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Sample records for bruce nuclear generating

  1. Work sampling studies: Bruce Nuclear Generating Stations 'A' and 'B'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work sampling in Ontario Hydro's Nuclear Operations Branch is one of the programs that address questions of human performance. The work sampling methodology was designed to measure actual 'hands on tool' time (wrench time), and other activities associated with station maintenance staff. This paper describes the methodology and discusses the results of wrench time studies conducted at Bruce Nuclear Generating Stations 'A' and 'B'. On the basis of the data collected, conclusions are drawn as to the usefulness of the work sampling technique. 4 refs., 13 tabs., 1 fig., 1 appendix

  2. AECB staff annual assessment of the Bruce B Nuclear Generating Station for the year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is the independent federal agency that controls all nuclear activities in Canada. A major use of nuclear energy in Canada is electricity production. The AECB assesses every station's performance against legal requirements, including the conditions in the operating licence. Each station is inspected and all aspects of the station's operation and management is reviewed. This report is the AECB staff assessment of reactor safety at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station B for 1996. It was concluded that Ontario Hydro operated Bruce B safely in 1996. Although the Bruce B plant is safe,it was noted that the number of outages and the number of secondary and tertiary equipment failures during reactor unit upsets increased. Ontario Hydro needs to pay special attention to prevent such a decrease in the safety performance at Bruce B

  3. AECB staff annual assessment of the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station for the year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is the independent federal agency that controls all nuclear activities in Canada. A major use of nuclear energy in Canada is electricity production. The AECB assesses every station's performance against legal requirements, including the conditions in the operating licence. Each station is inspected and all aspects of the station's operation and management is reviewed. This report is the AECB staff assessment of reactor safety at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A for 1996. Ontario Hydro operated Bruce A safely in 1996, maintaining the risk to workers and the public at an acceptably low level. Special safety system performance at Bruce A was adequate. Availability targets were all met. Improvement is needed to reduce the number of operating licence non-compliances

  4. The Bruce nuclear project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This case study assesses the industrial relations impact of the construction of the Bruce Nuclear Power Development. It examines the labour relations system in the Ontario electric power sector and in major building construction. Industrial relations problems and practices at the Bruce project are reviewed. The focus of the study is on the relationship between the project and the rest of the Ontario industrial construction industry

  5. AECB staff annual assessment of the Bruce B Nuclear Generating Station for the year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) staff assessment of reactor safety at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station B for 1995. Our on-site Project Officers and Ottawa-based specialists monitored the station during the year. AECB staff conclude that Ontario Hydro operated Bruce B safely in 1995. Radiation doses to workers and the public were well below the legal limits and remained well within Ontario Hydro's internal targets. Worker radiation doses increased slightly but were comparable to previous years. 7 tabs., 3 figs

  6. Review of safety system performance and its safety implications at Bruce A nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor shutdown system performance with respect to meeting all nuclear safety and regulatory requirements is discussed for the Bruce A nuclear generating station. The operating experience at Bruce A spans over 17 years starting from September 1977. The two shutdown systems have performed well over the years in spite of constantly more stringent safety requirements for the safe operating envelope and new regulatory requirements. The system surveillance programme has been effective in identifying problems. As a result, several changes to system design, operating procedures and testing and maintenance have been made to improve the system performance. A life-cycle management programme is in place, in which ageing-related problems are closely monitored. Testing programmes are being reassessed and system upgrade for environmental qualification is in progress. Lessons learned over the years and corrective actions taken are discussed. (author). 4 figs, 1 tab

  7. Design and verification of computer-based reactor control system modification at Bruce-A candu nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Control System at Bruce-A Nuclear Generating Station is going through some design modifications, which involve a rigorous design process including independent verification and validation. The design modification includes changes to the control logic, alarms and annunciation, hardware and software. The design (and verification) process includes design plan, design requirements, hardware and software specifications, hardware and software design, testing, technical review, safety evaluation, reliability analysis, failure mode and effect analysis, environmental qualification, seismic qualification, software quality assurance, system validation, documentation update, configuration management, and final acceptance. (7 figs.)

  8. Optimizing the use of operating experience at Ontario Hydro's Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most significant lessons learned from the Three Mile Island event (March 1979), and again with the Chernobyl disaster - (April 1986) was the ongoing requirement to learn from our mistakes and near misses, and those of our fellow utilities around the world: so that as an industry we do not repeat the same mistakes. The very future of our industry will depend on how well each one of us accomplishes this important ask. This paper describes in detail the challenges encountered by one station when incorporating a comprehensive 'Operating Program'. It begins with the Corporate Office's directives to its stations for such a program; and follows up with the details of the actual station implementation of the program, and day to day operating experiences. The paper describes in detail the following Operating Experience programs: - Root Cause Determination process. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, Human Performance Enhancement System (HPES) as an integral component of the Root Cause process. Finding solutions for our station for problems identified elsewhere is covered herein; - Significant Event Recommendation Tracking System: - Commitment Tracking System; - Operating Experience (Sharing Lessons Learned) System. The paper will show all the above processes tie closely together and complement each other. The paper discusses the staff required for such processes and their training requirements. It recommends process time lines, reporting mechanisms, and sign off requirements. It will describe the equipment utilized to carry out this work effectively, and with a minimum of staff. One unique feature of the Bruce 'A' system is an 'Effectiveness Follow-Up', usually three to six months after the event recommendations have been completed. By rechecking the finished actions and reviewing them with the personnel involved with the originating event we ensure that the real root causes have been identified and resolved. (author)

  9. Performance evaluation of the air exhaust sampling and monitoring systems at the Bruce-A nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bruce-A plant consists of four 825 MWe CANDU nuclear generating units. Each unit has 2 ventilation exhausts; a nominally Contaminated exhaust and a nominally Non-Contaminated exhaust. Each exhaust stream is monitored continuously for radioiodine, for radioactive particulate and for noble gases. The monitors provide warning of increasing emissions (i.e., a control function) and also provide a measure of station emission performance. The monitor systems consist of a probe in the exhaust stream, a sample line about 20 m long, and the monitor itself. Standards for probe design are available and some guidelines for sample-line design can be extracted from published data. Little, if any, in-station performance data are available for sampling systems, although plateout of radioiodine and deposition of particulate have been the subject of much speculation and a little laboratory study. A major in-station study has been undertaken at Bruce-A to obtain relevant in-station data. By comparisons of the concentrations of iodine, methyl iodine, and uranine particulate found at various points in the system, it could be concluded that no loss of iodine, methyl iodine, or particulate occurred in the ∼ 20 m line and that particulate material is sampled accurately even by a poorly designed probe mounted in a very poor location

  10. Experience in ultrasonic gap measurement between calandria tubes and liquid injection shutdown systems nozzles in Bruce Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gaps between calandria tubes (CT) and Liquid Injection Shutdown System (LISS) nozzles at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station ''A'' (Bruce A) are known to decrease with time due to radiation induced creep/sag of the calandria tubes. If this gap decreases to a point where the calandria tubes come into contact with the LISS nozzle, the calandria tubes could fail as a result of fretting damage. Proximity measurements were needed to verify the analytical models and ensure that CT/LISS nozzle contact does not occur earlier than predicted. The technique used was originally developed at Ontario Hydro Technologies (formerly Ontario Hydro Research Division) in the late seventies and put into practical use by Research and Productivity Council (RPC) of New Brunswick, who carried out similar measurements at Point Lepreau NGS in 1989 and 1991. The gap measurement was accomplished y inserting an inspection probe, containing four ultrasonic transducers (2 to measure gaps and 2 to check for probe tilt) and a Fredericks electrolytic potentiometer as a probe rotational sensor, inside LISS Nozzle number-sign 7. The ultrasonic measurements were fed to a system computer that was programmed to convert the readings into fully compensated gaps, taking into account moderator heavy water temperature and probe tilt. Since the measured gaps were found to be generally larger than predicted, the time to CT/LISS nozzle contact is now being re-evaluated and the planned LISS nozzle replacement will likely be deferred, resulting in considerable savings

  11. AECB staff annual assessment of the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station for the year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECB believe that Ontario Hydro operated Bruce A in a safe manner during 1994, and that the risk to workers and the public has been maintained at an acceptably low level. Radiation doses to workers and releases to the environment were well below regulatory limits. All special safety systems met availability targets. We noted improvements in operation and maintenance but some further improvements are still required. This is particularly true of the station's compliance with the Operating Licence. AECB believe that the station continues to be well managed, with a high priority placed on safety. However, there is a need for increased capability in the area of safety analysis and assessment. 4 tabs., 4 figs

  12. Determination of 14C in spent moderator ion-exchange resin from Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent ion-exchange resins are produced in the purification of coolant and moderator systems during the normal operation of CANDU (Canada deuterium uranium) nuclear reactors. Carbon-14 is a radionuclide of concern in disposal of ion-exchange resins because of its relatively long half-life, its potential high mobility and its ability to be easily incorporated into organisms. Only limited data are presently available on the 14C concentrations of spent from CANDU reactors. To establish a more comprehensive database for this radionuclide, concentrations of 14C were determined for two moderator resins from Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A. Mixed bed resins were separated into anion and cation fractions using a sugar solution, and the 14C concentrations were determined for each fraction. Carbon-14 was located predominantly in the anion beads. Samples of anion resin were found to undergo an 81% loss in the 14C concentration over a period of 160 d following the sugar separation procedure. Some evidence is given to suggest this loss in 14C may result from microbial activity. Concentrations and distributions of other predominant radionuclides, such as 60Co and 153Gd, are discussed as well. (author) 5 refs.; 2 figs.; 6 tabs

  13. Steam generator tubesheet waterlancing at Bruce B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persad, R. [Babcock and Wilcox Canada, Cambridge, Ontario (Canada); Eybergen, D. [Bruce Power, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    High pressure water cleaning of steam generator secondary side tubesheet surfaces is an important and effective strategy for reducing or eliminating under-deposit chemical attack of the tubing. At the Bruce B station, reaching the interior of the tube bundle with a high-pressure water lance is particularly challenging due to the requirement to setup on-boiler equipment within the containment bellows. This paper presents how these and other design constraints were solved with new equipment. Also discussed is the application of new high-resolution inter-tube video probe capability to the Bruce B steam generator tubesheets. (author)

  14. Operational safety and experience monitoring safety systems performance during operation at Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A (Bruce N.G.S. A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce N.G.S. A is a four 826 MWe CANDU (PHWR) unit station. Each reactor unit has two independent Shutdown Systems, Shutdown System One (SDS1) with 30 gravity dropped neutron absorbing rods and Shutdown System Two (SDS2) with Liquid Neutron Poison Injection System. At present there is a High Pressure Emergency Core Injection System (HPECI) common to two units and a Low Pressure Emergency Core Injection System (LPECI) common to the other two. The latter will be replaced by the HPECI which will be the Emergency Core Injection System for all the four reactor units by 1986. There is a single Negative Pressure Containment System (NPC) which is common to all four reactor units. To ensure that each of the five safety systems mentioned above will operate effectively when called upon, an ongoing comprehensive monitoring program is carried out by the operations staff at the station. The main element of this program consists of a battery of safety system tests, designed to test the operation of one or group of components without firing the system

  15. Ontario Hydro's operating experience with steam generators with specifics on Bruce A and Bruce B problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of the steam generators in Ontario Hydro nuclear power stations is reviewed. This performance has generally been outstanding compared to world averages, with very low tube failure and plugging rates. Steam generator problems have made only minor contributions to Ontario Hydro nuclear station incapability factors. The mechanisms responsible for the the observed tube degradation and failures are described. The majority of the leaks have been due fatigue in the U-bend of the Bruce 'A' steam generators. There have been very few failures attributed to corrosion of the three tube materials used in Ontario Hydro steam generators. Recent performance has been deteriorating primarily due to deposit accumulation in the steam generators. Plugging of the broached holes in the upper support plates at Bruce 'A' has caused some derating of two units. Increases have been observed in the primary heat transport system reactor inlet temperature of several units. These increases may be attributed to steam generator tube surface fouling. In addition, several units have accumulated deep, hard sludge piles on the tube sheet, although little damage been observed. Recently some fretting of tubes has been observed at BNGSB in the U-bend support region. Remedial measures are being taken to address the current problems. Solutions are being evaluated to reduce the generation of corrosion products in the feedtrain and their subsequent transport to the steam generators. (author)

  16. Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) analyses of the BNGS-B vacuum building. Report No. 92-185-K. [BNGS (Bruce Nuclear Generating Station)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, D.K.

    1992-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) has been found to play a significant role in causing corrosion, especially in those industries which use natural waters. The most significant of the organisms found to cause corrosion are the sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), particularly with anoxic deposits or stagnant weirs. In May 1992, the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station B Vacuum Building was inspected for MIC after being in service for 10 years. This report provides results for both on-site MIC inspection and for microbiological analysis of sediments, water, and slime deposits for evidence of MIC bacteria.

  17. Primary separator replacement for Bruce Unit 8 steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a scheduled maintenance outage of Bruce Unit 8 in 1998, it was discovered that the majority of the original primary steam separators were damaged in two steam generators. The Bruce B steam generators are equipped with GXP type primary cyclone separators of B and W supply. There were localized perforations in the upper part of the separators and large areas of generalized wall thinning. The degradation was indicative of a flow related erosion corrosion mechanism. Although the unit- restart was justified, it was obvious that corrective actions would be necessary because of the number of separators affected and the extent of the degradation. Repair was not considered to be a practical option and it was decided to replace the separators, as required, in Unit 8 steam generators during an advanced scheduled outage. GXP separators were selected for replacement to minimize the impact on steam generator operating characteristics and analysis. The material of construction was upgraded from the original carbon steel to stainless steel to maximize the assurance of full life. The replacement of the separators was a first of a kind operation not only for Ontario Power Generation and B and W but also for all CANDU plants. The paper describes the degradations observed and the assessments, the operating experience, manufacture and installation of the replacement separators. During routine inspection in 1998, many of the primary steam separators in two of steam generators at Bruce Nuclear Division B Unit 8 were observed to have through wall perforations. This paper describes assessment of this condition. It also discusses the manufacture and testing of replacement primary steam separators and the development and execution of the replacement separator installation program. (author)

  18. Characterization of oxides on Bruce A NGS liner tubes and steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxide deposits on end-fitting liner tubes and steam generator tubes from the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) were characterized in advance of the decontamination of the heat transport system (HTS) of Bruce Unit 2. Oxide loadings, and Co-60 surface activities and specific activities were determined for the oxides on inlet and outlet end-fitting liner tubes from Bruce Unit l, Bruce Unit 2 and Bruce Unit 4. Oxides on the inner surfaces of steam generator tubes from Bruce NGS Units 1 and 2 were also characterized. The consistency in the deposit characteristics on the inlet liner tubes and steam generator tubes from Bruce A, along with the absence of magnetite on the outlet liner tubes has led to the development of a model for iron transport in the HTS of pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). The activity transport/fouling mechanism involves flow-accelerated corrosion of the outlet feeder pipes, followed by deposition of iron in the steam generators, along the inlet feeder pipes, on the inlet end fittings, on the inlet fuel bundles and on the inlet region of the pressure tube. The results of loop experiments using decontamination solutions indicated that the oxide was rapidly removed from inlet liner tubes. However, removal of the Cr-rich oxide from the outlet liner tubes was less efficient, requiring the Alkaline Permangante (AP) oxidizing pre-treatment that is typically used in light water reactors (LWRs). The steam generator tubes were effectively decontaminated

  19. Clean energy for a new generation. Steam generator life cycle management and Bruce restart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the mid to late 1990s, Ontario Hydro decided to lay-up and write-down the Bruce A Nuclear Reactors. Upon transition to Bruce Power L.P., Canada's first and only private nuclear operator, new life and prospects were injected into the site, local economy and the provincial energy portfolio. The first step in this provincial power recovery initiative involved restart of Bruce Units 3 and 4 in the 2003/04 time-frame. Units 3 and 4 have performed beyond expectation during the last five-year operating interval. A combination of steam generator and fuel channel issues precluded a similar restart of Units 1 and 2. Enter the refurbishment of Bruce Units 1 and 2. This first-of-a-kind undertaking within the Canadian nuclear power industry is testament to the demonstrated industry leadership by Bruce Power L.P., their investors and the significant vendor community contribution that is supporting this major power infrastructure enhancement. Initiated as a 'turn-key' project solution separated from the operating units, this major refurbishment project has evolved to a fully managed in-house refurbishment project with the continued support from the broader vendor community. As part of this first-of-kind undertaking, Bruce Power L.P. is in the process of accomplishing such initiatives as a complete fuel channel re-tube (i.e. full core calandria and pressure tube replacement), replacement of all boilers (i.e. 16 in total) and the majority of feeder pipe replacement. Complimentary major upgrades and replacement of the remainder of plant equipment including both nuclear and non-nuclear valves, heat exchangers, electrical infrastructure, service water systems and components, all while meeting a parallel evolving/maturing regulatory environment related to achieving compliance with IAEA derived modern codes and standards. Returning to ground level, boiler replacement is a key part of the refurbishment undertaking and this further reflected a meeting of the 'old' and the 'new'. Pre

  20. Stress corrosion cracking experience in steam generators at Bruce NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In late 1990 and through 1991, units 1 and 2 at the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station (BNGS-A) experienced a number of steam generator tube leaks. Tube failures were identified by eddy current to be circumferential cracks at U-bend supports on the hot-leg side of the boilers. In late 1991, tubes were removed from these units for failure characterization. Two active failure modes were found: corrosion fatigue in both units 1 and 2 and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in unit 2. In unit 2, lead was found in deposits, on tubes, and in cracks, and the cracking was mixed-mode: transgranular and intergranular. This convincingly indicated the involvement of lead in the stress corrosion cracking failures. A program of inspection and tube removals was carried out to investigate more fully the extent of the problem. This program found significant cracking only in lead-affected boilers in unit 2, and also revealed a limited extent of non-lead-related intergranular stress corrosion cracking in other boilers and units. Various aspects of the failures and tube examinations are presented in this paper. Included is discussion of the cracking morphology, measured crack size distributions, and chemical analysis of tube surfaces, crack faces, and deposits -- with particular emphasis on lead

  1. Bruce nuclear power development (BNPD) postoperational aquatic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of three years of postoperational aquatic study conducted between 1979 and 1981 at the Bruce Nuclear Power Development site. An increase in the rate of organic and inorganic sedimentation during the summer was noted, and was possibly related to construction activity at the Bruce GS 'B' intake site. Vertical thermal stratification persisted later in the year at the 7 m contour of Bruce GS 'A' discharge than at other locations sampled. Water quality conditions reflected the oliogtrophic state of Lake Huron. Several changes were noted in the biotic community. The taxonomic composition of attached algae, zooplankton and benthic macroinvertebrates varied between sampling years. The number of common naids, amphipods and the trichopteran Cheumatopsyche increased substantially in the 1981 rock cage collections. The relative abundance of adult walleye, channel catfish and round whitefish in gill nets increased, with the former two species being more abundant (15 fish per net in September, 1980, and 33 fish per net in July, 1981, respectively) at the 3 m contour of the Bruce GS 'A' discharge transect than at other shoreline sampling locations

  2. Steam generator leak detection at Bruce A Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new steam generator leak detection system was recently developed and utilized at Bruce A. The equipment is based on standard helium leak detection, with the addition of moisture detection and several other capability improvements. All but 1% of the Unit 1 Boiler 03 tubesheet was inspected, using a sniffer probe which inspected tubes seven at a time and followed by individual tube inspections. The leak search period was completed in approximately 24 hours, following a prerequisite period of several days. No helium leak indications were found anywhere on the boiler. A single water leak indication was found, which was subsequently confirmed as a through-wall defect by eddy current inspection. (author)

  3. Steam generator replacement in Bruce A Unit 1 and Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bruce A Generating Station consists of four 900 MW class CANDU units. The reactor and Primary Heat Transport System for each Unit are housed within a reinforced concrete reactor vault. A large duct running below the reactor vaults accommodates the shared fuel handling system, and connects the four reactor vaults to the vacuum building. The reactor vaults, fuelling system duct and the vacuum building constitute the station vacuum containment system. Bruce A Unit 2 was shut down in 1995 and Bruce A Units 1, 3 and 4 were shutdown in 1997. Bruce A Units 3 and 4 were returned to service in late 2003 and are currently operating. Units 1 and 2 remain out of service. Bruce Power is currently undertaking a major rehabilitation of Bruce A Unit 1 and Units 2 that will extend the in-service life of these units by at least 25 years. Replacement of the Steam Generators (eight in each unit) is required; this work was awarded to SNC-Lavalin Nuclear (SLN). The existing steam drums (which house the steam separation and drying equipment) will be retained. Unit 2 is scheduled to be synchronized with the grid in 2009, followed by Unit 1 in 2009. Each Bruce A unit has two steam generating assemblies, one located above and to each end of the reactor. Each steam generating assembly consists of a horizontal cylindrical steam drum and four vertical Steam Generators. The vertical Steam Generators connect to individual nozzles that are located on the underside of the Steam Drum (SD). The steam drums are located in concrete shielding structures (steam drum enclosures). The lower sections of the Steam Generators penetrate the top of the reactor vaults: the containment pressure boundary is established by bellows assemblies that connect between the reactor vault roof slab and the Steam Generators. Each Steam Generators is supported from the bottom by a trapeze that is suspended from the reactor vault top structure. The Steam Generator Replacement (SGR) methodology developed by SLN for Unit 1

  4. Steam generator cleaning campaigns at Bruce A: 1993-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiler chemical cleaning (BOCC) and high-pressure water lancing operations were performed during the Bruce A 1993 Unit 3, 1994 Unit 3, 1995 Unit 1 and 1996 Unit 3 outages to remove secondary side deposits. High-pressure water lancing focused on three boiler areas: tube support plates, to remove broached hole deposits, hot leg U-bend supports to dislodge deposits contributing to boiler tube stress corrosion cracking and tube sheets with the aim of removing accumulated sludge piles and post BOCC insoluble residues. The chemical cleaning processes applied were modified versions of the one developed by the Electric Power Research Institute/Steam Generator Owners Group. During these BOCC operations, corrosion for several key boiler materials was monitored and was well below the specified allowances

  5. Steam generator replacement in Bruce A Unit 1 and Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bruce A Generating Station consists of four 900 MW class CANDU units. The reactor and Primary Heat Transport System for each Unit are housed within a reinforced concrete reactor vault. A large duct running below the reactor vaults accommodates the shared fuel handling system, and connects the four reactor vaults to the vacuum building. The reactor vaults, fuelling system duct and the vacuum building constitute the station vacuum containment system. Bruce A Unit 2 was shut down in 1995 and Bruce A Units 1, 3 and 4 were shutdown in 1997. Bruce A Units 3 and 4 were returned to service in late 2003 and are currently operating. Units 1 and 2 remain out of service. Bruce Power is currently undertaking a major rehabilitation of Bruce A Unit 1 and Unit 2 that will extend the in-service tile of these units by at least 25 years. Replacement of the Steam Generators (eight in each unit) is required; this work was awarded to SNC-Lavalin Nuclear (SLN). The existing steam drums (which house the steam separation and drying equipment) will be retained. Unit 2 is scheduled to be synchronized with the grid in 2009, followed by Unit 1 in 2009. Each Bruce A unit has two steam generating assemblies, one located above and to each end of the reactor. Each steam generating assembly consists of a horizontal cylindrical steam drum and four vertical Steam Generators. The vertical Steam Generators connect to individual nozzles that are located on the underside of the Steam Drum (SD). The steam drums are located in concrete shielding structures (steam drum enclosures). The lower sections of the Steam Generators penetrate the top of the reactor vaults: the containment pressure boundary is established by bellows assemblies that connect between the reactor vault roof slab and the Steam Generators. Each Steam Generators is supported from he bottom by a trapeze that is suspended from the reactor vault top structure. The Steam Generator Replacement (SGR) methodology developed by SLN for Unit 1

  6. Monitoring the risk of loss of heat sink during plant shutdowns at Bruce Generating Station 'A'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relatively simple loss of shutdown heat sink fault tree model has been developed and used during unit outages at Bruce Nuclear Generation Station 'A' to assess, from a risk and reliability perspective, alternative heat sink strategies and to aid in decisions on allowable outage configurations. The model is adjusted to reflect the various unit configurations planned during a specific outage, and identifies events and event combinations leading to loss of fuel cooling. The calculated failure frequencies are compared to the limits consistent with corporate and international public safety goals. The importance measures generated by the interrogation of the fault tree model for each outage configuration are also used to reschedule configurations with high fuel damage frequency later into the outage and to control the configurations with relatively high probability of fuel damage to short intervals at the most appropriate time into the outage. (author)

  7. Bruce NGS rehabilitation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper summarizes the status at the time of writing of the program to rehabilitate the 4-unit Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station. The aim of the program was to restore the target 85% capacity factor by repair and proactive maintenance

  8. Bruce Power's nuclear pressure boundary quality assurance program requirements, implementation and transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a full scope nuclear pressure boundary quality assurance program in Canada requires extensive knowledge of the structure and detailed requirements of codes and standards published by the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). Incorporation into company governance documents and implementation of these requirements while managing the transition to more recent revisions of these codes and standards represents a significant challenge for Bruce Power, Canada's largest independent nuclear operator. This paper explores the key developments and innovative changes that are used to ensure successful regulatory compliance and effective implementation of the Bruce Power Pressure Boundary Quality Assurance Program. Challenges and mitigating strategies to sustain this large compliance based program at Bruce Power's 8 unit nuclear power plant site will also be detailed. (author)

  9. The Bruce Energy Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bruce Energy Centre Development Corporation is a joint venture of the Ontario Energy Corporation and 6 private companies formed to market surplus steam from the Bruce Nuclear Power Development. The corporation will also sell or lease land near Bruce NPD. The Bruce Energy Centre has an energy output of 900 BTU per day per dollar invested. Potential customers include greenhouse operators, aquaculturalists, food and beverage manufacturers, and traditional manufacturers

  10. Mitigation of organically bound sulphate from water treatment plants at Bruce NGS and impact on steam generator secondary side chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce Power is the source of more than 20 per cent of Ontario's electricity and currently operates six reactor units at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A (two units) and B (four units) stations located on Lake Huron. This paper discusses the challenges faced and operating experience (OPEX) gained in meeting WANO 1.0 chemistry performance objectives for steam generator secondary side chemistry control, particularly with control of steam generator sulphates. A detailed sampling and analysis program conducted as part of this study concluded that a major contributor to steam generator (SG) elevated sulphates is Organically Bound Sulphate (OBS) in Water Treatment Plants (WTP) effluent. The Bruce A and B WTPs consist of clarification with downstream sand and carbon filtration for Lake Water pre-treatment, which are followed by conventional Ion Exchange (IX) demineralization. Samples taken from various locations in the process stream were analyzed for a variety of parameters including both organic bound and inorganic forms of sulphate. The results are inconclusive with respect to finding the definitive source of OBS. This is primarily due to the condition that the OBS in the samples, which are in relatively low levels, are masked during chemical analysis by the considerably higher inorganic sulphate background. Additionally, it was also determined that on-line Total Organic Carbon (TOC) levels at different WTP locations did not always correlate well with OBS levels in the effluent, such that TOC could not be effectively used as a control parameter to improve OBS performance of the WTP operation. Improvement efforts at both plants focused on a number of areas including optimization of clarifier operation, replacement of IX resins, addition of downstream mobile polishing trailers, testing of new resins and adsorbents, pilot-scale testing with a Reverse Osmosis (RO) rig, review of resin regeneration and backwashing practices, and operating procedure improvements

  11. Status of the reliability centered maintenance program at Ontario Hydro's Bruce 'A' Nuclear Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce A started a preventive maintenance (PM) quality improvement program in August of 1991. This initiative was taken to address the concerns expressed by the AECB and the Peer Audits finding. The concerns were on the quality of the Bruce A PM Program and its execution in the field. Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) analysis was selected as the PM program quality improvement and optimization technique. Therefore, RCM became a key component of Bruce A's Integrated PM program and maintenance strategy. As a result of RCM implementation, and improvements in the work planning and scheduling process, Bruce A is seeing downward trends in the corrective maintenance work load, maintenance preventable forced outages, overdue/missed PM tasks and corrective maintenance backlog. Control Room Operators have reported observing an improvement in systems and equipment response to transients. Other benefits include a documented, controlled and traceable PM program. In addition, the team approach required by RCM has started to improve staff confidence in the PM program which, in turn, is improving the compliance with the PM program. (author)

  12. Feasibility analysis of the utilization of moderator heat for agricultural and aquacultural purposes, Bruce nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is presented of the feasibility of using moderator reject heat from the Bruce nuclear power development either to heat greenhouses or to aid in a warm water hatchery or aquaculture operation. The study examines heat extraction and delivery plans, reliability of supply, pricing schedules, the Ontario greenhouse industry, site selection criteria, water transmission and distribution, costs, approvals required, and a construction timetable. Total system analysis shows that a greenhouse facility would be viable but the aquaculture/hatchery scheme is more cost-effective. (E.C.B.)

  13. Rehabilitation and maintenance of hatch openings at Bruce B Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hatch program was launched with an objective to assess the strength of the hatch openings with respect to the changed loading conditions and label the hatches with the maximum allowable point load capacity. Once the analysis was complete, a labeling program was adopted to clearly inform equipment operators of the load limits. In some cases where existing hatches did not have sufficient strength to carry the floor design live load, the hatches were reinforced. With team effort and excellent support from the field staff, we were able to successfully accomplish this objective. All 387 hatches are now labeled at Bruce B. The labeling program also incorporated input from operations staff and the Joint Health and Safety Committee. Above all this program reinforced the need for 'Safety First' culture. (author)

  14. Water lancing of Bruce-A Unit 3 and 4 steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the Bruce-A 1993 Unit 4 and 1994 Unit 3 outages, three water lancing operations were carried out along with chemical cleaning as part of the station boiler refurbishment program. The water lancing activities focused on three boiler areas.. 1) support plates to clean partially or completely blocked broach holes and prevent boiler water level oscillations, 2) hot leg U-bend supports (HLUBS) to remove deposits contributing to boiler tube stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and 3) tube sheets to dislodge sludge piles that potentially threaten boiler tube integrity and to flush out post chemical cleaning insoluble residues. The combination of water lancing and chemical cleaning effectively reduced broach hole blockage from up to 100% to 0-10% or less. As a result, boilers in Units 3 and 4 will operate for some time to come without concerns over water level oscillations. However, deposits remained in most tube support plate land areas. (author)

  15. Effects of high and low morpholine operation on corrosion product transport at Bruce NGS A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion product transport studies were carried out on the condensate and feedwater systems for two of the units at Bruce Nuclear Generating Station-A (Bruce NGS-A). Bruce NGS-A is a four unit station with a mixed copper/iron feedtrain and operates under morpholine chemistry. During the studies, two different morpholine chemistries were evaluated. When high morpholine concentrations were used, lower iron transport was reported; but this was offset by increased copper and zinc transport. The distribution of morpholine and its degradation products throughout the secondary system is also discussed. (author)

  16. Leak locating in Bruce NGS-A steam generators using gas tracer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1981, Ontario Hydro requested development of a leak locating technique capable of locating a 0.5 kg.h-1 heavy water leak within 72 h of access to the steam generator head. A gas tracer technique has been developed to the point where it can now be used in the station to locate such leaks. The technique consists of pressurizing the shell side to 450 kPa with a sulfur hexafluoride air mixture and sampling on the tube side. To speed up the search, a multi-tube sampler is used to sniff a number of tubes simultaneously. The technique as proposed requires a man to enter the steam generator head, but can be adapted for use from outside the steam generator head. The development equipment and procedures required to complete a search are described

  17. The post irradiation examination of fuel in support of Bruce A nuclear division fueling with flow program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce A Nuclear Division (BAND) units are operating at ∼ 75% of full power, because of the potential of a power pulse in the event of an inlet header break. As a result, BAND is converting to fueling with flow, to eliminate the potential of a power pulse and to allow for full-power operation. Concerns regarding the integrity of the end-of-life (EOL) bundles interacting with the latch at the downstream end of the fuel channel were raised. BAND carried out a test program in which EOL bundles in the upstream position 13 of Unit 2 were cascaded into the downstream latch position 1 of another channel. Six of twelve cascaded bundles and two typical EOL position 13 (benchmark) bundles were selected for post-irradiation examination (PIE). Incipient cracks were found in the assembly welds (endplateto-endcap welds) of all six cascaded bundles. No incipient cracks were found in the benchmark bundles. Metallographic and fractographic examination, along with crack dating, and hydrogen and deuterium analyses, indicated that the incipient cracks were the result of delayed-hydride assisted cracking at the EOL. Consequently, Ontario Hydro changed the design of the outlet shield plug to support all three rings of the fuel bundle, to minimize stress and prevent endplate cracking. Also, an ultrasonic endplate inspection tool (UT) was developed and located in the fuel bay. to inspect fuelbundle endplates for cracks. A second test was done involving a series of four bundle cascades in BAND Unit 4 channels that had new outlet shield plugs. The latch bundles were discharged after a hot shutdown. The cascaded Unit 2 and Unit 4 latch bundles were checked for cracks using the UT. The PIE found incipient cracks or less-than-ideal welds in the assembly welds of fuel elements from Unit 2 (latch-supported fuel bundles) that had been identified by the UT as having incipient cracks. No incipient cracks were found in the assembly welds of fuel elements from Unit 4 (new outlet shield

  18. Bruce used fuel dry storage project evolution from Pickering to Bruce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additional fuel storage capacity is required at Bruce Nuclear Generating Station, which otherwise would soon fill up all its pool storage capacity. The recommended option was to use a dry storage container similar to that at Pickering. The changes made to the Pickering type of container included: fuel to be stored in trays; the container's capacity increased to 600 bundles; the container's lid to be changed to a metal one; the single concrete lid to be changed to a double metal lid system; the container not to be transportable; the container would be dry-loaded. 7 figs

  19. Implementation and sustainability of a full scope nuclear power generator pressure boundary QA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2009 a new Power Reactor Operating License (PROL) was granted to Bruce Power, Canada's largest independent nuclear power generator. The PROL required the adoption of a large, multi year revision to one of the cornerstone referenced national standards, Canadian Standards Association (CSA) N285.0 and also introduced a new approach to the licensing process and structure. This paper will describe the basis of the new regulatory structure and required pressure boundary related PROL changes and will provide details of the resultant impacts, successful transition, implementation and sustainability of Bruce Power's PBQA Program. (author)

  20. RCM: the Bruce B experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of RCM techniques have begun to change maintenance practice at Bruce B. This paper identifies the status of the program at Bruce B, and examines a new methodology for completing system analysis studies by incorporating lessons learned and results from Bruce A. (author)

  1. Consolidated nuclear steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved system of providing power has a unique generating means for nuclear reactors with a number of steam generators in the form of replaceable modular units of the expendable type to attain the optimum in effective and efficient vaporization of fluid during the generating power. The system is most adaptable to undrground power plants and marine usage

  2. Consolidated nuclear steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention described relates to an improved system of providing power having a unique generating means of the nuclear reactor variety adapted with a plurality of steam generators in the form of replaceable modular units of the expendable type for the attainment of the optimum in effective and efficient vaporization of fluid during the process of generating power

  3. Replacement nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews past and current practices in the replacement of nuclear steam generators. Plants where steam generator replacement has occurred are reviewed to see what changes have been made, and how the evolving technology has significantly reduced outage time and man-rem exposures. Current preferences in design and material are reviewed. 3 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  4. Nuclear steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear steam generator has a blowdown pump arranged to pump water from the blowdown line through a filter for return to the steam generator. The piping is arranged so that the pump may operate to reverse the direction of pumping through the blowdown line whereby reverse circulation may be established during wet lay up of the steam generator. A blower is arranged to withdraw nitrogen from an upper elevation in the steam generator and inject the nitrogen into the blowdown line in combination with the pumped reverse circulation during wet lay up. (author)

  5. Impact of bundle deformation on CHF: ASSERT-PV assessment of extended burnup Bruce B bundle G85159W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a subchannel thermalhydraulic analysis of the effect on critical heat flux (CHF) of bundle deformation such as element bow and diametral creep. The bundle geometry is based on the post-irradiation examination (PIE) data of a single bundle from the Bruce B Nuclear Generating Station, Bruce B bundle G85159W, which was irradiated for more than two years in the core during reactor commissioning. The subchannel code ASSERT-PV IST is used to assess changes in CHF and dryout power due to bundle deformation, compared to the reference, undeformed bundle. (author)

  6. Nuclear power generation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a PWR type reactor, a free piston type stirling engine is disposed instead of a conventional steam generator and a turbine. Since the stirling engine does not cause radiation leakage in view of the structure, safety and reliability of the nuclear power generation are improved. Further, the thermal cycle, if it operates theoretically, is equivalent with a Carnot cycle having the highest thermodynamical heat efficiency, thereby enabling to obtain a high heat efficiency in an actual engine. (N.H.)

  7. Future nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book includes an introduction then it speaks about the options to secure sources of energy, nuclear power option, nuclear plants to generate energy including light-water reactors (LWR), heavy-water reactors (HWR), advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGR), fast breeder reactors (FBR), development in the manufacture of reactors, fuel, uranium in the world, current status of nuclear power generation, economics of nuclear power, nuclear power and the environment and nuclear power in the Arab world. A conclusion at the end of the book suggests the increasing demand for energy in the industrialized countries and in a number of countries that enjoy special and economic growth such as China and India pushes the world to search for different energy sources to insure the urgent need for current and anticipated demand in the near and long-term future in light of pessimistic and optimistic outlook for energy in the future. This means that states do a scientific and objective analysis of the currently available data for the springboard to future plans to secure the energy required to support economy and welfare insurance.

  8. Review and studies of gas treatment and ventilation systems in Ontario Hydro's nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas treatment systems for Ontario Hydro's major nuclear generating stations, namely Pickering A and B, Bruce A and B, and Darlington, are briefly described and compared. The Off-Gas Management System, the Reactor Ventilation System (or Contaminated Exhaust System) and the D2O Vapour Recovery System reduce gaseous radioactive emissions during normal station operation whereas the Emergency Filtered Air Discharge System is designed for post-accident containment clean-up. RandD areas to improve gaseous radionuclide control are also briefly discussed. A study at Bruce A using the tracer gas technique to determine the effectiveness of a modification to the ventilation system to induce air flow in the desired direction is discussed in detail. Results showed that the technique provided quantitative data of air movement in the station. Other applications of the tracer gas technique in nuclear generating stations have also been implemented or developed. (author)

  9. Bruce NGS: A discharge channel flow simulation using MODTURC-CLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Better understanding of the total residual chlorine (TRC) distribution and characteristics of water flow in the open discharge channel is desired to identify a representative sampling location for TRC in the cooling water discharge channel of a nuclear generating station. A three-dimensional flow simulation for Bruce NGS A was carried out using a state-of-the-art computer code MODTURC-CLAS. The results of this model are compared with data collected from a field measurement at Bruce A discharge channel in the summer of 1993. This model can be used to predict the characteristics of the discharge flows for various operating conditions of the station, and to help optimize the selection of a representative sampling point for TRC in the discharge channel. (author) 4 refs., 1 tab., 17 refs

  10. Experience of oil in CANDU® moderator during A831 planned outage at Bruce Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In their address to the Nuclear Plant Chemistry Conference 2009, Bruce Power staff will describe the effects of oil ingress to the moderator of a CANDU® reactor. During the A831 planned outage of Bruce Power Unit 3, an incident of oil ingress into moderator was discovered on Oct 17, 2008. An investigation identified the cause of the oil ingress. Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) assessed operability of the reactor with the oil present and made recommendations with respect to the effect on unit start-up with oil present. The principal concern was the radiolytic generation of deuterium from the breakdown of the oil in-core. Various challenges were presented during start-up which were overcome via innovative approaches. The subsequent actions and consequential effects on moderator chemistry are discussed in this paper. Examination of the plant chemistry data revealed some interesting aspects of moderator system chemistry under upset conditions which will also be presented. (author)

  11. Experience of oil in CANDU moderator during A831 planned outage at Bruce Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In their address to the Nuclear Plant Chemistry Conference 2009, Bruce Power staff will describe the effects of oil ingress to the moderator of a CANDU reactor. During the A831 planned outage of Bruce Power Unit 3, an incident of oil ingress into moderator was discovered on Oct 17, 2008. An investigation identified the cause of the oil ingress. Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) assessed operability of the reactor with the oil present and made recommendations with respect to the effect on unit start-up with oil present. The principal concern was the radiolytic generation of deuterium from the breakdown of the oil in-core. Various challenges were presented during start-up which were overcome via innovative approaches. The subsequent actions and consequential effects on moderator chemistry are discussed in this paper. Examination of the plant chemistry data revealed some interesting aspects of moderator system chemistry under upset conditions which will also be presented. (author)

  12. AECB staff review of Bruce NGS 'A' operation for the year 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'B' is monitored and licensing requirements are enforced by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). This report records the conclusions of the AECB staff assessment of Bruce NGS 'A' during 1989 and the early part of 1990. Overall operation of the station met acceptable safety standards. Despite numerous problems and technical difficulties encountered, station management and supervisory personnel acted with due caution and made decisions in the interests of safety. There was evidence of improvement in a number of key areas, supported by pertinent indicators in the objective measures table. The extensive inspection and maintenance programs carried out during the year revealed the extent of component deterioration due to aging to be larger than expected. Hydrogen embrittlement of pressure tubes, erosion/corrosion of steam and feed water valves, heat exchanger tubes and piping, fouling of boilers and heat exchangers, and environmental damage of electrical equipment are examples. Continued aging of plant equipment and its potential for reducing the margins for safe operation must be taken into account by Ontario Hydro in establishing priorities and target dates for completion of actions to resolve identified problems at Bruce NGS 'A'. (2 tabs.)

  13. Generation 'Next' and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    My generation was labeled by Russian mass media as generation 'Next.' My technical education is above average. My current position is as a mechanical engineer in the leading research and development institute for Russian nuclear engineering for peaceful applications. It is noteworthy to point out that many of our developments were really first-of-a-kind in the history of engineering. However, it is difficult to grasp the importance of these accomplishments, especially since the progress of nuclear technologies is at a standstill. Can generation 'Next' be independent in their attitude towards nuclear power or shall we rely on the opinions of elder colleagues in our industry? (authors)

  14. Bruce NGS B risk assessment (BBRA) peer review process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk-informed decision making is considered an effective approach to managing the risk of nuclear power plant operation in a competitive market. Hence, increased reliance on the station probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) to provide risk perspective inputs is inevitable. With increased reliance on the PRAs it is imperative that PRAs have the characteristics necessary to provide the required information. Recognizing the increased requirements on nuclear power plant PRAs the nuclear industry in the United States has expended significant effort over the past few years defining the required characteristics of a PRA for various applications. More recently several owners groups have drafted guidelines for PRA certification and several U.S. utilities have had their PRAs certified. During the year 2000 Ontario Power Generation, Nuclear (OPG,N) subjected the PRA of one of its stations to the U.S. style certification process. The PRA selected for this process was the Bruce B Risk Assessment (BBRA). BBRA was chosen for this process since it is the first OPG, N PRA to be used for risk-informed applications. However, the strengths of the BBRA identified from the certification process and the lessons learned are also largely applicable to the other OPG, N plant PRAs due to the use of similar methods and tools

  15. Nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case for nuclear power, from both a world and a British standpoint, is first discussed, with particular reference to oil supply and demand. It is considered that oil and gas should in future be used as a feedstock for the chemical industry, for transportation purposes, and as a starting point for protein food for animals and later for humans; to squander so much by burning simply as a crude fuel cannot be right. It is considered that Britain should continue constructing nuclear stations at a steady modest rate, and that the fast reactor should receive increasing attention, despite the anti-nuclear lobby. The case for the fast breeder reactor is discussed in detail, including its development at UKAEA Harwell and Dounreay. Accusations against the fast reactor are considered, particularly those concerned with safety, and with the use or misuse of Pu. Public debates are discussed. (U.K.)

  16. Review of Bruce A reactor regulating system software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each of the four reactor units at the Ontario Hydro Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station is controlled by the Reactor Regulating System (RRS) software running on digital computers. This research report presents an assessment of the quality and reliability of the RRS software based on a review of the RRS design documentation, an analysis of certain significant Event Reports (SERs), and an examination of selected software changes. We found that the RRS software requirements (i.e., what the software should do) were never clearly documented, and that design documents, which should describe how the requirements are implemented, are incomplete and inaccurate. Some RRS-related SERs (i.e., reports on unexpected incidents relating to the reactor control) implied that there were faults in the RRS, or that RRS changes should be made to help prevent certain unexpected events. The follow-up investigations were generally poorly documented, and so it could not usually be determined that problems were properly resolved. The Bruce A software change control procedures require improvement. For the software changes examined, there was insufficient evidence provided by Ontario Hydro that the required procedures regarding change approval, independent review, documentation updates, and testing were followed. Ontario Hydro relies on the expertise of their technical staff to modify the RRS software correctly; they have confidence in the software code itself, even if the documentation is not up-to-date. Ontario Hydro did not produce the documentation required for an independent formal assessment of the reliability of the RRS. (author). 37 refs., 3 figs

  17. Nuclear power generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To reduce radioactivity exposure by optionally and surely controlling the concentration ratio of nickel-iron in a feedwater system, and reducing the ionic radioactivity concentration in the nuclear reactor and substituting radioactive sources in nuclear reactor pipeways. Constitution: Condensated water in a nuclear reactor is caused to flow from a condensate pump through a reactor condensate-feed water system and condensate pipeways into hollow thread membrane filters. Most of iron oxide in the condensate is captured by the hollow thread membrane filters. When the filters are back-washed, the captured iron oxide is stored passing through an iron receiving tank of a feedwater iron injection device. The iron oxide thus stored is passed through a desalter, removed with ionic impurities and then stored as iron oxide equivalent with leak ion oxide in the condensate desalter into an iron storage tank. On the other hand, necessary ion oxide is injected into feed water by adjusting the opening degree of an iron injection controlling valve by a feedwater sampling device such that the concentration ratio of nickel-iron in the reactor feedwater system is maintained at 1/2. (Ikeda, J.)

