Evidence from the University of Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseel Zibin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the current study was to test whether Advanced Jordanian EFL learners have acquired the English causative alternation. To this end, we used a Grammaticality Judgment Task (GJT to determine whether the participants would be able distinguish between alternating and non-alternating causative/inchoative verbs. The verbs used in the GJT were chosen based on their frequency in the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA. The sample of the study consisted of eighty advanced Jordanian EFL learners, studying English Language and Literature at the University of Jordan. The results revealed that the participants have not acquired the English causative alternation (total mean=61%. Specifically, the results showed that the participants encountered some difficulties with certain verbs that do not alternate and were used ungrammatically on the GJT. We proposed that these difficulties could be attributed to the differences between English and Jordanian Arabic (JA in terms of the semantically-based constraints that govern the causative-inchoative alternation in English and JA. The participants transferred the argument structure of verbs in JA into English without realising that the two languages are different in terms of the verbs that are allowed to alternate and those that are not. The study concludes with recommendations for further research. Keywords: C

  5. Probing the metabolic network in bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei using untargeted metabolomics with stable isotope labelled glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J Creek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics coupled with heavy-atom isotope-labelled glucose has been used to probe the metabolic pathways active in cultured bloodstream form trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Glucose enters many branches of metabolism beyond glycolysis, which has been widely held to be the sole route of glucose metabolism. Whilst pyruvate is the major end-product of glucose catabolism, its transamination product, alanine, is also produced in significant quantities. The oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway is operative, although the non-oxidative branch is not. Ribose 5-phosphate generated through this pathway distributes widely into nucleotide synthesis and other branches of metabolism. Acetate, derived from glucose, is found associated with a range of acetylated amino acids and, to a lesser extent, fatty acids; while labelled glycerol is found in many glycerophospholipids. Glucose also enters inositol and several sugar nucleotides that serve as precursors to macromolecule biosynthesis. Although a Krebs cycle is not operative, malate, fumarate and succinate, primarily labelled in three carbons, were present, indicating an origin from phosphoenolpyruvate via oxaloacetate. Interestingly, the enzyme responsible for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was shown to be essential to the bloodstream form trypanosomes, as demonstrated by the lethal phenotype induced by RNAi-mediated downregulation of its expression. In addition, glucose derivatives enter pyrimidine biosynthesis via oxaloacetate as a precursor to aspartate and orotate.

  6. Flagellar adhesion in Trypanosoma brucei relies on interactions between different skeletal structures in the flagellum and cell body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotureau, Brice; Blisnick, Thierry; Subota, Ines; Julkowska, Daria; Cayet, Nadège; Perrot, Sylvie; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The Trypanosoma brucei flagellum is an essential organelle anchored along the surface of the cell body through a specialized structure called the flagellum attachment zone (FAZ). Adhesion relies on the interaction of the extracellular portion of two transmembrane proteins, FLA1 and FLA1BP. Here, we identify FLAM3 as a novel large protein associated with the flagellum skeleton whose ablation inhibits flagellum attachment. FLAM3 does not contain transmembrane domains and its flagellar localization matches closely, but not exactly, that of the paraflagellar rod, an extra-axonemal structure present in the flagellum. Knockdown of FLA1 or FLAM3 triggers similar defects in motility and morphogenesis, characterized by the assembly of a drastically reduced FAZ filament. FLAM3 remains associated with the flagellum skeleton even in the absence of adhesion or a normal paraflagellar rod. However, the protein is dispersed in the cytoplasm when flagellum formation is inhibited. By contrast, FLA1 remains tightly associated with the FAZ filament even in the absence of a flagellum. In these conditions, the extracellular domain of FLA1 points to the cell surface. FLAM3 is essential for proper distribution of FLA1BP, which is restricted to the most proximal portion of the flagellum upon knockdown of FLAM3. We propose that FLAM3 is a key component of the FAZ connectors that link the axoneme to the adhesion zone, hence it acts in an equivalent manner to the FAZ filament complex, but on the side of the flagellum.

  7. A global comparison of the human and T. brucei degradomes gives insights about possible parasite drug targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan T Mashiyama

    Full Text Available We performed a genome-level computational study of sequence and structure similarity, the latter using crystal structures and models, of the proteases of Homo sapiens and the human parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Using sequence and structure similarity networks to summarize the results, we constructed global views that show visually the relative abundance and variety of proteases in the degradome landscapes of these two species, and provide insights into evolutionary relationships between proteases. The results also indicate how broadly these sequence sets are covered by three-dimensional structures. These views facilitate cross-species comparisons and offer clues for drug design from knowledge about the sequences and structures of potential drug targets and their homologs. Two protease groups ("M32" and "C51" that are very different in sequence from human proteases are examined in structural detail, illustrating the application of this global approach in mining new pathogen genomes for potential drug targets. Based on our analyses, a human ACE2 inhibitor was selected for experimental testing on one of these parasite proteases, TbM32, and was shown to inhibit it. These sequence and structure data, along with interactive versions of the protein similarity networks generated in this study, are available at http://babbittlab.ucsf.edu/resources.html.

  8. Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in Urine and Saliva Samples in Nonhuman Primate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maina Ngotho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is a vector-borne parasitic zoonotic disease. The disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is the most prevalent in Africa. Early diagnosis is hampered by lack of sensitive diagnostic techniques. This study explored the potential of loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP and polymerase chain reaction (PCR in the detection of T. b. gambiense infection in a vervet monkey HAT model. Six vervet monkeys were experimentally infected with T. b. gambiense IL3253 and monitored for 180 days after infection. Parasitaemia was scored daily. Blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, saliva, and urine samples were collected weekly. PCR and LAMP were performed on serum, CSF, saliva, and urine samples. The detection by LAMP was significantly higher than that of parasitological methods and PCR in all the samples. The performance of LAMP varied between the samples and was better in serum followed by saliva and then urine samples. In the saliva samples, LAMP had 100% detection between 21 and 77 dpi, whereas in urine the detection it was slightly lower, but there was over 80% detection between 28 and 91 dpi. However, LAMP could not detect trypanosomes in either saliva or urine after 140 and 126 dpi, respectively. The findings of this study emphasize the importance of LAMP in diagnosis of HAT using saliva and urine samples.

  9. Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in Urine and Saliva Samples in Nonhuman Primate Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngotho, Maina; Kagira, John Maina; Gachie, Beatrice Muthoni; Karanja, Simon Muturi; Waema, Maxwell Wambua; Maranga, Dawn Nyawira; Maina, Naomi Wangari

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a vector-borne parasitic zoonotic disease. The disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is the most prevalent in Africa. Early diagnosis is hampered by lack of sensitive diagnostic techniques. This study explored the potential of loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the detection of T. b. gambiense infection in a vervet monkey HAT model. Six vervet monkeys were experimentally infected with T. b. gambiense IL3253 and monitored for 180 days after infection. Parasitaemia was scored daily. Blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), saliva, and urine samples were collected weekly. PCR and LAMP were performed on serum, CSF, saliva, and urine samples. The detection by LAMP was significantly higher than that of parasitological methods and PCR in all the samples. The performance of LAMP varied between the samples and was better in serum followed by saliva and then urine samples. In the saliva samples, LAMP had 100% detection between 21 and 77 dpi, whereas in urine the detection it was slightly lower, but there was over 80% detection between 28 and 91 dpi. However, LAMP could not detect trypanosomes in either saliva or urine after 140 and 126 dpi, respectively. The findings of this study emphasize the importance of LAMP in diagnosis of HAT using saliva and urine samples.

  10. Molecular Evidence of a Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Sylvatic Cycle in the Human African Trypanosomiasis Foci of Equatorial Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eCordon-Obras

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gambiense trypanosomiasis is considered an anthroponotic disease. Consequently, control programs are generally aimed at stopping transmission of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T. b. gambiense by detecting and treating human cases. However, the persistence of numerous foci despite efforts to eliminate this disease questions this strategy as unique tool to pursue the eradication. The role of animals as a reservoir of T. b. gambiense is still controversial, but could partly explain maintenance of the infection at hypo-endemic levels. In the present study, we evaluated the presence of T. b. gambiense in wild animals in Equatorial Guinea. The infection rate ranged from 0.8% in the insular focus of Luba to more than 12% in Mbini, a focus with a constant trickle of human cases. The parasite was detected in a wide range of animal species including four species never described previously as putative reservoirs. Our study comes to reinforce the hypothesis that animals may play a role in the persistence of T. b. gambiense transmission, being particularly relevant in low transmission settings. Under these conditions the integration of sustained vector control and medical interventions should be considered to achieve the elimination of Gambiense trypanosomiasis.

  11. IL-6 is Upregulated in Late-Stage Disease in Monkeys Experimentally Infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Nyawira Maranga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is constrained by lack of simple-to-use diagnostic, staging, and treatment tools. The search for novel biomarkers is, therefore, essential in the fight against HAT. The current study aimed at investigating the potential of IL-6 as an adjunct parameter for HAT stage determination in vervet monkey model. Four adult vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops were experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and treated subcuratively at 28 days after infection (dpi to induce late stage disease. Three noninfected monkeys formed the control group. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and blood samples were obtained at weekly intervals and assessed for various biological parameters. A typical HAT-like infection was observed. The late stage was characterized by significant (P<0.05 elevation of CSF IL-6, white blood cell count, and total protein starting 35 dpi with peak levels of these parameters coinciding with relapse parasitaemia. Brain immunohistochemical staining revealed an increase in brain glial fibrillary acidic protein expression indicative of reactive astrogliosis in infected animals which were euthanized in late-stage disease. The elevation of IL-6 in CSF which accompanied other HAT biomarkers indicates onset of parasite neuroinvasion and show potential for use as an adjunct late-stage disease biomarker in the Rhodesian sleeping sickness.

  12. IL-6 is Upregulated in Late-Stage Disease in Monkeys Experimentally Infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyawira Maranga, Dawn; Kagira, John Maina; Kinyanjui, Christopher Kariuki; Muturi Karanja, Simon; Wangari Maina, Naomi; Ngotho, Maina

    2013-01-01

    The management of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is constrained by lack of simple-to-use diagnostic, staging, and treatment tools. The search for novel biomarkers is, therefore, essential in the fight against HAT. The current study aimed at investigating the potential of IL-6 as an adjunct parameter for HAT stage determination in vervet monkey model. Four adult vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) were experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and treated subcuratively at 28 days after infection (dpi) to induce late stage disease. Three noninfected monkeys formed the control group. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood samples were obtained at weekly intervals and assessed for various biological parameters. A typical HAT-like infection was observed. The late stage was characterized by significant (P < 0.05) elevation of CSF IL-6, white blood cell count, and total protein starting 35 dpi with peak levels of these parameters coinciding with relapse parasitaemia. Brain immunohistochemical staining revealed an increase in brain glial fibrillary acidic protein expression indicative of reactive astrogliosis in infected animals which were euthanized in late-stage disease. The elevation of IL-6 in CSF which accompanied other HAT biomarkers indicates onset of parasite neuroinvasion and show potential for use as an adjunct late-stage disease biomarker in the Rhodesian sleeping sickness. PMID:24194772

  13. A single amino acid substitution in the group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor abolishes TLF-1 binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E DeJesus

    Full Text Available Critical to human innate immunity against African trypanosomes is a minor subclass of human high-density lipoproteins, termed Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1. This primate-specific molecule binds to a haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR on the surface of susceptible trypanosomes, initiating a lytic pathway. Group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT, escaping TLF-1 killing due to reduced uptake. Previously, we found that group 1 T. b. gambiense HpHbR (TbgHpHbR mRNA levels were greatly reduced and the gene contained substitutions within the open reading frame. Here we show that a single, highly conserved amino acid in the TbgHpHbR ablates high affinity TLF-1 binding and subsequent endocytosis, thus evading TLF-1 killing. In addition, we show that over-expression of TbgHpHbR failed to rescue TLF-1 susceptibility. These findings suggest that the single substitution present in the TbgHpHbR directly contributes to the reduced uptake and resistance to TLF-1 seen in these important human pathogens.

