WorldWideScience

Sample records for browser supporting comparative

  1. SNUGB: a versatile genome browser supporting comparative and functional fungal genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Seungill

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the full genome sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were released in 1996, genome sequences of over 90 fungal species have become publicly available. The heterogeneous formats of genome sequences archived in different sequencing centers hampered the integration of the data for efficient and comprehensive comparative analyses. The Comparative Fungal Genomics Platform (CFGP was developed to archive these data via a single standardized format that can support multifaceted and integrated analyses of the data. To facilitate efficient data visualization and utilization within and across species based on the architecture of CFGP and associated databases, a new genome browser was needed. Results The Seoul National University Genome Browser (SNUGB integrates various types of genomic information derived from 98 fungal/oomycete (137 datasets and 34 plant and animal (38 datasets species, graphically presents germane features and properties of each genome, and supports comparison between genomes. The SNUGB provides three different forms of the data presentation interface, including diagram, table, and text, and six different display options to support visualization and utilization of the stored information. Information for individual species can be quickly accessed via a new tool named the taxonomy browser. In addition, SNUGB offers four useful data annotation/analysis functions, including 'BLAST annotation.' The modular design of SNUGB makes its adoption to support other comparative genomic platforms easy and facilitates continuous expansion. Conclusion The SNUGB serves as a powerful platform supporting comparative and functional genomics within the fungal kingdom and also across other kingdoms. All data and functions are available at the web site http://genomebrowser.snu.ac.kr/.

  2. A Comparative Performance Analysis of Popular Internet Browsers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and take advantage of the World Wide Web (www). The window to the World Wide Web is a web browser, hence the development of various web browsers in the market today. A comparative study of four web browsers namely Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Opera and Netscape was carried out. A web portal developed ...

  3. Comparative assembly hubs: Web-accessible browsers for comparative genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngan; Hickey, Glenn; Raney, Brian J.; Armstrong, Joel; Clawson, Hiram; Zweig, Ann; Karolchik, Donna; Kent, William James; Haussler, David; Paten, Benedict

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Researchers now have access to large volumes of genome sequences for comparative analysis, some generated by the plethora of public sequencing projects and, increasingly, from individual efforts. It is not possible, or necessarily desirable, that the public genome browsers attempt to curate all these data. Instead, a wealth of powerful tools is emerging to empower users to create their own visualizations and browsers. Results: We introduce a pipeline to easily generate collections of Web-accessible UCSC Genome Browsers interrelated by an alignment. It is intended to democratize our comparative genomic browser resources, serving the broad and growing community of evolutionary genomicists and facilitating easy public sharing via the Internet. Using the alignment, all annotations and the alignment itself can be efficiently viewed with reference to any genome in the collection, symmetrically. A new, intelligently scaled alignment display makes it simple to view all changes between the genomes at all levels of resolution, from substitutions to complex structural rearrangements, including duplications. To demonstrate this work, we create a comparative assembly hub containing 57 Escherichia coli and 9 Shigella genomes and show examples that highlight their unique biology. Availability and implementation: The source code is available as open source at: https://github.com/glennhickey/progressiveCactus The E.coli and Shigella genome hub is now a public hub listed on the UCSC browser public hubs Web page. Contact: benedict@soe.ucsc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25138168

  4. A Comparative Performance Analysis of Popular Internet Browsers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The lack of awareness of available web browser and their characteristics, discourages many Nigerians from having ... Internet access and awareness are currently available in most part of Nigeria. Though bandwidth is restricted ..... memory, speed and brand, results will be obtained for the criteria of comparison of browsers.

  5. The Project Browser : Supporting information access for a project team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, A.H.M.; Kuijper, I.; Groenewegen, P.L.M.; Post, W.M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of our study was to design and evaluate a user interface concept for a so-called Project Browser, following a user-centered design method. Previous work has suggested that users prefer to access project-related information instrumental to the task they have to carry out. First, a

  6. A Comparative Performance Analysis of Popular Internet Browsers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enable users make informed decisions about the use, installation and recommendation of the major web browsers considered in work. The tool was designed and implemented using industry standard technologies such as: 1. JavaScript Scripting Language. 2. Hypertext Markup language (HTML). 3. Document Object Model ...

  7. An investigation of retail outcomes comparing two types of browsers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reynolds, Kristy E; Jones, Michael A; Musgrove, Carolyn Findley; Gillison, Stephanie T

    ... ) that allow retailers to gain a better understanding of consumers' browsing behavior also provides evidence as to the importance of browsing in the retailing industry. Previous research indicates that browsers, consumers who are engaged in browsing activity, are beneficial to retailers as they demonstrate higher levels of product involveme...

  8. The Plant Orthology Browser: An Orthology and Gene-Order Visualizer for Plant Comparative Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulpan, Dan; Leger, Serge

    2017-03-01

    Worldwide genome sequencing efforts for plants with medium and large genomes require identification and visualization of orthologous genes, while their syntenic conservation becomes the pinnacle of any comparative and functional genomics study. Using gene models for 20 fully sequenced plant genomes, including model organisms and staple crops such as Coss., (L.) Heynh., (L.) Beauv., turnip ( L.), barley ( L.), rice ( L.), sorghum [ (L.) Moench], wheat ( L.), red wild einkorn ( Tumanian ex Gandilyan), and maize ( L.), we computationally predicted 1,021,611 orthologs using stringent sequence similarity criteria. For each pair of plant species, we determined sets of conserved synteny blocks using strand orientation and physical mapping. Gene ontology (GO) annotations are added for each gene. Plant Orthology Browser (POB) includes three interconnected modules: (i) a gene-order visualization module implementing an interactive environment for exploration of gene order between any pair of chromosomes in two plant species, (ii) a synteny visualization module providing unique interactive dot plot representations of orthologous genes between a pair of chromosomes in two distinct plant species, and (iii) a search module that interconnects all modules via free-text search capability with online as-you-type suggestions and highlighting that allows exploration of the underlining information without constraint of interface-dependent search fields. The POB is a web-based orthology and annotation visualization tool, which currently supports 20 completely sequenced plant species with considerably large genomes and offers intuitive and highly interactive pairwise comparison and visualization of genomic traits via gene orthology. Copyright © 2017 Crop Science Society of America.

  9. On the Nets. Comparing Web Browsers: Mosaic, Cello, Netscape, WinWeb and InternetWorks Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notess, Greg R.

    1995-01-01

    World Wide Web browsers are compared by speed, setup, hypertext transport protocol (HTTP) handling, management of file transfer protocol (FTP), telnet, gopher, and wide area information server (WAIS); bookmark options; and communication functions. Netscape has the most features, the fastest retrieval, sophisticated bookmark capabilities. (JMV)

  10. A zooming Web browser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bederson, B.B.; Hollan, J.D.; Stewart, J.; Rogers, D.; Vick, D. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Ring, L.; Grose, E.; Forsythe, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We are developing a prototype zooming World-Wide Web browser within Pad++, a multiscale graphical environment. Instead of having a single page visible at a time, multiple pages and the links between them are depicted on a large zoomable information surface. Pages are scaled so that the page in focus is clearly readable with connected pages shown at smaller scales to provide context. We quantitatively compared performance with the Pad++ Web browser and Netscape in several different scenarios. We examined how quickly users could answer questions about a specific Web site designed for this test. Initially we found that subjects answered questions slightly slower with Pad++ than with Netscape. After analyzing the results of this study, we implemented several changes to the Pad++ Web browser, and repeated one Pad++ condition. After improvements were made to the Pad++ browser, subjects using Pad++ answered questions 23% faster than those using Netscape.

  11. Web Browser Security Update Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duebendorfer, Thomas; Frei, Stefan

    We analyze the effectiveness of different Web browser update mechanisms on various operating systems; from Google Chrome's silent update mechanism to Opera's update requiring a full re-installation. We use anonymized logs from Google's world wide distributed Web servers. An analysis of the logged HTTP user-agent strings that Web browsers report when requesting any Web page is used to measure the daily browser version shares in active use. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first global scale measurement of Web browser update effectiveness comparing four different Web browser update strategies including Google Chrome. Our measurements prove that silent updates and little dependency on the underlying operating system are most effective to get users of Web browsers to surf the Web with the latest browser version.

  12. Web Browser Trends and Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin-Jones, Bob

    2000-01-01

    Discusses Web browsers and how their capabilities have been expanded, support for Web browsing on different devices (cell phones, palmtop computers, TV sets), and browser support for the next-generation Web authoring language, XML ("extensible markup language"). (Author/VWL)

  13. Webvise: Browser and Proxy support for open hypermedia structuring mechanisms on the WWW

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Sloth, Lennard; Ørbæk, Peter

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses how to augment the World Wide Web with an open hypermedia service (Webvise) that provides structures such as contexts, links, annotations, and guided tours stored in hypermedia databases external to the Web pages. This includes the ability for users collaboratively to create...... Web pages. Support for providing links to/from parts of non-HTML data, such as sound and movie, will be possible via interfaces to plug-ins and Java-based media players. The hypermedia structures are stored in a hypermedia database, developed from the Devise Hypermedia framework, and the service...... be manipulated and used via special Java applets and a pure proxy server solution is provided for users who only need to browse the structures. A user can create and use the external structures as ‘transparency' layers on top of arbitrary Web pages, the user can switch between viewing pages with one or more...

  14. CpGislandEVO: A Database and Genome Browser for Comparative Evolutionary Genomics of CpG Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Barturen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypomethylated, CpG-rich DNA segments (CpG islands, CGIs are epigenome markers involved in key biological processes. Aberrant methylation is implicated in the appearance of several disorders as cancer, immunodeficiency, or centromere instability. Furthermore, methylation differences at promoter regions between human and chimpanzee strongly associate with genes involved in neurological/psychological disorders and cancers. Therefore, the evolutionary comparative analyses of CGIs can provide insights on the functional role of these epigenome markers in both health and disease. Given the lack of specific tools, we developed CpGislandEVO. Briefly, we first compile a database of statistically significant CGIs for the best assembled mammalian genome sequences available to date. Second, by means of a coupled browser front-end, we focus on the CGIs overlapping orthologous genes extracted from OrthoDB, thus ensuring the comparison between CGIs located on truly homologous genome segments. This allows comparing the main compositional features between homologous CGIs. Finally, to facilitate nucleotide comparisons, we lifted genome coordinates between assemblies from different species, which enables the analysis of sequence divergence by direct count of nucleotide substitutions and indels occurring between homologous CGIs. The resulting CpGislandEVO database, linking together CGIs and single-cytosine DNA methylation data from several mammalian species, is freely available at our website.

  15. G-compass: a web-based comparative genome browser between human and other vertebrate genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Sakate, Ryuichi; Matsuya, Akihiro; Murakami, Katsuhiko; Sato, Yoshiharu; Zhang, Hao; Gojobori, Takashi; Itoh, Takeshi; Imanishi, Tadashi

    2009-12-15

    G-compass is designed for efficient comparative genome analysis between human and other vertebrate genomes. The current version of G-compass allows us to browse two corresponding genomic regions between human and another species in parallel. One-to-one evolutionarily conserved regions (i.e. orthologous regions) between species are highlighted along the genomes. Information such as locations of duplicated regions, copy number variations and mammalian ultra-conserved elements is also provided. These features of G-compass enable us to easily determine patterns of genomic rearrangements and changes in gene orders through evolutionary time. Since G-compass is a satellite database of H-InvDB, which is a comprehensive annotation resource for human genes and transcripts, users can easily refer to manually curated functional annotations and other abundant biological information for each human transcript. G-compass is expected to be a valuable tool for comparing human and model organisms and promoting the exchange of functional information. G-compass is freely available at http://www.h-invitational.jp/g-compass/. t.imanishi@aist.go.jp

  16. Enabling interspecies epigenomic comparison with CEpBrowser

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Xiaoyi; Zhong, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Summary: We developed the Comparative Epigenome Browser (CEpBrowser) to allow the public to perform multi-species epigenomic analysis. The web-based CEpBrowser integrates, manages and visualizes sequencing-based epigenomic datasets. Five key features were developed to maximize the efficiency of interspecies epigenomic comparisons. Availability: CEpBrowser is a web application implemented with PHP, MySQL, C and Apache. URL: http://www.cepbrowser.org/. Contact: Supplementary inf...

  17. A genome browser database for rice ( Oryza sativa ) and Chinese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We have constructed an integrated genome browser database for sequence analysis of rice (Oryza sativa) and Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) genomes. The genome browser for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) was included to provide the comparative analysis with Chinese cabbage. The genome browser of rice ...

  18. Quantifying the web browser ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdman, Sela; Minkov, Einat; Bekkerman, Ron; Gefen, David

    2017-01-01

    Contrary to the assumption that web browsers are designed to support the user, an examination of a 900,000 distinct PCs shows that web browsers comprise a complex ecosystem with millions of addons collaborating and competing with each other. It is possible for addons to "sneak in" through third party installations or to get "kicked out" by their competitors without user involvement. This study examines that ecosystem quantitatively by constructing a large-scale graph with nodes corresponding to users, addons, and words (terms) that describe addon functionality. Analyzing addon interactions at user level using the Personalized PageRank (PPR) random walk measure shows that the graph demonstrates ecological resilience. Adapting the PPR model to analyzing the browser ecosystem at the level of addon manufacturer, the study shows that some addon companies are in symbiosis and others clash with each other as shown by analyzing the behavior of 18 prominent addon manufacturers. Results may herald insight on how other evolving internet ecosystems may behave, and suggest a methodology for measuring this behavior. Specifically, applying such a methodology could transform the addon market.

  19. Decoding Technology: Web Browsers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Tim; Donohue, Chip

    2007-01-01

    More than ever, early childhood administrators are relying on the Internet for information. A key to becoming an exceptional Web "surfer" is getting to know the ins and outs of the Web browser being used. There are several options available, and almost all can be downloaded for free. However, many of the functions and features they offer are very…

  20. Web Browser Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Luján Mora, Sergio

    2006-01-01

    Presentaciones del curso "Web Browser Programming" impartido en la Université M'Hamed Bougara (Bourmerdes, Argelia) en junio de 2006. Proyecto financiado por la Unión Europea: TEMPUS JEP-32102-2004, Licence Professionnelle Technologies des Applications Web (Professional License for Web Application Technologies).

  1. The HuRef Browser: a web resource for individual human genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Nelson; Lin, Yuan; Ng, Pauline C; Stockwell, Timothy B; Crabtree, Jonathan; Huang, Jiaqi; Kirkness, Ewen; Strausberg, Robert L; Frazier, Marvin E; Venter, J Craig; Kravitz, Saul; Levy, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    The HuRef Genome Browser is a web application for the navigation and analysis of the previously published genome of a human individual, termed HuRef. The browser provides a comparative view between the NCBI human reference sequence and the HuRef assembly, and it enables the navigation of the HuRef genome in the context of HuRef, NCBI and Ensembl annotations. Single nucleotide polymorphisms, indels, inversions, structural and copy-number variations are shown in the context of existing functional annotations on either genome in the comparative view. Demonstrated here are some potential uses of the browser to enable a better understanding of individual human genetic variation. The browser provides full access to the underlying reads with sequence and quality information, the genome assembly and the evidence supporting the identification of DNA polymorphisms. The HuRef Browser is a unique and versatile tool for browsing genome assemblies and studying individual human sequence variation in a diploid context. The browser is available online at http://huref.jcvi.org.

  2. Comparing Civilian Support for Terrorism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srobana Bhattacharya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Terrorism is an extreme form of political violence, that is inherently abhorrent in nature. Yet, it continues to attain enough support to continue and survive. The recent proliferation of Islamic State and its ever increasing domestic and international civilian support base urges immediate attention to this question. While most research holds that provision of public goods by terrorist groups is the primary cause for high levels of civilian support, I argue that, terrorist groups are more interested in resource extraction rather than resource provision. Additionally, these studies pay scant attention to existing resource structure, especially territorial and political control to explain terrorist-civilian interaction. This paper emphasizes the bi-directional nature of this interaction – a. perception of civilians by the terrorist group and b. terrorist group’s perception of the civilians. To analyze levels of civilian support for terrorism, I compare fifteen terrorist groups using qualitative comparative analysis and show how territory, political competition, ethnicity, target selection and organizational structure combine to explain conditions that lead terrorist groups to include or exclude civilian population for support. Based on the variance in support networks of terrorist groups, counter-terrorism policies should also differ. High civilian support indicates the need to use non-military methods to decrease the appeal of terrorist groups. However, terrorist groups with more diffused and multiple support structures need more collaborative and coercive measures to intercept all the possible links to the main group.

  3. An application of TOPSIS for ranking internet web browsers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Rostampour

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Web browser is one of the most important internet facilities for surfing the internet. A good web browser must incorporate literally tens of features such as integrated search engine, automatic updates, etc. Each year, ten web browsers are formally introduced as top best reviewers by some organizations. In this paper, we propose the implementation of TOPSIS technique to rank ten web browsers. The proposed model of this paper uses five criteria including speed, features, security, technical support and supported configurations. In terms of speed, Safari is the best web reviewer followed by Google Chrome and Internet Explorer while Opera is the best web reviewer when we look into 20 different features. We have also ranked these web browsers using all five categories together and the results indicate that Opera, Internet explorer, Firefox and Google Chrome are the best web browsers to be chosen.

  4. Reactive non-interference for a browser model

    OpenAIRE

    Bielova N.; Devriese D.; Massacci F.; Piessens F.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate non-interference (secure information flow) policies for web browsers, replacing or complementing the Same Origin Policy. First, we adapt a recently proposed dynamic information flow enforcement mechanism to support asynchronous I/O. We prove detailed security and precision results for this enforcement mechanism, and implement it for the Featherweight Firefox browser model. Second, we investigate three useful web browser security policies that can be enforced ...

  5. Jet browser model accelerated by GPUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forster Richárd

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last centuries the experimental particle physics began to develop thank to growing capacity of computers among others. It is allowed to know the structure of the matter to level of quark gluon. Plasma in the strong interaction. Experimental evidences supported the theory to measure the predicted results. Since its inception the researchers are interested in the track reconstruction. We studied the jet browser model, which was developed for 4π calorimeter. This method works on the measurement data set, which contain the components of interaction points in the detector space and it allows to examine the trajectory reconstruction of the final state particles. We keep the total energy in constant values and it satisfies the Gauss law. Using GPUs the evaluation of the model can be drastically accelerated, as we were able to achieve up to 223 fold speedup compared to a CPU based parallel implementation.

  6. BrowserAudit: Automated testing of browser security features

    OpenAIRE

    Hothersall-Thomas, C; Maffeis, S; Novakovic, C

    2015-01-01

    The security of the client side of a web application relies on browser features such as cookies, the same-origin policy and HTTPS. As the client side grows increasingly powerful and sophisticated, browser vendors have stepped up their offering of security mechanisms which can be leveraged to protect it. These are often introduced experimentally and informally and, as adoption increases, gradually become standardised (e.g., CSP, CORS and HSTS). Considering the diverse landscape of browser vend...

  7. Engineering the ATLAS TAG Browser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    ELSSI is a web-based event metadata (TAG) browser and event-level selection service for ATLAS. TAGs from all ATLAS physics and Monte Carlo data sets are routinely loaded into Oracle databases as an integral part of event processing. As data volumes increase, more and more sites are joining the distributed TAG data hosting topology. Meanwhile, TAG content and database schemata continue to evolve as new user requirements and additional sources of metadata emerge. All of this has posed many challenges to the development of ELSSI, which must support vast amounts of TAG data while source, content, geographic locations, and user query patterns may change over time. In this paper, we describe some of the challenges encountered in the process of developing ELSSI, and the software engineering strategies adopted to address those challenges. Approaches to management of access to data, browsing, data rendering, query building, query validation, execution, connection management, and communication with auxiliary services a...

  8. Engineering the ATLAS TAG Browser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    ELSSI is a web-based event metadata (TAG) browser and event-level selection service for ATLAS. TAGs from all ATLAS physics and Monte Carlo data sets are routinely loaded into Oracle databases as an integral part of event processing. As data volumes increase, more and more sites are joining the distributed TAG data hosting topology[1]. Meanwhile, TAG content and database schemata continue to evolve as new user requirements and additional sources of metadata emerge. All of this has posed many challenges to the development of ELSSI, which must support vast amounts of TAG data while source, content, geographic locations, and user query patterns may change over time. In this paper, we describe some of the challenges encountered in the process of developing ELSSI, and the software engineering strategies adopted to address those challenges. Approaches to management of access to data, browsing, data rendering, query building, query validation, execution, connection management, and communication with auxiliary service...

  9. Dietary overlap between Boer goats and indigenous browsers in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The winter diet of free ranging Boer goats in Valley Bushveld, KwaZulu-Natal, was determined by direct observations and compared with the diet of indigenous browsers (kudu, eland, giraffe, black rhinoceros) in order to determine which browsers are most compatible with goats for ensuring more efficient use of savanna ...

  10. Designing, Implementing, and Evaluating Secure Web Browsers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Christopher L.

    2009-01-01

    Web browsers are plagued with vulnerabilities, providing hackers with easy access to computer systems using browser-based attacks. Efforts that retrofit existing browsers have had limited success since modern browsers are not designed to withstand attack. To enable more secure web browsing, we design and implement new web browsers from the ground…

  11. Fiberweb: Diffusion Visualization and Processing in the Browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Louis-Philippe; Morency, Felix C; Cousineau, Martin; Houde, Jean-Christophe; Whittingstall, Kevin; Descoteaux, Maxime

    2017-01-01

    Data visualization is one of the most important tool to explore the brain as we know it. In this work, we introduce a novel browser-based solution for medical imaging data visualization and interaction with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) and tractography data: Fiberweb. It uses a recent technology, WebGL, that has yet to be fully explored for medical imaging purposes. There are currently very few software tools that allow medical imaging data visualization in the browser, and none of these tools support efficient data interaction and processing, such as streamlines selection and real-time deterministic and probabilistic tractography (RTT). With Fiberweb allowing these types of interaction, it is no longer the case. We show results of the visualization of medical imaging data, and demonstrate that our new RTT probabilistic algorithm can compare to a state of the art offline algorithm. Overall, Fiberweb pushes the boundary of interaction combined with scientific visualization, which opens great perspectives for quality control and neurosurgical navigation on browser-based mobile and static devices.

  12. A Lead Provided by Bookmarks - Intelligent Browsers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Balanescu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Browsers are applications that allow Internet access. A defining characteristic is their unidirectionality: Navigator-> Internet. The purpose of this article is to support the idea of Intelligent Browsers that is defined by bidirectional: Navigator-> Internet and Internet-> Navigator. The fundamental idea is that the Internet contains huge resources of knowledge, but they are “passive”. The purpose of this article is to propose the “activation” of this knowledge so that they, through “Intelligent Browsers”, to become from Sitting Ducks to Active Mentors. Following this idea, the present article proposes changes to Bookmarks function, from the current status of Favorites to Recommendations. The article presents an analysis of the utility of this function (by presenting a research of web browsing behaviors and in particular finds that the significance of this utility has decreased lately (to the point of becoming almost useless, as will be shown, in terms data-information-knowledge. Finally, it presents the idea of a project which aims to be an applied approach that anticipates the findings of this study and the concept of Intelligent Browsers (or Active Browsers required in the context of the Big Data concept.

  13. Trajectory Browser Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Cyrus; Jaroux, Belgacem A.

    2012-01-01

    The Trajectory Browser is a web-based tool developed at the NASA Ames Research Center to be used for the preliminary assessment of trajectories to small-bodies and planets and for providing relevant launch date, time-of-flight and V requirements. The site hosts a database of transfer trajectories from Earth to asteroids and planets for various types of missions such as rendezvous, sample return or flybys. A search engine allows the user to find trajectories meeting desired constraints on the launch window, mission duration and delta V capability, while a trajectory viewer tool allows the visualization of the heliocentric trajectory and the detailed mission itinerary. The anticipated user base of this tool consists primarily of scientists and engineers designing interplanetary missions in the context of pre-phase A studies, particularly for performing accessibility surveys to large populations of small-bodies. The educational potential of the website is also recognized for academia and the public with regards to trajectory design, a field that has generally been poorly understood by the public. The website is currently hosted on NASA-internal URL http://trajbrowser.arc.nasa.gov/ with plans for a public release as soon as development is complete.

  14. JPL Small Body Database Browser

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The JPL Small-Body Database Browser provides data for all known asteroids and many comets. Newly discovered objects and their orbits are added on a daily basis....

  15. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2017 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyner, Cath; Barber, Galt P; Casper, Jonathan; Clawson, Hiram; Diekhans, Mark; Eisenhart, Christopher; Fischer, Clayton M; Gibson, David; Gonzalez, Jairo Navarro; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Haeussler, Maximilian; Heitner, Steve; Hinrichs, Angie S; Karolchik, Donna; Lee, Brian T; Lee, Christopher M; Nejad, Parisa; Raney, Brian J; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Speir, Matthew L; Villarreal, Chris; Vivian, John; Zweig, Ann S; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M; Kent, W James

    2017-01-04

    Since its 2001 debut, the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) team has provided continuous support to the international genomics and biomedical communities through a web-based, open source platform designed for the fast, scalable display of sequence alignments and annotations landscaped against a vast collection of quality reference genome assemblies. The browser's publicly accessible databases are the backbone of a rich, integrated bioinformatics tool suite that includes a graphical interface for data queries and downloads, alignment programs, command-line utilities and more. This year's highlights include newly designed home and gateway pages; a new 'multi-region' track display configuration for exon-only, gene-only and custom regions visualization; new genome browsers for three species (brown kiwi, crab-eating macaque and Malayan flying lemur); eight updated genome assemblies; extended support for new data types such as CRAM, RNA-seq expression data and long-range chromatin interaction pairs; and the unveiling of a new supported mirror site in Japan. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. The proteome browser web portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Robert J A; Yu, Simon; Kannan, Anitha; Christiansen, Jeffrey H; Beitz, Anthony; Hancock, William S; Nice, Edouard; Smith, A Ian

    2013-01-04

    In 2010, the Human Proteome Organization launched the Human Proteome Project (HPP), aimed at identifying and characterizing the proteome of the human body. To support complete coverage, one arm of the project will take a gene- or chromosomal-centric strategy (C-HPP) aimed at identifying at least one protein product from each protein-coding gene. Despite multiple large international biological databases housing genomic and protein data, there is currently no single system that integrates updated pertinent information from each of these data repositories and assembles the information into a searchable format suitable for the type of global proteomics effort proposed by the C-HPP. We have undertaken the goal of producing a data integration and analysis software system and browser for the C-HPP effort and of making data collections from this resource discoverable through metadata repositories, such as Australian National Data Service's Research Data Australia. Here we present our vision and progress toward the goal of developing a comprehensive data integration and analysis software tool that provides a snapshot of currently available proteomic related knowledge around each gene product, which will ultimately assist in analyzing biological function and the study of human physiology in health and disease.

  17. Zbrowse: an interactive GWAS results browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg R. Ziegler

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The growing number of genotyped populations, the advent of high-throughput phenotyping techniques and the development of GWAS analysis software has rapidly accelerated the number of GWAS experimental results. Candidate gene discovery from these results files is often tedious, involving many manual steps searching for genes in windows around a significant SNP. This problem rapidly becomes more complex when an analyst wishes to compare multiple GWAS studies for pleiotropic or environment specific effects. To this end, we have developed a fast and intuitive interactive browser for the viewing of GWAS results with a focus on an ability to compare results across multiple traits or experiments. The software can easily be run on a desktop computer with software that bioinformaticians are likely already familiar with. Additionally, the software can be hosted or embedded on a server for easy access by anyone with a modern web browser.

  18. CompaGB: An open framework for genome browsers comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiapello Hélène

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tools to visualize and explore genomes hold a central place in genomics and the diversity of genome browsers has increased dramatically over the last few years. It often turns out to be a daunting task to compare and choose a well-adapted genome browser, as multidisciplinary knowledge is required to carry out this task and the number of tools, functionalities and features are overwhelming. Findings To assist in this task, we propose a community-based framework based on two cornerstones: (i the implementation of industry promoted software qualification method (QSOS adapted for genome browser evaluations, and (ii a web resource providing numerous facilities either for visualizing comparisons or performing new evaluations. We formulated 60 criteria specifically for genome browsers, and incorporated another 65 directly from QSOS's generic section. Those criteria aim to answer versatile needs, ranging from a biologist whose interest primarily lies into user-friendly and informative functionalities, a bioinformatician who wants to integrate the genome browser into a wider framework, or a computer scientist who might choose a software according to more technical features. We developed a dedicated web application to enrich the existing QSOS functionalities (weighting of criteria, user profile with features of interest to a community-based framework: easy management of evolving data, user comments... Conclusions The framework is available at http://genome.jouy.inra.fr/CompaGB. It is open to anyone who wishes to participate in the evaluations. It helps the scientific community to (1 choose a genome browser that would better fit their particular project, (2 visualize features comparatively with easily accessible formats, such as tables or radar plots and (3 perform their own evaluation against the defined criteria. To illustrate the CompaGB functionalities, we have evaluated seven genome browsers according to the implemented methodology

  19. CompaGB: An open framework for genome browsers comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Thomas; Loux, Valentin; Gendrault, Annie; Gibrat, Jean-François; Chiapello, Hélène

    2011-05-04

    Tools to visualize and explore genomes hold a central place in genomics and the diversity of genome browsers has increased dramatically over the last few years. It often turns out to be a daunting task to compare and choose a well-adapted genome browser, as multidisciplinary knowledge is required to carry out this task and the number of tools, functionalities and features are overwhelming. To assist in this task, we propose a community-based framework based on two cornerstones: (i) the implementation of industry promoted software qualification method (QSOS) adapted for genome browser evaluations, and (ii) a web resource providing numerous facilities either for visualizing comparisons or performing new evaluations. We formulated 60 criteria specifically for genome browsers, and incorporated another 65 directly from QSOS's generic section. Those criteria aim to answer versatile needs, ranging from a biologist whose interest primarily lies into user-friendly and informative functionalities, a bioinformatician who wants to integrate the genome browser into a wider framework, or a computer scientist who might choose a software according to more technical features. We developed a dedicated web application to enrich the existing QSOS functionalities (weighting of criteria, user profile) with features of interest to a community-based framework: easy management of evolving data, user comments... The framework is available at http://genome.jouy.inra.fr/CompaGB. It is open to anyone who wishes to participate in the evaluations. It helps the scientific community to (1) choose a genome browser that would better fit their particular project, (2) visualize features comparatively with easily accessible formats, such as tables or radar plots and (3) perform their own evaluation against the defined criteria. To illustrate the CompaGB functionalities, we have evaluated seven genome browsers according to the implemented methodology. A summary of the features of the compared genome

  20. EVALUATING EFFECTIVENESS OF MOBILE BROWSER SECURITY WARNINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak Shah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work precisely evaluates whether browser security warnings are as ineffective as proposed by popular sentiments and past writings. This research used different kinds of Android mobile browsers as well as desktop browsers to evaluate security warnings. Security experts and developers should give emphasis on making a user aware of security warnings and should not neglect aim of communicating this to users. Security experts and system architects should emphasis the goal of communicating security information to end users. In most of the browsers, security warnings are not emphasized, and browsers simply do not show warnings, or there are a number of ways to hide those warnings of malicious sites. This work precisely finds that how inconsistent browsers really are in prompting security warnings. In particular, majority of the modern mobile web browsers are vulnerable to these security threats. We find inconsistency in SSL warnings among web browsers. Based on this work, we make recommendations for warning designers and researchers.

  1. ASCIIGenome: a command line genome browser for console terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraldi, Dario

    2017-05-15

    Current genome browsers are designed to work via graphical user interfaces (GUIs), which, however intuitive, are not amenable to operate within console terminals and therefore are difficult to streamline or integrate in scripts. To circumvent these limitations, ASCIIGenome runs exclusively via command line interface to display genomic data directly in a terminal window. By following the same philosophy of UNIX tools, ASCIIGenome aims to be easily integrated with the command line, including batch processing of data, and therefore enables an effective exploration of the data. ASCIIGenome is written in Java. Consequently, it is a cross-platform tool and requires minimal or no installation. Some of the common genomic data types are supported and data access on remote ftp servers is possible. Speed and memory footprint are comparable to or better than those of common genome browsers. Software and source code (MIT License) are available at https://github.com/dariober/ASCIIGenome with detailed documentation at http://asciigenome.readthedocs.io . Dario.beraldi@cruk.cam.ac.uk. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. Extending a browser C++ simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Segarra Roca, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Getting started in computer programming involves using a number of tools such as editors, compilers, debuggers, and terminals. Learning how to use them can be challenging for programming begginers, and installing them may be demanding for certain organizations such as high schools. C– is a project that aims to bridge this gap by providing an educational C++ development environment that runs in a web browser. The goal of this thesis is to extend and improve the current implement...

  3. Botnet in the Browser: Understanding Threats Caused by Malicious Browser Extensions

    OpenAIRE

    Perrotta, Raffaello; Hao, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Browser extensions have been established as a common feature present in modern browsers. However, some extension systems risk exposing APIs which are too permissive and cohesive with the browser's internal structure, thus leaving a hole for malicious developers to exploit security critical functionality within the browser itself. In this paper, we raise the awareness of the threats caused by browser extensions by presenting a botnet framework based on malicious extensions installed in the use...

  4. CFGP 2.0: a versatile web-based platform for supporting comparative and evolutionary genomics of fungi and Oomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Cheong, Kyeongchae; Jung, Kyongyong; Jeon, Jongbum; Lee, Gir-Won; Kang, Seogchan; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Yin-Won; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, Comparative Fungal Genomics Platform (CFGP; http://cfgp.snu.ac.kr/) was publicly open with 65 genomes corresponding to 58 fungal and Oomycete species. The CFGP provided six bioinformatics tools, including a novel tool entitled BLASTMatrix that enables search homologous genes to queries in multiple species simultaneously. CFGP also introduced Favorite, a personalized virtual space for data storage and analysis with these six tools. Since 2007, CFGP has grown to archive 283 genomes corresponding to 152 fungal and Oomycete species as well as 201 genomes that correspond to seven bacteria, 39 plants and 105 animals. In addition, the number of tools in Favorite increased to 27. The Taxonomy Browser of CFGP 2.0 allows users to interactively navigate through a large number of genomes according to their taxonomic positions. The user interface of BLASTMatrix was also improved to facilitate subsequent analyses of retrieved data. A newly developed genome browser, Seoul National University Genome Browser (SNUGB), was integrated into CFGP 2.0 to support graphical presentation of diverse genomic contexts. Based on the standardized genome warehouse of CFGP 2.0, several systematic platforms designed to support studies on selected gene families have been developed. Most of them are connected through Favorite to allow of sharing data across the platforms.

  5. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2018 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Jonathan; Zweig, Ann S; Villarreal, Chris; Tyner, Cath; Speir, Matthew L; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Raney, Brian J; Lee, Christopher M; Lee, Brian T; Karolchik, Donna; Hinrichs, Angie S; Haeussler, Maximilian; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Navarro Gonzalez, Jairo; Gibson, David; Fiddes, Ian T; Eisenhart, Christopher; Diekhans, Mark; Clawson, Hiram; Barber, Galt P; Armstrong, Joel; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M; Kent, W James

    2017-11-02

    The UCSC Genome Browser (https://genome.ucsc.edu) provides a web interface for exploring annotated genome assemblies. The assemblies and annotation tracks are updated on an ongoing basis-12 assemblies and more than 28 tracks were added in the past year. Two recent additions are a display of CRISPR/Cas9 guide sequences and an interactive navigator for gene interactions. Other upgrades from the past year include a command-line version of the Variant Annotation Integrator, support for Human Genome Variation Society variant nomenclature input and output, and a revised highlighting tool that now supports multiple simultaneous regions and colors. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Vulnerability Assessment of Open Source Wireshark and Chrome Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    UNLIMITED 5 We spent much of the initial time learning about the logical model that modern HTML5 web browsers support, including how users interact with...are supposed to protect users of that site against cross-site scripting) and the new powerful an all-encompassing HTML5 standard. This vulnerability

  7. Memoirs of a Browser: A Cross-browser Detection Model for Privacy-breaching Extensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giuffrida, C.; Ortolani, S.; Crispo, B.

    2012-01-01

    Web browsers are undoubtedly one of the most popular user applications. This is even more evident in recent times, with Google introducing a platform where the browser is the only application provided to the user. With their modular and extensible architecture, modern browsers are also an appealing

  8. A genome browser database for rice (Oryza sativa) and Chinese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... 2National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science (NIHHS), Naju 520-821, Korea. 3High-Tech ... We have constructed an integrated genome browser database for sequence analysis of rice (Oryza ... Chinese cabbage genomes, users can obtain information using comparative genomics methods and.

  9. The Navigational Power of Web Browsers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bielecki, M.; Hidders, J.; Paredaens, J.; Spielmann, M.; Tyszkiewicz, J.; Van den Bussche, J.; http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00224-010-9294-3

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the computational capabilities of Web browsers, when equipped with a standard finite automaton. We observe that Web browsers are Turingcomplete. We introduce the notion of a navigational problem, and investigate the complexity of solving Web queries and navigational problems by Web

  10. Web browser accessibility using open source software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Obrenovic; J.R. van Ossenbruggen (Jacco)

    2007-01-01

    htmlabstractA Web browser provides a uniform user interface to different types of information. Making this interface universally accessible and more interactive is a long term goal still far from being achieved. Universally accessible browsers require novel interaction modalities and additional

  11. The UCSC genome browser database: update 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, R M; Karolchik, D; Zweig, A S

    2006-01-01

    The University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser Database contains, as of September 2006, sequence and annotation data for the genomes of 13 vertebrate and 19 invertebrate species. The Genome Browser displays a wide variety of annotations at all scales from the single nucleotide level up t...

  12. Distributed Computing on an Ensemble of Browsers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cushing, R.; Herawan, G.; Putra, H.; Belloum, A.; Bubak, M.; de Laat, C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors propose a new approach to distributed computing with Web browsers and introduce the WeevilScout prototype framework. The proliferation of Web browsers and the performance gains being achieved by current JavaScript virtual machines raises the question whether Internet

  13. Line-mode browser development days

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    Twelve talented web developers have travelled to CERN from all over the world to recreate a piece of web history: the line-mode browser. See the line-mode browser simulator that they created here. Read more about the birth of the web here.

  14. Exploring the enjoyment of playing browser games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimmt, Christoph; Schmid, Hannah; Orthmann, Julia

    2009-04-01

    Browser games--mostly persistent game worlds that can be used without client software and monetary cost with a Web browser--belong to the understudied digital game types, although they attract large player communities and motivate sustained play. The present work reports findings from an online survey of 8,203 players of a German strategy browser game ("Travian"). Results suggest that multiplayer browser games are enjoyed primarily because of the social relationships involved in game play and the specific time and flexibility characteristics ("easy-in, easy-out"). Competition, in contrast, seems to be less important for browser gamers than for users of other game types. Findings are discussed in terms of video game enjoyment and game addiction.

  15. D3GB: An Interactive Genome Browser for R, Python, and WordPress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, David; Prieto, Carlos

    2017-05-01

    Genome browsers are useful not only for showing final results but also for improving analysis protocols, testing data quality, and generating result drafts. Its integration in analysis pipelines allows the optimization of parameters, which leads to better results. New developments that facilitate the creation and utilization of genome browsers could contribute to improving analysis results and supporting the quick visualization of genomic data. D3 Genome Browser is an interactive genome browser that can be easily integrated in analysis protocols and shared on the Web. It is distributed as an R package, a Python module, and a WordPress plugin to facilitate its integration in pipelines and the utilization of platform capabilities. It is compatible with popular data formats such as GenBank, GFF, BED, FASTA, and VCF, and enables the exploration of genomic data with a Web browser.

  16. myGenomeBrowser: building and sharing your own genome browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrere, Sébastien; Gouzy, Jérôme

    2017-04-15

    myGenomeBrowser is a web-based environment that provides biologists with a way to build, query and share their genome browsers. This tool, that builds on JBrowse, is designed to give users more autonomy while simplifying and minimizing intervention from system administrators. We have extended genome browser basic features to allow users to query, analyze and share their data. myGenomeBrowser is freely available at https://bbric-pipelines.toulouse.inra.fr/myGenomeBrowser and includes tutorial screencasts. Source code and installation instructions can be found at https://framagit.org/BBRIC/myGenomeBrowser . myGenomeBrowser is open-source and mainly implemented in Perl, JavaScript, Apache and Docker. sebastien.carrere@inra.fr.

  17. Browsers for Distributed Systems: Universal Paradigm or Siren's Song?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seacord, Robett

    1998-01-01

    Web based browsers are quickly becoming ubiquitous in the workplace. Software development managers are quick to incorporate browsers into a broad range of software development projects, often inappropriately...

  18. WebPlus: lxplus in your browser

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    This talk will cover the possibility of offering a lxplus like service directly on the browser. How we could rely on containers and schedulers to maintain long lived sessions, and how to offer integration with common CERN services.

  19. How Far Can Client-Only Solutions Go for Mobile Browser Speed?

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhen; Lin, Felix Xiaozhu; Zhong, Lin; Chishtie, Mansoor

    2011-01-01

    Mobile browser is known to be slow because of the bottleneck in resource loading. Client-only solutions to improve resource loading are attractive because they are immediately deployable, scalable, and secure. We present the first publicly known treatment of client-only solutions to understand how much they can improve mobile browser speed without infrastructure support. Leveraging an unprecedented set of web usage data collected from 24 iPhone users continuously over one year, we examine the...

  20. GeneWiz browser: An Interactive Tool for Visualizing Sequenced Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Peter Fischer; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik; Rotenberg, Eva

    2009-01-01

    , standard atlases are pre-generated for all prokaryotic genomes available in GenBank, providing a fast overview of all available genomes, including recently deposited genome sequences. The tool is available online from http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/gwBrowser. [Supplemental material including interactive...... atlases is available online at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/gwBrowser/suppl/]....... readability and increased functionality compared to other browsers. The tool allows the user to select the display of various genomic features, color setting and data ranges. Custom numerical data can be added to the plot, allowing for example visualization of gene expression and regulation data. Further...

  1. Using a Web Browser for Environmental and Climate Change Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, T. Dale; Stackhouse, Paul; Mangosing, Daniel; Smith, G. Louis

    2005-01-01

    A new web browser for viewing and manipulating meteorological data sets is located on a web server at NASA, Langley Research Center. The browser uses a live access server (LAS) developed by the Thermal Modeling and Analysis Project at NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory. LAS allows researchers to interact directly with the data to view, select, and subset the data in terms of location (latitude, longitude) and time such as day, month, or year. In addition, LAS can compare two data sets and can perform averages and variances, LAS is used here to show how it functions as an internet/web browser for use by the scientific and educational community. In particular its versatility in displaying and manipulating data sets of atmospheric measurements in the earth's radiation budget (ERB) or energy balance, which includes measurements of absorbed solar radiation, reflected shortwave radiation (RSW), thermal outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), and net radiation is demonstrated. These measurements are from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) experiment and the surface radiation budget (SRB) experiment.

  2. Enhancing Independent Internet Access for Individuals with Mental Retardation through Use of a Specialized Web Browser: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Daniel K.; Stock, Steven E.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a prototype web browser, called Web Trek, that utilizes multimedia to provide access for individuals with cognitive disabilities was developed and pilot-tested with 12 adults with mental retardation. The Web Trek browser provided greater independence in accessing the Internet compared to Internet Explorer. (Contains references.)…

  3. gEVAL - a web-based browser for evaluating genome assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, William; Brugger, Kim; Caccamo, Mario; Sealy, Ian; Torrance, James; Howe, Kerstin

    2016-08-15

    For most research approaches, genome analyses are dependent on the existence of a high quality genome reference assembly. However, the local accuracy of an assembly remains difficult to assess and improve. The gEVAL browser allows the user to interrogate an assembly in any region of the genome by comparing it to different datasets and evaluating the concordance. These analyses include: a wide variety of sequence alignments, comparative analyses of multiple genome assemblies, and consistency with optical and other physical maps. gEVAL highlights allelic variations, regions of low complexity, abnormal coverage, and potential sequence and assembly errors, and offers strategies for improvement. Although gEVAL focuses primarily on sequence integrity, it can also display arbitrary annotation including from Ensembl or TrackHub sources. We provide gEVAL web sites for many human, mouse, zebrafish and chicken assemblies to support the Genome Reference Consortium, and gEVAL is also downloadable to enable its use for any organism and assembly. Web Browser: http://geval.sanger.ac.uk, Plugin: http://wchow.github.io/wtsi-geval-plugin kj2@sanger.ac.uk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. ABrowse - a customizable next-generation genome browser framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Lei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the rapid growth of genome sequencing projects, genome browser is becoming indispensable, not only as a visualization system but also as an interactive platform to support open data access and collaborative work. Thus a customizable genome browser framework with rich functions and flexible configuration is needed to facilitate various genome research projects. Results Based on next-generation web technologies, we have developed a general-purpose genome browser framework ABrowse which provides interactive browsing experience, open data access and collaborative work support. By supporting Google-map-like smooth navigation, ABrowse offers end users highly interactive browsing experience. To facilitate further data analysis, multiple data access approaches are supported for external platforms to retrieve data from ABrowse. To promote collaborative work, an online user-space is provided for end users to create, store and share comments, annotations and landmarks. For data providers, ABrowse is highly customizable and configurable. The framework provides a set of utilities to import annotation data conveniently. To build ABrowse on existing annotation databases, data providers could specify SQL statements according to database schema. And customized pages for detailed information display of annotation entries could be easily plugged in. For developers, new drawing strategies could be integrated into ABrowse for new types of annotation data. In addition, standard web service is provided for data retrieval remotely, providing underlying machine-oriented programming interface for open data access. Conclusions ABrowse framework is valuable for end users, data providers and developers by providing rich user functions and flexible customization approaches. The source code is published under GNU Lesser General Public License v3.0 and is accessible at http://www.abrowse.org/. To demonstrate all the features of ABrowse, a live demo for

  5. Plugin free remote visualization in the browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Georg; Slusallek, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Today, users access information and rich media from anywhere using the web browser on their desktop computers, tablets or smartphones. But the web evolves beyond media delivery. Interactive graphics applications like visualization or gaming become feasible as browsers advance in the functionality they provide. However, to deliver large-scale visualization to thin clients like mobile devices, a dedicated server component is necessary. Ideally, the client runs directly within the browser the user is accustomed to, requiring no installation of a plugin or native application. In this paper, we present the state-of-the-art of technologies which enable plugin free remote rendering in the browser. Further, we describe a remote visualization system unifying these technologies. The system transfers rendering results to the client as images or as a video stream. We utilize the upcoming World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) conform Web Real-Time Communication (WebRTC) standard, and the Native Client (NaCl) technology built into Chrome, to deliver video with low latency.

  6. The UCSC Genome Browser Database: update 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichs, A S; Karolchik, D; Baertsch, R

    2006-01-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz Genome Browser Database (GBD) contains sequence and annotation data for the genomes of about a dozen vertebrate species and several major model organisms. Genome annotations typically include assembly data, sequence composition, genes and gene predictions, ...

  7. The UCSC Genome Browser Database: 2008 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karolchik, D; Kuhn, R M; Baertsch, R

    2007-01-01

    The University of California, Santa Cruz, Genome Browser Database (GBD) provides integrated sequence and annotation data for a large collection of vertebrate and model organism genomes. Seventeen new assemblies have been added to the database in the past year, for a total coverage of 19 vertebrat...