  18. Nuclear power generation cost methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simplified calculational procedure for the estimation of nuclear power generation cost is outlined. The report contains a discussion of the various components of power generation cost and basic equations for calculating that cost. An example calculation is given. The basis of the fixed-charge rate, the derivation of the levelized fuel cycle cost equation, and the heavy water charge rate are included as appendixes

  19. Radioactive decay properties of Bruce 'A' CANDUTM UO2 fuel and fuel recycle waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a compilation of the radioactive decay properties of irradiated CANDU fuel of the type used at the Bruce Nuclear Power Generating Station. The report is similar to AECL-4436/1 and AECL-4436/2, which describe the decay properties of Pickering fuel. Using revised reference input data, the computer codes LATREP and CANIGEN II were employed to calculate the mass, activity and decay heat of the component isotopes in irradiated Bruce fuel. The decay properties of the fuel are tabulated for burnup levels of 550, 685, 865 and 1045 GJ/kg U (150, 190, 240 and 290 MWh/kg U). The decay properties for the waste that would be produced from recycling the fuel in a Purex-type process are tabulated for a burnup of 685 GJ/kg U. The total alpha, beta and gamma activity, the gamma spectra and neutron emissions of the used fuel and recycle waste are also presented. The report also presents a comparison of the CANIGEN II generated data with other codes such as ISOGEN, ORIGEN, FISSPROD-2 and earlier CANIGEN data. A detailed analysis of the differences between codes is presented along with a comparison of the ability of the codes to correctly predicts measured decay heats, radiation fields and actinide concentrations. This report is intended to provide a reference source to assist both research programs and safety assessment studies within the Canadian Nuclear Waste Management Program

  20. Managing nuclear predominant generating capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most common believe, associated with nuclear power plant, leads to the conclusion that it can only operate, as a base load plant. This observation can be reversed, by just looking at large generating capacity, using an important nuclear generation mix. Nuclear plants may certainly load follow and contribute to the grid frequency control. The French example illustrates these possibilities. The reactor control of French units has been customized to accommodate the grid requests. Managing such a large nuclear plant fleet requires to take various actions, ranging from a daily basis to a multi-annual prospective standpoint. The paper describes the various contributions leading to safe, reliable, well accepted and cost competitive nuclear plants in France. The combination of all aspects related to operations, maintenance scheduling, nuclear safety management, are presented. The use of PWR units carries considerable weight in economic terms, with several hundred million francs tied in with outage scheduling every year. This necessitates a global view of the entire generating system which can be mobilized to meet demand. There is considerable interaction between units as, on the one hand, they are competing to satisfy the same need, and, on the other hand, reducing maintenance costs means sharing the necessary resources, and thus a coordinated staggering of outages. In addition, nuclear fuel is an energy reserve which remains in the reactor for 3 or 4 years, with some of the fuel renewed each year. Due to the memory effect, the fuel retains a memory of past use, so that today's choices impact upon the future. A medium-term view of fuel management is also necessary. The coordination systems implemented by EDF aim to control these parameters for the benefit of electricity consumers. (author)

  1. Corrosion-product inventory: the Bruce-B secondary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion inspection and corrosion-product characterization in water and steam systems are important for component and systems maintenance in nuclear power stations. Corrosion products are produced, released and redeposited at various sites in the secondary system. Depending on the alloys used in the condenser and feedwater heaters, particulate iron oxides and hydroxides can account for about 95-99% of the total corrosion-product transport. Where brass or cupro-nickel alloys are present, copper and zinc contribute significantly to the total transport and deposition. Particulates are transported by the feedwater to the steam generators, where they accumulate and can cause a variety of problems, such as loss of heat transfer capability through deposition on boiler tubes, blockage of flow through boiler-tube support plates and accelerated corrosion in crevices, either in deep sludge piles or at blocked tube supports. The influx of oxidized corrosion products may have a particularly adverse effect on the redox environment of steam generator tubing, thereby increasing the probability of localized corrosion and other degradation mechanisms. In this paper, there is a description of a survey of general corrosion deposits in Bruce-B, Units 5-8, which helps to identify the origin, evolution and inventory of corrosion products along the secondary system of Candu reactors

  2. Bruce units 3 and 4 life extension integrated safety review process and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The refurbishment preparation phase for Bruce A Units 3 and 4 included the performance of an Integrated Safety Review, as called for by CNSC regulatory document RD-360, 'Life Extension of Nuclear Power Plants'. The Integrated Safety Review is a comprehensive assessment of plant design, condition and operation conducted at the time that plant life extension is being considered. This paper describes the process of preparing the Bruce Units 3 and 4 Life Extension Integrated Safety Review and summarizes lessons learned. (author)

  3. Innovations in RCM at Bruce B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of RCM techniques have begun to change maintenance practice at Bruce B. This paper discusses innovative practices begun recently. Bruce B has decided to evaluate plant systems using different methods based on the effects of system failure. This approach reduces costs, by using a streamlined method, while maintaining the accuracy of analysis. In addition, the approach increases the likelihood that program recommendations will be implemented by the maintenance department by providing maintenance craft with input to the process. Bruce B has also developed techniques to accelerate the analysis process by evaluating analyses performed at other units. These innovations have been successful piloted at the station

  4. Nuclear generation cost and nuclear research development fund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this study is to analyze the effects of nuclear R and D fund to nuclear generation cost and to assess the adaptability of fund size through the comparison with the nuclear research fund in Japan. It was estimated that nuclear R and D fund increased the average annual unit cost of nuclear power generation by 1.14 won/kWh. When the size of nuclear R and D fund is compared with that in Japan, this study suggests that the current nuclear R and D fund should be largely increased taking into consideration the ratio of R and D fund to nuclear generation

  5. Adoption of nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article develops a model of the innovation-adoption decision. The model allows the economic situation of a utility and its perception of uncertainty associated with an innovation to affect the probability of adopting it. This model is useful when uncertainties affecting decisions about adoption persist throughout the diffusion process, thereby making the usual adoption model implicit in rate-of-diffusion studies inappropriate. An empirical test of the model finds that firm size, power pool size, and selected aspects of uncertainty about the innovation are significant predictors of US utility companies' decisions on whether or not to adopt nuclear power generation. 17 references, 2 tables

  6. Nuclear Generating Stations and Transmission Grid Reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear generating stations have historically been susceptible to transmission system voltage excursions. When nuclear plants trip due to voltage excursions, the resulting loss of real and reactive power support can make grid events worse. New standards are being prepared which may help to improve nuclear plant and transmission system reliability. A brief historical perspective is provided. Another reliability issue is the fact that nuclear plants do not provide automatic generation control in response to frequency decay. As 28 new nuclear plants are being considered for connection to an already highly stressed transmission grid, consideration must be given to nuclear plant design features which will enhance, not degrade, transmission system reliability

  7. After reliability centred maintenance. Preventive maintenance living program implementation at Bruce Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial preventive maintenance (PM) programs represent a large part of plant O and M costs. PM Optimization (PMO) projects represent an effective mechanism for identifying unnecessary PM, extending PM intervals and infusing predictive maintenance (PdM) methods. However, once optimized, what process prevents the PM program from returning to a state of disarray? This is the function of a PM living program (PMLP). In 1997, an independent performance assessment identified concerns with the applicability and effectiveness of all Ontario Power Generation, Inc. (OPGI) PM programs. In response, OPGI instituted an Integrated Maintenance Program (IMP) including Reliability Centred Maintenance (RCM) and a PMLP. It should be noted that the PMLP was developed for the 3 OPGI nuclear Sites (i.e. Bruce, Pickering, and Darlington). Effective 1 May 2001, the Bruce Site has been leased to a group of investors lead by British Energy. This paper is written in historical context and therefore refers to the Bruce Site as part of OPGI. The PMLP is made up of five elements: 1) process control, 2) change control, 3) worker feedback, 4) program performance metrics, and 5) deferral module. A PMLP software tool, originally applied to Duke Energy nuclear plants, was enhanced and customized specifically for the OPGI PMLP, and then implemented at all three of OPGI's nuclear sites. The objective of the OPGI PMLP was to: Provide processes/procedures for continual optimization of all site PM tasks, Ensure effective and timely revision of PM tasks in the work management system, Ensure PM tasks remain applicable/effective at all times, Maintain and enhance PM consistency on a component, system and Site basis, Ensure that new predictive maintenance techniques are applied and integrated with the PM program, Ensure that mandated PM tasks are identified and executed, Provide a mechanism for craft feedback, Meet regulatory requirements for PM program effectiveness, and Provide PM task deferral

  8. Nuclear power generation modern power station practice

    CERN Document Server

    1971-01-01

    Nuclear Power Generation focuses on the use of nuclear reactors as heat sources for electricity generation. This volume explains how nuclear energy can be harnessed to produce power by discussing the fundamental physical facts and the properties of matter underlying the operation of a reactor. This book is comprised of five chapters and opens with an overview of nuclear physics, first by considering the structure of matter and basic physical concepts such as atomic structure and nuclear reactions. The second chapter deals with the requirements of a reactor as a heat source, along with the diff

  9. Bruce NGS B U-bend support stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The steam generators at Bruce NGS B have experienced a degree of tube fretting at the U-bend scalloped bar support locations. Investigation attributed the tube fretting to flow induced vibration induced wear as a result of U-bend supports which were too widely spaced (compared to current criteria), and insufficiently rigid. The paper describes the problem, the development of a stabilization configuration, its qualification, its installation tooling and procedures, and the installation of the initial trial assemblies. 4 refs., 9 figs

  10. Rigorous fitness-for-service case development - Bruce Unit 3 selective defuelling program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, J.L. [Bruce Power, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Bruce Unit 3 is life limited by fuel channel elongation. In order to manage this degradation mechanism, an extensive fitness-for-service and safety case was prepared to operate with some fuel channels empty of fuel to stop the growth of the pressure tubes. The regulatory approved safety case includes assessments of reactor physics, thermalhydraulics, nuclear safety, operations, fuel channel integrity, feeder integrity, engineering change and human factors. This method has been successfully employed for various defuelled configurations since 2004. The success of this program has been instrumental in Bruce Unit 3 being able to meet and exceed its original target life post-Restart.

  11. Conscience of Japanese on nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are considerably many investigations and researches on the attitude of general public to nuclear power generation, but those which analyzed the contents of attitude or the research which got into the problem of what method is desirable to obtain the understanding of nuclear power generation for power generation side is rarely found. Therefore, the research on where is its cause was begun. As the result, since the attitude to nuclear power generation is related to the attitudes to many things that surround nuclear power generation in addition to that directly to nuclear power generation, it is necessary to elucidate the problem synthetically. The social investigation was carried out for the public of from 18 to 79 years old who live in the supply area of Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. The data were obtained from those selected by probabilistic sampling, 1000 in urban area (rate of recovery 76%) and 440 in country area (rate of recovery 77%). The way of thinking on making questionnaire is shown. The investigation and the analysis of the obtained data were carried out. What do you recollect as a dangerous matter, the attitude to nuclear power generation, the structure of the conscience to nuclear power generation and its significance, the type classification of people and its features are reported and discussed. (K.I.)

  12. Nuclear Effects in Generators: the Path Forward

    CERN Document Server

    Mosel, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The extraction of neutrino oscillation parameters requires the determination of the neutrino energy from observations of the hadronic final state. The use of nuclear targets then requires the use of event generators to isolate the interesting elementary processes and to take experimental acceptances into account. In this talk I briefly summarize the history of event generators and their use in nuclear physics, talk briefly about the generators used in the neutrino community and then discuss future necessary developments.

  13. A large capacity turbine generator for nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In future large capacity nuclear power plant, capacity of a generator to be applied will be 1800 MVA of the largest class in the world. In response to this, the Mitsubishi Electric Co., Ltd. began to carry out element technology verification of a four-pole large capacity turbine generator mainly using upgrading technique of large capacity, since 1994 fiscal year. And, aiming at reliability verification of the 1800 MVA class generator, a model generator with same cross-section as that of an actual one was manufactured, to carry out some verifications on its electrified tests, and so on. Every performance evaluation result of tests on the model generator were good, and high reliability to design and manufacturing technique of the 1800 MVA class generator could be verified. In future, on the base of these technologies, further upgrading of reliability on the large capacity turbine generator for nuclear power generation is intended to be carried out. (G.K.)

  14. Problems and state of nuclear heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than one half of the fossil fuels consumed world-wide are used for heat generation, only about 25 to 30% are used for power generation. Application possibilities are reviewed of nuclear power in the production of low-potential heat in special low-temperature reactors, in nuclear heat plants or using heat from large nuclear power plants, including requirements for safety and reliability of the said sources and of heat transmission systems. The state of development of nuclear heating in Czechoslovakia and abroad is described. (Ha)

  15. Nuclear performance standards: Promoting efficient generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear plant performance standards are designed to share the risks of operation associated with nuclear generation. Such standards often shift risks from ratepayers to utility shareholders, even without a finding of imprudence or mismanagement. The rationale underlying nuclear performance standards is that ratepayers should not be responsible for excessive replacement power costs incurred as a result of unreasonable decisions by utility management, especially because the high fixed costs of nuclear plants are already included in base rates. In addition, performance standards can be designed to provide incentives to reward utilities that achieve superior nuclear performance, for the benefit of both ratepayers and shareholders

  16. The nuclear industry and the young generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Nuclear Society was founded in 1975. It is a federation of 25 nuclear societies from 24 countries-stretching from the Atlantic to the Urals and on across Russia to the Pacific. Through Russia's membership in the Pacific Nuclear Council. ENS is directly linked to that area, too. ENS comprises more than 20 000 professionals from industry, power stations, research centers and authorities, working to advance nuclear energy. ENS has three Member Societies in Australia, Israel and Morocco. Also it has collaboration agreements with the American Nuclear Society, the Argentinean Nuclear Energy Association, the Canadian and the Chinese Nuclear Societies. ENS is doing pioneering work with its Young Generation Network, standing for positive measures to recruit and educate young people as engineers, technicians and skilled staff ion the nuclear field: from school to university and in industry. The goals of the YGN are: to promote the establishment of national Young Generation networks; to promote the exchange of knowledge between older and younger generation cross-linked all over Europe; to encourage young people in nuclear technology to provide a resource for the future; to communicate nuclear issues to the public (general public, media, politicians). (N.C.)

  17. Generation-IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Harold

    2008-05-01

    Nuclear power technology has evolved through roughly three generations of system designs: a first generation of prototypes and first-of-a-kind units implemented during the period 1950 to 1970; a second generation of industrial power plants built from 1970 to the turn of the century, most of which are still in operation today; and a third generation of evolutionary advanced reactors which began being built by the turn of the 20^th century, usually called Generation III or III+, which incorporate technical lessons learned through more than 12,000 reactor-years of operation. The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is a cooperative international endeavor to develop advanced nuclear energy systems in response to the social, environmental and economic requirements of the 21^st century. Six Generation IV systems under development by GIF promise to enhance the future contribution and benefits of nuclear energy. All Generation IV systems aim at performance improvement, new applications of nuclear energy, and/or more sustainable approaches to the management of nuclear materials. High-temperature systems offer the possibility of efficient process heat applications and eventually hydrogen production. Enhanced sustainability is achieved primarily through adoption of a closed fuel cycle with reprocessing and recycling of plutonium, uranium and minor actinides using fast reactors. This approach provides significant reduction in waste generation and uranium resource requirements.

  18. The third generation of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developing nations use the nuclear plant option to satisfy important overall national development objectives, in addition to providing economical electric power. The relative importance of these two objectives changes as the nuclear program develops and the interim milestones are reached. This paper describes the three typical stages of nuclear power development programs. The first and the second generations are development phases with the third generation reaching self sufficiency. Examples are presented of European and Far East countries or regions which have reached of are about to step into the third generation phase of development. The paper concludes that to achieve the objective of a nuclear power self sufficiency, other than merely filling the need of economical electric power, a careful technology transfer plan must be followed which sets realistic and achievable goals and establishes the country as a reliable and technically competent member of the nuclear power industry. (author)

  19. Nuclear energy generation rates on magnetar surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Zhi-Quan; Liu Hong-Lin; Liu Jing-Jing; Lai Xiang-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Based on the new screening model, this paper discusses the influence of superstrong magnetic fields on nuclear energy generation rates on the surface of magnetars. The obtained result shows that the superstrong magnetic fields can increase the nuclear energy generation rates by many orders of magnitude. The enhancement may have a significant influence for further study of the magnetars, especially for the cooling, the x-ray luminosity observation and the evolution of the magnetars.

  20. Safe Hydrogen Generation by Nuclear HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several concepts of new high temperature nuclear reactors are designed to generate electricity and hydrogen. Hydrogen processes envisaged here are sulfur iodine thermo-chemical process and high temperature electrolysis. Proximity of hydrogen generation is a safety challenge for nuclear reactor. This paper describes prevention and protection against hydrogen hazards as a function of inventories and type of operation of the processes. This study is important for the designers because long distance between reactor and hydrogen facility induces difficult technological equipment. (authors)

  1. Ergonomics and nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and construction of nuclear power plants are executed to rigorous standards of safety and reliability. Similarly the human interface within the nuclear power plant must meet very high standards, and these must be demonstrated to be maintained and assured through time. The control room, as the operating nerve-centre of the plant, carries a large part of this responsibility. It is the work space dimension within which the operator-instrumentation interface must function as efficiently as possible. This paper provides an overview of how ergonomics has been used as a major tool in reshaping the man-machine interface within the control room in the interest of safety and reliability. Topics covered in the paper include workspace design, control panel layout, demarcation and labelling, switch and meter types, and annunciated and unannunciated alarms

  2. New generation nuclear microprobe systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past 20 years, the minimum probe size for nuclear microscopy has stayed around 1 micrometre. No breakthroughs in nuclear microprobe design have been forthcoming to produce dramatic improvements in spatial resolution. The difficulties of breaking the constraints that are preventing reduction of the probe size have been well recognised in the past. Over the past 5 years it has become clear that some of these constraints may not be as limiting as first thought. For example, chromatic aberration clearly is not as significant as implied from first order ion optics calculations. This paper reviews the constraints in view of the increased understanding of the past 5 years and looks at several new approaches, presently being evaluated in Melbourne and elsewhere, on how to make progress. These approaches include modified RF ion sources for improved beam brightness and exploitation of relaxed constraints on some lens aberrations allowing the use of high demagnification probe forming lens systems

  3. Bruce NGS A/B assessment of reactor vault fans on air mixing patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and results of numerical simulations of air mixing patterns in the CANDU Bruce Nuclear Generating Station reactor vault, as a function of vault cooling fan combinations, are presented. The results of this analysis will serve as a basis for selecting appropriate fan combination scenarios to consider in the upcoming post-LOCA (loss of coolant) hydrogen-air-steam mixing analysis. Following a severe reactor accident in which fuel cooling is impaired, a significant amount of hydrogen may be produced from the steam/Zircaloy reaction and subsequently released into containment. The hydrogen ignition system mitigates the consequences of hydrogen burns to within acceptable safety limits. Igniters deliberately initiate a burn of the hydrogen-air-steam mixture as it reaches its flammability limits. However without adequate mixing, the igniters may become blinded by a region of non-flammable hydrogen mixture while an unfavourable hydrogen mixture forms elsewhere. The vault cooling fans play an important role in promoting mixing in the vault atmosphere. To help assess the effects of vault cooling fans on air mixing, an analysis was carried out to identify the air mixing patterns as a function of different fan availability combinations. The three-dimensional containment code, GOTHIC, was used to model the Bruce containment with modelling emphasis on the reactor vault geometry and the vault cooling system fans. Twenty-five fan combination air mixing simulations and eight tracer gas fan dispersion simulations were performed. The results showed that air mixing patterns created by individual fans can be superimposed to determine the effects of various fan combinations, there was symmetry of flow patterns between the west and east vault halves, and there was a general absence of significant stagnant regions in the reactor vault. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Nuclear power generation and nuclear non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main points existing between nuclear energy development and nuclear non-proliferation policy are reviewed. The solar energy and other energy will replace for nuclear fission energy in the twenty first century, but it may not occur in the first half, and the structure has to be established to continue the development of nuclear fission technology, including breeder reactor technology. In the near future, it should be encouraged to use advanced thermal reactors if they are economic and operated with safety. Miserable results may be created in the worldwide scale, if a serious accident occurs anywhere or nuclear power reactors are utilized for military object. It is estimated to be possible to develop the ability of manufacturing nuclear weapons within two or three years in the countries where the industry is highly developed so as to generate nuclear power. It is also difficult to take measures so that nuclear power generation does not increase nuclear proliferation problems, and it is necessary to mitigate the motive and to establish the international organization. Concensus exists that as the minimum security action, the storage and transportation of materials, which can be directly utilized for nuclear weapons, should be decided by the international system. The most portions of sensitive nuclear fuel cycle should be put under the international management, as far as possible. This problem is discussed in INFCE. Related to the nuclear nonproliferation, the difference of policy in fuel cycle problems between USA and the other countries, the enrichment of nuclear fuel material, especially the reasons to inhibit the construction of additional enrichment facilities, nuclear fuel reprocessing problems, radioactive waste disposal, plutonium stock and plutonium recycle problems are reviewed. (Nakai, Y.)

  5. Air operated valve maintenance at Bruce 'A'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1990, a new Air Operated Valve(AOV) diagnostic tool was demonstrated at Bruce A. During the demonstration, the diagnostic unit quickly and correctly identified a passing valve that had extended a unit outage by five days. As a result of the demonstration, Bruce A began a pilot program in 1991 to assess the condition of critical station AOV's and to lay down the framework for developing an AOV Preventive Maintenance (PM) program through the use of state of the art valve diagnostics. This paper will begin by focusing on the key elements of the program including program goals, division of responsibilities, work flow and quality assurance. The focus will then shift to a discussion of the results of over 1000 diagnostic tests that have been performed at Bruce A. The trends observed in the results will be explored to identify those areas of AOV maintenance which should be targeted. The data will also be analyzed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the program in the areas of reduced corrective maintenance and reduced maintenance rework. The results of recent program review are also presented to complete the discussion of the program's effectiveness

  6. Nuclear power generation through a diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It composed of a lot of charts about energy use and civilization, energy for food, clothing and shelter, tendency of consumption of world energy, distribution chart energy resources of the world and dependence of energy import in major countries, increased demand of electric power, influence of outage, plan for development of power long term in Korea, nuclear power generation of the world, nuclear reactor use, trend electric charges in Korea, radiation and management of radioactive waste, all kinds of disasters and public opinions.

  7. Generation IV nuclear plant design strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation Generation IV nuclear reactor design criteria are examined under the light of known nuclear properties of fissile and fertile nuclei. Their conflicting nature is elucidated along with the resulting inevitability of a multitude of designs. The designs selected as candidates for further development are evaluated with respect to their potential to serve the different design criteria, thereby revealing their more difficult aspects of realization and the strong research challenges lying ahead

  8. Power generation costs. Coal - nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This supplement volume contains 17 separate chapters investigating the parameters which determine power generation costs on the basis of coal and nuclear power and a comparison of these. A detailed calculation model is given. The complex nature of this type of cost comparison is shown by a review of selected parameter constellation for coal-fired and nuclear power plants. The most favourable method of power generation can only be determined if all parameters are viewed together. One quite important parameter is the load factor, or rather the hours of operation. (UA) 891 UA/UA 892 AMO

  9. Nuclear Georeactor Generation of Earth's Geomagnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Herndon, J. Marvin

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this communication is to suggest that the mechanism for generating the geomagnetic field and the energy source for powering it are one and the same, a nuclear georeactor at the center of the Earth. Toward this end, I: i) Present evidence that the nuclear georeactor fission-product sub-shell is fluid; ii)Suggest that the geomagnetic field is generated within the georeactor sub-shell, rather than within Earth's iron-alloy fluid core; iii) Describe why convection appears more feas...

  10. A nuclear generator's approach to pressure boundary quality assurance program certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a full scope nuclear pressure boundary quality assurance program in Canada requires the incorporation of extensive detailed requirements of the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) and referenced American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards in company governance documents. Implementation of these requirements and demonstration of the required controls to an independent regulatory agent as required by the Power Reactor Operating Licenses at the 8 unit nuclear power plant site was a significant challenge to Bruce Power, Canada's largest independent nuclear operator. This paper explores the key developments and innovative changes that were used to ensure successful regulatory approval and independent certification of the Bruce Power Pressure Boundary QA Program. Challenges and mitigating strategies to sustain this large compliance based program will also be detailed. (author)

  11. External costs of nuclear-generated electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External costs of nuclear power include: future financial liabilities arising from decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities, health and environmental impacts of radioactivity releases in routine operation, radioactive waste disposal and effects of severe accidents. The nuclear energy industry operates under regulations that impose stringent limits to atmospheric emissions and liquid effluents from nuclear facilities as well as requiring the containment and confinement of solid radioactive waste to ensure its isolation from the biosphere as long as it may be harmful for human health and the environment. The capital and operating costs of nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities already internalize a major portion of the above-mentioned potential external costs, and these are reflected in the prices paid by consumers of nuclear-generated electricity. The externality related to potential health and environmental impacts of radioactive releases during routine operations have been assessed in a large number of comprehensive studies, in particular the ExternE project that was created in the framework of the European Commission. With regard to effects of severe nuclear accidents, a special legal regime, the third-party liability system, has been implemented to provide limited third party liability coverage in the event of a nuclear accident. The nuclear plant owners are held liable for some specified first substantial part of damages to third parties, and must secure insurance coverage adequate to cover this part. The Government provides coverage for some specified substantial second part of the damages, with any remaining damages to be considered by the national legislation. Thus, the costs of an incident or accident are fully internalized in the costs borne by the nuclear plant owners. Externalities of energy are not limited to environmental and health related impacts, but may result also from macro-economic, policy or strategic factors not reflected

  12. Economic analysis of nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An energy security index was developed to measure how the introduction of nuclear power generation improved the national security of energy supply in Korea. Using the developed index, a quantitative effort was made to analyze the relationship between the nuclear power generation and the national energy security. Environmental impacts were evaluated and a simplified external cost of a specific coal-fired power plant in Korea was estimated using the QUERI program, which was developed by IAEA. In doing so, efforts were made to quantify the health impacts such as mortality, morbidity, and respiratory hospital admissions due to particulates, SOx, and Nox. The effects of CO2 emission regulation on the national economy were evaluated. In doing so, the introduction of carbon tax was assumed. Several scenarios were established about the share of nuclear power generation and an effort was made to see how much contribution nuclear energy could make to lessen the burden of the regulation on the national economy. This study re-evaluated the methods for estimating and distributing decommissioning cost of nuclear power plant over lifetime. It was resulted out that the annual decommissioning deposit and consequently, the annual decommissioning cost could vary significantly depending on estimating and distributing methods. (author). 24 refs., 44 tabs., 9 figs

  13. Iran's nuclear program - for power generation or nuclear weapons?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    would withdraw from the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty (NPT), has generated enough concern among several of the dominant nations in the world, that they have gone to great lengths to try to dissuade Tehran from the continued pursuit of its in principle legal nuclear activities. As this report is issued, Iran still has some way ahead before its infrastructure can readily provide it with nuclear weapons on demand. But Iran seems almost to have overcome the presumably highest technological threshold, namely full-scale uranium enrichment. Today's infrastructure is far from sufficiently developed to be able to fully support Iran's planned nuclear power developments, but on the other hand the need for indigenously produced nuclear fuel is also several years ahead, as long as Iran's first self-constructed nuclear power plant is far from completion. The known and assumed uranium deposits, however, are of minute proportions compared to the stated ambitions of their nuclear power programme (20 GWe within 2030). Iran's future reactors will hardly be able to go online before they become dependent on fuel from abroad. The uranium deposits are, on the other hand, abundant for the future production of several thousands of nuclear weapons. And if the infrastructure that is arising today is actually directed towards that purpose, Iran will in theory some day be able to produce more than a hundred nuclear weapons a year. (Author)

  14. Bruce unit 1 moderator to end shield cooling leak repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In October 1994, a leak developed between the heavy water Moderator System and the light water End Shield Cooling System at Ontario Hydro's Bruce A Generating Station Unit 1. The interface between these two systems consists of numerous reactor components all within the reactor vessel. This paper describes the initial discovery and determination of the leak source. The techniques used to pinpoint the leak location are described. The repair strategies and details are outlined. Flushing and refilling of the Moderator system are discussed. The current status of the Unit 1 End Shield Cooling System is given with possible remedial measures for clean-up. Recommendations and observations are provided for future references. (author). 7 figs

  15. Generation III reactors - the nuclear renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Pressurized Reactor - GEN III+, the PWR type reactor, remains the world's first and currently being built power reactor everywhere. ATMEA1, a new 1,100 MWe pressurized water reactor combines state-of-the art- technology from AREVA and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries to meet the challenges of the nuclear renaissance. Thus, the next evolutionary design of Generation III reactors will be deployed over many decades and will represent a large part of the worldwide fleet throughout the 21st century. Generation III reactors will equip the future NPPs ensuring improved safety and reliability, with passive safety systems and a very low probability for core melt. The Generation III Reactors as 'The Nuclear Renaissance' is presented in the paper. (author)

  16. Bruce R. Fretz: A Leader with Quiet Grace and Tact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Clara E.

    2000-01-01

    Bruce Fretz has been a central figure in counseling psychology for the past 30 years. His primary contributions have been through scholarship. This article describes his background and then presents excerpts from extensive interviews in order to inform readers about the legacy that Bruce has left. (Author/MKA)

  17. CO2 emissions of nuclear electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of LCA studies on nuclear electricity generation revealed life cycle CO2 emissions ranging between 3 g/kWhe to 60 g/kWhe and above. Firstly, this paper points out the discrepancies in studies by estimating the CO2 emissions of nuclear power generation. Secondly, the paper sets out to provide critical review of future developments of the fuel cycle for light water reactors and illustrates the impact of uncertainties on the specific CO2 emissions of nuclear electricity generation. Each step in the fuel cycle will be considered and with regard to the CO2 emissions analysed. Thereby different assumptions and uncertainty levels are determined for the nuclear fuel cycle. With the impacts of low uranium ore grades for mining and milling as well as higher burn-up rates future fuel characteristics are considered. Sensitivity analyses are performed for all fuel processing steps, for different technical specifications of light water reactors as well as for further external frame conditions. (authors)

  18. On risk of nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When energy consumption becomes high and industrial activities become active, the risk of the death due to traffic accidents and work place accidents becomes high. On the other hand, if energy consumption is very low, and industrial activities are not active, there is the demerit or risk that human life becomes short as the result. In this study, on the viewpoint of the effects that poverty, electric power generation, nuclear reactor accidents, various disasters and spreading diseases exert to human life, the risks were determined quantitatively, and the risk of nuclear power generation was investigated by comparing it with other risks. When the relation of the energy consumption per one person with human life was investigated in various countries, there was considerably good correlation. In order to clarify the factors that exert influence to average life, the survival number curves of now and in the past were discussed on their change. The effects on average human life of poverty, the atmospheric contamination caused by power stations, the serious accidents in nuclear power stations such as that in Chernobyl, unexpected disasters such as Great Hanshin Earthquake and spreading diseases are reported. The comparison of the risk of nuclear power generation with other risks is shown. (K.I.)

  19. Chemistry control at Bruce NGS 'B' from constructed to commercial operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pre-operational storage chemistry and flushing of the secondary side is described. The approach devised for Bruce NGS 'B' Unit 6 was unique for an Ontario Hydro Nuclear Unit. The significance of the improved Construction installation and Quality Assurance procedures, combined with those of Operations is identified. Secondary side chemistry during both commissioning and later operation is reported. It will be shown that the application of ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) concept has resulted in tighter chemical specifications being met

  20. Fuelling with flow at Bruce A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuelling with flow is the solution chosen by Bruce A to overcome the potential power pulse caused by a major inlet header failure. Fuelling with flow solves the problem by rearranging the core to place new fuel at the channel inlet and irradiated fuel at the channel outlet. The change has a significant impact on the Bruce A fuel handling system which was designed primarily to do on power fuelling in the against flow direction. Mechanical changes to the fuelling machine include a modification to the existing ram head and the replacement of standard fuel carriers with new fuelling with flow fuel carriers having the capability of opening the channel latch. Changes to the control system are more involved. A new set of operational sequences are required for both the upstream and downstream fuelling machines to achieve the fuel change. Steps based on sensitive ram push are added to reduce the risk of failing to close the latch at the correct position to properly support the fuel string. Changes are also required to the protective interlocks to allow fuelling with flow and reduce risk. A new fuel string supporting shield plug was designed and tested to reduce the risk of endplate cracking that could occur on the irradiated bundle that would have been supported directly by the channel latch. Some operational changes have been incorporated to accommodate this new shield plug. Considerable testing has been carried out on all aspects of fuel handling where fuelling with flow differs from the reference fuelling against flow. (author). 3 figs

  1. Generation of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two generation techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance images, the retro-projection and the direct transformation method are studied these techniques are based on the acquisition of NMR signals which phases and frequency components are codified in space by application of magnetic field gradients. The construction of magnet coils is discussed, in particular a suitable magnet geometry with polar pieces and air gap. The obtention of image contrast by T1 and T2 relaxation times reconstructed from generated signals using sequences such as spin-echo, inversion-recovery and stimulated echo, is discussed. The mathematical formalism of matrix solution for Bloch equations is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  2. Developing people for the new nuclear generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current and possible refurbishment of the existing CANDU fleet, the potential for new build in Canada, and the impending retirement of the current generation, mean that the Canadian nuclear industry is facing a real people problem: How are we going to ensure a sustainable supply of young people to meet the demand? How are we going to maintain and transfer our acquired knowledge to this new generation? The presentation looks at fitting the pieces of the puzzle together: the recruitment, training, retention, and development challenges the industry must address, to ensure that we will have a sustainable supply of qualified people. (author)

  3. Generation of nuclear data banks through interpolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Data Bank generation, is a process in which a great amount of resources is required, both computing and humans. If it is taken into account that at some times it is necessary to create a great amount of those, it is convenient to have a reliable tool that generates Data Banks with the lesser resources, in the least possible time and with a very good approximation. In this work are shown the results obtained during the development of INTPOLBI code, used to generate Nuclear Data Banks employing bi cubic polynomial interpolation, taking as independent variables the uranium and gadolinium percents. Two proposals were worked, applying in both cases the finite element method, using one element with 16 nodes to carry out the interpolation. In the first proposals the canonic base was employed to obtain the interpolating polynomial and later, the corresponding linear equations system. In the solution of this system the Gaussian elimination method with partial pivot was applied. In the second case, the Newton base was used to obtain the mentioned system, resulting in a triangular inferior matrix, which structure, applying elemental operations, to obtain a blocks diagonal matrix, with special characteristics and easier to work with. For the validations test, a comparison was made between the values obtained with INTPOLBI and INTERTEG (created at the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas with the same purpose) codes, and Data Banks created through the conventional process, that is, with nuclear codes normally used. Finally, it is possible to conclude that the Nuclear Data Banks generated with INTPOLBI code constitute a very good approximation that, even though do not wholly replace conventional process, however are helpful in cases when it is necessary to create a great amount of Data Banks. (Author)

  4. Generation of nuclear data bank by interpolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Data Bank generation, is a process in which a great amount of resources is required, both computing and humans. If it is taken into account that at some times it is necessary to create a great amount of those, it is convenient to have a reliable tool that generates Data Banks with the lesse resources, in the least possible time and with a very good approximation. In this work are shown the results obtained during the development of INTPOLBI code, used to generate Nuclear Data Banks employing bi-cubic polynomial interpolation, takings as independent variables the uranium and gadolinia percents. Two proposal were worked, applying in both cases the finite element methods, using one element with 16 nodes to carry out the interpolation. In the first proposal the canonic base was employed to obtain the interpolating polynomial and later, the corresponding linear equations systems. In the solution of this system the Gaussian elimination methods with partial pivot was applied. In the second case, the Newton base was used to obtain the mentioned system, resulting in a triangular inferior matrix, which structure, applying elemental operations, to obtain a blocks diagonal matrix, with special characteristics and easier to work with. For the validations test, a comparison was made between the values obtained with INTPOLBI and INTERTEG (created at the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas with the same purpose) codes, and Data Banks created through the conventional process, with nuclear code normally used. Finally, it is possible to conclude that the Nuclear Data Banks generated with INTPOLBI code constitute a very good approximation that, even though do not wholly replace conventional process, however are helpful in cases when it is necessary to create a great amount of Data Banks

  5. Nuclear data banks generation by interpolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Data Bank generation, is a process in which a great amount of resources is required, both computing and humans. If it is taken into account that at some times it is necessary to create a great amount of those, it is convenient to have a reliable tool that generates Data Banks with the lesser resources, in the least possible time and with a very good approximation. In this work are shown the results obtained during the development of INTPOLBI code, use to generate Nuclear Data Banks employing bicubic polynominal interpolation, taking as independent variables the uranium and gadolinia percents. Two proposal were worked, applying in both cases the finite element method, using one element with 16 nodes to carry out the interpolation. In the first proposals the canonic base was employed, to obtain the interpolating polynomial and later, the corresponding linear equation systems. In the solution of this systems the Gaussian elimination methods with partial pivot was applied. In the second case, the Newton base was used to obtain the mentioned system, resulting in a triangular inferior matrix, which structure, applying elemental operations, to obtain a blocks diagonal matrix, with special characteristics and easier to work with. For the validation tests, a comparison was made between the values obtained with INTPOLBI and INTERTEG (create at the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (MX) with the same purpose) codes, and Data Banks created through the conventional process, that is, with nuclear codes normally used. Finally, it is possible to conclude that the Nuclear Data Banks generated with INTPOLBI code constitute a very good approximation that, even though do not wholly replace conventional process, however are helpful in cases when it is necessary to create a great amount of Data Banks

  6. THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT GRAPHITE PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William E. Windes; Timothy D. Burchell; Robert L. Bratton

    2008-09-01

    Developing new nuclear grades of graphite used in the core of a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the critical development activities being pursued within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. Graphite’s thermal stability (in an inert gas environment), high compressive strength, fabricability, and cost effective price make it an ideal core structural material for the HTGR reactor design. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermo-mechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. The NGNP graphite R&D program has selected a handful of commercially available types for research and development activities necessary to qualify this nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor. These activities fall within five primary areas; 1) material property characterization, 2) irradiated material property characterization, 3) modeling, and 4) ASTM test development, and 5) ASME code development efforts. Individual research and development activities within each area are being pursued with the ultimate goal of obtaining a commercial operating license for the nuclear graphite from the US NRC.

  7. Total generating costs: coal and nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was confined to single and multi-unit coal- and nuclear-fueled electric-generating stations. The stations are composed of 1200-MWe PWRs; 1200-MWe BWRs; 800-and 1200-MWe High-Sulfur Coal units, and 800- and 1200-MWe Low-Sulfur Coal units. The total generating cost estimates were developed for commercial operation dates of 1985 and 1990; for 5 and 8% escalation rates, for 10 and 12% discount rates; and, for capacity factors of 50, 60, 70, and 80%. The report describes the methodology for obtaining annualized capital costs, levelized coal and nuclear fuel costs, levelized operation and maintenance costs, and the resulting total generating costs for each type of station. The costs are applicable to a hypothetical Middletwon site in the Northeastern United States. Plant descriptions with general design parameters are included. The report also reprints for convenience, summaries of capital cost by account type developed in the previous commercial electric-power cost studies. Appropriate references are given for additional detailed information. Sufficient detail is given to allow the reader to develop total generating costs for other cases or conditions

  8. Next generation advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing energy demand by technological developments and the increase of the world population and gradually diminishing energy resources made nuclear power an indispensable option. The renewable energy sources like solar, wind and geothermal may be suited to meet some local needs. Environment friendly nuclear energy which is a suitable solution to large scale demands tends to develop highly economical, advanced next generation reactors by incorporating technological developments and years of operating experience. The enhancement of safety and reliability, facilitation of maintainability, impeccable compatibility with the environment are the goals of the new generation reactors. The protection of the investment and property is considered as well as the protection of the environment and mankind. They became economically attractive compared to fossil-fired units by the use of standard designs, replacing some active systems by passive, reducing construction time and increasing the operation lifetime. The evolutionary designs were introduced at first by ameliorating the conventional plants, than revolutionary systems which are denoted as generation IV were verged to meet future needs. The investigations on the advanced, proliferation resistant fuel cycle technologies were initiated to minimize the radioactive waste burden by using new generation fast reactors and ADS transmuters.

  9. Business health reporting process at Bruce Power helps drive successful plant performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developing and implementing consistent and comprehensive measures of performance on a large multi-reactor unit nuclear power plant site is a significant challenge. Linking these performance measures back to licence compliance standards and all aspects of the operations, engineering, maintenance and support activities is needed to ensure cohesive site-wide safe operations and satisfy regulatory needs. At Bruce Power, Canada's largest independently-owned nuclear power producer, a Business Health reporting process has been developed to provide a standardized performance rating scheme. The reporting process ties all self assessment activities to common management principles and process structure areas that comprise the Bruce Power Management System. The principles used for performance ratings link directly back to the operating licenses and the primary referenced management system standard. The Business Health reporting process provides a natural business and regulatory oversight framework report that is easily understood and consistently measured over time. The rating data is derived from easily understood quantitative and qualitative descriptions that can be trended over time. The results derived from semi-annual Business Health reports provide an ongoing overall measure of Bruce Power's management system effectiveness for enabling and sustaining required business results and high standards of safety. (author)

  10. Nuclear power generation of electricity in Sri Lanka?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brief description of how nuclear power is used to generate electricity, advantages and disadvantages of nuclear power, and the main factors that should be taken into consideration in dividing to use nuclear power in Sri Lanka

  11. Materials for generation-IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials science and materials development are key issues for the implementation of innovative reactor systems such as those defined in the framework of the Generation IV. Six systems have been selected for Generation IV consideration: gas-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, molten salt-cooled reactor, sodium-cooled fast reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and very high temperature reactor. The structural materials need to resist much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses and extremely corrosive environment, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. For this reason, the first consideration in the development of Generation-IV concepts is selection and deployment of materials that operate successfully in the aggressive operating environments expected in the Gen-IV concepts. This paper summarizes the Gen-IV operating environments and describes the various candidate materials under consideration for use in different structural applications. (author)

  12. 78 FR 39018 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit Nos. 2 and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit Nos. 2 and 3 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Supplement to Final Supplement 38 to the Generic...

  13. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

  14. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included

  15. Indian experience in nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power generation in India commenced in 1969 with the operation of Tarapur Atomic Power Station, which consists of two boiling-water reactor units of 210 MW(e) each. However, an early decision was made in favour of the pressurized-heavy-water reactor as the principal type of power reactor to be set up in the country and the first pressurized-heavy-water reactor unit commenced commercial operation in 1973. The second unit at this station was synchronized to the grid for the first time on 1st November 1980 and began commercial operation in April 1981. The paper describes the operational experience gained from thirteen years of operation of the BWR units at Tarapur and eight years of operation of the PHWR units at Rajasthan. Certain aspects of nuclear power generation are highlighted which are peculiar to a developing country, such as problems faced in operating relatively big nuclear units in medium and small grids, long lead times required for recruitment and training of personnel for manning the stations and spares management, especially in an environment of insufficient industrial infrastructure. The need for operation and maintenance staff to be self-sufficient in the absence of adequate external support is emphasized. A large number of design modifications are described that were carried out to improve the performance of the station and the safety of the plant, and to safeguard the environment and the health of the personnel. (author)

  16. Operating performance of LWR nuclear generating units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims at reviewing, on the basis of historical data, the operational problem areas which explain the degree of availability and productivity achieved up to now by nuclear power plants in commercial operation in the world. The operating performance data of nuclear power plants area analysed with respect to plant type, size and other significant reference parameters and they are evaluated also by comparison with fossil generating unit data. Major performance indices data are presented for both nuclear and fossil units type and distribution of outage causes. Unplanned full outages caused by nuclear power plant equipment and components failure are particulary emphasized. The trend for unplanned full outages due to the failure of components shows decreasing numerical values in 1981 with respect to the previous years. But this result should be weighed with the increasing plant unavailability hours needed for maintenance and repair action (chiefly preventive maintenance on critical components). This means that the number and downtime of forced outage must be drastically reduced for economic reasons (production losses and problems associated with the unavailable unit unplanned replacement) as well as for plant safe and reliable operation (sudden unavailability of key components and frequency of transients associated with plant shutdown and routine startup operation)

  17. Proposed deep geologic repository for low and intermediate-level radioactive waste at the Bruce site, Tiverton, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for the long-term management of operational Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste (LLW and ILW) is being proposed by Ontario Power Generation at the 900-ha Bruce Nuclear site. The Bruce Nuclear site is located approximately 225 kilometres northwest of Toronto near Tiverton, Ontario. The project is currently undergoing environmental assessment. This paper describes the current concept for Ontario Power Generation's proposed DGR. The underground repository concept is comprised of horizontally-excavated emplacement rooms arranged in panels with access provided via two vertical concrete-lined shafts. The emplacement rooms would be constructed at a depth of about 680 m within limestone. This limestone formation is laterally extensive and is directly overlain by 200 m of low permeability shale. The low-permeability diffusion-controlled geosphere immediately surrounding the repository will assure long-term isolation of the LLW and ILW. LL W and ILW will be retrieved from nearby above-ground storage structures and then transferred to the DGR. LLW and ILW will also be shipped directly from the nuclear generating stations to the DGR. In this concept, most waste packages are retrieved and transferred 'as is' with shielding added, as necessary, to protect workers. The waste packages are lowered by hoist to the repository horizon and then transferred by forklift or, in the case of large and heavy packages, by rail car to emplacement rooms. Waste packages are stacked within emplacement rooms by forklift or gantry crane and, when full, the rooms are isolated by closure walls. It is expected that the repository will be open for at least 50 years to receive LLW and ILW from the operation of Ontario's nuclear reactors. When filled with waste and after receipt of all necessary regulatory approvals, the repository will be sealed by placing low permeability concrete and clay-based plugs in each shaft. A preliminary safety assessment indicates

  18. Potential nuclear safeguards applications for neutron generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many nuclear safeguards inspection instruments use neutron sources to interrogate the fissile material (commonly 235U and 239Pu) to be measured. The neutron sources currently used in these instruments are isotopics such as Californium-252, Americium-Lithium, etc. It is becoming increasingly more difficult to transport isotopic sources from one measurement location to another. This represents a significant problem for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards inspectors because they must take their safeguards instruments with them to each nuclear installation to make an independent measurement. Purpose of this paper is to review the possibility of replacing isotopic neutron sources now used in IAEA safeguards instruments with electric neutron sources such as deuterium-tritium (D-T, 14-MeV neutrons) or deuterium-deuterium (D-D, 2-MeV neutrons). The potential for neutron generators to interrogate spent-light water reactor fuel assemblies in storage pools is also reviewed

  19. Report on Darlington nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Select Committee on Energy was appointed on July 10, 1985 by the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario in order to inquire into and report on Ontario Hydro affairs within ten months. Two sessions were planned the first of which was a review of the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station. Darlington is a large, 4 unit nuclear-powered electricity generating station currently under construction on the shore of Lake Ontario in the town of Newcastle. At the time the Committee met, construction had been underway for over four years. The first two units are scheduled to become operational in 1988 and 1989 with the second two scheduled to become operational in 1991 and 1992. The total estimated cost of the station is $10.895 billion of which $3.66 billion has been spent and $3.385 billion has been committed. Though the nuclear industry has been a major area of investment in Ontario over the past decade, the demand for electrical power from nuclear stations has been significantly decreased. This report focusses on the need for Darlington and public policy issues involved in planning and completing it. The Committee proposed the following recommendations: 1) The relationship between the Government of Ontario and Ontario Hydro and their individual responsibilities should be clarified. 2) An independent review of the Ontario Hydro demand/supply options should be carried out. 3) No further significant contracts for Darlington units 3 and 4 should be let for materials not required for construction during the next 6 months while the Committee studies demand and supply options

  20. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

  1. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East

  2. Nuclear Power and Ghana's Future Electricity Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major challenges facing Ghana in her developmental efforts is the generation of adequate and affordable electricity to meet increasing demand. Problems with the dependency on hydro power has brought insecurity in electricity supply due to periodic droughts. Thermal power systems have been introduced into the electricity generation mix to complement the hydro power supply but there are problems associated with their use. The high price of crude oil on the international market has made them expensive to run and the supply of less expensive gas from Steps are being taken to run the thermal plants on less expensive gas from Nigeria has delayed due to conflicts in the Niger Delta region and other factors. The existing situation has therefore called for the diversification of the electricity generation mix so as to ensure energy security and affordable power supply. This paper presents the nuclear option as a suitable alternative energy source which can be used to address the energy supply problems facing the nation as well the steps being taken towards its introduction in the national energy mix. In addition, electricity demand projections using the MAED model as well as other studies are presented. The expected electricity demand of 350000 GWh (4000MWyr) in 2030, exceeds the total electricity supply capability of the existing hydropower system, untapped hydro resources and the maximum amount of gas that can be imported from Nigeria through the West Africa pipeline. Also presented is a technological assessment on the type of nuclear reactor to be used. The technological assessment which was done based on economics, grid size, technological maturity, passive safety and standardization of reactor design, indicate that a medium sized pressurized water reactor (i.e. a PWR with capacity 300MW to 700MW) is the most favourable type of reactor. In addition the challenges facing the implementation of the nuclear power programme in Ghana are presented. (author)

  3. Restoration to serviceability of Bruce 'A' heat transfer equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce Units 1 to 4 were shut down during the 1990s by the former Ontario Hydro, due in part to a long list of system and equipment deficiencies and concerns, including steam generator tube degradation as a consequence of the then-existing steam generator secondary side water chemistry conditions. Upon its creation in 2001, and following a program of condition assessment, Bruce Power was able to determine that Units 3 and 4 could return to service; but that Units 1 and 2 would require refurbishment. That Refurbishment Program, which is currently well advanced, included the re-assessment of the condition of equipment throughout the plant including the heat transfer equipment; and determination item-by-item as to what inspection, cleaning, repair, or even replacement would be required to put the equipment into a condition where it could be expected to operate reliably for the additional 30 years expected from the plant. Clearly the objective is to suitably restore the equipment to serviceability without doing more refurbishment work than is warranted - without replacing equipment except where absolutely necessary. The first task in such a program is determination of its scope - i.e. a listing of all heat exchangers. That list included everything from the steam generators (which required replacement, now completed), to much smaller heat exchangers in the heavy water upgrader systems (which were found to be in very good overall condition). There is also a very large number of other so-called 'balance-of-plant' heat exchangers; these include the maintenance coolers, moderator heat exchangers, shutdown coolers and a whole raft of smaller coolers - many of which are cooled directly by lake water with its potential for bio-fouling and 'BIC' (Biologically Induced Corrosion). This paper focuses primarily on the engineering assessment, inspection, repair and general refurbishment of the balance-of-plant heat exchangers. As will be discussed in the paper, the assessment of the

  4. The generator coordinate method in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The generator coordinate method is introduced as a physical description of a N-body system in a subspace of a reduced number of degrees of freeedom. Special attention is placed on the identification of these special, 'collective' degrees of freedom. It is shown in particular that the method has close links with the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and also that considerations of differential geometry are useful in the theory. A set of applications is discussed and in particular the case of nuclear collisions is considered

  5. Limerick Nuclear Generating Station vibration monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philadelphia Electric Company utilizes a vibration monitoring computer system at its Limerick Nuclear Generating Station to evaluate machine performance. Performance can be evaluated through instantaneous sampling, online static and transient data. The system functions as an alarm monitor, displaying timely alarm data to the control area. The passage of time since the system's inception has been a learning period. Evaluation through continuous use has led to many enhancements in alarm handling and in the acquisition and display of machine data. Due to the system's sophistication, a routine maintenance program is a necessity. This paper describes the system's diagnostic tools and current utilization. System development and maintenance techniques will also be discussed

  6. Nuclear power generation incorporating modern power system practice

    CERN Document Server

    Myerscough, PB

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear power generation has undergone major expansion and developments in recent years; this third edition contains much revised material in presenting the state-of-the-art of nuclear power station designs currently in operation throughout the world. The volume covers nuclear physics and basic technology, nuclear station design, nuclear station operation, and nuclear safety. Each chapter is independent but with the necessary technical overlap to provide a complete work on the safe and economic design and operation of nuclear power stations.