  14. Similarity in variable antigen type composition of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense populations in different sites within the mouse host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, C M; Hunter, C A; Barry, J D; Vickerman, K

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense subpopulations in different sites within the body of infected mice were isolated and enumerated on day 6 of cyclically transmitted infections. Most trypanosomes were in the blood vasculature and spleen but approximately 6% occurred in lymph nodes and about 9% were extravascular. Most of the extravascular trypanosomes were in the peritoneal and pleural cavities; significant numbers also occurred in the brain and kidneys. Six major variable antigen types (VATs) were detected by immunofluorescence using specific antisera and monoclonal antibodies. The prevalence of each VAT was essentially the same in subpopulations in the blood, mesenteric and inguinal lymph nodes, brain, kidneys and peritoneal and pleural cavities. This similarity of VAT composition in different subpopulations is probably caused by high rates of dynamic interchange of trypanosomes between sites. Extravascular trypanosomes, therefore, form a significant proportion of the total population in acute infections of mice but they do not appear to play any special role in the population biology of antigenic variation at this stage of infection.

  15. Pyridinium Oxime Compounds as Antimicrobial Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    the causative agent of fish and amphibian tuberculosis, and is the closest relative of M. tuberculosis by 16S rRNA analysis that is not a member of the...0.17 mM L- tryptophan , 0.87 mM glycine, 0.79 mM L-tyrosine, 1.57 mM L-lysine, 1.48 mM L-valine, 1.75 mM L-leucine, 1.30 mM L-isoleucine, 1.01 mM L

  16. Trading Agents

    CERN Document Server

    Wellman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Automated trading in electronic markets is one of the most common and consequential applications of autonomous software agents. Design of effective trading strategies requires thorough understanding of how market mechanisms operate, and appreciation of strategic issues that commonly manifest in trading scenarios. Drawing on research in auction theory and artificial intelligence, this book presents core principles of strategic reasoning that apply to market situations. The author illustrates trading strategy choices through examples of concrete market environments, such as eBay, as well as abst

  17. Trypanosoma brucei Invasion and T-Cell Infiltration of the Brain Parenchyma in Experimental Sleeping Sickness: Timing and Correlation with Functional Changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Laperchia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The timing of Trypanosoma brucei entry into the brain parenchyma to initiate the second, meningoencephalitic stage of human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness is currently debated and even parasite invasion of the neuropil has been recently questioned. Furthermore, the relationship between neurological features and disease stage are unclear, despite the important diagnostic and therapeutic implications.Using a rat model of chronic Trypanosoma brucei brucei infection we determined the timing of parasite and T-cell neuropil infiltration and its correlation with functional changes. Parasite DNA was detected using trypanosome-specific PCR. Body weight and sleep structure alterations represented by sleep-onset rapid eye movement (SOREM periods, reported in human and experimental African trypanosomiasis, were monitored. The presence of parasites, as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells in the neuropil was assessed over time in the brain of the same animals by immunocytochemistry and quantitative analyses.Trypanosome DNA was present in the brain at day 6 post-infection and increased more than 15-fold by day 21. Parasites and T-cells were observed in the parenchyma from day 9 onwards. Parasites traversing blood vessel walls were observed in the hypothalamus and other brain regions. Body weight gain was reduced from day 7 onwards. SOREM episodes started in most cases early after infection, with an increase in number and duration after parasite neuroinvasion.These findings demonstrate invasion of the neuropil over time, after an initial interval, by parasites and lymphocytes crossing the blood-brain barrier, and show that neurological features can precede this event. The data thus challenge the current clinical and cerebrospinal fluid criteria of disease staging.

  18. Comparative biochemical and pathological changes in some laboratory animals experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei and their responses to diminazene diaceturate (Veriben® therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the biochemical and pathological changes of Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected mice, rats and rabbits, and study the chemotherapeutic effects according to standard criteria. Methods: A total of 20 Balb/c Albino mice, 20 Wister Albino rats and 20 New Zealand rabbits, all adults and of both sexes were used in the study. Each rodent group was divided into four groups (A, B, C and D of five animals each. Animals in Groups A and C were individually infected with 0.5 mL of blood from donor rats containing 1.5 ××106 Trypanasoma brucei brucei, while Groups B and D remained uninfected. The animals were later treated like this: Group A (infected and untreated control, Group B (uninfected and untreated control, Group C (infected and treated and Group D (uninfected and treated. The treatment was administered on Day 12 after infection. Results: The prepatent period for mice and rats was 4 days while that for rabbits was 8 days. There was a significant (P < 0.05 increase in levels of liver enzymes and serum metabolites which were more marked among the mice and rats than rabbits. These changes were modulated to their preinfection values in the infected treated animals. At necropsy, all animals showed splenomegaly, hepatomegaly and nephritis. However, cardiomegaly was exclusive to the rabbits. Histopathologically, degenerative changes were observed in both the liver and kidneys which were more severe among mice and rats and moderate in rabbits. Spleen of mice showed giant macrophages, while that of the rats showed epithelioid giant cells. However, spleen of rabbits showed haemosiderosis and eosinophilic infiltrations. Hydrophobic degeneration, necrosis and mononuclear cell infiltrations in the myocardium were observed only among rabbits. Conclusions: Diminazene diaceturate was able to ameliorate the various biochemical and pathological changes which were suggestive of severe liver and kidney dysfunctions with greater intensity occurring

  19. Depression and poverty among rural women: a relationship of social causation or social selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Leigh A; Braun, Bonnie; Charnigo, Richard; Havens, Jennifer R; Wright, David W

    2008-01-01

    Depression among rural women is a major public health concern. The purpose of this study was to test the competing theories of social causation and social selection to assess the relationship between depression and economic status for a sample of rural, low-income women in the United States. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze data from Rural Families Speak, a US Department of Agriculture-funded multi-state, longitudinal study of rural low-income families (N = 413). Results indicated that the social causation theory yielded a better approximation of the relationship between economic status and depression (RMSEA = 0.50 for a model based on this theory) than the social selection theory (RMSEA = 0.067). The association between lesser economic status and depressive symptoms is pressing in rural areas, given the high prevalence of both depression and poverty. These findings further emphasize the need for improved mental health services in this vulnerable population.

  20. Are All Children Equal? Causative Factors of Child Labour in Selected Districts of South Punjab, Pakistan

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    Syed Zubair Haider

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the causative factors of child labour in selected districts of South Punjab, Pakistan. As member of the International Labour Organization (ILO Pakistan has a responsibility to stamp out child labour from its regions. Our sample was selected from seven working environments (workshops, hotels, tea stalls, households, etc. through purposive sampling. The data were collected via a questionnaire which was completed by a sample of 547 working children. The findings of the exploratory factor analysis (EFA explored four factors from the research. Multilevel analyses were calculated to pinpoint the causative factors of child labour. The study results revealed that, due to family responsibilities, a lack of educational opportunities for children from low-income families, and increasing poverty, children develop an interest in working to earn their livelihood at the cost of their education. The children are involved in labour because their parents cannot meet their personal and educational requirements.

  1. Simultaneous social causation and social drift: Longitudinal analysis of depression and poverty in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Crick; Cois, Annibale

    2018-03-15

    Two theories have been proposed to explain the observed association between depression and poverty, namely social causation and social drift. Little is known regarding the relative importance of social causation and social drift in low and middle-income countries, where poverty is more severe and where most of the world's depressed individuals live. We analysed nationally representative longitudinal data from the National Income Dynamics Study in South Africa and simultaneously tested social causation and social drift hypotheses using structural equation modelling across three waves. Worse individual economic status at time 1 and 2 was independently associated with worse depression two years later at time 2 (standardised linear regression coefficient β = -0.110, Standard Error (SE): 0.024) and four years later at time 3 (β = -0.113, SE: 0.025) respectively. Conversely worse depression at time 1 and time 2 was independently associated with worse economic status at time 2 (β = -0.037, SE: 0.016) and time 3 (β = -0.028, SE: 0.012) respectively. In addition, the "effect" of depression on future assets was stronger among people with less baseline assets. The time span between data rounds is relatively short (four years); response rates are unequal across ethnic, age and sex groups; and the measure of depression is based on self-report. Social causation and social drift act simultaneously in this population, reinforcing poverty/depression cycles. Multi-sectoral policies are required that both prevent depression by addressing its economic determinants, and provide evidence-based treatment to mitigate the economic impact of depression. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A double face view on mind-brain relationship: the problem of mental causation

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    Jonas Gonçalves Coelho

    Full Text Available Abstract: Interpreting results of contemporary neuroscientif studies, I present a non-reductive physicalist account of mind-brain relationship from which the criticism of unintelligibility ascribed to the notion of mental causation is considered. Assuming that a paradigmatic criticism addressed to the notion of mental causation is that presented by Jaegwon Kim’s analysis on the theory of mind-body supervenience, I present his argument arguing that it encompasses a formulation of the problem of mental causation, which leads to difficulties by him pointed. To ask "how mental events, being a non-physical property of the brain, could act causally on brain structure and functioning?", is not to treat the mind as a property of the brain, but as a Cartesian substance. I argue that, rather than asking "how does mind could act causally on the brain?", as if the mind were something apart and independent of the brain, it would be more in line with a non-reductive physicalist view to ask "how the brain, guided by its mind, could act causally on itself?". To justify this last formulation of the problem of mental causation, I propose a "double face view", which consists in considering the consciousness as the essential property of the mind, and mind and brain as inseparable, dependent and irreducible faces. It means, in general terms, that the conscious mind is the result of brain structure and activity - "conscious mind as brain" - and that the brain, using its conscious mind as a guide to its actions, interacts with its body, and with the physical and sociocultural environment, constructing and being constructed by both - "brain as conscious mind".

  3. Causative bacteria and risk factors for peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis: A retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, Shinichi; Obata, Yoko; Sato, Shuntaro; Muta, Kumiko; Kitamura, Mineaki; Kawasaki, Satoko; Hirose, Misaki; Uramatsu, Tadashi; Nishino, Tomoya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although peritoneal dialysis (PD) is beneficial for patients with end-stage renal diseases (ESRD), there are some critical complications. PD-related peritonitis accounts for about 30% of all cases of catheter removal and transition to hemodialysis. We investigated the incidence, causative bacteria, and risk factors of PD-related peritonitis and peritonitis-related withdrawal in patients treated in the Nagasaki University Hospital. Methods: Subjects were 43 PD patients in the Nagas...