  8. Spoken Language Processing in the Clarissa Procedure Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, M.; Hockey, B. A.; Renders, J.-M.; Chatzichrisafis, N.; Farrell, K.

    2005-01-01

    Clarissa, an experimental voice enabled procedure browser that has recently been deployed on the International Space Station, is as far as we know the first spoken dialog system in space. We describe the objectives of the Clarissa project and the system's architecture. In particular, we focus on three key problems: grammar-based speech recognition using the Regulus toolkit; methods for open mic speech recognition; and robust side-effect free dialogue management for handling undos, corrections and confirmations. We first describe the grammar-based recogniser we have build using Regulus, and report experiments where we compare it against a class N-gram recogniser trained off the same 3297 utterance dataset. We obtained a 15% relative improvement in WER and a 37% improvement in semantic error rate. The grammar-based recogniser moreover outperforms the class N-gram version for utterances of all lengths from 1 to 9 words inclusive. The central problem in building an open-mic speech recognition system is being able to distinguish between commands directed at the system, and other material (cross-talk), which should be rejected. Most spoken dialogue systems make the accept/reject decision by applying a threshold to the recognition confidence score. NASA shows how a simple and general method, based on standard approaches to document classification using Support Vector Machines, can give substantially better performance, and report experiments showing a relative reduction in the task-level error rate by about 25% compared to the baseline confidence threshold method. Finally, we describe a general side-effect free dialogue management architecture that we have implemented in Clarissa, which extends the "update semantics'' framework by including task as well as dialogue information in the information state. We show that this enables elegant treatments of several dialogue management problems, including corrections, confirmations, querying of the environment, and regression

  9. HAPLOWSER: a whole-genome haplotype browser for personal genome and metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Woo-Cheol; Waterman, Michael S; Park, Sanghyun; Li, Lei M

    2009-09-15

    Haplotype assembly is becoming a very important tool in genome sequencing of human and other organisms. Although haplotypes were previously inferred from genome assemblies, there has never been a comparative haplotype browser that depicts a global picture of whole-genome alignments among haplotypes of different organisms. We introduce a whole-genome HAPLotype brOWSER (HAPLOWSER), providing evolutionary perspectives from multiple aligned haplotypes and functional annotations. Haplowser enables the comparison of haplotypes from metagenomes, and associates conserved regions or the bases at the conserved regions with functional annotations and custom tracks. The associations are quantified for further analysis and presented as pie charts. Functional annotations and custom tracks that are projected onto haplotypes are saved as multiple files in FASTA format. Haplowser provides a user-friendly interface, and can display alignments of haplotypes with functional annotations at any resolution. Haplowser, written in Java, supports multiple platforms including Windows and Linux. Haplowser is publicly available at http://embio.yonsei.ac.kr/haplowser .

  10. Online Marketing Strategy for a browser games portal

    OpenAIRE

    Vinaixa Campos, Joan

    2008-01-01

    The Browser games industry: Introduction and description of browser games and browser games portals. Description of the main characteristics that define the browser games industry and its competitive environment. Analysis of all the factors that need to be considered in order to make a successful market entry. Online marketing techniques: Introduction and description to the main online marketing techniques that exist to market a product or service in internet: Search Engine Marketing...

  11. 78 FR 30226 - Accessibility Requirements for Internet Browsers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ...] Accessibility Requirements for Internet Browsers AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule... and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 (CVAA). Section 718 of the Act requires Internet browsers built..., the Commission also affirms that section 716 of the Act requires certain Internet browsers used for...

  12. GTB - an online genome tolerance browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihab, Hashem A; Rogers, Mark F; Ferlaino, Michael; Campbell, Colin; Gaunt, Tom R

    2017-01-06

    Accurate methods capable of predicting the impact of single nucleotide variants (SNVs) are assuming ever increasing importance. There exists a plethora of in silico algorithms designed to help identify and prioritize SNVs across the human genome for further investigation. However, no tool exists to visualize the predicted tolerance of the genome to mutation, or the similarities between these methods. We present the Genome Tolerance Browser (GTB, http://gtb.biocompute.org.uk ): an online genome browser for visualizing the predicted tolerance of the genome to mutation. The server summarizes several in silico prediction algorithms and conservation scores: including 13 genome-wide prediction algorithms and conservation scores, 12 non-synonymous prediction algorithms and four cancer-specific algorithms. The GTB enables users to visualize the similarities and differences between several prediction algorithms and to upload their own data as additional tracks; thereby facilitating the rapid identification of potential regions of interest.

  13. Aladin Lite: Lightweight sky atlas for browsers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boch, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Aladin Lite is a lightweight version of the Aladin tool, running in the browser and geared towards simple visualization of a sky region. It allows visualization of image surveys (JPEG multi-resolution HEALPix all-sky surveys) and permits superimposing tabular (VOTable) and footprints (STC-S) data. Aladin Lite is powered by HTML5 canvas technology and is easily embeddable on any web page and can also be controlled through a Javacript API.

  14. The GLOBE 3D Genome Browser

    OpenAIRE

    Knoch, Tobias; Eussen, Bert; Moorhouse, Michael

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe combination of genome sequence and structure, its annotation and experimental data in an accessible and comprehensible way is a major challenge. Increasingly, there are a large number of extremely divergent data sets: the sequence itself, genes, regulatory regions, various forms of reoccurring sequence features and clone sets etc. Currently, one possibility to represent this information in a visual form - and thus to reveal its scientific meaning - is to use genome browsers su...

  15. Issues of Page Representation and Organisation in Web Browser's Revisitation Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Cockburn

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Many commercial and research WWW browsers include a variety of graphical revisitation tools that let users return to previously seen pages. Examples include history lists, bookmarks and site maps. In this paper, we examine two fundamental design and usability issues that all graphical tools for revisitation must address. First, how can individual pages be represented to best support page identification? We discuss the problems and prospects of various page representations: the pages themselves, image thumbnails, text labels, and abstract page properties. Second, what display organisation schemes can be used to enhance the visualisation of large sets of previously visited pages? We compare temporal organisations, hub-and spoke dynamic trees, spatial layouts and site maps.

  16. Browser App Approach: Can It Be an Answer to the Challenges in Cross-Platform App Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh Q. Huynh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: As smartphones proliferate, many different platforms begin to emerge. The challenge to developers as well as IS educators and students is how to learn the skills to design and develop apps to run on cross-platforms. Background: For developers, the purpose of this paper is to describe an alternative to the complex native app development. For IS educators and students, the paper provides a feasible way to learn and develop fully functional mobile apps without technical burdens. Methodology: The methods used in the development of browser-based apps is prototyping. Our proposed approach is browser-based, supports cross-platforms, uses open-source standards, and takes advantage of “write-once-and-run-anywhere” (WORA concept. Contribution: The paper illustrates the application of the browser-based approach to create a series of browser apps without high learning curve. Findings: The results show the potentials for using browser app approach to teach as well as to create new apps. Recommendations for Practitioners\t: Our proposed browser app development approach and example would be useful to mobile app developers/IS educators and non-technical students because the source code as well as documentations in this project are available for downloading. Future Research: For further work, we discuss the use of hybrid development framework to enhance browser apps.

  17. Aladin Lite: Embed your Sky in the Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boch, T.; Fernique, P.

    2014-05-01

    I will introduce and describe Aladin Lite1, a lightweight interactive sky viewer running natively in the browser. The past five years have seen the emergence of powerful and complex web applications, thanks to major improvements in JavaScript engines and the advent of HTML5. At the same time, browser plugins Java applets, Flash, Silverlight) that were commonly used to run rich Internet applications are declining and are not well suited for mobile devices. The Aladin team took this opportunity to develop Aladin Lite, a lightweight version of Aladin geared towards simple visualization of a sky region. Relying on the widely supported HTML5 canvas element, it provides an intuitive user interface running on desktops and tablets. This first version allows one to interactively visualize multi-resolution HEALPix image and superimpose tabular data and footprints. Aladin Lite is easily embeddable on any web page and may be of interest for data providers which will be able to use it as an interactive previewer for their own image surveys, previously pre-processed as explained in details in the poster "Create & publish your Hierarchical Progressive Survey". I will present the main features of Aladin Lite as well as the JavaScript API which gives the building blocks to create rich interactions between a web page and Aladin Lite.

  18. An open source browser-based software tool for graph drawing and visualisation

    OpenAIRE

    Vogt, Veit-Dieter

    2014-01-01

    In this research work we searched for open source libraries which supports graph drawing and visualisation and can run in a browser. Subsequent these libraries were evaluated to find out which one is the best for this task. The result was the d3.js is that library which has the greatest functionality, flexibility and customisability. Afterwards we developed an open source software tool where d3.js was included and which was written in JavaScript so that it can run browser-based. En este tr...

  19. QMachine: commodity supercomputing in web browsers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Sean R; Almeida, Jonas S

    2014-06-09

    Ongoing advancements in cloud computing provide novel opportunities in scientific computing, especially for distributed workflows. Modern web browsers can now be used as high-performance workstations for querying, processing, and visualizing genomics' "Big Data" from sources like The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) without local software installation or configuration. The design of QMachine (QM) was driven by the opportunity to use this pervasive computing model in the context of the Web of Linked Data in Biomedicine. QM is an open-sourced, publicly available web service that acts as a messaging system for posting tasks and retrieving results over HTTP. The illustrative application described here distributes the analyses of 20 Streptococcus pneumoniae genomes for shared suffixes. Because all analytical and data retrieval tasks are executed by volunteer machines, few server resources are required. Any modern web browser can submit those tasks and/or volunteer to execute them without installing any extra plugins or programs. A client library provides high-level distribution templates including MapReduce. This stark departure from the current reliance on expensive server hardware running "download and install" software has already gathered substantial community interest, as QM received more than 2.2 million API calls from 87 countries in 12 months. QM was found adequate to deliver the sort of scalable bioinformatics solutions that computation- and data-intensive workflows require. Paradoxically, the sandboxed execution of code by web browsers was also found to enable them, as compute nodes, to address critical privacy concerns that characterize biomedical environments.

  20. QMachine: commodity supercomputing in web browsers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Ongoing advancements in cloud computing provide novel opportunities in scientific computing, especially for distributed workflows. Modern web browsers can now be used as high-performance workstations for querying, processing, and visualizing genomics’ “Big Data” from sources like The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) without local software installation or configuration. The design of QMachine (QM) was driven by the opportunity to use this pervasive computing model in the context of the Web of Linked Data in Biomedicine. Results QM is an open-sourced, publicly available web service that acts as a messaging system for posting tasks and retrieving results over HTTP. The illustrative application described here distributes the analyses of 20 Streptococcus pneumoniae genomes for shared suffixes. Because all analytical and data retrieval tasks are executed by volunteer machines, few server resources are required. Any modern web browser can submit those tasks and/or volunteer to execute them without installing any extra plugins or programs. A client library provides high-level distribution templates including MapReduce. This stark departure from the current reliance on expensive server hardware running “download and install” software has already gathered substantial community interest, as QM received more than 2.2 million API calls from 87 countries in 12 months. Conclusions QM was found adequate to deliver the sort of scalable bioinformatics solutions that computation- and data-intensive workflows require. Paradoxically, the sandboxed execution of code by web browsers was also found to enable them, as compute nodes, to address critical privacy concerns that characterize biomedical environments. PMID:24913605

  1. A Web-Based Geospatial Metadata Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arko, R. A.; Chayes, D. N.

    2002-12-01

    We are developing a simple Web-based browser for the search and display of earth science metadata. Our design goals are: 1. to permit both map-based (geographical) and forms-based (textual) searching; 2. to integrate a wide variety of data types in a hierarchical fashion; 3. to conform to the FGDC metadata standard; 4. to take advantage of existing open source software wherever possible; 5. to be platform-independent, browser-independent, and "robust" (i.e. avoid application layers which are resource-intensive or behave unpredictably, such as Java applets); and 6. to present metadata in a dynamic fashion via live database connections. Our implementation is based on the MapServer GIS platform (developed at the University of Minnesota with NSF and NASA funding), PostgreSQL relational database management system, and PostGIS geographic database extensions (developed by Refractions Research Inc and available under GNU Public License). All of these packages are well-documented open source software and have been proven in commercial-grade applications. We combine geographical searching (click-and-drag on maps, in both global and polar projections) and textual searching (drop-down menus organized by FGDC category) for a range of geophysical, chemical, and biological data types. A corresponding framework for collecting and ingesting earth science metadata is reported elsewhere at this meeting (Chayes & Arko, "Real-time Metadata Capture Implementations").

  2. Comparative Influence of Self-Efficacy, Social Support and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative Influence of Self-Efficacy, Social Support and PerceiIved Barriers on Low Physical Activity Development in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes, Hypertension ... Physical Activity Questionnaire, Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale, Medical Outcomes Social Support Scale and Exercise Benefits and Barrier Scale, respectively.

  3. ECR Browser: A Tool For Visualizing And Accessing Data From Comparisons Of Multiple Vertebrate Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Nobrega, M A

    2004-01-06

    The increasing number of vertebrate genomes being sequenced in draft or finished form provide a unique opportunity to study and decode the language of DNA sequence through comparative genome alignments. However, novel tools and strategies are required to accommodate this increasing volume of genomic information and to facilitate experimental annotation of genome function. Here we present the ECR Browser, a tool that provides an easy and dynamic access to whole genome alignments of human, mouse, rat and fish sequences. This web-based tool (http://ecrbrowser.dcode.org) provides the starting point for discovery of novel genes, identification of distant gene regulatory elements and prediction of transcription factor binding sites. The genome alignment portal of the ECR Browser also permits fast and automated alignment of any user-submitted sequence to the genome of choice. The interconnection of the ECR browser with other DNA sequence analysis tools creates a unique portal for studying and exploring vertebrate genomes.

  4. Xenopus genomic data and browser resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vize, Peter D; Zorn, Aaron M

    2017-06-15

    The two species of Xenopus most commonly used in biomedical research are the diploid Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis and the tetraploid Xenopus laevis. The X. tropicalis genome sequence has been available since 2010 and this year the X. laevis, genome from two distinct genetic backgrounds has been published. Multiple genome assemblies available for both species and transcriptomic and epigenetic data sets are growing rapidly, all of which are available from a variety of web resources. This review describes the contents of these resources, how to locate and download genomic data, and also how to view and manipulate these data on various public genome browsers, with an emphasis on Xenbase, the Xenopus model organism database. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Interactive metagenomic visualization in a Web browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondov, Brian D; Bergman, Nicholas H; Phillippy, Adam M

    2011-09-30

    A critical output of metagenomic studies is the estimation of abundances of taxonomical or functional groups. The inherent uncertainty in assignments to these groups makes it important to consider both their hierarchical contexts and their prediction confidence. The current tools for visualizing metagenomic data, however, omit or distort quantitative hierarchical relationships and lack the facility for displaying secondary variables. Here we present Krona, a new visualization tool that allows intuitive exploration of relative abundances and confidences within the complex hierarchies of metagenomic classifications. Krona combines a variant of radial, space-filling displays with parametric coloring and interactive polar-coordinate zooming. The HTML5 and JavaScript implementation enables fully interactive charts that can be explored with any modern Web browser, without the need for installed software or plug-ins. This Web-based architecture also allows each chart to be an independent document, making them easy to share via e-mail or post to a standard Web server. To illustrate Krona's utility, we describe its application to various metagenomic data sets and its compatibility with popular metagenomic analysis tools. Krona is both a powerful metagenomic visualization tool and a demonstration of the potential of HTML5 for highly accessible bioinformatic visualizations. Its rich and interactive displays facilitate more informed interpretations of metagenomic analyses, while its implementation as a browser-based application makes it extremely portable and easily adopted into existing analysis packages. Both the Krona rendering code and conversion tools are freely available under a BSD open-source license, and available from: http://krona.sourceforge.net.

  6. Interactive metagenomic visualization in a Web browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillippy Adam M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A critical output of metagenomic studies is the estimation of abundances of taxonomical or functional groups. The inherent uncertainty in assignments to these groups makes it important to consider both their hierarchical contexts and their prediction confidence. The current tools for visualizing metagenomic data, however, omit or distort quantitative hierarchical relationships and lack the facility for displaying secondary variables. Results Here we present Krona, a new visualization tool that allows intuitive exploration of relative abundances and confidences within the complex hierarchies of metagenomic classifications. Krona combines a variant of radial, space-filling displays with parametric coloring and interactive polar-coordinate zooming. The HTML5 and JavaScript implementation enables fully interactive charts that can be explored with any modern Web browser, without the need for installed software or plug-ins. This Web-based architecture also allows each chart to be an independent document, making them easy to share via e-mail or post to a standard Web server. To illustrate Krona's utility, we describe its application to various metagenomic data sets and its compatibility with popular metagenomic analysis tools. Conclusions Krona is both a powerful metagenomic visualization tool and a demonstration of the potential of HTML5 for highly accessible bioinformatic visualizations. Its rich and interactive displays facilitate more informed interpretations of metagenomic analyses, while its implementation as a browser-based application makes it extremely portable and easily adopted into existing analysis packages. Both the Krona rendering code and conversion tools are freely available under a BSD open-source license, and available from: http://krona.sourceforge.net.

  7. PopGeV: a web-based large-scale population genome browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xinyi; Peng, Jing; Yu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Xiaohong; Li, Dongye; Liu, Baohui; Kong, Fanjiang; Yuan, Xiaohui

    2015-09-15

    The development of high-throughput sequencing technology has made it possible for more and more researchers to use population sequencing data to mine genes associated with specific traits. However, the massive amounts of sequencing data have also brought new challenges to the researchers. The question of how to browse population genomic data in an easy and intuitive manner must be addressed. Web-based genome browsers allow user to conveniently view the results of genomic analyses, but heavy usage can reduce the response speed of the webpage, which limits its usefulness in the display of large-scale genome data. IndexedDB technology is a good solution to this problem; it supports web browsers and so creates local databases. In this way, data can be read from the local storage, achieving a smooth display of population genomic data. PopGeV has the following characteristics. First, it uses a new encoding method for compression of population SNP and INDEL data. IndexedDB technology is used to download the results to local storage so that users can browse the results smoothly even when the network traffic is heavy. Second, PopGeV identify similar genomic regions between two individuals based on SNP data. Population diversity indexes are calculated when comparing two populations. Third, user defined annotation information can be integrated for user-friendly mining of gene functions. Simulation shows that PopGeV can smoothly display analysis results of population genome containing over 500 individuals with 2 millions SNP data. PopGeV is available at www.soyomics.com/popgev/ yuanxh@iga.ac.cn. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. [The design and realization of Web-view PACS browser].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pei-liang; Ye, Zhi-qian

    2006-05-01

    This article analyses the system structure and realization model of Web-view PACS browser in combination with the characteristic of PACS, and presents the realizing process of the web-view PACS browser using JSP mode and B/S model.

  9. Rasmuson Library DVD Browser: Fun with Screen Scraping and Drupal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Morlino

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The DVD Browser is a simple application that lets library patrons browse movie covers, titles, and reviews. It works by screen scraping the the Rasmuson Library catalog for DVD movies and dumps the data into a Drupal MySQL database. This paper describes the process of setting up the DVD Browser.

  10. MLitB: Machine Learning in the Browser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeds, E.; Hendriks, R.; Al Faraby, S.; Bruntink, M.; Welling, M.

    2015-01-01

    With few exceptions, the field of Machine Learning (ML) research has largely ignored the browser as a computational engine. Beyond an educational resource for ML, the browser has vast potential to not only improve the state-of-the-art in ML research, but also, inexpensively and on a massive scale,

  11. Ajax and Firefox: New Web Applications and Browsers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin-Jones, Bob

    2005-01-01

    Alternative browsers are gaining significant market share, and both Apple and Microsoft are releasing OS upgrades which portend some interesting changes in Web development. Of particular interest for language learning professionals may be new developments in the area of Web browser based applications, particularly using an approach dubbed "Ajax."…

  12. Selfrando: Securing the Tor Browser against De-anonymization Exploits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conti Mauro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tor is a well-known anonymous communication system used by millions of users, including journalists and civil rights activists all over the world. The Tor Browser gives non-technical users an easy way to access the Tor Network. However, many government organizations are actively trying to compromise Tor not only in regions with repressive regimes but also in the free world, as the recent FBI incidents clearly demonstrate. Exploiting software vulnerabilities in general, and browser vulnerabilities in particular, constitutes a clear and present threat to the Tor software. The Tor Browser shares a large part of its attack surface with the Firefox browser. Therefore, Firefox vulnerabilities (even patched ones are highly valuable to attackers trying to monitor users of the Tor Browser.

  13. Comparing Organic vs. Assigned UAV Support to the Maneuver Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    hovering or perching capability. Overall, no advantage. d Survivability: likelihood of avoiding destruction by enemy action Even Against small arms... Gerald J. Lieberman. Introduction to Operations Research, 7th ed. 2001. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. Comparing Organic vs. Assigned UAV Support

  14. SU-E-J-114: Web-Browser Medical Physics Applications Using HTML5 and Javascript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiari, M

    2012-06-01

    Since 2010, there has been a great attention about HTML5. Application developers and browser makers fully embrace and support the web of the future. Consumers have started to embrace HTML5, especially as more users understand the benefits and potential that HTML5 can mean for the future.Modern browsers such as Firefox, Google Chrome, and Safari are offering better and more robust support for HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript. The idea is to introduce the HTML5 to medical physics community for open source software developments. The benefit of using HTML5 is developing portable software systems. The HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript programming languages were used to develop several applications for Quality Assurance in radiation therapy. The canvas element of HTML5 was used for handling and displaying the images, and JavaScript was used to manipulate the data. Sample application were developed to: 1. analyze the flatness and symmetry of the radiotherapy fields in a web browser, 2.analyze the Dynalog files from Varian machines, 3. visualize the animated Dynamic MLC files, 4. Simulation via Monte Carlo, and 5. interactive image manipulation. The programs showed great performance and speed in uploading the data and displaying the results. The flatness and symmetry program and Dynalog file analyzer ran in a fraction of second. The reason behind this performance is using JavaScript language which is a lower level programming language in comparison to the most of the scientific programming packages such as Matlab. The second reason is that JavaScript runs locally on client side computers not on the web-servers. HTML5 and JavaScript can be used to develop useful applications that can be run online or offline on different modern web-browsers. The programming platform can be also one of the modern web-browsers which are mostly open source (such as Firefox). © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. BrainBrowser: distributed, web-based neurological data visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Tarek; Kassis, Nicolas; Rousseau, Marc-Étienne; Adalat, Reza; Evans, Alan C

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen massive, distributed datasets become the norm in neuroimaging research, and the methodologies used to analyze them have, in response, become more collaborative and exploratory. Tools and infrastructure are continuously being developed and deployed to facilitate research in this context: grid computation platforms to process the data, distributed data stores to house and share them, high-speed networks to move them around and collaborative, often web-based, platforms to provide access to and sometimes manage the entire system. BrainBrowser is a lightweight, high-performance JavaScript visualization library built to provide easy-to-use, powerful, on-demand visualization of remote datasets in this new research environment. BrainBrowser leverages modern web technologies, such as WebGL, HTML5 and Web Workers, to visualize 3D surface and volumetric neuroimaging data in any modern web browser without requiring any browser plugins. It is thus trivial to integrate BrainBrowser into any web-based platform. BrainBrowser is simple enough to produce a basic web-based visualization in a few lines of code, while at the same time being robust enough to create full-featured visualization applications. BrainBrowser can dynamically load the data required for a given visualization, so no network bandwidth needs to be waisted on data that will not be used. BrainBrowser's integration into the standardized web platform also allows users to consider using 3D data visualization in novel ways, such as for data distribution, data sharing and dynamic online publications. BrainBrowser is already being used in two major online platforms, CBRAIN and LORIS, and has been used to make the 1TB MACACC dataset openly accessible.

  16. BrainBrowser: distributed, web-based neurological data visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek eSherif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen massive, distributed datasets become the norm in neuroimaging research, and the methodologies used analyze them have, in response, become more collaborative and exploratory. Tools and infrastructure are continuously being developed and deployed to facilitate research in this context: grid computation platforms to process the data, distributed data stores to house and share them, high-speed networks to move them around and collaborative, often web-based, platforms to provide access to and sometimes manage the entire system. BrainBrowser is a lightweight, high-performance JavaScript visualization library built to provide easy-to-use, powerful, on-demand visualization of remote datasets in this new research environment. BrainBrowser leverages modern Web technologies, such as WebGL, HTML5 and Web Workers, to visualize 3D surface and volumetric neuroimaging data in any modern web browser without requiring any browser plugins. It is thus trivial to integrate BrainBrowser into any web-based platform. BrainBrowser is simple enough to produce a basic web-based visualization in a few lines of code, while at the same time being robust enough to create full-featured visualization applications. BrainBrowser can dynamically load the data required for a given visualization, so no network bandwidth needs to be waisted on data that will not be used. BrainBrowser's integration into the standardized web platform also allows users to consider using 3D data visualization in novel ways, such as for data distribution, data sharing and dynamic online publications. BrainBrowser is already being used in two major online platforms, CBRAIN and LORIS, and has been used to make the 1TB MACACC dataset openly accessible.

  17. Web Browser History Detection as a Real-World Privacy Threat

    CERN Document Server

    Janc, A

    2010-01-01

    Web browser history detection using CSS $visited$ styles has long been dismissed as an issue of marginal impact. However, due to recent changes in Web usage patterns, coupled with browser performance improvements, the long-standing issue has now become a significant threat to the privacy of Internet users. In this paper we analyze the impact of CSS-based history detection and demonstrate the feasibility of conducting practical attacks with minimal resources. We analyze Web browser behavior and detectability of content loaded via standard protocols and with various HTTP response codes. We develop an algorithm for efficient examination of large link sets and evaluate its performance in modern browsers. Compared to existing methods our approach is up to 6 times faster, and is able to detect up to 30,000 visited links per second. We present a novel Web application capable of effectively detecting clients’ browsing histories and discuss real-world results obtained from 271,576 Internet users. Our results indicat...

  18. Information-Flow-Based Access Control for Web Browsers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihama, Sachiko; Tateishi, Takaaki; Tabuchi, Naoshi; Matsumoto, Tsutomu

    The emergence of Web 2.0 technologies such as Ajax and Mashup has revealed the weakness of the same-origin policy[1], the current de facto standard for the Web browser security model. We propose a new browser security model to allow fine-grained access control in the client-side Web applications for secure mashup and user-generated contents. We propose a browser security model that is based on information-flow-based access control (IBAC) to overcome the dynamic nature of the client-side Web applications and to accurately determine the privilege of scripts in the event-driven programming model.

  19. Dual roles of an algal farming damselfish as a cultivator and opportunistic browser of an invasive seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyton, Kimberly A; Valentino, Lauren M; Maruska, Karen P

    2014-01-01

    Herbivory is a fundamental process determining reef resilience, and while algal farming damselfishes can help shape benthic assemblages, an understanding of their contribution to areas outside of defended territories is relatively unexplored. Here, we demonstrate how the farming damselfish Stegastes marginatus plays a dual role in benthic structuring by 1) contributing to persistence of the invasive macroalga Acanthophora spicifera within a Hawaiian marine protected area, where the macroalga occurred exclusively inside Stegastes territories, and 2) behaving as an opportunistic browser of the exotic alga outside their territorial borders. Greater than 50% of the biomass of tethered A. spicifera was consumed within one-hour when placed outside Stegastes territories, compared to ecological processes that shape reef ecosystems to improve management of MPAs that often support extensive farming damselfish populations.

  20. pWeb: A High-Performance, Parallel-Computing Framework for Web-Browser-Based Medical Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halic, Tansel; Ahn, Woojin; De, Suvranu

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a pWeb - a new language and compiler for parallelization of client-side compute intensive web applications such as surgical simulations. The recently introduced HTML5 standard has enabled creating unprecedented applications on the web. Low performance of the web browser, however, remains the bottleneck of computationally intensive applications including visualization of complex scenes, real time physical simulations and image processing compared to native ones. The new proposed language is built upon web workers for multithreaded programming in HTML5. The language provides fundamental functionalities of parallel programming languages as well as the fork/join parallel model which is not supported by web workers. The language compiler automatically generates an equivalent parallel script that complies with the HTML5 standard. A case study on realistic rendering for surgical simulations demonstrates enhanced performance with a compact set of instructions.

  1. Savant: genome browser for high-throughput sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Marc; Williams, Vanessa; Brook, Andrew; Brudno, Michael

    2010-08-15

    The advent of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies has made it affordable to sequence many individuals' genomes. Simultaneously the computational analysis of the large volumes of data generated by the new sequencing machines remains a challenge. While a plethora of tools are available to map the resulting reads to a reference genome, and to conduct primary analysis of the mappings, it is often necessary to visually examine the results and underlying data to confirm predictions and understand the functional effects, especially in the context of other datasets. We introduce Savant, the Sequence Annotation, Visualization and ANalysis Tool, a desktop visualization and analysis browser for genomic data. Savant was developed for visualizing and analyzing HTS data, with special care taken to enable dynamic visualization in the presence of gigabases of genomic reads and references the size of the human genome. Savant supports the visualization of genome-based sequence, point, interval and continuous datasets, and multiple visualization modes that enable easy identification of genomic variants (including single nucleotide polymorphisms, structural and copy number variants), and functional genomic information (e.g. peaks in ChIP-seq data) in the context of genomic annotations. Savant is freely available at http://compbio.cs.toronto.edu/savant.

  2. Comparing administration of nutrition support with prescribed dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Terezie Tolar; Griffith, Lara Kelley; Jones, Megan; Allen, Ginny; Yang, Jie; Wang, Chong; Leung, Wing; Williams, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether pediatric bone marrow transplant (BMT) patients receive the prescribed dose of nutrition support (NS). Data were obtained from electronic and paper charts at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The amount of NS received was compared with the amount prescribed. Data were collected on 32 patients for 63 hospital stays in which NS was administered. The mean percentage of nutrition prescription met and percentage of total estimated energy met were 69% and 72%, respectively. Allogeneic BMT patients received significantly more of their nutrition prescription (92%) than autologous BMT patients did (54%, P < .01). Malnourished patients were significantly more likely to receive the full dose of NS than patients who were considered nourished or obese (P < .05). This study showed that patients who were most in need of NS were more likely to receive the full dose.

  3. Comparing decision-support systems in adopting sustainable intensification criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouda eVosough Ahmadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable intensification (SI is a multifaceted concept incorporating the ambition to increase or maintain the current level of agricultural yields while reduce negative ecological and environmental impacts. Decision-support systems (DSS that use integrated analytical methods are often used to support decision making processes in agriculture. However, DSS often consist of set of values, objectives and assumptions that may be inconsistent or in conflict with merits and objectives of SI. These potential conflicts will have consequences for adoption and up-take of agricultural research, technologies and related policies and regulations such as genetic technology in pursuit of SI. This perspective paper aimed at comparing a number of frequently used socio-economic DSS with respect to their capacity in incorporating various dimensions of SI, and discussing their application to analyzing farm animal genetic resources (FAnGR policies. The case of FAnGR policies was chosen because of its great potential in delivering merits of SI. It was concluded that flexible DSS, with great integration capacity with various natural and social sciences, are needed to provide guidance on feasibility, practicality and policy implementation for SI.

  4. Comparing decision-support systems in adopting sustainable intensification criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Bouda Vosough; Moran, Dominic; Barnes, Andrew P; Baret, Philippe V

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable intensification (SI) is a multifaceted concept incorporating the ambition to increase or maintain the current level of agricultural yields while reduce negative ecological and environmental impacts. Decision-support systems (DSS) that use integrated analytical methods are often used to support decision making processes in agriculture. However, DSS often consist of set of values, objectives, and assumptions that may be inconsistent or in conflict with merits and objectives of SI. These potential conflicts will have consequences for adoption and up-take of agricultural research, technologies and related policies and regulations such as genetic technology in pursuit of SI. This perspective paper aimed at comparing a number of frequently used socio-economic DSS with respect to their capacity in incorporating various dimensions of SI, and discussing their application to analyzing farm animal genetic resources (FAnGR) policies. The case of FAnGR policies was chosen because of its great potential in delivering merits of SI. It was concluded that flexible DSS, with great integration capacity with various natural and social sciences, are needed to provide guidance on feasibility, practicality, and policy implementation for SI.

  5. Comparing decision support methodologies for identifying asthma exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexheimer, Judith W; Brown, Laura E; Leegon, Jeffrey; Aronsky, Dominik

    2007-01-01

    To apply and compare common machine learning techniques with an expert-built Bayesian Network to determine eligibility for asthma guidelines in pediatric emergency department patients. All patients 2-18 years of age presenting to a pediatric emergency department during a 2-month study period. We created an artificial neural network, a support vector machine, a Gaussian process, and a learned Bayesian network to compare each method's ability to detect patients eligible for asthma guidelines. Our outcome measures included the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves, sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios. The data were randomly split into a training set (n=3017) and test set (n=1006) for analysis. The systems performed equally well. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.959 for the expert-built Bayesian network, 0.962 for the automatically constructed Bayesian network, 0.956 for the Gaussian Process, and 0.937 for the artificial neural network. All four evaluated machine learning methods achieved high accuracy. The automatically created Bayesian network performed similarly to the expert-built network. These methods could be applied to create a realtime detection system for identifying asthma patients.

  6. A Lifelog Browser for Visualization and Search of Mobile Everyday-Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keum-Sung Hwang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices can now handle a great deal of information thanks to the convergence of diverse functionalities. Mobile environments have already shown great potential in terms of providing customized service to users because they can record meaningful and private information continually for long periods of time. The research for understanding, searching and summarizing the everyday-life of human has received increasing attention in recent years due to the digital convergence. In this paper, we propose a mobile life browser, which visualizes and searches human's mobile life based on the contents and context of lifelog data. The mobile life browser is for searching the personal information effectively collected on his/her mobile device and for supporting the concept-based searching method by using concept networks and Bayesian networks. In the experiments, we collected the real mobile log data from three users for a month and visualized the mobile lives of the users with the mobile life browser developed. Some tests on searching tasks confirmed that the result using the proposed concept-based searching method is promising.

  7. Winning by a neck: tall giraffes avoid competing with shorter browsers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Elissa Z; du Toit, Johan T

    2007-01-01

    With their vertically elongated body form, giraffes generally feed above the level of other browsers within the savanna browsing guild, despite having access to foliage at lower levels. They ingest more leaf mass per bite when foraging high in the tree, perhaps because smaller, more selective browsers deplete shoots at lower levels or because trees differentially allocate resources to promote shoot growth in the upper canopy. We erected exclosures around individual Acacia nigrescens trees in the greater Kruger ecosystem, South Africa. After a complete growing season, we found no differences in leaf biomass per shoot across height zones in excluded trees but significant differences in control trees. We conclude that giraffes preferentially browse at high levels in the canopy to avoid competition with smaller browsers. Our findings are analogous with those from studies of grazing guilds and demonstrate that resource partitioning can be driven by competition when smaller foragers displace larger foragers from shared resources. This provides the first experimental support for the classic evolutionary hypothesis that vertical elongation of the giraffe body is an outcome of competition within the browsing ungulate guild.

  8. Teleradiology system accessible through a common web browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luccichenti, Giacomo; Ngo Dinh, Nhan; Cademartiri, Filippo; Evangelisti, Giulio; Paolillo, Andrea; Bastianello, Stefano

    2004-01-01

    To describe a teleradiology system accessible via a PC and a common web browser. A dedicated system is connected to several radiological imagers (DR, US, CT, MR) with DICOM standard and TCP/IP protocol. The images are visualised in a common web browser on a remote PC by connecting to the dedicated web-site. Compressed images are visualised on a web page. Special toolbars allow specific operations to be performed on the images (brightness-contrast, zoom, distance measurement and ROI defining) and the communication with the radiological centre. The graphic interface is user-friendly and does not require any special knowledge, except for basic PC and internet surfing. Image compression can be set to preserve image quality, and image transfer is fast. The system presented overcomes the limitations of conventional teleradiology systems since it requires no special network or dedicated software, allowing for visualisation of a radiological examination on a PC and a common web browser.

  9. EcoBrowser: a web-based tool for visualizing transcriptome data of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Peng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli has been extensively studied as a prokaryotic model organism whose whole genome was determined in 1997. However, it is difficult to identify all the gene products involved in diverse functions by using whole genome sequencesalone. The high-resolution transcriptome mapping using tiling arrays has proved effective to improve the annotation of transcript units and discover new transcripts of ncRNAs. While abundant tiling array data have been generated, the lack of appropriate visualization tools to accommodate and integrate multiple sources of data has emerged. Findings EcoBrowser is a web-based tool for visualizing genome annotations and transcriptome data of E. coli. Important tiling array data of E. coli from different experimental platforms are collected and processed for query. An AJAX based genome browser is embedded for visualization. Thus, genome annotations can be compared with transcript profiling and genome occupancy profiling from independent experiments, which will be helpful in discovering new transcripts including novel mRNAs and ncRNAs, generating a detailed description of the transcription unit architecture, further providing clues for investigation of prokaryotic transcriptional regulation that has proved to be far more complex than previously thought. Conclusions With the help of EcoBrowser, users can get a systemic view both from the vertical and parallel sides, as well as inspirations for the design of new experiments which will expand our understanding of the regulation mechanism.

  10. Autoplot: a Browser for Science Data on the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faden, J.; Weigel, R. S.; West, E. E.; Merka, J.

    2008-12-01

    Autoplot (www.autoplot.org) is software for plotting data from many different sources and in many different file formats. Data from CDF, CEF, Fits, NetCDF, and OpenDAP can be plotted, along with many other sources such as ASCII tables and Excel spreadsheets. This is done by adapting these various data formats and APIs into a common data model that borrows from the netCDF and CDF data models. Autoplot uses a web browser metaphor to simplify use. The user specifies a parameter URL, for example a CDF file accessible via http with a parameter name appended, and the file resource is downloaded and the parameter is rendered in a scientifically meaningful way. When data span multiple files, the user can use a file name template in the URL to aggregate (combine) a set of remote files. So the problem of aggregating data across file boundaries is handled on the client side, allowing simple web servers to be used. The das2 graphics library provides rich controls for exploring the data. Scripting is supported through Python, providing not just programmatic control, but for calculating new parameters in a language that will look familiar to IDL and Matlab users. Autoplot is Java-based software, and will run on most computers without a burdensome installation process. It can also used as an applet or as a servlet that serves static images. Autoplot was developed as part of the Virtual Radiation Belt Observatory (ViRBO) project, and is also being used for the Virtual Magnetospheric Observatory (VMO). It is expected that this flexible, general-purpose plotting tool will be useful for allowing a data provider to add instant visualization capabilities to a directory of files or for general use in the Virtual Observatory environment.

  11. Dual roles of an algal farming damselfish as a cultivator and opportunistic browser of an invasive seaweed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A Peyton

    Full Text Available Herbivory is a fundamental process determining reef resilience, and while algal farming damselfishes can help shape benthic assemblages, an understanding of their contribution to areas outside of defended territories is relatively unexplored. Here, we demonstrate how the farming damselfish Stegastes marginatus plays a dual role in benthic structuring by 1 contributing to persistence of the invasive macroalga Acanthophora spicifera within a Hawaiian marine protected area, where the macroalga occurred exclusively inside Stegastes territories, and 2 behaving as an opportunistic browser of the exotic alga outside their territorial borders. Greater than 50% of the biomass of tethered A. spicifera was consumed within one-hour when placed outside Stegastes territories, compared to <5% lost from tethers within territories or herbivore exclusion cages. In situ remote video revealed that tethered A. spicifera located outside territories was grazed primarily by the surgeonfish Acanthurus nigrofuscus (∼68% of total bites and, surprisingly, by S. marginatus (∼27% of total bites that left their territories to feed on this resource on 107 occasions during 400 min of filming. Further, for over half of those occurrences where S. marginatus grazed on the tethered macroalga outside of territories, they fed alongside conspecifics and other species, displaying little of the aggressiveness that characterizes this damselfish. These results show that S. marginatus plays a wider role in determining benthic assemblages than previously recognized, acting both as cultivators of a canopy-forming invasive macroalga within their territories, and as opportunistic browsers in neighboring sites. Consequently, S. marginatus can affect benthic species composition across their territory borders. These results provide a rare example of interspecific facilitation of an exotic alga by an indigenous marine fish. Accounting for fish behaviors more broadly is important to further our

  12. A Comparative Study of Electronic Performance Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Frank; Klein, James D.; Sullivan, Howard

    2005-01-01

    Electronic performance support systems (EPSS) deliver relevant support information to users while they are performing tasks. The present study examined the effect of different types of EPSS on user performance, attitudes, system use and time on task. Employees at a manufacturing company were asked to complete a procedural software task and…

  13. A KML-BASED APPROACH FOR DISTRIBUTED COLLABORATIVE INTERPRETATION OF REMOTE SENSING IMAGES IN THE GEO-BROWSER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Huang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Existing implementations of collaborative image interpretation have many limitations for very large satellite imageries, such as inefficient browsing, slow transmission, etc. This article presents a KML-based approach to support distributed, real-time, synchronous collaborative interpretation for remote sensing images in the geo-browser. As an OGC standard, KML (Keyhole Markup Language has the advantage of organizing various types of geospatial data (including image, annotation, geometry, etc. in the geo-browser. Existing KML elements can be used to describe simple interpretation results indicated by vector symbols. To enlarge its application, this article expands KML elements to describe some complex image processing operations, including band combination, grey transformation, geometric correction, etc. Improved KML is employed to describe and share interpretation operations and results among interpreters. Further, this article develops some collaboration related services that are collaboration launch service, perceiving service and communication service. The launch service creates a collaborative interpretation task and provides a unified interface for all participants. The perceiving service supports interpreters to share collaboration awareness. Communication service provides interpreters with written words communication. Finally, the GeoGlobe geo-browser (an extensible and flexible geospatial platform developed in LIESMARS is selected to perform experiments of collaborative image interpretation. The geo-browser, which manage and visualize massive geospatial information, can provide distributed users with quick browsing and transmission. Meanwhile in the geo-browser, GIS data (for example DEM, DTM, thematic map and etc. can be integrated to assist in improving accuracy of interpretation. Results show that the proposed method is available to support distributed collaborative interpretation of remote sensing image

  14. Quality Search Content: A Reality With Next Generation Browsers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Lakshminarayana, S.

    moderate user is browsing through at the most 30 to 40 links out of the total delivery set from a search engine. Next Generation browsers are to reach the user with intelligence to address issues related the content filtering, address blocking, user...

  15. Faecal nitrogen of browser and mixed feeder game species during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A practical measure of assessing periods of potential nutritional stress of game species is needed in the management of these species in the Acacia karroo Riparian Thicket of the central Free State. The objectives of the study were to determine Nf concentration of four game species (browsers and mixed feeders) during ...

  16. The Consolidated Automated Support System (CASS): A comparative evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Meredith, Mark S.

    1990-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. This theses is an evaluation of the Consolidated Automated Support System (CASS) to determine whether it is likely to solve a host of long-standing problems with use of automatic test equipment (ATE) for support of Naval aircraft. CASS is a new ATE program nearing the end of full scale development which will replace all current ATE systems and many smaller manual testers to form a single, general purpose test system for all intermediate ...

  17. Comparing supports for LGBT aging in rural versus urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael G; Quam, Jean K

    2013-01-01

    Studies of rural populations typically underrepresent lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) older adults. This secondary analysis examined data from a nationwide sample of LGBT baby boomers (n = 1201). Geographic differences with respect to self-reported outness, acceptance of sexual identity, social and familial support, and household income were assessed with one-way analyses of variance. Guardedness about one's sexual identity and household asset levels were assessed with chi-square analyses. Rural individuals reported lower levels of outness, guardedness with people including siblings and close friends, and lower levels of household income. Providers should consider strategies for connecting older rural LGBT adults for potential care and support.

  18. The reference human nuclear mitochondrial sequences compilation validated and implemented on the UCSC genome browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasparre Giuseppe

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic nuclear genomes contain fragments of mitochondrial DNA called NumtS (Nuclear mitochondrial Sequences, whose mode and time of insertion, as well as their functional/structural role within the genome are debated issues. Insertion sites match with chromosomal breaks, revealing that micro-deletions usually occurring at non-homologous end joining loci become reduced in presence of NumtS. Some NumtS are involved in recombination events leading to fragment duplication. Moreover, NumtS are polymorphic, a feature that renders them candidates as population markers. Finally, they are a cause of contamination during human mtDNA sequencing, leading to the generation of false heteroplasmies. Results Here we present RHNumtS.2, the most exhaustive human NumtSome catalogue annotating 585 NumtS, 97% of which were here validated in a European individual and in HapMap samples. The NumtS complete dataset and related features have been made available at the UCSC Genome Browser. The produced sequences have been submitted to INSDC databases. The implementation of the RHNumtS.2 tracks within the UCSC Genome Browser has been carried out with the aim to facilitate browsing of the NumtS tracks to be exploited in a wide range of research applications. Conclusions We aimed at providing the scientific community with the most exhaustive overview on the human NumtSome, a resource whose aim is to support several research applications, such as studies concerning human structural variation, diversity, and disease, as well as the detection of false heteroplasmic mtDNA variants. Upon implementation of the NumtS tracks, the application of the BLAT program on the UCSC Genome Browser has now become an additional tool to check for heteroplasmic artefacts, supported by data available through the NumtS tracks.

  19. Comparative International Approaches to Better Understanding and Supporting Refugee Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficarra, Julie

    2017-01-01

    This article advocates for the application of comparative international approaches to preparing pre-service and in-service teachers for meeting the needs of refugee students. To start, the paper presents literature on refugees' varied educational experiences in their home countries and refugee camps as well as the processes through which they come…

  20. Adaptive Comparative Judgment: A Tool to Support Students' Assessment Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhind, Susan M; Hughes, Kirsty J; Yool, Donald; Shaw, Darren; Kerr, Wesley; Reed, Nicki

    2017-01-01

    Comparative judgment in assessment is a process whereby repeated comparison of two items (e.g., assessment answers) can allow an accurate ranking of all the submissions to be achieved. In adaptive comparative judgment (ACJ), technology is used to automate the process and present pairs of pieces of work over iterative cycles. An online ACJ system was used to present students with work prepared by a previous cohort at the same stage of their studies. Objective marks given to the work by experienced faculty were compared to the rankings given to the work by a cohort of veterinary students (n=154). Each student was required to review and judge 20 answers provided by the previous cohort to a free-text short answer question. The time that students spent on the judgment tasks was recorded, and students were asked to reflect on their experiences after engaging with the task. There was a strong positive correlation between student ranking and faculty marking. A weak positive correlation was found between the time students spent on the judgments and their performance on the part of their own examination that contained questions in the same format. Slightly less than half of the students agreed that the exercise was a good use of their time, but 78% agreed that they had learned from the process. Qualitative data highlighted different levels of benefit from the simplest aspect of learning more about the topic to an appreciation of the more generic lessons to be learned.