  7. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter of the final report of the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning in Ontario updates its interim report on nuclear power in Ontario (1978) in the light of the Three Mile Island accident and presents the commission's general conclusions and recommendations relating to nuclear power. The risks of nuclear power, reactor safety with special reference to Three Mile Island and incidents at the Bruce generating station, the environmental effects of uranium mining and milling, waste management, nuclear power economics, uranium supplies, socio-political issues, and the regulation of nuclear power are discussed. Specific recommendations are made concerning the organization and public control of Ontario Hydro, but the commission concluded that nuclear power is acceptable in Ontario as long as satisfactory progress is made in the disposal of uranium mill tailings and spent fuel wastes. (LL)

  8. AECB staff annual assessment of the Bruce Heavy Water Plant for the year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is the independent federal agency that controls all nuclear activities in Canada. Heavy water is an essential part of Canada's nuclear industry and the AECB regulates its production. The AECB staff assess every facilities performance against legal requirements, including the conditions in the operating licence issued. All aspects of the facility's operation and management are reviewed and each facility is inspected. This report is the AECB staff assessment of the operation of the Bruce Heavy Water Plant during 1996. The operation was safe in 1996 and Ontario Hydro complied with the regulations. The emergency response capability was found satisfactory

  9. Examination of nuclear systems of fourth generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report proposes a detailed discussion of the six nuclear systems selected by the Generation IV International Forum with the objective of coordinating research and development activities which should result in the deployment of nuclear systems (reactors and associated fuel cycle installations) of fourth generation by the second half of the 21. century. These systems are: sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR), very high temperature reactors (VHTR), gas cooled fast reactors (GFR), lead cooled fast reactors (LFR) or lead bismuth eutectic reactors (LBE), molten salt reactors (MSR), and supercritical water reactors (SCWR). Fast systems are interesting as they favour the transmutation of fertile materials into fissile materials. History and perspectives of development, main characteristics, management of safety functions, risk analysis, impact on the environment, radiation protection and decommissioning, concept maturity and R and D needs are discussed for each of these systems. A comparison is reported in terms of main characteristics of reactors, of neutron characteristics and reactivity control, of sensitivity to cooling losses, of confinement function, of exploitation safety, of in-service inspection, of behaviour in case of severe accident, of toxicity of chemical substances, of sensitivity to aggressions (seism), of concept maturity and technological difficulties. The report also proposes a review of the various fuels which can be used in these different systems and which have been considered as eligible by the International Forum: oxides, carbides, nitrides, metals, waste processing. The last part addresses the transmutation of long life radioactive elements: physics, context, assessment of scenarios soundness, influence of transmutation on installations and transports

  10. Environmental and Safety Concerns for Nuclear Power Generation in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel Ampomah-Amoako; Edward H. K. Akaho; Nyarko, Benjamin J. B.; Isaac Ennison; Odoi, Henry C.; Abrefah, Rex G.; Sogbadji, Robert B. M.; Birikorang, Sylvester A.; Aboh, Innocent J. K.; Kwaku A. Danso; Ekua Mensimah; Kwame Gyamfi

    2011-01-01

    Misconception about nuclear reactor safety has led several nuclear power projects to be abandoned. Safety was taken into consideration even before the first fission chain reaction was initiated. These safety precautions coupled with half a century of experience in nuclear power generation have made nuclear power the best choice for base load electricity generation in several countries across the globe. The storage of nuclear waste has been extensively studied over the years and several opport...

  11. 77 FR 40091 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Indian Point Nuclear Generating, Units 2 and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Indian Point Nuclear Generating, Units 2 and 3 AGENCY: Nuclear... statement for license renewal of nuclear plants; availability. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear...

  12. Nuclear power and Ghana's future electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the major challenges facing Ghana in her developmental efforts is how to meet the increasing electricity demand. Ghana's electricity generation system depends heavily on hydro power which accounts for 68% of total installed capacity. The remaining is taken by thermal power systems. The heavy dependency on hydro systems has led to shortfall in power supply in case of drought. To deal with this situation the necessary steps are being taken to build more thermal plants to complement the hydro systems. The thermal plants currently run on imported light crude oil but steps are being taken to run them on less expensive gas imported from Nigeria through the West African gas pipeline. The conflicts in the Niger Delta, the source of the gas has threatened the security of gas supply and this coupled with the fact that gas price is indexed to that of crude oil have raised concerns about the supply of gas from Nigeria. This paper presents the results of the assessment made in the Ghana electricity generation system and the role of nuclear power in Ghana's energy mix using MAED projections and the MESSAGE model. This assessment forms part of the IAEA-TC project 'Planning for Sustainable Energy Development in Ghana' which is meant among other things to develop a sustainable energy mix for the country. Energy projections made by using the MAED model have shown that Ghana's electricity demand expected to increase to about 4000MWyr in 2030. This expected electricity demand far exceeds the total electricity supply capability of the existing hydropower system, untapped hydro resources and the maximum amount of gas that can be imported from Nigeria through the West Africa pipeline. Technological assessment on the suitability of the various nuclear power technologies has been done based on the grid size, technological maturity, passivity and standardization of reactor designs and it has been found that a water cooled SMR with capacity not exceeding 400MW(e) is the

  13. Aging assessment of nuclear generating station cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of diagnostic techniques requiring small samples (e.g. shavings) for monitoring the condition of nuclear generating station cables have been identified. The cables studied were insulated with cross-linked or unmodified polyethylene, ethylene propylene rubber, butyl rubber, styrene butadiene rubber, and polyvinyl chloride. Specimens were aged at elevated temperatures, or gamma irradiated up to 120 Mrad. The degradation was assessed by conventional elongation measurements, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), oxidation induction time, DSC oxidation induction temperature (under high oxygen pressure), infrared carbonyl absorption, density, and swelling measurements. The sensitivities of the diagnostic techniques in measuring oxidation and embrittlement were compared with the elongation results, and a criterion for monitoring the cable degradation was developed. Some results presented illustrate the use of the diagnostic techniques in monitoring degradation. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 24 figs

  14. Nuclear power generation and global heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Professionals Association and Nuclear Activity of National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) are following with great interest the worldwide discussions on global heating and the role that nuclear power is going to play. The Association has an active presence, as part of the WONUC (recognized by the United Nations as a Non-Governmental Organization) in the COP4, which was held in Buenos Aires in November 1998. The environmental problems are closely related to human development, the way of power production, the techniques for industrial production and exploitation fields. CO2 is the most important gas with hothouse effects, responsible of progressive climatic changes, as floods, desertification, increase of average global temperature, thermal expansion in seas and even polar casks melting and ice falls. The consequences that global heating will have on the life and economy of human society cannot be sufficiently emphasized, great economical impact, destruction of ecosystems, loss of great coast areas and complete disappearance of islands owing to water level rise. The increase of power retained in the atmosphere generates more violent hurricanes and storms. In this work, the topics presented in the former AATN Meeting is analyzed in detail and different technological options and perspectives to mitigate CO2 emission, as well as economical-financial aspects, are explored. (author)

  15. Equipment transporter for nuclear steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transporter is described for use in a steam generator of a nuclear power installation. The generator is essentially a heat exchanger having a vertically extended shell. Across the lower portion extends a horizontal tube sheet having an upper surface which supports a bundle of vertically extending tubes forming a limited annular space with the inside of the shell wall and the upper surface. An opening of limited dimensions through the shell wall gains manual access to the limited annular space. The transporter has means for locating and removing solid debris from the upper surface of the tube sheet in the annular space and has a means for assembly and disassembly of the transporter so that it may be manually passed through the shell opening to and from a position on the upper surface of the tube sheet in the annular space. The transporter includes: a body; at least three wheels mounted on the body for engaging the upper surface of the tube sheet; a first motor mounted on the body drivingly connected to the wheels for moving the transporter along the upper surface of the tube sheet in the annular space; a remotely operated means on the body for locating solid debris on the upper surface of the tube sheet; and means for securing and removing solid debris on the upper surface of the tube sheet located by the means for locating

  16. Business environment change and decision making mechanism of nuclear generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Change magnitude of business environment for Japanese nuclear generators is significant. It is rapidly growing in the last several years. There are possibilities that the change might impact to management model of nuclear generators. In the paper, the impact to management model, especially, decision making mechanism of the generators is discussed. (author)

  17. Proliferation resistances of Generation IV recycling facilities for nuclear fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Åberg Lindell, Matilda

    2013-01-01

    The effects of global warming raise demands for reduced CO2 emissions, whereas at the same time the world’s need for energy increases. With the aim to resolve some of the difficulties facing today’s nuclear power, striving for safety, sustainability and waste minimization, a new generation of nuclear energy systems is being pursued: Generation IV. New reactor concepts and new nuclear facilities should be at least as resistant to diversion of nuclear material for weapons production, as were th...

  18. The performance of T-pad bearing pads, as a remedy against pressure tube crevice corrosion, on bundles irradiated at Bruce and Point Lepreau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crevice corrosion in CANDU reactors can occur between the standard design fuel bundle bearing pads and the pressure tube when the element operates at a sufficiently high power to create the crevice boiling condition necessary for the concentration of lithium hydroxide leading to enhanced oxidation of the bearing pad and pressure tube. Since crevice corrosion was discovered in Pickering pressure tubes, a concerted effort has been made on design changes to the standard bearing pads in order to minimize/elirninate crevice corrosion. This development program led to the T-Pad bearing pad design. Recent demonstration irradiations of prototype bundles, fitted with T-Pad bearing pads, were conducted in Bruce and Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Stations. The subsequent post-irradiation examinations indicated, that except for increased hydrogen and deuterium pickup in the T-Pads, the performance of the T-Pads and bundles is consistent with standard bearing pad bundles. (author)

  19. Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

  20. Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion

  1. The Carem reactor: Bridging the gap to nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An idea is presented as an alternative for the introduction of nuclear power in presently non-nuclear countries. This idea involves going through an intermediate step between the traditional research reactor and the first commercial nuclear power plant. This intermediate step would consist of a very small nuclear power plant, with the principal goal of gaining in experience in the country on all the processes involved in introducing commercial nuclear generation. (author)

  2. Chemistry control at Bruce N.G.S. 'B' from construction to commercial operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pre-operational storage chemistry and flushing of the secondary side is described. The approach devised for Bruce N.G.S. 'B' Unit 6 was unique for an Ontario Hydro nuclear unit. The significance of the improved construction installation and quality assurance is identified. Secondary side chemistry during both commissioning and later operation is reported. It will be shown that the application of ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) concept has resulted in tighter chemical specifications being met. (author). 11 refs., 6 tabs., 4 figs

  3. Nuclear Knowledge to the Next Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safe, reliable, and cost-effective operation of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) requires that personnel possess and maintain the requisite knowledge, skills, and attitudes to do their jobs properly. Such knowledge includes not only the technical competencies required by the nature of the technology and particular engineering designs, but also the softer competencies associated with effective management, communication and teamwork. Recent studies have shown that there has been a loss of corporate knowledge and memory. Both explicit knowledge and tacit knowledge must be passed on to the next generation of workers in the industry to ensure a quality workforce. New and different techniques may be required to ensure timely and effective knowledge retention and transfer. The IAEA prepared a report on this subject. The main conclusions from the report regarding strategies for managing the aging workforce are included. Also included are main conclusions from the report regarding the capture an d preservation of mission critical knowledge, and the effective transfer of this knowledge to the next generation of NPP personnel. The nuclear industry due to its need for well-documented procedures, specifications, design basis, safety analyses, etc., has a greater fraction of its mission critical knowledge as explicit knowledge than do many other industries. This facilitates the task of knowledge transfer. For older plants in particular, there may be a need for additional efforts to transfer tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge to support major strategic initiatives such as plant license extensions/renewals, periodic safety reviews, major plant upgrades, and plant specific control room simulator development. The challenge in disseminating explicit knowledge is to make employees aware that it is available and provide easy access in formats and forms that are usable. Tacit knowledge is more difficult to identify and disseminate. The challenge is to identify what can be converted to

  4. Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Fisher, Stephen Eugene [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

    2008-12-01

    As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

  5. Bruce A restart (execution and lessons-learned)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessons learned with the Bruce Units 3 and 4 restart have been incorporated into the current refurbishment of Units 1 and 2. In addition, lessons learned on the lead unit (U2) are aggressively applied on the lagging unit (U1) to maximize efficiency and productivity. There will be a discussion on how this internal OPEX, along with external lessons learned, are used to continuously improve all aspects of the Bruce A Restart project management cycle, from scope selection, through planning and scheduling, to execution.

  6. Bruce NGS A Unit 4 preheater divider plate failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On May 19, 1995, without any prior operational indications, Bruce A discovered preheater divider plate damage in Unit 4 that had the potential to have a major impact on the continued safe operation of the station. Further investigations indicated that Unit 4 may have been operating with this damage for as long as ten years. In the two months following the discovery, Bruce A has procured and replaced the 4 divider plates, located most of the missing pieces, retrieved pieces from the PHT system, investigated historical operational information, performed detailed analytical investigations, investigated root cause, performed in-situ and mock-up testing, updated operational procedures and installed DP monitoring equipment

  7. Environmental and safety concerns for nuclear power generation in Ghana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ampomah-Amoako, E.; Nyarko, B.J.B.; Ennison, I.; Odoi, H.C.; Abrefah, R.G.; Sogbadji, R.B.M.; Birikorang, S.A.; Aboh, I.J.K. [National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P. O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana)

    2010-07-01

    Misconception about nuclear reactor safety has led several nuclear power projects to be abandoned. Safety of nuclear reactors was taken into consideration even before the first fission chain reaction was initiated. These safety precautions coupled with half a century of experience in nuclear power generation have made nuclear power the best choice for base load electricity generation in several countries across the globe. Nuclear technology has brought several developments to nations that have had the opportunity to harness it fully. The storage of nuclear waste has been extensively studied over the years and several opportunities of fuel disposal and treatment have engineered the industrial growth of several countries. Greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation plant across the globe have added to the depletion of the ozone layer. Nuclear power production has helped to reduce the carbon emissions of several countries. The history of nuclear reactor safety and the management of nuclear waste are presented along with the comparison with other sources of electricity to give a clear reason for the promotion of nuclear power programme in Ghana. Emphasis is placed on the two outstanding nuclear power reactor accidents, Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents, which are mostly cited by opponents of nuclear power to assure the public of the mitigation methods currently in place at nuclear power stations to ensure the nonoccurrence of such incidents. The comparisons of greenhouse gas emissions of the various sources of electric power as well as industrial practices are discussed. The experiences of safety precautions currently observed at Ghana Research Reactor-1 Centre are presented. The effects of nuclear waste as well as their treatment are presented to indicate the preparedness of nuclear scientists to adequately protect the public from any exposure to radiation from the waste. The international and local regulations that are available for ensuring safe

  8. Design and performance of CANDU steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recirculating U-tube steam generators at Ontario Hydro's Pickering and Bruce CANDU Nuclear Generating Stations have demonstrated excellent reliability over many years of operation. Tube failures have been rare, contributing to high plant capacity factors. Of the approximately 390,000 steam generator U-tubes at the Pickering and Bruce plants, one tube leak has occurred at Pickering to date and 12 tubes have leaked at Bruce in a total of 89 reactor years of operation. The success of these units is attributed to an age old respect for steam generation equipment, an ongoing pursuit of research and design advancements, and extensive cooperative efforts on the part of the utility, the system designer, and the supplier. The supplier's involvement began with the steam generator design and manufacture for the very first CANDU plant. The utility's involvement began with their direct participation in the earliest stages of nuclear plant design. The utilities' contribution to the success of these units relates to the rigorous approach used in definition of requirements, in understanding the supplier's design in detail and in making every effort to operate, monitor, and service the equipment with appropriate care. This paper presents the supplier's and utility's approach to achieving these remarkable results. In order to present these viewpoints separately and in some detail, this paper is divided into two parts: Part 1 - The Equipment Supplier Perspective, and Part 2 - The Utility Perspective

  9. World nuclear power generation market and prospects of industry reorganization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In late years there are many trends placing nuclear energy with important energy in various countries in the world due to a remarkable rise to an energy price, importance of energy security and a surge of recognition to a global environment problem. Overseas nuclear industry's acquisition by a Japanese nuclear power plant maker and its capital or business tie-up with an overseas company, were announced in succession in 2006. A nuclear power plant maker has played an extremely important role supporting wide technology in all stages of a design, construction, operation and maintenance in a nuclear power generation business. After having surveyed the recent trend of world nuclear power generation situation, a background and the summary of these acquisition/tie-ups made were investigated and analyzed to consider the influence that movement of such an industry gives a world nuclear power generation market. (T. Tanaka)

  10. Nuclear power generation in Japan - present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper outlines the present status and future prospects of nuclear power generation in Japan with emphasis on the situations peculiar to Japan. It first describes why among the many kinds of energy resources available, Japan has decided to follow a nuclear energy policy. Next presented is the current status of nuclear power generation with a brief review of nuclear power technology development. All phases of nuclear power generation from procurement of nuclear fuel to waste disposal are covered. Social, political and technological problems that the Japanese electric power industry has to tackle in order to utilize fully nuclear energy are also discussed, together with the new technologies that will need to be developed to solve the problems effectively. As many quantitative data as possible are presented throughout the paper to provide a precise description. (Author)

  11. Promotion of public awareness relating nuclear power in young generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although nuclear power presents problems of waste, safety and non-proliferation, many people understand that it is an essential energy for addressing the global climate and reducing CO2. However, a vague negative-image to the radiation and nuclear power is deep-rooted among the public. Young generation is not an exception. It is very important to transfer many information from the experienced generation in the industry to young generations. In this paper, the research that applied the information intelligence to nuclear power, which involves of the nuclear fuel cycle, and the communication related activities for the social acceptance and improvement. (author)

  12. Inspection program for Embalse Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embalse Nuclear Generating Station (ENGS), a CANDU 6 type with 648 MWe output, started operating in 1983. In the last 10 years it has shown an excellent performance with an average 88.25 % capacity factor. In order to maintain the safety and operation levels at economically convenient levels, an efficient management of the effects of aging of Critical Systems, Structures and Components is required. In this regard, Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A.-ENGS's operator- has initiated a Plant Life Management (PLiM) program focused on reaching its design life and establishing the requirements for its life extension. Within the framework of this program, a series of reviews of the existing Operation and Maintenance programs is scheduled with the aim of establishing the bases for potential life extension. A work team has been designated to this effect and the team has received training in the PLiM methodologies by AECL. In this paper an analysis of the Inspection Program for ENGS is presented. Also, the areas to be reinforced for the Systems, Structures and Components identified as critical are identified based on the SAM (Systematic Assessment of Maintenance) methodologies. The ENGS Engineering Procedures form the basis for the inspection program along with the records of the inspections performed. The inspection program will be the object of analysis, as the starting point of the PLiM of ENGS. There are also other programs, for example those for preventive / predictive maintenance, routine testing, which focus on maintaining a high reliability of the safety as well as the process systems. All plant systems are taken into account with a list of inspections based on recommendations by the plant designer (AECL). It is continuously modified according to the results thereof and the experience of other plants, and revised within the framework of the SAM of the most important systems. Within this program, the ENGS chemistry laboratory and CNEA's (Comision Nacional Energia Atomica

  13. Optimization in the scale of nuclear power generation and the economy of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the not too distant future, the economy of nuclear power will have to be restudied. Various conditions and circumstances supporting this economy of nuclear power tend to change, such as the decrease in power demand and supply, the diversification in base load supply sources, etc. The fragility in the economic advantage of nuclear power may thus be revealed. In the above connection, on the basis of the future outlook of the scale of nuclear power generation, that is, the further reduction of the current nuclear power program, and of the corresponding supply and demand of nuclear fuel cycle quantities, the aspect of the economic advantage of nuclear power was examined, for the purpose of optimizing the future scale of nuclear power generation (the downward revision of the scale, the establishment of the schedule of nuclear fuel cycle the stagnation of power demand and nuclear power generation costs). (Mori, K.)

  14. Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons: Military effectiveness and collateral effects

    OpenAIRE

    Gsponer, Andre

    2005-01-01

    The paper begins with a general introduction and update to Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons (FGNW), and then addresses some particularly important military aspects on which there has been only limited public discussion so far. These aspects concern the unique military characteristics of FGNWs which make them radically different from both nuclear weapons based on previous-generation nuclear-explosives and from conventional weapons based on chemical-explosives: yields in the 1 to 100 tons rang...

  15. Solutions for nuclear & renewable power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA Group's business globally includes mining, reactors and services and renewables. In Canada, AREVA is a leading uranium producer and globally qualified for CANDU plants. AREVA's nuclear and renewables strategy is based on the development of nuclear and renewable energies.

  16. Process of public attitudes toward nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japanese public attitudes toward nuclear power generation had become negative year by year. After the Chernobyl accident, a percentage of the unfavorable respondent toward nuclear power generation has dramatically increased, and a new type of anti-nuclear movement has been observed. On the basis of our public opinion polls, the reason for this increase was found to be primarily decrease of sense of usefulness rather than increase of sense of nueasiness about nuclear safety. Particularly, social factors (change of life style, progress of civilian consciousness, credibility of the existing institutional system etc.) have influence on the attitude of either pro or anti-nuclear. Based on the above observation, we have inferred that process of the public attitudes has two flows arising from the above social factors, one is the usefulness and the other is the easiness about nuclear safety, and have formulated a model representing the process of public attitudes toward nuclear power. (author)

  17. David Bruce Payton : väikeriigid mõistavad üksteist / David Bruce Payton ; interv. Marianne Mikko

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Payton, David Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Uus-Meremaa suursaadik Eestis David Bruce Payton talupidaja toetamise loobumisest Uus-Meremaal, Uus-Meremaa põllumajandussektorist, veinidest, ekspordist, Eesti saamisest EL-i ja NATO liikmeks, Uus-Meremaa rahvastikust, elatustasemest, Iraagi võimalikust ründamisest, Põhja-Koreast

  18. Application of additional diesel generators in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to enlarge the nuclear safety margin, ensure safe shutdown of nuclear reactors under loss of on-site and offsite power supply, and raise the unit availability through elongation of diesel fallback time under unavailability of emergency diesel generators, at present, nuclear power stations of most countries and zones in the world such as France, the U.S., south Africa, South Korea and Taiwan have been equipped with additional diesel generators, making the safety performance of above-mentioned nuclear power stations advanced in the world. The wiring procedures, power supply mode, testing methods and the power supply and connection schemes of motor control center are described

  19. Comparison of cost estimates of nuclear electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to meet future energy needs without emitting carbon dioxide and other pollutants, many countries are now planning to introduce nuclear electricity generation, and many studies have been done to estimate the costs of generating electricity. In this paper we compared some of the papers to find the main factors influencing the generating costs. We found that the crucial factors to determine the cost competitiveness of nuclear electricity generation are the discount rate (rate of return for investment), hydrocarbon prices and the price of carbon dioxide. Especially the discount rate plays a main role because nuclear electricity generation requires high initial costs. In order to introduce nuclear power in many countries in the future, it will be important to give some governmental incentives or international aids to reduce the risks of investment, and effectively reduce the rate of return. (author)

  20. Environmental and Safety Concerns for Nuclear Power Generation in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Ampomah-Amoako

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Misconception about nuclear reactor safety has led several nuclear power projects to be abandoned. Safety was taken into consideration even before the first fission chain reaction was initiated. These safety precautions coupled with half a century of experience in nuclear power generation have made nuclear power the best choice for base load electricity generation in several countries across the globe. The storage of nuclear waste has been extensively studied over the years and several opportunities of fuel disposal and treatment have engineered the industrial growth of several countries. Nuclear power production has reduced the carbon emissions of several countries. The history of nuclear reactor safety and the management of nuclear waste are discussed along with the comparison with other sources of electricity to give a clear reason for the promotion of nuclear power programme in Ghana. The experiences of safety practices currently observed at Ghana Research Reactor-1 Centre are also discussed. The effects of nuclear waste as well as their treatment are discussed to indicate the preparedness of nuclear scientists to adequately protect the public from any exposure to radiation from the waste. The international and local regulations that are available for ensuring safe nuclear practice are also discussed.

  1. Public attitudes toward nuclear generating facilities: positive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Public opposition and intervention in the siting and development of nuclear power plants has become more of a limiting factor than technological issues. Attitude surveys indicate that, while the majority of Americans support nuclear power, the utilities would do well to respond to the concerns and opinions of local residents when projects are in the planning stages. Recent polls are analyzed to identify the demographic and perceptive factors of opposition. Demographic studies indicate that the greatest opposition comes from women, young people, urban residents, farmers, low-income groups, and the unemployed. Perceptual opposition is associated with anticipated negative impacts in the form of hazards and social disruption. Since there appears to be a correlation between access to pertinent information and level of support, utility planners could develop educational programs to provide this information on the advantages of nuclear power. 10 references

  2. Human factor problem in nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since a nuclear power plant accident at Threemile Island in U.S.A. occurred in March, 1979, twenty years have passed. After the accident, the human factor problem became focussed in nuclear power, to succeed its research at present. For direct reason of human error, most of factors at individual level or work operation level are often listed at their center. Then, it is natural that studies on design of a machine or apparatus suitable for various human functions and abilities and on improvement of relationship between 'human being and machine' and 'human being and working environment' are important in future. Here was, as first, described on outlines of the human factor problem in a nuclear power plant developed at a chance of past important accident, and then was described on educational training for its countermeasure. At last, some concrete researching results obtained by human factor research were introduced. (G.K.)

  3. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald

    2003-11-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project will demonstrate emissions-free nuclearassisted electricity and hydrogen production by 2015. The NGNP reactor will be a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with a design goal outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. The reactor thermal power and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during hypothetical accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. This paper provides a description of the project to build the NGNP at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The NGNP Project includes an overall reactor design activity and four major supporting activities: materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, fuel development and qualification, and the hydrogen production plant. Each of these activities is discussed in the paper. All the reactor design and construction activities will be managed under the DOE’s project management system as outlined in DOE Order 413.3. The key elements of the overall project management system discussed in this paper include the client and project management organization relationship, critical decisions (CDs), acquisition strategy, and the project logic and timeline. The major activities associated with the materials program include development of a plan for managing the selection and qualification of all component materials required for the NGNP; identification of specific materials alternatives for each system component; evaluation of the needed testing, code work, and analysis required to qualify each identified material; preliminary selection of component materials; irradiation of needed sample materials; physical, mechanical, and chemical testing of unirradiated and irradiated materials; and documentation of final materials selections. The NGNP will be licensed by the NRC under 10 CFR 50 or 10

  4. Economic analysis of nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major contents in this study are as follows : 1) Efforts are made to examine the role of nuclear energy considering environmental regulation. An econometric model for energy demand and supply including carbon tax imposition is established. 2) Analysis for the learning effect of nuclear power plant operation is performed. The study is focused to measure the effect of technology homogeneity on the operation performance. 3) A preliminary capital cost of the KALIMER is estimated by using cost computer program, which is developed in this study. (author). 36 refs.,46 tabs., 15 figs

  5. Environmental assessment, proposed generating station for Darlington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document indicates the intention of Ontario Hydro to seek approval from the Provincial Government for its plan to construct and operate a 3400 MWe nuclear generating station at the Darlington site, west of Bowmanville. This preliminary proposal also contains the environmental assessment. The environmental section of this proposal describes and assesses the existing environment and the environmental influences which would occur due to the construction and operation of a nuclear generating station, consisting of four 850 MW units, at the Darlington site. This proposed station is similar to the Bruce GS A station presently under construction. (author)

  6. Aiming at the rebirth of the nuclear generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A half century has passed since Japan began an industrialization of nuclear energy. The nuclear industries of today have a variety of branches and each industry functions independently. Young professionals need opportunities for communications among industries, utilities and institutes, and also nuclear experts. We, young professionals, are in the motion of organizing the 'Young Generation Network (YGN) of Japan,' and also foresee to organize 'YGN in Asia' in the future

  7. US central station nuclear electric generating units: significant milestones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Listings of US nuclear power plants include significant dates, reactor type, owners, and net generating capacity. Listings are made by state, region, and utility. Tabulations of status, schedules, and orders are also presented

  8. Electrical wire for use in nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical wire and cable suitable for use in nuclear generating stations, having at least one electrical conductor, a micaceous insulating layer surrounding the conductor and a layer of fluoropolymer insulation surrounding the micaceous layer are described

  9. Management of radioactive waste generated in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is a clinical specialty in which radioactive material is used in non-encapsulated form, for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Nuclear medicine involves administering to a patient a radioactive substance, usually liquid, both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. This process generates solid radioactive waste (syringes, vials, gloves) and liquid (mainly the patient's urine). (Author)

  10. Performance monitoring system for emergency diesel generator in nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sang Min; Kim, Kil Jeong; Jeong, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Tae Woon; Jung, Hoan Sung

    1998-12-01

    Hardware and software of performance monitoring system of emergency diesel generator in nuclear facility were studied, designed, fabricated to represent control performance parameters and engine performance parameters for field engineer through system analysis, decision of parameters, parameter change analysis, which will improve safety and economy of nuclear facility. (author). 15 refs., 3 tabs., 12 figs.

  11. Performance monitoring system for emergency diesel generator in nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardware and software of performance monitoring system of emergency diesel generator in nuclear facility were studied, designed, fabricated to represent control performance parameters and engine performance parameters for field engineer through system analysis, decision of parameters, parameter change analysis, which will improve safety and economy of nuclear facility. (author). 15 refs., 3 tabs., 12 figs

  12. New nuclear power generation in the UK: Cost benefit analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides an economic analysis of possible nuclear new build in the UK. It compares costs and benefits of nuclear new build against conventional gas-fired generation and low carbon technologies (CCS, wind, etc.). A range of scenarios are considered to allow for uncertainty as regards nuclear and other technology costs, gas prices and carbon prices. In the base case, the analysis suggests that there is a small cost penalty for new nuclear generation relative to conventional gas-fired generation, but that this is offset by environmental and security of supply benefits. More generally nuclear new build has a positive net benefit for a range of plausible nuclear costs, gas prices and carbon prices. This supports the UK policy of developing an enabling framework for nuclear new build in a market-based context. To the extent that assumptions in the analysis are not borne out in reality (e.g. as regards nuclear cost), this is a no regrets policy, given that the market would not invest in nuclear if it is prohibitively costly

  13. Developing the next generation of nuclear workers at OPG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation is about developing the next generation of nuclear workers at Ontario Power Generation (OPG). Industry developments are creating urgent need to hire, train and retain new staff. OPG has an aggressive hiring campaign. Training organization is challenged to accommodate influx of new staff. Collaborating with colleges and universities is increasing the supply of qualified recruits with an interest in nuclear. Program for functional and leadership training have been developed. Knowledge retention is urgently required

  14. Probabilistic projection of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of future nuclear and coal-fired plant power generation costs in which the probability distributions of key variables are used with a Monte Carlo driver code to obtain power generation cost distributions for the options. The resulting distributions are compared to deterministic estimates based on recommended parameters given in the US Dept. of Energy's Nuclear Energy Cost Data Base (NECDB)

  15. Promoting nuclear energy: meeting with new generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The VII General Congress on Nuclear Energy (VII CGEN) decided on another approach, in order to promote nuclear energy (NE) for the average public. Instead of promoting an event for the nuclear area, the VII CGEN was open to the general public, aiming at high schools of the city of Belo Horizonte, where the meeting was held. The papers submitted were classified to two poster sessions, one called journalistic, open to the public, and technical, for the congressmen. The authors of the former session were asked to make their posters understandable for an average person. The present article shows the strategies used in dealing with local high schools, which includes the preparation of two series of posters, one dealing with the history of NE until 1945, and the other with applications of NE, due to the lack of this kind of material in Portuguese. The results of these efforts are shown and discussed, in terms of a better public image for NE and her community in Brazil. The public response showed that there is more than enough public for this kind of event, but not events enough. (author)

  16. Examination of oxides and deposits on tubes removed from Bruce units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Bruce Nuclear Power Generating Station (BNPGS), sensitized Alloy 600 steam generator (SG) tubing in different units has exhibited different secondary side corrosion behavior at and/or near the upper roll joint transition zone (RTZ) of the tubes. Wastage and pitting was observed on tubes from Unit 3, while Unit 4 SG tubing has exhibited circumferential stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and intergranular attack (IGA) in addition to wastage and pitting. Intergranular attack in one SG from Unit 5 has been documented, whereas only micropitting has been observed on tubes from Units 6, 7 and 8. In preheaters (PH), which are also tubed with sensitized alloy 600, only a small number of shallow flaws with a crystallographic appearance were observed on some of the tubes. Of these corrosion mechanisms, the SCC currently affecting Unit 4 is of the most concern as it challenges the operating life of all of the SGs in that unit. To investigate the causes of the different corrosion behavior observed in different units, detailed surface and microscopy analysis was performed on the SG tubing (within the sludge pile and in the free span regions) and PH tubing (in the free span region) removed from different units. The results indicated that the oxides formed on all tube specimens were enriched in chromium at the outer surface with its absolute concentration being close to that in the base metal, suggesting that the pH of the crevice environment is from mildly acidic to mildly basic. It was also observed that the oxide morphology and thickness for SG tubes that suffered degradation was different compared to those tubes that appeared unaffected. Oxide thickness also appeared to be significantly greater on the PH tubing compared to the SG tubing. Finally, the degraded SG tubing also exhibited a greater level of contamination from the secondary side environment, with elements such as aluminum, silicon and copper being detected. Results from Raman spectroscopic analyses further

  17. Bruce B main control room facilities improvement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce B is a four unit CANDU station located on the shore of Lake Huron near Tiverton, Ontario. Designed in the 1970's and built in the mid 1980's, the station is rated at 840 Megawatts per unit. The Main Control Room (MCR) was designed as a single, large and spacious room comprising an area of approximately 5600 square feet. The MCR consists of five main control panel sections, which comprise the walls of the room. The five sections include the control panels for reactor units 5,6,7,8 and unit 0 (common services and switchyard controls). Three fuelling machine and fuel handling control consoles are located in the center of the MCR. In effect, the Bruce B MCR comprises no less than six separate operating islands in one large room. (author)

  18. Non intrusive check valve diagnostics at Bruce A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce A purchased non intrusive check valve diagnostic equipment in 1995 to ensure operability and availability of critical check valves in the Station. Diagnostics can be used to locate and monitor check valve degradation modes. Bruce A initiated a pilot program targeting check valves with flow through them and ones that completed open or close cycles. Approaches to determine how to confirm operability of passive check valves using non intrusive techniques were explored. A sample population of seventy-three check valves was selected to run the pilot program on prior to complete implementation. The pilot program produced some significant results and some inconclusive results. The program revealed a major finding that check valve performance modeling is required to ensure continuous operability of check valves. (author)

  19. Non intrusive check valve diagnostics at Bruce A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsch, S.P. [Ontario Hydro, Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A, Tiverton, ON (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    Bruce A purchased non intrusive check valve diagnostic equipment in 1995 to ensure operability and availability of critical check valves in the Station. Diagnostics can be used to locate and monitor check valve degradation modes. Bruce A initiated a pilot program targeting check valves with flow through them and ones that completed open or close cycles. Approaches to determine how to confirm operability of passive check valves using non intrusive techniques were explored. A sample population of seventy-three check valves was selected to run the pilot program on prior to complete implementation. The pilot program produced some significant results and some inconclusive results. The program revealed a major finding that check valve performance modeling is required to ensure continuous operability of check valves. (author)

  20. High-order harmonic generation from polyatomic molecules including nuclear motion and a nuclear modes analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Bruun; Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    We present a generic approach for treating the effect of nuclear motion in high-order harmonic generation from polyatomic molecules. Our procedure relies on a separation of nuclear and electron dynamics where we account for the electronic part using the Lewenstein model and nuclear motion enters as...... a nuclear correlation function. We express the nuclear correlation function in terms of Franck-Condon factors, which allows us to decompose nuclear motion into modes and identify the modes that are dominant in the high-order harmonic generation process. We show results for the isotopes CH4 and CD4...... and thereby provide direct theoretical support for a recent experiment [S. Baker et al., Science 312, 424 (2006)] that uses high-order harmonic generation to probe the ultrafast structural nuclear rearrangement of ionized methane....

  1. Improved maintenance procedures at Bruce NGS-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Bruce and Darlington, the fuel handling systems were supplied by GE Canada, who also supplied manuals for servicing them. At the time of the conference, GE Canada was in the process of installing a new computer publication system, with the capability of electronically creating, editing and revising both text and graphics. This will ensure that the technical people obtain current data from the manuals quickly. Several pages from the manuals are reproduced in this paper

  2. Integrated inspection programs at Bruce Heavy Water Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality pressure boundary maintenance and an excellent loss prevention record at Bruce Heavy Water Plant are the results of the Material and Inspection Unit's five inspection programs. Experienced inspectors are responsible for the integrity of the pressure boundary in their own operating area. Inspectors are part of the Technical Section, and along with unit engineering staff, they provide technical input before, during, and after the job. How these programs are completed, and the results achieved, are discussed. 5 figs., 1 appendix

  3. Generation IV nuclear energy systems: road map and concepts. 2. Generation II Measurement Systems for Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems in current operating plants have not changed appreciably since their original design in the 1950's. These systems depend on a variety of traditional process and radiation sensors for the measurement of safety and control variables such as temperature, pressure, and neutron flux. To improve their performance and to make them more robust, many plant control systems have been upgraded from analog to digital; most of them continue to utilize traditional single-input single-output architecture. Transmission of data, for the most part, continues to employ large coaxial cables. These cables are not the small cables used in a laboratory (i.e., RG-58 or RG-59). Because of concern about electromagnetic and radio frequency interference and other environmental effects, bulky triax cables, which are cables with two outer shields separated by an insulator, are used. In a nuclear plant there are literally miles of cables and hundreds of specialized penetrations for cables going through containment or pressure vessel walls. The I and C systems in the advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, i.e., Generation III reactors, do employ more advanced technology than current plants; however, they do not incorporate new technology on a broad scale. This in part is a consequence of the ALWR design philosophy that discouraged use of advanced technology if current technology was adequate. As a consequence, the I and C systems in the ALWRs continue to make use of current technology. There are two exceptions, however, which include the broad use of software-based digital systems and fiber optics for signal isolation and data transmission in nonradioactive areas. The ALWR design philosophy was a justifiably low-risk approach when considering the overall objective of 'capturing' lessons learned from current operating plants to design a plant that would exhibit performance superior to current plants and would be relatively easy to license without

  4. 77 FR 16278 - License Renewal Application for Indian Point Nuclear Generating Units 2 and 3; Entergy Nuclear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION License Renewal Application for Indian Point Nuclear Generating Units 2 and 3; Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: License renewal application; intent...

  5. Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons: Military effectiveness and collateral effects

    CERN Document Server

    Gsponer, A

    2005-01-01

    The paper begins with a general introduction and update to Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons (FGNW), and then addresses some particularly important military aspects on which there has been only limited public discussion so far. These aspects concern the unique military characteristics of FGNWs which make them radically different from both nuclear weapons based on previous-generation nuclear-explosives and from conventional weapons based on chemical-explosives: yields in the 1 to 100 tons range, greatly enhanced coupling to targets, possibility to drive powerful shaped charged jets and forged fragments, enhanced prompt radiation effects, reduced collateral damage and residual radioactivity, etc.

  6. Impacts of nuclear generating plants on local areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impacts resulting from building and operating twelve nuclear generating stations were not generally characteristic of impacts associated with resource-based energy developments. Economic benefits to local areas were not large due to significant commutation levels, income leakage from the rural areas, and relatively few local purchases of construction material. Revenue impacts from nuclear plants have shown important gains to local jurisdictions. Nevertheless, revenue impacts were found to be wide ranging, depending on state utility tax structures. Socioeconomic changes due to nuclear generating plants have not resulted in public expressions of concern but have sensitized communities to growth management issues. 15 references, 1 figure, 4 tables

  7. Derivation of Energy Generated by Nuclear Fission-Fusion Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Kayano, Hideo; Teshigawara, Makoto; Konashi, Kenji; Yamamoto, Takuya

    1994-01-01

    In the solids which contain fissionable elements and deuterium, it is expected that the energy generated by nuclear fission contributes to the promotion of the D-D nuclear fusion in the solids. When nuclear fission occurs by neutrons in the solid, the fissionable elements divide into two fission product nuclei having the energy of 100MeV, respectively. It is expected that the hige energy fission products promote rapidly nuclear fision reaction by knocking out the D atoms in the solids and by ...

  8. Background submission to the Royal Commission on Nuclear Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Royal Commission on Nuclear Power Generation in New Zealand is required to inquire into and report upon the likely consequences of a nuclear power programme. The New Zealand Electricity Department would have prime responsibilty for implementing the construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants should the need be established and should this be acceptable to the Government. In this submission the Department has attempted to present the issues raised by the introduction of nuclear power in relatively simple terms on the assumption that elaboration can be provided later if necessary

  9. BRUSLIB and NETGEN: the Brussels nuclear reaction rate library and nuclear network generator for astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Aikawa, M.; Arnould, M.; Goriely, S.; Jorissen, A.; Takahashi, K.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear reaction rates are quantities of fundamental importance in astrophysics. Substantial efforts have been devoted in the last decades to measure or calculate them. The present paper presents for the first time a detailed description of the Brussels nuclear reaction rate library BRUSLIB and of the nuclear network generator NETGEN so as to make these nuclear data packages easily accessible to astrophysicists for a large variety of applications. BRUSLIB is made of two parts. The first one c...

  10. Resource Needs for Nuclear Power Generation in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J. B. Nyarko

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear power is a proven technology that has served humanity for the past fifty years. It has provided electricity for several countries and shall continue to serve as a viable base load source of electric power. The need for skilled human resources for nuclear practice cannot be overlooked in the quest of any nation to adopt the technology. The Ghana Atomic Energy Commission and the University of Ghana in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency have thus started a Graduate School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences to provide the human resources needed for nuclear power generation in Ghana. The School currently offers second degree courses as well as doctor of philosophy courses. Financial, land and water resource needs for nuclear power generation have been discussed. Availability of the national grid due to the deregulation of the electric power sector has also been discussed. Nuclear Fuel availability has been discussed along with the steps Ghana has to go through to obtain the technology to her development. The legal and legislative framework for nuclear power generation has also been presented. The programs currently available from the IAEA to assist Ghana to develop nuclear power have also been discussed. Conclusions have been drawn based on the discussions made.

  11. Nuclear power generation in the competitive European market regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The framework conditions for economically optimised use of nuclear energy for power generation in Germany are less favourable compared to other European countries, as the nuclear power industry had and still has to tackle some additional problems due to German energy policy, as for instance additional expense for the expensive projects for site development for ultimate disposal of radwastes, orders for shutdown of nuclear power plants (Muelheim-Kaerlich), and the loss of investments that run into billions of Deutschmark. Today, the competitiveness of nuclear power in the German energy mix more than before is an item of political debate and can only be achieved if backed by the political will. The situation calls for efforts by all parties involved to establish consensus about the future role of nuclear energy for power generation. (orig./CB)

  12. Reaching the next generation of nuclear engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of California, Berkeley (UCB) American Nuclear Society (ANS) Student Section hosted two outreach events for young students between the ages of seven and twelve. The students were part of a private after-school club called Adventures Through Open Minds ScienceTM club for kids (A.T.O.M.S. club for kids) heated by Leslie Buchalter. Buchalter is an expert in early education and teaches children fundamental scientific concepts by using 'kid language' and associating usually difficult ideas with something even the very young children can understand. The greatest challenge for us UCB student organizers was to follow this manner of teaching and to construct activities that would always keep the attention of the children. We put together an array of fundamental concept demonstrations based on this philosophy. For example, the concept of half-life was taught by repeatedly tossing M and M's onto a surface and removing the upside down M and M's, and the concept of a nuclear chain reaction was introduced using a mousetrap-and-ping-pong-ball contraption. The main lessons learned were that the children most successfully absorbed ideas by engaging the students activity in the concept demonstrations, by using concepts and vocabulary already familiar to them which encouraged them to answer questions about familiar topics, and by creating a playful game out of every learning opportunity. (author)

  13. Fuel composition generation techniques of nuclear fuel cycle simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel cycle simulators track the flow of materials through the facilities that comprise a nuclear energy system. The composition of these materials, which simulators specify at the elemental or isotopic level, is driven by the neutronic characteristics of the reactors in the system. Therefore, all simulators include a method for generating input and output compositions for the reactor fuel they track, widely known as recipes. This paper surveys the recipe generation approaches taken by five simulators, which range from pre-computed reactor physics modeling to on-the-fly calculations. It concludes with an illustrative example of the canonical parametric recipe generation problem simulators are called upon to solve. (author)

  14. Nuclear data evaluation and group constant generation for reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear or shielding design analysis for reactors including nuclear facilities, nuclear data are one of the primary importances. Research project for nuclear data evaluation and their effective applications has been continuously performed. The objectives of this project are (1) to compile the latest evaluated nuclear data files, (2) to establish their processing code systems, and (3) to evaluate the multigroup constant library using the newly compiled data files and the code systems. As the results of this project, JEF-2.2 which is latest version of Joint Evaluated File developed at OECD/NEA was compiled and COMPLOT and EVALPLOT utility codes were installed in personal computer, which are able to draw ENDF/B-formatted nuclear data for comparison and check. Computer system (NJOY/ACER) for generating continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP library was established and the system was validated by analyzing a number of experimental data. (Author)

  15. Perspectives of conventional and nuclear steam generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the years to come, steam generation will be influenced by the following trends: 1) substitution of coal for petroleum, 2) a steady rise in energy costs, 3) environmental protection. The German boiler industry should try to maintain and further develop its high standard in order to be competitive on the world market in spite of high wages. Exports are absolutely necessary in view of the strongly fluctuating demand in Germany. (orig.)