  4. Interaction between the flagellar pocket collar and the hook complex via a novel microtubule-binding protein in Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Anna Albisetti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei belongs to a group of unicellular, flagellated parasites that are responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. An essential aspect of parasite pathogenicity is cytoskeleton remodelling, which occurs during the life cycle of the parasite and is accompanied by major changes in morphology and organelle positioning. The flagellum originates from the basal bodies and exits the cell body through the flagellar pocket (FP but remains attached to the cell body via the flagellum attachment zone (FAZ. The FP is an invagination of the pellicular membrane and is the sole site for endo- and exocytosis. The FAZ is a large complex of cytoskeletal proteins, plus an intracellular set of four specialised microtubules (MtQ that elongate from the basal bodies to the anterior end of the cell. At the distal end of the FP, an essential, intracellular, cytoskeletal structure called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC circumvents the flagellum. Overlapping the FPC is the hook complex (HC (a sub-structure of the previously named bilobe that is also essential and is thought to be involved in protein FP entry. BILBO1 is the only functionally characterised FPC protein and is necessary for FPC and FP biogenesis. Here, we used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to identify and characterize a new BILBO1 partner protein-FPC4. We demonstrate that FPC4 localises to the FPC, the HC, and possibly to a proximal portion of the MtQ. We found that the C-terminal domain of FPC4 interacts with the BILBO1 N-terminal domain, and we identified the key amino acids required for this interaction. Interestingly, the FPC4 N-terminal domain was found to bind microtubules. Over-expression studies highlight the role of FPC4 in its association with the FPC, HC and FPC segregation. Our data suggest a tripartite association between the FPC, the HC and the MtQ.

  5. Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense transmitted by a single tsetse fly bite in vervet monkeys as a model of human African trypanosomiasis.

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    John K Thuita

    Full Text Available We have investigated the pathogenicity of tsetse (Glossina pallidipes-transmitted cloned strains of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in vervet monkeys. Tsetse flies were confirmed to have mature trypanosome infections by xenodiagnosis, after which nine monkeys were infected via the bite of a single infected fly. Chancres developed in five of the nine (55.6% monkeys within 4 to 8 days post infection (dpi. All nine individuals were successfully infected, with a median pre-patent period of 4 (range = 4-10 days, indicating that trypanosomes migrated from the site of fly bite to the systemic circulation rapidly and independently of the development of the chancre. The time lag to detection of parasites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was a median 16 (range = 8-40 days, marking the onset of central nervous system (CNS, late stage disease. Subsequently, CSF white cell numbers increased above the pre-infection median count of 2 (range = 0-9 cells/microl, with a positive linear association between their numbers and that of CSF trypanosomes. Haematological changes showed that the monkeys experienced an early microcytic-hypochromic anaemia and severe progressive thrombocytopaenia. Despite a 3-fold increase in granulocyte numbers by 4 dpi, leucopaenia occurred early (8 dpi in the monkey infection, determined mainly by reductions in lymphocyte numbers. Terminally, leucocytosis was observed in three of nine (33% individuals. The duration of infection was a median of 68 (range = 22-120 days. Strain and individual differences were observed in the severity of the clinical and clinical pathology findings, with two strains (KETRI 3741 and 3801 producing a more acute disease than the other two (KETRI 3804 and 3928. The study shows that the fly-transmitted model accurately mimics the human disease and is therefore a suitable gateway to understanding human African trypanosomiasis (HAT; sleeping sickness.

  6. Crystal Structures of Trypanosoma brucei Sterol 14[alpha]-Demethylase and Implications for Selective Treatment of Human Infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Park, Hee-Won; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Harp, Joel M.; Sundaramoorthy, Munirathinam; Nes, W. David; Pays, Etienne; Chaudhuri, Minu; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R. (ULdB); (Vanderbilt); (TTU); (Toronto); (NWU); (Meharry)

    2010-01-25

    Sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (14DM, the CYP51 family of cytochrome P450) is an essential enzyme in sterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes. It serves as a major drug target for fungal diseases and can potentially become a target for treatment of human infections with protozoa. Here we present 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures of 14DM from the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma brucei, ligand-free and complexed with a strong chemically selected inhibitor N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl-4-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadi-azol-2-yl)benzamide that we previously found to produce potent antiparasitic effects in Trypanosomatidae. This is the first structure of a eukaryotic microsomal 14DM that acts on sterol biosynthesis, and it differs profoundly from that of the water-soluble CYP51 family member from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, both in organization of the active site cavity and in the substrate access channel location. Inhibitor binding does not cause large scale conformational rearrangements, yet induces unanticipated local alterations in the active site, including formation of a hydrogen bond network that connects, via the inhibitor amide group fragment, two remote functionally essential protein segments and alters the heme environment. The inhibitor binding mode provides a possible explanation for both its functionally irreversible effect on the enzyme activity and its selectivity toward the 14DM from human pathogens versus the human 14DM ortholog. The structures shed new light on 14DM functional conservation and open an excellent opportunity for directed design of novel antiparasitic drugs.

  7. Functional and structural insights revealed by molecular dynamics simulations of an essential RNA editing ligase in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommie E Amaro

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA editing ligase 1 (TbREL1 is required for the survival of both the insect and bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for the devastating tropical disease African sleeping sickness. The type of RNA editing that TbREL1 is involved in is unique to the trypanosomes, and no close human homolog is known to exist. In addition, the high-resolution crystal structure revealed several unique features of the active site, making this enzyme a promising target for structure-based drug design. In this work, two 20 ns atomistic molecular dynamics (MD simulations are employed to investigate the dynamics of TbREL1, both with and without the ATP substrate present. The flexibility of the active site, dynamics of conserved residues and crystallized water molecules, and the interactions between TbREL1 and the ATP substrate are investigated and discussed in the context of TbREL1's function. Differences in local and global motion upon ATP binding suggest that two peripheral loops, unique to the trypanosomes, may be involved in interdomain signaling events. Notably, a significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme's active site occurs during the apo simulations, opening an additional cavity adjacent to the ATP binding site that could be exploited in the development of effective inhibitors directed against this protozoan parasite. Finally, ensemble averaged electrostatics calculations over the MD simulations reveal a novel putative RNA binding site, a discovery that has previously eluded scientists. Ultimately, we use the insights gained through the MD simulations to make several predictions and recommendations, which we anticipate will help direct future experimental studies and structure-based drug discovery efforts against this vital enzyme.

  8. Nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy for second-stage Trypanosoma brucei gambiense sleeping sickness: a randomized clinical trial in Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priotto, Gerardo; Kasparian, Serena; Ngouama, Daniel; Ghorashian, Sara; Arnold, Ute; Ghabri, Salah; Karunakara, Unni

    2007-12-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is a fatal disease. Current treatment options for patients with second-stage disease are either highly toxic or impracticable in field conditions. We compared the efficacy and safety of the nifurtimox-eflornithine drug combination with the standard eflornithine regimen for the treatment of second-stage disease. A randomized, open-label, active-control, phase III clinical trial comparing 2 arms was conducted at the Sleeping Sickness Treatment Center, which was run by Medecins Sans Frontieres, in Nkayi, Bouenza Province, Republic of Congo. Patients were screened for inclusion and randomly assigned to receive eflornithine alone (400 mg/kg per day given intravenously every 6 h for 14 days) or eflornithine (400 mg/kg per day given intravenously every 12 h for 7 days) plus nifurtimox (15 mg/kg per day given orally every 8 h for 10 days). Patients were observed for 18 months. The study's outcomes were cure and adverse events attributable to treatment. A total of 103 patients with second-stage disease were enrolled. Cure rates were 94.1% for the eflornithine group and 96.2% for the nifurtimox-eflornithine group. Drug reactions were frequent in both arms, and severe reactions affected 25.5% of patients in the eflornithine group and 9.6% of those in the nifurtimox-eflornithine group, resulting in 2 and 1 treatment suspensions, respectively. There was 1 death in the eflornithine arm and no deaths in the nifurtimox-eflornithine arm. The nifurtimox-eflornithine combination appears to be a promising first-line therapy for second-stage sleeping sickness. If our findings are corroborated by ongoing findings from additional sites (a multicenter extension of this study), the new nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy will mark a major and multifaceted advance over current therapies.

  9. Radioprotective Agents

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    Ilker Kelle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since1949, a great deal of research has been carried out on the radioprotective activity of various chemical substances. Thiol compounds, compounds which contain –SH radical, different classes of pharmacological agents and other compounds such as vitamine C and WR-2721 have been shown to reduce mortality when administered prior to exposure to a lethal dose of radiation. Recently, honey bee venom as well as that of its components melittin and histamine have shown to be valuable in reduction of radiation-induced damage and also provide prophylactic alternative treatment for serious side effects related with radiotherapy. It has been suggested that the radioprotective activity of bee venom components is related with the stimulation of the hematopoetic system.

  10. A systematic approach to clinical determinations of causation in symptomatic spinal disk injury following motor vehicle crash trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Michael D; Centeno, Christopher J; Kohles, Sean S

    2009-10-01

    Clinical determinations of causation in cases of intervertebral disk (IVD) injury after a motor vehicle crash (MVC) are often disputed in medicolegal settings. No published systematic guidelines exist for making such determinations, which has resulted in infringement by nonclinical personnel into injury causation evaluations, a traditionally clinical activity. The result is causal determinations that are potentially disconnected from clinical observations of injury. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the current literature on causation, causal determinations after trauma and IVD injury after MVC, and to develop a practicable, logical, and literature-based approach to causation determinations of symptomatic IVD injury after MVC. The results of the review indicate IVD injury can result from any MVC regardless of magnitude, thus meeting the first criteria of causation, biologic plausibility. Individual determinations of causation depend entirely on the temporal association between the collision and the symptom onset (the second criterion) and a lack of a more probable explanation for the symptoms (the third). When these causal elements are met, clinicians can assert causation on a "more probable than not" or "reasonable probability" basis. Because of a lack of an established or reliable relationship between collision force and the probability of IVD injury the investigation of collision parameters is not a useful adjunct to causal determinations.

  11. The form of causation in health, disease and intervention: biopsychosocial dispositionalism, conserved quantity transfers and dualist mechanistic chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David W; Lucas, Nicholas; Kerry, Roger

    2017-01-25

    Causation is important when considering: how an organism maintains health; why disease arises in a healthy person; and, how one may intervene to change the course of a disease. This paper explores the form of causative relationships in health, disease and intervention, with particular regard to the pathological and biopsychosocial models. Consistent with the philosophical view of dispositionalism, we believe that objects are the fundamental relata of causation. By accepting the broad scope of the biopsychosocial model, we argue that psychological and social constructs be considered objects. We think that this 'biopsychosocial dispositionalism' offers the flexibility required to describe causation throughout health, disease and intervention pathways. When constructing mechanistic chains to describe causative pathways, we argue that an object will causally connect with others through actions; transfers of energy from one object to another, initiated by the manifestation of one or more dispositional property. Finally, our analysis of causative interactions utilises the concept that a common form of interaction exists between disease and intervention pathways. This common form will always be an object, but the mode of interaction will vary with each disease. We describe how intervention may act through objects being shared between converging mechanistic chains, or through the removal and/or insertion of objects in such chains. We believe that this analysis provides novel insight to the forms of causative transactions that can occur. In addition, we hope that the findings of this analysis represent the first step towards developing a framework for appraising the composition of mechanistic theories.

  12. Agent Building Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    AgentBuilder is a software component developed under an SBIR contract between Reticular Systems, Inc., and Goddard Space Flight Center. AgentBuilder allows software developers without experience in intelligent agent technologies to easily build software applications using intelligent agents. Agents are components of software that will perform tasks automatically, with no intervention or command from a user. AgentBuilder reduces the time and cost of developing agent systems and provides a simple mechanism for implementing high-performance agent systems.