  1. LightWAVE: Waveform and Annotation Viewing and Editing in a Web Browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, George B

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes LightWAVE, recently-developed open-source software for viewing ECGs and other physiologic waveforms and associated annotations (event markers). It supports efficient interactive creation and modification of annotations, capabilities that are essential for building new collections of physiologic signals and time series for research. LightWAVE is constructed of components that interact in simple ways, making it straightforward to enhance or replace any of them. The back end (server) is a common gateway interface (CGI) application written in C for speed and efficiency. It retrieves data from its data repository (PhysioNet's open-access PhysioBank archives by default, or any set of files or web pages structured as in PhysioBank) and delivers them in response to requests generated by the front end. The front end (client) is a web application written in JavaScript. It runs within any modern web browser and does not require installation on the user's computer, tablet, or phone. Finally, LightWAVE's scribe is a tiny CGI application written in Perl, which records the user's edits in annotation files. LightWAVE's data repository, back end, and front end can be located on the same computer or on separate computers. The data repository may be split across multiple computers. For compatibility with the standard browser security model, the front end and the scribe must be loaded from the same domain.

  2. Figure summarizer browser extensions for PubMed Central.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shashank; Yu, Hong

    2011-06-15

    Figures in biomedical articles present visual evidence for research facts and help readers understand the article better. However, when figures are taken out of context, it is difficult to understand their content. We developed a summarization algorithm to summarize the content of figures and used it in our figure search engine (http://figuresearch.askhermes.org/). In this article, we report on the development of web browser extensions for Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome and Apple Safari to display summaries for figures in PubMed Central and NCBI Images. The extensions can be downloaded from http://figuresearch.askhermes.org/articlesearch/extensions.php.

  3. Open source MySQL Browser for Open Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Bucea-Manea-Tonis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Our purpose is to cross-compile MySQL driver source code for Linux on Windows architecture using a tool chain in order to build a neutral valid graphic interface on 32 bits. Once achieving this goal we could say that every possible Open source application can be built and run on Windows with maximum efficiency concerning costs and resource. This browser is an example of open innovation because its source code is free for anybody willing to develop new software apps for business and uses only Open source tools.

  4. Introduction to the fathead minnow genome browser and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab initio gene prediction and evidence alignment were used to produce the first annotations for the fathead minnow SOAPdenovo genome assembly. Additionally, a genome browser hosted at genome.setac.org provides simplified access to the annotation data in context with fathead minnow genomic sequence. This work is meant to extend the utility of fathead minnow genome as a resource and enable the continued development of this species as a model organism. The fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) is a laboratory model organism widely used in regulatory toxicity testing and ecotoxicology research. Despite, the wealth of toxicological data for this organism, until recently genome scale information was lacking for the species, which limited the utility of the species for pathway-based toxicity testing and research. As part of a EPA Pathfinder Innovation Project, next generation sequencing was applied to generate a draft genome assembly, which was published in 2016. However, application of those genome-scale sequencing resources was still limited by the lack of available gene annotations for fathead minnow. Here we report on development of a first generation genome annotation for fathead minnow and the dissemination of that information through a web-based browser that makes it easy to search for genes of interest, extract the corresponding sequence, identify intron and exon boundaries and regulatory regions, and align the computationally predicted genes with other supporti

  5. MLitB: machine learning in the browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Meeds

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available With few exceptions, the field of Machine Learning (ML research has largely ignored the browser as a computational engine. Beyond an educational resource for ML, the browser has vast potential to not only improve the state-of-the-art in ML research, but also, inexpensively and on a massive scale, to bring sophisticated ML learning and prediction to the public at large. This paper introduces MLitB, a prototype ML framework written entirely in Javascript, capable of performing large-scale distributed computing with heterogeneous classes of devices. The development of MLitB has been driven by several underlying objectives whose aim is to make ML learning and usage ubiquitous (by using ubiquitous compute devices, cheap and effortlessly distributed, and collaborative. This is achieved by allowing every internet capable device to run training algorithms and predictive models with no software installation and by saving models in universally readable formats. Our prototype library is capable of training deep neural networks with synchronized, distributed stochastic gradient descent. MLitB offers several important opportunities for novel ML research, including: development of distributed learning algorithms, advancement of web GPU algorithms, novel field and mobile applications, privacy preserving computing, and green grid-computing. MLitB is available as open source software.

  6. GBshape: a genome browser database for DNA shape annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Tsu-Pei; Yang, Lin; Zhou, Tianyin; Main, Bradley J; Parker, Stephen C J; Nuzhdin, Sergey V; Tullius, Thomas D; Rohs, Remo

    2015-01-01

    Many regulatory mechanisms require a high degree of specificity in protein-DNA binding. Nucleotide sequence does not provide an answer to the question of why a protein binds only to a small subset of the many putative binding sites in the genome that share the same core motif. Whereas higher-order effects, such as chromatin accessibility, cooperativity and cofactors, have been described, DNA shape recently gained attention as another feature that fine-tunes the DNA binding specificities of some transcription factor families. Our Genome Browser for DNA shape annotations (GBshape; freely available at http://rohslab.cmb.usc.edu/GBshape/) provides minor groove width, propeller twist, roll, helix twist and hydroxyl radical cleavage predictions for the entire genomes of 94 organisms. Additional genomes can easily be added using the GBshape framework. GBshape can be used to visualize DNA shape annotations qualitatively in a genome browser track format, and to download quantitative values of DNA shape features as a function of genomic position at nucleotide resolution. As biological applications, we illustrate the periodicity of DNA shape features that are present in nucleosome-occupied sequences from human, fly and worm, and we demonstrate structural similarities between transcription start sites in the genomes of four Drosophila species. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. A browser-based event display for the CMS Experiment at the LHC using WebGL

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, T.

    2017-10-01

    Modern web browsers are powerful and sophisticated applications that support an ever-wider range of uses. One such use is rendering high-quality, GPU-accelerated, interactive 2D and 3D graphics in an HTML canvas. This can be done via WebGL, a JavaScript API based on OpenGL ES. Applications delivered via the browser have several distinct benefits for the developer and user. For example, they can be implemented using well-known and well-developed technologies, while distribution and use via a browser allows for rapid prototyping and deployment and ease of installation. In addition, delivery of applications via the browser allows for easy use on mobile, touch-enabled devices such as phones and tablets. iSpy WebGL is an application for visualization of events detected and reconstructed by the CMS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The first event display developed for an LHC experiment to use WebGL, iSpy WebGL is a client-side application written in JavaScript, HTML, and CSS and uses the WebGL API three.js. iSpy WebGL is used for monitoring of CMS detector performance, for production of images and animations of CMS collisions events for the public, as a virtual reality application using Google Cardboard, and asa tool available for public education and outreach such as in the CERN Open Data Portal and the CMS masterclasses. We describe here its design, development, and usage as well as future plans.

  8. JavaScript Access to DICOM Network and Objects in Web Browser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drnasin, Ivan; Grgić, Mislav; Gogić, Goran

    2017-01-01

    .... Ever-increasing utilization of the web browsers, laptops and handheld devices, as opposed to desktop applications and static organizational computers, lead to development of different web technologies...

  9. ROOT I/O in Javascript - Reading ROOT files in a browser

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    A JavaScript version of the ROOT I/O subsystem is being developed, in order to be able to browse (inspect) ROOT files in a platform independent way. This allows the content of ROOT files to be displayed in most web browsers, without having to install ROOT or any other software on the server or on the client. This gives a direct access to ROOT files from new (e.g. portable) devices in a light way. It will be possible to display simple graphical objects such as histograms and graphs (TH1, TH2, TH3, TProfile, TGraph, ...). The rendering will first be done with an external JavaScript graphic library, before investigating a way to produce graphics closer to what ROOT supports on other platforms (X11, Windows).

  10. nodeGame: Real-time, synchronous, online experiments in the browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balietti, Stefano

    2017-10-01

    nodeGame is a free, open-source JavaScript/ HTML5 framework for conducting synchronous experiments online and in the lab directly in the browser window. It is specifically designed to support behavioral research along three dimensions: (i) larger group sizes, (ii) real-time (but also discrete time) experiments, and (iii) batches of simultaneous experiments. nodeGame has a modular source code, and defines an API (application programming interface) through which experimenters can create new strategic environments and configure the platform. With zero-install, nodeGame can run on a great variety of devices, from desktop computers to laptops, smartphones, and tablets. The current version of the software is 3.0, and extensive documentation is available on the wiki pages at http://nodegame.org .

  11. Context Aware Concurrent Execution Framework for Web Browsers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Aamir; Erbad, Aiman; Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein

    2016-01-01

    Computing hungry multimedia web applications need to efficiently utilize all the resources of a device. HTML5 web workers is a non-sharing concurrency platform that enables multimedia web application to utilize the available multicore hardware. HTML5 web workers are implemented by major browser...... vendors to facilitate concurrent execution in web clients and enhance the quality of ambitious web applications. The concurrent execution in web workers allows parallel processing using available cores at the expense of communication overhead and extra computation. The benefits of concurrent execution can...... be maximized by balancing load across workers/CPU cores. This work presents load-balancing algorithms between web workers using parameters such as scheduler throughput, computation priority and game entities locality. An award-winning web-based multimedia game (raptjs.com) is used to evaluate the performance...

  12. Context Aware Concurrent Execution Framework for Web Browser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Aamir; Erbad, Aiman Mahmood; Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein

    Computing hungry multimedia web applications need to efficiently utilize the device resources. HTML5 web workers is a non-sharing concurrency platform that enables multimedia web application to utilize the available multi-core hardware. HTML5 web workers are implemented by major browser vendors...... to facilitate concurrent execution in web clients and enhance the quality of ambitious web applications. The concurrent execution in web workers allows parallel processing using available cores at the expense of communication overhead and extra computation. The benefits of concurrent execution can be maximized...... by balancing load across workers/CPU cores. This work presents load-balancing algorithms between web workers using parameters such as scheduler throughput, computation priority and game entity locality. An award-winning web-based multimedia game (raptjs.com) is used to test the performance of the load balance...

  13. Browser-based Analysis of Web Framework Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Kersten

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Although web applications evolved to mature solutions providing sophisticated user experience, they also became complex for the same reason. Complexity primarily affects the server-side generation of dynamic pages as they are aggregated from multiple sources and as there are lots of possible processing paths depending on parameters. Browser-based tests are an adequate instrument to detect errors within generated web pages considering the server-side process and path complexity a black box. However, these tests do not detect the cause of an error which has to be located manually instead. This paper proposes to generate metadata on the paths and parts involved during server-side processing to facilitate backtracking origins of detected errors at development time. While there are several possible points of interest to observe for backtracking, this paper focuses user interface components of web frameworks.

  14. Web Pages Content Analysis Using Browser-Based Volunteer Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Turek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing solutions to the problem of finding valuable information on the Websuffers from several limitations like simplified query languages, out-of-date in-formation or arbitrary results sorting. In this paper a different approach to thisproblem is described. It is based on the idea of distributed processing of Webpages content. To provide sufficient performance, the idea of browser-basedvolunteer computing is utilized, which requires the implementation of text pro-cessing algorithms in JavaScript. In this paper the architecture of Web pagescontent analysis system is presented, details concerning the implementation ofthe system and the text processing algorithms are described and test resultsare provided.

  15. Integrating heterogeneous open-source software into web browsers using AMICO:WEB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Obrenovic; J.R. van Ossenbruggen (Jacco)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractA web browser provides a uniform user interface to different types of information. Making this interface universally accessible and more interactive is a long term goal still far from being achieved. Universally accessible browsers require novel interaction modalities and additional

  16. Lexicon Sextant: Modeling a Mnemonic System for Customizable Browser Information Organization and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Siu-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an ongoing study of the development of a customizable web browser information organization and management system, which the author has named Lexicon Sextant (LS). LS is a user friendly, graphical web based add-on to the latest generation of web browsers, such as Google Chrome, making it easier and more intuitive to store and…

  17. HotJava: Sun's Animated Interactive World Wide Web Browser for the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machovec, George S., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Examines HotJava and Java, World Wide Web technology for use on the Internet. HotJava, an interactive, animated Web browser, based on the object-oriented Java programming language, is different from HTML-based browsers such as Netscape. Its client/server design does not understand Internet protocols but can dynamically find what it needs to know.…

  18. Web-browser encryption of personal health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Richard E; Nadkarni, Prakash; Schoenfeld, David A; Finkelstein, Dianne M

    2011-11-10

    Electronic health records provide access to an unprecedented amount of clinical data for research that can accelerate the development of effective medical practices. However it is important to protect patient confidentiality, as many medical conditions are stigmatized and disclosure could result in personal and/or financial loss. We describe a system for remote data entry that allows the data that would identify the patient to be encrypted in the web browser of the person entering the data. These data cannot be decrypted on the server by the staff at the data center but can be decrypted by the person entering the data or their delegate. We developed this system to solve a problem that arose in the context of clinical research, but it is applicable in a range of situations where sensitive information is stored and updated in a database and it is necessary to ensure that it cannot be viewed by any except those intentionally given access. By developing this system, we are able to centralize the collection of some patient data while minimizing the risk that protected health information be made available to study personnel who are not authorized to use it.

  19. Dietary shifts: do grazers become browsers in the Thicket Biome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Landman

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The diet of buffalo (Syncerus coffer and Burchell's zebra (Equus burchelli was investigated in the Addo Elephant National Park to test the hypothesis that the shortage of grass associated with thicket vegetation results in grazers increasing the proportion of dicotyledonous plant species in their diet. Diet composition, estimated from faecal analysis, indicated that 19 and 21 plant species were identified in the faeces of zebra and buffalo, respectively. Buffalo proved to have a higher percentage dicotyledonous (28.1 vs. 8.5 and lower percentage monocotyledonous (71.9 vs. 91.5 species in their diet than zebra. The grass Eragrostis curvula was found to be the dominant food item for both buffalo (18 of diet and zebra (39 of diet during the period of study. The present study indicated that a great proportion of the buffalo diet does in fact consist of grass, thereby refuting the perception that the Addo buffalo are primarily browsers. Both buffalo and zebra are specialised grazers and unsuited to a diet of browse. The probability of dietary shift by these grazers in the grass limited thicket vegetation is therefore challenged.

  20. The polypharmacology browser: a web-based multi-fingerprint target prediction tool using ChEMBL bioactivity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awale, Mahendra; Reymond, Jean-Louis

    2017-01-01

    Several web-based tools have been reported recently which predict the possible targets of a small molecule by similarity to compounds of known bioactivity using molecular fingerprints (fps), however predictions in each case rely on similarities computed from only one or two fps. Considering that structural similarity and therefore the predicted targets strongly depend on the method used for comparison, it would be highly desirable to predict targets using a broader set of fps simultaneously. Herein, we present the polypharmacology browser (PPB), a web-based platform which predicts possible targets for small molecules by searching for nearest neighbors using ten different fps describing composition, substructures, molecular shape and pharmacophores. PPB searches through 4613 groups of at least 10 same target annotated bioactive molecules from ChEMBL and returns a list of predicted targets ranked by consensus voting scheme and p value. A validation study across 670 drugs with up to 20 targets showed that combining the predictions from all 10 fps gives the best results, with on average 50% of the known targets of a drug being correctly predicted with a hit rate of 25%. Furthermore, when profiling a new inhibitor of the calcium channel TRPV6 against 24 targets taken from a safety screen panel, we observed inhibition in 5 out of 5 targets predicted by PPB and in 7 out of 18 targets not predicted by PPB. The rate of correct (5/12) and incorrect (0/12) predictions for this compound by PPB was comparable to that of other web-based prediction tools. PPB offers a versatile platform for target prediction based on multi-fingerprint comparisons, and is freely accessible at www.gdb.unibe.ch as a valuable support for drug discovery.Graphical abstract.

  1. HOME USERS SECURITY AND THE WEB BROWSER INBUILT SETTINGS, FRAMEWORK TO SETUP IT AUTOMATICALLY

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Serrhini; Abdelazziz Ait Moussa

    2013-01-01

    We are living in the electronic age where electronic transactions such as e-mail, e-banking, e-commerce and e-learning becoming more and more prominent. To access online for this services, the web browser is todayâs almost unique software used. These daysâ hackers know that browsers are installed into all computers and can be used to compromise a machine by distributing malware via malicious or hacked websites. Also these sites use JavaScript to manipulate browsers and can drive user system t...

  2. A comparative study of slope failure prediction using logistic regression, support vector machine and least square support vector machine models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lim Yi; Shan, Fam Pei; Shimizu, Kunio; Imoto, Tomoaki; Lateh, Habibah; Peng, Koay Swee

    2017-08-01

    A comparative study of logistic regression, support vector machine (SVM) and least square support vector machine (LSSVM) models has been done to predict the slope failure (landslide) along East-West Highway (Gerik-Jeli). The effects of two monsoon seasons (southwest and northeast) that occur in Malaysia are considered in this study. Two related factors of occurrence of slope failure are included in this study: rainfall and underground water. For each method, two predictive models are constructed, namely SOUTHWEST and NORTHEAST models. Based on the results obtained from logistic regression models, two factors (rainfall and underground water level) contribute to the occurrence of slope failure. The accuracies of the three statistical models for two monsoon seasons are verified by using Relative Operating Characteristics curves. The validation results showed that all models produced prediction of high accuracy. For the results of SVM and LSSVM, the models using RBF kernel showed better prediction compared to the models using linear kernel. The comparative results showed that, for SOUTHWEST models, three statistical models have relatively similar performance. For NORTHEAST models, logistic regression has the best predictive efficiency whereas the SVM model has the second best predictive efficiency.

  3. [Standard NF EN ISO 15189: comparative analysis with GBEA and implementation of the new reference support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Julien; Annaix, Véronique

    2010-01-01

    Within reflexions of the healthcare system in France, Ballereau's report published in 2008 suggests modifications of medical biology supports by quality. The new reference system will be ISO 15189 which provides requirements for competence and quality. It differs from GBEA (Guidelines to Good Execution of Analysis) on the requirement of a quality system management. We accomplished a comparative study of these two standards of reference to identify differences, therefore elements to be worked or supported for accreditation process.

  4. Lesbian mothers with planned families: a comparative study of internalized homophobia and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMino, Kathleen A; Appleby, George; Fisk, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the perception of social support and the degree of internalized homophobia for two demographically similar groups: lesbians with planned families and lesbians who did not have children. Results found that lesbians with planned families perceived significantly less social support from friends overall, from gay men and lesbian friends specifically, and more support from their families-of-origin than lesbians who did not have children. Lesbians with planned families also reported significantly higher internalized homophobia specific to disclosure of sexual identification. The authors suggest that selective disclosure may be an adaptive response rather than a true measure of internalized homophobia.

  5. Emotional effort and perceived support in renal nursing: a comparative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen; Bain, Paul; Broderick, Pia; Sully, Max

    2013-12-01

    Social support is an important moderator of poor well-being outcomes for nurses engaged in emotional labour with patients; however, the most effective support for renal nurses is not well understood compared with other specialties. To identify patterns and themes in how renal nurses and two other specialties engage with patients' emotional expressions, express their own emotion and access and provide support for emotional expenditure. Renal, emergency and palliative care nurses from Perth, Western Australia, were interviewed. Renal nurses engage in significant amounts of emotional labour with patients, and identify co-workers as the most important source of support due to their availability and a sense of shared experience. However, comparative analysis showed that renal nurses do not recognise their emotional expenditure as readily and have less certainty of co-worker support. Because their high levels of emotional engagement with patients are mostly positive, renal nurses are less prepared than other nurses to manage difficult emotional situations. As co-worker support is highly valued, organisations should train renal nurses specifically to support one another. © 2013 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  6. Wellbeing, activity and housing satisfaction - comparing residents with psychiatric disabilities in supported housing and ordinary housing with support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Mona; Argentzell, Elisabeth; Bejerholm, Ulrika; Tjörnstrand, Carina; Brunt, David

    2017-08-30

    The home is imperative for the possibilities for meaningful everyday activities among people with psychiatric disabilities. Knowledge of whether such possibilities vary with type of housing and housing support might reveal areas for improved support. We aimed to compare people with psychiatric disabilities living in supported housing (SH) and ordinary housing with support (OHS) regarding perceived well-being, engaging and satisfying everyday activities, and perceived meaning of activity in one's accommodation. The importance of these factors and socio-demographics for satisfaction with housing was also explored. This naturalistic cross-sectional study was conducted in municipalities and city districts (n = 21) in Sweden, and 155 SH residents and 111 OHS residents participated in an interview that included both self-reports and interviewer ratings. T-test and linear regression analysis were used. The SH group expressed more psychological problems, but better health, quality of life and personal recovery compared to the OHS residents. The latter were rated as having less symptom severity, and higher levels of functioning and activity engagement. Both groups rated themselves as under-occupied in the domains of work, leisure, home management and self-care, but the SH residents less so regarding home management and self-care chores. Although the groups reported similar levels of activity, the SH group were more satisfied with everyday activities and rated their housing higher on possibilities for social interaction and personal development. The groups did not differ on access to activity in their homes. The participants generally reported sufficient access to activity, social interaction and personal development, but those who wanted more personal development in the OHS group outnumbered those who stated they received enough. Higher scores on satisfaction with daily occupations, access to organization and information, wanting more social interaction, and personal

  7. IcyTree: rapid browser-based visualization for phylogenetic trees and networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Timothy G

    2017-08-01

    IcyTree is an easy-to-use application which can be used to visualize a wide variety of phylogenetic trees and networks. While numerous phylogenetic tree viewers exist already, IcyTree distinguishes itself by being a purely online tool, having a responsive user interface, supporting phylogenetic networks (ancestral recombination graphs in particular), and efficiently drawing trees that include information such as ancestral locations or trait values. IcyTree also provides intuitive panning and zooming utilities that make exploring large phylogenetic trees of many thousands of taxa feasible. IcyTree is a web application and can be accessed directly at http://tgvaughan.github.com/icytree . Currently supported web browsers include Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome. IcyTree is written entirely in client-side JavaScript (no plugin required) and, once loaded, does not require network access to run. IcyTree is free software, and the source code is made available at http://github.com/tgvaughan/icytree under version 3 of the GNU General Public License. tgvaughan@gmail.com.

  8. Multiple browsers structure tree recruitment in logged temperate forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faison, Edward K.; DeStefano, Stephen; Foster, David R.; Rapp, Joshua M.; Compton, Justin A.

    2016-01-01

    Historical extirpations have resulted in depauperate large herbivore assemblages in many northern forests. In eastern North America, most forests are inhabited by a single wild ungulate species, white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and relationships between deer densities and impacts on forest regeneration are correspondingly well documented. Recent recolonizations by moose (Alces americanus) in northeastern regions complicate established deer density thresholds and predictions of browsing impacts on forest dynamics because size and foraging differences between the two animals suggest a lack of functional redundancy. We asked to what extent low densities of deer + moose would structure forest communities differently from that of low densities of deer in recently logged patch cuts of Massachusetts, USA. In each site, a randomized block with three treatment levels of large herbivores–no-ungulates (full exclosure), deer (partial exclosure), and deer + moose (control) was established. After 6–7 years, deer + moose reduced stem densities and basal area by 2-3-fold, Prunus pensylvanica and Quercus spp. recruitment by 3–6 fold, and species richness by 1.7 species (19%). In contrast, in the partial exclosures, deer had non-significant effects on stem density, basal area, and species composition, but significantly reduced species richness by 2.5 species on average (28%). Deer browsing in the partial exclosure was more selective than deer + moose browsing together, perhaps contributing to the decline in species richness in the former treatment and the lack of additional decline in the latter. Moose used the control plots at roughly the same frequency as deer (as determined by remote camera traps), suggesting that the much larger moose was the dominant browser species in terms of animal biomass in these cuts. A lack of functional redundancy with respect to foraging behavior between sympatric large herbivores may explain combined browsing effects that were

  9. Multiple Browsers Structure Tree Recruitment in Logged Temperate Forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward K Faison

    Full Text Available Historical extirpations have resulted in depauperate large herbivore assemblages in many northern forests. In eastern North America, most forests are inhabited by a single wild ungulate species, white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus, and relationships between deer densities and impacts on forest regeneration are correspondingly well documented. Recent recolonizations by moose (Alces americanus in northeastern regions complicate established deer density thresholds and predictions of browsing impacts on forest dynamics because size and foraging differences between the two animals suggest a lack of functional redundancy. We asked to what extent low densities of deer + moose would structure forest communities differently from that of low densities of deer in recently logged patch cuts of Massachusetts, USA. In each site, a randomized block with three treatment levels of large herbivores-no-ungulates (full exclosure, deer (partial exclosure, and deer + moose (control was established. After 6-7 years, deer + moose reduced stem densities and basal area by 2-3-fold, Prunus pensylvanica and Quercus spp. recruitment by 3-6 fold, and species richness by 1.7 species (19%. In contrast, in the partial exclosures, deer had non-significant effects on stem density, basal area, and species composition, but significantly reduced species richness by 2.5 species on average (28%. Deer browsing in the partial exclosure was more selective than deer + moose browsing together, perhaps contributing to the decline in species richness in the former treatment and the lack of additional decline in the latter. Moose used the control plots at roughly the same frequency as deer (as determined by remote camera traps, suggesting that the much larger moose was the dominant browser species in terms of animal biomass in these cuts. A lack of functional redundancy with respect to foraging behavior between sympatric large herbivores may explain combined browsing effects that were

  10. Exploring TCGA Pan-Cancer data at the UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cline, Melissa S; Craft, Brian; Swatloski, Teresa; Goldman, Mary; Ma, Singer; Haussler, David; Zhu, Jingchun

    2013-01-01

    The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser (https://genome-cancer.ucsc.edu) offers interactive visualization and exploration of TCGA genomic, phenotypic, and clinical data, as produced by the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network...

  11. A Policy Based Approach for the Management of Web Browser Resources to Prevent Anonymity Attacks in Tor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Arribas, Guillermo; Garcia-Alfaro, Joaquin

    Web browsers are becoming the universal interface to reach applications and services related with these systems. Different browsing contexts may be required in order to reach them, e.g., use of VPN tunnels, corporate proxies, anonymisers, etc. By browsing context we mean how the user browsers the Web, including mainly the concrete configuration of its browser. When the context of the browser changes, its security requirements also change. In this work, we present the use of authorisation policies to automatise the process of controlling the resources of a Web browser when its context changes. The objective of our proposal is oriented towards easing the adaptation to the security requirements of the new context and enforce them in the browser without the need for user intervention. We present a concrete application of our work as a plug-in for the adaption of security requirements in Mozilla/Firefox browser when a context of anonymous navigation through the Tor network is enabled.

  12. Comcutejs: A Web Browser Based Platform For Large-Scale Computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Debski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new, cost effective, volunteer computing based platform.It utilizes volunteers’ web browsers as computational nodes. The computationaltasks are delegated to the browsers and executed in the background (indepen-dently of any user interface scripts making use of the HTML5 web workerstechnology. The capabilities of the platform have been proved by experimentsperformed in a wide range of numbers of computational nodes (1–400.

  13. Living City, a Collaborative Browser-based Massively Multiplayer Online Game

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrara, Emilio; Fiumara, Giacomo; Pagano, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the design and implementation of our Browser-based Massively Multiplayer Online Game, Living City, a simulation game fully developed at the University of Messina. Living City is a persistent and real-time digital world, running in the Web browser environment and accessible from users without any client-side installation. Today Massively Multiplayer Online Games attract the attention of Computer Scientists both for their architectural peculiarity and the close interconnectio...

  14. A browser-based tool for conversion between Fortran NAMELIST and XML/HTML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, O.

    A browser-based tool for conversion between Fortran NAMELIST and XML/HTML is presented. It runs on an HTML5 compliant browser and generates reusable XML files to aid interoperability. It also provides a graphical interface for editing and annotating variables in NAMELIST, hence serves as a primitive code documentation environment. Although the tool is not comprehensive, it could be viewed as a test bed for integrating legacy codes into modern systems.

  15. A browser-based tool for conversion between Fortran NAMELIST and XML/HTML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Naito

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A browser-based tool for conversion between Fortran NAMELIST and XML/HTML is presented. It runs on an HTML5 compliant browser and generates reusable XML files to aid interoperability. It also provides a graphical interface for editing and annotating variables in NAMELIST, hence serves as a primitive code documentation environment. Although the tool is not comprehensive, it could be viewed as a test bed for integrating legacy codes into modern systems.

  16. Software to provide security for Web Browser Cookies and Passwords using Trusted Computing Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Kannamanani, R.

    2008-01-01

    For further development and enhancement of browser security, there is need to develop something new which provides the better security for the user credential information which will be stored in user PC through the web browser. Although we have many softwares which provide the security functionalities for system, there are many vulnerabilities, so for this there is need to use some functions and specifications mentioned by Trusted Computing group. Therefore, the goal of this semester thesis w...

  17. Browser impacts in Mapungubwe National Park, South Africa: Should we be worried?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corli Coetsee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the impact of browsers on vegetation types within the Mapungubwe National Park and specifically whether rocky outcrops or ridges in the park serve as refugia from browsers, particularly elephants. We sampled 80 transects at 20 sites and recorded 1740 plants comprising 65 species. We found that a high proportion (> 80% of the woody vegetation sampled indicated browser utilisation. Although certain woody species (e.g. Albizia harveyi, Boscia albitrunca, Lannea schweinfurthii appeared to be preferred by browsers, browsing levels were relatively high among all woody species. High levels of browsing by herbivores other than elephants suggest that they have a significant impact on the park’s vegetation. We did not find that rocky ridges acted as refugia to browsers, but instead found that vegetation in rocky ridges was more severely impacted by browsers than vegetation in flat areas, despite vegetation being more accessible in flat areas. If elephant numbers continue to increase at the current rate (e.g. elephant numbers doubled between 2007 and 2010, we predict that some of the heavily utilised species will become locally rare over time.Conservation implications: High levels of browsing by both elephant and smaller herbivores contribute to significant impacts on vegetation away from rivers in Mapungubwe National Park. Without management interventions that address both types of impact, structural and species diversity are bound to decrease over the short to medium term.

  18. An Asynchronous P300-Based Brain-Computer Interface Web Browser for Severely Disabled People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Cagigal, Victor; Gomez-Pilar, Javier; Alvarez, Daniel; Hornero, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an electroencephalographic (EEG) P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) Internet browser. The system uses the "odd-ball" row-col paradigm for generating the P300 evoked potentials on the scalp of the user, which are immediately processed and translated into web browser commands. There were previous approaches for controlling a BCI web browser. However, to the best of our knowledge, none of them was focused on an assistive context, failing to test their applications with a suitable number of end users. In addition, all of them were synchronous applications, where it was necessary to introduce a "read-mode" command in order to avoid a continuous command selection. Thus, the aim of this study is twofold: 1) to test our web browser with a population of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in order to assess the usefulness of our proposal to meet their daily communication needs; and 2) to overcome the aforementioned limitation by adding a threshold that discerns between control and non-control states, allowing the user to calmly read the web page without undesirable selections. The browser was tested with sixteen MS patients and five healthy volunteers. Both quantitative and qualitative metrics were obtained. MS participants reached an average accuracy of 84.14%, whereas 95.75% was achieved by control subjects. Results show that MS patients can successfully control the BCI web browser, improving their personal autonomy.

  19. An "Electronic Fluorescent Pictograph" browser for exploring and analyzing large-scale biological data sets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Winter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exploration of microarray data and data from other high-throughput projects for hypothesis generation has become a vital aspect of post-genomic research. For the non-bioinformatics specialist, however, many of the currently available tools provide overwhelming amounts of data that are presented in a non-intuitive way. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of microarray data and data from other large-scale data sets, we have developed a tool, which we have dubbed the electronic Fluorescent Pictograph - or eFP - Browser, available at http://www.bar.utoronto.ca/, for exploring microarray and other data for hypothesis generation. This eFP Browser engine paints data from large-scale data sets onto pictographic representations of the experimental samples used to generate the data sets. We give examples of using the tool to present Arabidopsis gene expression data from the AtGenExpress Consortium (Arabidopsis eFP Browser, data for subcellular localization of Arabidopsis proteins (Cell eFP Browser, and mouse tissue atlas microarray data (Mouse eFP Browser. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The eFP Browser software is easily adaptable to microarray or other large-scale data sets from any organism and thus should prove useful to a wide community for visualizing and interpreting these data sets for hypothesis generation.

  20. Pediatric Basic Life Support Self-training is Comparable to Instructor-led Training: A randomized manikin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, L. D.; Løfgren, Bo; Jessen, C.

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric Basic Life Support Self-training is comparable to Instructor-led Training: A randomized manikin study.......Pediatric Basic Life Support Self-training is comparable to Instructor-led Training: A randomized manikin study....

  1. Comparing postpartum stressors and social support level in primiparous and multiparous women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Salari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Postpartum period is an exclusive period after birth which can act as a potential stressor and could be accompanied with psychological disorders. Social support could play an important role in maternal mental health. Considering various stressors and different levels of social support for women, this study aimed to compare postpartum stressors as well as social support level between primiparous and multiparous women. Method: This descriptive comparative study was conducted on 400 primiparous and multiparous mothers who referred to urban health centers, Mashhad, Iran in 2011. They had no history of medical or psychological problems and had healthy term neonates who were 8-25 days old. The sampling was carried out through a multistage cluster sampling. Data were collected using modified Hung questionnaire of postpartum stressors, Helen questionnaire of anxiety and Hopkins social support questionnaire. Data were analyzed using descriptive analytic statistics by SPSS version 11. Results: The mean stress scores were 242.5±157.1 in primiparous and 28.8±179.8 in multiparous women. The main stressor of primiparous and multiparous women was neonate bathing and lower-back pain, respectively. The mean score of social support was 108.3±8.25 in the primiparous and 102.0±26.6 in multiparous women, which showed a significant difference between two groups (P=0.000. Conclusion: Various care programs are essential to support primiparous and multiparous mothers from different stressors that they face in postpartum period. It is also recommended to provid more information regarding the social support for the families.

  2. A comparative evaluation of four restorative materials to support undermined occlusal enamel of permanent teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar A

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to test the support to undermined occlusal enamel provided by posterior restorative composite (FiltekTM P60, 3M Dental products USA, polyacid modified resin composite (F2000 compomer, 3M Dental products, USA., radiopaque silver alloy-glass ionomer cement (Miracle Mix. GC Corp, Tokyo, Japan and Glass Ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP. To test each material, 20 human permanent mandibular third molars were selected. The lingual cusps were removed and the dentin supporting the facial cusps was cut away, leaving a shell of enamel. Each group of prepared teeth was restored using the materials according to the manufacturer′s instructions. All the specimens were thermocycled (250 cycles, 6°C- 60°C, dwell time 30 seconds and then mounted on an acrylic base. Specimens were loaded evenly across the cusp tips at a crosshead speed of 5 mm /minute in Hounsfield universal testing machine until fracture occurred. Data obtained was analyzed using analysis of variance and Studentized- Newman- Keul′s range test. No significant differences were detected in the support provided by P-60, F 2000, Miracle Mix or Fuji IX GP groups. The support provided to undermined occlusal enamel by these materials was intermediate between no support and that provided by sound dentin. Without further development in dental material technology and evidence of its efficacy, restorative materials should not be relied upon to support undermined occlusal enamel to a level comparable to that provided by sound dentin.

  3. A Web services-based distributed system with browser-client architecture to promote tele-audiology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianchu; Givens, Gregg D; Wan, Yongbo

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to extend applications of the Internet and other telecommunication means to the assessment of hearing. The newly developed distributed system consists primarily of an application server and its database, and Web services under browser-server architecture to support remote hearing assessment. A pilot study was conducted: three independent audiologists assessed hearing of 25 subjects using testing approaches with different data communication configurations. Analysis of the results demonstrated the feasibility of replacing conventional "face-to-face" tests with the remote hearing tests using the distributed system. Because of its distributed architecture, the present system supports a new service model and separates technical maintenance and clinical services. Consequently, the system shows great potential to benefit the clinical hearing care profession. Future research is planned to apply this system to medical facilities and for distance applications.

  4. Deployment-related mental health support: comparative analysis of NATO and allied ISAF partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Vermetten

    2014-08-01

    members. Conclusion: This analysis demonstrated that in all five partners state-of-the-art preventative mental healthcare was included in the last deployment in Afghanistan, including a positive approach towards strengthening the mental resilience, a focus on self-regulatory skills and self-empowerment, and several initiatives that were well-integrated in a military context. These initiatives were partly/completely implemented by the military/colleagues/supervisors and applicable during several phases of the deployment cycle. Important new developments in operational mental health support are recognition of the role of social leadership and enhancement of operational peer support. This requires awareness of mental problems that will contribute to reduction of the barriers to care in case of problems. Finally, comparing mental health support services across countries can contribute to optimal preparation for the challenges of military deployment.

  5. Deployment-related mental health support: comparative analysis of NATO and allied ISAF partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermetten, Eric; Greenberg, Neil; Boeschoten, Manon A.; Delahaije, Roos; Jetly, Rakesh; Castro, Carl A.; McFarlane, Alexander C.

    2014-01-01

    Background For years there has been a tremendous gap in our understanding of the mental health effects of deployment and the efforts by military forces at trying to minimize or mitigate these. Many military forces have recently systematized the mental support that is provided to support operational deployments. However, the rationale for doing so and the consequential allocation of resources are felt to vary considerably across North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) International Security Assistance (ISAF) partners. This review aims to compare the organization and practice of mental support by five partnering countries in the recent deployment in Afghanistan in order to identify and compare the key methods and structures for delivering mental health support, describe bottlenecks and illustrate new developments. Method Information was collected through document analysis and semi-structured interviews with key military mental healthcare stakeholders. The review resulted from close collaboration between key military mental healthcare professionals within the Australian Defense Forces (ADF), Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), United Kingdom Armed Forces (UK), Netherlands Armed Forces (NLD), and the United States Army (US). Key stakeholders were interviewed about the mental health support provided during a serviceperson's military career. The main items discussed were training, prevention, early identification, intervention, and aftercare in the field of mental health. Results All forces reported that much attention was paid to mental health during the individual's military career, including deployment. In doing so there was much overlap between the rationale and applied methods. The main method of providing support was through training and education. The educative focus was to strengthen the mental resilience of individual soldiers while providing a range of mental healthcare services. All forces had abandoned standard psychological debriefing after critical incidents

  6. Deployment-related mental health support: comparative analysis of NATO and allied ISAF partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermetten, Eric; Greenberg, Neil; Boeschoten, Manon A; Delahaije, Roos; Jetly, Rakesh; Castro, Carl A; McFarlane, Alexander C

    2014-01-01

    For years there has been a tremendous gap in our understanding of the mental health effects of deployment and the efforts by military forces at trying to minimize or mitigate these. Many military forces have recently systematized the mental support that is provided to support operational deployments. However, the rationale for doing so and the consequential allocation of resources are felt to vary considerably across North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) International Security Assistance (ISAF) partners. This review aims to compare the organization and practice of mental support by five partnering countries in the recent deployment in Afghanistan in order to identify and compare the key methods and structures for delivering mental health support, describe bottlenecks and illustrate new developments. Information was collected through document analysis and semi-structured interviews with key military mental healthcare stakeholders. The review resulted from close collaboration between key military mental healthcare professionals within the Australian Defense Forces (ADF), Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), United Kingdom Armed Forces (UK), Netherlands Armed Forces (NLD), and the United States Army (US). Key stakeholders were interviewed about the mental health support provided during a serviceperson's military career. The main items discussed were training, prevention, early identification, intervention, and aftercare in the field of mental health. All forces reported that much attention was paid to mental health during the individual's military career, including deployment. In doing so there was much overlap between the rationale and applied methods. The main method of providing support was through training and education. The educative focus was to strengthen the mental resilience of individual soldiers while providing a range of mental healthcare services. All forces had abandoned standard psychological debriefing after critical incidents. Instead, by default, mental

  7. CDAPubMed: a browser extension to retrieve EHR-based biomedical literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez-Rey David

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last few decades, the ever-increasing output of scientific publications has led to new challenges to keep up to date with the literature. In the biomedical area, this growth has introduced new requirements for professionals, e.g., physicians, who have to locate the exact papers that they need for their clinical and research work amongst a huge number of publications. Against this backdrop, novel information retrieval methods are even more necessary. While web search engines are widespread in many areas, facilitating access to all kinds of information, additional tools are required to automatically link information retrieved from these engines to specific biomedical applications. In the case of clinical environments, this also means considering aspects such as patient data security and confidentiality or structured contents, e.g., electronic health records (EHRs. In this scenario, we have developed a new tool to facilitate query building to retrieve scientific literature related to EHRs. Results We have developed CDAPubMed, an open-source web browser extension to integrate EHR features in biomedical literature retrieval approaches. Clinical users can use CDAPubMed to: (i load patient clinical documents, i.e., EHRs based on the Health Level 7-Clinical Document Architecture Standard (HL7-CDA, (ii identify relevant terms for scientific literature search in these documents, i.e., Medical Subject Headings (MeSH, automatically driven by the CDAPubMed configuration, which advanced users can optimize to adapt to each specific situation, and (iii generate and launch literature search queries to a major search engine, i.e., PubMed, to retrieve citations related to the EHR under examination. Conclusions CDAPubMed is a platform-independent tool designed to facilitate literature searching using keywords contained in specific EHRs. CDAPubMed is visually integrated, as an extension of a widespread web browser, within the standard

  8. CDAPubMed: a browser extension to retrieve EHR-based biomedical literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the last few decades, the ever-increasing output of scientific publications has led to new challenges to keep up to date with the literature. In the biomedical area, this growth has introduced new requirements for professionals, e.g., physicians, who have to locate the exact papers that they need for their clinical and research work amongst a huge number of publications. Against this backdrop, novel information retrieval methods are even more necessary. While web search engines are widespread in many areas, facilitating access to all kinds of information, additional tools are required to automatically link information retrieved from these engines to specific biomedical applications. In the case of clinical environments, this also means considering aspects such as patient data security and confidentiality or structured contents, e.g., electronic health records (EHRs). In this scenario, we have developed a new tool to facilitate query building to retrieve scientific literature related to EHRs. Results We have developed CDAPubMed, an open-source web browser extension to integrate EHR features in biomedical literature retrieval approaches. Clinical users can use CDAPubMed to: (i) load patient clinical documents, i.e., EHRs based on the Health Level 7-Clinical Document Architecture Standard (HL7-CDA), (ii) identify relevant terms for scientific literature search in these documents, i.e., Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), automatically driven by the CDAPubMed configuration, which advanced users can optimize to adapt to each specific situation, and (iii) generate and launch literature search queries to a major search engine, i.e., PubMed, to retrieve citations related to the EHR under examination. Conclusions CDAPubMed is a platform-independent tool designed to facilitate literature searching using keywords contained in specific EHRs. CDAPubMed is visually integrated, as an extension of a widespread web browser, within the standard PubMed interface. It has

  9. Furosemide removal in constructed wetlands: Comparative efficiency of LECA and Cork granulates as support matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, A I; Dordio, A; Fragoso, R; Leitão, A E; Duarte, E

    2017-12-01

    The removal efficiency of LECA and cork granulates as support matrix for pharmaceuticals active compounds in a constructed wetland system was investigated using the diuretic drug Furosemide. Kinetics studies were performed testing three different concentrations of Furosemide in an ultrapure water matrix, along seven days. LECA achieved higher removal values compared to cork granulates. However, cork granulates presented a higher removal in the first 24 h of contact time compared to the other adsorbent. The kinetic studies showed that LECA and cork granulates have different adsorption behaviours for Furosemide which is controlled by different adsorption mechanisms. Both materials showed good removal efficiencies and a combination of the two should be further explored in order to applied both materials as support matrix to cope with different furosemide concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. COMPARATIVE KINEMATIC MEASURES OF TREADMILL RUNNING WITH OR WITHOUT BODY WEIGHT SUPPORT IN RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane Millslagle

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Treadmill walking and running using a supportive harness has been used as a training method to rehabilitate injured patients' walking or running gait. Comparison of full weight support (FWS and body weight support (BWS kinematic measures in competitive runners has received little attention. The purpose of this study was to compare selected FWS to BWS kinematic measures in healthy competitive runners. Ten male runners (age = 21.4 ± 1.5 years with a training regimen averaging 64 km per week at 3.8 m·s-1 participated. All participants ran three 3-minute trials. The randomized trial conditions were: FWS, 20% BWS, and 40% BWS. All conditions were videotaped with 2 cameras and a 21-point, 3-D model was generated for analysis. From the position-time data, cycle length (CL, cycle frequency (CF, time of contact (TC, hip-, knee-, ankle- range of motion in degrees (H-ROM, K-ROM, and A-ROM, respectively, and vertical displacement of the center of mass (COM were derived and compared. With increasing support conditions, cycle length increased. Cycle frequency, hip and ankle angle ranges, and COM vertical displacement decreased (p 0.05. BWS running produced significant changes in selected kinematic measures. These changes may provide insight into runners' behavior when using BWS in training or recovery from competition. Additional investigation of BWS training affect with competitive runners would be recommended

  11. Patterns of Engagement With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Online Support Groups: Comparing Posters and Lurkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the varying patterns of member engagement within inflammatory bowel disease online support groups. The aim of the study was, therefore, to compare posters and lurkers (i.e., those who read messages but choose not to post) in terms of engagement and motives for accessing online groups as well as to explore reasons why lurkers do not make an active contribution through posting messages. The findings revealed that those who posted messages visited groups more often and spent longer periods of time accessing them. However, there was no difference between posters and lurkers in terms of length of time as a group member. Furthermore, posters were more inclined to access online support groups to both seek and provide emotional, informational, and experiential support. Finally, four main reasons were described by lurkers for not posting messages and these focused on personal factors, illness severity, being helpful, and new member. For those healthcare professionals or patient volunteers who are involved in supporting inflammatory bowel disease online support groups, there are a number of practical strategies arising from these results which can be implemented to help integrate and encourage active participation by all members.