  16. An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy J. Leahy

    2010-06-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated “toolkit” consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

  17. Nuclear power generation and co-existence with local area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to originally strong anxiety and unreliability on nuclear power generation, frequent accidents and troubles in the old Nuclear Reactor and Fuels Development Incorporation (the new Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Incorporation), a fact that numbers of opposition group was over a half at citizen's vote conducted first in Japan and at Maki-machi in Niigata prefecture in August, 1996 on location of a nuclear power generation of the Tohoku Electric Co., Ltd., and so forth, affects some ripple effects to make difficult to form consensus on new location of a nuclear power generation. On making consensus of such location, every electric companies practise good communication with location areas, communication and other organizations, and so forth, promote positive information supplies and conversation type understanding works, and effort to acquire reliability for people of the location areas. Together with such efforts, they accumulate steadily safe operation results of the present nuclear power plants and develop nuclear PA (public acceptance) actions, local area promotion supporting countermeasures, and so forth. Here was introduced on a part of actions aiming at assistance to and co-existence with local areas promoted by every electric companies on various forms. (G.K.)

  18. Liberation of electric power and nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, as the Rule on Electric Business was revised after an interval of 35 years in 1995, and a competitive bid on new electric source was adopted after 1996 fiscal year, investigation on further competition introduction to electric power market was begun by establishment of the Basic Group of the Electric Business Council in 1997. By a report proposed on January, 1999 by the Group, the Rule was revised again on March, 1999 to start a partial liberation or retail of the electric power from March, 2000. From a viewpoint of energy security and for solution of global environmental problem in Japan it has been decided to positively promote nuclear power in future. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate how the competition introduction affects to development of nuclear power generation and what is a market liberation model capable of harmonizing with the development on liberation of electric power market. Here was elucidated on effect of the introduction on previous and future nuclear power generation, after introducing new aspects of nuclear power problems and investigating characteristic points and investment risks specific to the nuclear power generation. And, by investigating some possibilities to development of nuclear power generation under liberation models of each market, an implication was shown on how to be future liberation on electric power market in Japan. (G.K.)

  19. Nuclear material accounting: The next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse Hanford company (Westinghouse Hanford) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have undertaken a joint effort to develop a new generation material accounting system. The system will incorporate the latest advances in microcomputer hardware, software, and network technology. This system, the Local Area Network Material Accounting System (LANMAS), offers greater performance and functionality at a reduced overall cost. It also offers the possibility of establishing a standard among DOE and NRC facilities for material accounting. This report provides a discussion of this system

  20. Compressed beam directed particle nuclear energy generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to the generation of energy from the fusion of atomic nuclei which are caused to travel towards each other along collision courses, orbiting in common paths having common axes and equal radii. High velocity fusible ion beams are directed along head-on circumferential collision paths in an annular zone wherein beam compression by electrostatic focusing greatly enhances head-on fusion-producing collisions. In one embodiment, a steady radial electric field is imposed on the beams to compress the beams and reduce the radius of the spiral paths for enhancing the particle density. Beam compression is achieved through electrostatic focusing to establish and maintain two opposing beams in a reaction zone

  1. ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS FOR NEXT-GENERATION NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.

    2010-09-29

    Rising global energy demands coupled with increased environmental concerns point to one solution; they must reduce their dependence on fossil fuels that emit greenhouse gases. As the global community faces the challenge of maintaining sovereign nation security, reducing greenhouse gases, and addressing climate change nuclear power will play a significant and likely growing role. In the US, nuclear energy already provides approximately one-fifth of the electricity used to power factories, offices, homes, and schools with 104 operating nuclear power plants, located at 65 sites in 31 states. Additionally, 19 utilities have applied to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for construction and operating licenses for 26 new reactors at 17 sites. This planned growth of nuclear power is occurring worldwide and has been termed the 'nuclear renaissance.' As major industrial nations craft their energy future, there are several important factors that must be considered about nuclear energy: (1) it has been proven over the last 40 years to be safe, reliable and affordable (good for Economic Security); (2) its technology and fuel can be domestically produced or obtained from allied nations (good for Energy Security); and (3) it is nearly free of greenhouse gas emissions (good for Environmental Security). Already an important part of worldwide energy security via electricity generation, nuclear energy can also potentially play an important role in industrial processes and supporting the nation's transportation sector. Coal-to-liquid processes, the generation of hydrogen and supporting the growing potential for a greatly increased electric transportation system (i.e. cars and trains) mean that nuclear energy could see dramatic growth in the near future as we seek to meet our growing demand for energy in cleaner, more secure ways. In order to address some of the prominent issues associated with nuclear power generation (i.e., high capital costs, waste management

  2. NNSA Program Develops the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Experts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brim, Cornelia P.; Disney, Maren V.

    2015-09-02

    NNSA is fostering the next generation of nuclear security experts is through its successful NNSA Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP). NGFP offers its Fellows an exceptional career development opportunity through hands-on experience supporting NNSA mission areas across policy and technology disciplines. The one-year assignments give tomorrow’s leaders in global nuclear security and nonproliferation unparalleled exposure through assignments to Program Offices across NNSA.

  3. Strain measurements of nuclear power plant steam generator antiseismic supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power plants steam generators have different types of structural supports. One of these types are the antiseismic supports, which are intended to be under stress only if a seismic event takes place. Nevertheless, the antiseismic supports lugs, that are welded to the steam generator vessel, are subjected to thermal fatigue because of the temperature cycles related with the shut down and start up operations performed during the life of the nuclear power plant. In order to evaluate the stresses that the lugs are subjected to, several strain gages were welded on two supports lugs, positioned at two heights of one of the Embalse nuclear power plant steam generators. In this paper, the instrumentation used and the strain measurements obtained during two start up operations are presented. The influence of the plant start up operation parameters on the lugs strain evolution is also analyzed. (author)

  4. Comparison of nuclear reactor types of the next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a comparison for a selected relevant set of parameters for different commercial nuclear reactor types at the next generation. This parameters overview could serve as the base for the semi-quantitative decision bases for the selection of the future nuclear strategy. The number of advanced reactor designs of the LWR, HWR, GCR and LMR type are presented. Even currently many of them are still on the drawing boards, the concepts and designs should be assessed in the sense of sensible approach for planning the possible future nuclear strategy. (author)

  5. Nuclear undergraduate programs at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently Canada has 18 operational CANDU (CANada-Deuterium-Uranium) nuclear power plants, comprising of two units each at Pickering A and Bruce A, and four units at each of the Pickering B Bruce B and Darlington sites- Two of the Bruce A units are under refurbishment and the two remaining Pickering A units are in voluntary lay-up. The generating capacity and in-service dates of these units are given in reference. The first of these units, at Pickering, came into service in 1971, and have already undergone major refurbishment that is designed to extend the operating life of these units to 50 years. The commitment to refurbish the Bruce A units will have these reactors operational well into the 2030s, at a projected cost of 4.25 billion Canadian dollars. The Government of Ontario has recently announced its intent to have the present share of electricity generation from nuclear plants (∼51%) maintained, implying the need to refurbish all the currently operating units in Ontario, as well as to construct new nuclear units. The two CANDU power plants operating outside Ontario are also expected to have their operating lives extended. Estimates for all these projects range from 20 to 40 billion Canadian dollars. The large projected increases in expenditures in Canada's nuclear industry comes at a time when most of the people involved in the design and operation of the currently operating units are reaching retirement age, or have already retired. Ontario Power Generation, which operates the Pickering and Darlington nuclear electric generating stations, has been hiring in the order of 100 engineers per year and plans to continue at that space for several more years. Recognizing this demand, the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), which is located within 25 kilometres of the Pickering and Darlington plants, initiated undergraduate honours degree programs in nuclear engineering and science. (author)

  6. Future of nuclear energy for electricity generation in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiorino, Jose R.; Moreira, Joao M.L.; Carajlescov, Pedro, E-mail: joserubens.maiorino@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: joao.moreira@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: pedro.carajlescov@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (CECS/UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Aplicadas

    2015-07-01

    We discuss in this paper the medium- and long- terms evolution of nuclear power in Brazil considering official governmental studies and reports prepared by research groups. The documents reviewed include the national energy balance (BEN, 2014), the short-term planning (PDEE, 2023) and long-term planning (PNE-2030) documents emitted by EPE, and studies conducted by independent institutions and researchers. The studies consider different scenarios regarding gross national product growth and institutional development for the country and conclude that nuclear power should increase its role in Brazil. The generation matrix should diversity by 2030 and 2040 with hydropower decreasing its share from today's 70 % to values between 47 and 57 %. Nuclear power is considered a viable alternative for base load electricity generation in Brazil; to reduce generation risks during dry seasons, and to facilitate the operation of the whole power generation system. The share of nuclear power may reach values between 8 % and 15 % by 2040 according to different scenarios. To meet such growth and facilitate new investments, it is necessary to change the legal framework of the sector, and allow private ownership of enterprises to build and operate nuclear power plants in the country. (author)

  7. Future of nuclear energy for electricity generation in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss in this paper the medium- and long- terms evolution of nuclear power in Brazil considering official governmental studies and reports prepared by research groups. The documents reviewed include the national energy balance (BEN, 2014), the short-term planning (PDEE, 2023) and long-term planning (PNE-2030) documents emitted by EPE, and studies conducted by independent institutions and researchers. The studies consider different scenarios regarding gross national product growth and institutional development for the country and conclude that nuclear power should increase its role in Brazil. The generation matrix should diversity by 2030 and 2040 with hydropower decreasing its share from today's 70 % to values between 47 and 57 %. Nuclear power is considered a viable alternative for base load electricity generation in Brazil; to reduce generation risks during dry seasons, and to facilitate the operation of the whole power generation system. The share of nuclear power may reach values between 8 % and 15 % by 2040 according to different scenarios. To meet such growth and facilitate new investments, it is necessary to change the legal framework of the sector, and allow private ownership of enterprises to build and operate nuclear power plants in the country. (author)

  8. Power systems with nuclear-electric generators - Modelling methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a vast analysis on the issue of sustainable nuclear power development with direct conclusions regarding the Nuclear Programme of Romania. The work is targeting specialists and decision making boards. Specific to the nuclear power development is its public implication, the public being most often misinformed by non-professional media. The following problems are debated thoroughly: - safety, nuclear risk, respectively, is treated in chapter 1 and 7 aiming at highlighting the quality of nuclear power and consequently paving the way to public acceptance; - the environment considered both as resource of raw materials and medium essential for life continuation, which should be appropriately protected to ensure healthy and sustainable development of human society; its analysis is also presented in chapter 1 and 7, where the problem of safe management of radioactive waste is addressed too; - investigation methods based on information science of nuclear systems, applied in carrying out the nuclear strategy and planning are widely analyzed in the chapter 2, 3 and 6; - optimizing the processes by following up the structure of investment and operation costs, and, generally, the management of nuclear units is treated in the chapter 5 and 7; - nuclear weapon proliferation as a possible consequence of nuclear power generation is treated as a legal issue. The development of Romanian NPP at Cernavoda, practically, the core of the National Nuclear Programme, is described in chapter 8. Actually, the originality of the present work consists in the selection and adaptation from a multitude of mathematical models applicable to the local and specific conditions of nuclear power plant at Cernavoda. The Romanian economy development and power development oriented towards reduction of fossil fuel consumption and protection of environment, most reliably ensured by the nuclear power, is discussed in the frame of the world trends of the energy production. Various scenarios are

  9. Financial risk assessment for nuclear generation expansion planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the author gives a utility view of the nuclear generation expansion planning and financial risk assessment done by the New Brunswick Electric Power Commission in order to enter the nuclear power generation age, when its first reactor became critical (July 25, 1982). The system development philosophy, as well as the economic, technical, and environmental considerations of New Brunswick Power are mentioned. The risk/benefit optimization and the unit as such are described. The conclusions for future expansion planning are drawn

  10. Fire fighting capability assessment program Bruce B NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a report on the completion of work relating to the assessment of the capability of Bruce B NGS to cope with a large fire incident. This included an evaluation of an exercise scenario that would simulate a large fire incident and of their fire plans and procedures. Finally the execution of fire plans by Bruce B NGS, as demonstrated by their application of human and material resources during a simulated large fire, was observed. The fire fighting equipment and the personal protective clothing and associated equipment that was in use was all of good quality and in good condition. There had also been notable improvement in communications equipment. Similarly, the human resources that had been assigned to fire fighting and rescue crews and that were available were more than adequate. Use of a logical incident command system, and the adoption of proper policy and procedures for radio communications were equally significant improvements. Practice should correct the breakdowns that occurred in these areas during the exercise. As well, there remains a need for the development of policy on fire fighting and rescue operations with more depth and clarity. In summary, the key point to be recognized is the degree of improvement that has been realized since the previous evaluation in 1990. Clearly the Emergency Response Teams organization of Bruce B NGS is evolving into an effective fire fighting force. Providing that the deficiencies identified in this report are addressed satisfactorily, Fire Cross is confident that the organization will have the capability to provide rescue and fire fighting services that will satisfy the need. 2 figs

  11. Environmental health scoping study at Bruce Heavy Water Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are concerns that hydrogen sulfide released from the Heavy Water Plant near Kincardine, Ontario may be the cause of the mortalities and morbidities observed in a nearby flock of sheep. The Philosopher's Wool sheep farm is about four kilometres south-southeast of the Bruce Heavy Water Plant. Ontario Hydro, the owner and operator of the Bruce Heavy Water Plant, claims that hydrogen sulphide emissions from the Bruce Heavy Water Plant are within regulatory limits and well below levels that cause harm. Accordingly, the Atomic Energy Control Board commissioned the Alberta Environmental Centre, Alberta Department of Environmental Protection, to develop a scoping study for this environmental health issue. The first objective was to describe a field investigation model to define clearly the environmental health and operation of the sheep farm. The second objective was to describe possible exposure patterns and develop a holistic environmental pathway model. If appropriate, the third study objective was to describe animal models of the actual situation to elucidate specific aspects of the environmental health concerns. It was not the objective of this report to provide a definitive answer to the present environmental health issue. Ontario Hydro provided data to the Alberta Environmental Centre, as di the sheep farmer, the attending veterinarian, the University of Guelph study team, and the Atomic Energy Control Board. A six-tiered strategy of sequential evaluations of the ovine health problem is based on the multiple-response paradigm. It assumes the observed ovine health results are the result of multiple effector events. Each tier constitutes a separate, but inter-related, study. Sequential evaluation and feedback of each tier allow sound scientific judgements and efficient use of resources. (author). 59 refs., 11 tabs., 22 figs

  12. Reliability of generation at a Hanford Nuclear Energy Center (HNEC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear energy center characteristically would have large amounts of electric generating capacity in a relatively small geographical area. HNEC is a conceptual nuclear energy center containing 20 generating units of 1200 MW capacity each, located at Hanford, Washington. DS is an alternative concept; namely, 20 generating units of similar capacity in six clusters at sites along the Columbia and Willamette rivers in Washington and Oregon. HNEC in year 2005 could provide up to 30% of system capacity; typically utilities limit concentration of thermal plant generation to about 15% of system requirements. For this reason it is appropriate to examine the reliability of generation at a nuclear energy center to determine if it could be less than at dispersed sites because of local conditions and the close proximity of many generating units. In the report, reliability of generation HNEC is assessed by comparing it with that at Dispersed Sites (DS) throughout the Pacific Northwest. Reliability is measured in terms of two sets of risks: risk of forced outage, and risk of user power shortage

  13. Reliability of generation at a Hanford Nuclear Energy Center (HNEC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, R.G.; Dowis, W.J.

    1977-12-01

    A nuclear energy center characteristically would have large amounts of electric generating capacity in a relatively small geographical area. HNEC is a conceptual nuclear energy center containing 20 generating units of 1200 MW capacity each, located at Hanford, Washington. DS is an alternative concept; namely, 20 generating units of similar capacity in six clusters at sites along the Columbia and Willamette rivers in Washington and Oregon. HNEC in year 2005 could provide up to 30% of system capacity; typically utilities limit concentration of thermal plant generation to about 15% of system requirements. For this reason it is appropriate to examine the reliability of generation at a nuclear energy center to determine if it could be less than at dispersed sites because of local conditions and the close proximity of many generating units. In the report, reliability of generation HNEC is assessed by comparing it with that at Dispersed Sites (DS) throughout the Pacific Northwest. Reliability is measured in terms of two sets of risks: risk of forced outage, and risk of user power shortage.

  14. Safety and economics of new generations of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the so-called ENGINE program (ENergy Generation In the Natural Environment) of ECN, safety and economic aspects of nuclear reactor generations have been reviewed. After the Chernobyl accident in 1986 much has been done to enhance the safety of nuclear reactors. One promising development is the so-called passively safe light water reactor, which can be considered as the next generation of light water reactors. It has a rated power of 600 MWe or less, and safety is primarily based on passive systems. In accident conditions there is no need for operator action to keep the core cooled and covered with water for at least 72 hours. Passively safe water reactors need no demonstration stage and could be commercial around 1995. Two nuclear reactors of current design (1st generation, APWR and ABWR) and 3 pas-sively safe reactors (2nd generation, AP600, SBWR and SIR) are reviewed. Besides the 2nd generation reactors, other reactor types come into con-sideration, which are characterized by the most consequent utilisation of passive safety. A core melt accident with such a reactor is either highly unlikely or virtually impossible. Because of their advanced design demonstration is inevitable. Two reactor types of this 3rd generation are reviewed. Commercial introduction is expected after 2005. The economics of nuclear reactors are compared to those of ad-vanced coal fired power plants for the period 2000-2045. The Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant is used as a reference, and economically acceptable nuclear investment costs are calculated, based on annualised costs and a 30 year economic life. These economi-cally acceptable investment costs are compared to published investment costs of current reactors. (author). 113 refs.; 7 figs.; 22 tabs

  15. Regional projections of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 1995. A complete data set is supplied which specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results. When the comparison is based on reference cost parameters, nuclear- and coal-fired generation costs are found to be very close in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is favored in the South Atlantic region where coal must be transported over long distances, while coal-fired generation is favored in the Central and North Central regions where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. The reference data set reflects recent electric utility construction experience. Significantly lower nuclear capital investment costs would result if regulatory reform and improved construction practices were instituted. The electric power generation costs for base load oil- and natural gas-fired plants were also estimated. These plants were found to be noncompetitive in all regions for those scenarios most likely to develop. Generation cost sensitivity to changes in various parameters was examined at a reference location. The sensitivity parameters included capital investment costs, lead times, capacity factors, costs of money, and coal and uranium prices. In addition to the levelized lifetime costs, year-by-year cash flows and revenue requirements are presented. The report concludes with an analysis of the economic merits of recycling spent fuel in light-water reactors

  16. Deaerator transient at Bruce NGS 'B' Unit 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On April 25, 1987 during a planned 800 MW(e) load rejection test on Unit 8, a violent transient occurred in the deaerator/deaerator storage tank which caused the 500 ton vessel-piping network to tear away from its supports and move approximately three inches in an axial direction. Considerable effort was brought to bear and within one week the unit was returned to service. This paper describes the physical nature of the event and the role of the Bruce NGS 'B' training simulator in developing and testing control modifications to prevent its recurrence. (author). 4 refs., 6 figs

  17. Bruce 'A' Unit 4 fuel channel feeder coupling leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU reactor fuel channels are connected to the primary heat transport system by mechanical joints known as feeder couplings. In 1991, three feeder coupling leakages were discovered in Bruce 4. These leakages required the unit to be shut down for repair. An investigation showed that the leakage was caused by a small 'separation' at the couplings. The assessment was that this was unlikely to be a generic issue, because the later reactors have stronger capscrews. At the time of the conference, further improvements were being considered for the seal ring and capscrew materials, and more accurate capscrew preload measurements. 3 tabs., 10 figs

  18. 75 FR 10836 - Firstenergy Nuclear Operating Company, Firstenergy Nuclear Generation Corp., Ohio Edison Company...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... environment 75 FR 6736; dated February 10, 2010. This exemption is effective upon issuance. Dated at Rockville... COMMISSION Firstenergy Nuclear Operating Company, Firstenergy Nuclear Generation Corp., Ohio Edison Company, the Toledo Edison Company, Beaver Valley Power Station, Unit Nos. 1 And 2; Exemption 1.0...

  19. Nuclear power generation costs in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing world energy prices and shortages of fuel resources make the utilization of nuclear power extremely important. The United States nuclear power industry represents the largest body of nuclear power experience in the world. Analysis of the recent United States experience of substantial increases in the cost of nuclear power generation provides good insight into the interdependence of technological, financial, and institutional influences and their combined impact on the economic viability of nuclear power generation. The various factors influencing ultimate generation costs, including construction cost, fuel cost, regulatory reviews, and siting considerations are discussed, and their relative impacts are explored, including discussion of design complexity and related regulatory response. A closer look into the recent relatively high escalation of nuclear plant construction costs shows how differing economic conditions can affect the relative cost effectiveness of various methods of power generation. The vulnerability of capital-intensive, long-lead-time projects to changes in economic conditions and uncertainty in future power demands is discussed. Likewise, the pitfalls of new designs and increased sophistication are contrasted to the advantages which result from proven designs, reliable engineering, and shorter lead times. The value of reliable architect-engineers experienced in the design and construction of the plant is discussed. A discussion is presented of additional regulatory requirements stemming from public safety aspects of nuclear power. These include recognition of requirements for the very large effort for quality assurance of materials and workmanship during plant construction and operation. Likewise, a discussion is included of the demanding nature of operations, maintenance, and modification of plants during the operational phase because of the need for highly qualified operations and maintenance personnel and strict quality assurance

  20. Heartists : Om konstnärsparet Carolina Benedicks Bruce och William Blair Bruce med inriktning på könsroller, klass och identitet.

    OpenAIRE

    Pietikäinen, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    This essay accounts for the lives of atist couple Carolina Benedicks Bruce (1856-1935) and William Blair Bruce (1859-1906). The perspective emerges from both Griselda Pollock’s theories on female artists as from Yvonne Hirdman’s gender contract. The essay is made out in the form of a biography, with focus on aspects of gender roles, class and identity. The material consists of letters written by the couple and their families, as well as Carolina’s diaries.    Carolina Benedicks Bruce was born...

  1. Regional comparison of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear's main disadvantages are its high capital investment cost and uncertainty in schedule compared with alternatives. Nuclear plant costs continue to rise whereas coal plant investment costs are staying relative steady. Based on average experience, nuclear capital investment costs are nearly double those of coal-fired generation plants. The capital investment cost disadvantage of nuclear is balanced by its fuel cost advantages. New base load nuclear power plants were projected to be competitive with coal-fired plants in most regions of the country. Nuclear power costs wre projected to be significantly less (10% or more) than coal-fired power costs in the South Atlantic region. Coal-fired plants were projected to have a significant economic advantage over nuclear plants in the Central and North Central regions. In the remaining seven regions, the levelized cost of power from either option was projected to be within 10%. Uncertainties in future costs of materials, services, and financing affect the relative economics of the nuclear and coal options significantly. 10 figures

  2. Siemens' steam turbine generator packages for advanced nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the current economic crisis and the increasing share of renewable energy, the long term perspective predicts an increasing global demand for nuclear power generation applications. [1] In response to the growing demand for new nuclear power plants (NPPs), Siemens is implementing and further developing a modular platform of half speed steam turbines and generators covering the most relevant power range from 1000 - 1900 MWe. The paper presents details of the Siemens' Steam Turbine Generator Packages (turboset - Fig. 1) consisting of: Modular Steam Turbine Platform: SST-9000 series 4 pole turbo generator fleet SGEN5-4000W The design of the turbosets for NPPs is based on excellent operational experience with Siemens KONVOI saturated steam turbosets together with service and retrofit experience as well as on experience gained during the project execution of the world largest turboset in Olkiluoto 3. (orig.)

  3. Nuclear energy in the world electric power generation 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vol. 12/82 of the monthly bulletin 'Electricity' which is published by the Statistics Authority of the European Community (eurostat) the statistical data on the electric power supply in the world and the generation by nuclear power plants (with their share in the total electric power generation) in 1981 were published. According to this, the year of 1981 was marked by a slow-down of the increase in the electric power supply. With a total worldwide generation of 7970 TWh, the increase in comparison to 1980 was only +2.2%. This marks the high increase rates of electric power generation out of nuclear energy even more important. (orig./UA)

  4. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David L. Chichester; Edward H. Seabury

    2008-08-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  5. Next generation nuclear arms control staff development initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The current demographics for staff with nuclear expertise within the United States National Laboratory complex are dominated by a well experienced, but departing late-career workforce, a cadre of mid-career staff that are relatively few in number, and entry-level staff that are well educated but inexperienced, particularly in nuclear arms control and international nuclear safeguards affairs. Although there are a few significant United States Department of Energy (DOE) Programs that have been established to deal with this issue across the Laboratory complex (Next Generation Safeguards Initiative and Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program, as two examples), it remains the responsibility of the individual laboratories to provide internal education, training and development activities to move the next generation of nuclear arms control practitioners to higher levels of competency and responsibility. This presentation describes an internal Next Generation Nuclear Arms Control Staff Development Initiative for early- to mid-career technical and policy experts from a broad range of disciplines at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Elements of this internally funded PNNL initiative include, inter alia, student selection criteria, course focus and objectives, core curriculum topics, the distinguished guest speakers series, practical applications of new knowledge and other student responsibilities for action and engagement, training for technical publication, funding issues, and successes and achievements from the very first class of 2012. (author)

  6. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichester, D. L.; Seabury, E. H.

    2009-03-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  7. Nuclear power plant with new-generation WWER-1000 units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Czechoslovak nuclear industry is faced with a serious problem posed by the growing capital demands of nuclear power plants. Comparison with a number of foreign nuclear power plants revealed that the basic units of the Czechoslovak nuclear programme, WWER-1000 plants of the Zaporozhe type, have reserves in their technical design that can be utilized to reduce the capital and operating costs. This is the object of design work on a new-generation WWER-1000 type unit. The goals of the project, its organization and the extent of participation of the Czechoslovak party are described. The main target parameters of the new-generation unit (NGU) per gross output of a 1000 MWe unit, as compared with the Temelin nuclear power plant units, are as follows: concrete consumption (m3/MW) NGU/Temelin: 200/406; physical lifetime of the nuclear power plant (years): 50/30; possibility of power control: daily/weekend; area permanently occupied by the facility including cooling towers (m2/MW): 220/358; area temporarily occupied (m2/MW): 136/385; specific capital costs (CSK/MWh) 180/226. (Z.S.)

  8. Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R and D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis)

  9. Aiming at the rebirth of the nuclear generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear industries of today have a variety of branches and each industry functions independently, and young professionals need opportunities for communicating among themselves across the different fields of industries, utilities and institutes. We, young professionals, are in the motion of organizing the 'Young Generation Network (YGN) of Japan'. (authors)

  10. New Generation Nuclear Plant -- High Level Functions and Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Ryskamp; E. J. Gorski; E. A. Harvego; S. T. Khericha; G. A. Beitel

    2003-09-01

    This functions and requirements (F&R) document was prepared for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The highest-level functions and requirements for the NGNP preconceptual design are identified in this document, which establishes performance definitions for what the NGNP will achieve. NGNP designs will be developed based on these requirements by commercial vendor(s).

  11. The Environmental Impact of Electrical Generation: Nuclear vs. Conventional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, John J., Ed.

    This minicourse, partially supported by the Division of Nuclear Education and Training of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, is an effort to describe the benefit-to-risk ratio of various methods of generating electrical power. It attempts to present an unbiased, straightforward, and objective view of the advantages and disadvantages of nuclear…

  12. Multiple nuclear ortholog next generation sequencing phylogeny of Daucus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Next generation sequencing is helping to solve the data insufficiency problem hindering well-resolved dominant gene phylogenies. We used Roche 454 technology to obtain DNA sequences from 93 nuclear orthologs, dispersed throughout all linkage groups of Daucus. Of these 93 orthologs, ten were designed...

  13. LVRF fuel bundle manufacture for Bruce - project update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to the Power Uprate program at Bruce Power, Zircatec has committed to introduce, by Spring 2006 a new manufacturing line for the production of 43 element Bruce LVRF bundles containing Slightly Enriched Uranium (SEU) with a centre pin of blended dysprosia/urania (BDU). This is a new fuel design and is the first change in fuel design since the introduction of the current 37 element fuel over 20 years ago. Introduction of this new line has involved the introduction of significant changes to an environment that is not used to rapid changes with significant impact. At ZPI we have been able to build on our innovative capabilities in new fuel manufacturing, the strength and experience of our core team, and on our prevailing management philosophy of 'support the doer'. The presentation will discuss some of the novel aspects of this fuel introduction and the mix of innovative and classical project management methods that are being used to ensure that project deliverables are being met. Supporting presentations will highlight some of the issues in more detail. (author)

  14. Converting of Matter to Nuclear Energy by AB-Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Researcher offered a new nuclear generator which allowed to convert any matter to nuclear energy in accordance with Einstein equation E = mc2. The method was based upon tapping the energy potential of a Micro Black Hole (MBH and Hawking radiation created by this MBH. Researcher did not meet the idea and its research in literature to develop the method for getting a cheap energy. Approach: As is well-known, vacuum continuously produced virtual pairs of particles and antiparticles, in particular, photons and anti-photons. MBH event horizon allowed separating them. Anti-photons can be moved to MBH and be annihilated, decreasing mass of MBH, resulting photons leave the MBH neighborhood as Hawking radiation. The offered nuclear generator (named by Researcher as AB-generator utilized Hawking radiation and injected the matter into MBH and kept MBH in a stable state with near-constant mass. Results: AB-generator can be produced gigantic energy outputs and should be cheaper than a conventional electric station by a factor of hundreds of times. One also may be used in aerospace as a photon rocket or as a power source for many vehicles. Conclusion: Many scientists expect Large Hadron Collider at CERN may be produced one MBH every second. A technology to capture them may be developed; than they may be used for the AB-generator.

  15. BRUSLIB and NETGEN: the Brussels nuclear reaction rate library and nuclear network generator for astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Aikawa, M; Goriely, S; Jorissen, A; Takahashi, K

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear reaction rates are quantities of fundamental importance in astrophysics. Substantial efforts have been devoted in the last decades to measure or calculate them. The present paper presents for the first time a detailed description of the Brussels nuclear reaction rate library BRUSLIB and of the nuclear network generator NETGEN so as to make these nuclear data packages easily accessible to astrophysicists for a large variety of applications. BRUSLIB is made of two parts. The first one contains the 1999 NACRE compilation based on experimental data for 86 reactions with (mainly) stable targets up to Si. The second part of BRUSLIB concerns nuclear reaction rate predictions calculated within a statistical Hauser-Feshbach approximation, which limits the reliability of the rates to reactions producing compound nuclei with a high enough level density. These calculations make use of global and coherent microscopic nuclear models for the quantities entering the rate calculations. The use of such models is utterl...

  16. Energy situation and role of nuclear power generation in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increase of electric power demand in Italy slowed down during the last several years, but the maximum load continued to increase steadily. The electrical power consumption in Italy is 2375 kwh per person in 1974, which is much less than that in Germany, England and other countries in Europe. The energy resources in Italy consists of hydraulic power generation which has the capability about 11 x 103 MWe in operation in 1975, thermal power generation including both steam power and gas turbine with about 19 x 103 MWe and 0.4 MWe, respectively, and the geothermal power generation that is a special resource in Italy with the capacity of about 1/3 in the world. Research has not been carried out in the field of tidal power generation, but solar energy is developed in Italy. ENEL has exerted its best effort to scale up the thermal power generation since 1960s with the standardization of plant capacity into 160 MWe, 320 MWe and 660 MWe. The multiformity of fuel is considered in these thermal power generating plants recently, and coal is also looked for again. As for the nuclear power generation, about 600 MWe is now in operation. It is considered about the nuclear power generation that safety and financial problems exist which are connected to the public sense of unease with no ground, the solution of social economy problem around the sites, the necessity of much funds, and the licensing problem. Much effort is concentrated in the standardization of the plants, considering safety improvement and technical development. The lead time in the construction of a nuclear power plant is very long, and it is necessary to establish the siting law, promote the technical development and secure the public acceptance. (Nakai, Y.)

  17. Status of development of robots for nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of checkup, inspection, maintenance and repair in nuclear power plants, remotely operated automatic devices, that is, the robots for nuclear power generation, have been adopted from the past as one of the measures to improve the reliability of equipment, to shorten the period of regular inspection and to reduce the radiation exposure dose of workers. As the proportion of nuclear power generation in electric power supply has increased, the reduction of the period and man-hour of the repair works in radioactive environment and the qualitative improvement of works have become important problems. So far, several tens of the remotely operated automatic devices for repair works have been developed and applied to PWR plants. As the range of robotization expands, the inside of existing power stations becomes overcrowded with such special devices and their control boards, therefore, it is desirable to advance the mechanization toward high performance, versatility and autonomous systems. The remotely operated automatic devices for the repair of steam generators, nuclear reactors and fuel, the automatic ultrasonic flaw detectors for pipings, the storage systems for radioactive solid wastes, unmanned forklift trucks, the submerged robots for cleaning water intake and discharge channels and so on are described. (Kako, I.)

  18. CO{sub 2} emissions of nuclear electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissel, Steffen; Mayer-Spohn, Oliver; Fahl, Ulrich; Blesl, Markus; Voss, Alfred [Institute of Energy Economics and the Rational Use of Energy, University of Stuttgart Hessbruehlstrasse 49a, 70565 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    A survey of LCA studies on nuclear electricity generation revealed life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions ranging between 3 g/kWhe to 60 g/kWhe and above. Firstly, this paper points out the discrepancies in studies by estimating the CO{sub 2} emissions of nuclear power generation. Secondly, the paper sets out to provide critical review of future developments of the fuel cycle for light water reactors and illustrates the impact of uncertainties on the specific CO{sub 2} emissions of nuclear electricity generation. Each step in the fuel cycle will be considered and with regard to the CO{sub 2} emissions analysed. Thereby different assumptions and uncertainty levels are determined for the nuclear fuel cycle. With the impacts of low uranium ore grades for mining and milling as well as higher burn-up rates future fuel characteristics are considered. Sensitivity analyses are performed for all fuel processing steps, for different technical specifications of light water reactors as well as for further external frame conditions. (authors)

  19. Artificial earthquake generation for nuclear power plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time history method has been one of the analytical tools applied in the seismic resistant design of nuclear power plants. The time histories used are required to be consistent with the specified design Spectra. Since the spectra of recorded strong motion earthquake or conventionally generated artificial time history have local peaks and valleys, iteration procedures must be applied to generate the artificial time history with desired spectra. The paper describes a detailed method for generating a time history which is consistent with a specified design spectra. There are several advantages of this method described herein. First of all, frequency content of the time history is well under control. Secondly, if one wishes to generate the three components of an earthquake at one site, the inherent nature of this method will make the correlations among these three components to simulate closely the actual recorded time histories. Thirdly, a single time history can be generated to match a spectra for different damping values. (auth.)

  20. Online control loop tuning in Pickering Nuclear Generating Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most analog controllers in the Pickering B Nuclear Generating Stations adopted PID control scheme. In replacing the analog controllers with digital controllers, the PID control strategies, including the original tuning parameters were retained. The replacement strategy resulted in minimum effort on control loop tuning. In a few cases, however, it was found during commissioning that control loop tuning was required as a result of poor control loop performance, typically due to slow response and controlled process oscillation. Several factors are accounted for the necessities of control loop re-tuning. Our experience in commissioning the digital controllers showed that online control tuning posted some challenges in nuclear power plant. (author)

  1. Nuclear data evaluation and group constant generation for reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new 69-group nuclear data library for WIMS-KAERI code was generated using the ENDF/B-V, IV, JENDL-2, and ENDL-84 data and NJOY which is nuclear data processing code. Thermal reactor benchmark problems recommended by the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group at BNL were analyzed using this new library and WIMS-KAERI code. Using 14 benchmark problems the calculated average value and standard deviation for effective multiplication factors were 1.00303 and 0.00514, respectvely.(Author)

  2. Generation of bovine transgenics using somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stice Steven L

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability to produce transgenic animals through the introduction of exogenous DNA has existed for many years. However, past methods available to generate transgenic animals, such as pronuclear microinjection or the use of embryonic stem cells, have either been inefficient or not available in all animals, bovine included. More recently somatic cell nuclear transfer has provided a method to create transgenic animals that overcomes many deficiencies present in other methods. This review summarizes the benefits of using somatic cell nuclear transfer to create bovine transgenics as well as the possible opportunities this method creates for the future.

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

    2004-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

  4. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

  5. Controlled energy generation from nuclear fusion. 60th year atw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Georg [Pintsch Bamag AG, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Prospects increase, that with a controlled process of nuclear fusion one day an additional nuclear energy source will be commercially exploitable. In what follows, scientific principles according to the most recent research will be presented. Since approximately 30 years we are aware of the fact, that energy in form of light and heat provided by the sun and other fixed stars since over four billions years resulted from reactions of atomic nuclei. A series of such reactions became known which are considered for 'thermonuclear' processes, for example the carbon cycle by Bethe, where hydrogen is converted into helium. Most of the reflections and experiments dealt until 1938 with the reaction between nuclei of light elements. The possibility of splitting heavy nuclei was not anticipated. Its discovery by Hahn and Strassmann was a complete surprise - so to speak a rash reaction to release energy at the end of the element row. This 'way out' captured the interest of nuclear physicist for more than a decade. Only today, by starting to construct big nuclear power plants - only today, being able to assess the possibilities and limitations of this technology, the idea of energy generation through nuclear fusion steps into the foreground of nuclear research.

  6. Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghel, C. (Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)); Penttilae, S. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland))

    2010-03-15

    A network for material issues for Generation IV nuclear power has been initiated within the Nordic countries. The objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) are to put the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen IV issues, especially focussing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Other issues include reactor physics, dynamics and diagnostics, core and fuel design. The present report summarizes the work performed during the year 2009. The efforts made include identification of organisations involved in Gen IV issues in the Nordic countries, update of the forum website, http://www.studsvik.se/GenerationIV, and investigation of capabilities for research within the area of Gen IV. Within the NOMAGE4 project a seminar on Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems has been organized during 15-16th of October 2009. The aim of the seminar was to provide a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. As an outcome of the NOMAGE4, a few collaboration project proposals have been prepared/planned in 2009. The network was welcomed by the European Commission and was mentioned as an exemplary network with representatives from industries, universities, power companies and research institutes. NOMAGE4 has been invited to participate to the 'European Energy Research Alliance, EERA, workshop for nuclear structural materials' http://www.eera-set.eu/index.php?index=41 as external observers. Future plans include a new Nordic application for continuation of NOMAGE4 network. (author)

  7. Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A network for material issues for Generation IV nuclear power has been initiated within the Nordic countries. The objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) are to put the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen IV issues, especially focussing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Other issues include reactor physics, dynamics and diagnostics, core and fuel design. The present report summarizes the work performed during the year 2009. The efforts made include identification of organisations involved in Gen IV issues in the Nordic countries, update of the forum website, http://www.studsvik.se/GenerationIV, and investigation of capabilities for research within the area of Gen IV. Within the NOMAGE4 project a seminar on Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems has been organized during 15-16th of October 2009. The aim of the seminar was to provide a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. As an outcome of the NOMAGE4, a few collaboration project proposals have been prepared/planned in 2009. The network was welcomed by the European Commission and was mentioned as an exemplary network with representatives from industries, universities, power companies and research institutes. NOMAGE4 has been invited to participate to the 'European Energy Research Alliance, EERA, workshop for nuclear structural materials' http://www.eera-set.eu/index.php?index=41 as external observers. Future plans include a new Nordic application for continuation of NOMAGE4 network. (author)

  8. Economics issues - nuclear power generation in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of the US utility industry is in transition. Political, social, and economic factors are contributing to a rapid shift from a monopoly structure (captive markets, cost-plus prices, negotiated rate of return on capital) to a highly competitive one (choices for customers, prices determined by the market place, earnings based on market price less cost). The rate of change has been accelerating. For example, what just two years ago would have been thought of as highly unlikely -- competition for the individual electric customer -- is now part of the plan in California and other states. In our view, technology is at the root of many of these structural changes with more to come. Yet another round of technological change is afoot, involving even more efficient gas turbines, new methods of utilizing transmission lines, distributed generation, and new opportunities for electricity use and service. It can be argued that the restructuring of the marketplace reflects, in some measure, anticipation for these advances. For the foreseeable future, nuclear energy will continue to play a significant role in the generating grid of North America. However, new nuclear generation will be held to standards of competition that are dictated by market forces, and by advances in competing technologies for base load generation. It is important to understand these forces, and devise a response which ensures that nuclear energy will continue to provide a viable, competitive, and environmentally superior option for generating electricity in the 21st century. The EPRI Nuclear Power program is focused on achieving these goals. (author)

  9. Overview of the Spanish Fuel Cycle: Technical Tours Organized by Spanish young Generation in Nuclear.

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio Oviedo, I.P.; Jimenez Varas, Gonzalo; Ochoa Valero, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Spanish Young Generation in Nuclear (Jóvenes Nucleares, JJNN) is a non-profrt organization that depends on the Spanish Nuclear Society (Sociedad Nuclear Española, SNE).Since one of rts main goals is to spread the knowledge about nuclear power,severa! technical tours to facilities wrth an importan!role in the nuclear fuel cycle have been organized for the purpose ofleaming about the different stages of the Spanish tuel cycle. Spanish Young Generation in Nuclear h...

  10. Requirements for the next generation of nuclear databases and services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of relational database technology and general requirements for the next generation of nuclear databases and services are discussed. These requirements take into account an increased number of co-operating data centres working on diverse hardware and software platforms and users with different data-access capabilities. It is argued that the introduction of programming standards will allow the development of nuclear databases and data retrieval tools in a heterogeneous hardware and software environment. The functionality of this approach was tested with full-scale nuclear databases installed on different platforms having different operating and database management systems. User access through local network, internet, or CD-ROM has been investigated. (author)

  11. The generation IV nuclear reactor systems - Energy of future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten nations joined within the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), agreeing on a framework for international cooperation in research. Their goal is to develop future-generation nuclear energy systems that can be licensed, constructed, and operated in an economically competitive way while addressing the issues of safety, proliferation, and other public perception concerns. The objective is for the Gen IV systems to be available for deployment by 2030. Using more than 100 nuclear experts from its 10 member nations, the GIF has developed a Gen IV Technology Roadmap to guide the research and development of the world's most advanced, efficient and safe nuclear power systems. The Gen IV Technology Roadmap calls for extensive research and development of six different potential future reactor systems. These include water-cooled, gas-cooled, liquid metal-cooled and nonclassical systems. One or more of these reactor systems will provide the best combination of safety, reliability, efficiency and proliferation resistance at a competitive cost. The main goals for the Gen IV Nuclear Energy Systems are: - Provide sustainable energy generation that meets clean air objectives and promotes long-term availability of systems and effective fuel use for worldwide energy production; - Minimize and manage their nuclear waste and noticeably reduce the long-term stewardship burden in the future, improving the protection of public health and the environment; - Increase the assurance that these reactors are very unattractive and the least desirable route for diversion or theft of weapons-usable materials, and provide increased protection against acts of terrorism; - Have a clear life-cycle cost advantage over other energy sources; - Have a level of financial risk comparable to other energy projects; - Excel in safety and reliability; - Have a low likelihood and degree of reactor core damage. (authors)

  12. Reducing Risk for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John M. Beck II; Harold J. Heydt; Emmanuel O. Opare; Kyle B. Oswald

    2010-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, managed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is directed by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, to research, develop, design, construct, and operate a prototype forth generation nuclear reactor to meet the needs of the 21st Century. As with all large projects developing and deploying new technologies, the NGNP has numerous risks that need to be identified, tracked, mitigated, and reduced in order for successful project completion. A Risk Management Plan (RMP) was created to outline the process the INL is using to manage the risks and reduction strategies for the NGNP Project. Integral to the RMP is the development and use of a Risk Management System (RMS). The RMS is a tool that supports management and monitoring of the project risks. The RMS does not only contain a risk register, but other functionality that allows decision makers, engineering staff, and technology researchers to review and monitor the risks as the project matures.

  13. Generation of Matxs-formated nuclear data libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the NJOY nuclear data processing system, three multigroup MATXS-formated nuclear data libraries were generated based on the European data files JEF-1 and EFF-1. After processing with TRAMIX, TRANSX, or TRANSX-CTR these libraries can be red into most transport and diffusion codes. For the neutron analysis of gas-cooled or water moderated thermal reactor systems (including high converter PWR's) a 70-group WIMS-BOXER structured library was generated. A general purpose fine group library in 308 groups is provided for thermal as well as for fast reactor systems. A coupled 175 neutron/42 photon-group library in VITAMIN-J structure was created for the analysis of shielding problems and fusion blanket design. A problem found when using CRAY's CFT77 compiler to implement NJOY87 is discussed. The problem of irregular selfshielding factors from UNRESR for some isotopes and (σ0, material temperature)-combinations in the unresolved resonance range is addressed

  14. Diagnostic knowledge generation of nuclear power plants using knowledge compilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses a method to generate diagnostic knowledge of nuclear power plants, from commonly accepted physical knowledge and design information about plant configuration. This method is based on qualitative reasoning, which is advantageous to numerical information processing in the sense that system can explain why and how directly applicable knowledge is correctly generated, and that knowledge base is highly reusable and expandable because it is independent on detailed numerical design specifications. However, reasoning ambiguity has been found as the largest problem in applying the technique to nuclear power plants. The proposed approach mainly consists of a knowledge representation scheme, reasoning algorithm, and qualitative model construction method. (author). 4 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  15. Reducing Risk for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, managed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is directed by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, to research, develop, design, construct, and operate a prototype forth generation nuclear reactor to meet the needs of the 21st Century. As with all large projects developing and deploying new technologies, the NGNP has numerous risks that need to be identified, tracked, mitigated, and reduced in order for successful project completion. A Risk Management Plan (RMP) was created to outline the process the INL is using to manage the risks and reduction strategies for the NGNP Project. Integral to the RMP is the development and use of a Risk Management System (RMS). The RMS is a tool that supports management and monitoring of the project risks. The RMS does not only contain a risk register, but other functionality that allows decision makers, engineering staff, and technology researchers to review and monitor the risks as the project matures.