  13. Diverse patterns of expression of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene and unassigned reading frames 4 and 5 during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmer, D P; Feagin, J E; Stuart, K

    1985-01-01

    Transcription of a maxicircle segment from Trypanosoma brucei 164 that contains nucleotide (nt) sequences corresponding to cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and unassigned reading frames (URFs) 4 and 5 of other mitochondrial systems was investigated. Two major transcripts that differ in size by ca. 200 nt map to each of the COI and URF4 genes, while a single major transcript maps to URF5. In total RNA, the larger COI transcript is more abundant in procyclic forms (PFs) than in bloodstream forms (BFs), the smaller COI and both URF4 transcripts have similar abundances in both forms, and the single URF5 transcript is more abundant in BF than PF. These patterns of expression differ in poly(A)+ RNA as a result of a higher proportion of poly(A)+ mitochondrial transcripts in PFs than in BFs. In addition, small (300- to 500-nt) RNAs that are transcribed from C-rich sequences located between putative protein-coding genes also exhibit diverse patterns of expression between life cycle stages and differences in polyadenylation in PFs compared with BFs. These observations suggest that multiple processes regulate the differential expression of mitochondrial genes in T. brucei. Images PMID:2427925

  14. Trypanosoma brucei Inhibition by Essential Oils from Medicinal and Aromatic Plants Traditionally Used in Cameroon (Azadirachta indica, Aframomum melegueta, Aframomum daniellii, Clausena anisata, Dichrostachys cinerea and Echinops giganteus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamte, Stephane L Ngahang; Ranjbarian, Farahnaz; Campagnaro, Gustavo Daniel; Nya, Prosper C Biapa; Mbuntcha, Hélène; Woguem, Verlaine; Womeni, Hilaire Macaire; Ta, Léon Azefack; Giordani, Cristiano; Barboni, Luciano; Benelli, Giovanni; Cappellacci, Loredana; Hofer, Anders; Petrelli, Riccardo; Maggi, Filippo

    2017-07-06

    Essential oils are complex mixtures of volatile components produced by the plant secondary metabolism and consist mainly of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes and, to a minor extent, of aromatic and aliphatic compounds. They are exploited in several fields such as perfumery, food, pharmaceutics, and cosmetics. Essential oils have long-standing uses in the treatment of infectious diseases and parasitosis in humans and animals. In this regard, their therapeutic potential against human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) has not been fully explored. In the present work, we have selected six medicinal and aromatic plants ( Azadirachta indica , Aframomum melegueta , Aframomum daniellii , Clausena anisata , Dichrostachys cinerea , and Echinops giganteus ) traditionally used in Cameroon to treat several disorders, including infections and parasitic diseases, and evaluated the activity of their essential oils against Trypanosma brucei TC221. Their selectivity was also determined with Balb/3T3 (mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line) cells as a reference. The results showed that the essential oils from A. indica , A . daniellii , and E. giganteus were the most active ones, with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) values of 15.21, 7.65, and 10.50 µg/mL, respectively. These essential oils were characterized by different chemical compounds such as sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, monoterpene hydrocarbons, and oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Some of their main components were assayed as well on T. brucei TC221, and their effects were linked to those of essential oils.

  15. RNA interference analyses suggest a transcript-specific regulatory role for mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins MRP1 and MRP2 in RNA editing and other RNA processing in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vondrusková, Eva; van den Burg, Janny; Zíková, Alena; Ernst, Nancy Lewis; Stuart, Kenneth; Benne, Rob; Lukes, Julius

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins MRP1 and MRP2 occur in a heteromeric complex that appears to play a role in U-insertion/deletion editing in trypanosomes. Reduction in the levels of MRP1 (gBP21) and/or MRP2 (gBP25) mRNA by RNA interference in procyclic Trypanosoma brucei resulted in severe growth

  16. Fungal Agents as a Cause of Nasal Polyposis

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    Mohammad Nejadkazem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sinonasal polyposis is the most common tumor of nasal cavity and sinuses. Its complications are but not limited to sinusitis, breathing difficulties, hyposmia, anosmia and bone erosion. Methods and materials: A total of 98 patients with sinonasal polyposis were examined for suspicious causative fungal agent. Results: Direct microscopy and culture confirmed fungal agent in 8 patients (8.1% from which 3 cases had Alternaria spp, 1 patient Aspergillus spp, 1 patient Bipolaris spp, and 3 patients yeast. Conclusion: Fungi may be considered as a potential cause of sinonasal polyposis.   Keywords: Sinonasal Polyposis, Rhinosinusitis, Fungi

  17. Risk factors and causative organisms in microbial keratitis in daily disposable contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Fiona; Naduvilath, Thomas; Keay, Lisa; Radford, Cherry; Dart, John; Edwards, Katie; Carnt, Nicole; Minassian, Darwin; Holden, Brien

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated independent risk factors and causative organisms in microbial keratitis in daily disposable contact lens (CL)-wearers. A multisite prospective case-control study was undertaken. Cases were daily disposable CL-wearers attending Moorfields Eye Hospital with microbial keratitis and those reported through a one-year surveillance study in Australia and in New Zealand. A population-based telephone survey identified daily disposable CL-wearing controls. Subjects completed a questionnaire describing CL-wear history, hygiene and demographics. The sample used for risk factor analysis was weighted in proportion to the CL-wearing population at each location. Corneal scrape results were accessed. Independent risk factors were determined using multiple binary logistic regression. Causative organisms in different CL-wear modalities were compared using a chi-squared test. 963 daily disposable CL-wearers were identified, from which 67 cases and 374 controls were sampled. Independent risk factors were; wearing CLs every day compared with less frequent use (OR 10.4x; 95% CI 2.9-56.4), any overnight wear (OR 1.8x; 95% CI 1.6-2.1), less frequent hand washing (OR 1.8x; 95% CI 1.6-2.0), and smoking (OR 1.3x; 95% CI 1.1-1.6). Certain daily disposable CLs (OR 0.2x; 95% CI 0.1-0.2) had protective effects. Environmental organisms were less frequently recovered with daily disposable CLs (20%), compared with other modalities (36%; pkeratitis with daily disposable CLs. Risk varied with daily disposable CL type. The profile of causative organisms is consistent with less severe disease.

  18. Expression of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Antigens in Leishmania tarentolae. Potential for Use in Rapid Serodiagnostic Tests (RDTs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrie Rooney

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of rapid serodiagnostic tests for sleeping sickness and other diseases caused by kinetoplastids relies on the affordable production of parasite-specific recombinant antigens. Here, we describe the production of recombinant antigens from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T.b. gambiense in the related species Leishmania tarentolae (L. tarentolae, and compare their diagnostic sensitivity and specificity to native antigens currently used in diagnostic kits against a panel of human sera. A number of T.b. gambiense protein antigen candidates were chosen for recombinant expression in L. tarentolae based on current diagnostics in field use and recent findings on immunodiagnostic antigens found by proteomic profiling. In particular, the extracellular domains of invariant surface glycoprotein 65 (ISG65, variant surface glycoproteins VSG LiTat 1.3 and VSG LiTat 1.5 were fused with C-terminal histidine tags and expressed as soluble proteins in the medium of cultured, recombinant L. tarentolae. Using affinity chromatography, on average 10 mg/L of recombinant protein was purified from cultures and subsequently tested against a panel of sera from sleeping sickness patients from controls, i.e. persons without sleeping sickness living in HAT endemic countries. The evaluation on sera from 172 T.b. gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT patients and from 119 controls showed very high diagnostic potential of the two recombinant VSG and the rISG65 fragments with areas under the curve between 0.97 and 0.98 compared to 0.98 and 0.99 with native VSG LiTat 1.3 and VSG LiTat 1.5 (statistically not different. Evaluation on sera from 78 T.b. rhodesiense HAT patients and from 100 controls showed an acceptable diagnostic potential of rISG65 with an area under the curve of 0.83. These results indicate that a combination of these recombinant antigens has the potential to be used in next generation rapid serodiagnostic tests. In addition, the L. tarentolae

  19. Text-analytic Measurement of Effectuation and Causation Orientations among Small and Global Business Managers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Jan; Helmersson, Helge

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate how one can measure overall quality in texts gathered from interviews by means of PERTEX text analytic method. We compare text analytic measures and content for locally active Scandinavian small business managers and globally operating Indian IT managers when recapitulating......-components we are also able to display the degree of fragmentation, focus and integration in the text. We show how AFFI measures differ between managers with a causation or effectuation orientation irrespective of their role as small business manager or as an established global manager. Hence, we posit...

  20. Multiple evolutionary origins of Trypanosoma evansi in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Kamidi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi is the parasite causing surra, a form of trypanosomiasis in camels and other livestock, and a serious economic burden in Kenya and many other parts of the world. Trypanosoma evansi transmission can be sustained mechanically by tabanid and Stomoxys biting flies, whereas the closely related African trypanosomes T. brucei brucei and T. b. rhodesiense require cyclical development in tsetse flies (genus Glossina for transmission. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary origins of T. evansi. We used 15 polymorphic microsatellites to quantify levels and patterns of genetic diversity among 41 T. evansi isolates and 66 isolates of T. b. brucei (n = 51 and T. b. rhodesiense (n = 15, including many from Kenya, a region where T. evansi may have evolved from T. brucei. We found that T. evansi strains belong to at least two distinct T. brucei genetic units and contain genetic diversity that is similar to that in T. brucei strains. Results indicated that the 41 T. evansi isolates originated from multiple T. brucei strains from different genetic backgrounds, implying independent origins of T. evansi from T. brucei strains. This surprising finding further suggested that the acquisition of the ability of T. evansi to be transmitted mechanically, and thus the ability to escape the obligate link with the African tsetse fly vector, has occurred repeatedly. These findings, if confirmed, have epidemiological implications, as T. brucei strains from different genetic backgrounds can become either causative agents of a dangerous, cosmopolitan livestock disease or of a lethal human disease, like for T. b. rhodesiense.

  1. Assessing statistical views of natural selection: Room for non-local causation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huneman, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Recently some philosophers (the "statisticalists") have emphasized a potentially irreconcilable conceptual antagonism between the statistical characterization of natural selection (derived from population genetics) and the standard scientific discussion of natural selection in terms of forces and causes. Other philosophers have developed an account of the causal character of selectionist statements represented in terms of counterfactuals. I examine the compatibility between such statisticalism and counterfactually based causal accounts of natural selection (and related arguments about counterfactuals and causality) by distinguishing two distinct statisticalist claims: firstly the suggested impossibility for natural selection to be a cause acting upon populations and secondly the conceptualization that all evolutionary causes occur at the level of interactions between individual organisms. I argue that deriving the latter from the former involves supplementary assumptions concerning precisely what causation is. I critically examine two of these assumptions purportedly preventing natural selection being regarded as a cause: the locality claim and the modularity claim. I conclude that justifying the strongest version of statisticalism-i.e. evolutionary causation only occurs at the level of individual interactions between organisms-would require further metaphysical arguments that are likely to be deemed highly problematic. Additionally, I argue that such a metaphysical position would be considered incongruous with both our scientific and ordinary use of the concepts of causality and explanation as employed within our everyday epistemological framework. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Social mobility and psychiatric disabilities: an assessment of the social causation and social selection hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun-Uk; Han, Chang-Wan; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2010-09-01

    Social mobility is the movement of individuals, families and groups from one social position to another. Researchers indicate that people with psychiatric disabilities tend to come from lower socioeconomic status groups, and that the causal relationship between lower socioeconomic status and mental illness occurs through social mobility process. The purpose of this study was to examine the occupational social mobility process of a sample of self-identified psychiatrically disabled individuals who have been active members of the labor force for most of their adult lives. A total of 200 participants were recruited from the customers of a One-Stop Career Center in Gloucester County, New Jersey. The social mobility pattern of persons with psychiatric disabilities was compared to that of persons without psychiatric disabilities (n = 100 for each group). That is, the social selection and the social causation hypotheses were applied to the social mobility patterns of people with psychiatric disabilities. It was revealed that the social class distribution for fathers of people with psychiatric disabilities was not different from that of people without psychiatric disabilities and also there was no significant social mobility difference between the two groups. These findings do not support the social causation and the social selection hypotheses. Specifically, the findings demonstrate that occupational capabilities and skills of people with psychiatric disabilities have been stabilized and are similar to those of people without psychiatric disabilities. Furthermore, these results may dispute several biases and prejudices with regard to social mobility process of persons with psychiatric disabilities.