  12. Comparing Crowdsourcing and Friendsourcing: A Social Media-Based Feasibility Study to Support Alzheimer Disease Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Daniel Robert; Brady, Erin; Wilkerson, David; Yi, Eun-Hye; Karanam, Yamini; Callahan, Christopher M

    2017-04-10

    In the United States, over 15 million informal caregivers provide unpaid care to people with Alzheimer disease (AD). Compared with others in their age group, AD caregivers have higher rates of stress, and medical and psychiatric illnesses. Psychosocial interventions improve the health of caregivers. However, constraints of time, distance, and availability inhibit the use of these services. Newer online technologies, such as social media, online groups, friendsourcing, and crowdsourcing, present alternative methods of delivering support. However, limited work has been done in this area with caregivers. The primary aims of this study were to determine (1) the feasibility of innovating peer support group work delivered through social media with friendsourcing, (2) whether the intervention provides an acceptable method for AD caregivers to obtain support, and (3) whether caregiver outcomes were affected by the intervention. A Facebook app provided support to AD caregivers through collecting friendsourced answers to caregiver questions from participants' social networks. The study's secondary aim was to descriptively compare friendsourced answers versus crowdsourced answers. We recruited AD caregivers online to participate in a 6-week-long asynchronous, online, closed group on Facebook, where caregivers received support through moderator prompts, group member interactions, and friendsourced answers to caregiver questions. We surveyed and interviewed participants before and after the online group to assess their needs, views on technology, and experience with the intervention. Caregiver questions were pushed automatically to the participants' Facebook News Feed, allowing participants' Facebook friends to see and post answers to the caregiver questions (Friendsourced answers). Of these caregiver questions, 2 were pushed to crowdsource workers through the Amazon Mechanical Turk platform. We descriptively compared characteristics of these crowdsourced answers with the

  13. Analysis of gene evolution and metabolic pathways using the Candida Gene Order Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Candida species are the most common cause of opportunistic fungal infection worldwide. Recent sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of Candida genomic data. We have developed the Candida Gene Order Browser (CGOB), an online tool that aids comparative syntenic analyses of Candida species. CGOB incorporates all available Candida clade genome sequences including two Candida albicans isolates (SC5314 and WO-1) and 8 closely related species (Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia stipitis, Candida guilliermondii and Candida lusitaniae). Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also included as a reference genome. Results CGOB assignments of homology were manually curated based on sequence similarity and synteny. In total CGOB includes 65617 genes arranged into 13625 homology columns. We have also generated improved Candida gene sets by merging/removing partial genes in each genome. Interrogation of CGOB revealed that the majority of tandemly duplicated genes are under strong purifying selection in all Candida species. We identified clusters of adjacent genes involved in the same metabolic pathways (such as catabolism of biotin, galactose and N-acetyl glucosamine) and we showed that some clusters are species or lineage-specific. We also identified one example of intron gain in C. albicans. Conclusions Our analysis provides an important resource that is now available for the Candida community. CGOB is available at http://cgob.ucd.ie. PMID:20459735

  14. Analysis of gene evolution and metabolic pathways using the Candida Gene Order Browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrne Kevin P

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida species are the most common cause of opportunistic fungal infection worldwide. Recent sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of Candida genomic data. We have developed the Candida Gene Order Browser (CGOB, an online tool that aids comparative syntenic analyses of Candida species. CGOB incorporates all available Candida clade genome sequences including two Candida albicans isolates (SC5314 and WO-1 and 8 closely related species (Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia stipitis, Candida guilliermondii and Candida lusitaniae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also included as a reference genome. Results CGOB assignments of homology were manually curated based on sequence similarity and synteny. In total CGOB includes 65617 genes arranged into 13625 homology columns. We have also generated improved Candida gene sets by merging/removing partial genes in each genome. Interrogation of CGOB revealed that the majority of tandemly duplicated genes are under strong purifying selection in all Candida species. We identified clusters of adjacent genes involved in the same metabolic pathways (such as catabolism of biotin, galactose and N-acetyl glucosamine and we showed that some clusters are species or lineage-specific. We also identified one example of intron gain in C. albicans. Conclusions Our analysis provides an important resource that is now available for the Candida community. CGOB is available at http://cgob.ucd.ie.

  15. Analysis of gene evolution and metabolic pathways using the Candida Gene Order Browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, David A; O'Gaora, Peadar; Byrne, Kevin P; Butler, Geraldine

    2010-05-10

    Candida species are the most common cause of opportunistic fungal infection worldwide. Recent sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of Candida genomic data. We have developed the Candida Gene Order Browser (CGOB), an online tool that aids comparative syntenic analyses of Candida species. CGOB incorporates all available Candida clade genome sequences including two Candida albicans isolates (SC5314 and WO-1) and 8 closely related species (Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia stipitis, Candida guilliermondii and Candida lusitaniae). Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also included as a reference genome. CGOB assignments of homology were manually curated based on sequence similarity and synteny. In total CGOB includes 65617 genes arranged into 13625 homology columns. We have also generated improved Candida gene sets by merging/removing partial genes in each genome. Interrogation of CGOB revealed that the majority of tandemly duplicated genes are under strong purifying selection in all Candida species. We identified clusters of adjacent genes involved in the same metabolic pathways (such as catabolism of biotin, galactose and N-acetyl glucosamine) and we showed that some clusters are species or lineage-specific. We also identified one example of intron gain in C. albicans. Our analysis provides an important resource that is now available for the Candida community. CGOB is available at http://cgob.ucd.ie.

  16. Visualizing syntenic relationships among the hemiascomycetes with the Yeast Gene Order Browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Kevin P; Wolfe, Kenneth H

    2006-01-01

    The Yeast Gene Order Browser (YGOB) is an online tool designed to facilitate the comparative genomic visualization and appraisal of synteny within and between the genomes of seven hemiascomycete yeast species. Three of these genomes are polyploid, and hence contain intra-genomic syntenic regions, the correct assembly of which is a particular success of YGOB. Designed to accurately assemble, display and score gene order relationships, YGOB is both an interactive tool for browsing genomic data, and a software engine now being used for evolutionary analyses on a whole-genome scale. Underlying the online interface is the YGOB database, which consists of homology assignments across the species, extensively curated based on sequence similarity and novelly, an appraisal of genomic context (synteny) in multiple genomes. Currently the YGOB database incorporates genome data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida glabrata, Saccharomyces castellii, Ashbya gossypii, Kluyveromyces lactis, Kluyveromyces waltii and Saccharomyces kluyveri, but the system is scaleable to accommodate additional genomes. This paper discusses the usage and utility of version 1.0 of YGOB, which is publicly available at http://wolfe.gen.tcd.ie/ygob.

  17. Analysis of gene evolution and metabolic pathways using the Candida Gene Order Browser

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, David A

    2010-05-10

    Abstract Background Candida species are the most common cause of opportunistic fungal infection worldwide. Recent sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of Candida genomic data. We have developed the Candida Gene Order Browser (CGOB), an online tool that aids comparative syntenic analyses of Candida species. CGOB incorporates all available Candida clade genome sequences including two Candida albicans isolates (SC5314 and WO-1) and 8 closely related species (Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia stipitis, Candida guilliermondii and Candida lusitaniae). Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also included as a reference genome. Results CGOB assignments of homology were manually curated based on sequence similarity and synteny. In total CGOB includes 65617 genes arranged into 13625 homology columns. We have also generated improved Candida gene sets by merging\\/removing partial genes in each genome. Interrogation of CGOB revealed that the majority of tandemly duplicated genes are under strong purifying selection in all Candida species. We identified clusters of adjacent genes involved in the same metabolic pathways (such as catabolism of biotin, galactose and N-acetyl glucosamine) and we showed that some clusters are species or lineage-specific. We also identified one example of intron gain in C. albicans. Conclusions Our analysis provides an important resource that is now available for the Candida community. CGOB is available at http:\\/\\/cgob.ucd.ie.

  18. A user-centred evaluation framework for the Sealife semantic web browsers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Helen; Diallo, Gayo; de Quincey, Ed; Alexopoulou, Dimitra; Habermann, Bianca; Kostkova, Patty; Schroeder, Michael; Jupp, Simon; Khelif, Khaled; Stevens, Robert; Jawaheer, Gawesh; Madle, Gemma

    2009-10-01

    Semantically-enriched browsing has enhanced the browsing experience by providing contextualized dynamically generated Web content, and quicker access to searched-for information. However, adoption of Semantic Web technologies is limited and user perception from the non-IT domain sceptical. Furthermore, little attention has been given to evaluating semantic browsers with real users to demonstrate the enhancements and obtain valuable feedback. The Sealife project investigates semantic browsing and its application to the life science domain. Sealife's main objective is to develop the notion of context-based information integration by extending three existing Semantic Web browsers (SWBs) to link the existing Web to the eScience infrastructure. This paper describes a user-centred evaluation framework that was developed to evaluate the Sealife SWBs that elicited feedback on users' perceptions on ease of use and information findability. Three sources of data: i) web server logs; ii) user questionnaires; and iii) semi-structured interviews were analysed and comparisons made between each browser and a control system. It was found that the evaluation framework used successfully elicited users' perceptions of the three distinct SWBs. The results indicate that the browser with the most mature and polished interface was rated higher for usability, and semantic links were used by the users of all three browsers. Confirmation or contradiction of our original hypotheses with relation to SWBs is detailed along with observations of implementation issues.

  19. Navigating protected genomics data with UCSC Genome Browser in a Box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeussler, Maximilian; Raney, Brian J; Hinrichs, Angie S; Clawson, Hiram; Zweig, Ann S; Karolchik, Donna; Casper, Jonathan; Speir, Matthew L; Haussler, David; Kent, W James

    2015-03-01

    Genome Browser in a Box (GBiB) is a small virtual machine version of the popular University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser that can be run on a researcher's own computer. Once GBiB is installed, a standard web browser is used to access the virtual server and add personal data files from the local hard disk. Annotation data are loaded on demand through the Internet from UCSC or can be downloaded to the local computer for faster access. Software downloads and installation instructions are freely available for non-commercial use at https://genome-store.ucsc.edu/. GBiB requires the installation of open-source software VirtualBox, available for all major operating systems, and the UCSC Genome Browser, which is open source and free for non-commercial use. Commercial use of GBiB and the Genome Browser requires a license (http://genome.ucsc.edu/license/). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Pressure support improves oxygenation and lung protection compared to pressure-controlled ventilation and is further improved by random variation of pressure support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieth, Peter M; Carvalho, Alysson R; Güldner, Andreas; Kasper, Michael; Schubert, René; Carvalho, Nadja C; Beda, Alessandro; Dassow, Constanze; Uhlig, Stefan; Koch, Thea; Pelosi, Paolo; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo

    2011-04-01

    To explore whether 1) conventional pressure support ventilation improves lung function and attenuates the pulmonary inflammatory response compared to pressure-controlled ventilation and 2) random variation of pressure support levels (noisy pressure support ventilation) adds further beneficial effects to pressure support ventilation. Three-arm, randomized, experimental study. University hospital research facility. Twenty-four juvenile pigs. Acute lung injury was induced by surfactant depletion. Animals were randomly assigned to 6 hrs of mechanical ventilation (n = 8 per group) with either 1) pressure-controlled ventilation, 2) pressure support ventilation, or 3) noisy pressure support ventilation. During noisy pressure support ventilation, the pressure support varied randomly, with values following a normal distribution. In all groups, the driving pressures were set to achieve a mean tidal volume of 6 mL/kg. At the end of experiments, animals were killed and lungs extracted for histologic and biochemical analysis. Respiratory, gas-exchange, and hemodynamics variables were assessed hourly. The diffuse alveolar damage and the inflammatory response of lungs were quantified. Pressure support ventilation and noisy pressure support ventilation improved gas exchange and were associated with reduced histologic damage and interleukin-6 concentrations in lung tissue compared to pressure-controlled ventilation. Noisy pressure support ventilation further improved gas exchange and decreased the inspiratory effort while reducing alveolar edema and inflammatory infiltration compared to pressure support ventilation. In this model of acute lung injury, pressure support ventilation and noisy pressure support ventilation attenuated pulmonary inflammatory response and improved gas exchange as compared to pressure-controlled ventilation. Noisy pressure support ventilation further improved gas exchange, reduced the inspiratory effort, and attenuated alveolar edema and inflammatory

  1. In support of the importance of development comparative method in sociology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baščarević Ivan M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of comparative methods in social research is now almost non-debatable. In contemporary sociological literature there are many papers that indicate the use of the sociological (and not only sociological method. In addition, in international surveys carried out in the comparative-historical studies, there is a long-term tradition of development issues of comparative method in the study of social phenomena. This text is designed as a contribution to understanding the contribution of important comparative method in contemporary social research. Usefulness of comparative method became apparent to the classicists of sociology - K. Marx, E. Durkheim and M. Weber, and even much earlier to Auguste Comte. Their work (with the exception of Comte, despite many criticisms that are often moving in the direction of a lack of systematic and reliable source material, has an outstanding contribution in terms of highlighting the importance and application of comparative method. E. Durkheim was among the first to try to determine its epistemological significance. Critics of their actions, however, do not sufficiently take into account the limitations of that age, especially in underdeveloped standardization and classification of the data collected. The period of the sixties marked that, after a short delay, following re-affirmation and development of comparative methods in social research emerged. This was largely contributed by criticism of classical ideas related to this method, together with the 'fake controversy' between supporters of quantitative and qualitative methodology. A lot has been done in terms of standardization of comparative method and empirical information by training funds for the classification and measurement, and modern technical means by which it is possible to achieve a simple collection and processing of comparable data. By improvement of these methods, the shortcomings that accompanied comparative research in the past would

  2. Support for international trade law: The US and the EU compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Jappe; Elsig, Manfred

    2015-10-01

    In this article we compare US and EU support for bilateral and multilateral international trade law. We assess the support for international law of both trading blocs by focusing on the following four dimensions: leadership, consent, compliance and internalization. Although we find strong support for international trade law from both the US and the EU in general, we also witness some variation, most notably in relation to the design of preferential trade agreements (PTAs) and compliance with World Trade Organization (WTO) law. Turning to explaining these (moderate) differences, we argue that outcomes in US trade policy can best be explained by a domestic political factor, namely the direct influence of interest groups. Although the involvement of societal interests also goes a long way in explaining EU behavior, it does not tell the entire story. We posit that, in EU trade policy, institutions are a particular conditioning factor that needs to be stressed. Moreover, we suggest that foreign policy considerations in managing trade relations have characterized EU's support for international trade law.

  3. Support for international trade law: The US and the EU compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Jappe; Elsig, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    In this article we compare United States and European Union support for bilateral and multilateral international trade law. We assess the support for international law of both trading blocs by focusing on the following four dimensions: leadership, consent, compliance and internalization. Although we find strong support for international trade law from both the US and the EU in general, we also witness some variation, most notably in relation to the design of preferential trade agreements (PTAs) and compliance with World Trade Organization (WTO) law. Turning to explaining these (moderate) differences, we argue that outcomes in US trade policy can best be explained by a domestic political factor, namely the direct influence of interest groups. Although the involvement of societal interests also goes a long way in explaining EU behavior, it does not tell the entire story. We posit that, in EU trade policy, institutions are a particular conditioning factor that needs to be stressed. Moreover, we suggest that foreign policy considerations in managing trade relations have characterized EU’s support for international trade law. PMID:27867316

  4. A framework for web browser-based medical simulation using WebGL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halic, Tansel; Ahn, Woojin; De, Suvranu

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a web browser-based software framework that provides accessibility, portability, and platform independence for medical simulation. Typical medical simulation systems are restricted to the underlying platform and device, which limits widespread use. Our framework allows realistic and efficient medical simulation using only the web browser for anytime anywhere access using a variety of platforms ranging from desktop PCs to tablets. The framework consists of visualization, simulation, and hardware integration modules that are fundamental components for multimodal interactive simulation. Benchmark tests are performed to validate the rendering and computing performance of our framework with latest web browsers including Chrome and Firefox. The results are quite promising opening up the possibility of developing web-based medical simulation technology.

  5. Sealife: a semantic grid browser for the life sciences applied to the study of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Michael; Burger, Albert; Kostkova, Patty; Stevens, Robert; Habermann, Bianca; Dieng-Kuntz, Rose

    2006-01-01

    The objective of Sealife is the conception and realisation of a semantic Grid browser for the life sciences, which will link the existing Web to the currently emerging eScience infrastructure. The SeaLife Browser will allow users to automatically link a host of Web servers and Web/Grid services to the Web content he/she is visiting. This will be accomplished using eScience's growing number of Web/Grid Services and its XML-based standards and ontologies. The browser will identify terms in the pages being browsed through the background knowledge held in ontologies. Through the use of Semantic Hyperlinks, which link identified ontology terms to servers and services, the SeaLife Browser will offer a new dimension of context-based information integration. In this paper, we give an overview over the different components of the browser and their interplay. This SeaLife Browser will be demonstrated within three application scenarios in evidence-based medicine, literature & patent mining, and molecular biology, all relating to the study of infectious diseases. The three applications vertically integrate the molecule/cell, the tissue/organ and the patient/population level by covering the analysis of high-throughput screening data for endocytosis (the molecular entry pathway into the cell), the expression of proteins in the spatial context of tissue and organs, and a high-level library on infectious diseases designed for clinicians and their patients. For more information see http://www.biote.ctu-dresden.de/sealife.

  6. Modeling the HTML DOM and Browser API in Static Analysis of JavaScript Web Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Simon Holm; Madsen, Magnus; Møller, Anders

    2011-01-01

    such technologies to the domain of JavaScript web applications is challenging. In this paper, we discuss the challenges, which include the dynamic aspects of JavaScript and the complex interactions between JavaScript, HTML, and the browser. From this, we present the first static analysis that is capable...... of reasoning about the flow of control and data in modern JavaScript applications that interact with the HTML DOM and browser API. One application of such a static analysis is to detect type-related and dataflow-related programming errors. We report on experiments with a range of modern web applications...

  7. Black-Box Security Testing of Browser-Based Security Protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhodanan, Avinash

    2017-01-01

    Millions of computer users worldwide use the Internet every day for consuming web-based services (e.g., for purchasing products from online stores, for storing sensitive files in cloud-based file storage web sites, etc.). Browser-based security protocols (i.e. security protocols that run over the Hypertext Transfer Protocol and are executable by commercial web-browsers) are used to ensure the security of these services. Multiple parties are often involved in these protocols. For instance, a b...

  8. A comparative study of support vector machines and artificial neural networks for predicting precipitation in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Omid; Poorolajal, Jalal; Sadeghifar, Majid; Abbasi, Hamed; Maryanaji, Zohreh; Faridi, Hamid Reza; Tapak, Lily

    2015-02-01

    This study compared two machine learning techniques, support vector machines (SVM), and artificial neural network (ANN) in modeling monthly precipitation fluctuations. The SVM and ANN approaches were applied to the monthly precipitation data of two synoptic stations in Hamadan (Airport and Nojeh), the west of Iran. To avoid overfitting, the data were divided into two parts of training (70 %) and test sets (30 %). Then, monthly data from July 1976 to June 2001 and data from April 1961 to November 1996 were considered as training set for the Hamadan and Nojeh stations, respectively, and the remaining were used as test set. The results of the SVM model were compared with those of the ANN based on the root mean square errors, mean absolute errors, determination coefficient, and efficiency coefficient criteria. Based on the comparison, it was found that the SVM model outperformed the ANN, and the estimated precipitation values were in good agreement with the corresponding observed values.

  9. Comparative analysis of profit between three dissimilar repairable redundant systems using supporting external device for operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Ibrahim

    2014-07-01

    The importance in promoting, sustaining industries, manufacturing systems and economy through reliability measurement has become an area of interest. The profit of a system may be enhanced using highly reliable structural design of the system or subsystem of higher reliability. On improving the reliability and availability of a system, the production and associated profit will also increase. Reliability, availability and profit are some of the most important factors in any successful industry and manufacturing settings. In this paper, we compare three different repairable redundant systems using an external supporting device for operation based on the profit. Explicit expressions for the busy period of repairmen, steady-state availability and profit function are derived using linear first-order differential equations. Furthermore, we compare the profit for the three systems and find that system I is more profitable than systems II and III.

  10. Comparing a number line and audio prompts in supporting price comparison by students with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C; Satsangi, Rajiv; Bartlett, Whitney

    2016-01-01

    Price comparison is an important and complex skill, but it lacks sufficient research attention in terms of educating secondary students with intellectual disability and/or autism spectrum disorder. This alternating treatment design study compared the use of a paper-based number line and audio prompts delivered via an audio recorder to support three secondary students with intellectual disability to independently and accuracy compare the price of three separate grocery items. The study consisted of 22 sessions, spread across baseline, intervention, best treatment, and two different generalization phases. Data were collected on the percent of task analysis steps completed independently, the type of prompts needed, students' accuracy selecting the lowest priced item, and task completion time. With both intervention conditions, students were able to independently complete the task analysis steps as well as accurately select the lowest priced item and decrease their task completion time. For two of the students, the audio recorder condition resulted in the greatest independence and for one the number line. For only one student was the condition with the greatest independence also the condition for the highest rate of accuracy. The results suggest both tools can support students with price comparison. Yet, audio recorders offer students and teachers an age-appropriate and setting-appropriate option. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Managing landslide monitoring networks with near real time Geo-browsers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordan, Daniele; Dell'Anese, Federico; Manconi, Andrea; Allasia, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring applications are an extremely important task for the analysis and understanding geo-hazards, as well as for promptly recognizing and eventually warn about their potential paroxysmal evolution. Nowadays, a wide range of monitoring strategies and instruments can be applied in operative monitoring scenarios, and the technological evolution of last decades has considerably increased the possibility of managing complex multi-parametric networks. The effectiveness of a monitoring network in geo-hazard scenarios is usually directly associated to the type of instruments considered, the suitability and completeness of the monitoring network, and the frequency of acquisition of measurements (revisit time). However, especially during emergency scenarios, another fundamental parameter to consider is the possibility to achieve an easy and clear access to all the available information. The Geohazard Monitoring Group of CNR IRPI exploited the Google Earth® plugin to organize and present the information obtained d from a monitoring network installed on a landslide scenario in a straightforward fashion. The system restitutes all the available information on the monitored area as different layers, which are superimposed to the base map and digital elevation models provided by Google. The layers include data as raster (ortophotos, shaded relieves, etc.) and point information (position of instruments, monitored targets, etc.), as well as the most recent results obtained from the monitoring network in near real time. The resulting geo-browser is hosted on a dedicated website, where authorized end-users can select between several thematic visualizations. The system has been developed and tested in the Mont de La Saxe landslide scenario, a large instable slope located in the northwestern Italian. This new data exploitation modality has demonstrated to be an efficient tool to support the decision makers in particular during emergency phases.

  12. Comparative study of researcher community support and supervisory support among Finnish and Danish PhD-students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornér, Solveig; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Peltonen, Jouni

    and social sciences from two research-intensive universities in Denmark (n=145) and Finland (n=211) participated in the study. The study employed a convergent mixed methods design (Creswell & Clark, 2011), both quantitative analyses and qualitative analysis (open-ended descriptions) were employed...... regional contexts hold valid differences in experienced social support and educational strategies at the PhD level. References • Creswell, J.W. & Clark, V.L.P. (2011). Designing and Conducting Mixed Methods Research. London: SAGE Publications, Inc. • Ives, G. & Rowley, G. (2005). Supervisor selection......Prior research on doctoral supervision and researcher communities has identified social support as a key determinant of the doctoral journey (Jairam & Kahl, 2012; Zhao, Golde & McCormick, 2007). Supervisory support, for instance, in terms of constructive feedback and encouragement (Pyhältö...

  13. Comparative study on the mechanical mechanism of confined concrete supporting arches in underground engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhijin; Qin, Qian; Jiang, Bei; Luan, Yingcheng; Yu, Hengchang

    2018-01-01

    In order to solve the supporting problem in underground engineering with high stress, square steel confined concrete (SQCC) supporting method is adopted to enhance the control on surrounding rocks, and the control effect is remarkable. The commonly used cross section shapes of confined concrete arch are square and circular. At present, designers have no consensus on which kind is more proper. To search for the answer, this paper makes an analysis on the mechanical properties of the two shapes of the cross-sections. A full-scale indoor comparative test was carried out on the commonly used straight-wall semi-circular SQCC arch and circular steel confined concrete arch (CCC arch). This test is based on self-developed full-scale test system for confined concrete arch. Our research, combining with the numerical analysis, shows: (1) SQCC arch is consistent with CCC arch in the deformation and failure mode. The largest damages parts are at the legs of both of them. (2) The SQCC arch's bearing capability is 1286.9 kN, and the CCC arch's ultimate bearing capability is 1072.4kN. Thus, the SQCC arch's bearing capability is 1.2 times that of the CCC arch. (3) The arches are subjected to combined compression and bending, bending moment is the main reason for the arch failure. The section moment of inertia of SQCC arch is 1.26 times of that of CCC arch, and the former is better than the latter in bending performance. The ultimate bearing capacity is positively correlated with the size of the moment of inertia. Based on the above research, the engineering suggestions are as follows: (1) To improve the bearing capacity of the arch, the cross-sectional shape of the chamber should be optimized and the arch bearing mode changed accordingly. (2) The key damaged positions, such as the arch leg, should be reinforced, optimizing the state of force on the arch. SQCC arches should be used for supporting in underground engineering, which is under stronger influence of the bending moment and

  14. Stigma, Discrimination, Treatment Effectiveness and Policy Support: Comparing Public Views about Drug Addiction with Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Colleen L; McGinty, Emma Elizabeth; Pescosolido, Bernice; Goldman, Howard H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study compares current public attitudes about drug addiction with attitudes about mental illness. Methods A web-based national public opinion survey (N=709) was conducted to compare attitudes about stigma, discrimination, treatment effectiveness, and policy support. Results Respondents hold significantly more negative views toward persons with drug addiction compared to those with mental illness. More respondents were unwilling to have a person with drug addiction marry into their family or work closely with them on a job. Respondents were more willing to accept discriminatory practices, more skeptical about the effectiveness of available treatments, and more likely to oppose public policies aimed at helping persons with drug addiction. Conclusions Drug addiction is often treated as a sub-category of mental illness, and health insurance benefits group these conditions together under the rubric of behavioral health. Given starkly different public views about drug addiction and mental illness, advocates may need to adopt differing approaches for advancing stigma reduction and public policy. PMID:25270497

  15. New Perspectives on Popular Culture, Science and Technology: Web Browsers and the New Illiteracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charters, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Analysts predict that the knowledge economy of the near future will require people to be both computer literate and print literate. However, some of the reading and thinking habits of current college students suggest that electronic media such as web browsers may be limiting the new generation's ability to absorb and process what they read. Their…

  16. Temporal Manipulation and Sharing of Presentation State in Browser-Embedded Multimedia Documents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick); A.J. Jansen (Jack); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago)

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractThis paper describes an approach to defining, manipulating and sharing state variables between a web browser and a multimedia presentation engine in functionally compound XML-based documents. This framework, which we call smilState: the SMIL XML State Architecture, is a fully

  17. [Development of a Web-based laboratory data browser integrated with heterogeneous clinical information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Jun

    2009-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a Web-based laboratory data browser integrated with heterogeneous clinical information in a hospital setting. A Java-based web application was developed in-house, using free open-source software. The server side manages queries to heterogeneous hospital databases containing patient data. Order entry information including laboratory test results, drug prescriptions, injection orders, physiological test orders and, imaging test orders, was retrieved from a replication database, and integrated with nursing data from a nursing system database. The result was visualized in a time-series table format, and accessed by web browsers on computers connected to the hospital intranet. The laboratory data browser system achieved practical response times over huge databases (> 90 million records). The medical personnel accepted the system well, and applied the system to various clinical situations. Integrating heterogeneous data from hospital databases in a Web-based laboratory data browser is a practical approach. Presenting relevant medical information simultaneously added value to the laboratory data, and may promote better medical management.

  18. Piracy Versus Privacy: An Analysis of Values Encoded in the PirateBrowser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodó, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Piratebrowser is a web browser which utilizes the Privacy Enhancing Technology Tor to circumvent nationally implemented internet filters blocking the access to the Pirate Bay. The article analyzes the possible consequences of a mass influx of copyright pirates into the privacy domain. It

  19. A Freely-Available Authoring System for Browser-Based CALL with Speech Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Myles

    2017-01-01

    A system for authoring browser-based CALL material incorporating Google speech recognition has been developed and made freely available for download. The system provides a teacher with a simple way to set up CALL material, including an optional image, sound or video, which will elicit spoken (and/or typed) answers from the user and check them…

  20. A browser-based event display for the CMS experiment at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hategan, M.; McCauley, T.; Nguyen, P.

    2012-12-01

    The line between native and web applications is becoming increasingly blurred as modern web browsers are becoming powerful platforms on which applications can be run. Such applications are trivial to install and are readily extensible and easy to use. In an educational setting, web applications permit a way to deploy deploy tools in a highly-restrictive computing environment. The I2U2 collaboration has developed a browser-based event display for viewing events in data collected and released to the public by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The application itself reads a JSON event format and uses the JavaScript 3D rendering engine pre3d. The only requirement is a modern browser using HTML5 canvas. The event display has been used by thousands of high school students in the context of programs organized by I2U2, QuarkNet, and IPPOG. This browser-based approach to display of events can have broader usage and impact for experts and public alike.

  1. MediaMill: Fast and effective video search using the ForkBrowser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, O.; Snoek, C.G.M.; Worring, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this technical demonstration we showcase the MediaMill ForkBrowser for video retrieval. It embeds multiple query methods into a single browsing environment. We show that users can switch query methods on demand without the need to adapt to a different interface. This allows for fast and effective

  2. A browser-based event display for the CMS experiment at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hategan, M. [Chicago U.; McCauley, T. [Fermilab; Nguyen, P. [Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    The line between native and web applications is becoming increasingly blurred as modern web browsers are becoming powerful platforms on which applications can be run. Such applications are trivial to install and are readily extensible and easy to use. In an educational setting, web applications permit a way to deploy deploy tools in a highly-restrictive computing environment. The I2U2 collaboration has developed a browser-based event display for viewing events in data collected and released to the public by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The application itself reads a JSON event format and uses the JavaScript 3D rendering engine pre3d. The only requirement is a modern browser using HTML5 canvas. The event display has been used by thousands of high school students in the context of programs organized by I2U2, QuarkNet, and IPPOG. This browser-based approach to display of events can have broader usage and impact for experts and public alike.

  3. Lexicon-based Browsers for Searching in News Video Archives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worring, M.; Snoek, C.G.M.; de Rooij, O.; Nguyen, G.P.; Koelma, D.C.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present the methods and visualizations used in the MediaMill video search engine. The basis for the engine is a semantic indexing process which derives a lexicon of 101 concepts. To support the user in navigating the collection, the system defines a visual similarity space, a

  4. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist compared to other forms of triggered ventilation for neonatal respiratory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Thomas E; Hunt, Katie A; Shetty, Sandeep; Greenough, Anne

    2017-10-27

    Effective synchronisation of infant respiratory effort with mechanical ventilation may allow adequate gas exchange to occur at lower peak airway pressures, potentially reducing barotrauma and volutrauma and development of air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. During neurally adjusted ventilatory assist ventilation (NAVA), respiratory support is initiated upon detection of an electrical signal from the diaphragm muscle, and pressure is provided in proportion to and synchronous with electrical activity of the diaphragm (EADi). Compared to other modes of triggered ventilation, this may provide advantages in improving synchrony. Primary• To determine whether NAVA, when used as a primary or rescue mode of ventilation, results in reduced rates of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or death among term and preterm newborn infants compared to other forms of triggered ventilation• To assess the safety of NAVA by determining whether it leads to greater risk of intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH), periventricular leukomalacia, or air leaks when compared to other forms of triggered ventilation Secondary• To determine whether benefits of NAVA differ by gestational age (term or preterm)• To determine whether outcomes of cross-over trials performed during the first two weeks of life include peak pressure requirements, episodes of hypocarbia or hypercarbia, oxygenation index, and the work of breathing SEARCH METHODS: We performed searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cohrane Library; MEDLINE via Ovid SP (January 1966 to March 2017); Embase via Ovid SP (January 1980 to March 2017); the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) via EBSCO host (1982 to March 2017); and the Web of Science (1985 to 2017). We searched abstracts from annual meetings of the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) (2000 to 2016); meetings of the European Society of Pediatric Research (published in Pediatric Research); and meetings of the

  5. Randomized trial of a smartphone mobile application compared to text messaging to support smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, David B; Borland, Ron; Bettinghaus, Erwin P; Shane, James H; Zimmerman, Donald E

    2014-03-01

    Text messaging has successfully supported smoking cessation. This study compares a mobile application with text messaging to support smoking cessation. Young adult smokers 18-30 years old (n = 102) participated in a randomized pretest-posttest trial. Smokers received a smartphone application (REQ-Mobile) with short messages and interactive tools or a text messaging system (onQ), managed by an expert system. Self-reported usability of REQ-Mobile and quitting behavior (quit attempts, point-prevalence, 30-day point-prevalence, and continued abstinence) were assessed in posttests. Overall, 60% of smokers used mobile services (REQ-Mobile, 61%, mean of 128.5 messages received; onQ, 59%, mean of 107.8 messages), and 75% evaluated REQ-Mobile as user-friendly. A majority of smokers reported being abstinent at posttest (6 weeks, 53% of completers; 12 weeks, 66% of completers [44% of all cases]). Also, 37% (25%of all cases) reported 30-day point-prevalence abstinence, and 32% (22% of all cases) reported continuous abstinence at 12 weeks. OnQ produced more abstinence (pMobile. Use of both services predicted increased 30-day abstinence at 12 weeks (used, 47%; not used, 20%; p = 0.03). REQ-Mobile was feasible for delivering cessation support but appeared to not move smokers to quit as quickly as text messaging. Text messaging may work better because it is simple, well known, and delivered to a primary inbox. These advantages may disappear as smokers become more experienced with new handsets. Mobile phones may be promising delivery platforms for cessation services using either smartphone applications or text messaging.

  6. Comparative IL-TEM study concerning the degradation of carbon supported Pt-based electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartl, Katrin Gabriele; Hanzlik, Marianne; Arenz, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    responsible for the Pt surface area loss of carbon supported electrocatalysts. It is demonstrated that seemingly similar catalysts can exhibit under identical treatment pronounced differences in their degradation behaviour. As a consequence individual steps in the synthesis of electrocatalysts can have......In the present work the identical location transmission electron microscopy (IL-TEM) approach is used for a comparative study of the degradation of several standard Pt-based electrocatalysts for low temperature proton conducting membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The paper discusses the mechanisms...... a distinct effect on the degradation mechanism even if the base chemicals and materials used in their synthesis are identical. This finding sheds new light in the much debated issue if crystallite migration and coalescence or Pt dissolution and re-deposition are mainly responsible for the Pt surface area...

  7. Enhancing Motivation in Online Courses with Mobile Communication Tool Support: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantorn Chaiprasurt

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobile technologies have helped establish new channels of communication among learners and instructors, potentially providing greater access to course information, and promoting easier access to course activities and learner motivation in online learning environments. The paper compares motivation between groups of learners being taught through an online course based on an e-learning system with and without the support of mobile communication tools, respectively. These tools, which are implemented on a mobile phone, extend the use of the existing Moodle learning management system (LMS under the guidance of a mobile communication tools framework. This framework is considered to be effective in promoting learner motivation and encouraging interaction between learners and instructors as well as among learner peers in online learning environments. A quasi-experimental research design was used to empirically investigate the influence of these tools on learner motivation using subjective assessment (for attention, relevance, confidence, satisfaction, and social ability and objective assessment (for disengagement, engagement, and academic performance. The results indicate that the use of the tools was effective in improving learner motivation, especially in terms of the attention and engagement variables. Overall, there were statistically significant differences in subjective motivation, with a higher level achieved by experimental-group learners (supported by the tools than control-group learners (unsupported by the tools.

  8. A 1-year randomised controlled trial comparing zirconia versus metal-ceramic implant supported single-tooth restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiodt, Morten

    2011-01-01

    To compare the biological, technical and aesthetic outcomes of single implant-supported all-ceramic versus metal-ceramic crowns.......To compare the biological, technical and aesthetic outcomes of single implant-supported all-ceramic versus metal-ceramic crowns....

  9. A comparative analysis of sex change in Labridae supports the size advantage hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazancioğlu, Erem; Alonzo, Suzanne H

    2010-08-01

    The size advantage hypothesis (SAH) predicts that the rate of increase in male and female fitness with size (the size advantage) drives the evolution of sequential hermaphroditism or sex change. Despite qualitative agreement between empirical patterns and SAH, only one comparative study tested SAH quantitatively. Here, we perform the first comparative analysis of sex change in Labridae, a group of hermaphroditic and dioecious (non-sex changer) fish with several model sex-changing species. We also estimate, for the first time, rates of evolutionary transitions between sex change and dioecy. Our analyses support SAH and indicate that the evolution of hermaphroditism is correlated to the size advantage. Furthermore, we find that transitions from sex change to dioecy are less likely under stronger size advantage. We cannot determine, however, how the size advantage affects transitions from dioecy to sex change. Finally, contrary to what is generally expected, we find that transitions from dioecy to sex change are more likely than transitions from sex change to dioecy. The similarity of sexual differentiation in hermaphroditic and dioecious labrids might underlie this pattern. We suggest that elucidating the developmental basis of sex change is critical to predict and explain patterns of the evolutionary history of sequential hermaphroditism.

  10. A comparative finite elemental analysis of glass abutment supported and unsupported cantilever fixed partial denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishaniah, Ravikumar; Al Kheraif, Abdulaziz A; Elsharawy, Mohamed A; Alsaleh, Ayman K; Ismail Mohamed, Karem M; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the load distribution and displacement of cantilever prostheses with and without glass abutment by three dimensional finite element analysis. Micro-computed tomography was used to study the relationship between the glass abutment and the ridge. The external surface of the maxilla was scanned, and a simplified finite element model was constructed. The ZX-27 glass abutment and the maxillary first and second premolars were created and modified. The solid model of the three-unit cantilever fixed partial denture was scanned, and the fitting surface was modified with reference to the created abutments using the 3D CAD system. The finite element analysis was completed in ANSYS. The fit and total gap volume between the glass abutment and dental model were determined by Skyscan 1173 high-energy spiral micro-CT scan. The results of the finite element analysis in this study showed that the cantilever prosthesis supported by the glass abutment demonstrated significantly less stress on the terminal abutment and overall deformation of the prosthesis under vertical and oblique load. Micro-computed tomography determined a gap volume of 6.74162 mm(3). By contacting the mucosa, glass abutments transfer some amount of masticatory load to the residual alveolar ridge, thereby preventing damage to the periodontal microstructures of the terminal abutment. The passive contact of the glass abutment with the mucosa not only preserves the health of the mucosa covering the ridge but also permits easy cleaning. It is possible to increase the success rate of cantilever FPDs by supporting the cantilevered pontic with glass abutments. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative morphology of the hemolymph vascular system in Uropygi and Amblypygi (Arachnida): Complex correspondences support Arachnopulmonata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klußmann-Fricke, B-J; Wirkner, C S

    2016-08-01

    Although the circulatory system of arthropods has long been considered as rather simple, recent studies have demonstrated that in certain arthropod taxa, such as Malacostraca, some Chilopoda and also many Chelicerata, the vascular systems in particular are rather complex. Furthermore, a recent study has revealed that the prosomal ganglion of scorpions and spiders is supplied by an intricate network of arteries, the complexity of which bears a close resemblance to that of vertebrate capillary systems. In this study, we analyzed the hemolymph vascular systems of various species of Pedipalpi (i.e., Amblypygi and Uropygi). By combining modern techniques, such as MicroCT and cLSM, with computer-based 3D-reconstruction, we were able to produce comprehensive visualizations and descriptions of the vascular systems. Despite the lack of well-corroborated phylogenetic hypotheses on arachnid relationships and the controversial assertion of relationships between the pulmonate arachnids, we aim to elucidate the evolution of complex vascular systems in Arachnida. By comparing these highly complex vascular systems not only with each other, but also with other pulmonate arachnids, we found numerous detailed correspondences in the general branching pattern as well as in the supply patterns of the prosomal ganglion. We argue that these numerous and detailed correspondences by their absence in other arachnids i.e. aplumonates, support Arachnopulmonata. J. Morphol. 277:1084-1103, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Leptin Levels Are Higher in Whole Compared to Skim Human Milk, Supporting a Cellular Contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugananthan, Sambavi; Lai, Ching Tat; Gridneva, Zoya; Mark, Peter J; Geddes, Donna T; Kakulas, Foteini

    2016-11-08

    Human milk (HM) contains a plethora of metabolic hormones, including leptin, which is thought to participate in the regulation of the appetite of the developing infant. Leptin in HM is derived from a combination of de novo mammary synthesis and transfer from the maternal serum. Moreover, leptin is partially lipophilic and is also present in HM cells. However, leptin has predominately been measured in skim HM, which contains neither fat nor cells. We optimised an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for leptin measurement in both whole and skim HM and compared leptin levels between both HM preparations collected from 61 lactating mothers. Whole HM leptin ranged from 0.2 to 1.47 ng/mL, whilst skim HM leptin ranged from 0.19 to 0.9 ng/mL. Whole HM contained, on average, 0.24 ± 0.01 ng/mL more leptin than skim HM (p leptin and fat content (p = 0.17, n = 287), supporting a cellular contribution to HM leptin. No difference was found between pre- and post-feed samples (whole HM: p = 0.29, skim HM: p = 0.89). These findings highlight the importance of optimising HM leptin measurement and assaying it in whole HM to accurately examine the amount of leptin received by the infant during breastfeeding.

  13. Comparative evaluation of support vector machine classification for computer aided detection of breast masses in mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesniak, J. M.; Hupse, R.; Blanc, R.; Karssemeijer, N.; Székely, G.

    2012-08-01

    False positive (FP) marks represent an obstacle for effective use of computer-aided detection (CADe) of breast masses in mammography. Typically, the problem can be approached either by developing more discriminative features or by employing different classifier designs. In this paper, the usage of support vector machine (SVM) classification for FP reduction in CADe is investigated, presenting a systematic quantitative evaluation against neural networks, k-nearest neighbor classification, linear discriminant analysis and random forests. A large database of 2516 film mammography examinations and 73 input features was used to train the classifiers and evaluate for their performance on correctly diagnosed exams as well as false negatives. Further, classifier robustness was investigated using varying training data and feature sets as input. The evaluation was based on the mean exam sensitivity in 0.05-1 FPs on normals on the free-response receiver operating characteristic curve (FROC), incorporated into a tenfold cross validation framework. It was found that SVM classification using a Gaussian kernel offered significantly increased detection performance (P = 0.0002) compared to the reference methods. Varying training data and input features, SVMs showed improved exploitation of large feature sets. It is concluded that with the SVM-based CADe a significant reduction of FPs is possible outperforming other state-of-the-art approaches for breast mass CADe.

  14. A comparative study of support vector machine, artificial neural network and bayesian classifier for mutagenicity prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anju; Kumar, Rajnish; Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Ahmad, Ausaf; Ashraf, Ghulam Md

    2011-09-01

    Mutagenicity is the capability of a chemical to carry out mutations in genetic material of an organism. In order to curtail expensive drug failures due to mutagenicity found in late development or even in clinical trials, it is crucial to determine potential mutagenicity problems as early as possible. In this work we have proposed three different classifiers, i.e. Support Vector Machine (SVM), Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and bayesian classifiers, for the prediction of mutagenicity of compounds based on seventeen descriptors. Among the three classifiers Radial Basis Function (RBF) kernel based SVM classifier appeared to be more accurate for classifying the compounds under study on mutagens and non-mutagens. The overall prediction accuracy of SVM model was found to be 71.73% which was appreciably higher than the accuracy of ANN based classifier (59.72%) and bayesian classifier (66.61%). It suggests that SVM based prediction model can be used for predicting mutagenicity more accurately compared to ANN and bayesian classifier for data under consideration.

  15. Leptin Levels Are Higher in Whole Compared to Skim Human Milk, Supporting a Cellular Contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambavi Kugananthan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Human milk (HM contains a plethora of metabolic hormones, including leptin, which is thought to participate in the regulation of the appetite of the developing infant. Leptin in HM is derived from a combination of de novo mammary synthesis and transfer from the maternal serum. Moreover, leptin is partially lipophilic and is also present in HM cells. However, leptin has predominately been measured in skim HM, which contains neither fat nor cells. We optimised an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for leptin measurement in both whole and skim HM and compared leptin levels between both HM preparations collected from 61 lactating mothers. Whole HM leptin ranged from 0.2 to 1.47 ng/mL, whilst skim HM leptin ranged from 0.19 to 0.9 ng/mL. Whole HM contained, on average, 0.24 ± 0.01 ng/mL more leptin than skim HM (p < 0.0001, n = 287. No association was found between whole HM leptin and fat content (p = 0.17, n = 287, supporting a cellular contribution to HM leptin. No difference was found between pre- and post-feed samples (whole HM: p = 0.29, skim HM: p = 0.89. These findings highlight the importance of optimising HM leptin measurement and assaying it in whole HM to accurately examine the amount of leptin received by the infant during breastfeeding.

  16. The Multi-Sector Sustainability Browser (MSSB): A Tool for ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The MSSB is the first and only decision support tool containing information from scientific literature and technical reports that can be used to develop and implement sustainability initiatives. The MSSB is designed to assist individuals and communities in understanding the impacts that the four key dimensions of sustainability - Land Use, Buildings and Infrastructure, Transportation, and Materials Management - can have on human health, the economy, the built environment and natural environments. The MSSB has the following capabilities: a. Displays and describes linkages between the four major sustainability concepts (Land Use, Buildings and Infrastructure, Transportation, and Materials Management) and their subordinate concepts. b. Displays and lists literature sources and references (including weblinks where applicable) providing information about each major sustainability concept and its associated subordinate concepts. c. Displays and lists quantitative data related to each major sustainability concept and its associated subordinate concepts, with weblinks where applicable.The MSSB serves as a ‘visual database’, allowing users to: investigate one or more of the four key sustainability dimensions; explore available scientific literature references, and; assess potential impacts of sustainability activities. The MSSB reduces the amount of time and effort required to assess the state of sustainability science and engineering research pertaining

  17. Home Health Compare: Find a Home Health Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with " ... widget - Select to show Back to top Footer Home A federal government website managed and paid for ...

  18. Same but different: Comparative modes of information processing are implicated in the construction of perceptions of autonomy support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rebecca Rachael; Chatzisarantis, Nikos L D

    2017-11-01

    An implicit assumption behind tenets of self-determination theory is that perceptions of autonomy support are a function of absolute modes of information processing. In this study, we examined whether comparative modes of information processing were implicated in the construction of perceptions of autonomy support. In an experimental study, we demonstrated that participants employed comparative modes of information processing in evaluating receipt of small, but not large, amounts of autonomy support. In addition, we found that social comparison processes influenced a number of outcomes that are empirically related to perceived autonomy support such as sense of autonomy, positive affect, perceived usefulness, and effort. Findings shed new light upon the processes underpinning construction of perceptions related to autonomy support and yield new insights into how to increase the predictive validity of models that use autonomy support as a determinant of motivation and psychological well-being. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  19. Balance Sheets versus Decision Dashboards to support patient treatment choices: A comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, James G.; Veazie, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Growing recognition of the importance of involving patients in preference-driven healthcare decisions has highlighted the need to develop practical strategies to implement patient-centered shared decision making. The use of tabular balance sheets to support clinical decision making is well established. More recent evidence suggests that graphic, interactive decision dashboards can help people derive a deeper understanding of information within a specific decision context. We therefore conducted a non-randomized trial comparing the effects of adding an interactive dashboard to a static tabular balance sheet on patient decision-making. Method The study population consisted of members of the ResearchMatch registry who volunteered to participate in a study of medical decision making. Two separate surveys were conducted: one for the control group and one for the intervention group. All participants were instructed to imagine they were newly diagnosed with a chronic illness and asked to choose between three hypothetical drug treatments that varied with regard to effectiveness, side effects, and out-of-pocket cost. Both groups made an initial treatment choice after reviewing a balance sheet. After a brief washout period, members of the control group made a second treatment choice after reviewing the balance sheet again while intervention group members made a second treatment choice after reviewing an interactive decision dashboard containing the same information. After both choices participants rated their degree of confidence in their choice on a 1–10 scale. Results Members of the dashboard intervention group were more likely to change their choice of preferred drug, (10.2% vs. 7.5%, p=0.054) and had a larger increase in decision confidence than the control group: 0.67 vs. 0.075, p<0.03. There were no statistically significant between group differences in decisional conflict or decision aid acceptability. Conclusion These findings suggest that clinical

  20. Comparative study about social support network among familiar physicians and traffic officers, México

    OpenAIRE

    Aranda B., Carolina; Instituto de Investigación en Salud Ocupacional, Universidad de Guadalajara, México; Torres L., Teresa; Instituto de Investigación en Salud Ocupacional, Universidad de Guadalajara, México; Salazar E., José; Instituto de Investigación en Salud Ocupacional, Universidad de Guadalajara, México; Pando M., Manuel; Instituto de Investigación en Salud Ocupacional, Universidad de Guadalajara, México; Aldrete R., María Guadalupe; Instituto de Investigación en Salud Ocupacional, Universidad de Guadalajara, México

    2014-01-01

    The social support is the process that occurs between people that make up the social network of a subject. Actions such as listening, estimate, assess, and so on, are behaviors that occur among individuals who make up the network. The aim of this study analyze the situation of social support and social support networks on family physicians and traffic agents of a city in Mexico. 197 physicians and 875 traffic agents participated voluntarily with an informed consent. The information was collec...