  16. Review of first line supervisory positions in nuclear power plants - Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides an overview of first line supervisory activities at Ontario Hydro nuclear generating stations (Pickering 'A' and Bruce 'B') and the Point Lepreau nuclear generating station in New Brunswick. Activity profiles describing the range of first line supervisory roles and responsibilities for nuclear operators have been developed from survey data and flowcharting methods. These activity profiles have then been compared with formal job responsibilities as identified in job descriptions, supervisory training provided and assessment criteria used to evaluate supervisors. Finally, this report relates the findings of supervisory practices in the group under study with the findings in the current literature relating to supervisory functioning. (author). 32 tabs., 2 figs

  17. European Nuclear Young Generation. Position Paper on Nuclear Energy and the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world population is continually growing; from 1 billion in 1800 to 7 billion in 2011, we are expected to reach 10 billion by the end of the 21. century. To sustain this population growth, an increased energy supply is required to provide sufficient clean water, health care, education, food, shelter, communication and transportation. Whereas energy access is today guaranteed in OECD countries, around 1.3 billion people still live without sufficient access to energy. Affordable and reliable sources of energy are required to sustain our development. At the same time, it is now acknowledged by the scientific community that human activities are mainly responsible for climate change. Our growing energy-intensive societies are accelerating climate change and its associated consequences: rise of ocean levels, more frequent extreme meteorological phenomena and massive loss of biodiversity; consequences that must be prevented at all costs. We need sustainable, affordable, reliable and safe sources of energy. It is our responsibility to promote low carbon energies and responsible consumer behaviors that will prevent social and environmental disasters for current and future generations. Nuclear, a solution? Nuclear power is regarded by many as being environmentally friendly. Nuclear power plants have nearly no CO2 emission, while the nuclear industry is recognized as one of the safest industries; backed by stringent safety standards, transparency culture and international cooperation based on an evolution of lessons learnt from a variety of operations. Moreover, solutions for decommissioning and waste management exist and are already implemented in most European countries. Nuclear power is affordable and reliable. Nuclear power has one of the lowest production costs within the energy market, this stems from production costs which mainly depend upon the investment costs; fuel and operating costs have little impact on the price of nuclear electricity. Nuclear generation is

  18. Nuclear and conventional baseload electricity generation cost experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experienced costs of electricity generation by nuclear and conventional plants and the expected costs of future plants are important for evaluating the economic attractiveness of various power projects and for planning the expansion of electrical generating systems. The main objective of this report is to shed some light on recent cost experience, based on well authenticated information made available by the IAEA Member States participating in this study. Cost information was provided by Canada (Ontario Hydro), Czechoslovakia, Hungary, India, the Republic of Korea and Spain. Reference is also made to information received from Brazil, China, France, Russia and the United States of America. The part of the report that deals with cost experience is Section 2, where the costs of both nuclear and fossil fired plants are reviewed. Other sections give emphasis to the analysis of the major issues and relevant cost elements influencing the costs of nuclear power plants and to a discussion of cost projections. Many of the conclusions can also be applied to conventional plants, although they are usually less important than in the case of nuclear plants. 1 ref., figs and tabs

  19. A new fuel channel for Bruce NGS 'A'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the design and development of a new Bruce A fuel channel, designed for the Large Scale Fuel Channel Replacement Program. The original fuel channels were not capable of achieving their design life, because the effects of radiation on zirconium alloys were imperfectly understood at the time they were designed. The reason for the redesign is to produce a fuel channel that will survive the remaining life of the station, and to eliminate as many of the channel-related design problems as practical. In addition, a design that is quick and easy to install is wanted, to reduce radiation exposure to personnel and the duration of the outage. To achieve these goals, a dedicated design team comprising both fuel channel designers and installation tooling designers was assembled. 5 figs

  20. Uncertainties in gas dispersion at the Bruce heavy water plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been concerns regarding the uncertainties in atmospheric dispersion of gases released from the Bruce Heavy Water Plant (BHWP). The concern arises due to the toxic nature of H2S, and its combustion product SO2. In this study, factors that contribute to the uncertainties, such as the effect of the shoreline setting, the potentially heavy gas nature of H2S releases, and concentration fluctuations, have been investigated. The basic physics of each of these issues has been described along with fundamental modelling principles. Recommendations have been provided on available computer models that would be suitable for modelling gas dispersion in the vicinity of the BHWP. (author). 96 refs., 4 tabs., 25 figs

  1. Fuel handling solutions to power pulse at Bruce NGS A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to the discovery of the power pulse problem in March of 1993, Bruce A has installed flow straightening shield plugs in the inner zone channels of all units to partially reduce the gap and gain an increase in reactor power to 75%. After review and evaluation of solutions to manage the gap, including creep compensators and long fuel bundles, efforts have focused on a different solution involving reordering the fuel bundles to reverse the burnup profile. This configuration is maintained by fuelling with the flow and providing better support to the highly irradiated downstream fuel bundles by changing the design of the outlet shield plug. Engineering changes to the fuel handling control system and outlet shield plug are planned to be implemented starting in June 1996, thereby eliminating the power pulse problem and restrictions on reactor operating power. (author). 2 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  2. Evolution of nuclear fission reactors: Third generation and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy is attracting new interest around the world as countries look for low-carbon alternatives to fossil fuels to increase the diversity of their sources of energy and improve security of supply. Nuclear fission reactors provided approximately one sixth of the world's electricity needs in recent years. The vast majority of these reactors were built in the seventies and eighties. They are thus considered second generation systems, as they are based on experience gained with the first generation or prototypes built in the fifties and early sixties. Third generation reactors, developed in the nineties, are already a reality and will dominate the market in the coming decades. A significant research effort is underway on systems of the fourth generation. Better economics, improved use of natural resources, less production of radioactive waste, competitive production of hydrogen, and increased resistance to proliferation are within reach with these new systems. A review will be done on the most important features of third and fourth generation systems, together with a brief overview of the R and D challenges to be met.

  3. Generation of bovine transgenics using somatic cell nuclear transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Stice Steven L; Hodges Craig A

    2003-01-01

    Abstract The ability to produce transgenic animals through the introduction of exogenous DNA has existed for many years. However, past methods available to generate transgenic animals, such as pronuclear microinjection or the use of embryonic stem cells, have either been inefficient or not available in all animals, bovine included. More recently somatic cell nuclear transfer has provided a method to create transgenic animals that overcomes many deficiencies present in other methods. This revi...

  4. Generating highly polarized nuclear spins in solution using dynamic nuclear polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolber, J.; Ellner, F.; Fridlund, B.;

    2004-01-01

    A method to generate strongly polarized nuclear spins in solution has been developed, using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) at a temperature of 1.2K, and at a field of 3.354T, corresponding to an electron spin resonance frequency of 94GHz. Trityl radicals are used to directly polarize 13C and...... other low-γ nuclei. Subsequent to the DNP process, the solid sample is dissolved rapidly with a warm solvent to create a solution of molecules with highly polarized nuclear spins. Two main applications are proposed: high-resolution liquid state NMR with enhanced sensitivity, and the use of the...

  5. Bruce Thompson: Adventures and advances in ultrasonic backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margetan, Frank J.

    2012-05-01

    Over the course of his professional career Dr. R. Bruce Thompson published several hundred articles on non-destructive evaluation, the majority dealing with topics in ultrasonics. One longtime research interest of Dr. Thompson, with applications both to microstructure characterization and defect detection, was backscattered grain noise in metals. Over a 20 year period he led a revolving team of staff members and graduate students investigating various aspects of ultrasonic backscatter. As a member of that team I had the privilege of working along side Dr. Thompson for many years, serving as a sort of Dr. Watson to Bruce's Sherlock Holmes. This article discusses Dr. Thompson's general approaches to modeling backscatter, the research topics he chose to explore to systematically elucidate a better understanding of the phenomena, and the many contributions to the field achieved under his leadership. The backscatter work began in earnest around 1990, motivated by a need to improve inspections of aircraft engine components. At that time Dr. Thompson launched two research efforts. The first led to the heuristic Independent Scatterer Model which could be used to estimate the average grain noise level that would be seen in any given ultrasonic inspection. There the contribution from the microstructure was contained in a measureable parameter known as the Figure-of-Merit or FOM. The second research effort, spearheaded by Dr. Jim Rose, led to a formal relationship between FOM and details of the metal microstructure. The combination of the Independent Scattering Model and Rose's formalism provided a powerful tool for investigating backscatter in metals. In this article model developments are briefly reviewed and several illustrative applications are discussed. These include: the determination of grain size and shape from ultrasonic backscatter; grain noise variability in engine-titanium billets and forgings; and the design of ultrasonic inspection systems to improve defect

  6. Nuclear power generation alternative for a clean energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    World Energy Council stated that to raise the efficiency in which energy is provided is a huge challenge for power engineering. Over 60% of primary energy is in effect, wasted. At present 63% of the world's electricity comes from thermal power (coal, oil and gas), 19% from hydro, 17% from nuclear, 0.5% from geothermal and 0.1% from solar, wind and biomass. Nuclear power almost completely avoids all the problems associated within fossil fuels: no greenhouse effect, no acid rain, no air pollution with sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, no oil spills, etc. Its impact on health and environment is related to radiation and is relatively minor. Without pretending a high accuracy of numbers, if the first Romanian nuclear power reactor will be replaced by a coal plant of equivalent capacity, about 5 millions tons of CO2 and large quantities of associated sulfur and nitrous oxides, would be discharged to the atmosphere each year. However, the acceptance of nuclear power is largely an emotional issue. Based on the environmental monitoring program this paper tries to demonstrate that the routine radioactive emissions of Cernavoda NPP, which are limited by competent national authority, constitutes an insignificant risk increase. The concept of sustainable development was elaborated in the late 1980s and defined as a development that fulfil the needs of the present, without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Sustainable development incorporates equity within and across countries as well as across generations, and integrates economic growth, environmental protection and social welfare. To analyze nuclear energy from a sustainable development perspective it is necessary to consider its economic, environmental and social impacts characteristics, both positive and negative. It is obvious that the development of nuclear energy broadens the natural resource base usable for energy production, and increases human and man-made capital. There are also

  7. Basic recognition on safety of nuclear electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety of nuclear electric power generation is not to inflict radiation damage on public. Natural radiation is about 1 mSv every year. As far as the core melting on large scale does not occur, there is not the possibility of exerting serious radiation effect to public. The way of thinking on ensuring the safety is defense in depth. The first protection is the prevention of abnormality, the second protection is the prevention of accidents, and the third protection is the relaxation of effect. As design base accidents, the loss of coolant accident due to the breakdown of inlet pipings of reactors and the breaking of fine tubes in steam generators are included. The suitability of location is evaluated. As the large scale accidents of nuclear power stations in the past, Chernobyl accident and Three Mile Island accident are explained. The features of the countermeasures to the accident in Mihama No. 2 plant are described. The countermeasures to severe accidents, namely accident management and general preventive maintenance are explained. The background of the nonconfidence feeling to nuclear electric power generation and the importance of opening information to public are shown. (K.I.)

  8. Nuclear Energy In Switzerland: It's going ahead. Challenges For The Swiss Nuclear Society Young Generation Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiss energy policy is focused on generating domestic electric power without combusting fossil fuels for already four decades. Roughly 60% of the electricity is generated in hydroelectric plants, which is possible due to the country's favourable topography; the remaining 40% are produced by the country's five nuclear power plants (NPPs). As in any other country nuclear power has its enemies in Switzerland. Due to the direct democracy system in Switzerland the nuclear opposition has a lot of possibilities to disturb the energy policy. Since 1969, when the first Swiss nuclear power plant went online, four plebiscites were held on the issue of civil use of nuclear energy. Four times Swiss citizens voted in favour of further operation of the existing plants also in the latest battle for nuclear energy, which was won in 2003. In 2005 and 2006 several Swiss studies about the future energy situation, especially the electricity situation, have been published. All off them show clearly that there will be a big gab around the year 2020 when the oldest three nuclear power plants will fade out. A public debate was started, how to solve the problem. Beside others, building new nuclear power plants was mentioned and discussed rationally. In 2007 the energy police of the Swiss government changed into a more nuclear friendly position and at the end of the same year some electricity companies lunched a new build program. Hosting the International Youth Nuclear Congress 2008 (IYNC 2008) in Switzerland seems to be just the right moment for the nuclear industry in our country. The slightly changed surroundings effected the organization of Swiss Nuclear Society (SNS) and SNS Young Generation Group (SNSYG) and enlarged the fields of activities for SNSYG. Those activities mentioned in the previous chapters will be developed in the future. The discussion about new builds in Switzerland has started and because of that more nuclear activities in Switzerland will occur. And surely there will

  9. Ontario Hydro's nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1981 Ontario Hydro generated over 100 billion KWh of electrical energy. Approximately one third of this was from nuclear units. There are ten CANDU units (5 250 MW) currently in operation, and another twelve (8 600 MW) are under construction. The presently committed nuclear expansion program is estimated to involve expenditures of 16 billion dollars over the next 10 years. About 10 000 people are employed in the nuclear design and construction program. All projects are generally on schedule, with the stations coming into service during the following time periods: Pickering B, 1983-85; Bruce B, 1984-87; Darlington, 1988-90. The status of each project is reviewed. Planning is underway for some retubing projects, as early as 1985 for Pickering A

  10. Generation of aerosols for filter efficiency testing in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Research Contract No. 1815 was to develop a new method of sodium chloride aerosol generation for filter efficiency testing in nuclear installations. The first phase of the study was devoted to the development of a suitable aerosol generator. The first NaCl aerosol generator enabled determination of the influence various parameters like nozzle diameter, air flow rate, NaCl concentration in solution, solution temperature, etc., on the generation capacity and aerosol characteristics. The drawbacks of this generator were removed by modifying the design. Sodium chloride aerosol concentration was measured by means of a portable sodium flame photometer, and the particle size distribution was determined by a six-stage Andersen cascade impactor. For particle shape analysis electron microscopy was used. By using the aerosols generated the efficiency of air filters was tested. The results showed that the optimum parameters for atomization of 24NaCl solution are: Nozzle diameter 0.5x10-3m; compressed air pressure 196.132kPa; air flow rate 6.1x10-5m3/s. Under these conditions test aerosols of 0.335x10-6m mass median diameter were obtained with a geometrical standard deviation, sigma=2.04. Preliminary high efficiency particulate air filter tests with the above 24NaCl aerosols showed the minimum filter penetration of the order of 5x10-5% with a relative standard deviation not exceeding 15%. This showed that the 24NaCl aerosol generated from liquid phase can be successfully used for filter testing in nuclear installations

  11. V. C. Summer Nuclear Station steam generator replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Virgil C. Summer Steam Generator Replacement Project involved the first-ever replacement of an existing steam generator with a different and later vintage component from the original equipment manufacturer (OEM), in this case Westinghouse Model Delta-75 steam generators to replace Westinghouse Model D-3 steam generators, which had been plaguing South Carolina Electric and Gas Company's (SCE and G) Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Plant since shortly after initial operation in 1982. This project also involved the first use of laser metrology technology for steam generator-to-reactor coolant system severance cutting, machining, and component fitup and the first use of an impregnated sponge blast media for reactor coolant system pipe end decontamination. The sequence of events leading to the decision to replace steam generators and during the replacement process is described. Intensive planning and teamwork, combined with input from SCE and G and the use of mockups to train the work force in a simulated radiological environment, were instrumental in achieving world-record schedule performance and setting a new US record for the lowest accumulated radiation exposure during a steam generator replacement project while completing the project without a single lost workday case incident

  12. International performance indicators and the UK Nuclear Electricity Generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the beginning of the 1990's the UK electricity supply industry has undergone major changes moving from a wholly owned public utility to that of a multi company based activity, resulting in a fiercely competitive marketplace. In such a competitive market, where commercial pressures influence day to day decision making, it has been suggested that safety considerations could, in such an environment, be compromised. Safety is, and always has been, the number one priority and commercial considerations always come second in this respect. In the UK there are currently two companies generating electricity commercially by nuclear means, British Energy and BNFL Magnox Generation. The two companies cooperate and liaise with each other in a number of areas, one such area is in the field of performance indicators. Whilst this paper primarily presents a British Energy perspective, much of the content also applies to BNFL Magnox Generation and the principles described are essentially the same for both companies. The paper describes how internationally comparable performance indicators form part of the UK nuclear electricity generators' performance enhancing measures to monitor and improve safety performance within the context of an increasingly competitive market. The paper focuses primarily on five clearly comparable WANO Performance Indicators and shows how these indicators spearhead a suite of indicators that are used collectively in the companies' drive to improve their respective safety performance and as a consequence operational performance against the world's best performing reactors. (author)

  13. Nuclear Power for Electricity Generation in Ghana: Issues and Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghana's electricity demand has been estimated to be growing at a high rate of about 7% per annum over the last ten years. This is due to the relatively high population growth, economic aspiration of the country and the extension of electricity to rural areas. Electricity supply, on the contrary, has been unable to meet the demand due to high dependency on rain-fed hydropower plants, which started operating in 1965 and currently account for about 68% of the total installed capacity. Within the last 28 years, climatic changes and draughts have caused the nation to experience three major power crises. These climate changes resulted in low inflows and thus reduced power generation from hydropower systems. To complement the hydropower systems, the Government in 1997 installed thermal plants based on light crude oil. However, due to the high crude oil prices on the international market in recent times have made the operation of these plants very expensive. Ghana's crude oil find can boost its energy supply when the oil exploration begins somewhere in 2010. For rural cooking, domestic biomass is employed. Ghana has no domestic coal resources. The Government of Ghana is concerned with: limited further growth potential of domestic hydro; high cost of imported oil and gas and environmental issues associated with use of imported coal. Small Solar and wind generation exist in some sectors, but potential large-scale development is not envisioned for the near future. With these in mind, the President of Ghana set up a Committee involving Stakeholder Institutions to formulate the Nuclear Power Policy and develop the basic elements of Nuclear Infrastructure and to assess the viability of introducing the nuclear power option in Ghana's energy mix. Cabinet took a decision to include the nuclear power for electricity generation after the Committee submitted his report to the President in 2008. (author)

  14. Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from

  15. Rolling test of turbine generator by non-nuclear steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object and procedure of rolling turbine generator test by non-nuclear steam in Qinshan NPP are presented. The steam source of rolling test is compared and chosen. The steam quantity during the rolling test is simply calculated. The limits of parameters of the test and the preparing for rolling of turbine generator are introduced. Procedures of rolling test are divided into three stage of speed: 600 r/min, 1200 r/min, 3000 r/min. Parameters measured as a result of rolling test, such as absolute vibration of axle, metal temperature of bearings, temperature of oil from the exit of bearings and vacuity of condenser etc, show that the design, manufacture, installation and speed control of turbine generator are satisfactory

  16. Installation of an irradiated fuel bundle discharge counter at Bruce NGS-B 3 000 MW(e) CANDU power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design, manufacture and installation of an irradiated fuel bundle discharge counter for the multi-unit CANDU Bruce NGS-B Generating Station involved contributions from the International Atomic Energy Agency (Agency), designers (AECL), contractors, manufacturers, utility and the regulatory agency. The installation at Bruce NGS-B was the first made by the Agency as a retrofit to a multi-unit CANDU reactor approaching its fist critical operation, where the whole project was the responsibility of the Agency and where the original design of the reactor had not had provision for the Agency equipment. The scheduling and integration of the installation into the normal activities involved in starting up a 3 000 MW(e) multi-unit generating station were successfully achieved. The Agency has demonstrated the capability and performance of the fuel discharge counter

  17. Measures to radioactive contamination connected with nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems on the environmental radioactivity due to nuclear power generation must be dealt with not only as the local problems in the regions around nuclear power plants but also as the environmental acitivity problems in global scale. Human security and protection are maintained by the regulation of releasing radioactive materials to the environment from all the facilities, not limited to nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, and the safety control of environmental activity. The fundamental concept of the regulation and control of environmental activity and each system taken in U.K., U.S. and Japan are described first. Next, the present status of releasing radioactivity into the air and water in the world is explained in detail and the minute data are shown for the release into water. The underground and deep ocean disposals of solid wastes are described with calculation formulae obtained so far. Since the information on the aspect of exposure of human body to natural radiation is important for comparison when the influence of artificial activity is evaluated, the survey of the natural radiation and the conditions of activity due to nuclear tests and the peaceful uses of atomic energy are described, respectively. In Japan, the special committee on environmental safety investigated the possibility of materializing the numerical guide to ''as low as practicable'', and submitted the report showing ''target dose'' in light water reactor nuclear power plants to the Atomic Energy Comission of Japan, in which the dose for whole body exposure is proposed as 5 m rem/year and that for thyroid gland exposure due to radioactive iodine as 15 m rem/year. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Nuclear power generation facilities. Environmental fatigue evaluation method for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This JNES-SS report is 'Environmental Fatigue Evaluation Guide for Nuclear Power Generation Facilities' that summarizes the results on environmental fatigue evaluation derived from the final technical results of EFT project, 'Environmental Fatigue Testing of Materials for Nuclear Power Generation Facilities'. This EFT project was advanced by commission to the Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corporation (JAPEIC) from Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) (from April 1994 to September 2003), and subsequently by subsidies to the Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) from MITI (from December 2003 to March 2007). This report is to provide the final proposal of the equation to evaluate the environmental fatigue life that has been reviewed and revised, including the newest data obtained in EFT project. (J.P.N.)

  19. Electrosleeve process for in-situ nuclear steam generator repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degradation of steam generator (SG) tubing by localized corrosion is a widespread problem in the nuclear industry that can lead to costly forced out-ages, unit de-rating, SG replacement or even the permanent shutdown of a reactor. In response to the onset of SG tubing degradation at Ontario Hydro's Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) Unit 5, and the determined unsuitability of conventional repair methods (mechanically expanded or welded sleeves) for Alloy 400, an alternative repair technology was developed. Electrosleeve is a non-intrusive, low-temperature process that involves the electrodeposition of a nanocrystalline nickel microalloy forming a continuously bonded, structural layer over the internal diameter of the degraded region. This technology is designed to provide a long-term pressure boundary repair, fully restoring the structural integrity of the damaged region to its original state. This paper describes the Electrosleeve process for SG tubing repair and the unique properties of the advanced sleeve material. The successful installation of Electrosleeves that have been in service for more than three years in Alloy 400 SG tubing at the Pickering-5 CANDU unit, the more recent extension of the technology to Alloy 600 and its demonstration in a U.S. pressurized water reactor (PWR), is presented. A number of PWR operators have requested plant operating technical specification changes to permit Electrosleeve SG tube repair. Licensing of the Electrosleeve by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is expected imminently. (author)

  20. Electrosleeve process for in-situ nuclear steam generator repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, R.A. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, ON (Canada); Moran, T.E. [Framatome Technologies Inc., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Renaud, E. [Babcock and Wilcox Industries Ltd., Cambridge, ON (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    Degradation of steam generator (SG) tubing by localized corrosion is a widespread problem in the nuclear industry that can lead to costly forced out-ages, unit de-rating, SG replacement or even the permanent shutdown of a reactor. In response to the onset of SG tubing degradation at Ontario Hydro's Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) Unit 5, and the determined unsuitability of conventional repair methods (mechanically expanded or welded sleeves) for Alloy 400, an alternative repair technology was developed. Electrosleeve is a non-intrusive, low-temperature process that involves the electrodeposition of a nanocrystalline nickel microalloy forming a continuously bonded, structural layer over the internal diameter of the degraded region. This technology is designed to provide a long-term pressure boundary repair, fully restoring the structural integrity of the damaged region to its original state. This paper describes the Electrosleeve process for SG tubing repair and the unique properties of the advanced sleeve material. The successful installation of Electrosleeves that have been in service for more than three years in Alloy 400 SG tubing at the Pickering-5 CANDU unit, the more recent extension of the technology to Alloy 600 and its demonstration in a U.S. pressurized water reactor (PWR), is presented. A number of PWR operators have requested plant operating technical specification changes to permit Electrosleeve SG tube repair. Licensing of the Electrosleeve by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is expected imminently. (author)

  1. Fluidized bed nuclear reactor as a IV generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this paper is to analyze the characteristics of the Fluidized Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR) concept under the light of the requirements set for the IV generation nuclear reactors. It is seen that FBNR generally meets the goals of providing sustainable energy generation that meets clean air objectives and promotes long-term availability of systems and effective fuel utilization for worldwide energy production; minimize and manage their nuclear waste and notably reduce the long term stewardship burden in the future, thereby improving protection for the public health and the environment; increase the assurance that it is a very unattractive and least desirable route for diversion or theft of weapons-usable materials; excel in safety and reliability; have a very low likelihood and degree of reactor core damage; eliminate the need for offsite emergency response; have a clear life-cycle cost advantage over other energy sources; have a level of financial risk comparable to other energy projects. The other advantages of the proposed design are being modular, low environmental impact, exclusion of severe accidents, short construction period, flexible adaptation to demand, excellent load following characteristics, and competitive economics. (author)

  2. Carsten Niebuhr and James Bruce: Lifted Latitudes and Virtual Voyages on the Red Sea...?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib

    2013-01-01

    In 1791 Carsten Niebuhr published a review of the first two volumes of Bruce’s Reisen zur Entdeckung der Quellen des Nils (1790). Niebuhr’s strongest criticism of Bruce was that he seemed to have plagiarized some of Niebuhr’s astronomical observations (“adopted them without examination”) and that...... as written by Bruce in 1770 at Gondar, Abyssinia, contains information about latitudes identical with some of Niebuhr’s observations which were unpublished in 1770; possible explanations for this are proposed. In summary, it seems that Niebuhr is right; it is almost certain that Bruce plagiarized...

  3. Evaluating nuclear power as the next baseload generation option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, K.J.; Sanford, M.O. (Tennessee Valley Authority (US))

    1992-01-01

    Numerous factors must be taken into account when planning to meet baseload generating needs of the next century. Examining nuclear power as an option to meet these needs offers significant challenges with respect to evaluating and managing the business risks. This paper describes one mechanism to accomplish this while continuing to participate in industry activities targeted at advancing the nuclear option. One possible model of pursuing high-risk, long-term projects, like nuclear power, is to spread these risks among the project participants and for each organization to commit slowly. With this model of progressive engagement, participants may invest in early information gathering with the objective of uncertainty reduction at preliminary stages in the project, before large investments must be made. For nuclear power, a partnership between a utility (or utility group) and a supplier team may well be the best means of implementing such a model. A partnership also provides opportunity to develop the long-term relationships within the industry which are imperative.

  4. Human Reliability for the Next Generation of Nuclear Experts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, Cameron W [ORNL; Eisele, Gerhard R [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    As the nuclear renaissance progresses and today s nuclear and radiological experts retire, a new generation of experts will ultimately be recruited, trained, and replace the old guard. Selecting individuals who have the attitudes and values appropriate to work in the nuclear industry and who have the best qualifications for the position will be a key to the success of this renaissance. In a world with deep divisions on political and social issues; how a State, agency, or company assures that those hired can be trusted with the access to, and responsibilities for, nuclear and/or radiological materials is an important consideration. Human interactions invariably rely on the offering of assurance and the receipt of trust. A fundamental element in any human relationship is knowing when to trust and when to doubt. When are assurances to be believed or questioned? Human reliability programs (HRP) are used to assure a person s truthfulness and loyalty to the State. An HRP program has a number of elements and may not fit all cultures in the same form. An HRP can vary in scope from simple background checks of readily available data to full field investigations and testing. This presentation discusses possible elements for an HRP from regulation to implementation and the issues related to each element. The effects of an HRP on potential recruits will be discussed.

  5. Introduction to the methods of estimating nuclear power generating costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report prepared by the Agency with the guidance and assistance of a panel of experts from Member States, the names of whom will be found at the end of this report, represents the first step in the methods of cost evaluation. The main objectives of the report are: (1) The preparation of a full list of the cost items likely to be encountered so that the preliminary estimates for a given nuclear power system can be relied upon in deciding on its economic merits. (2) A survey of the methods currently used for the estimation of the generating costs of the power produced by a nuclear station. The survey is intended for a wide audience ranging from engineers to public officials with an interest in the prospects of nuclear power. An attempt has therefore been made to refrain from detailed technical discussions in order to make the presentation easily understandable to readers with only a very general knowledge of the principles of nuclear engineering. 3 figs, tabs

  6. Public perception of nuclear power generation - Myths and reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are 126 units of nuclear reactors under construction or in planning in 25 countries with a combined capacity of 108GW. (Table 2) In Japan 4 units were completed and went into operation in 1993 making the number of operating nuclear reactors 46 supplying 37GW as of the end of 1993, which represents about 30% of the total electricity in Japan, Plans for building additional 9 reactors were announced in 1993. With respect to the future of nuclear power generation, 50% supported its further promotion, 30% expected the status quo maintained and 10% wanted to see it reduced (another 10% for 'don't know'). Here again, 'strong' opinions represented by 'positive support' on one end and strong opposition calling for 'immediate termination of all operating nuclear power plants' on the other accounted for less than 10% and the remaining 90% were comprised by weak supporters, weak critics, and 'don't know'. This 90%, referred to as a mushiness Index, indicates the status of public opinion yet to firm up and characterized predominantly by 'soft' opinions subject to change.

  7. Young Generation in Nuclear Initiative to Promote Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kenyan Young Generation in Nuclear (KYGN) is a recently founded not to profit organization. Its mandate is to educate, inform, promote and transfer knowledge on the peaceful, safe and secure users of nuclear science and technology in Kenya. It brings on board all scientist and students with special interest in nuclear science and related fields. KYGN is an affiliate of International Youth Nuclear Congress (YNC) whose membership with IYNC whose membership is drawn from member state of United Nations. Through our membership with IYNC, KYGN members have been able to participate in different forums. In this paper, we discuss KYGN’s prime roles opportunities as well as the challenges of the organization

  8. Ontario Hydro nuclear generation division information systems at Darlington NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for a more efficient method of managing information in Ontario Hydro's nuclear stations was initially identified in the early 1980's. There followed a Nuclear Generation Division Information System Planning Study in 1982, which identified the major information problems confronting the division and specified the existing and new information systems required to address these. In 1983/84, the requirements for these systems were defined. Detailed specifications were produced in 1985 and during 1986/87 the systems were designed, tested and installed, initially at Darlington NGS. The systems are now in full production at Darlington and are in the process of being installed at Pickering NGS. This paper outlines an overview of these systems, a brief description of the Work Management System, the way in which they are all used, the costs associated with them and the benefits resulting from them

  9. Nuclear power generation in a newly industrialized society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taiwan is considered one of the newly-industrialized countries of the Pacific Basin, having enjoyed rapid economic growth since the end of the 1940's. The power system has grown with the economy, having a capacity of 11,869 MW in 1983. Labour wages have increased, so in order to maintain its economic advantage, Taiwan must keep energy costs low. Nuclear power is becoming increasingly important, since fuel costs are only one third of those for coal. In 1983 there were four reactors in operation, with two more scheduled to come into commercial operation in 1984 and six units planned. By 2000 it is expected that nuclear will contribute 53 percent of Taiwan's expected 110,000 GWH of electricity generation

  10. Nuclear data generation for cryogenic moderators and high temperature moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The commonly used processing codes for nuclear data only allow the generation of cross section data for a limited number of materials and physical conditions.At present, one of the most used computer codes for the generation of neutron cross sections is N J O Y, which is based on a phonon expansion of the scattering function starting from the frequency spectrum.Therefore, the information related to the system's density of states is crucial to produce the required data of interest. In this work the formalism of the Synthetic Model for Molecular Solids (S M M S) was implemented, which is in turn based on the Synthetic Frequency Spectrum (S F S) concept.The synthetic spectrum is central in the present work, and it is built from simple, relevant parameters of the moderator, thus conforming an alternative tool when no information on the actual frequency spectrum of the moderator material is available.S F S 's for several material of interest where produced in this work, for both cryogenic and high temperature moderators.We studied some materials of special interest, like solid methane, ice, methyl clathrate and two which are of special interest in the nuclear industry: graphite and beryllium.The libraries generated in the present work for the materials considered, in spite of their synthetic origin, are able to produce results that are even in better agreement with available information

  11. New radionuclide generator systems for use in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A current emphasis in nuclear medicine is to better match the physical lifetime of the radionuclides used in vivo for diagnosis and treatment to the biological lifetime of the diagnostic procedure or to minimize radiation dose to areas other than those to be treated. In many cases the biological lifetime is on the order of minutes. Since the direct production of radionuclides with half lives of minutes requires the user to be near a suitable reactor or accelerator, this study was undertaken to produce short-lived radionuclides indirectly. If a long-lived radionuclide decays into a short-lived radionuclide, quick separation of the daughter activity from the parent enables the user to have a short-lived daughter while freeing him from the constraint of proximity to a cyclotron. Systems where a short-lived daughter is separated from a long-lived parent are called radionuclide generators. Two generator systems were developed for use in nuclear medicine, one in diagnostic work and the other for therapeutic work. The yield and breakthrough characteristics were within the limits required to minimize unnecessary radiation exposure in patients. Two parent radionuclides were produced using 4He beams available from medium energy cyclotrons. The yield was high enough to produce generators that would be useful in clinical applications

  12. Nuclear-fuel-cycle facility deployment and price generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enrichment process and how it is to be modeled in the International Nuclear Model (INM) is described. The details of enrichment production, planning, unit price generation, demand estimation and ordering are examined. The enrichment process from both the producer's and the utility's point of view is analyzed. The enrichment separative-work-unit (SWU) contracts are also discussed. The relationship of the enrichment process with other sectors of the nuclear fuel cycle, expecially uranium mining and milling is considered. There are portions of the enrichment process that are not completely understood at the present time. These areas, which require further study, will be pinpointed in the following discussion. In many cases, e.g., the advent of SMU brokerage activities, the answers will emerge only in time. In other cases, e.g., political trends, uncertainties will always remain. It is possible to cast the uncertainties in a probabilistic framework, but this is beyond the scope of this report. INM, a comprehensive model of the international nuclear industry, simulates the market decision process based on current and future price expectations under a broad range of scenario specifications. INM determines the proper reactor mix as well as the planning, operation, and unit price generation of the attendant nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The level of detail of many of the enrichment activities presented in this report, e.g., the enrichment contracts, is too fine to be incorporated into INM. Nevertheless, they are presented in a form that is ammendable to modeling. The reasons for this are two-fold. First, it shows the level of complexity that would be required to model the entire system. Second, it presents the structural framework for a detailed, stand-alone enrichment model

  13. Removal of deposited copper from nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the copper-removal process implemented during the cleaning of the NPD nuclear steam generator in Ontario revealed that major shortcomings in the process were depletion of the strong ammonia solution and relatively poor copper removal. Tests have shown that the concentration of the ammonia solution can be preserved close to its initial value, and high concentrations of complexed copper obtained, by sparging the ammonia solution with oxygen recirculating through a gas recirculation loop. Using recirculating oxygen for sparging at ambient air temperature, approximately 11 g/l of copper were dissolved by 100 g/l ammonia solution while the gaseous ammonia content of the recirculating gas remained well below the lower flammability limit. The corrosion rates of mild steel and commonly used nuclear steam generator tube materials in oxygenated ammonia solution were less than 30 mil/yr and no intergranular attack of samples was observed during tests. A second technique studied for the removal of copper is to ammoniate the spent iron-removal solvent to approximately pH 9.5 and sparge with recirculating oxygen. Complexed ferric iron in the spent iron-removal solvent was found to be the major oxidizing agent for metallic copper. The ferric iron can be derived from oxidation of dissolved ferrous iron to the ferric state or from dissolved oxides of iron directly. To extract copper from the secondary sides of nuclear steam generators, strong ammonia solution sparged with recirculating oxygen is recommended as the first stage, while ammoniated spent iron-removal solvent sparged with recirculating oxygen may be used to remove the copper freshly exposed during the removal of iron

  14. Effector caspase Dcp-1 and IAP protein Bruce regulate starvation-induced autophagy during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ying-Chen Claire; Chittaranjan, Suganthi; Barbosa, Sharon González; McCall, Kimberly; Gorski, Sharon M

    2008-09-22

    A complex relationship exists between autophagy and apoptosis, but the regulatory mechanisms underlying their interactions are largely unknown. We conducted a systematic study of Drosophila melanogaster cell death-related genes to determine their requirement in the regulation of starvation-induced autophagy. We discovered that six cell death genes--death caspase-1 (Dcp-1), hid, Bruce, Buffy, debcl, and p53-as well as Ras-Raf-mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathway components had a role in autophagy regulation in D. melanogaster cultured cells. During D. melanogaster oogenesis, we found that autophagy is induced at two nutrient status checkpoints: germarium and mid-oogenesis. At these two stages, the effector caspase Dcp-1 and the inhibitor of apoptosis protein Bruce function to regulate both autophagy and starvation-induced cell death. Mutations in Atg1 and Atg7 resulted in reduced DNA fragmentation in degenerating midstage egg chambers but did not appear to affect nuclear condensation, which indicates that autophagy contributes in part to cell death in the ovary. Our study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms that coordinately regulate autophagic and apoptotic events in vivo. PMID:18794330

  15. Risks of turbine generators at WWER-440 nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many serious fires and incidents have occurred in the turbine halls of nuclear power plants, resulting in serious damage and long shutdown outages. Some of these incidents have endangered the safe shutdown of the plants because of the location of lack of vital fire protection safety systems. A detailed analysis is necessary for all those plants that have equipment important for safe shutdown located in the turbine hall or its vicinity without strict fire separation by fire rated barriers. A reduction in the fire frequencies of the turbine hall is an additional way of improving safety. This is possible by improving all aspects of turbine generator operation. (author)

  16. Turbo-generator sets in conventional and nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of unit power in conventional and nuclear power stations in Germany and the USA - the development of design criteria for conventional and reheat turbines - a survey of constructional types and problems of conventional reheat turbines by the example of turbine types for 150, 300, 600 and 1,200 MW - saturated steam turbines for boiling-water and pressurized-water reactors - maintenance, automatics, and turbine protection systems - reliability and availability - common turbine defects: outlook on limiting outputs of turbines and generators with different cooling systems and low-pressure parts. (orig./AK)

  17. Operating experience with diesel generators in Belgian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various problems have occurred on the diesel generators in the Belgian nuclear power plants, independently of the D.G. manufacturer or from the operating crew. Furthermore no individual part of the D.G. can be incriminated as being the main cause of the incidents. The incidents reported in this paper are chosen because of the importance for the safety or for the long repair period. The unavailability of a D.G. can only be detected by periodic tests and controls. Combined with a good preventive maintenance, the risks of incidents can be reduced. (author)

  18. Static and dynamic high power, space nuclear electric generating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space nuclear electric generating systems concepts have been assessed for their potential in satisfying future spacecraft high power (several megawatt) requirements. Conceptual designs have been prepared for reactor power systems using the most promising static (thermionic) and the most promising dynamic conversion processes. Component and system layouts, along with system mass and envelope requirements have been made. Key development problems have been identified and the impact of the conversion process selection upon thermal management and upon system and vehicle configuration is addressed. 10 references

  19. Materials research in support of nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation outlines the activities of CANMET-MTL in materials research in support of nuclear power generation. CANMET-MTL is a Government of Canada research laboratory specializing in materials (metals and metal-based materials). Its mandate is to improve the competitive, social and environmental performance of Canadian industries in the area of metals. These include the economic benefits from value-added processing and manufacturing, materials for clean energy production and improved energy efficiency in processing and product end-use.

  20. Research of electrochemistry behavior of slower for nuclear steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion of construction material in high temperature water is one of the important problems of nuclear reactor. Lately research shows that TiO2 inhabiting species can alleviate local corrosion, such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and intergranular attack (IGA) of steam generator tubes, and thus prolong the life of SG tube. This paper has studied the corrosion potentials and polarization carve of steel stainless in caustic solution with TiO2 inhabiting species, and it shows that TiO2 have positive effect. (authors)

  1. The Development of OZONE Washer at nuclear power generation plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An OZONE Washer for working clothes in nuclear power generation plants was developed. An ozone generator, tank for the solution with ozone and its recycling, washer and exhaust ventilation makes constructs of the OZONE Washer. The washing effect was determined by the difference of the absorbance of samples between before and after washing. These samples were sewed on the stained places and washed. Main strain was consisted of sebum and protein from human bodies. The average removing stains of samples by water and ozone dissolved solution were 100% and 200%, respectively. Moreover, the deodorization and disinfecting effect were observed by ozone. The water saving of equipment was carried out by reuse of washing water after adding ozone. The strains was dissolved in water and then oxidized thoroughly by ozone added. (S.Y.)

  2. Performance of Durasil 70 media Salem Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of Duratek's EVR (Enhanced Volume Reduction) Demineralization System employing sluiceable pressure vessels and improved operational techniques has generated operational efficiencies including volume reduction (VR), reduced personnel labor and exposure, higher flowrates and improved decontamination factors (DF) for cleanup of liquid radwaste streams at the Salem Nuclear Generating Station. Further significant VR improvements have been achieved utilizing Duratek's Durasil D-70 process media. This proprietary media has demonstrated the ability to process the high conductivity wastestreams found at the Salem facility. Earlier lab and on-site testing projections of throughputs of a magnitude 15 times higher than organic resin have been confirmed. A long-term problem, cobalt species removal in a high sodium environment, has been mitigated by this media

  3. Generation of core model data for Nuclear Power Plant simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Soo; Jung, Yil Sup; Kim, Yong Rae; Do, Man Seok; Chung, Jong Sung; Kim, Jae Sik; Kim, Yeong Baek [Korea Nuclear Fuel Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Nuclear power plant simulators currently operated in Korea have their own core models which are not updated with new one of current core cycle. This is because proper input constants for the core model cannot be provided in timely manner. The best workaround for this is the development of a new separate core analysis device with the real time calculation power and the development of the automatic procedure to generate input constants for core model more easily. In this research a new procedure is established for the generation of core model for NPP simulator. Therefore, with the development of core model implementation technology for NPP simulator, it is expected that core model of the simulator will be updated with ease and in timely manner.

  4. Foundations for the Fourth Generation of Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plentiful, affordable electrical energy is a critically important commodity to nations wishing to grow their economy. Energy, and more specifically electricity, is the fuel of economic growth. More than one-third of the world's population (more than 2 billion people), however, live today without access to any electricity. Further, another 2 billion people in the world exist on less than 100 watts of electricity per capita. By comparison, the large economies of Japan and France use more than 800 watts of electricity per capita, and the United States uses nearly 1500 watts of electricity per capita. As the governments of developing nations strive to improve their economies, and hence the standard of living of their people, electricity use is increasing. Several forecasts of electrical generation growth have concluded that world electricity demand will roughly double in the next 20-25 years, and possibly triple by 2050. This electrical generation growth will occur primarily in the rapidly developing and growing economies in Asia and Latin America. This net growth is in addition to the need for replacement generating capacity in the United States and Europe as aging power plants (primarily fossil-fueled) are replaced. This very substantial worldwide electricity demand growth places the issue of where this new electricity generation capacity is to come from squarely in front of the developed countries. They have a fundamental desire (if not a moral obligation) to help these developing countries sustain their economic growth and improve their standard of living, while at the same time protecting the energy (and economic) security of their own countries. There are currently 435 power reactors generating about 16 percent of the world's electricity. We know full well that nuclear power shows great promise as an economical, safe, and emissions-free source of electrical energy, but it also carries at least the perception of great problems, from public safety to dealing with

  5. Student Lloyd C. Bruce listens to MS John M. Lounge in CSR during STS-26

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Seated in the customer support room (CSR) of JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30, student experimenter Lloyd C. Bruce listens to Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge onboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, during the STS-26 mission. Bruce's student experiment 82-4 (SE82-4) 'The Effects of Weightlessness on Grain Formation and Strength in Metals' is onboard OV-103. Lounge is visible in the television (TV) monitor on the left.

  6. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-06-01

    OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from

  7. Laser generated x-ray source for pumping nuclear transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This collection of vugraphs presents studies of x-ray spectra for resonantly pumping nuclear transitions. The 24 beam OMEGA laser system is being used, generating 0.6 nsec pulses of 2.5 kJ at a wavelength of 351 nm. Total emitted energy approaching 1 J on the 8.4 keV resonance line of Cu+27 is measured in a single shot. This energy could be sufficient for resonantly pumping the 8.4099 keV M1 transition in 169Tm from the 1/2+ ground level to the 3/2+ excited level, with a lifetime of 3.9 nsec. Results from a praseodymium target show a spectrally dense x-ray spectrum over an interval of about 1 keV around 8.4 keV, from transitions of n = 2 shell electrons. Spectrally dense bands of successively higher Z targets can be used to maximize the changes of resonant pumping of unknown nuclear levels. The usefulness of a projected high repetition rate laser (>1 Hz) for high data production rate in nuclear excitation experiments is described. We finally show examples of LLE capabilities relevant to gamma-ray laser research in areas such as diffraction in crystals and x-ray studies. 36 figs

  8. A cohort analysis of nuclear generation cost data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Nuclear Energy Information Center of the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Ltd., cost analysis of nuclear power generation has been carried out. In general, it is frequently carried out to analyze timely changing trends on various indexes on management of power stations such as annual O and M (operation and management) costs, apparatus using ratio, and so on, in nuclear power stations. Main aims of such analyses are to obtain knowledge useful for future policies and management decision making by grasping factors causing such changes to evaluate effects based on them as quantitatively as possible. Effects of the timely changing factors on various indexes on management of power stations can consider by dividing them to three types shown as follows; (1) effects of every years, (2) effects of every elapsed years, and (3) effects of operation beginning year. By separating these three effects to evaluate them, grasping of factors at background of the changes and their quantitative evaluations can be carried out more correctly, to be expected to obtain more useful knowledge. Here were described results applied on engineering method called by the 'Bayes type Cohort model' developed at a field of social science to trend analysis on indexes of such power stations. (G.K.)