  3. Attribution of intentional causation influences the perception of observed movements: Behavioural evidence and neural correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Moore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research on human agency suggests that intentional causation is associated with a subjective compression in the temporal interval between actions and their effects. That is, intentional movements and their causal effects are perceived as closer together in time than equivalent unintentional movements and their causal effects. This so-called intentional binding effect is consistently found for one’s own self-generated actions. It has also been suggested that intentional binding occurs when observing intentional movements of others. However, this evidence is undermined by limitations of the paradigm used. In the current study we aimed to overcome these limitations using a more rigorous design in combination with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI to explore the neural underpinnings of intentional binding of observed movements. In particular, we aimed to identify brain areas sensitive to the interaction between intentionality and causality attributed to the observed action. Our behavioural results confirmed the occurrence of intentional binding for observed movements using this more rigorous paradigm. Our fMRI results highlighted a collection of brain regions whose activity was sensitive to the interaction between intentionality and causation. Intriguingly, these brain regions have previously been implicated in the sense of agency over one’s own movements. We discuss the implications of these results for intentional binding specifically, and the sense of agency more generally.

  4. Causative Chain Difference for each Type of Accidents in Japanese Maritime Traffic Systems (MTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanginingastuti Mutmainnah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Causative chain (CC is a failure chain that cause accident as an outcome product of the second step of MOP model, namely line relation analysis (LRA. This CC is a connection of several causative factors (CF, an outcome product of first step of MOP model, namely corner analysis (CA. MOP Model is an abbreviation from 4M Overturned Pyramid, created by authors by combining 2 accident analysis models. There are two steps in this model, namely CA and LRA. Utilizing this model can know what is CF that happen dominantly to the accidents and what is a danger CC that characterize accidents in a certain place and certain period. By knowing the characteristics, the preventive action can be decided to decrease the number of accident in the next period. The aim of this paper is providing the development of MOP Model that has been upgraded and understanding the characteristics of each type accident. The data that is analyzed in this paper is Japanese accidents from 2008 until 2013, which is available on Japan Transportation Safety Board (JTSB’s website. The analysis shows that every type of accidents has a unique characteristic, shown by their CFs and CCs. However, Man Factor is still playing role to the system dominantly.

  5. Causative factors of cost overrun in highway projects of Sindh province of Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohu, S.; Halid, A.; Nagapan, S.; Fattah, A.; Latif, I.; Ullah, K.

    2017-11-01

    Cost overrun is an increase of cost of project from approved budget which was signed by parties at the time of tender. Cost overrun in construction of highway projects is a common problem worldwide and construction industry of Pakistan is also facing this crucial problem of cost overrun in highway projects of Pakistan. The main objective of this research is to identify the causative factors of cost overrun in highway projects of Sindh province of Pakistan. A well designed questionnaire was developed based on 64 common factors of cost overrun from literature review. Developed questionnaire was distributed among selected 30 experts from owner/client, designer/consultant and contractor who have experience more than 20 years’ experience in highway projects. The collected data was statistical analyzed. After analysis results showed that delay process in payment by client, inadequate planning, client interference, poor contract management, delay of decision making, change of scope of project and financial problems faced by client were most causative factors of cost overrun in highway projects. This research will provide alertness to stakeholders of highway projects of Sindh province to avoid cost overrun in projects.

  6. Cow's milk exposure and asthma in a newborn cohort: repeated ascertainment indicates reverse causation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussman, Chris; Todem, David; Forster, Johannes; Arshad, Hassan; Urbanek, Radvan; Karmaus, Wilfried

    2007-03-01

    The effect of cow's milk consumption on childhood asthma has been debated for several years. This study attempts to provide further insight into this association through the use of a longitudinal study design. Newborns from parents with atopic history were recruited from Germany, Austria, and England (n = 696). For five repeated ascertainments, information was collected on cow's milk exposure, incidence of doctor-diagnosed asthma, and confounders. Generalized estimation equations, incorporating different models (concurrent, delayed, combined, and reverse causation), were used to determine this association. No association between cow's milk consumption and childhood asthma was found for the concurrent effects model (OR = 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.55, 1.20). In the delayed effects model, the direction of the association varied with time of follow-up. Thus, we stratified by period, which resulted in a significant protective delayed effect at 36 months (OR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.06, 0.49). However, reverse causation negated this finding since the presence of asthma in prior months led to a reduction in further exposure to cow's milk (OR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.16, 0.99). Hence, cow's milk consumption does not protect against childhood asthma. The apparent protection of cow's milk against asthma may result from parents of asthmatic children avoiding cow's milk, rather than actual prophylaxis.

  7. Moral Evaluations of Organ Transplantation Influence Judgments of Death and Causation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair-Collins, Michael; Gerend, Mary A

    Two experiments investigated whether moral evaluations of organ transplantation influence judgments of death and causation. Participants' beliefs about whether an unconscious organ donor was dead and whether organ removal caused death in a hypothetical vignette varied depending on the moral valence of the vignette. Those who were randomly assigned to the good condition (vs. bad) were more likely to believe that the donor was dead prior to organ removal and that organ removal did not cause death. Furthermore, attitudes toward euthanasia and organ donation independently predicted judgments of death and causation, regardless of experimental condition. The results are discussed in light of the framework of motivated reasoning, in which motivation influences the selection of cognitive processes and representations applied to a given domain, as well as Knobe's person-as-moralist model, in which many basic concepts are appropriately imbued with moral features. On either explanatory framework, these data cast doubt on the psychological legitimacy of the mainstream justification for vital organ procurement from heart-beating donors, which holds that neurological criteria for death are scientifically justified, independently of concerns about organ transplantation. These data suggest that, rather than concluding that organ removal is permissible because the donor is dead, people may believe that the donor is dead because they believe organ removal to be permissible.

  8. Maternal education and adolescent drug use: a longitudinal analysis of causation and selection over a generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miech, Richard; Chilcoat, Howard

    2005-02-01

    Current evidence indicates that in the USA illegal drug use among adolescents between the 1980s and 1990s became significantly more prevalent in families with lower maternal education in comparison to families with higher maternal education. In this study, we examine whether this inter-generational change results from either (a) a changing influence of socioeconomic status on drug use, as predicted by the inter-generational social 'causation' hypothesis, or (b) a negative influence of drug use on socioeconomic status, as predicted by the inter-generational social 'selection/drift' hypothesis. The analyses are based on the US National Longitudinal Study of 1979, which includes information on drug use for both a nationally representative sample of respondents aged 19-27 in 1984, as well as drug use information for the children of these respondents, who were aged 18-27 in 1998. The results indicate that inter-generation change in cocaine and marijuana use resulted almost entirely from social causation. These findings support illegal drug use as a good candidate for analyses in the 'fundamental cause' tradition that seek to understand the social factors that concentrate poor health and health behaviors in the lower social strata over historical time.

  9. How Can God Act in the World? Modern Science and the Problem of Divine Causation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juuso Loikkanen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The belief that God actively acts in the world has been fundamental to orthodox Christian theology throughout the history of Christianity. Since the rise of modern science, however, this traditional understanding of God’s actions has attracted more and more critique. Firstly, it has been argued God cannot act in the world without violating the allegedly all-encompassing laws of nature, and, consequently, because the laws of nature cannot presumably ever be broken, it is considered totally impossible for God to influence the physical world in any way. Secondly, it is claimed that even if breaking the laws of nature was not, in theory, impossible, it would still be, in practice, impossible for an immaterial entity such as God to influence the material world. In this article, I argue that the first objection, i.e., that God cannot act in the world, holds partly true. I maintain that God cannot act without interfering with the processes of nature (although some recent attempts of building noninterventionist theories of God’ actions have been made. Nevertheless, I do not see how God’s intervention would constitute a problem for modern physics, as has often been proposed. Moreover, the second claim, i.e., that immaterial entities cannot affect material entities, is not based on evidence but on an unfounded assumption that because we do not know the mechanism of causation between immaterial and material entities, this causation is not possible.

  10. Beliefs about causation of schizophrenia: do Indian families believe in supernatural causes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, T N; Thara, R

    2001-03-01

    Beliefs about the causation of schizophrenia could influence the attitudes patients' families adopt towards the patient and may also influence their help-seeking behaviour. Indian families have been typically described as often believing in causes like supernatural forces and therefore seeking help from magico-religious healers. In the changing mental health scenario in India, this impression needs verification. Key relatives living with 254 chronic schizophrenia patients were interviewed and asked to name the causes they believed were behind the illness. A list of possible causes was provided for the families to select from, and relatives were also encouraged to mention other possible causes, not featured in the list. The possible causes identified and the factors related to attributions made were analysed. A supernatural cause was named by only 12% of the families and as the only cause by 5%. Psychosocial stress was most commonly cited cause, followed by personality defect and heredity. A small number of families (14%) could not name any cause and 39% named more than one cause. Patient gender and education, duration of illness and the key relative's education and the nature of relationship were related to the type of causal attributions made. Families living with patients suffering chronic schizophrenia receiving treatment in urban India rarely subscribe to the idea of supernatural causation of the illness. The causal attributions made by them are fairly rational and understandable, given the relative lack of exposure to proper information about the illness.

  11. GPR41 and GPR43¬ in obesity and inflammation – protective or causative?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei eAng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available GPR41 and GPR43 are a pair of mammalian G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs expressed in human adipocytes, colon epithelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These receptors are activated by short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs such as acetate, propionate and butyrate– which are produced during dietary fiber fermentation by resident gut bacteria. This unique ligand specificity suggests that GPR41 and GPR43 may mediate the interaction between the human host and the gut microbiome. Indeed, studies on knockout mice implicate GPR41 and GPR43 in chronic inflammatory disorders such as obesity, colitis, asthma and arthritis. However, whether GPR41 and GPR43 are protective or causative is inconsistent between studies. This discrepancy may be due to differences in the disease models used, the inbred mouse strains or non-specific knockout effects. Here, we review the latest findings on GPR41 and GPR43, highlighting contradictory observations. With GPR41 and GPR43 being considered as drug targets, it is pertinent that their role is fully elucidated. We propose that future studies on human tissues, ex vivo, may allow us to confirm the role of GPR41 and GPR43 in humans, be it protective or causative.