  1. Self-study program on HTML browser--application to Clinical Nursing General Remarks Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, N; Sota, Y; Ezumi, H

    1997-01-01

    We created a self-study program using HTML browser on the Clinical Nursing General Remarks Course, Eighty-three students each selected a published book on a personal history (written personal reflections from individuals who had undergone medical treatment and hospitalization), read it and submitted reports of their impressions of the histories. Their reports were arranged from a nursing perspective and entered on the home page of our college using HTML browser. We intended that the students would become more interested in reading of the personal histories, and that they would acquire new self-study skills and increase their interest in Internet through use of our program. In addition, we hoped that this program would encourage positive communication and mutual sharing of information. The students were able to easily refer to a personal history according to their interest from a nursing perspective. Therefore this program realized the mutual learning among students and other users.

  2. The Open Anatomy Browser: A Collaborative Web-Based Viewer for Interoperable Anatomy Atlases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halle, Michael; Demeusy, Valentin; Kikinis, Ron

    2017-01-01

    The Open Anatomy Browser (OABrowser) is an open source, web-based, zero-installation anatomy atlas viewer based on current web browser technologies and evolving anatomy atlas interoperability standards. OABrowser displays three-dimensional anatomical models, image cross-sections of labeled structures and source radiological imaging, and a text-based hierarchy of structures. The viewer includes novel collaborative tools: users can save bookmarks of atlas views for later access and exchange those bookmarks with other users, and dynamic shared views allow groups of users can participate in a collaborative interactive atlas viewing session. We have published several anatomy atlases (an MRI-derived brain atlas and atlases of other parts of the anatomy) to demonstrate OABrowser's functionality. The atlas source data, processing tools, and the source for OABrowser are freely available through GitHub and are distributed under a liberal open source license.

  3. jsPsych: a JavaScript library for creating behavioral experiments in a Web browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Joshua R

    2015-03-01

    Online experiments are growing in popularity, and the increasing sophistication of Web technology has made it possible to run complex behavioral experiments online using only a Web browser. Unlike with offline laboratory experiments, however, few tools exist to aid in the development of browser-based experiments. This makes the process of creating an experiment slow and challenging, particularly for researchers who lack a Web development background. This article introduces jsPsych, a JavaScript library for the development of Web-based experiments. jsPsych formalizes a way of describing experiments that is much simpler than writing the entire experiment from scratch. jsPsych then executes these descriptions automatically, handling the flow from one task to another. The jsPsych library is open-source and designed to be expanded by the research community. The project is available online at www.jspsych.org .

  4. A comparative study of entrepreneurs and managers: stress, burnout, locus of control, and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, M A

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships of job stress to job burnout, of locus of control and social support to stress and burnout, and the moderating effects of locus of control and social support on the stress-burnout relationship. These relationships were tested with questionnaire data collected from a random sample of entrepreneurs (N = 238) and managers (N = 288). Results showed that entrepreneurs reported that they had higher internal locus of control, received less social support, and had less job burnout than managers. Hierarchical regression analyses found support for eight of the ten main effects and one of the four moderating effects.

  5. A 1-year randomised controlled trial comparing zirconia versus metal-ceramic implant supported single-tooth restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the biological, technical and aesthetic outcomes of single implant-supported all-ceramic versus metal-ceramic crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six patients with premolar agenesis were randomly treated with 38 all-ceramic (AC) and 37 metal-ceramic (MC) implant-supported si...

  6. A Comparative Study of Student Support Services of Allama Iqbal Open University and the Open University of Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujjar, Aijaz Ahmed; Chaudhry, Bushra Naoreen; Chaudhry, Amtul Hafeez

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to compare the availability, quality, similarities and differences in student support services offered by the Allama Iqbal Open University (AIOU) Pakistan and The Open University of Sri Lanka (OUSL). It also aims to identify and report the deficiencies that students of both the institutions face in the student support services.…

  7. Pathway projector: web-based zoomable pathway browser using KEGG atlas and Google Maps API.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Nobuaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Ogawa, Ryu; Kido, Nobuhiro; Oshita, Kazuki; Ikegami, Keita; Tamaki, Satoshi; Tomita, Masaru

    2009-11-11

    Biochemical pathways provide an essential context for understanding comprehensive experimental data and the systematic workings of a cell. Therefore, the availability of online pathway browsers will facilitate post-genomic research, just as genome browsers have contributed to genomics. Many pathway maps have been provided online as part of public pathway databases. Most of these maps, however, function as the gateway interface to a specific database, and the comprehensiveness of their represented entities, data mapping capabilities, and user interfaces are not always sufficient for generic usage. We have identified five central requirements for a pathway browser: (1) availability of large integrated maps showing genes, enzymes, and metabolites; (2) comprehensive search features and data access; (3) data mapping for transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic experiments, as well as the ability to edit and annotate pathway maps; (4) easy exchange of pathway data; and (5) intuitive user experience without the requirement for installation and regular maintenance. According to these requirements, we have evaluated existing pathway databases and tools and implemented a web-based pathway browser named Pathway Projector as a solution. Pathway Projector provides integrated pathway maps that are based upon the KEGG Atlas, with the addition of nodes for genes and enzymes, and is implemented as a scalable, zoomable map utilizing the Google Maps API. Users can search pathway-related data using keywords, molecular weights, nucleotide sequences, and amino acid sequences, or as possible routes between compounds. In addition, experimental data from transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic analyses can be readily mapped. Pathway Projector is freely available for academic users at (http://www.g-language.org/PathwayProjector/).

  8. ImageJS: Personalized, participated, pervasive, and reproducible image bioinformatics in the web browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Jonas S; Iriabho, Egiebade E; Gorrepati, Vijaya L; Wilkinson, Sean R; Grüneberg, Alexander; Robbins, David E; Hackney, James R

    2012-01-01

    Image bioinformatics infrastructure typically relies on a combination of server-side high-performance computing and client desktop applications tailored for graphic rendering. On the server side, matrix manipulation environments are often used as the back-end where deployment of specialized analytical workflows takes place. However, neither the server-side nor the client-side desktop solution, by themselves or combined, is conducive to the emergence of open, collaborative, computational ecosystems for image analysis that are both self-sustained and user driven. ImageJS was developed as a browser-based webApp, untethered from a server-side backend, by making use of recent advances in the modern web browser such as a very efficient compiler, high-end graphical rendering capabilities, and I/O tailored for code migration. Multiple versioned code hosting services were used to develop distinct ImageJS modules to illustrate its amenability to collaborative deployment without compromise of reproducibility or provenance. The illustrative examples include modules for image segmentation, feature extraction, and filtering. The deployment of image analysis by code migration is in sharp contrast with the more conventional, heavier, and less safe reliance on data transfer. Accordingly, code and data are loaded into the browser by exactly the same script tag loading mechanism, which offers a number of interesting applications that would be hard to attain with more conventional platforms, such as NIH's popular ImageJ application. The modern web browser was found to be advantageous for image bioinformatics in both the research and clinical environments. This conclusion reflects advantages in deployment scalability and analysis reproducibility, as well as the critical ability to deliver advanced computational statistical procedures machines where access to sensitive data is controlled, that is, without local "download and installation".

  9. Pathway projector: web-based zoomable pathway browser using KEGG atlas and Google Maps API.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuaki Kono

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biochemical pathways provide an essential context for understanding comprehensive experimental data and the systematic workings of a cell. Therefore, the availability of online pathway browsers will facilitate post-genomic research, just as genome browsers have contributed to genomics. Many pathway maps have been provided online as part of public pathway databases. Most of these maps, however, function as the gateway interface to a specific database, and the comprehensiveness of their represented entities, data mapping capabilities, and user interfaces are not always sufficient for generic usage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have identified five central requirements for a pathway browser: (1 availability of large integrated maps showing genes, enzymes, and metabolites; (2 comprehensive search features and data access; (3 data mapping for transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic experiments, as well as the ability to edit and annotate pathway maps; (4 easy exchange of pathway data; and (5 intuitive user experience without the requirement for installation and regular maintenance. According to these requirements, we have evaluated existing pathway databases and tools and implemented a web-based pathway browser named Pathway Projector as a solution. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Pathway Projector provides integrated pathway maps that are based upon the KEGG Atlas, with the addition of nodes for genes and enzymes, and is implemented as a scalable, zoomable map utilizing the Google Maps API. Users can search pathway-related data using keywords, molecular weights, nucleotide sequences, and amino acid sequences, or as possible routes between compounds. In addition, experimental data from transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic analyses can be readily mapped. Pathway Projector is freely available for academic users at (http://www.g-language.org/PathwayProjector/.

  10. Formats and Network Protocols for Browser Access to 2D Raster Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, L.

    2015-12-01

    Tiled web maps in browsers are a major success story, forming the foundation of many current web applications. Enabling tiled data access is the next logical step, and is likely to meet with similar success. Many ad-hoc approaches have already started to appear, and something similar is explored within the Open Geospatial Consortium. One of the main obstacles in making browser data access a reality is the lack of a well-known data format. This obstacle also represents an opportunity to analyze the requirements and possible candidates, applying lessons learned from web tiled image services and protocols. Similar to the image counterpart, a web tile raster data format needs to have good intrinsic compression and be able to handle high byte count data types including floating point. An overview of a possible solution to the format problem, a 2D data raster compression algorithm called Limited Error Raster Compression (LERC) will be presented. In addition to the format, best practices for high request rate HTTP services also need to be followed. In particular, content delivery network (CDN) caching suitability needs to be part of any design, not an after-thought. Last but not least, HTML 5 browsers will certainly be part of any solution since they provide improved access to binary data, as well as more powerful ways to view and interact with the data in the browser. In a simple but relevant application, digital elevation model (DEM) raster data is served as LERC compressed data tiles which are used to generate terrain by a HTML5 scene viewer.

  11. ImageJS: Personalized, participated, pervasive, and reproducible image bioinformatics in the web browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas S Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Image bioinformatics infrastructure typically relies on a combination of server-side high-performance computing and client desktop applications tailored for graphic rendering. On the server side, matrix manipulation environments are often used as the back-end where deployment of specialized analytical workflows takes place. However, neither the server-side nor the client-side desktop solution, by themselves or combined, is conducive to the emergence of open, collaborative, computational ecosystems for image analysis that are both self-sustained and user driven. Materials and Methods: ImageJS was developed as a browser-based webApp, untethered from a server-side backend, by making use of recent advances in the modern web browser such as a very efficient compiler, high-end graphical rendering capabilities, and I/O tailored for code migration. Results : Multiple versioned code hosting services were used to develop distinct ImageJS modules to illustrate its amenability to collaborative deployment without compromise of reproducibility or provenance. The illustrative examples include modules for image segmentation, feature extraction, and filtering. The deployment of image analysis by code migration is in sharp contrast with the more conventional, heavier, and less safe reliance on data transfer. Accordingly, code and data are loaded into the browser by exactly the same script tag loading mechanism, which offers a number of interesting applications that would be hard to attain with more conventional platforms, such as NIH′s popular ImageJ application. Conclusions : The modern web browser was found to be advantageous for image bioinformatics in both the research and clinical environments. This conclusion reflects advantages in deployment scalability and analysis reproducibility, as well as the critical ability to deliver advanced computational statistical procedures machines where access to sensitive data is controlled, that is, without

  12. CPTAC Proteomics Data on UCSC Genome Browser | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium scientists are working together with the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genomics Institute to provide public access to cancer proteomics data via the UCSC Genome Browser. This effort extends accessibility of the CPTAC data to more researchers and provides an additional level of analysis to assist the cancer biology community.

  13. The HIV mutation browser: a resource for human immunodeficiency virus mutagenesis and polymorphism data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman E Davey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Huge research effort has been invested over many years to determine the phenotypes of natural or artificial mutations in HIV proteins--interpretation of mutation phenotypes is an invaluable source of new knowledge. The results of this research effort are recorded in the scientific literature, but it is difficult for virologists to rapidly find it. Manually locating data on phenotypic variation within the approximately 270,000 available HIV-related research articles, or the further 1,500 articles that are published each month is a daunting task. Accordingly, the HIV research community would benefit from a resource cataloguing the available HIV mutation literature. We have applied computational text-mining techniques to parse and map mutagenesis and polymorphism information from the HIV literature, have enriched the data with ancillary information and have developed a public, web-based interface through which it can be intuitively explored: the HIV mutation browser. The current release of the HIV mutation browser describes the phenotypes of 7,608 unique mutations at 2,520 sites in the HIV proteome, resulting from the analysis of 120,899 papers. The mutation information for each protein is organised in a residue-centric manner and each residue is linked to the relevant experimental literature. The importance of HIV as a global health burden advocates extensive effort to maximise the efficiency of HIV research. The HIV mutation browser provides a valuable new resource for the research community. The HIV mutation browser is available at: http://hivmut.org.

  14. French MeSH Browser: a cross-language tool to access MEDLINE/PubMed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirion, Benoit; Pereira, Susanne; Névéol, Aurélie; Dahamna, Badisse; Darmoni, Stéfan

    2007-10-11

    When searching the medical literature, health professionals and lay people strongly prefer to use their native language. Therefore, Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) translations would be helpful to those who are not fluent in English to access scientific papers indexed in the MEDLINE bibliographic database. Furthermore, medical terminologies such as MeSH are challenging in any language. In this context, a French MeSH Browser was developed.

  15. Comparing objective measures of environmental supports for pedestrian travel in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence is growing that the built environment has the potential to influence walking--both positively and negatively. However, uncertainty remains on the best approaches to representing the pedestrian environment in order to discern associations between walking and the environment. Research into the relationship between environment and walking is complex; challenges include choice of measures (objective and subjective, quality and availability of data, and methods for managing quantitative data through aggregation and weighting. In particular, little research has examined how to aggregate built environment data to best represent the neighborhood environments expected to influence residents' behavior. This study examined associations between walking and local pedestrian supports (as measured with an environmental audit, comparing the results of models using three different methods to aggregate and weight pedestrian features. Methods Using data collected in 2005-2006 for a sample of 251 adult residents of Montgomery County, MD, we examined associations between pedestrian facilities and walking behaviors (pedestrian trips and average daily steps. Adjusted negative binomial and ordinary least-squares regression models were used to compare three different data aggregation techniques (raw averages, length weighting, distance weighting for measures of pedestrian facilities that included presence, condition, width and connectivity of sidewalks, and presence of crossing aids and crosswalks. Results Participants averaged 8.9 walk trips during the week; daily step counts averaged 7042. The three aggregation techniques revealed different associations between walk trips and the various pedestrian facilities. Crossing aids and good sidewalk conditions were associated with walk trips more than were other pedestrian facilities, while sidewalk facilities and features showed associations with steps not observed for crossing aids and

  16. Nessi: An EEG-Controlled Web Browser for Severely Paralyzed Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bensch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated that an EEG-controlled web browser based on self-regulation of slow cortical potentials (SCPs enables severely paralyzed patients to browse the internet independently of any voluntary muscle control. However, this system had several shortcomings, among them that patients could only browse within a limited number of web pages and had to select links from an alphabetical list, causing problems if the link names were identical or if they were unknown to the user (as in graphical links. Here we describe a new EEG-controlled web browser, called Nessi, which overcomes these shortcomings. In Nessi, the open source browser, Mozilla, was extended by graphical in-place markers, whereby different brain responses correspond to different frame colors placed around selectable items, enabling the user to select any link on a web page. Besides links, other interactive elements are accessible to the user, such as e-mail and virtual keyboards, opening up a wide range of hypertext-based applications.

  17. Nessi: an EEG-controlled web browser for severely paralyzed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, Michael; Karim, Ahmed A; Mellinger, Jürgen; Hinterberger, Thilo; Tangermann, Michael; Bogdan, Martin; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Birbaumer, Niels

    2007-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that an EEG-controlled web browser based on self-regulation of slow cortical potentials (SCPs) enables severely paralyzed patients to browse the internet independently of any voluntary muscle control. However, this system had several shortcomings, among them that patients could only browse within a limited number of web pages and had to select links from an alphabetical list, causing problems if the link names were identical or if they were unknown to the user (as in graphical links). Here we describe a new EEG-controlled web browser, called Nessi, which overcomes these shortcomings. In Nessi, the open source browser, Mozilla, was extended by graphical in-place markers, whereby different brain responses correspond to different frame colors placed around selectable items, enabling the user to select any link on a web page. Besides links, other interactive elements are accessible to the user, such as e-mail and virtual keyboards, opening up a wide range of hypertext-based applications.

  18. plas.io: Open Source, Browser-based WebGL Point Cloud Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, H.; Finnegan, D. C.; Gadomski, P. J.; Verma, U. K.

    2014-12-01

    Point cloud data, in the form of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), RADAR, or semi-global matching (SGM) image processing, are rapidly becoming a foundational data type to quantify and characterize geospatial processes. Visualization of these data, due to overall volume and irregular arrangement, is often difficult. Technological advancement in web browsers, in the form of WebGL and HTML5, have made interactivity and visualization capabilities ubiquitously available which once only existed in desktop software. plas.io is an open source JavaScript application that provides point cloud visualization, exploitation, and compression features in a web-browser platform, reducing the reliance for client-based desktop applications. The wide reach of WebGL and browser-based technologies mean plas.io's capabilities can be delivered to a diverse list of devices -- from phones and tablets to high-end workstations -- with very little custom software development. These properties make plas.io an ideal open platform for researchers and software developers to communicate visualizations of complex and rich point cloud data to devices to which everyone has easy access.

  19. A Comparative Study of the Citation Impact of Chinese Journals with Government Priority Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, P.; Leydesdorff, L.

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the citation impact of Chinese journals, relevant Chinese government agencies have launched a program entitled Citation Impact Upgrading Plan (CIUP) with financial support. Only a few journals that perform better have been screened out for CIUP support. This study tries to figure

  20. Cloud Based Resource for Data Hosting, Visualization and Analysis Using UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Analysis Virtual Machine (CAVM) project will leverage cloud technology, the UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser, and the Galaxy analysis workflow system to provide investigators with a flexible, scalable platform for hosting, visualizing and analyzing their own genomic data.

  1. Comparing Robust Decision-Making and Dynamic Adaptive Policy Pathways for model-based decision support under deep uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakkel, J.H.; Haasnoot, M.; Walker, W.E.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of model-based approaches for supporting decision-making under deep uncertainty have been suggested, but they are rarely compared and contrasted. In this paper, we compare Robust Decision-Making with Dynamic Adaptive Policy Pathways. We apply both to a hypothetical case inspired by a

  2. Cochrane reviews compared with industry supported meta-analyses and other meta-analyses of the same drugs: systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders W; Hilden, Jørgen; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the methodological quality and conclusions in Cochrane reviews with those in industry supported meta-analyses and other meta-analyses of the same drugs. DESIGN: Systematic review comparing pairs of meta-analyses that studied the same two drugs in the same disease and were pu...

  3. Support structure effect on CO oxidation: A comparative study on SiO2 nanospheres and CeO2 nanorods supported CuOx catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Shaikh Tofazzel; Almesned, Yazeed; Zhang, Kefu; Zell, Elizabeth T.; Bernard, David T.; Balaz, Snjezana; Wang, Ruigang

    2018-01-01

    The effect of support reducibility and reduction treatment was studied in SiO2 nanospheres and CeO2 nanorods supported CuOx (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) catalysts on CO oxidation. CuO nanoparticles were impregnated on SiO2 nanospheres and CeO2 nanorods using thermal decomposition method and then the samples were oxidized in air at different temperatures (400-600 °C). The sample oxidized at 400 °C was also further reduced under hydrogen atmosphere to compare the effect of reduction treatment on the catalytic activity. Detailed XRD, Raman, H2-TPR, and CO oxidation analyses were carried out to understand the effect of CuOx-support interaction and different CuOx species on the catalytic performance. Compared to SiO2 nanospheres supported CuOx catalysts, both CuO/CeO2 and reduced CuOx/CeO2 catalysts exhibited superior catalytic performance in terms of CO conversion and low-temperature hydrogen consumption. The enhanced activity of CeO2 nanorods supported CuOx catalysts was correlated strongly to the surface defects on CeO2 nanorods and interfacial structures.

  4. Health learning materials support in South Africa compared with other developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, J

    1996-06-01

    Actions to promote media use for education at all levels in developing countries have to cope with a number of deterrents like the lack of appropriate audiovisual materials and a media support infrastructure. In the early eighties the World Health Organization and United Nations Development Programme initiated a capacity building project to enable developing countries to generate sufficient instructional and learning materials for medical and health education. Since South Africa is still a non-participator in the programme, this article presents the findings of a recent survey to get a global picture of health learning materials support in developing countries as a possible model for South Africa.

  5. Subpixel urban land cover estimation: comparing cubist, random forests, and support vector regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey T. Walton

    2008-01-01

    Three machine learning subpixel estimation methods (Cubist, Random Forests, and support vector regression) were applied to estimate urban cover. Urban forest canopy cover and impervious surface cover were estimated from Landsat-7 ETM+ imagery using a higher resolution cover map resampled to 30 m as training and reference data. Three different band combinations (...

  6. Comparing Two Pre-Listening Supports with Iranian EFL Learners: Opportunity or Obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Sayyed Mohammad; Janbaz, Fateme

    2014-01-01

    Since listening is a crucial component of language competence and fundamental for successful communication as well, its development has been gradually given much attention from language teachers and researchers. This study is aimed at investigating the effectiveness of two pre-listening supports, i.e. question preview and topic preparation on the…

  7. Comparing Acquisition Strategies: Maintenance-Free Operating Period vs. Traditional Logistics Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-30

    absolutely essential if any real improvement is to be realized. We gratefully acknowledge the ongoing support and leadership of our sponsors, whose...component monitoring (advanced management modules), as well as extended environmental survivability, that is, TELCO hardening Standards NEBS- 3/ETSA.1

  8. Male sexuality after cancer treatment - needs for information and support : testicular cancer compared to malignant lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker-Pool, G.; Hoekstra, H.J.; van Imhoff, G.W.; Sonneveld, D.J.A.; Sleijfer, D.T.; van Driel, M.F.; Koops, H.S.; van de Wiel, H.B.M.

    Testicular cancer (TC) as well as malignant lymphoma (NIL), both have nowadays an excellent prognosis. However, both types of cancer may be diagnosed at young adulthood and patients may experience sexual concerns. In this article the need for information and support concerning sexuality will be

  9. Quantitative Assessment of Pore Blockage in Supported Catalysts: Comparing Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Physisorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggenhuisen, T.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313959498; Zecevic, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341386715; Talsma, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08138212X; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X; de Jongh, P.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/186125372

    2012-01-01

    Mesoporous materials are commonly used as supports for a guest phase, such as catalytically active transition metal nanoparticles. N2 physisorption at 77 K is the standard technique to characterize mesoporosity; however, it is not always suitable to assess pore blockage caused by the guest phase.

  10. A comparative study of care burden and social support among caregivers of persons with schizophrenia and epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilufer Karim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The caregivers of persons with epilepsy and schizophrenia undergo severe emotional, physical, financial burden due to the nature, chronicity, disability, and stigma attached to the illness. Aim: To assess the burden and social support among caregivers of persons with schizophrenia and epilepsy. Method: The study was conducted at the Out Patient Department of LokopriyaGopinathBordoloi Regional Institute of Mental Health, Tezpur. It was a comparative study. Purposive sampling technique was used for selection of the sample. The sample for the current study comprised of caregivers of 30 persons with schizophrenia and 30 persons suffering from epilepsy. A semi-structured socio-demographic data sheet, the Burden Assessment Schedule (BAS, the Social Support Questionnaire, and the General Health Questionnaire were administered to the caregivers. Results: There was no significant difference reported by the caregivers in the two groups with the entire domains of BAS and perceived social support. Physical and mental health, and caregivers’ strategy domains of BAS had significant negative correlation at 0.05 levels with perceived social support. External support, support of patient, taking responsibility, and other relation domains of BAS had significant negative correlation at the 0.01 level with perceived social support. Conclusion: While the two groups had no significant difference with the entire domains of BAS and perceived social support; physical and mental health, and caregivers’ strategy had significant negative correlation with perceived social support.

  11. Social Support Behaviors and Work Stressors among Nurses: A Comparative Study between Teaching and Non-Teaching Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarneh, Basil Hameed

    2017-01-29

    The concept of "work stressors" has been well studied. However, in the field of nursing, studies concerning social support behaviors are limited. The aim of this study was to compare nurse work stressors, social support behaviors, and predictors of these variables among nurses in Jordanian teaching and non-teaching hospitals. A convenience sampling technique and a comparative quantitative research design were used in the current study. Two hundred and ninety-one nurses were recruited from five teaching hospitals, and 172 were recruited from eight non-teaching hospitals in Jordan. The Nursing Stress Scale (NSS) and the Inventory of Social Supportive Behaviors (ISSB) were used to collect data. The studied variables differed across hospitals. In some subscales, as well as in some individual items of the scales, nurse work stressors and social support behaviors differed between teaching and non-teaching hospitals. In teaching hospitals, the work shift was the only predictor of nurses' work stressors, whereas the work shift and model of nursing care were predictors of social support behaviors. In non-teaching hospitals, the work shift, level of education, and model of nursing care were predictors of nurse work stressors. Predictors of social support behaviors were marital status, model of nursing, and organizational structure. Regardless of the type of hospital, nurse stressors should be assessed and, once identified, managed by providing various social support behaviors. By turning a work environment into a healthy workplace, researchers and nurse leaders believe that improvements can be realized in recruitment and patient safety and quality.

  12. Comparative Public Support for Conserving Reptile Species is High: Australian Evidence and its Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Tisdell, Clement A.; Wilson, Clevo; Swarna Nantha, Hemanath

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates factors influencing the public’s support for conservation of tropical reptile species in a focal group drawing on Australian data and an experiment involving a sample of the Australian public. The influences of the likeability of the species, their degree of endangerment, ethical considerations as well as knowledge are examined and found to be important. Likeability is found to be much less important than the existing literature suggests. This is highlighted by compari...

  13. Comparing Transition-Edge Sensor Response Times in a Modified Contact Scheme with Different Support Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A. D.; Kenyon, M. E.; Bumble, B.; Runyan, M. C.; Echternach, P. E.; Holmes, W. A.; Bock, J. J.; Bradford, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of the thermal conductance, G, and effective time constants, tau, of three transition-edge sensors (TESs) populated in arrays operated from 80-87mK with T(sub C) approximately 120mK. Our TES arrays include several variations of thermal architecture enabling determination of the architecture that demonstrates the minimum noise equivalent power (NEP), the lowest tau and the trade-offs among designs. The three TESs we report here have identical Mo/Cu bilayer thermistors and wiring structures, while the thermal architectures are: 1) a TES with straight support beams of 1mm length, 2) a TES with meander support beams of total length 2mm and with 2 phononfilter blocks per beam, and 3) a TES with meander support beams of total length 2mm and with 6 phonon-filter blocks per beam. Our wiring scheme aims to lower the thermistor normal state resistance R(sub N) and increase the sharpness of the transition alpha=dlogR/dlogT at the transition temperature T(sub C). We find an upper limit of given by (25+/-10), and G values of 200fW/K for 1), 15fW/K for 2), and 10fW/K for 3). The value of alpha can be improved by slightly increasing the length of our thermistors.

  14. Knowledge extraction from the behaviour of players in a web browser game

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, João Miguel Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado em Informatics Engineering The analysis of the player’s behaviour is a requirement with growing popularity in the traditional computer games segment and has been proven to aid the developers create better and more profitable games. There is now interest in trying to replicate this attainment in a less conventional genre of games known as web browser games. The main objective of this work is to analyse and create a technique for the analysis of the beh...

  15. Automatic identification of comparative effectiveness research from Medline citations to support clinicians’ treatment information needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingyuan; Fiol, Guilherme Del; Grout, Randall W.; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha; Medlin, Richard; Mishra, Rashmi; Weir, Charlene; Liu, Hongfang; Mostafa, Javed; Fiszman, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Online knowledge resources such as Medline can address most clinicians’ patient care information needs. Yet, significant barriers, notably lack of time, limit the use of these sources at the point of care. The most common information needs raised by clinicians are treatment-related. Comparative effectiveness studies allow clinicians to consider multiple treatment alternatives for a particular problem. Still, solutions are needed to enable efficient and effective consumption of comparative effectiveness research at the point of care. Objective Design and assess an algorithm for automatically identifying comparative effectiveness studies and extracting the interventions investigated in these studies. Methods The algorithm combines semantic natural language processing, Medline citation metadata, and machine learning techniques. We assessed the algorithm in a case study of treatment alternatives for depression. Results Both precision and recall for identifying comparative studies was 0.83. A total of 86% of the interventions extracted perfectly or partially matched the gold standard. Conclusion Overall, the algorithm achieved reasonable performance. The method provides building blocks for the automatic summarization of comparative effectiveness research to inform point of care decision-making. PMID:23920677

  16. Automatic identification of comparative effectiveness research from medline citations to support clinicians' treatment information needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingyuan; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Grout, Randall W; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha; Medlin, Richard; Mishra, Rashmi; Weir, Charlene; Liu, Hongfang; Mostafa, Javed; Fiszman, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Online knowledge resources such as Medline can address most clinicians' patient care information needs. Yet, significant barriers, notably lack of time, limit the use of these sources at the point of care. The most common information needs raised by clinicians are treatment-related. Comparative effectiveness studies allow clinicians to consider multiple treatment alternatives for a particular problem. Still, solutions are needed to enable efficient and effective consumption of comparative effectiveness research at the point of care. Design and assess an algorithm for automatically identifying comparative effectiveness studies and extracting the interventions investigated in these studies. The algorithm combines semantic natural language processing, Medline citation metadata, and machine learning techniques. We assessed the algorithm in a case study of treatment alternatives for depression. Both precision and recall for identifying comparative studies was 0.83. A total of 86% of the interventions extracted perfectly or partially matched the gold standard. Overall, the algorithm achieved reasonable performance. The method provides building blocks for the automatic summarization of comparative effectiveness research to inform point of care decision-making.

  17. A Decision Support System to Compare the Transportation Modes in Logistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Özceylan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The selection of an optimal transportation mode is one of the most important factors in supply chain and logistic planning. Furthermore, the selection transportation mode is a complex, multi-criteria decision problem. The decision makers have to face and take attention with a lot of criteria; such as cost, quality, delivery time, safety, accessibility and etc while choosing the best mode. Under these criteria, there must be a selection between motorway, seaway, airway, pipeline, railway and also intermodal modes. Selection the transportation mode is very promising issue because it affects about 60-65 % of total logistic cake. There are some techniques which can be heuristics and logical approaches are used to reach the best option. The analytical hierarchy process (AHP which is one of the mathematical methods can be very useful in involving several decision makers with different conflicting objectives to arrive at a consensus decision. In this paper, the selection of an optimal transportation mode using an AHP-based model was evaluated for logistic activities. To solve this transportation mode selection problem, we developed a decision support system based AHP. By using the developed decision support system, the best transportation modes is determined and discussed.

  18. Comparing Simple and Advanced Video Tools as Supports for Complex Collaborative Design Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Carmen; Pea, Roy; Hesse, Friedrich W.; Rosen, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Working with digital video technologies, particularly advanced video tools with editing capabilities, offers new prospects for meaningful learning through design. However, it is also possible that the additional complexity of such tools does "not" advance learning. We compared in an experiment the design processes and learning outcomes…

  19. Enhancing Motivation in Online Courses with Mobile Communication Tool Support: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiprasurt, Chantorn; Esichaikul, Vatcharaporn

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technologies have helped establish new channels of communication among learners and instructors, potentially providing greater access to course information, and promoting easier access to course activities and learner motivation in online learning environments. The paper compares motivation between groups of learners being taught through an…

  20. Using Qualitative Comparative Analysis to Explore Outcome Patterns of Grant Support to Farmer Organisations in Bolivia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ton, G.

    2015-01-01

    We used Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) to study the combinations of factors that are consistently related to success or failure of grants given to farmer groups. Using data from a sample of 26 grant beneficiaries, we explored whether baseline characteristics of the organisations related to

  1. Effectiveness of group psychotherapy compared to social support groups in patients with primary, non-metastatic breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Petra J.; Visser, Adriaan P.; Garssen, Bert; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the effectiveness of experiential-existential group psychotherapy with a social support group for women with a primary breast cancer on psychosocial adjustment. A total of 67 well-adjusted women, who had been operated not earlier than 4 months before start

  2. Comparing multi-criteria decision analysis and integrated assessment to support long-term water supply planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, L.; Maurer, M; Lienert, Judit

    2017-01-01

    We compare the use of multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA)–or more precisely, models used in multi-attribute value theory (MAVT)–to integrated assessment (IA) models for supporting long-term water supply planning in a small town case study in Switzerland. They are used to evaluate thirteen system

  3. Comparing Sexual-Minority and Heterosexual Young Women's Friends and Parents as Sources of Support for Sexual Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Carly K.; Morgan, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study provides a comparative analysis of sexual-minority and heterosexual emerging adult women's experiences seeking support for sexual issues from parents and friends. Participants included 229 college women (88 sexual-minority women; 141 heterosexual women), ranging from 18 to 25 years of age, who provided written responses to an…

  4. Comparative stress distribution of implant-retained mandibular ball-supported and bar-supported overlay dentures: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaei, Fariborz; Khoshhal, Masoumeh; Bayat-Movahed, Saeed; Ahangary, Ahmad Hassan; Firooz, Farnaz; Izady, Alireza; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2011-08-01

    Implant-retained mandibular ball-supported and bar-supported overlay dentures are the two most common treatment options for the edentulous mandible. The superior option in terms of strain distribution should be determined. The three-dimensional model of mandible (based on computerized tomography scan) and its overlying implant-retained bar-supported and ball-supported overlay dentures were simulated using SolidWorks, NURBS, and ANSYS Workbench. Loads A (60 N) and B (60 N) were exerted, respectively, in protrusive and laterotrusive motions, on second molar mesial, first molar mesial, and first premolar. The strain distribution patterns were assessed on (1) implant tissue, (2) first implant-bone, and (3) second implant-bone interfaces. Protrusive: Strain was mostly detected in the apical of the fixtures and least in the cervical when bar design was used. On the nonworking side, however, strain was higher in the cervical and lower in the apical compared with the working side implant. Laterotrusive: The strain values were closely similar in the two designs. It seems that both designs are acceptable in terms of stress distribution, although a superior pattern is associated with the application of bar design in protrusive motion.

  5. A comparative analysis of renewable electricity support mechanisms for Southeast Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovacool, Benjamin K. [National University of Singapore, Energy Governance Program, Centre on Asia and Globalisation, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, 469C Bukit Timah Road, Singapore 259772 (Singapore)

    2010-04-15

    This study evaluates the applicability of eight renewable electricity policy mechanisms for Southeast Asian electricity markets. It begins by describing the methodology behind 90 research interviews of stakeholders in the electricity industry. It then outlines four justifications given by respondents for government intervention to support renewables in Southeast Asia: unpriced negative externalities, counteracting subsidies for conventional energy sources, the public goods aspect of renewable energy, and the presence of non-technical barriers. The article develops an analytical framework to evaluate renewable portfolio standards, green power programs, public research and development expenditures, systems benefits charges, investment tax credits, production tax credits, tendering, and feed-in tariffs in Southeast Asia. It assesses each of these mechanisms according to the criteria of efficacy, cost effectiveness, dynamic efficiency, equity, and fiscal responsibility. The study concludes that one mechanism, feed-in tariffs, is both the most preferred by respondents and the only one that meets all criteria. (author)

  6. A 'compare and contrast' exercise: wrapping versus personalised external aortic root support (PEARS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treasure, Tom

    2016-07-12

    Wrapping of the aorta and personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) both have the purpose of preventing further expansion of the ascending aorta in order to reduce the risk of aortic dissection and to spare the patient the disastrous consequences of aortic rupture. For the first time, Plonek and colleagues have reported systematically the CT appearances of a series of cases of wrapping. They illustrate the important finding that there are residual spaces between the aorta and the wrap. PEARS by contrast is intimately in contact with the aorta due to its personalised design and is fully incorporated due it construction from a porous mesh. A limitation of PEARS is that it is, of its nature, a planned and elective operation while wrapping can be undertaken during an emergency operation and can be used without prior planning as an intraoperative decision.

  7. Comparative Assessment and Decision Support System for Strategic Military Airlift Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, John; Iwata, Curtis; Mavris, Dimitri; Weston, Neil; Fahringer, Philip

    2011-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company has been awarded several programs to modernize the aging C-5 military transport fleet. In order to ensure its continuation amidst budget cuts, it was important to engage the decision makers by providing an environment to analyze the benefits of the modernization program. This paper describes an interface that allows the user to change inputs such as the scenario airfields, take-off conditions, and reliability characteristics. The underlying logistics surrogate model was generated using data from a discrete-event simulation. Various visualizations such as intercontinental flight paths illustrated in 3D, have been created to aid the user in analyzing scenarios and performing comparative assessments for various output logistics metrics. The capability to rapidly and dynamically evaluate and compare scenarios was developed enabling real time strategy exploration and trade-offs.

  8. RPAN: rice pan-genome browser for ∼3000 rice genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen; Hu, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Tianqing; Lu, Kuangchen; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Wensheng; Shi, Jianxin; Wang, Chunchao; Lu, Jinyuan; Zhang, Dabing; Li, Zhikang; Wei, Chaochun

    2017-01-25

    A pan-genome is the union of the gene sets of all the individuals of a clade or a species and it provides a new dimension of genome complexity with the presence/absence variations (PAVs) of genes among these genomes. With the progress of sequencing technologies, pan-genome study is becoming affordable for eukaryotes with large-sized genomes. The Asian cultivated rice, Oryza sativa L., is one of the major food sources for the world and a model organism in plant biology. Recently, the 3000 Rice Genome Project (3K RGP) sequenced more than 3000 rice genomes with a mean sequencing depth of 14.3×, which provided a tremendous resource for rice research. In this paper, we present a genome browser, Rice Pan-genome Browser (RPAN), as a tool to search and visualize the rice pan-genome derived from 3K RGP. RPAN contains a database of the basic information of 3010 rice accessions, including genomic sequences, gene annotations, PAV information and gene expression data of the rice pan-genome. At least 12 000 novel genes absent in the reference genome were included. RPAN also provides multiple search and visualization functions. RPAN can be a rich resource for rice biology and rice breeding. It is available at http://cgm.sjtu.edu.cn/3kricedb/ or http://www.rmbreeding.cn/pan3k. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. NemaCount: quantification of nematode chemotaxis behavior in a browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2016-06-01

    Nematodes such as Caenorhabditis elegans offer a very effective and tractable system to probe the underlying mechanisms of diverse sensory behaviors. Numerous platforms exist for quantifying nematode behavior and often require separate dependencies or software. Here I describe a novel and simple tool called NemaCount that provides a versatile solution for the quantification of nematode chemotaxis behavior. The ease of installation and user-friendly interface makes NemaCount a practical tool for measuring diverse behaviors and image features of nematodes such as C. elegans. The main advantage of NemaCount is that it operates from within a modern browser such as Google Chrome or Apple Safari. Any features that change in total number, size, shape, or angular distance between control and experimental preparations are suited to NemaCount for image analysis, while commonly used chemotaxis assays can be quantified, and statistically analyzed using a suite of functions from within NemaCount. NemaCount also offers image filtering options that allow the user to improve object detection and measurements. NemaCount was validated by examining nematode chemotaxis behavior; angular distances of locomotory tracks in C. elegans; and body lengths of Heterorhabditis bacteriophora nematodes. Apart from a modern browser, no additional software is required to operate NemaCount, making NemaCount a cheap, simple option for the analysis of nematode images and chemotaxis behavior.

  10. Networked telepresence system using web browsers and omni-directional video streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tomoya; Yamazawa, Kazumasa; Sato, Tomokazu; Ikeda, Sei; Nakamura, Yutaka; Fujikawa, Kazutoshi; Sunahara, Hideki; Yokoya, Naokazu

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, we describe a new telepresence system which enables a user to look around a virtualized real world easily in network environments. The proposed system includes omni-directional video viewers on web browsers and allows the user to look around the omni-directional video contents on the web browsers. The omni-directional video viewer is implemented as an Active-X program so that the user can install the viewer automatically only by opening the web site which contains the omni-directional video contents. The system allows many users at different sites to look around the scene just like an interactive TV using a multi-cast protocol without increasing the network traffic. This paper describes the implemented system and the experiments using live and stored video streams. In the experiment with stored video streams, the system uses an omni-directional multi-camera system for video capturing. We can look around high resolution and high quality video contents. In the experiment with live video streams, a car-mounted omni-directional camera acquires omni-directional video streams surrounding the car, running in an outdoor environment. The acquired video streams are transferred to the remote site through the wireless and wired network using multi-cast protocol. We can see the live video contents freely in arbitrary direction. In the both experiments, we have implemented a view-dependent presentation with a head-mounted display (HMD) and a gyro sensor for realizing more rich presence.

  11. EntrezAJAX: direct web browser access to the Entrez Programming Utilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loman, Nicholas J; Pallen, Mark J

    2010-06-21

    Web applications for biology and medicine often need to integrate data from Entrez services provided by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. However, direct access to Entrez from a web browser is not possible due to 'same-origin' security restrictions. The use of "Asynchronous JavaScript and XML" (AJAX) to create rich, interactive web applications is now commonplace. The ability to access Entrez via AJAX would be advantageous in the creation of integrated biomedical web resources. We describe EntrezAJAX, which provides access to Entrez eUtils and is able to circumvent same-origin browser restrictions. EntrezAJAX is easily implemented by JavaScript developers and provides identical functionality as Entrez eUtils as well as enhanced functionality to ease development. We provide easy-to-understand developer examples written in JavaScript to illustrate potential uses of this service. For the purposes of speed, reliability and scalability, EntrezAJAX has been deployed on Google App Engine, a freely available cloud service. The EntrezAJAX webpage is located at http://entrezajax.appspot.com/

  12. JavaScript Access to DICOM Network and Objects in Web Browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drnasin, Ivan; Grgić, Mislav; Gogić, Goran

    2017-10-01

    Digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) 3.0 standard provides the baseline for the picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). The development of Internet and various communication media initiated demand for non-DICOM access to PACS systems. Ever-increasing utilization of the web browsers, laptops and handheld devices, as opposed to desktop applications and static organizational computers, lead to development of different web technologies. The DICOM standard officials accepted those subsequently as tools of alternative access. This paper provides an overview of the current state of development of the web access technology to the DICOM repositories. It presents a different approach of using HTML5 features of the web browsers through the JavaScript language and the WebSocket protocol by enabling real-time communication with DICOM repositories. JavaScript DICOM network library, DICOM to WebSocket proxy and a proof-of-concept web application that qualifies as a DICOM 3.0 device were developed.

  13. Savant Genome Browser 2: visualization and analysis for population-scale genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Marc; Smith, Eric J M; Brook, Andrew; Strbenac, Dario; Turner, Brian; Mezlini, Aziz M; Robinson, Mark D; Wodak, Shoshana J; Brudno, Michael

    2012-07-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies are providing an unprecedented capacity for data generation, and there is a corresponding need for efficient data exploration and analysis capabilities. Although most existing tools for HTS data analysis are developed for either automated (e.g. genotyping) or visualization (e.g. genome browsing) purposes, such tools are most powerful when combined. For example, integration of visualization and computation allows users to iteratively refine their analyses by updating computational parameters within the visual framework in real-time. Here we introduce the second version of the Savant Genome Browser, a standalone program for visual and computational analysis of HTS data. Savant substantially improves upon its predecessor and existing tools by introducing innovative visualization modes and navigation interfaces for several genomic datatypes, and synergizing visual and automated analyses in a way that is powerful yet easy even for non-expert users. We also present a number of plugins that were developed by the Savant Community, which demonstrate the power of integrating visual and automated analyses using Savant. The Savant Genome Browser is freely available (open source) at www.savantbrowser.com.

  14. EntrezAJAX: direct web browser access to the Entrez Programming Utilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallen Mark J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Web applications for biology and medicine often need to integrate data from Entrez services provided by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. However, direct access to Entrez from a web browser is not possible due to 'same-origin' security restrictions. The use of "Asynchronous JavaScript and XML" (AJAX to create rich, interactive web applications is now commonplace. The ability to access Entrez via AJAX would be advantageous in the creation of integrated biomedical web resources. We describe EntrezAJAX, which provides access to Entrez eUtils and is able to circumvent same-origin browser restrictions. EntrezAJAX is easily implemented by JavaScript developers and provides identical functionality as Entrez eUtils as well as enhanced functionality to ease development. We provide easy-to-understand developer examples written in JavaScript to illustrate potential uses of this service. For the purposes of speed, reliability and scalability, EntrezAJAX has been deployed on Google App Engine, a freely available cloud service. The EntrezAJAX webpage is located at http://entrezajax.appspot.com/

  15. State support of the high-tech exports: comparative analysis and lessons for Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgen Panchenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The nature of the natural increase in the share of high-tech exports in the overall world exports and trade in general is revealed. The trends in geographical and industrial developments of a high-tech exports in 2004-2015 are shown in the world, developed countries and the EU. Based on the study of dynamics of the high-tech exports of the leading countries in general, as well as engineering products segment, the basic models of state regulation in this sphere are identified i.e. active dirigisme, moderate dirigisme and liberalism. The experience of maintaining a high-tech exports to the US, Germany, Britain, Japan, South Korea and China is summarized. The tendencies of high-tech exports of Ukrainian enterprises in industries such as aerospace engineering, electronics and telecommunications, scientific instruments, computer and office appliances, as well as military industrial products were analyzed. The directions of forming the state support of domestic exporters of high-tech products were identified.

  16. ICT supporting nurses and physicians in hospitals: results of a comparative survey in Austria and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, Ursula; Schaubmayr, Christine; Flemming, Daniel; Sellemann, Björn; Aehlen, Christiane; Ammenwerth, Elske

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the use of clinical information systems, particularly for nursing, in Austria and Germany. In 2007, all acute care hospitals in both countries received questionnaires with identical questions. 12.4% in Germany and 34.6% in Austria responded. The surveys revealed a consistent higher usage of clinical IT in Austrian than in German hospitals. It also included a significant difference in the percentage of electronic nursing records in use. These findings correspond with a significantly higher number of PC workstations on the wards. Despite these differences, Austrian and German hospitals reported a nearly identical IT budget. Factors which might have influenced the wider use of clinical IT are a re-focus on clinical matters after rigorous organisational changes, legal constraints and a general IT-friendly climate in Austria.