  9. Scaling back French nuclear generation poses risk to trade deficit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing electricity costs weigh on the performance of France's exports, and this should lead to 'prudence' regarding the rate at which France's nuclear plants are taken out of service, says a report from the council of economic analysis (CAE), an economic think tank that advises the French prime minister. Reducing the proportion of nuclear energy in the country's generation mix was part of French president Francois Hollande's agreement with the country's green parties during his election campaign and is one of the key issues being discussed in France's energy transition debate. The government has said that nuclear energy's share in the generation mix should be reduced from 75% to 50% by 2025. The only nuclear plant the government has committed to closing is France's oldest, the 1.8 GW Fessenheim plant. It is scheduled to close at the end of 2016, but the move has generated much debate. 'Nobody knows why Fessenheim should be closed. Because it is old? So what?' said a legal source close to the French energy market who asked to remain anonymous. 'It's a shame that the French energy transition debate is not dealing with fundamental questions. It's too political', said the source. Low electricity prices are a key factor in maintaining France's economic competitiveness in relation to other European countries, said the CAE report, which was published on 16 May. A 10% increase in power prices paid by industrial consumers would lead to a 1.9% average reduction in the value of France's exports, it said. The market share of France's exports fell 19% in 2005-10, one of the largest slumps in Europe, according to a report published last summer by the European Commission. The country's current account recorded a growing deficit from 2005 onwards, reaching -2.2% in 2011, with the trade balance for goods accounting for most of this deterioration, said the report. Although France's trade deficit improved in 2012, driven by aerospace sector sales and weak domestic demand, the

  10. Applications of nuclear-powered thermoelectric generators in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The source of electrical power which enables information to be transmitted from the space crafts Voyager 1 and 2 back to Earth after a time period of more than a decade and at a distance of more than a billion miles is known as an RTG (radioisotope thermoelectric generator). It utilises the Seebeck effect in producing electricity from heat. In essence it consists of a large number of semiconductor thermocouples connected electrically in series and thermally in parallel. A temperature difference is maintained across the thermocouples by providing a heat source, which in the case of an RTG is a radioactive isotope, and the heat sink is space. The combination of an energy-conversion system, free of moving parts and a long-life, high energy-density heat source, provides a supply of electrical power typically in the range of tens to hundred of watts and which operates reliably over extended periods of time. An electric power source, based upon thermoelectric conversion by which utilises a nuclear reactor as a heat source, has also been deployed in space and a 100-kW system is being developed to provide electrical power to a variety of commercial and military projects including SDI. Developments in thermoelectrics that have taken place in the western world during the past 30 years are primarily due to United States interest and involvement in the exploration of space. This paper reviews US applications of nuclear-powered thermoelectric generators in space. (author)

  11. Corrosion evaluation of alternate nuclear steam generator tubing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several materials were evaluated for use in nuclear steam generators (NSG). These materials were exposed to corrosive conditions representative of those found in nuclear steam generators. The materials evaluated were gold, titanium, tantalum, niobium, Hastelloy C-276, Hastelloy G. Nickel 200, nickel-base Alloy 625, and heat-tracked nickel-base Alloy 600. The test environments simulated acid pitting attack, caustic stress corrosion cracking and reduced sulfur attack. In the pitting environment, the monolithic materials did well, however Nickel 200, nickel-base Alloy 600 and Hastelloy G3 did poorly. The remaining alloys, nickel-base Alloy 625 and Hastelloy C-276 were relatively unaffected in the pitting environment. Tantalum, titanium, niobium, nickel-base Alloy 625 performed poorly in the environment designed to evaluate resistance to caustic cracking. Nickel-base Alloy 600 (stress-relieved), Hastelloy C-276, Hasteloy G-3 and Nickel 200 compared fair to good in the caustic sodium. The gold was unaffected in the hot caustic solution. In the environment selected to represent a reduced sulfur environment, nickel-base Alloy 625 and Hastelloy C-276 exhibited considerable resistance. The nickel-base Alloy 600 was attacked within a relatively short period of time

  12. Steam generator of Vandellos nuclear power station: Operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Central Nuclear de Vandellos power station at Hospitalet del Infante, Spain, is a 500 MWe gas graphite moderated natural uranium reactor. The plant has generated over 46,000 million KWh over the past thirteen years of service. Throughout this service, the plant has suffered from THO phase erosion-corrosion damage in the steam generator sections of the system. The Vandellos steam generators are once-through units constructed of 1386 mild steel tubing (panels) each fabricated into a serpentine containing 83 horizontal passes. Four independent steam generator circuits are combined to feed two, 250 MWe turbines. Erosion-corrosion damage has caused panel element leakage in the evaporation of some tubing elements. The rate of erosion-corrosion damage has been modified through different operational changes since damage was first detected in 1975. This paper describes the different operating behavior of the four steam generators and an evaluation of damage through the expertise of different technical resource groups. The changes in plant operating technique discussed include hydrodynamic conditions and chemical treatment parameters. One of the most important changes in plant operation has been in the use of amines as alkaline agents. Solutions of ammonia were initially used for pH control of feedwater. In an effort to reduce erosion-corrosion levels below rates experienced using ammonia, a change was made to the use of morpholine, and more recently, a change to the use of AMP(2 amino-2-methyl-1-propanol) has shown favorable results. The paper outlines the overall behavior of steam generator function under plant transition conditions, and contrasts that behavior with current chemical parameters experienced using AMP treatment. Water chemistry characteristics are used to present an evaluation of the development of erosion-corrosion damages from 1976 through present operating conditions. (author)

  13. Thorium and its future importance for nuclear energy generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lainetti, Paulo E.O., E-mail: lainetti@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Thorium was discovered in 1828 by the Swedish chemist Jons J. Berzelius. Despite some advantages over uranium for use in nuclear reactors, its main use, in the almost two centuries since its discovery, the use of thorium was restricted to use for gas mantles, especially in the early twentieth century. In the beginning of the Nuclear Era, many countries had interested on thorium, particularly during the 1950-1970 period. There are about 435 nuclear reactors in the world nowadays. They need more than 65.000 tons of uranium yearly. The future world energy needs will increase and, even if we assumed a conservative contribution of nuclear generation, it will be occur a significant increasing in the uranium prices, taking into account that uranium, as used in the present thermal reactors, is a finite resource. Thorium is nearly three times more abundant than uranium in the Earth's crust. Despite thorium is not a fissile material, {sup 232}Th can be converted to {sup 233}U (fissile) more efficiently than {sup 238}U to {sup 239}Pu. Besides this, since it is possible to convert thorium waste into nonradioactive elements, thorium is an environment-friendly alternative energy source. Thorium fuel cycle is also inherently resistant to proliferation. Some papers evaluate the thorium resources in Brazil over 1.200.000 metric t. Then, the thorium alternative must be seriously considered in Brazil for strategic reasons. In this paper a brief history of thorium is presented, besides a review of the world thorium utilization and a discussion about advantages and restrictions of thorium use. (author)

  14. Nuclear data banks generation by interpolation; Generacion de bancos de datos nucleares mediante interpolacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo M, J. A

    1999-07-01

    Nuclear Data Bank generation, is a process in which a great amount of resources is required, both computing and humans. If it is taken into account that at some times it is necessary to create a great amount of those, it is convenient to have a reliable tool that generates Data Banks with the lesser resources, in the least possible time and with a very good approximation. In this work are shown the results obtained during the development of INTPOLBI code, use to generate Nuclear Data Banks employing bicubic polynominal interpolation, taking as independent variables the uranium and gadolinia percents. Two proposal were worked, applying in both cases the finite element method, using one element with 16 nodes to carry out the interpolation. In the first proposals the canonic base was employed, to obtain the interpolating polynomial and later, the corresponding linear equation systems. In the solution of this systems the Gaussian elimination methods with partial pivot was applied. In the second case, the Newton base was used to obtain the mentioned system, resulting in a triangular inferior matrix, which structure, applying elemental operations, to obtain a blocks diagonal matrix, with special characteristics and easier to work with. For the validation tests, a comparison was made between the values obtained with INTPOLBI and INTERTEG (create at the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (MX) with the same purpose) codes, and Data Banks created through the conventional process, that is, with nuclear codes normally used. Finally, it is possible to conclude that the Nuclear Data Banks generated with INTPOLBI code constitute a very good approximation that, even though do not wholly replace conventional process, however are helpful in cases when it is necessary to create a great amount of Data Banks.

  15. A nuclear spectrum generator for semiconductor X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear spectrum generator for semiconductor X-ray detectors is designed in this paper. It outputs step ramp signals with random distribution in amplitude and time according to specified reference spectrum. The signals are similar to the signals from an actual semiconductor X-ray detector, and can be use to check spectrum response characteristics of an X-ray fluorometer. This helps improving energy resolution of the X-ray fluorometer. The spectrum generator outputs step ramp signals satisfying the probability density distribution function of any given reference spectrum in amplitude through sampling on the basis of 32-bit randomizer. The system splits 1024 interval segmentation of the time that the step ramp signals appear, and calculates the appearance probability of step ramp signals in different intervals and the average time between the time intervals, by random sampling. The step ramp signals can meet the rule of exponential distribution in time. Test results of the spectrum generator show that the system noise is less than 2.43 mV, the output step ramp signals meet the Poisson distribution in counting rate and the probability density distribution function of the reference spectrum in amplitude. The counting rate of the output step ramp signals can be adjusted. It meets the rule of the output signals from semiconductor X-ray detectors, such as Si-pin detector and silicon drift detector. (authors)

  16. Steam Generator tube integrity -- US Nuclear Regulatory Commission perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, E.L.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1997-02-01

    In the US, the current regulatory framework was developed in the 1970s when general wall thinning was the dominant degradation mechanism; and, as a result of changes in the forms of degradation being observed and improvements in inspection and tube repair technology, the regulatory framework needs to be updated. Operating experience indicates that the current U.S. requirements should be more stringent in some areas, while in other areas they are overly conservative. To date, this situation has been dealt with on a plant-specific basis in the US. However, the NRC staff is now developing a proposed steam generator rule as a generic framework for ensuring that the steam generator tubes are capable of performing their intended safety functions. This paper discusses the current U.S. regulatory framework for assuring steam generator (SG) tube integrity, the need to update this regulatory framework, the objectives of the new proposed rule, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory guide (RG) that will accompany the rule, how risk considerations affect the development of the new rule, and some outstanding issues relating to the rule that the NRC is still dealing with.

  17. Decision process regarding nuclear generation: the Brazilian case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Countries face a constant need to expand their electricity generation capacities. Electricity sources in a country and the respective generation technologies have different technical, economic, environmental, social and political characteristics. The evaluation criteria of the generating sources and their technologies must not be restricted to the supply of the increased demand at the lowest cost. Compliance with other public policies must be considered in the decision process of the expansion, for instance, maximize local acquisition and minimize foreign fuel purchase. Countries have different energy resources, as well as different levels of technology and development in their industrial parks. Brazil has many mineral reserves, besides the hydraulic potential, for supporting the expansion. The decision process in this sector, which includes nuclear energy as a sub-sector, requires analyzing and evaluating various information and data. In this stage, a quantitative model providing a first approach for the decision may be applied. The new institutional structure adopted in the sector during the 1990s and 2000s brought about new conditions into an already complex decision process. In such context of methodology complexity, political aspects gain relevance, becoming of increased importance. The political environment is described and the players are identified. One conclusion and a few recommendations are provided. (author)

  18. 78 FR 26662 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit No. 3 Extension of Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... notice appearing in the Federal Register on April 3, 2013 (78 FR 20144), by extending the original public... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit No. 3 Extension of...

  19. Eligibility of the Ambidexter nuclear complex for a generation IV nuclear power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the international workshop on Generation IV Nuclear Power systems, held in Crystal City, Virginia on January 27-28, 2000, attended government officials from nine nations reached a consensus view on the next generation technologies that are more proliferation-resistant, safe and economical and that should be developed in concert with future nuclear fuel cycles. Indeed, more than 90% of present nuclear power plants in the world are subject to the water-cooled reactor technology that is inherently bound by these compulsory requirements. Aiming at a long-term substitute for the conventional nuclear technologies, the innovative concept of the AMBIDEXTER (Advanced Molten-salt Break-even Inherently-safe Dual-missioning EXperimental and TEst Reactor) nuclear complex has been proposed for design development. The purpose of this paper is to review and discuss its design features particularly in respect of the eligibility for a Generation IV nuclear power system. Taking advantages of utilizing the liquefied fuel that continuously circulates in the reactor system, the integral and passive system concept embodies the design principle that the heat and radioactive materials generated by nuclear reactions should be separated as early as possible from their birth-place and be transported as effectively as possible to the termini of their life in the complex. All the reactor equipment including the core, heat exchangers and recirculation jet pumps are deployed in the reactor vessel. The intermediate heat transport system ensures physical separation between the reactor system and the energy conversion systems. Small size piping connections on the reactor vessel periphery are provided for delivering about 10% of the irradiated fuel salt flow to the chemical processing units. The composition of 7LiF-BeF2-ThF4-233UF4 fuel material was optimized for the core design to simultaneously satisfy the criticality and the conversion ratio requirements for the self

  20. Using thermoelectric nuclear power generators in spacecraft power-generation propulsion complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, P.V.; Galkin, A.Ya.; Gryaznov, G.M. [and others

    1994-04-01

    Power-generation and propulsion complexes for spacecraft, universal space platforms (US) which combine a power unit and high- and low-thrust propulsion unions, make it possible to efficiently solve problems involved in creating satellite communication systems, environmental monitoring systems, industrial technology platforms, interorbital shuttles, etc. Electrical power consumed by prospective spacecraft designed for communication or environmental monitoring may be as high as 20-30 kW. Manufacturing of semiconductors and biological materials in space may require electrical power of 30-l00 kW in the coming decades. The power required to transport loads between orbits using ion-plasma jet engines will amount to tens to hundreds of kilowatts. For all these missions, nuclear power units have important advantages over solar photoelectric power units in their mass, size, cost, and performance characteristics. There is a good reason to consider the use of thermoelectric Nuclear Power Generators (NPG) for USPs due to their small bulk, their capacity for generating greatly increased power in the high-power mode during 15-20% of the total length of the mission, and minimal disturbance of the motion of the spacecraft.

  1. Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

  2. Hydraulic Testing of Silurian and Ordovician Strata at the Bruce Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauheim, R. L.; Avis, J. D.; Chace, D. A.; Roberts, R. M.; Toll, N. J.

    2009-05-01

    Ontario Power Generation is proposing a Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for the long-term management of its Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste (L&ILW) within a Paleozoic-age sedimentary sequence beneath the Bruce Site near Tiverton, Ontario, Canada. The concept envisions that the DGR would be excavated at a depth of approximately 680 m within the Ordovician Cobourg Formation, a massive, dense, argillaceous limestone. A key attribute of the Bruce site is the extremely low permeabilities associated with the thick Ordovician carbonate and argillaceous bedrock formations that will host and enclose the DGR. Such rock mass permeabilities are thought sufficiently low to contribute toward or govern a diffusion-dominated transport regime. To support this concept, hydraulic testing was performed in 2008 and 2009 in two deep boreholes at the proposed repository site, DGR-3 and DGR-4. The hydraulic testing was performed using a straddle-packer tool with a 30.74-m test interval. Sequential tests were performed over the entire open lengths of the boreholes from the F Unit of the Silurian Salina Formation into the Ordovician Gull River Formation, a distance of approximately 635 m. The tests consisted primarily of pressure-pulse tests, with a few slug tests performed in several of the higher permeability Silurian units. The tests are analyzed using the nSIGHTS code, which allows the entire pressure history a test interval has experienced since it was penetrated by the drill bit to be included in the test simulation. nSIGHTS also allows the model fit to the test data to be optimized over an n-dimensional parameter space to ensure that the final solution represents a true global minimum rather than simply a local minimum. The test results show that the Ordovician-age strata above the Coboconk Formation (70+ m below the Cobourg) have average horizontal hydraulic conductivities of 1E-13 m/s or less. Coboconk and Gull River hydraulic conductivities are as high as 1E-11 m

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

  4. Nuclear electricity generation: what are the external costs?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broad economic analysis becomes increasingly important in the context of market deregulation and integration of environmental and social aspects in policy making. External costs will remain a challenge for policy makers as long as they are not assessed and recognised in a reliable and fair way across all sectors of the economy. This report provides insights into the internalized and external costs of nuclear generated electricity and alternative sources. This book will be of interest to policy makers and analysts in the field of energy and electricity systems. It contains authoritative information and data that could assist in their decision-making processes as well as support more in-depth analyses and academic research. (author)

  5. Aging assessment of electrical cables from NPD nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degradation of NPD Nuclear Generating Station control and power cables after approximately 25 years of service was assessed. The PVC and SBR insulated cables were also exposed to radiation, accident and post-accident conditions, and accelerated aging to simulate extended service life. The degradation of the samples from the containment boiler room was minimal, caused mainly by thermal conditions rather than radiation. Although irradiation to 55 Mrad, simulating normal operation and accident radiation levels, caused degradation, the cables could still function during accident and post-accident conditions. Accelerated thermal aging to simulate an additional 10 years of service at 45 degrees C caused embrittlement of the PVC and a 60% decrease in elongation of the SBR. Comparison of test results of aged NPD cables with newer PVC cables obtained from Pickering NGS 'A' shows that the newer cables have improved aging stability and therefore should provide adequate service during their design life of 31 years

  6. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynne M. Stevens

    2010-07-01

    Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

  7. Environmental fatigue evaluation guide of nuclear power generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was environmental fatigue evaluation guide issued in 2007 on the base of the latest data of environmental fatigue testing of materials in simulated reactor coolant environments of nuclear power generation facilities obtained until March 2007. Proposal of equation to evaluate environmental fatigue life with reference fatigue curve in air at the room temperature and environmental fatigue life correction factor in high-temperature water was provided for carbon steel, low alloy steel, austenitic stainless steel and nickel based alloy. Environmental correction factor was obtained from parameters derived from strain rate and temperature; with additional parameters of dissolved oxygen concentration and sulfur content in case of carbon steel and low alloy steel. Calculation of environmental fatigue life correction factor was made to provide large and simplified one with factor multiplication or simplified methods and also accurate and complicated one with detailed method based on selection of strain rate, temperature and dissolved oxygen. (T. Tanaka)

  8. Xenon suppression in a nuclear fueled electric power generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fissile inventory required in operating a negative power coefficient nuclear reactor in an electric power generating system is reduced by cycling the load imposed on the system when 100% power can no longer be maintained at equilibrium due to xenon poisoning in order to induce an oscillation in the xenon concentration which is in antiphase with the power requirements so that 100% power can be maintained at least during part of the day. The load can be progressively reduced by a preset amount each night or a xenon suppression controller which forecasts the xenon reactivity at the time selected for a return to full power as a function of reactor history, current reactor flux and an arbitrary load schedule can be used to determine the maximum reduced power level that will permit operation at full power at the selected time. (author)

  9. Control technology for nuclear power system of next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the summary of the results obtained by the investigation activities for two years carried out by the expert committee on investigation of control technology for nuclear power system of next generation. The course of investigation is outlined, and as the results, as advanced control technologies, adaptive control. H sub (infinite) control, fuzzy control and the application of autonomous distributed system and genetic algorithm to control; as operation support technology, the operation and monitoring system for nuclear power plants and safety support system; as interface technology which is the basic technology of them, virtual reality, multimedia and so on; further, various problems due to human factors, computer technology, artificial intelligence and others were taken up, and the grasp of the present status and the future subjects was carried out, including the information in international conferences. The items of the investigation are roughly divided into measurement and control technologies, interface technology and operation support, human factors, computer technology and artificial intelligence, and the trend in foreign countries, and the results of investigation for respective items are reported. (K.I.)

  10. Development situation about the Canadian CANDU Nuclear Power Generating Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU reactor is the most versatile commercial power reactor in the world. The acronym 'CANDU', a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, stands for 'CANada Deuterium Uranium'. CANDU uses heavy water as moderator and uranium (originally, natural uranium) as fuel. All current power reactors in Canada are of the CANDU type. Canada exports CANDU type reactor in abroad. CANDU type is used as the nuclear power plants to produce electrical. Today, there are 41 CANDU reactors in use around the world, and the design has continuously evolved to maintain into unique technology and performance. The CANDU-6 power reactor offers a combination of proven, superior and state-of-the-art technology. CANDU-6 was designed specifically for electricity production, unlike other major reactor types. One of its characteristics is a very high operating and fuel efficiency. Canada Nuclear Power Generating Stations were succeeded in a commercial reactor of which the successful application of heavy water reactor, natural uranium method and that on-power fuelling could be achieved. It was achieved through the joint development of a major project by strong support of the federal government, public utilities and private enterprises. The potential for customization to any country's needs, with competitive development and within any level of domestic industrial infrastructure, gives CANDU technology strategic importance in the 21st century

  11. Cosmic-Ray Generated Charged Particles for Nuclear Inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charged particles continuously rain down on the surface of the Earth. These charged particles primarily consist of muons and electrons. Muons are subatomic particles with the same charge as the electron, but with 200 times the mass. These particles are generated from interactions of primary cosmic-rays, primarily protons, with the upper atmosphere. Decision Sciences has implemented a tracking detector to measure the interactions of these particles with materials through which they pass: multiple Coulomb scattering and ionization energy loss and from these measurements is able to reconstruct a three-dimensional map of the density and atomic number of the materials in a scan volume. This map, combined with sensitive gamma detection capability of the tracking detector, enables the detection of nuclear and radiological materials that may be concealed in shielding, as well as discrimination of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) from point sources that would be more associated with threats. Times to clear most non-threat cargo range from 30-60 seconds, with suspicious (heavy shielding or gamma emitting) scenes being held longer to confirm the presence of and identify nuclear or radiological materials. Extended scanning in this circumstance would typically take two to ten minutes. (author)

  12. Nuclear power plant modeling and steam generator stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes the development of a computer model simulating the transient behavior of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) and a stability analysis of steam generators in an overall NSSS structure. In the analysis of stream generator stability characteristics, an emphasis was placed on the physical interpretation of density wave oscillation (DWO) phenomena in boiling channels. The PWR NSSS code TRANSG-P is based on the nonlinear steam generator code TRANSG, in which the basic flow channel and heat-exchanger models were previously formulated. In addition to the steam generator, the TRANSG-P code includes models for the pressurizer, the pump, and the turbine. The mathematical model for fluid channels is based upon one-dimensional, nonlinear, single-fluid conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy. Space and time discretization of these equations is accomplished using an implicit finite-difference formulation. The pressurizer is modeled as a nonequilibrium system at uniform pressure, consisting of vapor and liquid regions. Flashing and condensation are accounted for, and control elements are also modeled. The pump behavior is determined by making use of homologous curves, whereas simple energy conservation and choked flow equations are used to model the turbine. Efforts were made to assess the accuracy of the entire plant model of the TRANSG-P code through simulation of a loss-of-feedwater accident that occurred at a PWR plant. The TRANSG-P results are in reasonable agreement with the plant data, which inherently are subject to considerable uncertainties. In addition, once-through and natural-circulation boiling channel calculations, performed for the investigation of flow stability characteristics, showed good agreement with the test data

  13. Modeling a Helical-coil Steam Generator in RELAP5-3D for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan V. Hoffer; Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan A. Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Options for the primary heat transport loop heat exchangers for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant are currently being evaluated. A helical-coil steam generator is one heat exchanger design under consideration. Safety is an integral part of the helical-coil steam generator evaluation. Transient analysis plays a key role in evaluation of the steam generators safety. Using RELAP5-3D to model the helical-coil steam generator, a loss of pressure in the primary side of the steam generator is simulated. This report details the development of the steam generator model, the loss of pressure transient, and the response of the steam generator primary and secondary systems to the loss of primary pressure. Back ground on High Temperature Gas-cooled reactors, steam generators, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant is provided to increase the readers understanding of the material presented.

  14. Solving the maintenance dilemma of ageing controls in nuclear standby generators. The decision to retro-fit the control system with 'off the shelf technology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackouts - Are we 2 Steps away from Nuclear meltdown owing to Aging Controls? The intent of this white paper is to high-light the need to:- 1. Replace the aging control systems associated with critical safety equipment of Standby Generators in the nuclear environment. 2. Explain how 'off the shelf' standard control equipment may be suitably selected, integrated and tested for a nuclear environment. 3. High-light the lessons learned in respect of: - a. Qualification of COTS (commercial off the shelf) equipment for use in a nuclear application. b. Software quality assurance program. c. Reducing plant outage time. 4. Guide you on the selection criteria of credible partners that can implement such mission critical control systems. Causes for Concern - The control systems of some of the Standby Generators are 30+ years old and aging equipment is no longer available from the OEM's. Maintenance crews are evolving with young engineers who have no experience, or chance to be trained, on the old installed control base. The writer has no doubt that the extent of the black outs of North America, Aug 2003, and the standby generators ever reducing availability, has compromised their ability to provide essential service and communications to maintain the safety of the nuclear plant. These concerns prompted Ontario Power Generator and Bruce Power to review the reliability of their standby generators and this review prompted them to locate a suitable supplier for the task of replacing the control system. OPG's previous attempts to have the controls replaced by I and C dedicated companies weighed heavy on their minds. Worsening the dilemma was the fact that it used dedicated controls and what might be considered 'Propriety Software'. Black Outs - Not only is it possible, the probability of it happening is getting stronger The Northeast Blackout of 2003 was a massive widespread power outage that occurred throughout parts of the North-eastern and Midwestern United States and Ontario

  15. Retrofitting alarm prioritization at Bruce A: strategy development and implementation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prioritization strategy for computer-displayed control room alarms has been developed for Bruce A to better assist operations staff in visually identifying key alarms and judging the relative importance of alarms. The strategy consists of assigning each alarm indicative of a problem to be addressed to one of five priority categories. Each alarm is assigned to an alarm category based on an off-line analysis of the consequence and response characteristics applicable to the alarm for three plant operating contexts. The colour of the alarm message is used to convey the priority category of each alarm in computer-based alarm displays. In addition, alarms indicative of non-problematic changes in the state of plant equipment and processes are given a separate colour assignment to visually differentiate them from alarms indicative of problems. This paper outlines the user-based approach employed in the prioritization strategy development, describes the key features of the prioritization strategy adopted, and discusses the initial experience in systematically determining the priority assignments for all 6000 computer-based alarms associated with each generating unit. (author)

  16. New perspectives on nuclear power—Generation IV nuclear energy systems to strengthen nuclear non-proliferation and support nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, nuclear power has received support from environmental and climate researchers emphasizing the need to address factors of global importance such as climate change, peace and welfare. Here, we add to previous discussions on meeting future climate goals while securing safe supplies of energy by discussing future nuclear energy systems in the perspective of strengthening nuclear non-proliferation and aiding in the process of reducing stockpiles of nuclear weapons materials. New nuclear energy systems, currently under development within the Generation IV (Gen IV) framework, are being designed to offer passive safety and inherent means to mitigate consequences of nuclear accidents. Here, we describe how these systems may also be used to reduce or even eliminate stockpiles of civil and military plutonium—the former present in waste from today's reactors and the latter produced for weapons purposes. It is argued that large-scale implementation of Gen IV systems would impose needs for strong nuclear safeguards. The deployment of Safeguards-by-Design principles in the design and construction phases can avoid draining of IAEA resources by enabling more effective and cost-efficient nuclear safeguards, as compared to the current safeguards implementation, which was enforced decades after the first nuclear power plants started operation. - Highlights: • Generation IV systems are developed for long-term sustainable electricity production. • New perspectives are capabilities to manage nuclear waste from nuclear power and aid disarmament. • Simulations show how a country can launch fast reactors to control and reduce plutonium stocks. • Safeguards-by-Design principles should be deployed, facilitating effective nuclear safeguards

  17. The technology of the bearings used in the nuclear power generation system turbine generator units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bearing consists of all the stationary part which allow the relative motion in rotation or in translation, of a shaft line. Inside the bearing there is a journal bearing with a metallic anti-friction coating (the babbitt metal). The high power turbine generator unit rotors are supported by smooth transversal journal bearings fed with oil which fills the empty space and runs along the shaft. The technologies used for the bearings and the thrust bearings of the turbine generator units and the various shaft lines of the French CP0/CP1- and CP2/1300 MW-type nuclear power plants are described. The experience feedback is then discussed in terms of the dynamics of the shaft line, i.e. vibrational problems, the influence of the alignment and the babbitt metal incidents. (author)

  18. Advanced ceramic materials for next-generation nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John

    2011-10-01

    The nuclear industry is at the eye of a 'perfect storm' with fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs, worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, and increased concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that have caused many to look negatively at long-term use of fossil fuels. This convergence of factors has led to a growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Many are surprised to learn that nuclear power provides approximately 20% of the electrical power in the US and approximately 16% of the world-wide electric power. With the above factors in mind, world-wide over 130 new reactor projects are being considered with approximately 25 new permit applications in the US. Materials have long played a very important role in the nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced reactor systems and fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Advanced metallic and ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles, advanced alloy fuels for 'deep-burn' applications, as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, a number of fuel reprocessing operations are being investigated. Advanced materials continue to provide a vital contribution in 'closing the fuel cycle' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable cements, ceramics, and glasses. Beyond this fission energy application, fusion energy will demand advanced materials capable of withstanding the extreme environments of high

  19. Advanced ceramic materials for next-generation nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear industry is at the eye of a 'perfect storm' with fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs, worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, and increased concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that have caused many to look negatively at long-term use of fossil fuels. This convergence of factors has led to a growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Many are surprised to learn that nuclear power provides approximately 20% of the electrical power in the US and approximately 16% of the world-wide electric power. With the above factors in mind, world-wide over 130 new reactor projects are being considered with approximately 25 new permit applications in the US. Materials have long played a very important role in the nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced reactor systems and fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Advanced metallic and ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles, advanced alloy fuels for 'deep-burn' applications, as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, a number of fuel reprocessing operations are being investigated. Advanced materials continue to provide a vital contribution in 'closing the fuel cycle' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable cements, ceramics, and glasses. Beyond this fission energy application, fusion energy will demand advanced materials capable of withstanding the extreme environments of high

  20. New nuclear power plants for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towards the end of this year the Ontario government will select the technology for its future nuclear power plants. To clarify the differences between the contending reactors I have put together the following quick overview. Ontario's requirement is for a stand-alone two-unit nuclear power plant to provide around 2,000 to 3,500 MWe of baseload generating capacity at a site to he specified with an option for one or two additional units. It is likely that the first units will be located at either the Darlington site near Bowmanville or the Bruce site near Kincardine. However the output from the Bruce site is presently transmission constrained. All nuclear-electric generation in Ontario comes from Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) CANDU reactors at Pickering, Darlington and Bruce. The contenders are, AECL's 1085 MWe (net) ACR-1000 (Advanced CANDU Reactor), Westinghouse Electric Company's 1117 MWe (net) AP1000 (Advanced Passive), AREVA NP's 1600 MWe (net) U.S. EPR (United States Evolutionary Pressurized Reactor) and the 1550 MWe (net) GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy's ESBWR (Economic and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor). Westinghouse has Toshiba as a majority shareholder, AREVA has the government of France as a majority shareholder and GE-Hitachi has GE as the major shareholder. AECL is a federal crown corporation and is part of Team CANDU consisting of Babcock and Wilcox Canada, GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Canada Inc., Hitachi Canada Limited and SNC-Lavalin Nuclear Inc. Generally the engineering split in Team CANDU would be, AECL, Mississauga, Ontario, responsible for the design of the nuclear steam plant including reactor and safety systems; Babcock and Wilcox Canada, Cambridge, Ontario, responsible for supply of the steam generators and other pressure retaining components; GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Canada Inc., Peterborough, Ontario for the fuel handling equipment; Hitachi Canada Limited, Mississauga, for the balance of plant steam to electricity conversion

  1. Young generation in Romanian nuclear system - Romanian nuclear organizations implication in nuclear knowledge management at University 'Politehnica' of Bucharest - Results and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge management should be assumed by the major players within the nuclear community: government, industry and university. Starting from these problems this article gives an overview about Romanian nuclear knowledge management and the Young Generation implications. In Romania there are many government and non-government nuclear institutions such: CNCAN (Romanian Regulatory Body), ROMATOM (Romanian Atomic Forum), AREN (Romanian 'Nuclear Energy' Association), and companies: SNN ('Nuclearelectrica' SA National Company), CITON (Centre of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Projects), SCN (Institute for Nuclear Research), ROMAG - PROD (Romanian Heavy Water Plant). All these institutes and companies are sustaining the national nuclear program and promoting the new technologies in the nuclear industry according with CNCAN and ROMATOM regulations. University 'POLITEHNICA' of Bucharest - Power Engineering Faculty - through Nuclear Power Plant Department is the promoter of nuclear knowledge management. It is implied in assuring and maintaining a high-quality training for young staff. Young Generation is implicated in nuclear knowledge management through University 'Politehnica' of Bucharest - Power Engineering Faculty - Nuclear Power Plant Department and AREN (Romanian 'Nuclear Energy' Association). Young Generation Department has special educational programs for attracting and supporting students. It provides adequate information and interacts with potential students. Moreover the article gives results about Romanian nuclear engineers since 1970 till now. An analysis of these data is done. Also it is discussed how University 'Politehnica' of Bucharest, the Romanian Government and the Industry work together to co-ordinate more effectively their efforts to encourage the young generation. (author)

  2. Young generation in Romanian nuclear system - Romanian nuclear organizations implication in nuclear knowledge management at University 'Politehnica' of Bucharest: Results and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The knowledge management should be assumed by the major players within the nuclear community: government, industry and university. Starting from these problems this article gives an overview about Romanian nuclear knowledge management and the Young Generation implications. In Romania there are many government and non-government nuclear institutions such: CNCAN (Romanian Regulatory Body), ROMATOM (Romanian Atomic Forum), AREN (Romanian 'Nuclear Energy' Association), and companies: SNN ('Nuclearelectrica' SA National Company), CITON (Centre of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Projects), SCN (Institute for Nuclear Research ), ROMAG - PROD ( Romanian Heavy Water Plant). All these institutes and companies are sustaining the national nuclear program and promoting the new technologies in the nuclear industry according with CNCAN and ROMATOM regulations. University 'POLITEHNICA' of Bucharest - Power Engineering Faculty - through Nuclear Power Plant Department is the promoter of nuclear knowledge management. It is implied in assuring and maintaining a high - quality training for young staff. Young Generation is implicated in nuclear knowledge management through University 'Politehnica' of Bucharest - Power Engineering Faculty - Nuclear Power Plant Department and AREN (Romanian 'Nuclear Energy' Association). Young Generation Department has special educational programs for attracting and supporting students. It provides adequate information and interacts with potential students. Moreover the article gives results about Romanian nuclear engineers since 1970 till now. An analysis of these data is done. Also it is discussed how University 'Politehnica' of Bucharest, the Romanian Government and the Industry work together to co-ordinate more effectively their efforts to encourage the young generation. (author)

  3. Nuclear aerosol test facility studies using plasma torch aerosol generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the behavior of aerosols released into the reactor containment following accidents, an experimental simulation facility, called Nuclear Aerosol Test Facility (NATF) has recently been built and commissioned in BARC. It mainly consists of a Test vessel for simulating the containment, plasma torch aerosol generator (PTAG) system for generating metal-based aerosols and aerosol monitoring instrumentation. The main component of the PTAG is a 40 kW dc plasma torch, powered by a constant current power supply, operating in a non-transferred arc mode. Optimal operating conditions of PTAG have been established. Experiments consist of injecting the aerosols of a given material for about 20 minutes into the vessel, simultaneously monitoring the concentrations at various points in the vessel. The measurements of the size distribution and mass concentrations in the vessel are carried out at periodic intervals. Various combination of experiments with different metals such as zinc, tin and manganese, under varying turbulence conditions (with and without keeping the fan continuously on) have been performed. The aerosols were generally found to be fractal aggregates with low fractal dimension (∼1.6). The mass depletion data have been subjected to theoretical analysis and validation exercises with available aerosol behavior codes. The results are further discussed. (author)

  4. The spanish electric system operation. The contribution of nuclear generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operation of an electric system encloses the collection of activities which extend from affective generation dispatch to issuing instruction for network manoeuvring along with international exchange scheduling. Based on the market mechanisms that apply to energy transactions, these tasks guarantee the security of supply end consumers, which is the final goal of the System Operators actions. In Spain this function is executed by Red Electrica de Espana (REE) since 1985, after being constituted as the first Transmission and System Operator (TSO) in the world. Additionally the variations to Law 54/1997 introduced by law 17/2007 also assign REE the function of sole transmission owner in the Spanish electric system. In order to achieve the aforementioned goal, nuclear energy plays in Spain a fundamental role in electric generation thanks to its high availability rate, the predictability of its fuel recharges, its high operational reliability, its geographical location, the stability of its costs and the security of supply given by the possibility of on-site fuel storage in the power plant. (Author)

  5. Mesh generation technology for nuclear reactor simulation; barriers and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesh generation in support of nuclear reactor simulation has much in common with the requirements of other application areas, such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Indeed, fluid dynamics analysis of the coolant behavior inside the reactor core is an internal flow problem that requires the resolution of spatial and temporal variations in the flow caused by complex component configurations, fluids/structure interaction, turbulence, and thermal heating of the coolant. Typical concerns of meshing complex geometries; the use of hexahedral vs. tetrahedral elements, element geometric quality, mesh smoothness, use of anisotropic elements in the thermal boundary layer, etc., are all considerations important to the reactor meshing problem. Reactor meshing begins to become more specialized as the need to employ reactor simulation as a predictive design and safety analysis capability grows in importance. First, a predictive capability will require more precise physical models to be included, and these models will need to be supported by a computational science framework that will allow them to be accurately approximated both spatially and temporally during the reactor core analysis. Both the multiphysical nature of the composite reactor model and details of the physics algorithms themselves will place new requirements on the meshing process needed to support multidimensional reactor simulation. This article discusses the current state of meshing technology applied to reactor simulation and examines a set of issues that are important in the generation of high-quality reactor meshes today and in the future

  6. Nuclear Fusion Effects Induced in Intense Laser-Generated Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deutered polyethylene (CD2n thin and thick targets were irradiated in high vacuum by infrared laser pulses at 1015W/cm2 intensity. The high laser energy transferred to the polymer generates plasma, expanding in vacuum at supersonic velocity, accelerating hydrogen and carbon ions. Deuterium ions at kinetic energies above 4 MeV have been measured by using ion collectors and SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. At these energies the deuterium–deuterium collisions may induce over threshold fusion effects, in agreement with the high D-D cross-section valuesaround 3 MeV energy. At the first instants of the plasma generation, during which high temperature, density and ionacceleration occur, the D-D fusions occur as confirmed by the detection of mono-energetic protonsand neutrons with a kinetic energy of 3.0 MeV and 2.5 MeV, respectively, produced by the nuclear reaction. The number of fusion events depends strongly on the experimental set-up, i.e. on the laser parameters (intensity, wavelength, focal spot dimension, target conditions (thickness, chemical composition, absorption coefficient, presence of secondary targets and used geometry (incidence angle, laser spot, secondary target positions.A number of D-D fusion events of the order of 106÷7 per laser shot has been measured.

  7. Technology standards for structure, etc. concerning nuclear power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The notification is defined under the order on technology standards for structure, etc. concerning nuclear power generating facilities. Vessels hereunder are classified into 4 kinds and tubes 3 kinds. The 1st kind of vessel includes pressure vessel, pressurizer, steam generator of reactors and others, and the 2nd kind-container and its connected vessels of reactors. The 3rd and 4th kinds contain other vessels. Basic concepts and terms are explained, such as: the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th vessel; the 1st, 2nd and 3rd tube; intensity of stress; film stress; bending stress; primary stress; secondary stress; primary general film stress; primary partial film stress; peak stress; intensity of peak stress and intensity of repeated peak stress. Materials, standards of materials, examinations including drop, shock, non-breaking, supersonic waves tests, etc., structure, intensity of stress, size and others of each kind of vessels are stipulated with various graphs and tables attached. Materials, standards, structure, thickness, welding of joint, hole, flange, joint and dimension, etc. of each kind of tubes are prescribed as well. Standards and calculation of capacity of safety valves are described in detail. Pressure tests and test pieces for inspection are specified particularly. (Okada, K.)

  8. 77 FR 65417 - Northern States Power Company (Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant Independent Spent Fuel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Northern States Power Company (Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation); Notice of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Reconstitution Pursuant to 10 CFR...

  9. ENDF/B-VII.0: Next Generation Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Nuclear Science and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, M B; Oblozinsky, P; Herman, M; Greene, N M; McKnight, R D; Smith, D L; Young, P G; MacFarlane, R E; Hale, G M; Haight, R C; Frankle, S; Kahler, A C; Kawano, T; Little, R C; Madland, D G; Moller, P; Mosteller, R; Page, P; Talou, P; Trellue, H; White, M; Wilson, W B; Arcilla, R; Dunford, C L; Mughabghab, S F; Pritychenko, B; Rochman, D; Sonzogni, A A; Lubitz, C; Trumbull, T H; Weinman, J; Brown, D; Cullen, D E; Heinrichs, D; McNabb, D; Derrien, H; Dunn, M; Larson, N M; Leal, L C; Carlson, A D; Block, R C; Briggs, B; Cheng, E; Huria, H; Kozier, K; Courcelle, A; Pronyaev, V; der Marck, S

    2006-10-02

    We describe the next generation general purpose Evaluated Nuclear Data File, ENDF/B-VII.0, of recommended nuclear data for advanced nuclear science and technology applications. The library, released by the U.S. Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in December 2006, contains data primarily for reactions with incident neutrons, protons, and photons on almost 400 isotopes. The new evaluations are based on both experimental data and nuclear reaction theory predictions. The principal advances over the previous ENDF/B-VI library are the following: (1) New cross sections for U, Pu, Th, Np and Am actinide isotopes, with improved performance in integral validation criticality and neutron transmission benchmark tests; (2) More precise standard cross sections for neutron reactions on H, {sup 6}Li, {sup 10}B, Au and for {sup 235,238}U fission, developed by a collaboration with the IAEA and the OECD/NEA Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC); (3) Improved thermal neutron scattering; (4) An extensive set of neutron cross sections on fission products developed through a WPEC collaboration; (5) A large suite of photonuclear reactions; (6) Extension of many neutron- and proton-induced reactions up to an energy of 150 MeV; (7) Many new light nucleus neutron and proton reactions; (8) Post-fission beta-delayed photon decay spectra; (9) New radioactive decay data; and (10) New methods developed to provide uncertainties and covariances, together with covariance evaluations for some sample cases. The paper provides an overview of this library, consisting of 14 sublibraries in the same, ENDF-6 format, as the earlier ENDF/B-VI library. We describe each of the 14 sublibraries, focusing on neutron reactions. Extensive validation, using radiation transport codes to simulate measured critical assemblies, show major improvements: (a) The long-standing underprediction of low enriched U thermal assemblies is removed; (b) The {sup 238}U, {sup 208}Pb, and {sup 9}Be reflector

  10. Nuclear power generation in competition with other sources for base load electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The latest studies performed by OECD and IAEA on the subject were analyzed in order to clarify the international context. Nuclear, gas and coal are compared. The general conclusion is that nuclear power is competitive for electricity generation considering new plants to be commissioned around year 2000. If the discount rate is 5% per annum it is considered the best option in most of the countries included in the studies. If 10% is chosen the levelized costs favour the gas option. In the Argentine case, the analysis of possible plants for the near future shows a clear advantage for the gas projects. This is mainly due to the low capital costs and low local gas prices. The possible evolution of this situation is considered: gas prices will most probably increase because they should approach the price of fuel oil or diesel oil which are used as substitutes in winter for electricity generation and the export projects to Chile and Brasil will also push prices up. The environmental aspects of the question and its influence on regulations and costs is a matter of speculation. Some countries have already penalized greenhouse gases emissions but it is not clear how and when this trend will affect local prices. (author). 4 refs., 6 tabs

  11. Maintenance practices for emergency diesel generator engines onboard United States Navy Los Angeles class nuclear submarines

    OpenAIRE

    Hawks, Matthew Arthur

    2006-01-01

    CIVINS The United States Navy has recognized the rising age of its nuclear reactors. With this increasing age comes increasing importance of backup generators. In addition to the need for decay heat removal common to all (naval and commercial) nuclear reactors, naval vessels with nuclear reactors also require a backup means of propulsion. All underway Navy nuclear reactors are operated with diesel generators as a backup power system, able to provide emergency electric power for reactor dec...

  12. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R and D) Program is responsible for performing R and D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R and D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management

  13. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for

  14. Radioactive Wastes were Generated from Nuclear Power Plant PWR 1000 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive wastes generated from operation nuclear power plant 1000 MWe generally consist of low level waste, intermediate level waste and high level waste. Amount of low and intermediate level waste from nuclear power plant after treatment was approximately 300-400 drum 200 litter every year. Spent fuel was generated from nuclear power plant as many as 25-30 tones with volume 35-50 m3 per year. The radioactive wastes generated from nuclear power plant (NPP) have been managed according to the nuclear safety standard. (author)

  15. Dynamic buckling in a next generation metal coolant nuclear reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Forasassi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the paper is to investigate the buckling effects due to the seismic sloshing phenomena interesting for a next generation heavy liquid metal cooled reactor as for example the eXperimental Accelerator Driven System (XADS.Design/methodology/approach: In this study the structural buckling behaviour of a reactor pressure vessel, retaining a rather large amount of liquid and many internal structures, is coupled to the fluid-structure interaction because during a postulated earthquake (e.g. Design Basis Earthquake the primary coolant surrounding the internals may be accelerated with a resulting significant fluid-structure hydrodynamic interaction (known as “sloshing”. Finite element numerical approach is applied because neither linear nor second-order potential theory is directly applicable when steep waves are present and local bulge appear with a marked decrease in strength of structure.Findings: The numerical results are presented and discussed highlighting the importance of the fluid-structure interaction effects in terms of stress intensity and impulsive pressure on the structural dynamic capability. These results allowed to determine the components mostly affected by the loading condition, in order to upgrade the geometrical design, if any, for the considered nuclear power plant (NPP.Research limitations/implications: The presented research results may be considered preliminary; thus it may be useful for a design upgrading of the reactor vessel and for achieving a first evaluation of the real components capacity to bear dynamic loads in particular in the event of a severe earthquake.Originality/value: From the point of view of the practical implication, it is worth to stress that the safety of liquid retaining nuclear structures subjected to a seismic loading is of great importance in regard to the hydrodynamic forces caused by sloshing and impulsive liquid motion determined by the liquid filling levels oscillatory

  16. The nuclear electricity generating industry in England and Wales post-privatisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of the new legal framework within which the nuclear generating industry has operated in England and Wales since 31 March 1990. It describes the formation of Nuclear Electric plc and the licensing arrangements, including the various obligations which have been placed upon Nuclear Electric by virtue of its Generation Licence. The impact of competition law is outlined, together with the commercial arrangements including electricity pooling and some of the other more important agreements which Nuclear Electric has entered into. Finally, the Paper discusses some of the constraints under which Nuclear Electric operates, and summarises Government policy towards nuclear power and its future prospects in the United Kingdom. (author)

  17. An experimental study on the effect of TV commercials on the attitudes towards nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study is about the effect TV commercials have on the subjects' attitudes towards nuclear power generation. A number of 191 female students participated in the experiment. It was hypothesized that TV commercials would have a positive effect on the viewer's attitude towards nuclear power generation. The main results of the study supported this hypothesis, demonstrating that TV commercials constitute an effective means for changing people's perception of nuclear power generation. (author)

  18. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented

  19. Main Generator Seal Oil Supply Reliability Improvements at Southern California Edison's San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the justification for the approach, details and results of the Main Generator Seal Oil System reliability enhancements on the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, SONGS. The SONGS, Unit 3 experienced substantial turbine damage in early 2001 after the turbine bearings lubrication oil supply failed. During a loss of off-site power incident, power was lost to the two AC powered turbine lubrication oil pumps due to a breaker failure in the switchgear and the DC powered emergency bearing lubricating oil pump failed to start due to a breaker trip. The SONGS turbine generators coasted down from full speed to a full stop without lubricating oil. This resulted in significant bearing, journal and steam path damage that required a four-month duration repair outage during a time period where electricity was in short supply in the State of California. The generator hydrogen sealing system remained operable during this event, however it was recognized during the event follow up investigation that this system had vulnerabilities to failure similar to the bearing lubrication system. In order to prevent a reoccurrence of this extremely costly event, SONGS has taken actions to modify both of these critical turbine generator systems by adding additional, continuously operating pumps with a new, independent power source and independently routed cables. The main challenge was to integrate the additional equipment into the existing lubrication and seal oil systems. The lubrication Oil System was the first system to be retro-fitted and these results already have been presented. Reference 2. This paper provides the result of the reliability enhancements for the Main Generator Seal Oil System, which concludes the turbine/generator critical oil systems reliability improvements, performed by SONGS. It is worth noting that the design team discovered and corrected a number of other significant operational issues, which had been present from the early days and also learned

  20. Thermal behavior of the nuclear graphite waste generated from the decommissioning of the nuclear research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hee Chul; Eun, Hee Chul; Lee, Dong Gyu; Cho, Yong Jun; Kang, Young Ae; Lee, Keun Woo; Oh, Won Jin [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    This study investigated the thermal behavior of the nuclear graphite waste generated from the decommissioning of the Korean nuclear research reactor. The first part study investigated the decomposition rate of the nuclear graphite waste up to 1000 .deg. C under various oxygen partial pressures using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA). Tested graphite waste sample not easily destroyed in the oxygen-deficient condition. However, the gas-solid oxidation reaction was found to be very effective in the presence of oxygen. No significant amount of the products of incomplete combustion was formed even in the limited oxygen concentration of 4 % O{sub 2}. The influence of temperature and oxygen partial pressure was evaluated by the theoretical model analysis of the thermo-gravimetric data. The activation energy and the reaction order of graphite oxidation were evaluated as 128 kJ/mole and 1.1, respectively. The second part of this study investigated the behavior of radioactive elements under graphite oxidation atmosphere using thermodynamic equilibrium model. {sup 22}Na, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs were found be the semi-volatile elements. Since volatile uranium species can be formulated at high temperatures above 1050 .deg. C, the temperature of incinerator furnace should be minimized. Other corrosion/activation products, fission products and uranium were found to be the non-volatile species.