  12. Effects of Manipulation on Attributions of Causation, Free Will, and Moral Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Dylan; Lombrozo, Tania

    2017-03-01

    If someone brings about an outcome without intending to, is she causally and morally responsible for it? What if she acts intentionally, but as the result of manipulation by another agent? Previous research has shown that an agent's mental states can affect attributions of causal and moral responsibility to that agent, but little is known about what effect one agent's mental states can have on attributions to another agent. In Experiment 1, we replicate findings that manipulation lowers attributions of responsibility to manipulated agents. Experiments 2-7 isolate which features of manipulation drive this effect, a crucial issue for both philosophical debates about free will and attributions of responsibility in situations involving social influence more generally. Our results suggest that "bypassing" a manipulated agent's mental states generates the greatest reduction in responsibility, and we explain our results in terms of the effects that one agent's mental states can have on the counterfactual relations between another agent and an outcome. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  13. Multi-factorial causative model for back pain management; relating causative factors and mechanisms to injury presentations and designing time- and cost effective treatment thereof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Jeremy

    2012-08-01

    Back pain resolution has not statistically improved over many years with some literature suggesting chronic back pain to be increasing. From a search of literature on causes, events, mechanisms, factors and treatment for back pain, a model is developed that relates causes of back injury to factors that result in pain through two primary mechanisms; muscle fatigue and muscle/tendon/connective tissue strain or sprain with other main mechanisms being diminished reactivity and strength, changes in tendon/tissue mechanical properties and fear of back pain recurrence/fear of movement following a back pain episode. The model highlights the fact that back pain/injury is multi-factorial with numerous circular relationships. Therefore treatment should also be multi-factorial; a combination of physical and psychological therapy with attention to mechanisms at work or in daily living that exacerbate the injury and delay recovery thereof. Exercise is one method that can reduce muscle imbalance, improve resilience to muscle fatigue, and address reactivity and strength. More importantly, eccentric exercise can rectify musculotendinous or connective tissue injury which plays a role in prolonging the back injury cycle. Posture is identified as a causative factor for back pain with the time exposure for posture representing the largest portion of daily activities. From literature and from clinical observation, treatment methods can be improved and incorporated into integrated multi-modal programs. An integrated exercise program that commences with motor control exercise and progresses into functional movement is suggested. Furthermore a modification of the McKenzie extension movement may benefit back injury rehabilitation for a majority of lower back pain patients. Otherwise the sit-to-stand movement is a regular and frequent exacerbating mechanism of back pain and likely continuously tears connective tissue during the movement thus prolonging the cycle of back pain and can be

  14. Agility: Agent - Ility Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Craig

    2002-01-01

    ...., object and web technologies). The objective of the Agility project is to develop an open agent grid architecture populated with scalable, deployable, industrial strength agent grid components, targeting the theme 'agents for the masses...

  15. Riot Control Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Facts About Riot Control Agents Interim document Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir FACT SHEET What riot control agents are Riot control agents (sometimes referred to ...

  16. Interacting agents in finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, C.; Durlauf, S.N.; Blume, L.E.

    2008-01-01

    Interacting agents in finance represent a behavioural, agent-based approach in which financial markets are viewed as complex adaptive systems consisting of many boundedly rational agents interacting through simple heterogeneous investment strategies, constantly adapting their behaviour in response

  17. Some Studies On Neonatal Calf Diarrhea In Egypt Part 1: Causative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The data confirms the principal causal agent in neonatal calf diarrhoea in Egypt as Escherichia coli, Rotavirus, Corona virus, Clostridium perfringens, Salmonella spp and Cryptosporidium spp as a single or mixed infection by the isolated agents. In addition, diet, management and sanitation are also significant contributory ...

  18. Blocking Synthesis of the Variant Surface Glycoprotein Coat in Trypanosoma brucei Leads to an Increase in Macrophage Phagocytosis Due to Reduced Clearance of Surface Coat Antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie L Y Cheung

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular bloodstream form parasite Trypanosoma brucei is supremely adapted to escape the host innate and adaptive immune system. Evasion is mediated through an antigenically variable Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG coat, which is recycled at extraordinarily high rates. Blocking VSG synthesis triggers a precytokinesis arrest where stalled cells persist for days in vitro with superficially intact VSG coats, but are rapidly cleared within hours in mice. We therefore investigated the role of VSG synthesis in trypanosome phagocytosis by activated mouse macrophages. T. brucei normally effectively evades macrophages, and induction of VSG RNAi resulted in little change in phagocytosis of the arrested cells. Halting VSG synthesis resulted in stalled cells which swam directionally rather than tumbling, with a significant increase in swim velocity. This is possibly a consequence of increased rigidity of the cells due to a restricted surface coat in the absence of VSG synthesis. However if VSG RNAi was induced in the presence of anti-VSG221 antibodies, phagocytosis increased significantly. Blocking VSG synthesis resulted in reduced clearance of anti-VSG antibodies from the trypanosome surface, possibly as a consequence of the changed motility. This was particularly marked in cells in the G2/ M cell cycle stage, where the half-life of anti-VSG antibody increased from 39.3 ± 4.2 seconds to 99.2 ± 15.9 seconds after induction of VSG RNAi. The rates of internalisation of bulk surface VSG, or endocytic markers like transferrin, tomato lectin or dextran were not significantly affected by the VSG synthesis block. Efficient elimination of anti-VSG-antibody complexes from the trypanosome cell surface is therefore essential for trypanosome evasion of macrophages. These experiments highlight the essentiality of high rates of VSG recycling for the rapid removal of host opsonins from the parasite surface, and identify this process as a key parasite

  19. The orthologue of Sjögren's syndrome nuclear autoantigen 1 (SSNA1 in Trypanosoma brucei is an immunogenic self-assembling molecule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen P Price

    Full Text Available Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (PSS is a highly prevalent autoimmune disease, typically manifesting as lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands leading to chronically impaired lacrimal and salivary secretion. Sjögren's Syndrome nuclear autoantigen 1 (SSNA1 or NA14 is a major specific target for autoantibodies in PSS but the precise function and clinical relevance of this protein are largely unknown. Orthologues of the gene are absent from many of the commonly used model organisms but are present in Chlamyodomonas reinhardtii (in which it has been termed DIP13 and most protozoa. We report the functional characterisation of the orthologue of SSNA1 in the kinetoplastid parasite, Trypanosoma brucei. Both TbDIP13 and human SSNA1 are small coiled-coil proteins which are predicted to be remote homologues of the actin-binding protein tropomyosin. We use comparative proteomic methods to identify potential interacting partners of TbDIP13. We also show evidence that TbDIP13 is able to self-assemble into fibril-like structures both in vitro and in vivo, a property which may contribute to its immunogenicity. Endogenous TbDIP13 partially co-localises with acetylated α-tubulin in the insect procyclic stage of the parasite. However, deletion of the DIP13 gene in cultured bloodstream and procyclic stages of T. brucei has little effect on parasite growth or morphology, indicating either a degree of functional redundancy or a function in an alternative stage of the parasite life cycle.

  20. Characterization of a Novel Class I Transcription Factor A (CITFA) Subunit That Is Indispensable for Transcription by the Multifunctional RNA Polymerase I of Trypanosoma brucei

    KAUST Repository

    Nguyen, T. N.

    2012-10-26

    Trypanosoma brucei is the only organism known to have evolved a multifunctional RNA polymerase I (pol I) system that is used to express the parasite\\'s ribosomal RNAs, as well as its major cell surface antigens, namely, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) and procyclin, which are vital for establishing successful infections in the mammalian host and the tsetse vector, respectively. Thus far, biochemical analyses of the T. brucei RNA pol I transcription machinery have elucidated the subunit structure of the enzyme and identified the class I transcription factor A (CITFA). CITFA binds to RNA pol I promoters, and its CITFA-2 subunit was shown to be absolutely essential for RNA pol I transcription in the parasite. Tandem affinity purification (TAP) of CITFA revealed the subunits CITFA-1 to -6, which are conserved only among kinetoplastid organisms, plus the dynein light chain DYNLL1. Here, by tagging CITFA-6 instead of CITFA-2, a complex was purified that contained all known CITFA subunits, as well as a novel proline-rich protein. Functional studies carried out in vivo and in vitro, as well as a colocalization study, unequivocally demonstrated that this protein is a bona fide CITFA subunit, essential for parasite viability and indispensable for RNA pol I transcription of ribosomal gene units and the active VSG expression site in the mammalian-infective life cycle stage of the parasite. Interestingly, CITFA-7 function appears to be species specific, because expression of an RNA interference (RNAi)-resistant CITFA-7 transgene from Trypanosoma cruzi could not rescue the lethal phenotype of silencing endogenous CITFA-7.

  1. The response of trypanosomes and other eukaryotes to ER stress and the spliced leader RNA silencing (SLS) pathway in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaeli, Shulamit

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is induced when the quality control machinery of the cell is overloaded with unfolded proteins or when one of the functions of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is perturbed. Here, I describe UPR in yeast and mammals, and compare it to what we know about pathogenic fungi and the parasitic protozoans from the order kinetoplastida, focusing on the novel pathway the spliced leader silencing (SLS) in Trypanosoma brucei. Trypanosomes lack conventional transcription regulation, and thus, lack most of the UPR machinery present in other eukaryotes. Trypanosome genes are transcribed in polycistronic units that are processed by trans-splicing and polyadenylation. In trans-splicing, which is essential for processing of each mRNA, an exon known as the spliced leader (SL) is added to all mRNAs from a small RNA, the SL RNA. Under severe ER stress, T. brucei elicits the SLS pathway. In SLS, the transcription of the SL RNA gene is extinguished, and the entire transcription complex dissociates from the SL RNA promoter. Induction of SLS is mediated by an ER-associated kinase (PK3) that migrates to the nucleus, where it phosphorylates the TATA-binding protein (TRF4), leading shut-off of SL RNA transcription. As a result, trans-splicing is inhibited and the parasites activate a programmed cell death (PCD) pathway. Despite the ability to sense the ER stress, the different eukaryotes, especially unicellular parasites and pathogenic fungi, developed a variety of unique and different ways to sense and adjust to this stress in a manner different from their host.

  2. The role of B-cells and IgM antibodies in parasitemia, anemia, and VSG switching in Trypanosoma brucei-infected mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Magez

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes are extracellular parasitic protozoa, predominantly transmitted by the bite of the haematophagic tsetse fly. The main mechanism considered to mediate parasitemia control in a mammalian host is the continuous interaction between antibodies and the parasite surface, covered by variant-specific surface glycoproteins. Early experimental studies have shown that B-cell responses can be strongly protective but are limited by their VSG-specificity. We have used B-cell (microMT and IgM-deficient (IgM(-/- mice to investigate the role of B-cells and IgM antibodies in parasitemia control and the in vivo induction of trypanosomiasis-associated anemia. These infection studies revealed that that the initial setting of peak levels of parasitemia in Trypanosoma brucei-infected microMT and IgM(-/- mice occurred independent of the presence of B-cells. However, B-cells helped to periodically reduce circulating parasites levels and were required for long term survival, while IgM antibodies played only a limited role in this process. Infection-associated anemia, hypothesized to be mediated by B-cell responses, was induced during infection in microMT mice as well as in IgM(-/- mice, and as such occurred independently from the infection-induced host antibody response. Antigenic variation, the main immune evasion mechanism of African trypanosomes, occurred independently from host antibody responses against the parasite's ever-changing antigenic glycoprotein coat. Collectively, these results demonstrated that in murine experimental T. brucei trypanosomiasis, B-cells were crucial for periodic peak parasitemia clearance, whereas parasite-induced IgM antibodies played only a limited role in the outcome of the infection.

  3. Kinetic and mutational analysis of the Trypanosoma brucei NBT1 nucleobase transporter expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals structural similarities between ENT and MFS transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, I; De Koning, H P; Soteriadou, K; Diallinas, G

    2008-05-01

    Parasitic protozoa are unable to synthesise purines de novo and thus depend on the uptake of nucleosides and nucleobases across their plasma membrane through specific transporters. A number of nucleoside and nucleobase transporters from Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Leishmania major have recently been characterised and shown to belong to the equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) family. A number of studies have demonstrated the functional importance of particular transmembrane segments (TMS) in nucleoside-specific ENT proteins. TbNBT1, one of only three bona fide nucleobase-selective members of the ENT family, has previously been shown to be a high-affinity transporter for purine nucleobases and guanosine. In this study, we use the Saccharomyces cerevisiae expression system to build a biochemical model of how TbNBT1 recognises nucleobases. We next performed random in vitro and site-directed mutagenesis to identify residues critical for TbNBT1 function. The identification of residues likely to contribute to permeant binding, when combined with a structural model of TbNBT1 obtained by homology threading, yield a tentative three-dimensional model of the transporter binding site that is consistent with the binding model emerging from the biochemical data. The model strongly suggests the involvement of TMS5, TMS7 and TMS8 in TbNBT1 function. This situation is very similar to that concerning transporters of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), one of which was used as a template for the threading. This point raises the possibility that ENT and MFS carriers, despite being considered evolutionarily distinct, might in fact share similar topologies and substrate translocations pathways.