  17. Desain prototipe aplikasi sistem monitoring browser ponsel anak untuk menerapkan internet sehat dengan kontrol orang tua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufik Hidayat

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakPenggunaan internet dikalangan anak-anak saat ini sudah menjadi trend, bahkan banyak orang tua sudah memberikan ponsel android kepada anak-anak dalam melakukan komunikasi sehari-hari. Hal tersebut sangat berdampak kepada anak dalam pemanfaatan teknologi internet yang kurang sehat seperti mendapatkan data dan informasi melalui browsing internet tanpa pemantauan orang tua sehingga anak dengan mudah mendapatkan kata-kata atau informasi yang tidak layak dikonsumsi oleh anak tersebut. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendesain aplikasi sistem monitoring browser ponsel anak untuk menerapkan internet sehat dengan kontrol orang tua menggunakan metode prototipe. Hasil penelitian tersebut berupa rancangan aplikasi monitoring broser anak yang dapat digunakan untuk memantau aktivitas browsing internet pada ponsel anak secara online pada platform android dengan otomatis mengirim pesan notifikasi kepada orang tua dan orang tua dapat memberikan respon atau balasan secara langsung ketika anak sedang mencoba melakukan aktivitas browsing internet yang tidak sehat. Kata kunci: Kontrol orang tua, penelusuran aman, sistem monitoring, aktivitas penelusuran harian  Abstract The use of the internet among children currently have become a trend, even many parents already gives android phones to children in doing everyday communication. It is so impacting to the child in the utilization of internet technologies that are less healthy as get data and information through browsing the internet without monitoring parents so children easily get words or information that is not feasible is consumed by the child. This research aims to design a monitoring system of the mobile browser app to implement a healthy internet parental control method using prototype. The results of such research in the form of a draft application monitoring these children which can be used to monitor the activities of internet browsing on mobile child online on the android platform with automatic

  18. Approach to cost-benefit analysis between supported employment and special employment centers through comparative simulation with 24 workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Borja Jordán de Urríes Vega

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a cost-benefit analysis comparing supported employment (SE with special employment center (EEC, from an individual, corporate and society perspective. A simulation was carried out with a sample of 24 workers in regular employment by SE and hypothetical data were obtained for the same workers as if they were in a similar job in EEC. The results show that SE workers, working the same amount of hours, have higher hourly earnings than in EEC (9.22 € compared to 4.59 €. The SE also generates less social burden from the company (22.21 % than EEC (85.54 %. The Supported Employment’s payoff for society is much higher (315.03% than that of the EEC (83.14%. Therefore, the conclusions of the study are directed towards the consideration that supported employment is more beneficial in terms of cost benefit for the individual, business and society when compared to the special employment centers.

  19. Evaluating ecological equivalence of created marshes: comparing structural indicators with stable isotope indicators of blue crab trophic support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Chris; LaPeyre, Megan K.

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to examine ecological equivalence of created marshes of different ages using traditional structural measures of equivalence, and tested a relatively novel approach using stable isotopes as a measure of functional equivalence. We compared soil properties, vegetation, nekton communities, and δ13C and δ15N isotope values of blue crab muscle and hepatopancreas tissue and primary producers at created (5-24 years old) and paired reference marshes in SW Louisiana. Paired contrasts indicated that created and reference marshes supported equivalent plant and nekton communities, but differed in soil characteristics. Stable isotope indicators examining blue crab food web support found that the older marshes (8 years+) were characterized by comparable trophic diversity and breadth compared to their reference marshes. Interpretation of results for the youngest site was confounded by the fact that the paired reference, which represented the desired end goal of restoration, contained a greater diversity of basal resources. Stable isotope techniques may give coastal managers an additional tool to assess functional equivalency of created marshes, as measured by trophic support, but may be limited to comparisons of marshes with similar vegetative communities and basal resources, or require the development of robust standardization techniques.

  20. A hybrid BCI web browser based on EEG and EOG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenghong He; Tianyou Yu; Zhenghui Gu; Yuanqing Li

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we propose a new web browser based on a hybrid brain computer interface (BCI) combining electroencephalographic (EEG) and electrooculography (EOG) signals. Specifically, the user can control the horizontal movement of the mouse by imagining left/right hand motion, and control the vertical movement of the mouse, select/reject a target, or input text in an edit box by blinking eyes in synchrony with the flashes of the corresponding buttons on the GUI. Based on mouse control, target selection and text input, the user can open a web page of interest, select an intended target in the web and read the page content. An online experiment was conducted involving five healthy subjects. The experimental results demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. An innovative browser-based data exploration tool with simultaneous scrolling in time and wavelength domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Gregory L.; Schiff, David; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Freeland, Samuel L.

    2017-08-01

    We present Cruiser, a new web tool for the precision interactive blending of image series across time and wavelength domains. Scrolling in two dimensions enables discovery and investigation of similarities and differences in structure and evolution across multiple wavelengths. Cruiser works in the latest versions of standards compliant browsers on both desktop and IOS platforms. Co-aligned data cubes have been generated for AIA, IRIS, and Hinode SOT FG, and image data from additional instruments, both space-based and ground-based, can be data sources. The tool has several movie playing and image adjustment controls which will be described in the poster and demonstrated on a MacOS notebook and iPad.

  2. Generating HapMap Data Text Reports Using the Genome Browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Albert Vernon

    2008-07-01

    INTRODUCTIONThe primary goal of the International Haplotype Map Project has been to develop a haplotype map of the human genome that describes the common patterns of genetic variation, in order to accelerate the search for the genetic causes of human disease. Within the project, ~3.9 million distinct single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been genotyped in 270 individuals from four worldwide populations. The project data are available for unrestricted public use at the HapMap website. This site, which is the primary portal to genotype data produced by the project, offers bulk downloads of the data set, as well as interactive data browsing and analysis tools that are not available elsewhere. In many cases, a researcher will be interested in downloading HapMap data from a region of interest for local analysis. This protocol describes the direct download of genotype, frequency, tag-SNPs, and other reports from the project website, using the genome browser.

  3. Interpolate with DIVA and view the products in OceanBrowser : what's up ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watelet, Sylvain; Barth, Alexander; Beckers, Jean-Marie; Troupin, Charles

    2017-04-01

    The Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis (DIVA) software is a statistical tool designed to reconstruct a continuous field from discrete measurements. This method is based on the numerical implementation of the Variational Inverse Model (VIM), which consists of a minimization of a cost function, allowing the choice of the analyzed field fitting at best the data sets without presenting unrealistic strong variations. The problem is solved efficiently using a finite-element method. This method, equivalent to the Optimal Interpolation, is particularly suited to deal with irregularly-spaced observations and produces outputs on a regular grid (2D, 3D or 4D). The results are stored in NetCDF files, the most widespread format in the earth sciences community. OceanBrowser is a web-service that allows one to visualize gridded fields on-line. Within the SeaDataNet and EMODNET (Chemical lot) projects, several national ocean data centers have created gridded climatologies of different ocean properties using the data analysis software DIVA. In order to give a common viewing service to those interpolated products, the GHER has developed OceanBrowser which is based on open standards from the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), in particular Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Feature Service (WFS). These standards define a protocol for describing, requesting and querying two-dimensional maps at a given depth and time. DIVA and OceanBrowser are both softwares tools which are continuously upgraded and distributed for free through frequent version releases. The development is funded by the EMODnet and SeaDataNet projects and include many discussions and feedback from the users community. Here, we present two recent major upgrades. First, we have implemented a "customization" of DIVA analyses following the sea bottom, using the bottom depth gradient as a new source of information. The weaker the slope of the bottom ocean, the higher the correlation length. This correlation length being

  4. Using Browser Notebooks to Analyse Big Atmospheric Data-sets in the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, N.; Tomlinson, J.; Arribas, A.; Prudden, R.

    2016-12-01

    We are presenting an account of our experience building an ecosystem for the analysis of big atmospheric data-sets. By using modern technologies we have developed a prototype platform which is scaleable and capable of analysing very large atmospheric datasets. We tested different big-data ecosystems such as Hadoop MapReduce, Spark and Dask, in order to find the one which was best suited for analysis of multidimensional binary data such as NetCDF. We make extensive use of infrastructure-as-code and containerisation to provide a platform which is reusable, and which can scale to accommodate changes in demand. We make this platform readily accessible using browser based notebooks. As a result, analysts with minimal technology experience can, in tens of lines of Python, make interactive data-visualisation web pages, which can analyse very large amounts of data using cutting edge big-data technology

  5. Thin client (web browser)-based collaboration for medical imaging and web-enabled data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tuong Huu; Malhi, Nadeem

    2002-01-01

    Utilizing thin client software and open source server technology, a collaborative architecture was implemented allowing for sharing of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) and non-DICOM images with real-time markup. Using the Web browser as a thin client integrated with standards-based components, such as DHTML (dynamic hypertext markup language), JavaScript, and Java, collaboration was achieved through a Web server/proxy server combination utilizing Java Servlets and Java Server Pages. A typical collaborative session involved the driver, who directed the navigation of the other collaborators, the passengers, and provided collaborative markups of medical and nonmedical images. The majority of processing was performed on the server side, allowing for the client to remain thin and more accessible.

  6. Building a Better Book in the Browser (Using Semantic Web technologies and HTML5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. Clark

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The library as place and service continues to be shaped by the legacy of the book. The book itself has evolved in recent years, with various technologies vying to become the next dominant book form. In this article, we discuss the design and development of our prototype software from Montana State University (MSU Library for presenting books inside of web browsers. The article outlines the contextual background and technological potential for publishing traditional book content through the web using open standards. Our prototype demonstrates the application of HTML5, structured data with RDFa and Schema.org markup, linked data components using JSON-LD, and an API-driven data model. We examine how this open web model impacts discovery, reading analytics, eBook production, and machine-readability for libraries considering how to unite software development and publishing.

  7. Comparative Hemodynamic Effects of Contemporary Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in a Porcine Model of Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Brian R; Konecny, Filip; Suzuki, Gen; Iyer, Vijay; Canty, John M

    2016-11-28

    The aim of this study was to directly compare the hemodynamic effects of 2 contemporary percutaneous mechanical circulatory support devices in a porcine model of acute myocardial infarction. Percutaneous support devices offer the ability to unload the ischemic left ventricle, but the comparative hemodynamic effects of contemporary platforms are unclear. Yorkshire swine (mean weight 76 ± 2 kg; n = 7) were instrumented with a left ventricular (LV) pressure-volume (PV) catheter and subjected to a 2-h coronary occlusion. Hemodynamic parameters and PV-derived indexes of LV performance were assessed 30 min after reperfusion and during LV support with Impella CP (ICP) and TandemHeart devices (in randomized order) at comparable flow rates. Myocardial infarction produced a rightward shift of the PV loop and increased LV end-diastolic pressure (from 9 ± 2 mm Hg to 15 ± 2 mm Hg; p = 0.04). After reperfusion, both devices maintained aortic pressure, shifted the PV loop to the left, and decreased LV end-diastolic pressure (ICP vs. TandemHeart; 11 ± 1 mm Hg vs. 7 ± 4 mm Hg; p = 0.04). However, only TandemHeart elicited significant reductions in native LV stroke volume (from 75 ± 7 ml to 39 ± 7 ml; p < 0.01), dP/dtmax (from 988 ± 77 mm Hg/s to 626 ± 42 mm Hg/s; p < 0.01), stroke work (from 0.70 ± 0.03 J to 0.26 ± 0.05 J; p < 0.01), PV area (from 0.95 ± 0.11 J to 0.47 ± 0.10 J; p < 0.01), and pre-load-recruitable stroke work slope (from 41.7 ± 2.8 J/ml to 30.6 ± 3.9 J/ml; p = 0.05). At comparable device flow rates, TandemHeart decreased LV pre-load, native LV stroke volume, and myocardial contractility to a greater degree than ICP. Reductions in load-independent indexes of LV performance indicate favorable effects on myocardial oxygen balance and support further study of TandemHeart in clinical scenarios requiring mechanical support in the setting of acute myocardial ischemia. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published

  8. CNC-milled titanium frameworks supported by implants in the edentulous jaw: a 10-year comparative clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örtorp, Anders; Jemt, Torsten

    2012-03-01

    No long-term clinical studies covering more than 5 years are available on Computer Numeric Controlled (CNC) milled titanium frameworks. To evaluate and compare the clinical and radiographic performance of implant-supported prostheses provided with CNC titanium frameworks in the edentulous jaw with prostheses with cast gold-alloy frameworks during the first 10 years of function. Altogether, 126 edentulous patients were by random provided with 67 prostheses with titanium frameworks (test) in 23 maxillas and 44 mandibles, and with 62 prostheses with gold-alloy castings (control) in 31 maxillas and 31 mandibles. Clinical and radiographic 10-year data were collected for the groups and statistically compared on patient level. The 10-year prosthesis and implant cumulative survival rate was 95.6% compared with 98.3%, and 95.0% compared with 97.9% for test and control groups, respectively (p > .05). No implants were lost after 5 years of follow-up. Smokers lost more implants than nonsmokers after 5 years of follow-up (p .05), respectively. One prosthesis was lost in each group due to loss of implants, and one prosthesis failed due to framework fracture in the test group. Two metal fractures were registered in each group. More appointments of maintenance were needed for the prostheses in the maxilla compared with those in the mandible (p CNC-milled titanium frameworks are a viable alternative to gold-alloy castings for restoring patients with implant-supported prostheses in the edentulous jaw. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF HEALTH CAPITAL, FRAILTY AND AGING AMONG OLD PEOPLE WITH AND WITHOUT MEANS OF SUPPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jauregui JR

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This work is a comparative analysis of health capital, frailty and ageing among old people with and without means of support. Material and Methods: Target population are individuals older than 50 years old, Intervention Group have lower socio-economic status and live in slums. Control Group belong to a higher social clas living in an urban population with all the material resources. Results: The data analyzed corresponds to a sample of 448 people. Comparison between both groups was not rendered as significant. Conclusions: In Our observation, populations exposed to hostile environments evidence for decades to be functionally apt to defend themselves from it.

  10. INPRO Activities on Development of Advanced Tools to Support Judgment Aggregation for Comparative Evaluation of Nuclear Energy Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kuznetsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents first results of the INPRO Collaborative Project on Key Indicators for Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems, which has the objective to develop guidance and tools for comparative evaluation of the status, prospects, benefits, and risks associated with development of innovative nuclear technologies for a more distant future. Presented results illustrate expedience of application of the multicriteria decision analysis methods, which are able to provide the added value to comparative assessment of nuclear energy systems. First, the paper presents a short review of the multicriteria decision analysis methods appropriate to support judgment aggregation within comparative evaluations of nuclear energy systems based on key indicators and highlights the methodology to perform such assessments. Second, a set of key indicators elaborated in the INPRO Collaborative Project on Global Architecture of Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems Based on Thermal and Fast Reactors Including a Closed Fuel Cycle (GAINS were evaluated for comparative evaluation of nuclear energy system evolution scenarios. Third, a numerical example is presented of application of the selected key indicators, methods, and tools for judgment aggregation in comparative assessment of the GAINS nuclear energy systems.

  11. Protocol for the saMS trial (supportive adjustment for multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy to supportive listening for adjustment to multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCrone Paul

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an incurable, chronic, potentially progressive and unpredictable disease of the central nervous system. The disease produces a range of unpleasant and debilitating symptoms, which can have a profound impact including disrupting activities of daily living, employment, income, relationships, social and leisure activities, and life goals. Adjusting to the illness is therefore particularly challenging. This trial tests the effectiveness of a Cognitive Behavioural intervention compared to Supportive Listening to assist adjustment in the early stages of MS. Methods/Design This is a two arm randomized multi-centre parallel group controlled trial. 122 consenting participants who meet eligibility criteria will be randomly allocated to receive either Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Supportive Listening. Eight one hour sessions of therapy (delivered over a period of 10 weeks will be delivered by general nurses trained in both treatments. Self-report questionnaire data will be collected at baseline (0 weeks, mid-therapy (week 5 of therapy, post-therapy (15 weeks and at six months (26 weeks and twelve months (52 weeks follow-up. Primary outcomes are distress and MS-related social and role impairment at twelve month follow-up. Analysis will also consider predictors and mechanisms of change during therapy. In-depth interviews to examine participants' experiences of the interventions will be conducted with a purposively sampled sub-set of the trial participants. An economic analysis will also take place. Discussion This trial is distinctive in its aims in that it aids adjustment to MS in a broad sense. It is not a treatment specifically for depression. Use of nurses as therapists makes the interventions potentially viable in terms of being rolled out in the NHS. The trial benefits from incorporating patient input in the development and evaluation stages. The trial will provide important information about the

  12. Comparative analysis of foot support-spring indicators of primary school age children with weak eyesight in physical education process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Habіb

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to fulfill comparative analysis of foot support-spring indicators of schoolchildren with weak eyesight. Material: in the research 7-10 years’ age children (n=76 with weak eyesight participated. The children learn in specialized boarding school. Results: we found statistically confident differences between some foot support-spring indicators of primary school children with weak eyesight and their practically healthy children. It was registered that primary school children had weaker muscles and ligaments of lower limbs. The reason can be insufficient motor functioning and muscles’ stiffening in moving in space as well as the absence of exercises for prophylaxis of foot functional disorders. Conclusions: we determined that there is demand in working out and implementation of practical recommendations in physical education process of schoolchildren with weak eyesight. Physical education process shall be oriented on educational aims, on application of health related correcting and compensatory-prophylaxis physical exercises. Such approach will positively influence on correction of foot support-spring disorders.

  13. Gender, cancer experience and internet use: a comparative keyword analysis of interviews and online cancer support groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Clive; Ziebland, Sue; Charteris-Black, Jonathan

    2006-05-01

    A new method, comparative keyword analysis, is used to compare the language of men and women with cancer in 97 research interviews and two popular internet based support groups for people with cancer. The method is suited to the conjoint qualitative and quantitative analysis of differences between large bodies of text, an alternative to the 'code and retrieval' approach used in much thematic analysis of qualitative materials. Web forums are a rich source of data about illness experience and gender differences. Marked differences in the performance of gender are evident. These differences follow linguistic and other behavioural patterns (such as social network differences) established in other contexts. Men with prostate cancer indicate in research interviews that they are more likely to seek information on the internet; women with breast cancer that they are more likely to seek social and emotional support. Men's concerns cluster around treatment information, medical personnel and procedures. Their experience of disease is more localised on particular areas of the body, while women's experience is more holistic. Women's forum postings orientate much more towards the exchange of emotional support, including concern with the impact of illness on a wide range of other people. Women's use of superlatives as well as words referring to feelings indicate their enactment of greater emotional expressivity. Web forums are platforms for an intensification of men's knowledge gathering activities. Web forums, though actually quite publicly visible, appear to be subjectively experienced by both sexes as relatively private places for the exchange of intimate personal information. The 'privacy' of the breast cancer forum facilitated interactions found in other studies to be characteristic of women's friendship groups.

  14. Comparing anger, anger expression, life stress and social support between Korean female nursing and general university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Won Hee; Lee, Gyungjoo

    2017-12-01

    To compare anger, anger expression, life stress and social support among female students at a nursing university and a general university and to examine factors affecting anger in each group. University students typically experience constant stress resulting from factors like academic requirements, personal relationships and career decisions; this tends to promote anger. Particularly, nursing students' anger can negatively affect the quality of care that they provide, and also their mental health. Therefore, anger management of nursing students is very important in the training and development of future nurses. Nursing education needs to confirm factors associated with anger of nursing students compared with general university students to develop specific intervention programs for decreasing their anger levels. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used. Participants were 286 female students (146 from a nursing university and 140 from a general university); they completed self-report surveys examining anger, anger expression, life stress and social support. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was done to identify factors affecting anger. Data were collected from 15 May-10 June 2016. In the stepwise multiple regression analysis, we entered three anger expression factors, eight life stress factors and social support as explanatory variables; factors affecting anger among nursing students were anger-out and same-sex peer relationship stress. In general university students, anger-out, anger-control and anger-in were identified as factors affecting anger. Becoming proficient in beneficial anger expression techniques and reducing stress from same-sex peer relationships will reduce anger among female nursing students. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Comparing multi-criteria decision analysis and integrated assessment to support long-term water supply planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Lisa; Maurer, Max; Lienert, Judit

    2017-01-01

    We compare the use of multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA)-or more precisely, models used in multi-attribute value theory (MAVT)-to integrated assessment (IA) models for supporting long-term water supply planning in a small town case study in Switzerland. They are used to evaluate thirteen system scale water supply alternatives in four future scenarios regarding forty-four objectives, covering technical, social, environmental, and economic aspects. The alternatives encompass both conventional and unconventional solutions and differ regarding technical, spatial and organizational characteristics. This paper focuses on the impact assessment and final evaluation step of the structured MCDA decision support process. We analyze the performance of the alternatives for ten stakeholders. We demonstrate the implications of model assumptions by comparing two IA and three MAVT evaluation model layouts of different complexity. For this comparison, we focus on the validity (ranking stability), desirability (value), and distinguishability (value range) of the alternatives given the five model layouts. These layouts exclude or include stakeholder preferences and uncertainties. Even though all five led us to identify the same best alternatives, they did not produce identical rankings. We found that the MAVT-type models provide higher distinguishability and a more robust basis for discussion than the IA-type models. The needed complexity of the model, however, should be determined based on the intended use of the model within the decision support process. The best-performing alternatives had consistently strong performance for all stakeholders and future scenarios, whereas the current water supply system was outperformed in all evaluation layouts. The best-performing alternatives comprise proactive pipe rehabilitation, adapted firefighting provisions, and decentralized water storage and/or treatment. We present recommendations for possible ways of improving water supply planning

  16. Comparing multi-criteria decision analysis and integrated assessment to support long-term water supply planning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Scholten

    Full Text Available We compare the use of multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA-or more precisely, models used in multi-attribute value theory (MAVT-to integrated assessment (IA models for supporting long-term water supply planning in a small town case study in Switzerland. They are used to evaluate thirteen system scale water supply alternatives in four future scenarios regarding forty-four objectives, covering technical, social, environmental, and economic aspects. The alternatives encompass both conventional and unconventional solutions and differ regarding technical, spatial and organizational characteristics. This paper focuses on the impact assessment and final evaluation step of the structured MCDA decision support process. We analyze the performance of the alternatives for ten stakeholders. We demonstrate the implications of model assumptions by comparing two IA and three MAVT evaluation model layouts of different complexity. For this comparison, we focus on the validity (ranking stability, desirability (value, and distinguishability (value range of the alternatives given the five model layouts. These layouts exclude or include stakeholder preferences and uncertainties. Even though all five led us to identify the same best alternatives, they did not produce identical rankings. We found that the MAVT-type models provide higher distinguishability and a more robust basis for discussion than the IA-type models. The needed complexity of the model, however, should be determined based on the intended use of the model within the decision support process. The best-performing alternatives had consistently strong performance for all stakeholders and future scenarios, whereas the current water supply system was outperformed in all evaluation layouts. The best-performing alternatives comprise proactive pipe rehabilitation, adapted firefighting provisions, and decentralized water storage and/or treatment. We present recommendations for possible ways of improving water

  17. Evolution of gene regulation of pluripotency - the case for wiki tracks at genome browsers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struckmann Stephan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimentally validated data on gene regulation are hard to obtain. In particular, information about transcription factor binding sites in regulatory regions are scattered around in the literature. This impedes their systematic in-context analysis, e.g. the inference of their conservation in evolutionary history. Results We demonstrate the power of integrative bioinformatics by including curated transcription factor binding site information into the UCSC genome browser, using wiki and custom tracks, which enable easy publication of annotation data. Data integration allows to investigate the evolution of gene regulation of the pluripotency-associated genes Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog. For the first time, experimentally validated transcription factor binding sites in the regulatory regions of all three genes were assembled together based on manual curation of data from 39 publications. Using the UCSC genome browser, these data were then visualized in the context of multi-species conservation based on genomic alignment. We confirm previous hypotheses regarding the evolutionary age of specific regulatory patterns, establishing their "deep homology". We also confirm some other principles of Carroll's "Genetic theory of Morphological Evolution", such as "mosaic pleiotropy", exemplified by the dual role of Sox2 reflected in its regulatory region. Conclusions We were able to elucidate some aspects of the evolution of gene regulation for three genes associated with pluripotency. Based on the expected return on investment for the community, we encourage other scientists to contribute experimental data on gene regulation (original work as well as data collected for reviews to the UCSC system, to enable studies of the evolution of gene regulation on a large scale, and to report their findings. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr. Gustavo Glusman and Dr. Juan Caballero, Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, USA (nominated by Dr. Doron

  18. Stress distribution patterns of implant supported overdentures-analog versus finite element analysis: A comparative in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathy, Soumyadev; Babu, C L Satish; Shetty, Shilpa; Raj, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to asses & compare the load transfer characteristics of Ball/O-ring and Bar/Clip attachment systems in implant supported overdentures using analog and finite element analysis models. For the analog part of the study, castable bar was used for the bar and clip attachment and a metallic housing with a rubber O-ring component was used for the ball/O-ring attachment. The stress on the implant surface was measured using the strain-gauge technique. For the finite element analysis, the model were fabricated and load applications were done in a similar manner as in analog study. The difference between both the attachment systems was found to be statistically significant (PO-ring attachment system transmitted lesser amount of stresses to the implants on the non-loading side, as compared to the Bar-Clip attachment system. When overall stress distribution is compared, the Bar-Clip attachment seems to perform better than the Ball/O-ring attachment, because the force was distributed better.

  19. Comparing Hyperion Lunar Observation with model calculations in support of GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xi; Cao, Changyong; Uprety, Sirish; Padula, Frank; Choi, Taeyoung

    2014-09-01

    Radiometric stability of the lunar surface and its smooth reflectance spectrum makes the moon an attractive candidate for calibrating satellite-based hyper/multi-band visible and infrared imagers. Long-term performance monitoring of satellite instrument using Moon can reveal the degradation of instruments. In this paper, analysis of Hyperion lunar observations and comparison with lunar model are performed in support of Cal/Val activities for satellite photometric imager such as GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) instrument. Hyperion makes hyper-spectral observations of the moon regularly with moon phase mostly at 7 degree and it covers visible and shirt-wavelength infrared (SWIR) channels with 10 nm spectral resolution. Five Hyperion lunar observations are analyzed. Lunar reflectance is derived from Hyperion observation and the mean absolute lunar spectral reflectance difference between Hyperion derivation and lunar model is 4.0 ± 2.62%. Through reflectance comparison, over-compensation of two strong atmospheric water absorption bands in Hyperion calibration is identified. The radiometric variance and degradation of Hyperion are assessed. To support the calibration of GOES-R ABI, hyper-spectral data of Hyperion lunar observation is convoluted with ABI spectral response functions for reflective solar bands to synthesize predicted lunar images to be observed by ABI. Lunar irradiances are derived from these synthesized lunar images for ABI and compared with lunar model predictions to quantify spectral biases. Long-term lunar imaging window of opportunities for GOES-R ABI are also assessed. The ability of using lunar model and Hyperion observation to calibrate satellite VNIR/SWIR sensors and reduce the measurement uncertainties is essential to support post-launch Cal/Val activities of GOES-R ABI.

  20. ChromoZoom: a flexible, fluid, web-based genome browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Theodore R; Roth, Frederick P

    2013-02-01

    Current web-based genome browsers require repetitious user input to scroll over long distances, alter the drawing density of elements or zoom through multiple orders of magnitude. Generally, either the server or the client is responsible for the majority of data processing, resulting in either servers having to receive and handle data relevant only to one user, or clients redundantly processing widely viewed data. ChromoZoom pre-renders and caches general-use tracks into tiled images on the server and serves them in an interactive web interface with inertial scrolling and precise, fluent zooming via the mouse wheel or trackpad. Custom tracks in several formats can be rendered by client-side code alongside the pre-rendered tracks, minimizing server load because of user-specific rendering and eliminating the need to transmit private data. ChromoZoom thereby enables rapid and simultaneous exploration of curated, experimental and personal genomic datasets. Human and yeast genome researchers may browse recent assemblies within ChromoZoom at http://chromozoom.org/. Source code is available at http://github.com/rothlab/chromozoom/.

  1. Visualization of Distributed Solar Data and Metadata with the Solar Weather Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicula, B.; Marqué, C.; Berghmans, D.

    2008-04-01

    The Solar Weather Browser (SWB) is a standalone, open-source software tool designed to display solar images with context overlays. It was originally developed for the space-weather forecast activities of the Solar Influence Data analysis Center (SIDC) but it is more generally well suited to display the output of solar-feature recognition methods. The SWB is also useful in the context of distributed solar-image archives, where it could play the role of a quick-look viewer. The SWB allows the user to visually browse large solar data sets and investigate the solar activity for a given date. It has a client server design that minimizes the bandwidth from the network to the user’s monitor. The server processes the data using the SolarSoft library and distributes them through a Web server to which the SWB client connects. The client is readily available for Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows at http://sidc.be/SWB . We discuss the software technology embedded in the SWB as well as its use for solar physics and space weather.

  2. Indirect interactions between browsers and seed predators affect the seed bank dynamics of a chaparral shrub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveny, Adrian J; Fox, Laurel R

    2006-11-01

    Interactions between herbivores and seed predators may have long-term consequences for plant populations that rely on persistent seed banks for recovery after unpredictable fires. We assessed the effects of browsing by deer and seed predation by rodents, ants and birds on the densities of seeds entering the seed bank of Ceanothus cuneatus var. rigidus, a maritime chaparral shrub in coastal California. Ceanothus produced many more seeds when protected from browsers in long-term experimental exclosures than did browsed plants, but the seed densities in the soil beneath browsed and unbrowsed Ceanothus were the same at the start of an intensive one-year study. The density of seeds in the soil initially increased in both treatments following summer seed drop: while densities returned to pre-drop levels within a few weeks under browsed plants, soil seed densities remained high for 5-8 months beneath unbrowsed plants. Rodent abundance (especially deer mice) was higher near unbrowsed plants than >30 m away, and rodents removed Ceanothus seeds from dishes in the experimental plots. At least in the short term, rodent density and rates of seed removal were inversely related to the intensity of browsing. Our data have management implications for maintaining viable Ceanothus populations by regulating the intensity of browsing and the timing, intensity and frequency of fires.

  3. Feeding rates of a mammalian browser confirm the predictions of a 'foodscape' model of its habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Karen J; Moore, Ben D; Wallis, Ian R; Foley, William J

    2014-03-01

    Adequate nutrition is a fundamental requirement for the maintenance and growth of populations, but complex interactions between nutrients and plant toxins make it difficult to link variation in plant quality to the ecology of wild herbivores. We asked whether a 'foodscape' model of habitat that uses near-infrared spectroscopy to describe the palatability of individual trees in the landscape, predicted the foraging decisions of a mammalian browser, the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus). Specifically, we considered four behavioural decision points at which nutritional quality may influence an animal's decision. These were: which tree to enter, whether to feed from that tree, when to stop eating, and how long to remain in that tree. There were trends for koalas to feed in eucalypt trees that were more palatable than unvisited neighbouring conspecific trees, and than trees that they visited but did not eat. Koalas ate longer meals in more palatable trees, and stayed longer and spent more time feeding per visit to these trees. Using more traditional chemical analyses, we identified that an interaction between the concentrations of formylated phloroglucinol compounds (a group of plant secondary metabolites) and available N (an integrated measure of tannins, digestibility and N) influenced feeding. The study shows that foodscape models that combine spatial information with integrated measures of food quality are a powerful tool to predict the feeding behaviour of herbivores in a landscape.

  4. OntoBrowser: a collaborative tool for curation of ontologies by subject matter experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravagli, Carlo; Pognan, Francois; Marc, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The lack of controlled terminology and ontology usage leads to incomplete search results and poor interoperability between databases. One of the major underlying challenges of data integration is curating data to adhere to controlled terminologies and/or ontologies. Finding subject matter experts with the time and skills required to perform data curation is often problematic. In addition, existing tools are not designed for continuous data integration and collaborative curation. This results in time-consuming curation workflows that often become unsustainable. The primary objective of OntoBrowser is to provide an easy-to-use online collaborative solution for subject matter experts to map reported terms to preferred ontology (or code list) terms and facilitate ontology evolution. Additional features include web service access to data, visualization of ontologies in hierarchical/graph format and a peer review/approval workflow with alerting. The source code is freely available under the Apache v2.0 license. Source code and installation instructions are available at http://opensource.nibr.com This software is designed to run on a Java EE application server and store data in a relational database. philippe.marc@novartis.com. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Comparisons among Health Behavior Surveys: Implications for the Design of Informatics Infrastructures That Support Comparative Effectiveness Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sunmoo; Wilcox, Adam B; Bakken, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    To address the electronic health data fragmentation that is a methodological limitation of comparative effectiveness research (CER), the Washington Heights Inwood Informatics Infrastructure for Comparative Effectiveness Research (WICER) project is creating a patient-centered research data warehouse (RDW) by linking electronic clinical data (ECD) from New York Presbyterian Hospital's clinical data warehouse with ECD from ambulatory care, long-term care, and home health settings and the WICER community health survey (CHS). The purposes of the research were to identify areas of overlap between the WICER CHS and two other surveys that include health behavior data (the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Survey and the New York City Community Health Survey (NYC CHS)) and to identify gaps in the current WICER RDW that have the potential to affect patient-centered CER. We compared items across the three surveys at the item and conceptual levels. We also compared WICER RDW (ECD and WICER CHS), BRFSS, and NYC CHS to the County Health Ranking framework. We found that 22 percent of WICER items were exact matches with BRFSS and that there were no exact matches between WICER CHS and NYC CHS items not also contained in BRFSS. The results suggest that BRFSS and, to a lesser extent, NYC CHS have the potential to serve as population comparisons for WICER CHS for some health behavior-related data and thus may be particularly useful for considering the generalizability of CER study findings. Except for one measure related to health behavior (motor vehicle crash deaths), the WICER RDW's comprehensive coverage supports the mortality, morbidity, and clinical care measures specified in the County Health Ranking framework but is deficient in terms of some socioeconomic factors and descriptions of the physical environment as captured in BRFSS. Linkage of these data in the WICER RDW through geocoding can potentially facilitate patient-centered CER that integrates important

  6. Governing new technology: A comparative analysis of government support for nanotechnology in the Netherlands and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eijmberts, Johannes

    This study examines this variance in national government support for nanotechnology---its shape, size, and policy priorities---by comparing the United States and the Netherlands. Our operating hypothesis is that national government support for nanotechnology development is driven not by the intrinsic nature of the technology but by longstanding structural and institutional arrangements. That is, in the U.S., pluralist political traditions and reliance on classical liberal market economics would suggest a detached national government approach, leaving any initiative to market actors. At the same time, legacies of corporatism in the Dutch political system and a tradition of greater direct government involvement in the national economy would suggest a government-led policy on nanotechnology development. The findings show otherwise. Early on, the U.S. government established the National Nanotechnology Initiative, an overarching federal mechanism to promote and coordinate nanotechnology development. Yet, despite its appearance of central direction and coordination, the NNI reflected pluralist arrangements by leaving ample autonomy for participating federal departments and agencies. The creation of the NNI was driven particularly by concerns of about foreign challenges to American global leadership in science and technology. In the Netherlands, by contrast, the path taken shows the legacy of Dutch corporatist practice---slow, incremental, and embedded in pre-existing institutional arrangements. The Dutch government initially took no directive role, relying instead on established links among universities, public research funding organizations, and industries to advance nanotechnology development in the Netherlands. However, over time, Dutch government involvement in nanotechnology grew to be more supportive, sizeable, comprehensive, and directive---particulary by requiring substantial investments in risk-related research as a condition for public funding and, notably, by

  7. Comparable Outcome of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Treated With Extracorporeal Life Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellouze, Omar; Vuillet, Melitine; Perrot, Justine; Grosjean, Sandrine; Missaoui, Anis; Aho, Serge; Malapert, Ghislain; Bouhemad, Belaid; Bouchot, Oliver; Girard, Claude

    2017-09-06

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) has shown benefits in the management of refractory in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) by improving survival. Nonetheless, the results concerning out-of-hospital refractory cardiac arrests (OHCA) remain uncertain. The aim of our investigation was to compare survival between the two groups. We realized a single-center retrospective, observational study of all patients who presented IHCA or OHCA treated with ECLS between 2011 and 2015. Multivariate analysis was realized to determine independent factors associated with mortality. Over the 4-year period, 65 patients were included, 43 in the IHCA group (66.2%), and 22 (33.8%) in the OHCA group. The duration of low flow was significantly longer in the OHCA group (60 vs. 90 min, P = 0.004). Survival to discharge from the hospital was identical in the two groups (27% in the OHCA group vs. 23% in the IHCA group, P = 0.77). All surviving patients in the OHCA group had a cerebral performance categories score of 1-2. In multivariate analysis, we found that the initial lactate level and baseline blood creatinine were independently associated with mortality. We found comparable survival and neurological score in patients who presented IHCA and OHCA treated with ECLS. We believe that appropriate selection of patients and optimization of organ perfusion during resuscitation can lead to good results in patients with OHCA treated with ECLS. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. RadStation: client-based digital dictation system and integrated clinical information display with an embedded Web-browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, K W; Suitor, C T; Hildebrand, S; Downs, R

    2000-01-01

    RadStation is a digital dictation system having an integrated display of clinical information. The three-tiered system architecture provides robust performance, with most information displayed within one second after a request. The multifunctional client tier is a unique client/browser hybrid. A Web browser display window functions as the client application's data display window for clinical information, radiology reports, and laboratory and pathology results. RadStation provides a robust platform for digital dictation functionality. The system's internal status checks ensure operational integrity in a clinical environment. Also, the programmable dictation microphone and bar-code reader supplant the mouse as the system's primary input device. By merging information queries into existing work flow, radiologist's interpretation efficiency is maintained with instant access to essential clinical information. Finally, RadStation requires minimal training and has been enthusiastically accepted by our radiologists in an active clinical practice.

  9. Development of a browser application to foster research on linking climate and health datasets: Challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajat, Shakoor; Whitmore, Ceri; Sarran, Christophe; Haines, Andy; Golding, Brian; Gordon-Brown, Harriet; Kessel, Anthony; Fleming, Lora E

    2017-01-01

    Improved data linkages between diverse environment and health datasets have the potential to provide new insights into the health impacts of environmental exposures, including complex climate change processes. Initiatives that link and explore big data in the environment and health arenas are now being established. To encourage advances in this nascent field, this article documents the development of a web browser application to facilitate such future research, the challenges encountered to date, and how they were addressed. A 'storyboard approach' was used to aid the initial design and development of the application. The application followed a 3-tier architecture: a spatial database server for storing and querying data, server-side code for processing and running models, and client-side browser code for user interaction and for displaying data and results. The browser was validated by reproducing previously published results from a regression analysis of time-series datasets of daily mortality, air pollution and temperature in London. Data visualisation and analysis options of the application are presented. The main factors that shaped the development of the browser were: accessibility, open-source software, flexibility, efficiency, user-friendliness, licensing restrictions and data confidentiality, visualisation limitations, cost-effectiveness, and sustainability. Creating dedicated data and analysis resources, such as the one described here, will become an increasingly vital step in improving understanding of the complex interconnections between the environment and human health and wellbeing, whilst still ensuring appropriate confidentiality safeguards. The issues raised in this paper can inform the future development of similar tools by other researchers working in this field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Yeast Gene Order Browser: Combining curated homology and syntenic context reveals gene fate in polyploid species

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Kevin P.; Wolfe, Kenneth H

    2005-01-01

    We developed the Yeast Gene Order Browser (YGOB; http://wolfe.gen.tcd.ie/ygob) to facilitate visual comparisons and computational analysis of synteny relationships in yeasts. The data presented in YGOB, currently covering seven species, are based on sets of homologous genes that have been intensively manually curated based on both sequence similarity and genomic context (synteny). We reconciled different laboratories' lists of paralogous Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene pairs formed by genome du...

  11. GUIdock-VNC: using a graphical desktop sharing system to provide a browser-based interface for containerized software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Varun; Hung, Ling-Hong; Keswani, Jayant; Kristiyanto, Daniel; Lee, Sung Bong; Yeung, Ka Yee

    2017-04-01

    Software container technology such as Docker can be used to package and distribute bioinformatics workflows consisting of multiple software implementations and dependencies. However, Docker is a command line-based tool, and many bioinformatics pipelines consist of components that require a graphical user interface. We present a container tool called GUIdock-VNC that uses a graphical desktop sharing system to provide a browser-based interface for containerized software. GUIdock-VNC uses the Virtual Network Computing protocol to render the graphics within most commonly used browsers. We also present a minimal image builder that can add our proposed graphical desktop sharing system to any Docker packages, with the end result that any Docker packages can be run using a graphical desktop within a browser. In addition, GUIdock-VNC uses the Oauth2 authentication protocols when deployed on the cloud. As a proof-of-concept, we demonstrated the utility of GUIdock-noVNC in gene network inference. We benchmarked our container implementation on various operating systems and showed that our solution creates minimal overhead.

  12. Making the PACS workstation a browser of image processing software: a feasibility study using inter-process communication techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunliang; Ritter, Felix; Smedby, Orjan

    2010-07-01

    To enhance the functional expandability of a picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) workstation and to facilitate the integration of third-part image-processing modules, we propose a browser-server style method. In the proposed solution, the PACS workstation shows the front-end user interface defined in an XML file while the image processing software is running in the background as a server. Inter-process communication (IPC) techniques allow an efficient exchange of image data, parameters, and user input between the PACS workstation and stand-alone image-processing software. Using a predefined communication protocol, the PACS workstation developer or image processing software developer does not need detailed information about the other system, but will still be able to achieve seamless integration between the two systems and the IPC procedure is totally transparent to the final user. A browser-server style solution was built between OsiriX (PACS workstation software) and MeVisLab (Image-Processing Software). Ten example image-processing modules were easily added to OsiriX by converting existing MeVisLab image processing networks. Image data transfer using shared memory added processing time while the other IPC methods cost 1-5 s in our experiments. The browser-server style communication based on IPC techniques is an appealing method that allows PACS workstation developers and image processing software developers to cooperate while focusing on different interests.

  13. Comparison Algorithm Kernels on Support Vector Machine (SVM To Compare The Trend Curves with Curves Online Forex Trading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    irfan abbas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At this time, the players Forex Trading generally still use the data exchange in the form of a Forex Trading figures from different sources. Thus they only receive or know the data rate of a Forex Trading prevailing at the time just so difficult to analyze or predict exchange rate movements future. Forex players usually use the indicators to enable them to analyze and memperdiksi future value. Indicator is a decision making tool. Trading forex is trading currency of a country, the other country's currency. Trading took place globally between the financial centers of the world with the involvement of the world's major banks as the major transaction. Trading Forex offers profitable investment type with a small capital and high profit, with relatively small capital can earn profits doubled. This is due to the forex trading systems exist leverage which the invested capital will be doubled if the predicted results of buy / sell is accurate, but Trading Forex having high risk level, but by knowing the right time to trade (buy or sell, the losses can be avoided. Traders who invest in the foreign exchange market is expected to have the ability to analyze the circumstances and situations in predicting the difference in currency exchange rates. Forex price movements that form the pattern (curve up and down greatly assist traders in making decisions. The movement of the curve used as an indicator in the decision to purchase (buy or sell (sell. This study compares (Comparation type algorithm kernel on Support Vector Machine (SVM to predict the movement of the curve in live time trading forex using the data GBPUSD, 1H. Results of research on the study of the results and discussion can be concluded that the Kernel Dot, Kernel Multiquaric, Kernel Neural inappropriately used for data is non-linear in the case of data forex to follow the pattern of trend curves, because curves generated curved linear (straight and then to type of kernel is the closest curve

  14. Social Support from Developmental Contexts and Adolescent Substance Use and Well-Being: A Comparative Study of Spain and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Iglesias, Antonia; Camacho, Inês; Rivera, Francisco; Moreno, Carmen; Matos, Margarida Gaspar de

    2017-11-20

    The aim of this study was to analyse the contribution of social support from family, friend and school (teacher and classmate) contexts in substance use (tobacco and alcohol use) and well-being (life satisfaction and health-related quality of life). Participants were 5,784 Portuguese and 22,610 Spanish adolescents aged 11 to 16 years, from the 2014 edition of the Health Behavior in School-aged Children (HBSC) study in Portugal and Spain. Results showed that for a higher life satisfaction, family (p support were important in Portugal, and family (p support in Spain. Similarly, for a better health-related quality of life, all the social support variables were relevant in Portugal (family: p support (p support was more relevant for adolescent well-being than for adolescent substance use, and the most relevant source of support was family support, in both Spain and Portugal.

  15. Gbrowse Moby: a Web-based browser for BioMoby Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Mark

    2006-10-24

    The BioMoby project aims to identify and deploy standards and conventions that aid in the discovery, execution, and pipelining of distributed bioinformatics Web Services. As of August, 2006, approximately 680 bioinformatics resources were available through the BioMoby interoperability platform. There are a variety of clients that can interact with BioMoby-style services. Here we describe a Web-based browser-style client--Gbrowse Moby--that allows users to discover and "surf" from one bioinformatics service to the next using a semantically-aided browsing interface. Gbrowse Moby is a low-throughput, exploratory tool specifically aimed at non-informaticians. It provides a straightforward, minimal interface that enables a researcher to query the BioMoby Central web service registry for data retrieval or analytical tools of interest, and then select and execute their chosen tool with a single mouse-click. The data is preserved at each step, thus allowing the researcher to manually "click" the data from one service to the next, with the Gbrowse Moby application managing all data formatting and interface interpretation on their behalf. The path of manual exploration is preserved and can be downloaded for import into automated, high-throughput tools such as Taverna. Gbrowse Moby also includes a robust data rendering system to ensure that all new data-types that appear in the BioMoby registry can be properly displayed in the Web interface. Gbrowse Moby is a robust, yet facile entry point for both newcomers to the BioMoby interoperability project who wish to manually explore what is known about their data of interest, as well as experienced users who wish to observe the functionality of their analytical workflows prior to running them in a high-throughput environment.

  16. Gbrowse Moby: a Web-based browser for BioMoby Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkinson Mark

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The BioMoby project aims to identify and deploy standards and conventions that aid in the discovery, execution, and pipelining of distributed bioinformatics Web Services. As of August, 2006, approximately 680 bioinformatics resources were available through the BioMoby interoperability platform. There are a variety of clients that can interact with BioMoby-style services. Here we describe a Web-based browser-style client – Gbrowse Moby – that allows users to discover and "surf" from one bioinformatics service to the next using a semantically-aided browsing interface. Results Gbrowse Moby is a low-throughput, exploratory tool specifically aimed at non-informaticians. It provides a straightforward, minimal interface that enables a researcher to query the BioMoby Central web service registry for data retrieval or analytical tools of interest, and then select and execute their chosen tool with a single mouse-click. The data is preserved at each step, thus allowing the researcher to manually "click" the data from one service to the next, with the Gbrowse Moby application managing all data formatting and interface interpretation on their behalf. The path of manual exploration is preserved and can be downloaded for import into automated, high-throughput tools such as Taverna. Gbrowse Moby also includes a robust data rendering system to ensure that all new data-types that appear in the BioMoby registry can be properly displayed in the Web interface. Conclusion Gbrowse Moby is a robust, yet facile entry point for both newcomers to the BioMoby interoperability project who wish to manually explore what is known about their data of interest, as well as experienced users who wish to observe the functionality of their analytical workflows prior to running them in a high-throughput environment.