  1. Thermal behavior of the nuclear graphite waste generated from the decommissioning of the nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the thermal behavior of the nuclear graphite waste generated from the decommissioning of the Korean nuclear research reactor. The first part study investigated the decomposition rate of the nuclear graphite waste up to 1000 .deg. C under various oxygen partial pressures using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA). Tested graphite waste sample not easily destroyed in the oxygen-deficient condition. However, the gas-solid oxidation reaction was found to be very effective in the presence of oxygen. No significant amount of the products of incomplete combustion was formed even in the limited oxygen concentration of 4 % O2. The influence of temperature and oxygen partial pressure was evaluated by the theoretical model analysis of the thermo-gravimetric data. The activation energy and the reaction order of graphite oxidation were evaluated as 128 kJ/mole and 1.1, respectively. The second part of this study investigated the behavior of radioactive elements under graphite oxidation atmosphere using thermodynamic equilibrium model. 22Na, 134Cs and 137Cs were found be the semi-volatile elements. Since volatile uranium species can be formulated at high temperatures above 1050 .deg. C, the temperature of incinerator furnace should be minimized. Other corrosion/activation products, fission products and uranium were found to be the non-volatile species

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2010-09-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R and D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R and D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R and D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R and D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the ''highly ranked'' phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR

  4. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2010-12-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  5. Recycling of concrete generated from Nuclear Power Plant dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor decommissioning required various technologies such as dismantling of facilities, decontamination, radioactivity measurement and recycling of dismantling wastes. This article discussed recycling of demolished concrete wastes. Dismantling of reactor building of large one unit of nuclear power plants would generate about 500 K tons of concrete wastes, about 98% of which was non-radioactive and could be used as base course material or backfill material after crushed to specified particle size. Since later part of 1990s, high quality recycled aggregate with specified limit of bone-dry density, water absorptivity and amount of fine aggregate had been developed from demolished concrete with 'Heat and rubbing method', 'Eccentric rotor method' and 'Screw grinding method' so as to separate cements attached to aggregate. Recycled aggregates were made from concrete debris with 'Jaw crusher' to particle size less than 40 mm and then particle size control or grinded by various grinding machines. Recycled fine aggregates made from crushing would have fragile site with cracks, air voids and bubbles. The author proposed quality improvement method to selectively separate fragile defects from recycled aggregates using weak grinding force, leaving attached pastes much and preventing fine particle generation as byproducts. This article outlined experiments to improve quality of recycled fine aggregates and their experimental results confirmed improvement of flow ability and compressive strength of mortal using recycled fine aggregates using 'Particle size selector' and 'Ball mill' so as to remove their fragile parts less than 2%. Mortal made from recycled fine aggregate could also prevent permeation of chloride ion. Recycled aggregate could be used for concrete instead of natural aggregate. (T. Tanaka)

  6. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2007-01-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  7. Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive

  8. The Developmental Strategy of the Korean Nuclear Power Generation Technology and the Future Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Republic of Korea started its program on nuclear energy development in the late 1950s. The first power generation reactor started producing commercial electricity in 1978. In 1983, Korea started its long-term project on the standardized nuclear power plant design (KSPNP). At the present, nuclear energy provides almost 40% of the total electricity generation in the Republic of Korea. The technology transfer program and technological self-reliance initiative of the Korean nuclear power generation community have been successfully executed to the point that Korea is now capable of exporting her nuclear power generation capabilities and sharing her know-how and developmental experience with other developed and developing nations, which need nuclear power generation in order to secure energy supply for sustainable development

  9. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.E. Demick

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  10. Radionuclide Gas Transport through Nuclear Explosion-Generated Fracture Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-01

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. Seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.

  11. Steam generator management at Ontario Hydro Nuclear Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickerson, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Maruska, C.C. [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    Managing ageing steam generators involves costly decisions for the utility, both in terms of the cost of the maintenance activities andin terms of having the unit shutdown and consequent power loss while performing these activities. The benefits of these activities are seldom guaranteed and are sometimes very intangible. For nuclear utilities the most pertinent questions that arise are have we identified all the problem(s), can we predict the risk due to these problems? Can we implement corrective and preventive activities to manage the problem and what is the optimum timing of implementation? Is the money spent worthwhile, i.e. has it given us a return in production and safety? Can we avoid surprises? How can we tangibly measure success? This paper touches briefly on all the questions mentioned above but it mainly addresses the last question: 'how can we tangibly measure success?' by using several success indicators proposed by EPRI and by applying them to actual Ontario Hydro experience. The appropriateness of these success indicators as the means to assess the success of these programs, to feed back the results, and to enhance or revise the programs will be discussed. (author)

  12. Optimization of air ducts for nuclear reactor power generation station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the optimization study on the heating, ventilating and air conditions system in Nuclear Reactor Power Generation Station, proper arrangement of air ducts has been studied using the experimental and analytical investigation from a viewpoint of duct arrangement optimization. This study consists of two parts. Part I is optimization of air ducts in the corridors and Part II is optimization of air duct in each room. In part I, from viewpoints of confinement of radioactive materials in facilities having possible radioactive contamination and improvement of thermal environment for workers, the authors have studied air ducts system in which fresh air is supplied to corridors and heat removal and ventilation for each room are performed by transferring air from the corridors, instead of current ducts system with supply duct to each room. In part II, the condenser room with complex configuration and large space, and the electrical equipment room with simple space are selected for model areas. Based on these studies, experimental and analytical investigation (using a three-dimensional thermal hydraulic analysis) technique has been established, and the effective design method for duct arrangement of HVAC design has been verified for Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. The air-duct arrangements optimized in this study are applied to an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Power Station in trial and reduction of the air-duct quantity is confirmed

  13. Review of emergency diesel generator performance at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed by BNL for the NRC's Vendor Program Branch, Office of Inspection and Enforcement, in order to evaluate recent Diesel Generator (DG) and DG vendor performance. All DG vendors were reviewed with the exception of Transamerica Delaval, Inc. (TDI), due to the emphasis already being given to TDI diesels. For the time period 1980 through 1983 inclusive, BNL reviewed and evaluated DG failure data, DG vendor inspection reports, the TDI lessons learned as they related to the other vendors, and pertinent studies that had previously been completed. BNL also contacted DG vendors currently in the business to determine their present and projected work scope. An overall conclusion is that non-TDI DG performance has been reasonably good. Considering the complexity of the DG, the overall number of failures is not excessively high in terms of failures per DG year when compared to other equipment in a power plant. Also, the DG reliability figures are generally good. Additionally, losses of offsite power have been decreasing. Hence, it is not felt that an immediate, intensive inspection program of all DGs is required. Nonetheless, important areas were identified for inspection followup at DG vendors, subvendors, and nuclear power plants. The most significant areas requiring followup are: auxiliary systems components, failure analyses and corrective actions, DG maintenance, DG design modifications, and spare parts

  14. Strain measurement on a compact nuclear reactor steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaldaferri, Denis Henrique Bianchi; Gomes, Paulo de Tarso Vida; Mansur, Tanius Rodrigues, E-mail: dhbs@cdtn.b, E-mail: gomespt@cdtn.b, E-mail: tanius@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Pozzo, Renato del, E-mail: delpozzo@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil); Mola, Jairo [Unitecnica Engenharia, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work presents the strain measurement procedures applied to a compact nuclear reactor steam generator, during a hydrostatic test, using strain gage technology. The test was divided in two steps: primary side test and secondary side test. In the primary side test twelve points for strain measurement using rectangular rosettes, three points (two external and one internal) for temperature measurement using special strain gages and one point for pressure measurement using a pressure transducer were monitored. In the secondary side test 18 points for strain measurement using rectangular rosettes, four points (two external and two internal) for temperature measurement using special strain gages and one point for pressure measurement using a pressure transducer were monitored. The measurement points on both internal and external pressurizer walls were established from pre-calculated stress distribution by means of numerical approach (finite elements modeling). Strain values using a quarter Wheatstone bridge circuit were obtained. Stress values, from experimental strain were determined, and to numerical calculation results were compared. (author)

  15. Steam generator management at Ontario Hydro Nuclear Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Managing ageing steam generators involves costly decisions for the utility, both in terms of the cost of the maintenance activities and in terms of having the unit shutdown and consequent power loss while performing these activities. The benefits of these activities are seldom guaranteed and are sometimes very intangible. For nuclear utilities the most pertinent questions that arise are have we identified all the problem(s), can we predict the risk due to these problems? Can we implement corrective and preventive activities to manage the problem and what is the optimum timing of implementation? Is the money spent worthwhile, i.e. has it given us a return in production and safety? Can we avoid surprises? How can we tangibly measure success? This paper touches briefly on all the questions mentioned above but it mainly addresses the last question: 'how can we tangibly measure success?' by using several success indicators proposed by EPRI and by applying them to actual Ontario Hydro experience. The appropriateness of these success indicators as the means to assess the success of these programs, to feed back the results, and to enhance or revise the programs will be discussed. (author)

  16. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Pre-Conceptual Design Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a demonstration of the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology for the production of process heat, electricity, and hydrogen. This nuclear based technology can provide high-temperature process heat (up to 950 C) that can be used as a substitute for the burning of fossil fuels for a wide range of commercial applications. The substitution of the HTGR for burning fossil fuels conserves these hydrocarbon resources for other uses, reduces uncertainty in the cost and supply of natural gas and oil, and eliminates the emissions of greenhouse gases attendant with the burning of these fuels. The HTGR is a passively1 safe nuclear reactor concept with an easily understood safety basis that permits substantially reduced emergency planning requirements and improved siting flexibility compared to current and advanced light water reactors (LWRs). In the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), the Department of Energy (DOE) was tasked with providing a demonstration of this HTGR technology to economically and reliably produce electricity and hydrogen by the year 2021. As the lead nuclear technology development laboratory of the DOE, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated the work necessary to complete this task. The EPAct also stipulated that the task should be undertaken in partnership with the industrial end users of the technology. To that end, a working group has been assembled consisting of suppliers of the technology, nuclear plant owner/operators, other supportive technology companies, and potential end users. The objective of the working group is to form an Alliance that would provide the private sector perspective and direction for completion of the NGNP in partnership with the DOE. The Alliance will support the selection of the specific operating conditions and configuration for NGNP to ensure it meets private sector expectations, commence

  17. Generation 4 International Forum. 2009 GIF R and D outlook for generation 4 nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the state, at mid 2009, of research and development of the 6 reactor types that were selected in the framework of the GIF (Generation 4 International Forum): VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor), SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor), SCWR (Super-Critical Water Reactor), GFR (Gas-cooled Fast Reactor), LFR (Lead-cooled reactor), and MSR (Molten Salt Reactor). Regarding each type of reactors, the state of advancement is reported for the reactor itself, its specific components and materials, its nuclear fuel, and its fuel cycle. The outlook of development and research work is also given for the next 5 years for the 6 types of reactors. (A.C.)

  18. Generation and migration of hydrogen in nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. There is concern that hydrogen generated by anaerobic corrosion of metals in a repository could affect adversely the functional properties of radioactive waste repository barriers if the pressure caused by hydrogen accumulation was allowed to increase beyond some limits. This problem can be solved either by preventing fast generation of hydrogen from metals involved in a repository or by using barriers permeable enough not to allow accumulation of hydrogen to achieve pressure leading possibly to failure of barriers. This concern is particularly relevant for repository concepts with steel based canisters, which is the case of the Czech DGR concept. This article describes the work conducted in Nuclear Research Institute Rez (NRI) focused both on determining hydrogen generation under various conditions, measuring pressure arisen due to accumulation of hydrogen before a compacted, saturated bentonite layer and measuring transport of hydrogen through it. Hydrogen generation or carbon steel corrosion rates were determined both in solution simulated bentonite pore water in anaerobic glove box with content of residual oxygen less than 0.1 ppm under various temperatures and in contact of metal with compacted bentonite in special corrosion apparatus under conditions simulated conditions in a deep geological repository. The apparatus developed in NRI contained carbon steel disc in direct contact with compacted bentonite, which was saturated from above by synthetic granitic water under high pressure. A membrane below carbon steel samples enabled to measure pressure between carbon steel and bentonite. The increase of pressure indicates hydrogen accumulation due to corrosion. Also the total pressure caused by combination of swelling pressure, water pressure and hydrogen pressure was measured. Corrosion rates were determined from weigh loss of carbon steel samples. Two types of devices were used for measuring hydrogen migration

  19. Introducing Nuclear Energy to High-School Students: The Spanish Young Generation in Nuclear (Jóvenes Nucleares) Lectures

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez Varas, Gonzalo; A. Muñoz; Brucker, R; Villar, T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main goals of Spanish Young Generation (JJNN) is to spread knowledge about nuclear energy, not only pointing out its advantages and its role in our society, but also trying to correct some of the ideas that are due to the biased information and to the lack of knowledge. With this goal in mind, lectures were given in several high schools, aimed at students ranging from 14 to 18 years old. This paper explains the experience accumulated during those talks and the conclusions that can ...

  20. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Preliminary Project Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This draft preliminary project management plan presents the conceptual framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, consistent with the authorization in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. In developing this plan, the Idaho National Laboratory has considered three fundamental project planning options that are summarized in the following section. Each of these planning options is literally compliant with the Energy Policy Act of 2005, but each emphasizes different approaches to technology development risks, design, licensing and construction risks, and to the extent of commercialization support provided to the industry. The primary focus of this draft preliminary project management plan is to identify those activities important to Critical Decision-1, at which point a decision on proceeding with the NGNP Project can be made. The conceptual project framework described herein is necessary to establish the scope and priorities for the technology development activities. The framework includes: A reference NGNP prototype concept based on what is judged to be the lowest risk technology development that would achieve the needed commercial functional requirements to provide an economically competitive nuclear heat source and hydrogen production capability. A high-level schedule logic for design, construction, licensing, and acceptance testing. This schedule logic also includes an operational shakedown period that provides proof-of-principle to establish the basis for commercialization decisions by end-users. An assessment of current technology development plans to support Critical Decision-1 and overall project progress. The most important technical and programmatic uncertainties (risks) are evaluated, and potential mitigation strategies are identified so that the technology development plans may be modified as required to support ongoing project development. A rough-order-of-magnitude cost evaluation that provides an initial basis for budget planning. This

  1. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. E. MacDonald

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen

  2. Management of radioactive waste generated in nuclear medicine; Gestion de los residuos radiactivos generados en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz Perez, P.

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear medicine is a clinical specialty in which radioactive material is used in non-encapsulated form, for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Nuclear medicine involves administering to a patient a radioactive substance, usually liquid, both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. This process generates solid radioactive waste (syringes, vials, gloves) and liquid (mainly the patient's urine). (Author)

  3. Technical characteristics of new generation of nuclear power plants; Charakterystyka techniczna elektrowni jadrowych nowej generacji

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janczak, R.; Mikulski, A.; Staron, E. [Instytut Energii Atomowej, Swierk-Otwock (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    The concept of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR) as a new generation of nuclear reactors for energetics have been presented. The influence of reactor accidents (TMI and Chernobyl) on technical and scientific development of nuclear reactors has been discussed from the view point of safety assurance and requirements being defined by American and European Nuclear Regulatory commission. 12 refs, 14 figs.

  4. New reactor concepts for new generation of nuclear power plants: an overview, invited paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outlook for energy demand underscores the need to increase the share of nuclear energy production. Achieving the vision of sustainable growth of nuclear energy will require development of both advanced nuclear fuel cycles and next generation reactor technologies and advanced reprocessing and fuel treatment technologies. To achieve this vision, the US department of energy (DOE) has adopted new strategy, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), which integrates earlier programs: the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative (Generation IV), Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), and the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) with proliferation-resistant spent fuel reprocessing to minimize nuclear waste. Generation IV furthers this vision beyond previous energy systems, such as Generation III+, through incremental improvements in economic competitiveness, sustainability, development of passively safe systems, and breakthrough methods to reduce the routes of nuclear proliferation. This paper summarizes the main characteristics of the six most promising nuclear energy systems identified by the Generation IV Roadmap and reviews some Generation IV system designs for small-side proliferation resistant reactors being developed by University of California at Berkeley. (author)

  5. The Japanese attitude towards nuclear power generation. Changes as seen through time series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is intended to determine people's attitudes toward nuclear power generation, shedding light on the changed and unchanged structures of attitudes by comparing data on nuclear power generation for 1993 and 1998. Although some nuclear facility accidents occurred during the last five years, public attitudes toward nuclear power generation remain almost the same. For the utilization of nuclear power generation, there was a slight increase in passive affirmation. The percentage of active affirmation was less than 10 percent, but if passive affirmation is included a high percentage exceeding 70 percent acknowledged the utilization of nuclear power. It was found that people's attitudes toward the utilization of nuclear power became slightly more positive in 1998 than in 1993. The difference was found in the general measure of attitudes based on many questions about nuclear power generation, and in the importance and the utility of nuclear power generation including the purpose of nuclear power generation. People are not conscious of the anxiety about nuclear power generation in ordinary life. However, when people were made to think about nuclear power generation, the degree of anxiety increases even if provided with data that prove its safety. On the other hand, it was revealed that the degree of anxiety about nuclear facility accidents remains the same in the last five years, that is, it has not increased, although a growing interest in the disposal and treatment of radioactive wastes was seen. As a result of a comparison of the structure of attitudes, based on the study by Hayashi 1994, it was found that the group that had no interest in nuclear power generation offered the most noticeable features in answering pattern in both 1993 and 1998. Moreover, it was found also that the latter group of respondents were characterized by a little opportunity to have information. A similarity in the relationship between people's attitudes toward nuclear power generation

  6. A High Intensity Multi-Purpose D-D Neutron Generator for Nuclear Engineering Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This NEER project involves the design, construction and testing of a low-cost high intensity D-D neutron generator for teaching nuclear engineering students in a laboratory environment without radioisotopes or a nuclear reactor. The neutron generator was designed, fabricated and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

  7. 75 FR 34776 - Florida Power & Light Company; Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... quantity of non- radiological effluents. No changes to the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System... COMMISSION Florida Power & Light Company; Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4; Environmental... licensee), for operation of the Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4, located in...

  8. Time to plan for the next generation of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent policy decisions dealing with the nuclear fuel cycle and proliferation are examined, and the conclusion is reached that international cooperation is the key to solving the problems of nuclear weapons proliferation and building public support for continuing peaceful nuclear applications. It is essential to support international safeguards that will reduce the insecurities that motivate nuclear weapons acquisition and to recognize the ingredient of technical capability. Beyond this, more multinational guarantees and reserve stockpiles are needed and more attention must be paid to alternative fuel-cycle options. Five specific technical studies are suggested for international evaluation

  9. Membranes for H2 generation from nuclear powered thermochemical cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an effort to produce hydrogen without the unwanted greenhouse gas byproducts, high-temperature thermochemical cycles driven by heat from solar energy or next-generation nuclear power plants are being explored. The process being developed is the thermochemical production of Hydrogen. The Sulfur-Iodide (SI) cycle was deemed to be one of the most promising cycles to explore. The first step of the SI cycle involves the decomposition of H2SO4 into O2, SO2, and H2O at temperatures around 850 C. In-situ removal of O2 from this reaction pushes the equilibrium towards dissociation, thus increasing the overall efficiency of the decomposition reaction. A membrane is required for this oxygen separation step that is capable of withstanding the high temperatures and corrosive conditions inherent in this process. Mixed ionic-electronic perovskites and perovskite-related structures are potential materials for oxygen separation membranes owing to their robustness, ability to form dense ceramics, capacity to stabilize oxygen nonstoichiometry, and mixed ionic/electronic conductivity. Two oxide families with promising results were studied: the double-substituted perovskite AxSr1-xCo1-yByO3-δ (A=La, Y; B=Cr-Ni), in particular the family LaxSr1-xCo1-yMnyO3-δ (LSCM), and doped La2Ni1-xMxO4 (M = Cu, Zn). Materials and membranes were synthesized by solid state methods and characterized by X-ray and neutron diffraction, SEM, thermal analyses, calorimetry and conductivity. Furthermore, we were able to leverage our program with a DOE/NE sponsored H2SO4 decomposition reactor study (at Sandia), in which our membranes were tested in the actual H2SO4 decomposition step

  10. Economic impacts of electricity liberalization on the status of nuclear power generation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the economic impact of electricity liberalization on the status of nuclear power generation in the United States. Nuclear power plants have been treated equally with other types of power plants in the liberalized electricity market. The existing nuclear power plants were thought to be competitive in liberalized wholesale electricity market. Competitive pressure from the market also facilitated efficiency improvement among the existing nuclear power plants. Although it was difficult to build new reactor, the U.S. nuclear power generators expanded capacity through up rates. In recent years, however, nuclear power plants suffer from the decline in wholesale power prices and some of them are forced to retire early. Although there are some market design issues that could be improved to maintain the efficient nuclear power plants in competitive environment, it is now argued that some additional arrangements to mitigate the investment risks of the nuclear power plants are necessary. (author)

  11. On the problem of nuclear power generation. Calculation rationality and personality suitability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If developed nations, under the condition that the “nuclear military technology” exists, act in “global economy” according to “calculation rationality” as the behavioral principle, then the nuclear power generation appears necessarily. However, it is possible for us to force “calculation rationality” to bear some “personality suitability” — to abandon nuclear power generation — from the standpoint of “rationality based on personal values”. (author)

  12. The Korean strategy and experience in developing nuclear power generation capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Korean nuclear energy development program and future prospects are discussed. Korea has achieved the substantial level of nuclear power plant localization through Korean Standard Nuclear Power (KSNP) Plant approach. The KSNP approach includes plant standardization, equipment, fuel and service localization and codes and standards development. Korea could develop her own decision making capability as Korea took the total project management responsibility in the KSNP approach. Current Korean nuclear R and D program includes next generation nuclear power plant development and advanced fuel development. The PWR-CANDU symbiosis is carefully considered to improve the nuclear power economy

  13. The trend of the public opinion upon nuclear power generation in internet blog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors pay attention to and survey internet information which is called 'blog' to grasp how nuclear power generation information is treated in internet and forms public opinion. Examples of the outcomes are as follows. 1) Numbers of blog reference will change by public opinion upon nuclear power generation. A lot of blog references about nuclear power plants are conducted when a big earthquake occurred. 2) As a feature of the report, numbers of the references against nuclear power generation exceed those which are positive for nuclear power. There are a lot of blog reports which are against nuclear power generation and easy to make readers believe that they are true even if they are based on misunderstanding. It is worried that such reports give people too much negative influence for the public opinion upon nuclear power generation. The authors survey short term trend of the internet public opinion after TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Power Plants Accident too. As a result, it is made clear that people's concern upon nuclear power became very high and the ratio of the supporters of nuclear power generation changed after the accident. (author)

  14. Nuclear energy in medium and long term energy generation of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study; objectives and activities of Nuclear Power Plants Department and Turkish Electricity Generation and Transmission Corporation is briefly mentioned. A brief history of electricity generation, development of Turkish electrical energy sector and development of the installed capacity of country is presented. The history and future perspectives of AKZuyu Nuclear Power Plant Project is sharply outlined. In the light of the current situation in electricity generation and demand projections, importance of nuclear power among the other future electricity generation alternatives of Turkey is underlined

  15. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system

  16. Relationship between students' interests in science and attitudes toward nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the following two points, we conducted an attitude survey among senior high school students. Study 1 The differences in attitudes between nuclear power generation and other science and technologies. Study 2 The relationship between student's interest in science and attitudes toward nuclear power generation. In the questionnaire, the attitude toward nuclear power generation consisted of four questions: (1) pros and cons, (2) safety, (3) necessity, (4) reliability of scientists and engineers who are involved in nuclear power; and we treat four science and technology issues: (1) genetically modified foods, (2) nuclear power generation, (3) humanoid and pet robots, (4) crone technology. From study 1, on attitude to security toward nuclear power generation, about 80% of respondents answered negatively and on attitude to necessity toward it, about 75% of respondents answered positively. Therefore, we found that the structure of attitude was complicated and that it was specific to nuclear power generation. From study 2, we found students' interests in science that influence the attitude toward nuclear power generation. (author)

  17. "He's Supportive, Period": A Tribute to Bertram (Chip) Bruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    In this personal and revealing essay, the author traces her relationship with Chip Bruce, from its beginnings, when he served on her dissertation committee, to the present, when she realizes that she is paying forward to her own graduate students the fruits of community inquiry and supportive teaching and learning.

  18. Our GSLIS Colleague, Chip Bruce: An Appreciation. A Deweyan Pragmatist in the Internet Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The reconstructive project needed to enable information for democracy, to which Chip Bruce has contributed much, is of long standing. Using a few wide brush strokes, in this article some of the most vital historical contexts for situating this project are supplied.

  19. Coffee Cups, Canoes, Airplanes and the Lived Experience: Reflections on the Works of Bertram (Chip) Bruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haythornthwaite, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    A career spent in research, teaching, and engagement with community entails a lifetime of assemblage of meaning from people, resources, technologies and experience. In his work, Bertram (Chip) Bruce has long engaged with how we create such an assemblage of meaning from our formal and found learning, and from the "lived experience" of…

  20. Comment on "Describing Weyl Neutrinos by a Set of Maxwell-like Equations" by S Bruce

    CERN Document Server

    Dvoeglazov, V V

    1996-01-01

    Results of the work of S. Bruce [{\\it Nuovo Cimento} {\\bf 110}B (1995) 115] are compared with those of recent papers of D. V. Ahluwalia and myself, devoted to describing neutral particles of spin $j=1/2$ and $j=1$.

  1. Production of gel 99mTc generators for Nuclear Medicine at the Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and testing of the gel-type 99mTc generator technology has been going on for several years at the Nuclear Power Institute of China. This generator type has already been licensed by the Ministry of Health. With the co-operation of the IAEA, under Model Project CPR/2/006,it is intended to upgrade and optimise the existing facility for large scale production and continue to improve the generator performance in terms of quality and reliability of its use in nuclear medicine. The expert mission objective was to carry out final laboratory tests to assess the performance of the gel- type 99mTc, locally produced, as well as to assess the suitability of the corresponding 99mTc eluate for nuclear medicine studies. In particular, the expert tested the suitability of the 99mTc for the labelling of sensitive biomolecules and its general performance in a nuclear medicine service

  2. Safety Requirements to Face Nuclear Power Plants Blackout Using Standby Gas Turbine Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main function of nuclear power plant safety systems is to prevent damage to the reactor and the release of radioactive materials into the surroundings following an occurrence that interrupts normal power plant operation. Recent nuclear regulations concerning the emergency power generating facilities in nuclear power plants consider diesel engines only for the application which is n't the best choice for stand by generation needs. In this paper the main goal is to determine the main characteristic of Diesel Generator (DG) and Gas Turbine Generator (GTG) and justify the main general requirements for a station blackout power sources using gas turbine generator instead of commonly used diesel generators to bring multiplicity to the design of the nuclear unit

  3. Revitalizing the nuclear business at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ontario Hydro, North America's largest electric power utility, with an installed capacity of 34,000 MW, has under gone a major restructuring over the past year to better align itself with a changing electricity market and evolving customer needs. The single largest new business unit within the new Ontario Hydro is Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN), responsible for engineering, operation and maintenance of the Corporation's 20 large nuclear units at three generating sites, OHN faces a significant challenge in returning Ontario's nuclear units to the world-leading performance levels they enjoyed in the past, particularly the older Pickering A and Bruce A plants. However, steady progress is being made as evidenced by improving peer reviews and overall capacity and financial performance

  4. Nuclear power generation alternative for a clean energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: World Energy Council stated that it is a huge goal to raise the efficiency in which energy is provided. Over 60% of primary energy is, in effect, wasted. At present 63% of the world's electricity comes from thermal power (coal, oil and gas) 19% from hydro, 17% from nuclear, 0.5% from geothermal and 0.1% from solar, wind and biomass. Nuclear power almost completely avoids all the problems associated with fossil fuels: no greenhouse effect, no acid rain, no air pollution with sulfur dioxide or nitrogen oxides, no oil spills, etc. Its impact on health and environment is related to radiation and is relatively minor. Without pretending a high accuracy of numbers, if the Romanian nuclear power reactors will be replaced by a coal plant of equivalent capacity, about 10 millions tons of CO2 and large quantities of associated sulfur and nitrous oxides, would be discharged to the atmosphere each year. However the acceptance of nuclear power is largely and an emotional issue. In all activities in which nuclear industry is involved, it takes care of the environment. Nuclear energy can have an important contribution for the future of mankind regarding the sustainable supply of energy. Security problems are part of universal nuclear technology management and it is not risk free. The nuclear industry acknowledges responsibilities and has a unique security culture. Security is not only a technical problem, but also an emotional one. Based on the environmental monitoring program this paper tries to demonstrate that the routine radioactive emissions of Cernavoda NPP, which are limited by National Competent Authority, gives an insignificant risk increase. For assessing the environmental impacts and damage costs from exposure, IAEA's Model SIMPACTS is applied. SIMPACT is a powerful and convenient tool for evaluating external costs of human health and environmental impacts for nuclear power and other energy sources. (authors)

  5. Design, operating and maintenance experience of Babcock and Wilcox nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) has designed and manufactured nuclear steam generators since the beginnings of the nuclear era in the 1950's. This paper describes how the B and W recirculating steam generator design evolved, the operating and maintenance history of the design, and the evolution of design and manufacturing methods into replacement steam generators for non-B and W reactors. (author)

  6. Environmental and health effects of fossil fuel and nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to identify and assess the present and future dimensions of environmental effects and impacts of various energy generation alternatives, and to place safety and environmental risks associated with the nuclear industry in Canada in perspective with the risks from other sources. It was found that nuclear power generation involves a comparable risk to that of conventional methods of thermoelectric power generation

  7. Generation of random nuclear pulse using Fibonacci linear feedback shift registers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generating random nuclear pulses is of great interest in the field of nuclear instrumentation as it can facilitate the testing of front end electronics like pre-amplifiers, amplifiers and associated electronic channels in absence of radiation source and detectors. An algorithm based on Fibonacci Linear feedback shift registers (LFSR) has been developed. It employs LFSRs to generate uniformly distributed random numbers which are then suitably processed to produce random pulses having characteristics of pulses generated by a neutron detector. (author)

  8. Study on risk management for operation of nuclear generation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reputation loss is regarded as a management issue because it impacts to business and industries significantly. Reputation management is one of the approach both business and public organizations. Application of reputation management for nuclear plant management is discussed. (author)

  9. Nuclear power generation safe and competitive - now and in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ENC brings together scientists, academics, chief executives and all the major players from both the European and world nuclear utilities, to debate on the nuclear energy from technical, commercial and political perspectives. The abstracts of presentation from this conference are proposed in this paper grouped in four main themes: innovative reactors and fuel cycle; waste management including partitioning and transmutation and ADS development; experimental, research reactors and neutron sources; operation, maintenance, inspection and thermal hydraulics. (A.L.B.)

  10. Nuclear power generation safe and competitive - now and in future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf-Dieter, Krebs [European Nuclear Society and Framatome ANP (Germany); Hoffman, D.R. [American Nuclear Society and Excel Services Corp. (United States)

    2002-07-01

    ENC brings together scientists, academics, chief executives and all the major players from both the European and world nuclear utilities, to debate on the nuclear energy from technical, commercial and political perspectives. The abstracts of presentation from this conference are proposed in this paper grouped in four main themes: innovative reactors and fuel cycle; waste management including partitioning and transmutation and ADS development; experimental, research reactors and neutron sources; operation, maintenance, inspection and thermal hydraulics. (A.L.B.)

  11. Present status and future outlook of nuclear power generation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of energy consumption in Japan is heavily dependent on imported oil, therefore Japan has been making its greatest effort in developing nuclear power among other alternatives of oil. The capacity factor of the nuclear power plants in Japan marked 76% in FY 1986, exceeding 70% level for the past several years. The share of nuclear power is expected to increase steadily in the future. Future scale of the nuclear power generation is projected as 62,000 MW in year 2000 and as 137,000 MW in 2030. Nuclear power is expected to produce 58% of the nation's total power generation in 2030. Under the present circumstances, Janpan is executing a nuclear energy policy based on the following guidelines: 1. Promoting the safety advancement program; 2. Improving LWR technologies; 3. Program on use of plutonium in thermal reactors; 4. Advanced thermal reactors (ATRs); 5. Promotion of FBR development; 6. Nuclear fuel cycle. (Liu)

  12. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Steam Generator and Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Wright

    2010-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for

  13. Progress of international cooperation of nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International cooperation on nuclear power technology under promotion of the Japan Electric Power Information Center can be divided roughly to two items: one is an assistant project of Japan Keirin Association and another is an international training of operation management and so forth on nuclear power plant trusted by Ministry of International Trade and Industry. Among upgrading needs of technical cooperation on nuclear power to the developing nations, the electric companies were received a request on private cooperation by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. In 1985, it was decided that the nuclear power technical cooperation through an subsidy project of the Japan Keirin Association was advanced mainly by every electric companies as a window of the Japan Electric Power Information Center in Japan Electric Industry Association. And, by receiving another request, the Japan Electric Power Information Center began an international training on operation management and so one of the nuclear power plant since October, 1992. Here were introduced outlines of both technical cooperation on nuclear power and international training on operation management. (G.K.)

  14. The development and use of radionuclide generators in nuclear medicine - recent advances and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the trend in radionuclide generator research has declined, radionuclide generator systems continue to play an important role in nuclear medicine. Technetium-99m obtained from the molybdenum-99/technetium-99m generator system is used in over 80% of all diagnostic clinical studies and there is increasing interest and use of therapeutic radioisotopes obtained from generator systems. This paper focuses on a discussion of the major current areas of radionuclide generator research, and the expected areas of future research and applications

  15. Factors affecting the next generation of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For both financial, environmental and health reasons, and because of external and internal factors affecting this nation's energy supply, nuclear power will likely play a part in supplying this nation's energy in the coming decades. I believe this to be true for some other parts of the world as well. Even some severe critics of the nuclear power industry and the NRC might agree with me on this point. Increasing concern with the environmental consequences of the burning of fossil fuels has led some former opponents of the use of nuclear power to balance anew the risks and benefits of nuclear power and to modify to some degree their former opposition. A related concern with the adequacy of the energy supply is leading others to modify their positions. According to analyses done by the U.S. Department of Energy, after 1994 the United States will no longer be able to assure all its citizens a reliable supply of electricity. Already, many areas of the country are in need of additional electric capacity. In both Sweden and Switzerland, similar concerns have led to the adoption by many of more compromising positions. Some critics of nuclear power may in the end still reject it as an alternative, but, with the increased pressures on the environment and on our energy supply, nuclear power is an alternative which cannot be rejected without the most serious consideration. This should be, I believe, a point of consensus among us. In sum, there is a future for nuclear power in the sense that there is a use for it

  16. Nuclear heat generation race on the walls and floor of calandria vault of 500 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear heat generation rate profile along the walls and floor of calandria vault is required to analyse its strength during the life time of reactor power operation and to ascertain adequacy of cooling and shielding arrangements. Hence detailed heat generation profile on the face and across the thickness of walls and floor is generated. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  17. Determination of leveled costs of electric generation for gas plants, coal and nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work analyzes the leveled costs of electric generation for different types of nuclear reactors known as Generation III, these costs are compared with the leveled costs of electric generation of plants with the help of natural gas and coal. In the study several discount rates were used to determine their impact in the initial investment. The obtained results are comparable with similar studies and they show that it has more than enough the base of the leveled cost the nuclear option it is quite competitive in Mexico. Also in this study it is also thinks about the economic viability of a new nuclear power station in Mexico. (Author)

  18. Attitude changes toward nuclear power generation. Analysis of data from a longitudinal survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Attitude changes toward nuclear power generation in response to incidents/accidents at the nuclear facilities were examined, using a longitudinal survey. A replicated survey was conducted in Kansai area following the incidents in 1995 and 1997, and a panel survey was conducted in 1997, using the same subjects as those in the survey conducted by C. Hayashi in 1993 about the attitude toward nuclear power generation. The results of the panel survey showed that an anxiety about a nuclear incident/accident tended to increase and that the number of those who decreased an anxiety about a nuclear incident/accident was relatively small, compared to an anxiety about other incidents/accidents. Using the quantification theory to analyze the group that showed changes in attitude toward nuclear power generation, it was suggested that the increase or decrease in the level of anxiety about a nuclear power incident/accident had an influence on the changes in attitude. However, the influence was not the most significant one compared to other factors. With the inclusion of the group that showed no change in attitude, the general population structure that the approval for nuclear power generation because of inevitable use of nuclear energy accounted for sixty percent remained with no significant change. (author)

  19. Development of power generation and nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of Czechoslovak WWER type nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and planned. Regional geological surveying is being performed for nuclear power plant siting, covering an area of about 100 to 200 km in radius, as well as engineering and geological surveying aimed at obtaining data on the bearing capacity and stability of the area, on the subsidence of foundation soil due to construction, on ground water level, etc. The basic engineering and geological properties of suitable nuclear power plant sites are listed. A description is given of the method of seismic subdivision of the site into micro-areas and of the system of automatic earthquake protection used for securing the seismic safety of the power plants. (E.J.). 3 refs

  20. The Spanish Nuclear Electricity Generating Capacity since 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article describes the evolution of Spain's nuclear power plants since 1982, the year in which the journal of the Spanish Nuclear Society first appeared, underlining those events that have had a special impact on this evolution at national and international level. At present, there are 9 nuclear groups operating in the country, of the total 17 that were at different stages of their life cycle at that time. This reduction in the number of groups that finally managed to initiated and indefinitely continue their operating lifetime contrasts with the growth of electricity consumption over the period, which has practically doubled. During these 18 years have been profound transformations in the social, economic and political context of Spain, both in general and in the Electricity Industry in particular. Nevertheless, there are now reasons, old new, to feel confident as regards the future of this energy source. (Author)

  1. Modern turbine-generators for smaller standardized nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an emerging interest in small standardized nuclear power plants for worldwide commercial application, and these are of a size for which well proven compact steam turbines are ideally suited. With its experience, GEC ALSTHOM is well placed to provide turbines for small standardized nuclear systems up to the 600 MW(e) currently envisaged. At this low power level, full-speed turbines are the appropriate choice. The paper describes relevant experience with these turbines, and the corresponding thermodynamic cycles. 4 refs., 13 figs

  2. Code generator for experiments on nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A code pulse train generator for experiments on relaxation analysis is described. The generator generates upto 8 pulses, whose duration and intervals between them are controlled from 0.5 μs to 160 s with the step of 0.1 μs. The maximum number of pulse train recurrence is 160. A separate code generates the Karr-Parsel series. A synchropulse for measuring-recording devices is established after any pulse of a set code or after the last 180 deg pulse in the Karr train. The device is performed using microcircuits of the 155 series

  3. Corrosion aspects in steam generators of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steam generators of pressurized water reactors (PWR), transfer heat from a primary coolant system to a secondary coolant system. Primary coolant water is heated in the core and passes through the steam generator that transfer heat to the secondary coolant water. However, the steam generator is dead for ionic impurities, corrosion products and fabrication/maintenence residues. These impurities concentrate between crevice and cracks. Many types of degradation mechanisms affect the tubes. The tubes are dented, craked, ovalized, wasted, etc. This paper describes the main corrosion problems in steam generators and includes the corrective actions to considered to reduce or eliminate these corrosion problems. (author)

  4. Relationship between people's awareness of environmental capabilities of saving energy, photovoltaic power generation and nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, relationship between people's awareness of environmental capabilities of saving energy, photovoltaic power generation (PV) and nuclear power generation was investigated using questionnaire method. The results showed that saving energy is conducted without reference to its environment preservation effect. However the older people tend to regard saving energy as contribution to environment preservation. The attitude toward usage of PV has a close relationship to awareness of energy environmental concerns. Acceptance of cost sharing for the introducing of wide-scale PV systems to society is related to environment protection image of PV and the attitude toward loss of social convenience lost as a result of saving energy activities. The older people become, the more priority people put on environment protection before the social convenience. There is little relationship between environmental capabilities of nuclear power generation, that never discharge CO2 on generation, and awareness of energy environmental concerns. (author)

  5. Childhood leukemia around five nuclear facilities in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of public concern over the incidence of leukemia around the Sellafield nuclear fuel reprocessing plant, the Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board commissioned a study to test for similar clustering around licensed nuclear facilities in Ontario. In this study the incidence and mortality of leukemia among children up to the age of 14 years born within a radius of about 25 km from five different types of facilities were compared to the provincial average. The facilities considered were the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, the Bruce Nuclear Power Development, the uranium conversion facility at Port Hope, the uranium mine and mill facilities in Elliot Lake, and the Chalk River Laboratories. The ratio of observed to expected childhood leukemias was around unity at the 95 percent confidence level, indicating that the occurrence of the disease is not significantly different from the provincial average. The sample size is not large enough to distinguish between a change occurrence and a true excess or deficit. (table)

  6. Nuclear heat generating plants - technical concepts and market potentials. Chapter 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the advantages and disadvantages of different heat generating systems, a comparison is made between nuclear heat generating plants and competing heat generating systems. Nuclear heat generating plant concepts in practice have to compete with a wide range of existing and new fossil heat generating technologies of the most different capacities, ranging from combined heat and power generation to individual heating in one-family houses. Heat generation costs are calculated by means of a dynamic annuity method from an economic point of view. The development of real prices of fossil energy sources is based on two scenarios characterized as follows: scenario I - insignificant price increase by the year 2000, then stagnant; scenario II - moderate price increase by the year 2010, then stagnant. As a result of that systems comparison it can be stated that the considered nuclear heat generating plants may be an interesting competitive heat generation option, provided the assumptions on which the study is based can be implemented. This applies especially to investment costs. At the same time those plants contribute to a diversification of energy source options on the heat market. Their use leads to a reduction of fossil fuel imports, increasing at the same time short- and long-term supply guarantees. If nuclear heat generating plants substitute fossil heat generating plants, or render the construction of new ones superfluous, they contribute to avoiding chemical air pollutants. (orig./UA)

  7. Development of nuclear decay data library JDDL, and nuclear generation and decay calculation code COMRAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For safety evaluation of nuclear fuel facilities, a nuclear decay data library named JDDL and a computer code COMRAD have been developed to calculate isotopic composition of each nuclide, radiation source intensity, energy spectrum of γ-ray and neutron, and decay heat of spent fuel. JDDL has been produced mainly from the evaluated nuclear data file ENSDF to use new nuclear data. To supplement the data file for short life nuclides, the JNDC data set were also used which had been evaluated by Japan Nuclear Data Committee. Using these data, calculations became possible from short period to long period after irradiation. (author)

  8. Nuclear power generation alternative for a clean energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    World Energy Council stated that the raise of energy production efficiency should be a huge goal. Over 60% of primary energy is, in effect, wasted. At present 63% of the world's electricity comes from thermal power (coal, oil and gas), 19% from hydro, 17% from nuclear, 0.5% from geothermal and 0.1% from solar, wind and biomass. Nuclear power almost completely avoids all the problems associated with fossil fuels: no greenhouse effect, no acid rain, no air pollution with sulfur dioxide or nitrogen oxides, no oil spills, etc. Its impact on health and environment is related to radiation and is relatively minor. Without pretending a high accuracy of numbers, if the first Romanian nuclear power reactor will be replaced by a coal plant of equivalent capacity, about 5 millions tons of CO2 and large quantities of associated sulfur and nitrous oxides, would be discharged to the atmosphere each year. However the acceptance of nuclear power is largely an emotional issue. Based on the environmental monitoring program this paper tries to demonstrate that the routine radioactive emissions of Cernavoda NPP, which are limited by National Competent Authority, gives an insignificant risk increase. (authors)

  9. Problems concerning the installation of pipings for nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power stations in the world in operation at the end of 1975 were 173 plants, and those in planning or construction stage were 505 plants. The total power output amounted to 530 x 103 MW. Light water reactors occupy nearly 90% of commercial nuclear power stations. The pipings in a 1100 MW BWR nuclear power station exceeds 5000 tons, and the man-hours for the construction of the pipings are enormous. High degree of safety and reliability are required for these pipings, and it is the difference and the feature that the manufacture and installation of these pipings are carried out under the strict quality assurance system, as compared with other plants. The pipings in a nuclear power plant are diverse and complex, and laid in very restricted spaces. Therefore they interfere with each other, and construction schedule is disturbed. The problems in the planning of the pipings, the reliability of the pipings, the enormous amount of the pipings, the management of working procedures, the storage, piping works and the state of installation, the consideration about the design and layout, the pipings in a containment vessel and the models of machinery and equipments, and the tendency of design method for the future are explained. (Kako, I.)