  4. The role of the PI(3,5)P2 kinase TbFab1 in endo/lysosomal trafficking in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilden, Julia K; Umaer, Khan; Kruzel, Emilia K; Hecht, Oliver; Correa, Renan O; Mansfield, John M; Bangs, James D

    2017-06-01

    Protein trafficking through endo/lysosomal compartments is critically important to the biology of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, but the routes material may take to the lysosome, as well as the molecular factors regulating those routes, remain incompletely understood. Phosphoinositides are signaling phospholipids that regulate many trafficking events by recruiting specific effector proteins to discrete membrane subdomains. In this study, we investigate the role of one phosphoinositide, PI(3,5)P2 in T. brucei. We find a low steady state level of PI(3,5)P2 in bloodstream form parasites comparable to that of other organisms. RNAi knockdown of the putative PI(3)P-5 kinase TbFab1 decreases the PI(3,5)P2 pool leading to rapid cell death. TbFab1 and PI(3,5)P2 both localize strongly to late endo/lysosomes. While most trafficking functions were intact in TbFab1 deficient cells, including both endocytic and biosynthetic trafficking to the lysosome, lysosomal turnover of an endogenous ubiquitinylated membrane protein, ISG65, was completely blocked suggesting that TbFab1 plays a role in the ESCRT-mediated late endosomal/multivesicular body degradative pathways. Knockdown of a second component of PI(3,5)P2 metabolism, the PI(3,5)P2 phosphatase TbFig4, also resulted in delayed turnover of ISG65. Together, these results demonstrate an essential role for PI(3,5)P2 in the turnover of ubiquitinylated membrane proteins and in trypanosome endomembrane biology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Oral fexinidazole for late-stage African Trypanosoma brucei gambiense trypanosomiasis: a pivotal multicentre, randomised, non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesu, Victor Kande Betu Ku; Kalonji, Wilfried Mutombo; Bardonneau, Clélia; Mordt, Olaf Valverde; Blesson, Séverine; Simon, François; Delhomme, Sophie; Bernhard, Sonja; Kuziena, Willy; Lubaki, Jean-Pierre Fina; Vuvu, Steven Lumeya; Ngima, Pathou Nganzobo; Mbembo, Hélène Mahenzi; Ilunga, Médard; Bonama, Augustin Kasongo; Heradi, Josué Amici; Solomo, Jean Louis Lumaliza; Mandula, Guylain; Badibabi, Lewis Kaninda; Dama, Francis Regongbenga; Lukula, Papy Kavunga; Tete, Digas Ngolo; Lumbala, Crispin; Scherrer, Bruno; Strub-Wourgaft, Nathalie; Tarral, Antoine

    2017-11-04

    Few therapeutic options are available to treat the late-stage of human African trypanosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease, caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (g-HAT). The firstline treatment is a combination therapy of oral nifurtimox and intravenous eflornithine that needs to be administered in a hospital setting by trained personnel, which is not optimal given that patients often live in remote areas with few health resources. Therefore, we aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of an oral regimen of fexinidazole (a 2-substituted 5-nitroimidazole with proven trypanocidal activity) versus nifurtimox eflornithine combination therapy in patients with late-stage g-HAT. In this randomised, phase 2/3, open-label, non-inferiority trial, we recruited patients aged 15 years and older with late-stage g-HAT from g-HAT treatment centres in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (n=9) and the Central African Republic (n=1). Patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to receive either fexinidazole or nifurtimox eflornithine combination therapy according to a predefined randomisation list (block size six). The funder, data management personnel, and study statisticians were masked to treatment. Oral fexinidazole was given once a day (days 1-4: 1800 mg, days 5-10: 1200 mg). Oral nifurtimox was given three times a day (days 1-10: 15 mg/kg per day) with eflornithine twice a day as 2 h infusions (days 1-7: 400 mg/kg per day). The primary endpoint was success at 18 months (ie, deemed as patients being alive, having no evidence of trypanosomes in any body fluid, not requiring rescue medication, and having a cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count ≤20 cells per μL). Safety was assessed through routine monitoring. Primary efficacy analysis was done in the modified intention-to-treat population and safety analyses in the intention-to-treat population. The acceptable margin for the difference in success rates was defined as 13%. This study has been completed and is registered with

  6. Correlation not causation: the relationship between personality traits and political ideologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Brad; Eaves, Lindon J; Hatemi, Peter K

    2012-01-01

    The assumption in the personality and politics literature is that a person's personality motivates them to develop certain political attitudes later in life. This assumption is founded on the simple correlation between the two constructs and the observation that personality traits are genetically influenced and develop in infancy, whereas political preferences develop later in life. Work in psychology, behavioral genetics, and recently political science, however, has demonstrated that political preferences also develop in childhood and are equally influenced by genetic factors. These findings cast doubt on the assumed causal relationship between personality and politics. Here we test the causal relationship between personality traits and political attitudes using a direction of causation structural model on a genetically informative sample. The results suggest that personality traits do not cause people to develop political attitudes; rather, the correlation between the two is a function of an innate common underlying genetic factor.

  7. Acute septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint caused by Haemophilus parainfluenzae: a rare causative origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Myong-Joo; Kim, Yeon-Dong; Ham, Hyang-Do

    2015-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint is a rare entity with symptoms that include erythema, swelling, and tenderness over the AC joint, fever, and limitation of shoulder motion with pain. In previous reports, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species have been mentioned as common causative organisms. Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a normal inhabitant of the oral cavity, respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, and urogenital tract. However, it sometimes causes opportunistic infections leading to septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. AC joint infection associated with H.parainfluenzae is very rare, and only one case has been reported in the literature. Moreover, septic arthritis in immunocompetent patients is also very rare. Here, we report the case of a healthy patient with H. parainfluenzae-related septic arthritis of the AC joint.

  8. Evidence, illness, and causation: an epidemiological perspective on the Russo-Williamson Thesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Alexander R; Dammann, Olaf

    2015-12-01

    According to the Russo-Williamson Thesis, causal claims in the health sciences need to be supported by both difference-making and mechanistic evidence. In this article, we attempt to determine whether Evidence-based Medicine (EBM) can be improved through the consideration of mechanistic evidence. We discuss the practical composition and function of each RWT evidence type and propose that exposure-outcome evidence (previously known as difference-making evidence) provides associations that can be explained through a hypothesis of causation, while mechanistic evidence provides finer-grained associations and knowledge of entities that ultimately explains a causal hypothesis. We suggest that mechanistic evidence holds untapped potential to add value to the assessment of evidence quality in EBM and propose initial recommendations for the integration of mechanistic and exposure-outcome evidence to improve EBM by robustly leveraging available evidence in support of good medical decisions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Altered brain-gut axis in autism: comorbidity or causative mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Emeran A; Padua, David; Tillisch, Kirsten

    2014-10-01

    The concept that alterated communications between the gut microbiome and the brain may play an important role in human brain disorders has recently received considerable attention. This is the result of provocative preclinical and some clinical evidence supporting early hypotheses about such communication in health and disease. Gastrointestinal symptoms are a common comorbidity in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), even though the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In addition, alteration in the composition and metabolic products of the gut microbiome has long been implicated as a possible causative mechanism contributing to ASD pathophysiology, and this hypothesis has been supported by several recently published evidence from rodent models of autism induced by prenatal insults to the mother. Recent evidence in one such model involving maternal infection, that is characterized by alterations in behavior, gut physiology, microbial composition, and related metabolite profile, suggests a possible benefit of probiotic treatment on several of the observed abnormal behaviors. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Case-control study of possible causative factors in mycosis fungoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuyp, E.; Burgoyne, A.; Aitchison, T.; MacKie, R.

    1987-02-01

    A detailed case control study was carried out on 53 patients (33 males and 20 females) with histologically proven mycosis fungoides and on an age- and sex-matched control population. Possible causative factors investigated included occupation, recreation, and exposure to petrochemicals, pesticides, insecticides, and potential carcinogens. Exposure to plants of the Compositae family, tanning history, and chronic sun exposure were also investigated, as were smoking history, drug ingestion history, and other skin disease. Personal and family histories of other malignancies were also investigated. The only statistically significant difference to emerge was that the patients with mycosis fungoides had significantly more family history of atopic dermatitis. In view of the absence of any significant difference between patients and controls with regard to personal history of atopic dermatitis, this difference may be the result of multiple statistical testing rather than a phenomenon of true biological significance.

  11. The concept of adequate causation and Max Weber's comparative sociology of religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, A

    1999-06-01

    Max Weber's The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, studied in isolation, shows mainly an elective affinity or an adequacy on the level of meaning between the Protestant ethic and the 'spirit' of capitalism. Here it is suggested that Weber's subsequent essays on 'The Economic Ethics of World Religions' are the result of his opinion that adequacy on the level of meaning needs and can be verified by causal adequacy. After some introductory remarks, particularly on elective affinity, the paper tries to develop the concept of adequate causation and the related concept of objective possibility on the basis of the work of v. Kries on whom Weber heavily relied. In the second part, this concept is used to show how the study of the economic ethics of India, China, Rome and orthodox Russia can support the thesis that the 'spirit' of capitalism, although it may not have been caused by the Protestant ethic, was perhaps adequately caused by it.