  17. Reproducible Bioconductor workflows using browser-based interactive notebooks and containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almugbel, Reem; Hung, Ling-Hong; Hu, Jiaming; Almutairy, Abeer; Ortogero, Nicole; Tamta, Yashaswi; Yeung, Ka Yee

    2018-01-01

    Bioinformatics publications typically include complex software workflows that are difficult to describe in a manuscript. We describe and demonstrate the use of interactive software notebooks to document and distribute bioinformatics research. We provide a user-friendly tool, BiocImageBuilder, that allows users to easily distribute their bioinformatics protocols through interactive notebooks uploaded to either a GitHub repository or a private server. We present four different interactive Jupyter notebooks using R and Bioconductor workflows to infer differential gene expression, analyze cross-platform datasets, process RNA-seq data and KinomeScan data. These interactive notebooks are available on GitHub. The analytical results can be viewed in a browser. Most importantly, the software contents can be executed and modified. This is accomplished using Binder, which runs the notebook inside software containers, thus avoiding the need to install any software and ensuring reproducibility. All the notebooks were produced using custom files generated by BiocImageBuilder. BiocImageBuilder facilitates the publication of workflows with a point-and-click user interface. We demonstrate that interactive notebooks can be used to disseminate a wide range of bioinformatics analyses. The use of software containers to mirror the original software environment ensures reproducibility of results. Parameters and code can be dynamically modified, allowing for robust verification of published results and encouraging rapid adoption of new methods. Given the increasing complexity of bioinformatics workflows, we anticipate that these interactive software notebooks will become as necessary for documenting software methods as traditional laboratory notebooks have been for documenting bench protocols, and as ubiquitous.

  18. Socializing Young People to Ethics via Play Experience: Browser Games and Parental Concerns for Safety Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divina Meigs

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers an online game and its relation to safety and privacy, in order to examine social and ethical issues raised by parental concern over harmful content. To gain real insights on the responsibility of adults, it develops a hands-on approach that takes into account the major stakeholders, especially young people and the related circle of people around them. Therefore the research question that is raised is: how do browser games provide reassurance to parents about their children’s safety and privacy? The issue of safety online is explored in three parts, using an ethnographic research framework: it explores a specific online game, it provides a profile of participants, it analyses their types of actions in relation to safety and privacy, and discusses the results in terms of incidence of risk, peer-monitoring and community control. The findings show that there is a rather strong tendency to self-regulation, but that tendency is partly due to a strong presence of mediating adults and peers. The results are discussed in terms of incidence of risk, peer-monitoring and networked means of control on the one hand, and in terms of scientific contribution to socialization theory on the other hand. They lead to final considerations on the repertoire of ethical strategies set up online and its meaning for the concerns of adults towards online risk as well as the need for policies on regulation and self-regulation. They also lead to extensions on the socialization to norms and the appropriation of ethics by young people.

  19. From SuperClusters to Browsers: Using Research Simulations in Informal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold, J.; Dusenbery, P. B.

    2001-12-01

    As research fields push forward, continually creating more sophisticated and computationally intensive simulations, it can be forgotten that older modeling approaches can play a valuable role in educating the public. The bleeding edge simulation of a decade ago that ran only on supercomputers can now run from a browser window, giving non-scientists insights into physical systems as well as insights into how science is done. This translation from research to education is not always practical: many approaches are too abstract or not sufficiently "bullet proof" to be used in this way. But at their best, simulations can help create inquiry-based environments that allow the public to "do science" without needing to mastering the underlying mathematics. This approach is illustrated by a project funded by a small grant from NSF ISE through a program that provides education supplements to existing research awards. The project is a cooperative one that includes research scientists as well as professional educators. Using techniques adapted from a magnetospheric research program, applets are being built that allow web site visitors to explore the motion of particles in the Earth's magnetosphere. In order to maximize the impact of the program, the web pages will be linked to the Space Science Institute's Space Weather Center, a larger Space Weather outreach program that can provide background and context for the simulations. The scientists provide the technical expertise to re-implement the simulation in Java, so that it can be run over the web. The educators provide insight into how to identify specific learning goals, and how to accomplish those goals in an inquiry-based way using the web. We will describe some of the learning goals for the applets, as well as the approximations and compromises that need to be made to balance simulation accuracy with general public accessibility.

  20. Comparative study of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy and nutritional support in patients with different types of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrañaga, Alejandra; Fluiters, Enrique; Docet, María F; Fernández Sastre, José Luis; García-Mayor, Ricardo V

    2014-09-09

    There are several psychological approaches to treat ED with efficacy being revealed by empirical research; however none of them are universally accepted. The objective was to compare response to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in patients with different clinical forms of Eating Disorders. Seventy-four patients diagnosed with eating disorders, 32 with Anorexia nervosa (AN), 19 with Bulimia nervosa (BN) and 23 with Eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS) were included. This is a prospective and comparative study. Patients were treated by psychotherapy, nutritional treatment and pharmacotherapy. The recovery rates in the groups of patients with AN, BN and EDNOS were 14 (43.7%), 8 (42.1%), 10 (43.4%), respectively, p>0.05. The rates of improvement were 14 (43.7%), 10 (52.6%), 12 (52.1%) for AN, BN and EDNOS, respectively, p>0.05. Finally, the rate of patients who had poor outcome were 3 (9.3%), 1 (5.2%), and 1 (4.3%), p>0.05, for AN, BN, and EDNOS, respectively. Cox regression analysis showed that the age of disease onset and no use of psychotropic drugs predicted a good response in patients with ED. The treatment response to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, nutritional support and psychotropic drugs in the majority of patients was favorable and similar in most patients with different types of Eating Disorders. Furthermore, a young age and no use of psychotropic drugs predict a favorable outcome in patients with ED. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Global Command and Control System (GCCS). Mobile Code Security Policy Guidance For Browser Script Software Development (JavaScript, JScript, VBScript)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    .... Hence, Web access, and the browsers that implement that access, must be closely monitored and guarded against both intentional and unintentional disclosure, alteration, and/or destruction of information...

  2. A New Browser-based, Ontology-driven Tool for Generating Standardized, Deep Descriptions of Geoscience Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, S. D.; Kelbert, A.; Rudan, S.; Stoica, M.

    2016-12-01

    Standardized metadata for models is the key to reliable and greatly simplified coupling in model coupling frameworks like CSDMS (Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System). This model metadata also helps model users to understand the important details that underpin computational models and to compare the capabilities of different models. These details include simplifying assumptions on the physics, governing equations and the numerical methods used to solve them, discretization of space (the grid) and time (the time-stepping scheme), state variables (input or output), model configuration parameters. This kind of metadata provides a "deep description" of a computational model that goes well beyond other types of metadata (e.g. author, purpose, scientific domain, programming language, digital rights, provenance, execution) and captures the science that underpins a model. While having this kind of standardized metadata for each model in a repository opens up a wide range of exciting possibilities, it is difficult to collect this information and a carefully conceived "data model" or schema is needed to store it. Automated harvesting and scraping methods can provide some useful information, but they often result in metadata that is inaccurate or incomplete, and this is not sufficient to enable the desired capabilities. In order to address this problem, we have developed a browser-based tool called the MCM Tool (Model Component Metadata) which runs on notebooks, tablets and smart phones. This tool was partially inspired by the TurboTax software, which greatly simplifies the necessary task of preparing tax documents. It allows a model developer or advanced user to provide a standardized, deep description of a computational geoscience model, including hydrologic models. Under the hood, the tool uses a new ontology for models built on the CSDMS Standard Names, expressed as a collection of RDF files (Resource Description Framework). This ontology is based on core concepts

  3. Comparative antitrypanosomal screening of methanolic extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative antitrypanosomal screening of methanolic extracts of khaya senegalensis and Moringa oleifera. ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information about how to print, ...

  4. Comparing artificial neural networks, general linear models and support vector machines in building predictive models for small interfering RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle A McQuisten

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exogenous short interfering RNAs (siRNAs induce a gene knockdown effect in cells by interacting with naturally occurring RNA processing machinery. However not all siRNAs induce this effect equally. Several heterogeneous kinds of machine learning techniques and feature sets have been applied to modeling siRNAs and their abilities to induce knockdown. There is some growing agreement to which techniques produce maximally predictive models and yet there is little consensus for methods to compare among predictive models. Also, there are few comparative studies that address what the effect of choosing learning technique, feature set or cross validation approach has on finding and discriminating among predictive models. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three learning techniques were used to develop predictive models for effective siRNA sequences including Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs, General Linear Models (GLMs and Support Vector Machines (SVMs. Five feature mapping methods were also used to generate models of siRNA activities. The 2 factors of learning technique and feature mapping were evaluated by complete 3x5 factorial ANOVA. Overall, both learning techniques and feature mapping contributed significantly to the observed variance in predictive models, but to differing degrees for precision and accuracy as well as across different kinds and levels of model cross-validation. CONCLUSIONS: The methods presented here provide a robust statistical framework to compare among models developed under distinct learning techniques and feature sets for siRNAs. Further comparisons among current or future modeling approaches should apply these or other suitable statistically equivalent methods to critically evaluate the performance of proposed models. ANN and GLM techniques tend to be more sensitive to the inclusion of noisy features, but the SVM technique is more robust under large numbers of features for measures of model precision and accuracy. Features

  5. A Mobile Health Intervention Supporting Heart Failure Patients and Their Informal Caregivers: A Randomized Comparative Effectiveness Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, John D; Striplin, Dana; Marinec, Nicolle; Chen, Jenny; Trivedi, Ranak B; Aron, David C; Fisher, Lawrence; Aikens, James E

    2015-06-10

    Mobile health (mHealth) interventions may improve heart failure (HF) self-care, but standard models do not address informal caregivers' needs for information about the patient's status or how the caregiver can help. We evaluated mHealth support for caregivers of HF patients over and above the impact of a standard mHealth approach. We identified 331 HF patients from Department of Veterans Affairs outpatient clinics. All patients identified a "CarePartner" outside their household. Patients randomized to "standard mHealth" (n=165) received 12 months of weekly interactive voice response (IVR) calls including questions about their health and self-management. Based on patients' responses, they received tailored self-management advice, and their clinical team received structured fax alerts regarding serious health concerns. Patients randomized to "mHealth+CP" (n=166) received an identical intervention, but with automated emails sent to their CarePartner after each IVR call, including feedback about the patient's status and suggestions for how the CarePartner could support disease care. Self-care and symptoms were measured via 6- and 12-month telephone surveys with a research associate. Self-care and symptom data also were collected through the weekly IVR assessments. Participants were on average 67.8 years of age, 99% were male (329/331), 77% where white (255/331), and 59% were married (195/331). During 15,709 call-weeks of attempted IVR assessments, patients completed 90% of their calls with no difference in completion rates between arms. At both endpoints, composite quality of life scores were similar across arms. However, more mHealth+CP patients reported taking medications as prescribed at 6 months (8.8% more, 95% CI 1.2-16.5, P=.02) and 12 months (13.8% more, CI 3.7-23.8, Phealth during weekly IVR calls. Compared to a relatively intensive model of IVR monitoring, self-management assistance, and clinician alerts, a model including automated feedback to an informal

  6. Online emotional support delivered by trained volunteers: users' satisfaction and their perception of the service compared to psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumel, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Technology could answer the substantial need in human resources available for supporting those who suffer from mental illness, by providing scalable methods to train and engage non-professionals to those who need their support. 7 Cups of Tea (7COT) platform was chosen for this study, because it provides a good case study for examining this kind of solution. The aim of this paper was to provide empirical findings regarding users' satisfaction with online emotional support provided by trained volunteers and how it is perceived in comparison to psychotherapy. An online survey was conducted among a convenience sample of 7COT users. The findings showed high user satisfaction with the support provided by 7COT listeners and, on average, users who indicated to receive psychotherapy in their past marked the listeners' support to be as helpful as psychotherapy. Relating to psychotherapy and online emotional support advantages, different advantages were found. The findings suggest that receiving support from volunteers makes users feel that the support is more genuine. The paper provides preliminary evidence that people in emotional distress may find non-professionals support delivered through the use of technology to be helpful. Limitations and implications are discussed.

  7. Development of a user-friendly system for image processing of electron microscopy by integrating a web browser and PIONE with Eos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Takafumi; Yasunaga, Takuo

    2014-11-01

    need to provide common workspace for analysis because the client is physically separated from a server. We solved the file format problem by extension of rules of OptionControlFile of Eos. Furthermore, to solve workspace problems, we have developed two type of system. The first system is to use only local environments. The user runs a web server provided by Eos, access to a web client through a web browser, and manipulate the local files with GUI on the web browser. The second system is employing PIONE (Process-rule for Input/Output Negotiation Environment), which is our developing platform that works under heterogenic distributed environment. The users can put their resources, such as microscopic images, text files and so on, into the server-side environment supported by PIONE, and so experts can write PIONE rule definition, which defines a workflow of image processing. PIONE run each image processing on suitable computers, following the defined rule. PIONE has the ability of interactive manipulation, and user is able to try a command with various setting values. In this situation, we contribute to auto-generation of GUI for a PIONE workflow.As advanced functions, we have developed a module to log user actions. The logs include information such as setting values in image processing, procedure of commands and so on. If we use the logs effectively, we can get a lot of advantages. For example, when an expert may discover some know-how of image processing, other users can also share logs including his know-hows and so we may obtain recommendation workflow of image analysis, if we analyze logs. To implement social platform of image processing for electron microscopists, we have developed system infrastructure, as well. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The Pain Genes Database: An interactive web browser of pain-related transgenic knockout studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix-Fralish, Michael L; Ledoux, Jean B; Mogil, Jeffrey S

    2007-09-01

    The transgenic knockout mouse is one of the most important tools of modern biology, and commonly employed by pain researchers to examine the function of genes of interest. Over 400 papers, at a current rate of >60 papers per year, have been published to date describing a statistically significant behavioral pain "phenotype" resulting from the null mutation of a single gene. The standard literature review format is incapable of providing a sufficiently broad and up-to-date overview of the field. We have therefore constructed the Pain Genes Database, an interactive, web-based data browser designed to allow easy access to and analysis of the published pain-related phenotypes of mutant mice (over 200 different mutants at the date of submission). Manuscripts describing results of pain-relevant knockout studies were identified via Medline search. Manuscripts were included in the database if they described the testing of a spontaneous or genetically engineered mutant mouse with null expression of a single gene on a behavioral assay of acute or tonic nociception, injury- or stimulus-induced hypersensitivity (i.e., allodynia or hyperalgesia), or drug- or stress-induced inhibition of nociception (i.e., analgesia), and reported at least one statistically significant difference between the mutant mice and their simultaneously tested wildtype controls. The database features two levels of exploration, one allowing the identification of genes by name, acronym, genomic position or "summary" phenotype, and the other allowing in-depth browsing, paper-by-paper, of specific phenotypes and test parameters. Links to genetic databases and Medline abstracts are provided for each gene and paper. It is our intention to update the database continually based on weekly Medline searches. This database should provide pain researchers with a useful and easy-to-use tool for the generation of novel hypotheses regarding the roles of genes and their protein products in pain processing and modulation

  9. PGen: large-scale genomic variations analysis workflow and browser in SoyKB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Khan, Saad M; Wang, Juexin; Rynge, Mats; Zhang, Yuanxun; Zeng, Shuai; Chen, Shiyuan; Maldonado Dos Santos, Joao V; Valliyodan, Babu; Calyam, Prasad P; Merchant, Nirav; Nguyen, Henry T; Xu, Dong; Joshi, Trupti

    2016-10-06

    With the advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and significant reductions in sequencing costs, it is now possible to sequence large collections of germplasm in crops for detecting genome-scale genetic variations and to apply the knowledge towards improvements in traits. To efficiently facilitate large-scale NGS resequencing data analysis of genomic variations, we have developed "PGen", an integrated and optimized workflow using the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) high-performance computing (HPC) virtual system, iPlant cloud data storage resources and Pegasus workflow management system (Pegasus-WMS). The workflow allows users to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion-deletions (indels), perform SNP annotations and conduct copy number variation analyses on multiple resequencing datasets in a user-friendly and seamless way. We have developed both a Linux version in GitHub ( https://github.com/pegasus-isi/PGen-GenomicVariations-Workflow ) and a web-based implementation of the PGen workflow integrated within the Soybean Knowledge Base (SoyKB), ( http://soykb.org/Pegasus/index.php ). Using PGen, we identified 10,218,140 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1,398,982 indels from analysis of 106 soybean lines sequenced at 15X coverage. 297,245 non-synonymous SNPs and 3330 copy number variation (CNV) regions were identified from this analysis. SNPs identified using PGen from additional soybean resequencing projects adding to 500+ soybean germplasm lines in total have been integrated. These SNPs are being utilized for trait improvement using genotype to phenotype prediction approaches developed in-house. In order to browse and access NGS data easily, we have also developed an NGS resequencing data browser ( http://soykb.org/NGS_Resequence/NGS_index.php ) within SoyKB to provide easy access to SNP and downstream analysis results for soybean researchers. PGen workflow has been optimized for the most

  10. Tooth wear in captive giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis): mesowear analysis classifies free-ranging specimens as browsers but captive ones as grazers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, Marcus; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A; Brasch, Juliane; Castell, Johanna C; Kaiser, Thomas

    2007-09-01

    Captive giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) mostly do not attain the longevity possible for this species and frequently have problems associated with low energy intake and fat storage mobilization. Abnormal tooth wear has been among the causes suggested as an underlying problem. This study utilizes a tooth wear scoring method ("mesowear") primarily used in paleobiology. This scoring method was applied to museum specimens of free-ranging (n=20) and captive (n=41) giraffes. The scoring system allows for the differentiation between attrition--(typical for browsers, as browse contains little abrasive silica) and abrasion--(typical for grazers, as grass contains abrasive silica) dominated tooth wear. The dental wear pattern of the free-ranging population is dominated by attrition, resembles that previously published for free-ranging giraffe, and clusters within browsing herbivores in comparative analysis. In contrast, the wear pattern of the captive population is dominated by abrasion and clusters among grazing herbivores in comparative analyses. A potential explanation for this difference in tooth wear is likely related to the content of abrasive elements in zoo diets. Silica content (measured as acid insoluble ash) is low in browse and alfalfa. However, grass hay and the majority of pelleted compound feeds contain higher amounts of silica. It can be speculated that the abnormal wear pattern in captivity compromises tooth function in captive giraffe, with deleterious long-term consequences.

  11. A Comparative Study on Resilience, Perceived Social Support and Hopelessness Among Cancer Patients Treated with Curative and Palliative Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Somasundaram, Ravindran Ottilingam; Devamani, Kiran A

    2016-01-01

    Psychological distress is common among patients affected by cancer. In this study, we examined the relationship between resilience, social support, and hopelessness among cancer patients treated with curative and palliative care...

  12. A Comparative Study on Resilience, Perceived Social Support and Hopelessness Among Cancer Patients Treated with Curative and Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasundaram, Ravindran Ottilingam; Devamani, Kiran A

    2016-01-01

    Psychological distress is common among patients affected by cancer. In this study, we examined the relationship between resilience, social support, and hopelessness among cancer patients treated with curative and palliative care. Sixty cancer patients in the age range of 18-65 years were randomly selected and divided into two groups based on their treatment intent namely, curative care (n = 30) and palliative care (n = 30). Both groups were assessed by the following instruments: Bharathiar University Resilience Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and Beck Hopelessness Scale. Resilience was significantly associated with less hopelessness and higher levels of perceived social support. Cancer patients are found to be resilient, and the role of social support and hopelessness on promoting resilience cannot be ignored.

  13. Browser Based Platform in Maintaining Clinical Activities - Use of The iPads in Head and Neck Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W. Y.; Moore, J.; Quon, H.; Evans, K.; Sharabi, A.; Herman, J.; Hacker-Prietz, A.; McNutt, T.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Incompatibility between documentation and clinical workflow causes physician resistance in organized data collection, which in turn complicates the use of data in patient care improvement. To resolve the gap, we developed an iPad compatible in situ browser-based platform that integrates clinical activity with data collection and analysis presentation. The ability to perform in-clinic activities and monitor decision making using the iPad was evaluated. Methods: A browser-based platform that can exchange and present analysed data from the MOSAIQ database was developed in situ, the iPads were distributed in head and neck clinics to present the browser for clinical activities, data collection and assessment monitoring. Performance of the iPads for in-clinic activities was observed. Results: All in-clinic documentation activities can be performed without workstation computers. Accessing patient record and previous assessments was significantly faster without having to open the MOSAIQ application. Patient assessments can be completed with the physician facing the patient. Graphical presentation of toxicity progression and patient radiation plans to the patient can be performed in single interface without patient leaving the seating area. Updates in patient treatment status and medical history were presented in real time without having to move paper charts around. Conclusions: The iPad can be used in clinical activities independent of computer workstations. Improvements in clinical workflow can be critical in reducing physician resistance in data maintenance. Using the iPad in providing real-time quality monitoring is intuitive to both providers and patients.

  14. A Multimodal Evaluation of the Comparative Efficacy of Yoga Versus a Patient-Centered Support Group for Treating Chronic Pain in Gulf War Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AD AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0615 TITLE: A Multimodal Evaluation of the Comparative Efficacy of Yoga versus a Patient-Centered Support Group for...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 29 Sep 2014 - 28 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Multimodal Evaluation of the Comparative Efficacy of Yoga versus a

  15. PubMed-EX: a web browser extension to enhance PubMed search with text mining features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Dai, Hong-Jie; Lai, Po-Ting; Huang, Chi-Hsin

    2009-11-15

    PubMed-EX is a browser extension that marks up PubMed search results with additional text-mining information. PubMed-EX's page mark-up, which includes section categorization and gene/disease and relation mark-up, can help researchers to quickly focus on key terms and provide additional information on them. All text processing is performed server-side, freeing up user resources. PubMed-EX is freely available at http://bws.iis.sinica.edu.tw/PubMed-EX and http://iisr.cse.yzu.edu.tw:8000/PubMed-EX/.

  16. Google Earth as Geoscience Data Browser Project: Development of a Tool to Convert JAMSTEC Research Vessel Navigation Data to KML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Yamagishi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new system using Google Earth as a data browser to visualize navigation data obtained by JAMSTEC research vessels. An XML-based language called Keyhole Markup Language (KML is used to plot data on Google Earth. We developed a program, called a KML generator, to convert navigation data to KML. The generator enables us to quickly visualize on Google Earth the cruise track of any JAMSTEC vessel. The visualized image is a powerful tool for managing information on research cruises of various JAMSTEC vessels.

  17. pileup.js: a JavaScript library for interactive and in-browser visualization of genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderkam, Dan; Aksoy, B Arman; Hodes, Isaac; Perrone, Jaclyn; Hammerbacher, Jeff

    2016-08-01

    P: ileup.js is a new browser-based genome viewer. It is designed to facilitate the investigation of evidence for genomic variants within larger web applications. It takes advantage of recent developments in the JavaScript ecosystem to provide a modular, reliable and easily embedded library. The code and documentation for pileup.js is publicly available at https://github.com/hammerlab/pileup.js under the Apache 2.0 license. correspondence@hammerlab.org. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. The Yeast Gene Order Browser: combining curated homology and syntenic context reveals gene fate in polyploid species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Kevin P; Wolfe, Kenneth H

    2005-10-01

    We developed the Yeast Gene Order Browser (YGOB; http://wolfe.gen.tcd.ie/ygob) to facilitate visual comparisons and computational analysis of synteny relationships in yeasts. The data presented in YGOB, currently covering seven species, are based on sets of homologous genes that have been intensively manually curated based on both sequence similarity and genomic context (synteny). We reconciled different laboratories' lists of paralogous Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene pairs formed by genome duplication (ohnologs), and present near-exhaustive lists of the ohnolog pairs retained in S. cerevisiae (551, including 22 previously unidentified), Saccharomyces castellii (599), and Candida glabrata (404).

  19. Online decision support system for surface irrigation management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenchao; Cui, Yuanlai

    2017-04-01

    Irrigation has played an important role in agricultural production. Irrigation decision support system is developed for irrigation water management, which can raise irrigation efficiency with few added engineering services. An online irrigation decision support system (OIDSS), in consist of in-field sensors and central computer system, is designed for surface irrigation management in large irrigation district. Many functions have acquired in OIDSS, such as data acquisition and detection, real-time irrigation forecast, water allocation decision and irrigation information management. The OIDSS contains four parts: Data acquisition terminals, Web server, Client browser and Communication system. Data acquisition terminals are designed to measure paddy water level, soil water content in dry land, ponds water level, underground water level, and canals water level. A web server is responsible for collecting meteorological data, weather forecast data, the real-time field data, and manager's feedback data. Water allocation decisions are made in the web server. Client browser is responsible for friendly displaying, interacting with managers, and collecting managers' irrigation intention. Communication system includes internet and the GPRS network used by monitoring stations. The OIDSS's model is based on water balance approach for both lowland paddy and upland crops. Considering basic database of different crops water demands in the whole growth stages and irrigation system engineering information, the OIDSS can make efficient decision of water allocation with the help of real-time field water detection and weather forecast. This system uses technical methods to reduce requirements of user's specialized knowledge and can also take user's managerial experience into account. As the system is developed by the Browser/Server model, it is possible to make full use of the internet resources, to facilitate users at any place where internet exists. The OIDSS has been applied in

  20. A systematic review of implant-supported overdentures in the edentulous maxilla, compared to the mandible : How many implants?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Slot, Jan; Huddleston Slater, James J.R.; Vissink, Arjan

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim: There is now overwhelming evidence from systematic reviews that a two-implant overdenture is the first choice of treatment for the edentulous mandible. Conversely, consensus is lacking for implant-supported maxillary overdentures. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the

  1. A comparative study on resilience, perceived social support and hopelessness among cancer patients treated with curative and palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Ravindran Ottilingam Somasundaram; Devamani, Kiran A

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Psychological distress is common among patients affected by cancer. In this study, we examined the relationship between resilience, social support, and hopelessness among cancer patients treated with curative and palliative care. Patients and Methods: Sixty cancer patients in the age range of 18?65 years were randomly selected and divided into two groups based on their treatment intent namely, curative care (n = 30) and palliative care (n = 30). Both groups were assessed by the following...

  2. Self-management support to people with type 2 diabetes - a comparative study of Kaiser Permanente and the Danish Healthcare System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Michaela; Strandberg-Larsen, Martin; Frølich, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Self-management support is considered to be an essential part of diabetes care. However, the implementation of self-management support within healthcare settings has appeared to be challenging and there is increased interest in "real world" best practice examples to guide policy efforts. In order...... to explore how different approaches to diabetes care and differences in management structure influence the provision of SMS we selected two healthcare systems that have shown to be comparable in terms of budget, benefits and entitlements. We compared the extent of SMS provided and the self-management...

  3. Aquaporin-4 in Astroglial Cells in the CNS and Supporting Cells of Sensory Organs—A Comparative Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Gleiser

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The main water channel of the brain, aquaporin-4 (AQP4, is one of the classical water-specific aquaporins. It is expressed in many epithelial tissues in the basolateral membrane domain. It is present in the membranes of supporting cells in most sensory organs in a specifically adapted pattern: in the supporting cells of the olfactory mucosa, AQP4 occurs along the basolateral aspects, in mammalian retinal Müller cells it is highly polarized. In the cochlear epithelium of the inner ear, it is expressed basolaterally in some cells but strictly basally in others. Within the central nervous system, aquaporin-4 (AQP4 is expressed by cells of the astroglial family, more specifically, by astrocytes and ependymal cells. In the mammalian brain, AQP4 is located in high density in the membranes of astrocytic endfeet facing the pial surface and surrounding blood vessels. At these locations, AQP4 plays a role in the maintenance of ionic homeostasis and volume regulation. This highly polarized expression has not been observed in the brain of fish where astroglial cells have long processes and occur mostly as radial glial cells. In the brain of the zebrafish, AQP4 immunoreactivity is found along the radial extent of astroglial cells. This suggests that the polarized expression of AQP4 was not present at all stages of evolution. Thus, a polarized expression of AQP4 as part of a control mechanism for a stable ionic environment and water balanced occurred at several locations in supporting and glial cells during evolution. This initially basolateral membrane localization of AQP4 is shifted to highly polarized expression in astrocytic endfeet in the mammalian brain and serves as a part of the neurovascular unit to efficiently maintain homeostasis.

  4. Supporting Imagers' VOICE: A National Training Program in Comparative Effectiveness Research and Big Data Analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Stella K; Rawson, James V; Recht, Michael P

    2017-12-05

    Provided methodologic training, more imagers can contribute to the evidence basis on improved health outcomes and value in diagnostic imaging. The Value of Imaging Through Comparative Effectiveness Research Program was developed to provide hands-on, practical training in five core areas for comparative effectiveness and big biomedical data research: decision analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, evidence synthesis, big data principles, and applications of big data analytics. The program's mixed format consists of web-based modules for asynchronous learning as well as in-person sessions for practical skills and group discussion. Seven diagnostic radiology subspecialties and cardiology are represented in the first group of program participants, showing the collective potential for greater depth of comparative effectiveness research in the imaging community. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparing Two Diagnostic Procedures in Planning Dental Implants to Support a Mandibular Free-Ending Removable Partial Denture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Charlotte; Raghoebar, Gerry; Meijer, Henny J A; Schepers, Rutger; Cune, Marco S.

    Background: The use of a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for the preoperative implant planning is increasing. A clear guideline is needed in which cases of CBCT is essential. Purpose: In this study, two imaging modalities (panoramic radiograph and CBCT) are compared in preoperative implant

  6. Patient preference compared with random allocation in short-term psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy with indicated addition of pharmacotherapy for depression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van, H.L.; Dekker, J.J.M.; Koelen, J.; Kool, S.; Aalst, van G.; Hendriksen, I.J.M.; Peen, J.; Schoevers, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    Depressed patients randomized to psychotherapy were compared with those who had been chosen for psychotherapy in a treatment algorithm, including addition of an antidepressant in case of early nonresponse. There were no differences between randomized and by-preference patients at baseline in

  7. Comparative effectiveness of a serious game and an e-module to support patient safety knowledge and awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Dankbaar (Mary); O. Richters (Olivier); C.J. Kalkman (Cor); G. Prins (Gerrie); O.T.J. Ten Cate (Olle T. J.); J.J.G. van Merriënboer (Jeroen); S.C.E. Schuit (Stephanie)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Serious games have the potential to teach complex cognitive skills in an engaging way, at relatively low costs. Their flexibility in use and scalability makes them an attractive learning tool, but more research is needed on the effectiveness of serious games compared to more

  8. Comparative effectiveness of a serious game and an e-module to support patient safety knowledge and awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Dankbaar (Mary); O. Richters (Olivier); C.J. Kalkman (Cor); G. Prins (Gerrie); O.T.J. Ten Cate (Olle T. J.); J.J.G. van Merriënboer (Jeroen); S.C.E. Schuit (Stephanie)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Serious games have the potential to teach complex cognitive skills in an engaging way, at relatively low costs. Their flexibility in use and scalability makes them an attractive learning tool, but more research is needed on the effectiveness of serious games compared to more

  9. Supportive environments for physical activity, community action, and policy in 8 European Union Member States: Comparative analysis and specificities of context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruetten, A.; Frahsa, A.; Engbers, L.; Gusi, N.; Mota, J.; Pacenka, R.; Troelsen, J.; Vasickova, J.; Vuillemin, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: A multilevel theoretical framework of physical activity (PA) promotion that addresses supportive environments, PA behavior, community action, and PA promoting policies is related to research and development in an international comparative study. Methods: Most-different and most-similar

  10. The Emotional and Academic Consequences of Parental Conditional Regard: Comparing Conditional Positive Regard, Conditional Negative Regard, and Autonomy Support as Parenting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Guy; Assor, Avi; Niemiec, Christopher P.; Deci, Edward L.; Ryan, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    The authors conducted 2 studies of 9th-grade Israeli adolescents (169 in Study 1, 156 in Study 2) to compare the parenting practices of conditional positive regard, conditional negative regard, and autonomy support using data from multiple reporters. Two socialization domains were studied: emotion control and academics. Results were consistent…

  11. Superior Two-year Results of Externally Unsupported Polyester Compared to Supported Grafts in Above-knee Bypass Grafting : A Multicenter Randomised Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriens, B. H. R.; van Det, R. J.; Meerwaldt, R.; van der Palen, J.; Gerrits, D. G.; Zeebregts, C. J.; Geelkerken, R. H.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare externally supported thin wall knitted polyester (P-EXS) and externally unsupported thin wall knitted polyester (P-non-EXS) for above-knee (AK) femoro-popliteal bypass grafting. Design: A prospective multicenter randomised clinical trial. Material and

  12. Evaluation of outputs from a 'Sustainable Nutrient Management Decision Support System' (SNM-DSS) compared to farmer opinion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerebel, A.; Cassidy, R.; Jordan, P.; Holden, N. M.

    2012-04-01

    Eutrophication of both fresh and coastal water bodies is one of the greatest threats to water quality in Europe and other developed countries. Sources of pollution are multiple but agriculture is known to be a large contributor, due to farm nutrient management such as land spreading of fertilisers and their subsequent loss via overland flow to surface waters. The stringent targets set for compliance with the Water Framework Directive by 2015 have led to action by the Irish regulatory authorities to reduce risk and prevent further deterioration of water status. One step was to prohibit the spreading of fertilisers over the winter period, with closed periods in 3 zones based on annual rainfall statistics. While this calendar approach is supported by scientific evidence, its justification has been debated by the farming community. A consequence of the regulation has been the concentration of hazard on dates directly preceding and following the closed period when soils can be heavily loaded with organic slurries and manures. An alternative lies in a Sustainable Nutrient Management Decision Support System (SNM-DSS), which has been developed to predict optimum conditions for fertiliser application depending on real-time observations of soil and weather conditions. The Hybrid Soil Moisture Deficit (HSMD) model forms the basis of this system and is essential for defining the thresholds for optimum management. The model outputs were tested against field water content data (θ) and evaluated by comparison with farmer opinion over a 3-year period. Daily Soil Moisture Deficit (SMD) was calculated from weather data collected on 5 sites and θ was estimated using time domain Reflectometry probes on 10 fields (2 × 5 sites). The question "Can slurry be spread today?" was also answered on a daily basis by 6 farmers located at the instrumented sites and the responses were related to calculated SMD values. A significant relationship between SMD and θ for all test sites showed that

  13. Self-Management Support to People with Type 2 Diabetes - A comparative study of Kaiser Permanente and the Danish Healthcare System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiøtz Michaela

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-management support is considered to be an essential part of diabetes care. However, the implementation of self-management support within healthcare settings has appeared to be challenging and there is increased interest in “real world” best practice examples to guide policy efforts. In order to explore how different approaches to diabetes care and differences in management structure influence the provision of SMS we selected two healthcare systems that have shown to be comparable in terms of budget, benefits and entitlements. We compared the extent of SMS provided and the self-management behaviors of people living with diabetes in Kaiser Permanente (KP and the Danish Healthcare System (DHS. Methods Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data from a random sample of 2,536 individuals with DM from KP and the DHS in 2006–2007 to compare the level of SMS provided in the two systems and identify disparities associated with educational attainment. The response rates were 75 % in the DHS and 56 % in KP. After adjusting for gender, age, educational level, and HbA1c level, multiple linear regression analyses determined the level of SMS provided and identified disparities associated with educational attainment. Results Receipt of SMS varied substantially between the two systems. More people with diabetes in KP reported receiving all types of SMS and use of SMS tools compared to the DHS (p  Conclusions Despite better SMS support in KP compared to the DHS, self-management remains an under-supported area of care for people receiving care for diabetes in the two health systems. Our study thereby suggests opportunity for improvements especially within the Danish healthcare system and systems adopting similar SMS support strategies.

  14. Comparing the Effectiveness of a Clinical Registry and a Clinical Data Warehouse for Supporting Clinical Trial Recruitment: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chunhua; Bigger, J Thomas; Busacca, Linda; Wilcox, Adam; Getaneh, Asqual

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a case study comparing the relative efficiency of using a Diabetes Registry or a Clinical Data Warehouse to recruit participants for a diabetes clinical trial, TECOS. The Clinical Data Warehouse generated higher positive predictive accuracy (31% vs. 6.6%) and higher participant recruitment than the Registry (30 vs. 14 participants) in a shorter time period (59 vs. 74 working days). We identify important factors that increase clinical trial recruitment efficiency and lower cost. PMID:21347102

  15. Laparoscopic-guided compared to skilled instructor support for student rectal examination training using live horses in the veterinary curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, Rolfe M; Manchester, Alison C; Mohammed, Hussni O; Ortved, Kyla; Reesink, Heidi L; Schnabel, Lauren V; Lang, Hayley M; Scrivani, Peter V; Fubini, Susan L

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the veterinary student learning outcome of 2 methods of equine rectal examination training. Randomized prospective study. Veterinary students (3rd and 4th year; n = 40) and practicing equine veterinarians (n = 10). Year 1: Group 1 (n = 11) and Group 2 students (n = 10) received skilled instructor (SI) and laparoscopic-guidance (LG), respectively, during rectal exam instruction. All students were tested on rectal identification of 4 abdominal organs. Year 2: One group of students (n = 19) was trained and subsequently tested using each technique, first SI, followed by LG. Subjective evaluation of laparoscopy as a teaching tool was achieved with veterinary students and equine practitioners. A significantly greater percentage of students having LG compared to SI were able to correctly identify the left kidney (Year 1) and the spleen, cecum, and right ovary (Year 2). A significantly greater proportion of LG trained students in years 1 and 2 (100% and 95%, respectively) were also able to identify 75% of organs compared with SI (27% and 21%, respectively). Both students and veterinarians uniformly provided favorable feedback for LG in teaching rectal palpation skills. The LG method of equine rectal examination instruction resulted in improved learning for identification of several key abdominal organs compared with SI. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  16. Weight Loss Maintenance for 2 Years after a 6-Month Randomised Controlled Trial Comparing Education-Only and Group-Based Support in Japanese Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Nakata

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our previous study, a 6-month randomised controlled trial, demonstrated that a group-based support promoted weight loss as compared to an education-only intervention. The purpose of this study was to examine weight loss maintenance for 2 years. Methods: Originally, 188 overweight Japanese adults, aged 40-65 years, were randomly assigned to 3 groups: control, education-only or group-based support. After the 6-month intervention, 125 participants in the education-only and the group-based support groups were followed up for 2 years. The primary outcome was the amount of weight lost. The participants were retrospectively grouped into quartiles of percent weight loss for secondary analyses. Results: At the end of follow-up, the amount of weight lost in the education-only and the group-based support groups was the same (3.3 kg. Secondary analyses using data of those who completed the study (n = 100 revealed that the participants in the highest quartile of percent weight loss significantly increased their step counts and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity compared with the lowest quartile. No significant differences were observed in the energy intake among the four groups. Conclusion: The effects of group-based support disappear within 2 years. Increasing physical activity may be a crucial factor for successful maintenance of weight loss.

  17. 3Disease Browser: A Web server for integrating 3D genome and disease-associated chromosome rearrangement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruifeng; Liu, Yifang; Li, Tingting; Li, Cheng

    2016-10-13

    Chromosomal rearrangement (CR) events have been implicated in many tumor and non-tumor human diseases. CR events lead to their associated diseases by disrupting gene and protein structures. Also, they can lead to diseases through changes in chromosomal 3D structure and gene expression. In this study, we search for CR-associated diseases potentially caused by chromosomal 3D structure alteration by integrating Hi-C and ChIP-seq data. Our algorithm rediscovers experimentally verified disease-associated CRs (polydactyly diseases) that alter gene expression by disrupting chromosome 3D structure. Interestingly, we find that intellectual disability may be a candidate disease caused by 3D chromosome structure alteration. We also develop a Web server (3Disease Browser, http://3dgb.cbi.pku.edu.cn/disease/) for integrating and visualizing disease-associated CR events and chromosomal 3D structure.

  18. Desarrollo de un videojuego MMORPG de tipo browser-game (MMORPG: Massively Multiplayer Online Rol Playing Game)

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    El trabajo contiene el desarrollo de un videojuego del genero MMORPG de tipo browser game, que ofrezca interacción entre los jugadores, la herramienta se ejecutó a través de la metodología XP (Extreme Programing) sobre la cual fue implementada dentro de las fases de creación de este software, así mismo se utilizó como motor de bases de datos MySQL y como lenguaje de programación orientado a objetos Ruby, con el framework web Ruby On Rails el cual maneja el patrón de diseño MVC (Modelo Vista C...

  19. Topography Analysis and Visualization Software Supports a Guided Comparative Planetology Education Exhibit at the Smithsonian's Air and Space Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, J. H.; Masuoka, C. M.; Frey, H. V.; Keller, J.; Williams, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Planetary Geodynamics Laboratory (http://geodynamics.gsfc.nasa.gov) of NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center designed, produced and recently delivered a "museum-friendly" version of GRIDVIEW, a grid visualization and analysis application, to the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum where it will be used in a guided comparative planetology education exhibit. The software was designed to enable museum visitors to interact with the same Earth and Mars topographic data and tools typically used by planetary scientists, and experience the thrill of discovery while learning about the geologic differences between Earth and Mars.

  20. A Phylogenetic Comparative Study of Bantu Kinship Terminology Finds Limited Support for Its Co-Evolution with Social Organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Myrtille; Mace, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The classification of kin into structured groups is a diverse phenomenon which is ubiquitous in human culture. For populations which are organized into large agropastoral groupings of sedentary residence but not governed within the context of a centralised state, such as our study sample of 83 historical Bantu-speaking groups of sub-Saharan Africa, cultural kinship norms guide all aspects of everyday life and social organization. Such rules operate in part through the use of differing terminological referential systems of familial organization. Although the cross-cultural study of kinship terminology was foundational in Anthropology, few modern studies have made use of statistical advances to further our sparse understanding of the structuring and diversification of terminological systems of kinship over time. In this study we use Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods of phylogenetic comparison to investigate the evolution of Bantu kinship terminology and reconstruct the ancestral state and diversification of cousin terminology in this family of sub-Saharan ethnolinguistic groups. Using a phylogenetic tree of Bantu languages, we then test the prominent hypothesis that structured variation in systems of cousin terminology has co-evolved alongside adaptive change in patterns of descent organization, as well as rules of residence. We find limited support for this hypothesis, and argue that the shaping of systems of kinship terminology is a multifactorial process, concluding with possible avenues of future research.

  1. A Phylogenetic Comparative Study of Bantu Kinship Terminology Finds Limited Support for Its Co-Evolution with Social Organisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrtille Guillon

    Full Text Available The classification of kin into structured groups is a diverse phenomenon which is ubiquitous in human culture. For populations which are organized into large agropastoral groupings of sedentary residence but not governed within the context of a centralised state, such as our study sample of 83 historical Bantu-speaking groups of sub-Saharan Africa, cultural kinship norms guide all aspects of everyday life and social organization. Such rules operate in part through the use of differing terminological referential systems of familial organization. Although the cross-cultural study of kinship terminology was foundational in Anthropology, few modern studies have made use of statistical advances to further our sparse understanding of the structuring and diversification of terminological systems of kinship over time. In this study we use Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods of phylogenetic comparison to investigate the evolution of Bantu kinship terminology and reconstruct the ancestral state and diversification of cousin terminology in this family of sub-Saharan ethnolinguistic groups. Using a phylogenetic tree of Bantu languages, we then test the prominent hypothesis that structured variation in systems of cousin terminology has co-evolved alongside adaptive change in patterns of descent organization, as well as rules of residence. We find limited support for this hypothesis, and argue that the shaping of systems of kinship terminology is a multifactorial process, concluding with possible avenues of future research.

  2. A Phylogenetic Comparative Study of Bantu Kinship Terminology Finds Limited Support for Its Co-Evolution with Social Organisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Myrtille; Mace, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The classification of kin into structured groups is a diverse phenomenon which is ubiquitous in human culture. For populations which are organized into large agropastoral groupings of sedentary residence but not governed within the context of a centralised state, such as our study sample of 83 historical Bantu-speaking groups of sub-Saharan Africa, cultural kinship norms guide all aspects of everyday life and social organization. Such rules operate in part through the use of differing terminological referential systems of familial organization. Although the cross-cultural study of kinship terminology was foundational in Anthropology, few modern studies have made use of statistical advances to further our sparse understanding of the structuring and diversification of terminological systems of kinship over time. In this study we use Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods of phylogenetic comparison to investigate the evolution of Bantu kinship terminology and reconstruct the ancestral state and diversification of cousin terminology in this family of sub-Saharan ethnolinguistic groups. Using a phylogenetic tree of Bantu languages, we then test the prominent hypothesis that structured variation in systems of cousin terminology has co-evolved alongside adaptive change in patterns of descent organization, as well as rules of residence. We find limited support for this hypothesis, and argue that the shaping of systems of kinship terminology is a multifactorial process, concluding with possible avenues of future research. PMID:27008364

  3. Comparative analysis of speed's impact on muscle demands during partial body weight support motor-assisted elliptical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnfield, Judith M; Irons, Sonya L; Buster, Thad W; Taylor, Adam P; Hildner, Gretchen A; Shu, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with walking limitations often experience challenges engaging in functionally relevant exercise. An adapted elliptical trainer (motor to assist pedal movement, integrated body weight harness, ramps/stairs, and grab rails) has been developed to help individuals with physical disabilities and chronic conditions regain/retain walking capacity and fitness. However, limited published studies are available to guide therapeutic interventions. This repeated measures study examined the influence of motor-assisted elliptical training speed on lower extremity muscle demands at four body weight support (BWS) levels commonly used therapeutically for walking. Electromyography (EMG) and pedal trajectory data were recorded as ten individuals without known disability used the motor-assisted elliptical trainer at three speeds [20,40, 60 revolutions per minute (RPM)] during each BWS level (0%, 20%, 40%, 60%). Overall, the EMG activity (peak, mean, duration) in key stabilizer muscles (i.e., gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, vastus lateralis, medial gastrocnemius and soleus) recorded at 60 RPM exceeded those at 40 RPM, which were higher than values at 20 RPM in all but three situations (gluteus medius mean at 0% BWS, vastus lateralis mean at 20% BWS, soleus duration at 40% BWS); however, these differences did not always achieve statistical significance. Slower motor-assisted speeds can be used to accommodate weakness of gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, vastus lateralis, medial gastrocnemius and soleus. As strength improves, training at faster motor-assisted speeds may provide a means to progressively challenge key lower extremity stabilizers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prototype of Multifunctional Full-text Library in the Architecture Web-browser / Web-server / SQL-server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyapin, Sergey; Kukovyakin, Alexey

    Within the framework of the research program "Textaurus" an operational prototype of multifunctional library T-Libra v.4.1. has been created which makes it possible to carry out flexible parametrizable search within a full-text database. The information system is realized in the architecture Web-browser / Web-server / SQL-server. This allows to achieve an optimal combination of universality and efficiency of text processing, on the one hand, and convenience and minimization of expenses for an end user (due to applying of a standard Web-browser as a client application), on the other one. The following principles underlie the information system: a) multifunctionality, b) intelligence, c) multilingual primary texts and full-text searching, d) development of digital library (DL) by a user ("administrative client"), e) multi-platform working. A "library of concepts", i.e. a block of functional models of semantic (concept-oriented) searching, as well as a subsystem of parametrizable queries to a full-text database, which is closely connected with the "library", serve as a conceptual basis of multifunctionality and "intelligence" of the DL T-Libra v.4.1. An author's paragraph is a unit of full-text searching in the suggested technology. At that, the "logic" of an educational / scientific topic or a problem can be built in a multilevel flexible structure of a query and the "library of concepts", replenishable by the developers and experts. About 10 queries of various level of complexity and conceptuality are realized in the suggested version of the information system: from simple terminological searching (taking into account lexical and grammatical paradigms of Russian) to several kinds of explication of terminological fields and adjustable two-parameter thematic searching (a [set of terms] and a [distance between terms] within the limits of an author's paragraph are such parameters correspondingly).