  10. Training the next generation of nuclear engineers in safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents how undergraduate and graduate nuclear engineering students at the PennsyIvania State University are trained to develop a safety ethic or 'culture' during their coursework. This safety culture is instilled in terms of nuclear safety analysis, design, and licensing issues. various aspects of reactor safety are described either directly or indirectly in each Penn State nuclear engineering course by the development of particular theory and practical applications. A graduate level reactor safety course serves to tie in all the student's previous knowledge into a focused study of safety analysis, licensing, and accident scenarios. With each Penn State nuclear engineering course, there is a focus, and an expected level of understanding of the impact of analysis and design on reactor safety. Foundational to all courses is the knowledge of atomic, health, and reactor physics, mathematics, and general engineering principles. This paper describes the progression of courses related to reactor safety in the Penn State curriculum. The objectives for each course is given in terms of its importance in reactor safety. A detailed description of the graduate level reactor safety course is given to demonstrate how to assemble safety topics into a course that directly addresses safety, licensing, and accident analyses. This safety course serves to provide students with an comprehension of the current 'safety culture' in the United States, and hopefully, instills a proper understanding of safety issues and ethics. (author)

  11. The Staffing of Central Electricity Generating Board Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is given of the staffing requirements and organization at a CEBG nuclear power station. The training of staff and licensing requirements for reactoroperating staff are discussed. Experience gained to data of the outcome of pre-operating training and detailed planning in the operational sphere is given. (author)

  12. System defense mechanisms in nuclear power generation control computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dual-redundant computers are used to control and monitor the production of power from Ontario Hydro's nuclear power reactors. Each computer must have the capability of monitoring its own performance and detecting faults. Upon fault detection, each computer must initiate corrective responses to ensure the integrity of critical control functions. This paper reviews those features the authors have termed system defense mechanisms

  13. Nuclear suppliers prepare for the next generation of orders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses preparations for a rebirth of interest in new nuclear capacity. The author suggests that the economic engine of the industrial world in the next century will be fueled by electric power, and that planning for siting must begin now

  14. Nuclear Energy In Switzerland: It's going ahead. Challenges For The Swiss Nuclear Society Young Generation Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streit, Marco [Aare-Tessin Ltd for Electricity, Bahnhofquai 12, CH-4601 Olten (Switzerland); Bichsel, Thomas [BKW FMB Energie AG, NPP Muehleberg, CH-3203 Muehleberg (Switzerland); Fassbender, Andre [NPP Goesgen-Daeniken AG, CH-4658 Daeniken (Switzerland); Horvath, Matthias [National Emergency Operations Centre, CH-8044 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    Swiss energy policy is focused on generating domestic electric power without combusting fossil fuels for already four decades. Roughly 60% of the electricity is generated in hydroelectric plants, which is possible due to the country's favourable topography; the remaining 40% are produced by the country's five nuclear power plants (NPPs). As in any other country nuclear power has its enemies in Switzerland. Due to the direct democracy system in Switzerland the nuclear opposition has a lot of possibilities to disturb the energy policy. Since 1969, when the first Swiss nuclear power plant went online, four plebiscites were held on the issue of civil use of nuclear energy. Four times Swiss citizens voted in favour of further operation of the existing plants also in the latest battle for nuclear energy, which was won in 2003. In 2005 and 2006 several Swiss studies about the future energy situation, especially the electricity situation, have been published. All off them show clearly that there will be a big gab around the year 2020 when the oldest three nuclear power plants will fade out. A public debate was started, how to solve the problem. Beside others, building new nuclear power plants was mentioned and discussed rationally. In 2007 the energy police of the Swiss government changed into a more nuclear friendly position and at the end of the same year some electricity companies lunched a new build program. Hosting the International Youth Nuclear Congress 2008 (IYNC 2008) in Switzerland seems to be just the right moment for the nuclear industry in our country. The slightly changed surroundings effected the organization of Swiss Nuclear Society (SNS) and SNS Young Generation Group (SNSYG) and enlarged the fields of activities for SNSYG. Those activities mentioned in the previous chapters will be developed in the future. The discussion about new builds in Switzerland has started and because of that more nuclear activities in Switzerland will occur. And surely

  15. Nuclear recoil detection in liquid argon using a two-phase CRAD and DD neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of nuclear recoils in noble liquids using neutron elastic scattering off nuclei is relevant in the field of calibration of rare-event detectors for dark matter search and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments. We present here the first results on nuclear recoil detection in liquid Ar, using a two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detector (CRAD) and DD neutron generator. The technique to select the nuclear recoils for backward neutron scattering has been demonstrated

  16. New reactor concepts for new generation of nuclear power in the USA: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the growing demands for more reliable energy sources, there is an international interest in the development of new nuclear energy systems to be deployed between 2010 and 2030, that will improve safety and reliability, decrease proliferation risks, improve radioactive waste management and lower cost of nuclear energy production. Six nuclear energy systems were selected as candidates for this Generation IV initiative. In this paper we will explore each of these concepts, as well as several of more advanced concepts. (author)

  17. Strategic thinking about nuclear energy: implications of the emerging market structure in electric generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global environmental concerns provide strong motivation for electric generating technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions. By itself however, this incentive is probably not sufficient to reverse the long-term decline in the market share of nuclear energy. This is because the power plants now offered by the nuclear vendors mesh poorly with the needs of competitive generating markets. Where managers of generating companies are held accountable to share owners in a competitive environment, the nuclear power plants now offered in the market for new generating capacity are at a distinct disadvantage. As much of the world moves toward the competitive model, this disadvantage will become increasingly limiting. An alternative nuclear power plant concept and fuel cycle is needed, a radical departure from current practice, designed with the competitive marketplace in mind. To accomplish this, a new kind of institution is required: multinational in scope, oriented toward the market, and able to master the politics of the fuel cycle. (author)

  18. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Collins

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Systems, Subsystems, and Components, establishes a baseline for the current technology readiness status, and provides a path forward to achieve increasing levels of technical maturity.

  19. GAMFIL: a computer program for generating photon production nuclear data file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer program GAMFIL was developed in order to generate a photon production nuclear data file with the ENDF/B format. By assuming that evaluation is performed with the nuclear reaction theory code GNASH, GAMFIL converts the GNASH output into a data file in the ENDF/B format. For this purpose, output subroutines of GNASH were partly modified. (author)

  20. 76 FR 5216 - Florida Power Corporation, Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... COMMISSION Florida Power Corporation, Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant; Exemption 1.0 Background Florida Power Corporation (the licensee) is the holder of Facility Operating License No. DPR-72, which.... Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, the Commission) now or hereafter in effect. The facility consists...

  1. Design Features and Technology Uncertainties for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John M. Ryskamp; Phil Hildebrandt; Osamu Baba; Ron Ballinger; Robert Brodsky; Hans-Wolfgang Chi; Dennis Crutchfield; Herb Estrada; Jeane-Claude Garnier; Gerald Gordon; Richard Hobbins; Dan Keuter; Marilyn Kray; Philippe Martin; Steve Melancon; Christian Simon; Henry Stone; Robert Varrin; Werner von Lensa

    2004-06-01

    This report presents the conclusions, observations, and recommendations of the Independent Technology Review Group (ITRG) regarding design features and important technology uncertainties associated with very-high-temperature nuclear system concepts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The ITRG performed its reviews during the period November 2003 through April 2004.

  2. From the lab to the battlefield? Nanotechnology and fourth generation nuclear weapons

    CERN Document Server

    Gsponer, A

    2002-01-01

    The paper addresses some major implications of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) engineering and nanotechnology for the improvement of existing types of nuclear weapons, and the development of more robust versions of these weapons, as well as for the development of fourth generations nuclear weapons in which nanotechnology will play an essential role.

  3. Outlook for world nuclear power generation and long-term energy supply and demand situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, the author presents a long-term outlook for the world's nuclear generating capacity, taking into account the nuclear policy changes after Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. World primary energy demand will grow from 11.2 billion tons of oil equivalent (toe) in 2009 to 17.3 billion toe in 2035. Along with this rapid increase in global energy consumption, the world's nuclear generating capacity will grow from 392 GW in 2010 to 484 GW in 2020 and 574 GW in 2035 in the 'Reference scenario'. Even in the 'Low nuclear scenario', where the maximum impact of Fukushima accident to the nuclear policies of each government is assumed, it will continue to grow in the future, exceeding 500 GW in 2035. In particular, Asian countries such as China and India will lead the growth both in the energy demand and in the nuclear power capacity. Therefore, it is essential to better ensure the safety of nuclear power generation. It is important for technologically developed countries, including Japan, to make active contributions to the establishment of a global nuclear safety control system. On the other hand, energy security and global warming will continue to be major issues, which will make it indispensable to make the best effort to save energy and expand renewable energy utilization. Japan is competitive in energy-saving and environmental conservation technologies, thus further development and utilization of there technologies should be a key option of Japan's growth growth strategy in the future. (author)

  4. Financing of nuclear power plant using resources of power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is proved that during the lifetime of a power plant, financial resources are produced from depreciation and from the profit for the delivered electrical power in an amount allowing to meet the cost of construction, interests of credits, the corporation taxes, and the means usable by the utility for simple reproduction of the power plant, additional investment, or for the ultimate decommissioning of the nuclear power plant. The considerations are simplified to 1 MW of installed capacity of a WWER-440 nuclear power plant. The breakdown is shown of the profit and the depreciation over the power plant lifetime, the resources of regular payments of credit instalments for the construction and the method of its calculation, and the income for the state budget and for the utility during the plant liofetime. (J.B.). 5 tabs., 5 refs

  5. Production and testing of tubes for nuclear boiler steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallourec, second pipe manufacturer in Europe, has developed a workshop for the production of nuclear heat exchanger tubes in its Montbard plant. This workshop, by its special construction, production engineering and handling procedures, has attained nuclear standards and can produce U-bended tubes from diameter 12 to 25 mm with a maximum length of 36 meters. Its annual out-put is 1.500.000 meters. The final dimensions are obtained by a cold rolling procedure, followed by an outside and inside degreasing, a solution annealing in a controlled atmosphere continuous type furnace, a surface grinding and an inside surface conditionning. The non-destructive tests: eddy currents, ultrasonic tests and thickness mesures are recorded on a single tube basis. The curving and packing procedures have been specially developed for this production

  6. Global Boiling by Nuclear Heated Ocean: Unstoppable Atomic Generations

    OpenAIRE

    ATSUJI, Shigeo; FUJIMOTO, Ryosuke

    2014-01-01

    Hiroyuki Itsuki has said that Fukushima was a ‘second war defeat’. Japan, which suffered the atomic bombing of ‘Hiroshima’ and ‘Nagasaki’ in the Second World War, wasonce again visited by a nuclear incident at Fukushima. After the world war, the state wasdefeated but the natural environment was preserved. Conversely, at Fukushima, thenatural environment was lost and people were robbed of their livelihood, with the statealone remaining intact. Historically, the International Atomic Energy Agen...

  7. Human factors in nuclear power generation: a system's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human factors problems in nuclear power plants, as in other complex, welldefended technologies, fall into two broad categories: active failures and latent conditions. Active failures are the slips, lapses, mistakes and non-compliant actions (violations) committed by control room operators and maintenance personnel. Latent conditions, on the other hand, are the delayed-action consequences of top-level decisions.(author) 2 figs., 4 refs

  8. Solar nuclear energy generation and the chlorine solar neutrino experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Haubold, H. J.; Mathai, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    The study of solar neutrinos may provide important insights into the physics of the central region of the Sun. Four solar neutrino experiments have confirmed the solar neutrino problem but do not clearly indicate whether solar physics, nuclear physics, or neutrino physics have to be improved to solve it. Nonlinear relations among the different neutrino fluxes are imposed by two coupled systems of differential equations governing the internal structure and time evolution of the Sun. We assume ...

  9. Reliability-centered maintenance in nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes experiences in implementing RCM programs within the nuclear power group. It addresses how this engineered approach provided more direction for predictive maintenance efforts, and a better application of personnel, skills, and limited maintenance dollars. This has resulted in cost savings in terms of plant availability, lessened radiation exposure of staff, and intangibles among other areas. Payback times of such programs are on the level of one year at present

  10. Review of 12-hour shifts at nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project reviewed the practice of 12-hour shift work schedules at nuclear power plants, and its relationship to safety. The current literature was examined for information on accidents, fatigue and personal preferences. Interviews with operators and maintainers showed that these groups had attitude and preference differences related to both 12 hour shift schedules and overtime work opportunities. Several factors related to 12-hour schedules were identified which could affect safety, but which have not been adequately considered. (24 refs.)

  11. Nuclear steam generator inspection and repair using robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the steam generators in pressurized water reactors were not originally envisioned as high maintenance components, quite the opposite has been experienced. Steam generator work, including periodic inspection, tube plugging, sleeving, machining and welding not only represents a sizeable portion of an outage schedule, but can be a major contributor to personnel radiation exposure. This last area, radiation exposure, is one of the primary reasons for development of the remotely operated equipment discussed in the paper

  12. Foreign Material Exclusion Program at CNE Cernavoda Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the face of a continuing attention to operations and maintenance costs at nuclear power plants, the future of the industry depends largely upon increasing plant availability and improving operating efficiency. The success in achieving these objectives is dependent upon the success of each plant's equipment maintenance program. Preventing the introduction of foreign materials into a nuclear power plant system or component requires a careful, thoughtful, and professional approach by all site personnel. This paper describes a proactive approach to prevent the introduction of foreign material into systems and components, by providing an overview of technical considerations required to develop, implement, and manage a foreign material exclusion program at CNE Cernavoda Unit 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Station. It is also described an example of Foreign Material Intrusion which happened during the 2003 planned maintenance outage at Cernavoda Unit no.1. This paper also defines personnel responsibilities and key nomenclature and a means for evaluating prospective work tasks and activities against standardized criteria, in order to identify the appropriate level of the required FME controls. (author)

  13. Modular reactor strategy as new-generation nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear industries of the U.S. have been plaqued by serious loss of new orders due to the disturbed construction schedule, the uncertainty of public requirement, etc. It is in the midst of this gloomy environment that the modular reactor strategy emerged out in the U.S. as a new step toward recovering self-supporting nuclear industries. Given the clear incentive to revitalize the sluggish nuclear industries, their modular reactor approach is intended to create trouble-less, low management-risk reactors. Their major goals seem to be a low management risk, suitability for export, and shortened construction schedule. Modular reactors appear to have many advantages over large reactors that can apply not only to the U.S. but to Japan as well, serving for improvement of manufactures' productivity, significant saving of engineering costs, design simplification, reduction of licensing procedures and plant site work, improvement of plant availability, high export potential, significant reduction of total learning costs, expanded selection of plant sites, market-proximate and dispersed siting, reasonable reduction of required isolation distance, and creation of competitive environs. In Japan, most of the R and D items scheduled for the next decade are geared towards large reactors. The advantages of modular reactors, however, would be far-reaching even in Japan, and it would be desirable that their design details and characteristics be evaluated immediately, based on which appropriate follow-on activities should be initiated. (Nogami, K.)

  14. Palo Verde nuclear generating station EASEplus SIMULATE model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Palo Verde on-site reactor engineers have an extremely powerful and accurate tool for quickly predicting the effects of reactor power maneuvers on core axial shape index (ASI) and xenon worth. They can analyze postulated future power maneuvers quickly and supply the reactor operators with valuable predictions without having to consult with the off-site nuclear analysis group. The tool developed by the nuclear analysis group was an advanced nodal code with a graphic user interface (GUI) driver for ease of use. The advanced nodal code used was the Studsvik of America SIMULATE-3 Version 2.20-DSI. This SIMULATE version was compiled for use on a personal computer (PC) with a Definicon Systems' 50-MHz coprocessor board. The GUI face used was Expert-EASE Systems' EASE+SIM3 Version 3.0 pre-/postprocessor. The system was installed on Compaq Deskpro 386/20e PCs located in the control room of each of the three units, in the reactor engineering office, in the nuclear analysis office, and in the control room of the training simulator

  15. Materials and wastes from power generation of nuclear origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In most countries, spent nuclear fuel is directly stored in pools and constitute the bulk of highly radioactive waste. In France, reprocessing separates spent fuel into three categories: uranium, plutonium, minor actinides and fission products. Hence, a vast amount of very diverse radioactive materials are stored in various sites and conditions, under two denominations: 'nuclear materials' (which can be or are partly recycled) and 'radioactive waste' which should be permanently disposed of. The production of highly radioactive and long-lived waste raise legitimate questions on the use of nuclear energy for power production and many people think that it's a sufficient reason for giving up this technique. Concerning existing radioactive waste, the alternative to deep disposal should be: a) dry storage of spent fuel and other existing waste in protected sites (bunkers or hills), and b) more active research on the possibilities to reduce both radioactivity and the lifetime of radioactive waste. (authors)

  16. Foreign Material Exclusion Program at CNE Cernavoda Nuclear Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urjan, Daniel [S.N. ' Nuclearelectrica' SA, CNE Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant, Medgidiei 2 Street, 905200 Cernavoda, Constanta (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    In the face of a continuing attention to operations and maintenance costs at nuclear power plants, the future of the industry depends largely upon increasing plant availability and improving operating efficiency. The success in achieving these objectives is dependent upon the success of each plant's equipment maintenance program. Preventing the introduction of foreign materials into a nuclear power plant system or component requires a careful, thoughtful, and professional approach by all site personnel. This paper describes a proactive approach to prevent the introduction of foreign material into systems and components, by providing an overview of technical considerations required to develop, implement, and manage a foreign material exclusion program at CNE Cernavoda Unit 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Station. It is also described an example of Foreign Material Intrusion which happened during the 2003 planned maintenance outage at Cernavoda Unit no.1. This paper also defines personnel responsibilities and key nomenclature and a means for evaluating prospective work tasks and activities against standardized criteria, in order to identify the appropriate level of the required FME controls. (author)

  17. Improvements in in-bay irradiated fuel inspection planning and analysis at Bruce Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes improvements in irradiated fuel inspection planning and analysis implemented at Bruce Power since 2012. A review of inspection plans and fuel performance reports since 2001 identified significant variations in how irradiated fuel bundles were selected for inspection from year-to-year. A series of inspection tasks was established in an inspection logic and technical basis document. Inspection objectives and bundle selection criteria were defined for each task. These requirements, along with resource availability are now used to prepare a fuel inspection plan each year. The inspection results are then considered in the context of the analysis objectives for each task. The inspection results are presented in brief monthly updates and in-depth semi-annual reports in addition to the Annual Fuel Performance Reports. These changes have improved the effectiveness, consistency and efficiency of Bruce Power’s fuel performance monitoring. (author)

  18. An integrated approach for securing a nuclear power plant for electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is expected that the nuclear fission energy would be one of the mostly needed options for electric power generation due to the high operating performance of nuclear power plants [NPPs], with significant improvements in reliability and enhanced levels of nuclear safety. Also, measures to guard against radiation and criticality hazards when dealing with nuclear materials [NMs] and other radioactive materials [RMs] are essential to be considered. In recent years, nuclear security has become a major concern in the world. Re-evaluation of security in the nuclear industry sector is becoming an extremely important task in order to achieve better control and protection of NMs and RMs and higher level of protection for their associated facilities. The purpose of this study is to develop an integrated approach for securing a nuclear power plant [NPP] for electricity generation. It focuses on investigating measures of some fundamental nuclear safety parameters in a NPP together with measures of the nuclear security system of the facility, and to study how such measures could ensure the nuclear security of the NPP. The idea is that measures of the NPP security system should be implemented under control of the national nuclear security regime of the concerned State. Such measures integrated to measures of nuclear engineering safety system, nuclear physical protection [PP] system and nuclear materials accountancy and control [ACC/C] system should be implemented -in real time mode- from the start of design phases of the NPP to the phases of full operation up to the decommissioning phases of the NPP, with well coordinated manner and consistently. Schematic representation of the approach is given. (author)

  19. Cost comparison of central electric power generation using coal and nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper addresses the current and expected future costs of generating electricity with the two available practical modes of power generation, coal and nuclear. It describes the procedures and inputs used to arrive at the conclusion that generation with nuclear fuels will be about 16% more economical than generation with the best coal alternative. Recognizing the uncertainty in long range estimates of this type, various sensitivity checks are developed to determine how much the capital, fuel, and operating costs would have to change to force a change in the ranking of the alternatives. The results are current estimates of the costs of generating electricity in the future in the middle western area of the United States with large nuclear units, and with comparably sized and comparably loaded coal units firing high and low sulfur coals

  20. Reliability of diesel generators in the Finnish and Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diesel generators are used as emergency AC-power sources in nuclear power plants and they produce electric power for other emergency systems during accidents in which offsite power is lost. The reliability of diesel generators is thus of major concern for overall safety of nuclear power plants. In this study we consider the reliability of diesel generators in the Swedish and Finnish nuclear power plants on the basis of collected operational experience. We classify the occurred failures according to their functional criticality, type and cause. The failures caused by human errors in maintenance and testing are analysed in detail. We analyse also the reliability of the diesel generator subsystems. Further, we study the effect of surveillance test and the type of test on the reliability. Finally we construct an unavailability model for single diesel generator unit and discuss the findings of the study giving some practical recommendations

  1. Kuldlõvid Louise Bourgeois'le, Bruce Naumanile ja Itaalia paviljonile / Reet Varblane

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Varblane, Reet, 1952-

    1999-01-01

    Veneetsia 48. rahvusvahelise kunstibiennaali preemiasaajad, premeeritud tööd, korralduskomitee ja žürii koosseis. Kuldlõvid: Louise Bourgeois, Bruce Nauman, Itaalia paviljon (Monica Bonvicini, Bruna Esposito, Luisa Lambri, Paola Pivi, Grazia Toderi ühisprojekt); kolm rahvusvahelist preemiat: Doug Aitken, Cai Gou-Qiang, Shirin Neshat; žürii tõstis esile: Georges Abeagbo, Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Katarzyna Kozura ? (Kozyra), Lee Bul; UNESCO preemia: Ghada Amer

  2. Review of the reliability of Bruce 'B' RRS dual computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The review presents an analysis of the Bruce 'B' Reactor Regulating System (RRS) Digital Control Computer (DCC) system, based on system documentation, significant event reports (SERs), question sets, and a site visit. The intent is to evaluate the reliability of the RRS DCC and to identify the possible scenarios that could lead to a serious process failure. The evaluation is based on three relatively independent analyses, which are integrated and presented in the form of Conclusions and Recommendations

  3. R. Bruce Merrifield and Solid-Phase Peptide Synthesis: A Historical Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, A R

    2007-12-04

    Bruce Merrifield, trained as a biochemist, had to address three major challenges related to the development and acceptance of solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). The challenges were (1) to reduce the concept of peptide synthesis on a insoluble support to practice, (2) overcome the resistance of synthetic chemists to this novel approach, and (3) establish that a biochemist had the scientific credentials to effect the proposed revolutionary change in chemical synthesis. How these challenges were met is discussed in this article.

  4. La polisemia comunicativa delle opere linguistiche di Bruce Nauman come adesione alle teorie del secondo Wittgenstein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Magini

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bruce Nauman, artista americano postminimalista, ha indagato l’elemento linguistico in tutte le sue possibilità espressive attraverso l’impiego di media disparati quali neon, audioinstallazioni, videoinstallazioni, stampe e testi. Tale pluralità metodologica risponde ad una profonda rielaborazione del Wittgenstein delle Ricerche Filosofiche. This paper aims to analyze l’influenza del pensiero wittgensteiniano sulla produzione artistica di Nauman.

  5. Seismic risk assessment as applied to the Zion Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its licensing and evaluation role, the NRC funded the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) with the goal of developing tools and data bases to evaluate the risk of earthquake caused radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. This paper describes the SSMRP risk assessment methodology and the results generated by applying this methodology to the Zion Nuclear Generating Station. In addition to describing the failure probabilities and risk values, the effects of assumptions about plant configuration, plant operation, and dependence will be given

  6. Review of tube support plate analysis for steam generators of Millstone Unit II Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetite growth in steam generator tube support plates was observed in the Millstone Unit II Nuclear Power Plant. If growth is allowed to continue, the tube may eventually fail resulting from plate shifting and the squeezing action of the growing magnetite. The corrective actions undertaken by the Northeast Nuclear Energy Company (NNECO) for this effect have been summarized in a report submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) entitled, Millstone Unit No. II Steam Generator Repairs and Corrective Actions, Docket No. 50-336. The analytical study part of this report is reviewed here, and conclusions and recommendations for further research are given

  7. Major issues associated with nuclear power generation cost and their evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the evaluation of power generation cost that is an important item for energy policy planning. Especially with a focus on nuclear power generation cost, it reviews what will become a focal point on evaluating power generation cost at the present point after the estimates of the 'Investigation Committee on Costs' that was organized by the government have been issued, and what will be a major factor affecting future changes in costs. This paper firstly compared several estimation results on nuclear power generation cost, and extracted/arranged controversial points and unsolved points for discussing nuclear power generation cost. In evaluating nuclear power generation cost, the comparison of capital cost and other costs can give the understanding of what can be important issues. Then, as the main issues, this paper evaluated/discussed the construction cost, operation/maintenance cost, external cost, issue of discount rate, as well as power generation costs in foreign countries and the impact of fossil fuel prices. As other issues related to power generation cost evaluation, it took up expenses for decommissioning, disposal of high-level radioactive waste, and re-processing, outlined the evaluation results by the 'Investigation Committee on Costs,' and compared them with the evaluation examples in foreign countries. These costs do not account for a large share of the entire nuclear power generation costs. The most important point for considering future energy policy is the issue of discount rate, that is, the issue of fund-raising environment for entrepreneurs. This is the factor to greatly affect the economy of future nuclear power generation. (A.O.)

  8. Significance of chemical return in nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reasonable understanding of PWR steam generator corrosion mechanisms such as denting and wastage has been developed, and adequate chemistry control programs defined to obviate the magnitude and effects of these modes of attack. However, relatively unique corrosion attack modes have been encountered at several plants notwithstanding the presence of a reasonable to very good chemistry control program when considered in light of the Steam Generator Owners Group chemistry guidelines. The uniqueness of attack also suggests that parameters not routinely measured or monitored may be playing a significant role. In the authors opinions, the only reasonable method of routinely identifying corrosion accelerating species present in crevices, sludge piles, and deposits in PWR steam generators is by performing detailed chemical return studies during power transients, shutdowns, and long term layups. Although it would be preferable to obtain samples from regions of attack, such samples generally are not available for obvious reasons

  9. Bruce and Darlington power pulse and pressure tube integrity programs -status 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimum solution to pressure tube fretting at the inlet of the Bruce and Darlington channels, a concern which became very serious following inspections in early 1992, is to remove the inlet bundle and operate with a 12 fuel bundle channel. During analysis of this operating mode a 'power pulse' was identified which could occur during an inlet header break where all the fuel in the channel moved rapidly to the inlet of the channel. The pulse was unacceptable and the units were derated until solutions could be implemented. A number of solutions were identified and each station has begun implementation of their specific solution. Implementation has not been without problems and this paper provides a status report on the progress to date of the long bundle implementation solution for Bruce B and Darlington and the fuelling with the flow solution being implemented at Bruce A. Both types of solution have a significant impact on the original concern, fretting of the pressure tube. (author). 1 ref., 6 figs

  10. Structural and metamorphic evolution of the Mid-Late Proterozoic Rayner Complex, Cape Bruce, East Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granulite to transitional granulite facies gneisses exposed at Cape Bruce, Rayner Complex, East Antarctica, record three main orogenic/magmatic phases: (1) intrusion of c. 1000-980 Ma felsic orthogneisses into Mid-Proterozoic metasediments, contemporary with the development of north-trending reclined to recumbent folds; (2) extensive c. 980-900 Ma felsic magmatism, including equivalents of the Mawson Charnockite, which accompanied the development of upright, east-northeast-trending folds; and (3) ultramylonite zones of uncertain age. The first two phases are known as the Rayner Structrual Episode, the effects of which are similar in rocks to the east of Cape Bruce, at Mawson, and in the northern Prince Charles Mountains. Archaean rocks immediately to the west of Cape Bruce were tectonically reworked during the Rayner Structural Episode. The first orogenic phase is inferred to represent the collision between a wedge-shaped Proterozoic block comprising rocks of the Mawson Coast and Eastern Ghats Province, with the Archaean Napier Complex. The second orogenic phase included a major period of crustal growth through emplacement of the Mawson Charnockite and equivalents. (author). 41 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  11. Decommissioning of Fort St. Vrain nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the U.S.A., a licensee can propose decontaminating a nuclear power plant using any of three methods: DECON, SAFSTOR, or ENTOMB. For the Fort St. Vrain reactor, DECON was chosen. According to this option, portions of the facility, containing radioactive contaminants, are dismantled and removed, or else decontaminated, soon after the cessation of power. The work to be done is of three kinds: decontamination and dismantlement of the pre-stressed concrete reactor vessel; decontamination or dismantling of actually or potentially contaminated balance of plant; and site cleanup and final site radiation survey. Each of these elements of the work is discussed

  12. Nuclear collective motion within the generator coordinate method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The generator coordinate method (GCM) and the Gaussian approximation for the overlap (GOA) of generating functions are used to multidimensional collective vibrations. The proper collective Schroedinger equation is derived, starting from a mean field potential depending on some collective parameters and including a residual pairing interaction. The mass parameters for the shape vibrations estimated in the cranking and in the GCM approximations are compared. It is also shown that within GCM + GOA method it is relatively simple to restore the broken symmetries, e.g. the approximate projection for good particle number and angular momentum of the BCS vawe function. 15 refs., 7 figs. (M.F.W.)

  13. Comparative costs of coal and nuclear-generated electricity in the united states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper compares the future first-year operating costs and lifetime levelized costs of producing baseload coal- and nuclear-generated electricity under schedules shorter than those recently experienced at U.S. plants. Nuclear appears to have a clear economic advantage. Coal is favorable only when it is assumed that the units will operate at very low capacity factors and/or when the capital cost differential between nuclear and coal is increased far above the recent historical level. Nuclear is therefore a cost-competitive electric energy option for utilities and should be considered as an alternative to coal when large baseload capacity is required. (author)

  14. Opportunities, support and constraints in connection with infrastructures for safe nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety of nuclear power generation involves the activities of various parties, which can be divided into three groups belonging to certain 'infrastructures', i.e. the general infrastructure, the nuclear infrastructure and the operation infrastructure. The group belonging to the general infrastructure is interested not only in the safety of nuclear power generation but also in economy, security and other values of society. In recent years, the requirements of this group regarding the safety and quality of nuclear power have become more stringent. Therefore, operators of nuclear power plants (NPPs) are required to strengthen their questioning attitude regarding progress and transparency of their work. The nuclear infrastructure includes parties which are institutionally connected with nuclear power generation, provide technological resources and have an influence on the constraints to the operation of NPPs. They are expected to act as mediators between the group belonging to the general infrastructure and the operators, using their technological and institutional knowledge as a catalyst. The operators of NPPs should seek co-operation with this group to organize and manage their technological and human resources. The group of people belonging to the operation infrastructure is responsible for maintaining the safety and economy of nuclear power. Plant operators should direct and control activities in accordance with their responsibility for enhancing and maintaining the safety and competitiveness of the plants, continuously strengthening the safety culture of workers in all activities, with peer evaluation, information exchange, periodic reviews, etc

  15. A study of the public opinion concerning nuclear power generation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, I surveyed the outcome of opinion poll about people's attitude toward nuclear power and analysed their awareness of nuclear power generation in the United States. As a result, it was found that percentage of the people who have positive attitude toward nuclear power has been over 60% since 1998. This result corresponds to the fact that people's preference is tending more toward nuclear power generation which is called the nuclear power Renaissance in the United States. Furthermore, analysis of the outcome of the opinion poll in power stations site region was also conducted and it was found that attitude of the people in the site region was more positive than that of average level in the United States. (author)

  16. Korean students' behavioral change toward nuclear power generation through education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Ok; Kim, Jae Rok; Choi, Yoon Seok [Dept. of Education and Research, Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    As a result of conducting a 45 minute-long seminar on the principles, state of use, advantages, and disadvantages of nuclear power generation for Korean elementary, middle, and high school students, the levels of perception including the necessity (p<0.017), safety (p<0.000), information acquisition (p<0.000), and subjective knowledge (p<0.000), objective knowledge (p<0.000), attitude (p<0.000), and behavior (p<0.000) were all significantly higher. This indicates that education can be effective in promoting widespread social acceptance of nuclear power and its continued use. In order to induce behavior change toward positive judgments on nuclear power generation, it is necessary to focus on attitude improvement while providing the information in all areas related to the perception, knowledge, attitude, and behavior. Here, the positive message on the convenience and the safety of nuclear power generation should be highlighted.

  17. Korean students' behavioral change toward nuclear power generation through education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of conducting a 45 minute-long seminar on the principles, state of use, advantages, and disadvantages of nuclear power generation for Korean elementary, middle, and high school students, the levels of perception including the necessity (p<0.017), safety (p<0.000), information acquisition (p<0.000), and subjective knowledge (p<0.000), objective knowledge (p<0.000), attitude (p<0.000), and behavior (p<0.000) were all significantly higher. This indicates that education can be effective in promoting widespread social acceptance of nuclear power and its continued use. In order to induce behavior change toward positive judgments on nuclear power generation, it is necessary to focus on attitude improvement while providing the information in all areas related to the perception, knowledge, attitude, and behavior. Here, the positive message on the convenience and the safety of nuclear power generation should be highlighted.

  18. Technology development for nuclear power generation for space application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a few years now, the TERRA project is developing several technology pieces to foster nuclear space applications. In this way, a nuclear reactor concept has been developed as a first proposal. Together, the problem of heat to electricity conversion has been addressed. A closed Brayton cycle is being built and a Stirling machine is being worked out and perfected. In addition, two types of heat pipes are being look at. One related with high temperature made of Mo13Re, an especial alloy. And a second one made of copper, which mainly could be used as a passive heat rejection. In this way, all major areas of interest in a micro station to be used in space has been addressed. A new passive technology has been inferred and is related with Tesla turbine or its evolution, known as multi fluid passive turbine. This technology has the potential to either: improve the Brayton cycle or its efficiency. In this paper, some details are discussed and some will be shown during the presentation, as the work evolve. (author)

  19. Technology development for nuclear power generation for space application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Ribeiro, Guilherme B.; Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Nascimento, Jamil A.; Placco, Guilherme M., E-mail: guimarae@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: lamartine.guimaraes@pq.cnpq.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Energia Nuclear; Faria, Saulo M. de [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    For a few years now, the TERRA project is developing several technology pieces to foster nuclear space applications. In this way, a nuclear reactor concept has been developed as a first proposal. Together, the problem of heat to electricity conversion has been addressed. A closed Brayton cycle is being built and a Stirling machine is being worked out and perfected. In addition, two types of heat pipes are being look at. One related with high temperature made of Mo13Re, an especial alloy. And a second one made of copper, which mainly could be used as a passive heat rejection. In this way, all major areas of interest in a micro station to be used in space has been addressed. A new passive technology has been inferred and is related with Tesla turbine or its evolution, known as multi fluid passive turbine. This technology has the potential to either: improve the Brayton cycle or its efficiency. In this paper, some details are discussed and some will be shown during the presentation, as the work evolve. (author)

  20. Polyvalent remote manipulator robot for nuclear reactor steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote controlled manipulator for work inside the water box of a steam generator has a base plate bolted over the man hole, an orienting base that can rotate the robot about the vertical axis, three coupled articulating joints and three arms

  1. The Environmental Impact of Electrical Power Generation: Nuclear and Fossil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg.

    This text was written to accompany a course concerning the need, environmental costs, and benefits of electrical power generation. It was compiled and written by a committee drawn from educators, health physicists, members of industry and conservation groups, and environmental scientists. Topics include: the increasing need for electrical power,…

  2. The effects of nuclear power generators upon electronic instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. G.; Truscello, V. C.

    1970-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity of electronic instruments susceptible to neutron and gamma radiation is evaluated by means of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator /RTG/. The gamma field of the RTG affects instrument operation and requires shielding, the neutron field does not affect operation via secondary capture-gamma production.

  3. Small Nuclear Co-generation Plants Based on Shipbuilding Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of nuclear cogeneration plants and power desalination complexes of relatively small power, using proven shipbuilding technology, becomes more and more attractive for solving the power supply problems of remote districts of the Extreme North and the Far East with small and medium power grids and for removing the shortage of fresh water in different world regions. The idea of transportation of the power unit with high degree of readiness to the place of its location with minimum construction and mounting activities at the site is very attractive. Compactness typical of RP based on shipbuilding technology allows to develop floating or ground-based plants at minimum use of water area and territory. Small construction scope at the site under conditions of minimum anthropogenic loads and high ecological indices are important arguments in favor of floating nuclear cogeneration plant based on ship power units against the alternative fossil sources. At present, the activities on floating nuclear cogeneration plant design, which is developed on the basis of floating power unit with two KLT-40S reactor plant, which is a modified option of standard KLT-40-type ship plant for icebreaker fleet in Russia are the most advanced. To date, a detailed design of reactor plant has been developed and approved, design activities on floating power unit are in the stage of completion, the site for its location has been selected and licensing by GAN, Russia, is in progress. Besides OKBM has developed some designs of nuclear cogeneration plants of different power on the basis of integral reactor plants, using the experience of transport and stationary power plants designing. Nuclear cogeneration plant investment analysis showed acceptable social and economical efficiency of the design that creates conditions for commercial construction of floating power units with KLT-40S reactor plan. At the same time the reduction of the design recovering terms, increase of budget income and

  4. A Conceptual Study of Hybrid System for Nuclear Energy Generation and Transmutation at CIAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy supply is a severe problem for developing country. Nuclear energy is just at its start in China. For developing nuclear energy three aspects must considered: 1. Nuclear waste handled properly: 2. Nuclear power station safety improved; 3. Natural Uranium resource utilization factor increased and new applicable resources expected. A research group for accelerator driven subcritical reactor in China Institute of Atomic Energy has been working for two years. Research results indicated subcritical reactor nuclear system driven by high intensity proton current accelerator can meet these requirements, that is 1. Subcritical reactor safety is accessible for the public 2. Some Short-lived. Low poison nuclear waste is removed from nuclear system, that is radioactive clean. 3. U-238 and Th-232 in the subcritical reactor can be converted into stationary nuclear fuel inventory to generate nuclear energy. The research results also indicated that the theoretical basis is right for accelerator driven subcritical reactor nuclear energy system, and has technological advantages for the further development of nuclear energy system which is different from conventional nuclear energy system, it's a technological innovation way for development of nuclear energy. During the early time of nuclear power exploitation and application in our country, it is worth to exploit this novel technological option.In this paper, discussion on the transmutation concept of high-level radioactive nuclide in nuclear waste is firstly conducted. And Then a brief description to the basic principle of ADS is given. The fission in the subcritical reactor with external neutron source is discussed. The relation ship of energy gain of the system, external neutron source with the subcritical reactor k is also discussed. (Author) 12 refs

  5. Research on the response of various persons to information about nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author surveyed blogs readily available on the Internet for three purposes: (1) to grasp the public response to nuclear problems after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, (2) to determine changes in the number of blogs based on an article search, and (3) to identify the stance of bloggers on the necessity of nuclear power generation based on reading contribution contents. Furthermore the author conducted a questionnaire survey of public response in reference to the results of the blog survey. From the blog survey, it was found that immediately after the accident, the number of blogs which were negative toward nuclear power generation drastically increased, but as time has passed, blogs which are positive are increasing in number somewhat in expectation of stabilized economic and living conditions. The main results of the questionnaire survey are as follows. (1) Many persons want power generation that is non-nuclear; this is because they have good expectations for renewable energy sources or new thermal power generation as an alternative energy and they strongly feel anxious about the issue of disposal of spent nuclear fuel. (2) Because of the risk of negative impacts which electricity shortages bring on the economy and lifestyles, some persons do not want immediate decommissioning of nuclear power reactors, they favor a phase-out of nuclear power generation. Though public opinion about nuclear problems includes the expectation that one alternative energy can be selected, there is a possibility that this opinion will shift to find an optimum energy mix of plural energy sources. (author)

  6. A panel cointegration analysis of CO2 emissions, nuclear energy and income in major nuclear generating countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This study revisits the nuclear-energy-growth-CO2 emissions nexus. • A panel cointegration analysis is employed. • Nuclear energy has a beneficial effect on reducing CO2 emissions. • CO2 emissions decrease with economic growth. - Abstract: A number of studies have examined the effect of nuclear energy on CO2 emissions, and a lot has been learned from these studies. Due to their weaknesses in modeling approaches and variable uses, however, properly constructed and comprehensive analyses are limited. The main objective of this study is thus to contribute to the debate over nuclear energy and the environment with an enhanced model and variables. For this, a panel cointegration analysis is applied to quantify the effects of nuclear energy, energy consumption and income on CO2 emissions in 12 major nuclear generating countries. The results show that nuclear energy tends to reduce CO2 emissions. It is also found that CO2 emissions tend to decrease monotonically with income growth, providing no evidence in support of the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) for CO2 emissions

  7. General principles of maintaining the secure and reliable power generation on Ukrainian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major problems of the electrical equipment exploitation at the nuclear power plants (NPP) have ben analyzed, with an account of generation structure and the transmission lines configuration of the All-Ukrainian Power System. Directions have been elaborated to provide a secure and reliable NPP generation via optimization of the power facilities structure and the introduction of inherently new equipment

  8. The generation cost of a nuclear power station in the eighties and its comparison to other electricity generating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various factors which are significant to the capital cost of a nuclear power plant are being reviewed. An example is given of the calculation of the power generation cost for a 600 MW nuclear power plant, which was assumed to become operational in 1985. The calculation was based on the contributions from capital cost, fuel cost and the cost for operation and maintenance. A similar calculation was carried out for a coal-generation and an oil-generation plant of the same size (600 MW) which are becoming operational in the same year (1985). The generation cost for the Saguling Hydro Project, which will be completed in 1982, is also given. This 1982 figure has been subsequently extrapolated to 1985 in order to include the effect of escalation. The result of the study could be considered as a confirmation of the Nuclear Power Planning Study for Java Island, which has been carried out at the IAEA Head-quarters in Vienna in the beginning of 1975. (author)

  9. Experience in designing steam generators for nuclear power plants developed by JSC 'Afrikantov OKBM'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JSC Afrikantov OKBM designs floating and land-based reactor plants (RP) for small and medium nuclear power plants (NPP) to cater for needs of regional energy sectors, as well as ship-based nuclear propulsion plants, in particular for nuclear ice breakers. The most prepared for commercialization are NPP designs with KLT-40S, ABV-6, VBER-300 reactor plants and the RITM RP design for the next generation multi-purpose nuclear ice-breaker. The RPs use once-through steam generators with the secondary circuit fluid flowing inside the tubes. This type of steam generators is characterized by a number of advantages, such as compact size, easy control, high reparability at the minimum dosimetric costs, the best suitability for layouts of integral RPs and high safety level. The designs incorporate both straight-tube and coil-type steam generator constructions. The key issue in the implementation of the once-through steam generator designs was the selection of a material for their heat-transfer surfaces. On this purpose, titanium alloys are used. The experience in titanium alloy application in once-through steam generators of various types has been gained for more than 40 years. The unique titanium properties enabled development of original steam generator designs and generation of definite principles in designing the once-through steam generators, justification of their reliability, operational monitoring, repair, service life management and replacement. JSC Afrikantov OKBM has also gained experience in designing vertical steam generators with circulation ratio suitable for high-power NPPs with VVER reactors. One of the last developments is the PGVA-1500 steam generator for a 1500 MW (e) NPP with the VVER-1500 reactor. This vertical steam generator features a number of solutions that eliminate the drawbacks related to tube damage due to sliming on the tube plate while preserving the advantages of the vertical design. Additionally, the steam generator specific amount of metal

  10. The young generation - guarantors for the future of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For several years the 'YOUNG GENERATION' has been attracting great interest all over Europe. Based on the Young Generation Network of the European Nuclear Society (ENS) founded by Jan Runermark, in a lot of European countries a national Young Generation Network has been established, as well in Germany. Since October 1998 the Young Generation in Germany has been working in the frame of a difficult political situation after the decision was made about the phasing out of nuclear energy in Germany. Nowadays, our highly qualified and motivated young people who have been working for a couple of years in the nuclear field and already took over a lot of knowledge and experiences, have to decide: Is there a future for us in the nuclear industry? The paper will briefly summarise the wide range of activities of the German Young Generation. A selection of them will be chosen to highlight our fight for the future of nuclear energy in Germany, e.g. communication with the public, know-how-transfer, improvement of links between the fuel vendor and their customers. The main purpose is to point out: There is a young generation who is ready to take over the knowledge and the responsibility for the future. (author)

  11. The OPERA event generator and the data tuning of nuclear re-interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OPERA event generator 'NEGN' is based on an adapted version of the event generator developed for the NOMAD experiment [M. Veltri, presentation at the NUINT01 conference]. It includes all the features implemented in the NOMAD generator which were cross-checked with a large sample of neutrino interactions, finely reconstructed at the level of single particles. This sample allowed for a study of the hadronic system fragmentation and to tune the inclusion of nuclear effects, like the intra-nuclear cascades. Many of these effects are also relevant, for different reasons, in the OPERA simulation

  12. The entropy problem of decentralized solar and nuclear heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The entropy fluxes of decentralized hot-water systems based on solar collectors coupled with an electrical auxiliary heating installation are deduced. It is shown that this kind of solar energy has to remain very restricted, not only for quantitative-energetic reasons, but also for entropy ones, and that a solar hot-water system will always have to rely on an energy system of low entropy. In contrast to this, the provision of heat for space heating with the help of the 'nuclear short-distance concept', which needs practically no external energy, is not subject to these restrictions. This concept is introduced briefly, and the prices which can be achieved are considered. (Auth.)

  13. Reliable, fault tolerant control systems for nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two operational features of CANDU Nuclear Power Stations provide for high plant availability. First, the plant re-fuels on-line, thereby eliminating the need for periodic and lengthy refuelling 'outages'. Second, the all plants are controlled by real-time computer systems. Later plants are also protected using real-time computer systems. In the past twenty years, the control systems now operating in 21 plants have achieved an availability of 99.8%, making significant contributions to high CANDU plant capacity factors. This paper describes some of the features that ensure the high degree of system fault tolerance and hence high plant availability. The emphasis will be placed on the fault tolerant features of the computer systems included in the latest reactor design - the CANDU 3 (450MWe). (author)

  14. A ''New Generation'' of Nuclear Power Plants- Electric Utility Aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 50% increase in worldwide energy consumption in the next 20 years is anticipated, due to the global population growth and to higher standards of living. Meeting these energy demands with the fossil energy sources such as coal. gas and oil may lead to atmospheric accumulation of greenhouse gases, resulting in global warming of several degrees with catastrophic climatic consequences. Implementation of various energy conservation measures may bring only insignificant reduction in demand levels. Hopes that the renewable energy sources (such as hydroelectric, solar, wind power, biomass and geothermal) may supply the growth in the demand - are unrealistic. Only nuclear power (providing already 16% of world electricity) may meet all the energy demand growth with negligible greenhouse emission

  15. Electro-nuclear neutron generator – XADS at ITEP

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M Kozodaev; N D Gavrilin; M M Igumnov; V N Konev; N V Lazarev; A M Raskopin; V V Seliverstov; O V Shvedov; E B Volkov

    2007-02-01

    In this report, the purpose and status of the currently constructed ITEP experimental accelerator driven system (XADS) are discussed. This hybrid electro-nuclear facility of moderate power integrates the pulse proton linac (36 MeV, 0.5 mA) and heavy water sub-critical blanket assembly (heat power of 100 kW). Most parts of the equipment units are ordered for industrial manufacturing and some are under development. The facility is supposed to be used for investigations of a wide range of problems concerning both the target-blanket assembly and the accelerator-driver and at the same time explore the dynamical processes arising during their combined operation. Some other applications of the proton beam and neutron source are also discussed. It is possible in future to increase the current and energy of proton or heavy ion beam.

  16. Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station: an example of the state role in regional nuclear projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear power plant siting policy which confines new construction to existing sites will lead to the formation of large regional power centers, each involving many utilities from several states. The Palo Verde Nuclear Project in Arizona has been examined in terms of the role state regulation plays in large regional nuclear projects. State regulatory processes do not reflect the regional nature of large power centers. Decisions and actions by individual state regulatory commissions create risk and uncertainty for all the utility participants in regional projects. A climate and mechanism to encourage and facilitate interstate cooperation are needed to enhance the viability of the confined siting policy and the regional power center concept

  17. Current status and future research with resonant nuclear generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that Nucell, Inc. a subsidiary of Peripheral Systems, Inc. is developing alternative energy technologies for generating electrical power by employing radioisotopes as the prime power source. A phenomenon known as the Beta Voltaic Effect is used to directly convert radioactive decay energy into electricity without going through a thermal cycle. The great attraction of isotopic power supplies is that radioactive decay energy is several orders of magnitude greater than chemical energy

  18. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

  19. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators

  20. Effects of the accident at Mihama Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 on the public's attitude to nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of an ongoing public opinion survey regarding nuclear power generation, which started in 1993, a survey was carried out in the Kansai and Kanto regions two months after the accident at Unit 3 of the Mihama Nuclear Power Plant. In addition to analyzing the statistically significant changes that have taken place since the previous survey (taken in 2003), increase and decrease of the ratio of answers to all the questions related to nuclear power before and after the two accidents were compared in the case of the accidents which occurred in the Mihama Unit 3 and the JCO company's nuclear-fuel plant. In the Kansai region, a feeling of uneasiness about the risky character of nuclear power generation increased to some extent, while the public's trust in the safety of nuclear power plants decreased somewhat. After a safety-related explanation on ''Early detection of troubles'' and Accident prevention'' was given from a managerial standpoint, people felt a little less at ease than they had before. Uneasiness, however, did not increase in relation to the overall safety explanation given about the engineering and technical functioning of the plant. There was no significant negative effect on the respondents' evaluation of or attitude toward nuclear power generation. It was found that the people's awareness about the Mihama Unit 3 accident was lower and the effect of the accident on their awareness of nuclear power generation was more limited and smaller when compared with the case of the JCO accident. In the Kanto region, people knew less about the Mihama Unit 3 accident than those living in the Kansai region, and they remembered the JCO accident, the subsequent cover-up by Tokyo Electric Power Company, and the resulting power shortage better than those living in Kansai. This suggested that there was a little difference in terms of psychological distance in relation to the accidents an incidents depending on the place where the events occurred and the company which