  12. Non-Reflective Thinkers Are Predisposed to Attribute Supernatural Causation to Uncanny Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Romain; Bonnefon, Jean-François

    2015-07-01

    For unknown reasons, individuals who are confident in their intuitions are more likely to hold supernatural beliefs. How does an intuitive cognitive style lead one to believe in faith healing, astrology, or extrasensory perception (ESP)? We hypothesize that cognitive style is critically important after one experiences an uncanny event that seems to invite a supernatural explanation. In three studies, we show that irrespective of their prior beliefs in the supernatural, non-reflective thinkers are more likely than reflective thinkers to accept supernatural causation after an uncanny encounter with astrology and ESP. This is the first time that controlled experiments demonstrate the negative dynamics of reflection and supernatural causality attribution. We consider the possible generalization of our findings to religious beliefs and their implications for the social vulnerability of non-reflective individuals. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  13. Causative impact of air pollution on evapotranspiration in the North China Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ling

    2017-10-01

    Atmospheric dispersion conditions strongly impact air pollution under identical surface emissions. The degree of air pollution in the Jing-Jin-Ji region is so severe that it may impose feedback on local climate. Reference evapotranspiration (ET 0 ) plays a significant role in the estimation of crop water requirements, as well as in studies on climate variation and change. Since the traditional correlation analysis cannot capture the causality, we apply the convergent cross mapping method (CCM) in this study to observationally investigate whether the air pollution impacts ET 0 . The results indicate that southwest regions of Jing-Jin-Ji always suffer higher PM 2.5 concentration than north regions through the whole year, and correlation analysis suggests that PM 2.5 concentration has a significant negative effect on ET 0 in most cities. The causality detection with CCM quantitatively demonstrates the significantly causative influence of PM 2.5 concentration on ET 0 , higher PM 2.5 concentration decreasing ET 0 . However, CCM analysis suggests that PM 2.5 concentration has a relatively weak causal influence on ET 0 while the correlation analysis gives the near zero correlation coefficient in Zhangjiakou city, indicating that the causative influence of PM 2.5 concentration on ET 0 is better revealed with CCM method than the correlation analysis. Considering that ET 0 is strongly associated with crop water requirement, the amount of water for agricultural irrigation could be reduced at high PM 2.5 concentrations. These findings can be utilized to improve the efficiency of water resources utilization, and reduce the exploiting amount of groundwater in the Jing-Jin-Ji region, although PM 2.5 is detrimental to human health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A synthetic approach to compare the large truck crash causation study and naturalistic driving data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Jeffrey S; Hanowski, Richard J; Bocanegra, Joseph

    2018-03-01

    Truck crashes represent a significant problem on our nation's highways. There is a great opportunity to learn about crash causation by analyzing and comparing the Large Truck Crash Causation Study (LTCCS) and naturalistic driving (ND) data. These data sets provide in-depth information, but have contrasting strengths and weaknesses. The LTCCS contains information on high-severity crashes (crashes and fatal crashes), but relied on data collected during crash investigations. The LTCCS identified principal driver errors in the crash, such as the Critical Reason, but not detailed behaviors or scenario sequences. The ND data sets relate primarily to non-crashes that are detectable from dynamic vehicle events, such as hard braking, swerve, etc., provide direct video observations of the driver and the surrounding driving scene and precise information on driver inputs (kinematics) and captured events, and provide certain types of exposure data that cannot easily be obtained using crash reconstruction data. The ND data are collected continuously, thereby capturing both safety-critical events and normative driving (i.e., baseline). The current project evaluated large-truck crash data from the LTCCS and two large-truck ND data sets, the Naturalistic Truck Driving Study and the Drowsy Driver Warning System Field Operational Test. A synthetic risk ratio analysis on the associated factor, Following Too Closely, indicated that truck drivers in the LTCCS were 1.34 times more likely to be involved in a crash, than an ND crash-relevant conflict, if they were following too closely (i.e., tailgating). Given several caveats noted in the paper, this study suggests it's possible to use the ND data set to calculate the exposure of a given behavior and use the LTCCS data set to calculate the crash exposure to the same behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. THE ROLE OF ADVERSE LIFESTYLE CHANGES IN THE CAUSATION OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Lotfi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Adverse lifestyle changes like rapid change in dietary habits coupled with decreased physical activity and increasing rates of alcohol and tobacco consumption can increase Coronary Artery Disease risk factors and its mortality even higher than the rates predicted. To evaluate the role of Adverse Lifestyle changes factors in the causation of CAD, a hospital based case-control study was conducted in an urban area of East Delhi from April 2002 to December 2003. A total of 500 subjects with age group 30-75 (250 cases and 250 controls, were included in this study. To obtain more validate comparisons, 250 controls also was selected from community of East Delhi. The tool of enquiry was a pre-tested and pre-coded questionnaire. A confidence level of 95% and study power of 80% were considered for the interpretation of possible significant findings. Sexwise stratified analysis was separately done for male and female subjects using Multiple Logistic Regression. Comparison of male cases with their counterparts in both control groups indicated that milk consumption, using saturated oils for cooking medium, and tobacco consumption could account for as CAD independent predictors (P < 0.001. The comparison of female cases with their counterparts in both control groups also showed that majority of those significantly were nuts consumer (P < 0.01. Male cases compared to males in hospital group and female cases compared with females in community control group significantly were nuts consumer and used saturated oils in their cookings respectively (P < 0.01. Our study showed that dietary factors such as consumption of milk, nuts, saturated oils and smoking, as misbehavior factor, could play an important role in the causation of Coronary Artery Diseases (CAD in urban area of East Delhi, India.

  16. Causation model of autism: Audiovisual brain specialization in infancy competes with social brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffler, Karen Frankel; Oestreicher, Leonard M

    2016-06-01

    Earliest identifiable findings in autism indicate that the autistic brain develops differently from the typical brain in the first year of life, after a period of typical development. Twin studies suggest that autism has an environmental component contributing to causation. Increased availability of audiovisual (AV) materials and viewing practices of infants parallel the time frame of the rise in prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Studies have shown an association between ASD and increased TV/cable screen exposure in infancy, suggesting AV exposure in infancy as a possible contributing cause of ASD. Infants are attracted to the saliency of AV materials, yet do not have the experience to recognize these stimuli as socially relevant. The authors present a developmental model of autism in which exposure to screen-based AV input in genetically susceptible infants stimulates specialization of non-social sensory processing in the brain. Through a process of neuroplasticity, the autistic infant develops the skills that are driven by the AV viewing. The AV developed neuronal pathways compete with preference for social processing, negatively affecting development of social brain pathways and causing global developmental delay. This model explains atypical face and speech processing, as well as preference for AV synchrony over biological motion in ASD. Neural hyper-connectivity, enlarged brain size and special abilities in visual, auditory and motion processing in ASD are also explained by the model. Positive effects of early intervention are predicted by the model. Researchers studying causation of autism have largely overlooked AV exposure in infancy as a potential contributing factor. The authors call for increased public awareness of the association between early screen viewing and ASD, and a concerted research effort to determine the extent of causal relationship. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia and Causative Microorganisms in Intensive Care Unit: A Two Year Retrospective Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Palabıyık

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is the most common nosocomial infection in the intensive care units (ICUs. It causes prolonged hospital stay and increases mortality. In this study, we aimed to investigate the rate of VAP, causative microorganisms, and their antibiotic susceptibilities in anaesthesiology and reanimation ICU (ARICU. Material and Method: This retrospective study included patients who were admitted to 12-bed ARICU between January 2013 and December 2014. The detection of VAP was done according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. The rate of VAP, VAP ratio, and ventilator utilization ratio (VUR were calculated according to guidelines of Turkish National Infection Surveillance Control Group. Endotracheal aspiration samples were collected and cultivated. The identification of the isolates was performed by using VITEK-2 automated system. Antibiotic susceptibilities were determined by the disc diffusion method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute criteria. Results: VAP was determined in 16 of 359 patients who required invasive mechanic ventilation for longer than 48 hours and hospitalized in ARICU. VUR was 65%, VAP ratio was 4.5% and the rate of VAP was 3.3 per 1000 ventilator days. Seventeen microorganisms were isolated from endotracheal aspiration samples, including Acinetobacter baumannii (n=6, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=4, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (n=4, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae and Serratia marcescens. The most sensitive antibiotics for microorganisms are listed as follows; Acinetobacter baumannii: colistin, Pseudomonas aeruginosa: amikacin, carbapenems; Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: linezolid, teicoplanin, vancomycin, trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole; Klebsiella and Enterobacteriaceae species: carbapenems, trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin. Conclusion: Intermittent analyses and antibiotic susceptibilities of VAP

  18. Co-morbidity between major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders: shared etiology or direct causation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, A R; Pettit, J W; Lewinsohn, P M; Seeley, J R; Roberts, R E

    2011-10-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders (ANX) are debilitating and prevalent conditions that often co-occur in adolescence and young adulthood. The leading theoretical models of their co-morbidity include the direct causation model and the shared etiology model. The present study compared these etiological models of MDD-ANX co-morbidity in a large, prospective, non-clinical sample of adolescents tracked through age 30. Logistic regression was used to examine cross-sectional associations between ANX and MDD at Time 1 (T1). In prospective analyses, Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine T1 predictors of subsequent disorder onset, including risk factors specific to each disorder or common to both disorders. Prospective predictive effect of a lifetime history of one disorder (e.g. MDD) on the subsequent onset of the second disorder (e.g. ANX) was then examined. This step was repeated while controlling for common risk factors. The findings supported relatively distinct profiles of risk between MDD and ANX depending on order of development. Whereas the shared etiology model best explained co-morbid cases in which MDD preceded ANX, direct causation was supported for co-morbid cases in which ANX preceded MDD. Consistent with previous research, significant cross-sectional and prospective associations were found between MDD and ANX. The results of the present study suggest that different etiological models may characterize the co-morbidity between MDD and ANX based upon the temporal order of onset. Implications for classification and prevention efforts are discussed.

  19. What causes health inequality? A systematic review on the relative importance of social causation and health selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Hannes; Pakpahan, Eduwin; Hoffmann, Rasmus

    2015-12-01

    The social gradient in health is one of the most reliable findings in public health research. The two competing hypotheses that try to explain this gradient are known as the social causation and the health selection hypothesis. There is currently no synthesis of the results of studies that test both hypotheses. We provide a systematic review of the literature that has addressed both the health selection and social causation hypotheses between 1994 and 2013 using seven databases following PRISMA rules. The search strategy resulted in 2952 studies, of which, we included 34 in the review. The synthesis of these studies suggests that there is no general preference for either of the hypotheses (12 studies for social causation, 10 for health selection). However, both a narrative synthesis as well as meta-regression results show that studies using indicators for socio-economic status (SES) that are closely related to the labor market find equal support for health selection and social causation, whereas indicators of SES like education and income yield results that are in favor of the social causation hypothesis. High standards in statistical modeling were associated with more support for health selection. The review highlights the fact that the causal mechanisms behind health inequalities are dependent on whether or not the dimension being analyzed closely reflects labor market success. Additionally, further research should strive to improve the statistical modeling of causality, as this might influence the conclusions drawn regarding the relative importance of health selection and social causation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  20. The study of trypanosome species circulating in domestic animals in two human African trypanosomiasis foci of Côte d'Ivoire identifies pigs and cattle as potential reservoirs of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Djetchi, Martial Kassi; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Koffi, Mathurin; Kaboré, Jacques; Kaboré, Justin Windingoudi; Kaba, Dramane; Courtin, Fabrice; Coulibaly, Bamoro; Fauret, Pierre; Kouakou, Lingué; Ravel, Sophie; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Solano, Philippe; De Meeûs, Thierry; Bucheton, Bruno; Jamonneau, Vincent

    2017-10-01

    Important control efforts have led to a significant reduction of the prevalence of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) in Côte d'Ivoire, but the disease is still present in several foci. The existence of an animal reservoir of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense may explain disease persistence in these foci where animal breeding is an important source of income but where the prevalence of animal African trypanosomiasis (AAT) is unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the trypanosome species circulating in domestic animals in both Bonon and Sinfra HAT endemic foci. 552 domestic animals (goats, pigs, cattle and sheep) were included. Blood samples were tested for trypanosomes by microscopic observation, species-specific PCR for T. brucei sl, T. congolense, T. vivax and subspecies-specific PCR for T. b. gambiense and T. b. gambiense immune trypanolysis (TL). Infection rates varied significantly between animal species and were by far the highest in pigs (30%). T. brucei s.l was the most prevalent trypanosome species (13.7%) followed by T. congolense. No T. b. gambiense was identified by PCR while high TL positivity rates were observed using T. b. gambiense specific variants (up to 27.6% for pigs in the Bonon focus). This study shows that domestic animals are highly infected by trypanosomes in the studied foci. This was particularly true for pigs, possibly due to a higher exposure of these animals to tsetse flies. Whereas T. brucei s.l. was the most prevalent species, discordant results were obtained between PCR and TL regarding T. b. gambiense identification. It is therefore crucial to develop better tools to study the epidemiological role of potential animal reservoir for T. b. gambiense. Our study illustrates the importance of "one health" approaches to reach HAT elimination and contribute to AAT control in the studied foci.