  5. Adapting an existing visualization application for browser-based deployment: A case study from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Owen A.

    2013-02-01

    THOR, the Tool for High-resolution Observation Review, is a data viewer for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. THOR began as a desktop application, but now it can be accessed with a web browser, making THOR one of the first online tools for visualizing TRMM satellite data (http://pps.gsfc.nasa.gov/thor). In this effort, the reuse of the existing visualization code was maximized and the complexity of new code was minimized by avoiding unnecessary functionality, frameworks, or libraries. The simplicity of this approach makes it potentially attractive to researchers wishing to adapt their visualization applications for online deployment. To enable THOR to run within a web browser, three new pieces of code are written. First, the graphical user interface (GUI) of the desktop application is translated into HTML, JavaScript, and CSS. Second, a simple communication mechanism is developed over HTTP. Third, a virtual GUI is created on the server that interfaces with the image-generating routines of the existing desktop application so that these routines do not need to be modified for online use. While the basic functionality of THOR is now available online, prototyping is ongoing for enhanced 3D imaging and other aspects of both THOR Desktop and THOR Online. Because TRMM data products are complex and periodically reprocessed with improved algorithms, having a tool such as THOR is important to analysts at the Precipitation Processing System where the algorithms are tested and the products generated, stored, and distributed. Researchers also have found THOR useful for taking a first look at individual files before writing their own software to perform specialized calculations and analyses.

  6. An Equivalence Trial Comparing Instructor-Regulated With Directed Self-Regulated Mastery Learning of Advanced Cardiac Life Support Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Luke A; Donkers, Jeroen; Brydges, Ryan; Perelman, Vsevolod; Cavalcanti, Rodrigo B; Issenberg, S Barry

    2015-08-01

    Instructor-led simulation-based mastery learning of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) skills is an effective and focused approach to competency-based education. Directed self-regulated learning (DSRL) may be an effective and less resource-intensive way to teach ACLS skills. Forty first-year internal medicine residents were randomized to either simulation-based DSRL or simulation-based instructor-regulated learning (IRL) of ACLS skills using a mastery learning model. Residents in each intervention completed pretest, posttest, and retention test of their performance in leading an ACLS response to a simulated scenario. Performance tests were assessed using a standardized checklist. Residents in the DSRL intervention were provided assessment instruments, a debriefing guide, and scenario-specific teaching points, and they were permitted to access relevant online resources. Residents in the IRL intervention had access to the same materials; however, the teaching and debriefing were instructor led. Skills of both the IRL and DSRL interventions showed significant improvement after the intervention, with an average improvement on the posttest of 21.7%. After controlling for pretest score, there was no difference between intervention arms on the posttest [F(1,37) = 0.02, P = 0.94] and retention tests [F(1,17) = 1.43, P = 0.25]. Cost savings were realized in the DSRL intervention after the fourth group (16 residents) had completed each intervention, with an ongoing savings of $80 per resident. Using a simulation-based mastery learning model, we observed equivalence in learning of ACLS skills for the DSRL and IRL conditions, whereas DSRL was more cost effective.

  7. Fitness Parks: A Comparative Study of the Components of Jakarta-Manila Parks and their Responsiveness to Support Physical Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanoza, Franklin S., Jr.; Navarra, Nappy L.; Engg, D.

    2017-10-01

    Fitness has become more popular due to the cultural phenomenon that being fit can enhance one’s perception of beauty. The sprouting of various outlets for physical activity such as bodybuilding gyms that cater to weightlifting, outdoor group dance classes, sports camps and cause-oriented marathons can be noticed in numerous parts of the world. But slowly its concept, that being fit is a mere physical representation of beauty, is shifting into a more health-oriented consciousness. Annual reports have shown that coronary heart disease is still in the top rank of the death causes in the world. This information has led more people to protect their health through several lifestyle improvements, with regular exercise being one of these methods to achieve health goals. Its numerous benefits range from the lowering of blood pressure, heightened learning capacity to the improvement of mood. The health-rooted awareness of the need for physical activities to support one’s daily requirement has spread worldwide and has now been recognized by a lot of people. Parks are usually designed with amenities such as playgrounds, pathways and wide open spaces where people from all walks of life convene, interact with each other and do various physical activities. With this in mind, the capacity of parks to host such activities has to be studied to determine which components do people who engage in active healthy lifestyles find highly attractive and usable. An analysis of such could lead to effective space programming of our local neighborhood parks making it more perceptive to the physical needs of the people. Two major sports complexes from South East Asia have been used as case studies to assess the responsiveness of the locals to the amenities offered in each complex to address health goals. The comparison revealed that the Gelora Bung Karno Complex in Jakarta, Indonesia has more activity-oriented amenities and longer operating hours, making it more receptive to meet the

  8. Supporting data for comparative proteomic analysis of Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644 exposed to a sublethal concentration of nisin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendi Nishino Miyamoto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we provide the LC–MS/MS data from a comparative analysis of Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644 treated and non-treated with a sublethal concentration of nisin (10−3 mg/mL. Protein samples were analyzed by multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT approach, in an off-line configuration. The raw MS/MS data allowed the detection of 49,591 spectra which resulted in 576 protein identifications. After Scaffold validation, 179 proteins were identified with high confidence. A label-free quantitative analysis based of normalized spectral abundance factor (NSAF was used and 13 proteins were found differentially expressed between nisin-treated and non-treated cells. Gene ontology analysis of differentially expressed proteins revealed that most of them are correlated to metabolic process, oxidative stress response mechanisms and molecular binding. A detailed analysis and discussion of these data may be found in Miyamoto et al. [1].

  9. Supporting data for comparative proteomic analysis of Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644 exposed to a sublethal concentration of nisin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Kendi Nishino; Mariante Monteiro, Karina; da Silva Caumo, Karin; Rodrigues Lorenzatto, Karina; Bunselmeyer Ferreira, Henrique; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    Here we provide the LC–MS/MS data from a comparative analysis of Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644 treated and non-treated with a sublethal concentration of nisin (10−3 mg/mL). Protein samples were analyzed by multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) approach, in an off-line configuration. The raw MS/MS data allowed the detection of 49,591 spectra which resulted in 576 protein identifications. After Scaffold validation, 179 proteins were identified with high confidence. A label-free quantitative analysis based of normalized spectral abundance factor (NSAF) was used and 13 proteins were found differentially expressed between nisin-treated and non-treated cells. Gene ontology analysis of differentially expressed proteins revealed that most of them are correlated to metabolic process, oxidative stress response mechanisms and molecular binding. A detailed analysis and discussion of these data may be found in Miyamoto et al. [1]. PMID:26217729

  10. ComPAIR: A New Online Tool Using Adaptive Comparative Judgement to Support Learning with Peer Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany Potter

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Peer feedback is a useful strategy in teaching and learning, but its effectiveness particularly in introductory courses can be limited by the relative newness of students to both the body of knowledge upon which they are being asked to provide feedback and the skill set involved in providing good feedback. This paper applies a novel approach to facilitating novice feedback: making use of students’ inherent ability to compare. The ComPAIR application discussed in this article scaffolds peer feedback through comparisons, asking students to choose the “better” of two answers in a series of pairings offered in an engaging online context. In contrast to other peer-feedback approaches that seek to train novices to be able to provide expert feedback (such as calibrated peer review or to crowdsource grading, ComPAIR focuses upon the benefits to be gained from the critical process of comparison and ranking. The tool design is based on the longstanding psychological principle of comparative judgement, by which novices who may not yet have the compass to assess others’ work confidently can still rank content as “better” with accuracy. Data from 168 students in pilot studies in English, Physics and Math courses at the University of British Columbia are reviewed. Though the use of ComPAIR required little classroom time, students perceived this approach to increase their facility with course content, their ability assess their own work, and their capacity to provide feedback on the work of others in a collaborative learning environment.

  11. Mindfulness training alters emotional memory recall compared to active controls: support for an emotional information processing model of mindfulness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug eRoberts-Wolfe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: While mindfulness-based interventions have received widespread application in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the mechanism by which mindfulness meditation improves well-being remains elusive. One possibility is that mindfulness training alters the processing of emotional information, similar to prevailing cognitive models of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigating the effects of mindfulness training on emotional information processing (i.e. memory biases in relation to both clinical symptomatology and well-being in comparison to active control conditions.Methods: Fifty-eight university students (28 female, age = 20.1 ± 2.7 years participated in either a 12-week course containing a "meditation laboratory" or an active control course with similar content or experiential practice laboratory format (music. Participants completed an emotional word recall task and self-report questionnaires of well-being and clinical symptoms before and after the 12-week course.Results: Meditators showed greater increases in positive word recall compared to controls F(1, 56 = 6.6, p = .02. The meditation group increased significantly more on measures of well-being [F(1, 56 = 6.6, p = .01], with a marginal decrease in depression and anxiety [(F(1, 56 = 3.0, p = .09] compared to controls. Increased positive word recall was associated with increased psychological well-being [r = 0.31, p = .02] and decreased clinical symptoms [r = -0.29, p = .03].Conclusion: Mindfulness training was associated with greater improvements in processing efficiency for positively valenced stimuli than active control conditions. This change in emotional information processing was associated with improvements in psychological well-being and less depression and anxiety. These data suggest that mindfulness training may improve well-being via changes in emotional information processing.

  12. A national action plan for sharable and comparable nursing data to support practice and translational research for transforming health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Bonnie L; Latimer, Gail E; Matney, Susan A; Park, Jung In; Sensmeier, Joyce; Simpson, Roy L; Swanson, Mary Jo; Warren, Judith J; Delaney, Connie W

    2015-05-01

    There is wide recognition that, with the rapid implementation of electronic health records (EHRs), large data sets are available for research. However, essential standardized nursing data are seldom integrated into EHRs and clinical data repositories. There are many diverse activities that exist to implement standardized nursing languages in EHRs; however, these activities are not coordinated, resulting in duplicate efforts rather than building a shared learning environment and resources. The purpose of this paper is to describe the historical context of nursing terminologies, challenges to the use of nursing data for purposes other than documentation of care, and a national action plan for implementing and using sharable and comparable nursing data for quality reporting and translational research. In 2013 and 2014, the University of Minnesota School of Nursing hosted a diverse group of nurses to participate in the Nursing Knowledge: Big Data and Science to Transform Health Care consensus conferences. This consensus conference was held to develop a national action plan and harmonize existing and new efforts of multiple individuals and organizations to expedite integration of standardized nursing data within EHRs and ensure their availability in clinical data repositories for secondary use. This harmonization will address the implementation of standardized nursing terminologies and subsequent access to and use of clinical nursing data. Foundational to integrating nursing data into clinical data repositories for big data and science, is the implementation of standardized nursing terminologies, common data models, and information structures within EHRs. The 2014 National Action Plan for Sharable and Comparable Nursing Data for Transforming Health and Healthcare builds on and leverages existing, but separate long standing efforts of many individuals and organizations. The plan is action focused, with accountability for coordinating and tracking progress designated

  13. Mindfulness training alters emotional memory recall compared to active controls: support for an emotional information processing model of mindfulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Wolfe, Douglas; Sacchet, Matthew D; Hastings, Elizabeth; Roth, Harold; Britton, Willoughby

    2012-01-01

    While mindfulness-based interventions have received widespread application in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the mechanism by which mindfulness meditation improves well-being remains elusive. One possibility is that mindfulness training alters the processing of emotional information, similar to prevailing cognitive models of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mindfulness training on emotional information processing (i.e., memory) biases in relation to both clinical symptomatology and well-being in comparison to active control conditions. Fifty-eight university students (28 female, age = 20.1 ± 2.7 years) participated in either a 12-week course containing a "meditation laboratory" or an active control course with similar content or experiential practice laboratory format (music). Participants completed an emotional word recall task and self-report questionnaires of well-being and clinical symptoms before and after the 12-week course. Meditators showed greater increases in positive word recall compared to controls [F(1, 56) = 6.6, p = 0.02]. The meditation group increased significantly more on measures of well-being [F(1, 56) = 6.6, p = 0.01], with a marginal decrease in depression and anxiety [F(1, 56) = 3.0, p = 0.09] compared to controls. Increased positive word recall was associated with increased psychological well-being (r = 0.31, p = 0.02) and decreased clinical symptoms (r = -0.29, p = 0.03). Mindfulness training was associated with greater improvements in processing efficiency for positively valenced stimuli than active control conditions. This change in emotional information processing was associated with improvements in psychological well-being and less depression and anxiety. These data suggest that mindfulness training may improve well-being via changes in emotional information processing. Future research with a fully randomized design will be

  14. Comparative effectiveness of a serious game and an e-module to support patient safety knowledge and awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankbaar, Mary E W; Richters, Olivier; Kalkman, Cor J; Prins, Gerrie; Ten Cate, Olle T J; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J G; Schuit, Stephanie C E

    2017-02-02

    Serious games have the potential to teach complex cognitive skills in an engaging way, at relatively low costs. Their flexibility in use and scalability makes them an attractive learning tool, but more research is needed on the effectiveness of serious games compared to more traditional formats such e-modules. We investigated whether undergraduate medical students developed better knowledge and awareness and were more motivated after learning about patient-safety through a serious game than peers who studied the same topics using an e-module. Fourth-year medical students were randomly assigned to either a serious game that included video-lectures, biofeedback exercises and patient missions (n = 32) or an e-module, that included text-based lectures on the same topics (n = 34). A third group acted as a historical control-group without extra education (n = 37). After the intervention, which took place during the clinical introduction course, before the start of the first rotation, all students completed a knowledge test, a self-efficacy test and a motivation questionnaire. During the following 10-week clinical rotation they filled out weekly questionnaires on patient-safety awareness and stress. The results showed patient safety knowledge had equally improved in the game group and e-module group compared to controls, who received no extra education. Average learning-time was 3 h for the game and 1 h for the e-module-group. The serious game was evaluated as more engaging; the e-module as more easy to use. During rotations, students in the three groups reported low and similar levels of patient-safety awareness and stress. Students who had treated patients successfully during game missions experienced higher self-efficacy and less stress during their rotation than students who treated patients unsuccessfully. Video-lectures (in a game) and text-based lectures (in an e-module) can be equally effective in developing knowledge on specific topics. Although

  15. A comparative analysis of returns of various financial asset classes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative analysis of returns of various financial asset classes in South Africa: a triumph of bonds? ... Southern African Business Review ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in ...

  16. Knowledge-based systems as decision support tools in an ecosystem approach to fisheries: Comparing a fuzzy-logic and rule-based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarre, Astrid; Paterson, B.; Moloney, C.L.

    2008-01-01

    rule-based Boolean and fuzzy-logic models have been used successfully as knowledge-based decision support tools. This study compares two such systems relevant to fisheries management in an EAF developed for the southern Benguela. The first is a rule-based system for the prediction of anchovy...... recruitment and the second is a fuzzy-logic tool to monitor implementation of an EAF in the sardine fishery. We construct a fuzzy-logic counterpart to the rule-based model, and a rule-based counterpart to the fuzzy-logic model, compare their results, and include feedback from potential users of these two...... decision support tools in our evaluation of the two approaches. With respect to the model objectives, no method clearly outperformed the other. The advantages of numerically processing continuous variables, and interpreting the final output. as in fuzzy-logic models, can be weighed up against...

  17. How robust is a robust policy? A comparative analysis of alternative robustness metrics for supporting robust decision analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakkel, Jan; Haasnoot, Marjolijn

    2015-04-01

    In response to climate and socio-economic change, in various policy domains there is increasingly a call for robust plans or policies. That is, plans or policies that performs well in a very large range of plausible futures. In the literature, a wide range of alternative robustness metrics can be found. The relative merit of these alternative conceptualizations of robustness has, however, received less attention. Evidently, different robustness metrics can result in different plans or policies being adopted. This paper investigates the consequences of several robustness metrics on decision making, illustrated here by the design of a flood risk management plan. A fictitious case, inspired by a river reach in the Netherlands is used. The performance of this system in terms of casualties, damages, and costs for flood and damage mitigation actions is explored using a time horizon of 100 years, and accounting for uncertainties pertaining to climate change and land use change. A set of candidate policy options is specified up front. This set of options includes dike raising, dike strengthening, creating more space for the river, and flood proof building and evacuation options. The overarching aim is to design an effective flood risk mitigation strategy that is designed from the outset to be adapted over time in response to how the future actually unfolds. To this end, the plan will be based on the dynamic adaptive policy pathway approach (Haasnoot, Kwakkel et al. 2013) being used in the Dutch Delta Program. The policy problem is formulated as a multi-objective robust optimization problem (Kwakkel, Haasnoot et al. 2014). We solve the multi-objective robust optimization problem using several alternative robustness metrics, including both satisficing robustness metrics and regret based robustness metrics. Satisficing robustness metrics focus on the performance of candidate plans across a large ensemble of plausible futures. Regret based robustness metrics compare the

  18. Benchmarking Web-testing - Selenium versus Watir and the Choice of Programming Language and Browser

    OpenAIRE

    Kuutila, Miikka; Mäntylä, Mika; Raulamo-Jurvanen, Päivi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Selenium is claimed to be the most popular software test automation tool. Past academic works have mainly neglected testing tools in favor of more methodological topics. Objective: We investigated the performance of web-testing tools, to provide empirical evidence supporting choices in software test tool selection and configuration. Method: We used 4*5 factorial design to study 20 different configurations for testing a web-store. We studied 5 programming language bindings (C#, Java, ...

  19. A randomized pilot study comparing the role of PEEP, O2flow, and high-flow air for weaning of ventilatory support in very low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chang-Yo; Yang, Mei-Chin; Chu, Shih-Ming; Chiang, Ming-Chou; Lien, Reyin

    2017-09-06

    There is a lack of evidence to guide step-wise weaning of positive pressure respiratory support for premature infants. This study sought to compare the efficacy of three weaning protocols we designed to facilitate weaning of very low birth weight (VLBW, less than 1500 g) preterm infants from nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) support. This was a prospective, randomized, controlled trial of VLBW preterm infants who received positive pressure ventilatory support in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) from April 2008 through March 2009. When these infants were weaned to CPAP as their last step of respiratory support, they would be randomly assigned to one of the following three groups as their further weaning methods (M): (M1) CPAP group, (M2) O 2 flow group, and (M3) air flow group. The time period they needed to wean off any kind of respiratory support, as well as the likelihood of developing relevant prematurity related morbidities, were compared among patients using different weaning modalities. 181 patients were enrolled in the study. Their gestational age (GA) and birth weight (BW) were 29.1 ± 2.5, 28.7 ± 2.4, 28.7 ± 2.4 (mean ± SD) weeks and 1142 ± 232, 1099 ± 234, 1083 ± 219 g, in M1, M2 and M3, respectively. The time (period) needed to wean off support was 16.0 ± 10.0 days (M1), 11.6 ± 6.4 days (M2), and 15.0 ± 8.9 days (M3), respectively (p = .033). Incidence of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) were both significantly higher in the O 2 flow group (p = .048). Although using low oxygen flow significantly shortens CPAP weaning time, it may increase risks of BPD and ROP, both known to be related to oxygen toxicity. Unless the infant has BPD and is O 2 -dependent, clinicians should consider using air flow or just splinting with no support at all when weaning NCPAP. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. A comparative study of alumina-supported Ni catalysts prepared by photodeposition and impregnation methods on the catalytic ozonation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Julia L., E-mail: ozliliana@yahoo.com.mx [Lab. Ing. Química Ambiental. ESIQIE–Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Mexico); Valenzuela, Miguel A. [Lab.Catálisis y Materiales. ESIQIE–Instituto Politécnico Nacional. Zacatenco (Mexico); Tiznado, Hugo [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología. CNyN Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico); Poznyak, Tatiana [Lab. Ing. Química Ambiental. ESIQIE–Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Mexico); Chairez, Isaac [Departamento de Bioprocesos, UPIBI- Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Mexico); Magallanes, Diana [Lab. Ing. Química Ambiental. ESIQIE–Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Mexico)

    2017-02-15

    The heterogeneous catalytic ozonation on unsupported and supported oxides has been successfully tested for the removal of several refractory compounds in aqueous solution. In this work, alumina-supported nickel catalysts prepared by photodeposition and impregnation methods were compared in the catalytic ozonation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). The catalysts were characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photochemical decomposition of Ni acetylacetonate to produce Ni(OH){sub 2}, NiO, and traces of Ni° deposited on alumina was achieved in the presence of benzophenone as a sensitizer. A similar surface composition was found with the impregnated catalyst after its reduction with hydrogen at 500 °C and exposed to ambient air. Results indicated a higher initial activity and maleic acid (byproduct) concentration with the photodeposited catalyst (1 wt% Ni) compared to the impregnated catalyst (3 wt% Ni). These findings suggest the use of the photodeposition method as a simple and reliable procedure for the preparation of supported metal oxide/metal catalysts under mild operating conditions.

  1. Implant Supported Distal Extension over Denture Retained by Two Types of Attachments. A Comparative Radiographic Study by Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrous, Ahmed I; Aldawash, Hussien A; Soliman, Tarek A; Banasr, Fahad H; Abdelwahed, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to compare and evaluate the effect of two different attachments (locator attachment and ball and socket [B&S] attachment) on implants and natural abutments supporting structures, in cases of limited inter-arch spaces in mandibular Kennedy Class I implant supported removable partial over dentures by measuring the bone height changes through the cone beam radiographic technology. Materials and Methods: Two implants were positioned in the first or second molar area following the two-stage surgical protocol. Two equal groups were divided ten for each: Group I: Sides were the placed implants restored by the locator attachment. Group II: The other sides, implants were restored by B&S attachment. Evaluation of the implants and main abutments supporting structures of each group was done at the time of removable partial over denture insertion, 6, 12 and 18 months by measuring the bone height changes using cone beam computed tomography. Results: Implants with locator attachment showed marginal bone height better effects on implants and main abutments supporting structures. Conclusion: Implants restored by locator attachment shows better effects on bone of both main natural abutments and implant than those restored with ball and socket. PMID:26028894

  2. BorreliaBase: a phylogeny-centered browser of Borrelia genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Lia; Pagan, Pedro E; Packer, Daniel; Martin, Che L; Akther, Saymon; Ramrattan, Girish; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Fraser, Claire M; Schutzer, Steven E; Luft, Benjamin J; Casjens, Sherwood R; Qiu, Wei-Gang

    2014-07-03

    The bacterial genus Borrelia (phylum Spirochaetes) consists of two groups of pathogens represented respectively by B. burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme borreliosis, and B. hermsii, the agent of tick-borne relapsing fever. The number of publicly available Borrelia genomic sequences is growing rapidly with the discovery and sequencing of Borrelia strains worldwide. There is however a lack of dedicated online databases to facilitate comparative analyses of Borrelia genomes. We have developed BorreliaBase, an online database for comparative browsing of Borrelia genomes. The database is currently populated with sequences from 35 genomes of eight Lyme-borreliosis (LB) group Borrelia species and 7 Relapsing-fever (RF) group Borrelia species. Distinct from genome repositories and aggregator databases, BorreliaBase serves manually curated comparative-genomic data including genome-based phylogeny, genome synteny, and sequence alignments of orthologous genes and intergenic spacers. With a genome phylogeny at its center, BorreliaBase allows online identification of hypervariable lipoprotein genes, potential regulatory elements, and recombination footprints by providing evolution-based expectations of sequence variability at each genomic locus. The phylo-centric design of BorreliaBase (http://borreliabase.org) is a novel model for interactive browsing and comparative analysis of bacterial genomes online.

  3. Remote Mobile Health Monitoring System Based on Smart Phone and Browser/Server Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhou Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A remote mobile health monitoring system with mobile phone and web service capabilities is proposed in this paper. It provides an end-to-end solution; specifically, (1 physiologic parameters, including respiration rate and heart rate, are measured by wearable sensors and recorded by a mobile phone which presents the graphical interface for the user to observe his/her health status more easily; (2 it provides doctors and family members with necessary data through a web interface and enables authorized personnel to monitor the patient’s condition and to facilitate remote diagnosis; and (3 it supports real-time alarming and positioning services during an urgent situation, such as a tumble or a heart attack, so that unexpected events can be handled in a timely manner. Experimental results show that the proposed system can reliably monitor the physiologic parameters and conveniently report the user’s position.

  4. Remote Mobile Health Monitoring System Based on Smart Phone and Browser/Server Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunzhou; Liu, Huiyu; Su, Xiaolin; Jiang, Pei; Wei, Dongfei

    2015-01-01

    A remote mobile health monitoring system with mobile phone and web service capabilities is proposed in this paper. It provides an end-to-end solution; specifically, (1) physiologic parameters, including respiration rate and heart rate, are measured by wearable sensors and recorded by a mobile phone which presents the graphical interface for the user to observe his/her health status more easily; (2) it provides doctors and family members with necessary data through a web interface and enables authorized personnel to monitor the patient's condition and to facilitate remote diagnosis; and (3) it supports real-time alarming and positioning services during an urgent situation, such as a tumble or a heart attack, so that unexpected events can be handled in a timely manner. Experimental results show that the proposed system can reliably monitor the physiologic parameters and conveniently report the user's position.

  5. Comparing the Distance Learning-Related Course Development Approach and Faculty Support and Rewards Structure at AACSB Accredited Institutions between 2001 and 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Perreault, Ed.D.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The study compared the support and rewards provided faculty members for online course teaching and the development approaches used at business schools accredited by AACSB between 2001 and 2006. Data were collected from 81 professors in 2001 and 140 professors in 2006. The professors were involved in developing or teaching online courses at AACSB business schools across the United States. The findings indicate that faculty members received limited support and are not taking advantage of training options. Faculty members are most likely rewarded for their involvement in distance learning through stipends based on the number of online sections taught. Little has changed during the five-year period in regards to course development. Faculty members continue to use an individual instead of a team approach to course development and most faculty members learned online course development and delivery techniques on their own.

  6. Exploring the Support Needs of Family Caregivers of Patients with Brain Cancer Using the CSNAT: A Comparative Study with Other Cancer Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, Samar M.; Deas, Kathleen; Howting, Denise; Lee, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    A substantial burden is placed on family caregivers of patients diagnosed with brain cancers. Despite this, the support needs of the caregivers are often under-recognised and not addressed adequately in current routine and patient centred clinical care. The Care Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) is a validated instrument designed to systematically identify and address caregiver needs. It has been trialled in an Australian palliative care community setting using a stepped wedge cluster design involving 322 family carers of terminally ill patients. The current article reports on a subset from this trial, 29 caregivers of patients with primary brain cancer, and compares their profile and outcomes to those of other cancer groups. Caregiver strain was assessed using the Family Appraisal of Caregiving Questionnaire, caregiver physical and mental wellbeing using SF12 and caregiver workload using a questionnaire on support with activities of daily living (ADL). In comparison to caregivers of patients with all other cancers, the primary brain cancer group had significantly higher levels of caregiver strain, lower levels of mental wellbeing and a higher level of ADL workload. Their physical wellness also deteriorated significantly over time. An action plan approach led to practical solutions for addressing highlighted concerns. Four themes evolved from the family caregivers’ feedback interviews: The extremely challenging caregiver experience with brain cancer; the systematic and practical approach of the CSNAT during rapid changes; connection with health professionals, feeling acknowledged and empowered; and timely advice and assurance of support during the caregiving journey. This preliminary study has demonstrated that the CSNAT provides a practical and useful tool for assessing the support needs of family caregivers of patients with brain cancer and has provided the basis for a larger scale, longitudinal study that allows a more detailed characterisation of the

  7. LINCS Canvas Browser: interactive web app to query, browse and interrogate LINCS L1000 gene expression signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Qiaonan; Flynn, Corey; Niepel, Mario; Hafner, Marc; Muhlich, Jeremy L; Fernandez, Nicolas F; Rouillard, Andrew D; Tan, Christopher M; Chen, Edward Y; Golub, Todd R; Sorger, Peter K; Subramanian, Aravind; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2014-07-01

    For the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) project many gene expression signatures using the L1000 technology have been produced. The L1000 technology is a cost-effective method to profile gene expression in large scale. LINCS Canvas Browser (LCB) is an interactive HTML5 web-based software application that facilitates querying, browsing and interrogating many of the currently available LINCS L1000 data. LCB implements two compacted layered canvases, one to visualize clustered L1000 expression data, and the other to display enrichment analysis results using 30 different gene set libraries. Clicking on an experimental condition highlights gene-sets enriched for the differentially expressed genes from the selected experiment. A search interface allows users to input gene lists and query them against over 100 000 conditions to find the top matching experiments. The tool integrates many resources for an unprecedented potential for new discoveries in systems biology and systems pharmacology. The LCB application is available at http://www.maayanlab.net/LINCS/LCB. Customized versions will be made part of the http://lincscloud.org and http://lincs.hms.harvard.edu websites. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Cistrome Data Browser: a data portal for ChIP-Seq and chromatin accessibility data in human and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Shenglin; Qin, Qian; Wu, Qiu; Sun, Hanfei; Zheng, Rongbin; Zang, Chongzhi; Zhu, Muyuan; Wu, Jiaxin; Shi, Xiaohui; Taing, Len; Liu, Tao; Brown, Myles; Meyer, Clifford A; Liu, X Shirley

    2017-01-04

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation, DNase I hypersensitivity and transposase-accessibility assays combined with high-throughput sequencing enable the genome-wide study of chromatin dynamics, transcription factor binding and gene regulation. Although rapidly accumulating publicly available ChIP-seq, DNase-seq and ATAC-seq data are a valuable resource for the systematic investigation of gene regulation processes, a lack of standardized curation, quality control and analysis procedures have hindered extensive reuse of these data. To overcome this challenge, we built the Cistrome database, a collection of ChIP-seq and chromatin accessibility data (DNase-seq and ATAC-seq) published before January 1, 2016, including 13 366 human and 9953 mouse samples. All the data have been carefully curated and processed with a streamlined analysis pipeline and evaluated with comprehensive quality control metrics. We have also created a user-friendly web server for data query, exploration and visualization. The resulting Cistrome DB (Cistrome Data Browser), available online at http://cistrome.org/db, is expected to become a valuable resource for transcriptional and epigenetic regulation studies. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Translating person-centered care into practice: A comparative analysis of motivational interviewing, illness-integration support, and guided self-determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoffmann, Vibeke; Hörnsten, Åsa; Storbækken, Solveig; Graue, Marit; Rasmussen, Bodil; Wahl, Astrid; Kirkevold, Marit

    2016-03-01

    Person-centred care [PCC] can engage people in living well with a chronic condition. However, translating PCC into practice is challenging. We aimed to compare the translational potentials of three approaches: motivational interviewing [MI], illness integration support [IIS] and guided self-determination [GSD]. Comparative analysis included eight components: (1) philosophical origin; (2) development in original clinical setting; (3) theoretical underpinnings; (4) overarching goal and supportive processes; (5) general principles, strategies or tools for engaging peoples; (6) health care professionals' background and training; (7) fidelity assessment; (8) reported effects. Although all approaches promoted autonomous motivation, they differed in other ways. Their original settings explain why IIS and GSD strive for life-illness integration, whereas MI focuses on managing ambivalence. IIS and GSD were based on grounded theories, and MI was intuitively developed. All apply processes and strategies to advance professionals' communication skills and engagement; GSD includes context-specific reflection sheets. All offer training programs; MI and GSD include fidelity tools. Each approach has a primary application: MI, when ambivalence threatens positive change; IIS, when integrating newly diagnosed chronic conditions; and GSD, when problem solving is difficult, or deadlocked. Professionals must critically consider the context in their choice of approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Internet-Based Delivery of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Compared to Monitoring, Feedback and Support for Problem Gambling: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Leanne M; Oei, Tian P S; Raylu, Namrata; Horrigan, Katherine; Day, Jamin; Ireland, Michael; Clough, Bonnie A

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of an Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy program (I-CBT) for the treatment of problem gambling, when compared to a waitlist control and an active comparison condition consisting of monitoring, feedback, and support (I-MFS). Participants (N = 174) were randomly allocated to the three conditions. Variables of interest were gambling outcome and related mental health measures. Participants in the active conditions (I-CBT and I-MFS) completed six online modules. Both I-CBT and I-MFS conditions resulted in significant treatment gains on gambling severity. However, I-CBT was also associated with reductions in a range of other gambling-related and mental health outcomes. Compared with I-MFS, I-CBT produced greater effects across seven outcomes measures, relating to gambling urges, cognitions, stress, and life satisfaction. I-CBT participants also rated the program as significantly more satisfactory. Treatment gains observed for both active conditions were found to be stable through to 12 month follow up. The results indicate that the benefits of I-CBT were more than simply the non-specific effects of engaging in online treatment or receiving motivation, feedback, and support. Online treatments for gambling may be a valuable tool in increasing help-seeking and treatment engagement in this population, and be integrated as part of stepped care approaches to treatment.

  11. Translog, a web browser for studying the expression divergence of homologous genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xianjun; Akalin, Altuna; Sharma, Yogita; Lenhard, Boris

    2010-01-18

    Increasing amount of data from comparative genomics, and newly developed technologies producing accurate gene expression data facilitate the study of the expression divergence of homologous genes. Previous studies have individually highlighted factors that contribute to the expression divergence of duplicate genes, e.g. promoter changes, exon structure heterogeneity, asymmetric histone modifications and genomic neighborhood conservation. However, there is a lack of a tool to integrate multiple factors and visualize their variety among homologous genes in a straightforward way. We introduce Translog (a web-based tool for Transcriptome comparison of homologous genes) that assists in the comparison of homologous genes by displaying the loci in three different views: promoter view for studying the sharing/turnover of transcription initiations, exon structure for displaying the exon-intron structure changes, and genomic neighborhood to show the macro-synteny conservation in a larger scale. CAGE data for transcription initiation are mapped for each transcript and can be used to study transcription turnover and expression changes. Alignment anchors between homologous loci can be used to define the precise homologous transcripts. We demonstrate how these views can be used to visualize the changes of homologous genes during evolution, particularly after the 2R and 3R whole genome duplication. We have developed a web-based tool for assisting in the transcriptome comparison of homologous genes, facilitating the study of expression divergence.

  12. Hyperinvasive approach to out-of hospital cardiac arrest using mechanical chest compression device, prehospital intraarrest cooling, extracorporeal life support and early invasive assessment compared to standard of care. A randomized parallel groups comparative study proposal. "Prague OHCA study".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belohlavek, Jan; Kucera, Karel; Jarkovsky, Jiri; Franek, Ondrej; Pokorna, Milana; Danda, Jiri; Skripsky, Roman; Kandrnal, Vit; Balik, Martin; Kunstyr, Jan; Horak, Jan; Smid, Ondrej; Valasek, Jaroslav; Mrazek, Vratislav; Schwarz, Zdenek; Linhart, Ales

    2012-08-10

    Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has a poor outcome. Recent non-randomized studies of ECLS (extracorporeal life support) in OHCA suggested further prospective multicenter studies to define population that would benefit from ECLS. We aim to perform a prospective randomized study comparing prehospital intraarrest hypothermia combined with mechanical chest compression device, intrahospital ECLS and early invasive investigation and treatment in all patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin compared to a standard of care. This paper describes methodology and design of the proposed trial. Patients with witnessed OHCA without ROSC (return of spontaneous circulation) after a minimum of 5 minutes of ACLS (advanced cardiac life support) by emergency medical service (EMS) team and after performance of all initial procedures (defibrillation, airway management, intravenous access establishment) will be randomized to standard vs. hyperinvasive arm. In hyperinvasive arm, mechanical compression device together with intranasal evaporative cooling will be instituted and patients will be transferred directly to cardiac center under ongoing CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). After admission, ECLS inclusion/exclusion criteria will be evaluated and if achieved, veno-arterial ECLS will be started. Invasive investigation and standard post resuscitation care will follow. Patients in standard arm will be managed on scene. When ROSC achieved, they will be transferred to cardiac center and further treated as per recent guidelines. 6 months survival with good neurological outcome (Cerebral Performance Category 1-2). Secondary outcomes will include 30 day neurological and cardiac recovery. Authors introduce and offer a protocol of a proposed randomized study comparing a combined "hyperinvasive approach" to a standard of care in refractory OHCA. The protocol is opened for sharing by other cardiac centers with available ECLS and cathlab teams trained to admit patients with refractory

  13. Comparative Case Study of Diffusion of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing in Two Clinical Settings: Empirically Supported Treatment Status Is Not Enough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Joan M; Biyanova, Tatyana; Coyne, James C

    2009-01-01

    An in-depth comparative case study was conducted of two attempts at diffusion of an empirically supported, but controversial, psychotherapy: eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). One Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) treatment setting in which there was substantial uptake was compared with a second VA setting in which it was not adopted. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 mental health clinicians at the first site, and 19 at the second. Critical selling points for EMDR were a highly regarded champion, the observability of effects with patients, and personally experiencing its effects during a role training session. Compatibility with existing psychotherapist practices and values further allowed the therapy to become embedded in the organizational culture. At the second site, a sense that EMDR was not theoretically coherent or compelling overwhelmed other considerations, including its empirical status. Comparative studies contrasting settings in which innovative therapies are implemented versus those in which they were rejected may aid in refining theories of and strategies for dissemination.

  14. Comparative Case Study of Diffusion of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing in Two Clinical Settings: Empirically Supported Treatment Status Is Not Enough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Joan M.; Biyanova, Tatyana; Coyne, James C.

    2013-01-01

    An in-depth comparative case study was conducted of two attempts at diffusion of an empirically supported, but controversial, psychotherapy: eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). One Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) treatment setting in which there was substantial uptake was compared with a second VA setting in which it was not adopted. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 mental health clinicians at the first site, and 19 at the second. Critical selling points for EMDR were a highly regarded champion, the observability of effects with patients, and personally experiencing its effects during a role training session. Compatibility with existing psychotherapist practices and values further allowed the therapy to become embedded in the organizational culture. At the second site, a sense that EMDR was not theoretically coherent or compelling overwhelmed other considerations, including its empirical status. Comparative studies contrasting settings in which innovative therapies are implemented versus those in which they were rejected may aid in refining theories of and strategies for dissemination. PMID:25360060

  15. The GPlates Portal: Cloud-Based Interactive 3D Visualization of Global Geophysical and Geological Data in a Web Browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, R Dietmar; Qin, Xiaodong; Sandwell, David T; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; Williams, Simon E; Flament, Nicolas; Maus, Stefan; Seton, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The pace of scientific discovery is being transformed by the availability of 'big data' and open access, open source software tools. These innovations open up new avenues for how scientists communicate and share data and ideas with each other and with the general public. Here, we describe our efforts to bring to life our studies of the Earth system, both at present day and through deep geological time. The GPlates Portal (portal.gplates.org) is a gateway to a series of virtual globes based on the Cesium Javascript library. The portal allows fast interactive visualization of global geophysical and geological data sets, draped over digital terrain models. The globes use WebGL for hardware-accelerated graphics and are cross-platform and cross-browser compatible with complete camera control. The globes include a visualization of a high-resolution global digital elevation model and the vertical gradient of the global gravity field, highlighting small-scale seafloor fabric such as abyssal hills, fracture zones and seamounts in unprecedented detail. The portal also features globes portraying seafloor geology and a global data set of marine magnetic anomaly identifications. The portal is specifically designed to visualize models of the Earth through geological time. These space-time globes include tectonic reconstructions of the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields, and several models of long-wavelength surface dynamic topography through time, including the interactive plotting of vertical motion histories at selected locations. The globes put the on-the-fly visualization of massive data sets at the fingertips of end-users to stimulate teaching and learning and novel avenues of inquiry.

  16. Personalised External Aortic Root Support (PEARS Compared with Alternatives for People with Life-Threatening Genetically Determined Aneurysms of the Aortic Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Treasure

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Personalised external aortic support was first proposed in 2000 by Tal Golesworthy, an engineer with familial Marfan syndrome and an aortic root aneurysm. After putting together a research and development team, and finding a surgeon to take on the challenge to join him in this innovative approach, he was central to the manufacture of the device, custom made for his own aorta. He was the patient for the ‘first in man’ operation in 2004. Ten years later he is well and 45 other people have had their own personalised device implanted. In this account, the stepwise record of proof of principle, comparative quantification of the surgical and perioperative requirements, 10 years of results, and development and research plans for the future are presented.

  17. Personalised External Aortic Root Support (PEARS) Compared with Alternatives for People with Life-Threatening Genetically Determined Aneurysms of the Aortic Root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treasure, Tom; Pepper, John

    2015-01-15

    Personalised external aortic support was first proposed in 2000 by Tal Golesworthy, an engineer with familial Marfan syndrome and an aortic root aneurysm. After putting together a research and development team, and finding a surgeon to take on the challenge to join him in this innovative approach, he was central to the manufacture of the device, custom made for his own aorta. He was the patient for the 'first in man' operation in 2004. Ten years later he is well and 45 other people have had their own personalised device implanted. In this account, the stepwise record of proof of principle, comparative quantification of the surgical and perioperative requirements, 10 years of results, and development and research plans for the future are presented.

  18. Comparative cost analysis of insecticide-treated net delivery strategies: sales supported by social marketing and free distribution through antenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Allegri, Manuela; Marschall, Paul; Flessa, Steffen; Tiendrebéogo, Justin; Kouyaté, Bocar; Jahn, Albrecht; Müller, Olaf

    2010-01-01

    Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) are effective in substantially reducing malaria transmission. Still, ITN coverage in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) remains extremely low. Policy makers are concerned with identifying the most suitable delivery mechanism to achieve rapid yet sustainable increases in ITN coverage. Little is known, however, on the comparative costs of alternative ITN distribution strategies. This paper aimed to fill this gap in knowledge by developing such a comparative cost analysis, looking at the cost per ITN distributed for two alternative interventions: subsidized sales supported by social marketing and free distribution to pregnant women through antenatal care (ANC). The study was conducted in rural Burkina Faso, where the two interventions were carried out alongside one another in 2006/07. Cost information was collected prospectively to derive both a financial analysis adopting a provider's perspective and an economic analysis adopting a societal perspective. The average financial cost per ITN distributed was US$8.08 and US$7.21 for sales supported by social marketing and free distribution through ANC, respectively. The average economic cost per ITN distributed was US$4.81 for both interventions. Contrary to common belief, costs did not differ substantially between the two interventions. Due to the district's ability to rely fully on the use of existing resources, financial costs associated with free ITN distribution through ANC were in fact even lower than those associated with the social marketing campaign. This represents an encouraging finding for SSA governments and points to the possibility to invest in programmes to favour free ITN distribution through existing health facilities. Given restricted budgets, however, free distribution programmes are unlikely to be feasible.

  19. Electromyographic evaluation of masticatory muscles in dentate patients versus conventional and implant-supported fixed and removable denture wearers- a preliminary report comparing model foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uram-Tuculescu, Sorin; Cooper, Lyndon F; Foegeding, E Allen; Vinyard, Christopher J; De Kok, Ingeborg J; Essick, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate differences in masticatory muscle function during chewing of model foods designed to differ in fracture strength between dentate subjects (n = 5, ages 59 to 68 years) versus patients treated with a maxillary conventional complete denture opposing natural dentition or one of the following types of mandibular complete dentures: conventional, implant-supported overdenture, implant-supported fixed denture (n = 20, ages 45 to 83 years). The authors hypothesized that denture wearers would differ in duration of chewing, frequency of chewing, and masticatory muscle activity while preparing a bolus for swallowing. Surface electromyography was recorded bilaterally from the masseter, anterior temporalis, and anterior digastric. Masticatory muscle activity was evaluated using scaled values of the area under the electromyographic curve, while subjects chewed agar-based model foods with different fracture strengths. Chewing duration and frequency also were calculated from electromyographic recordings. Mixed model analysis of variance with "subject" as a random factor was used during statistical analysis. Logarithmic transformation was required to achieve normalization of residuals for the duration of chewing and the relative masticatory muscles activity, but not for the chewing frequency. Relative masticatory muscle activity was 2.57 times higher for the denture wearers than for the dentate subjects during chewing of model foods (P masticatory muscle activity from the 1st to the 10th chewing cycle was proportionally less in magnitude and occurred more gradually for denture wearers compared to dentate subjects. While chewing sequence duration increased with food fracture strength, it did not differ significantly in treatment versus dentate groups. Chewing cycle frequency did not differ between groups or with food fracture strength. The observed increases in relative masticatory muscle activity for denture wearers compared to the dentate subjects during oral food

  20. Stability indicating analysis of bisacodyl by partial least squares regression, spectral residual augmented classical least squares and support vector regression chemometric models: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim A. Naguib

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Partial least squares regression (PLSR, spectral residual augmented classical least squares (SRACLS and support vector regression (SVR are three different chemometric models. These models are subjected to a comparative study that highlights their inherent characteristics via applying them to analysis of bisacodyl in the presence of its reported degradation products monoacetyl bisacodyl (I and desacetyl bisacodyl (II, in raw material. For proper analysis, a 3 factor 3 level experimental design was established resulting in a training set of 9 mixtures containing different ratios of the interfering species. A linear test set consisting of 6 mixtures was used to validate the prediction ability of the suggested models. To test the generalisation ability of the models, some extra mixtures were prepared that are outside the concentration space of the training set. To test the ability of models to handle nonlinearity in spectral response, another set of nonlinear samples was prepared. The paper highlights model transfer to other labs under other conditions as well. This paper aims to manifest the advantages of SRACLS and SVR over PLSR model, where SRACLS can tackle future changes without the need for tedious recalibration, while SVR is a more robust and general model, with high ability to model nonlinearity in spectral response, though like PLSR is needing recalibration. The results presented indicate the ability of the three models to analyse bisacodyl in the presence of its degradation products in raw material with high accuracy and precision; where SVR gives the best results at all tested conditions compared to other models.

  1. Supportive environments for physical activity, community action, and policy in 8 European Union Member States: comparative analysis and specificities of context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruetten, Alfred; Frahsa, Annika; Engbers, Luuk; Gusi, Narcis; Mota, Jorge; Pacenka, Rimantas; Troelsen, Jens; Vasickova, Jana; Vuillemin, Anne

    2014-07-01

    A multilevel theoretical framework of physical activity (PA) promotion that addresses supportive environments, PA behavior, community action, and PA promoting policies is related to research and development in an international comparative study. Most-different and most-similar case selection was applied to data from 8 European Union Member States. Data from semistructured key informant qualitative interviews, focus group interviews with experts and policy-makers, as well as document analysis were linked to corresponding Eurobarometer data. The framework on the interplay of environment, PA behavior, community action and policies appears to be working across most different countries. Comprehensive systems of PA infrastructures are interlinked with relatively high levels of PA prevalence. These countries implement comprehensive national policies on PA promotion and show a positive perception of related local governments' engagement. Less comprehensive systems of infrastructures interplay with lower levels of PA prevalence, less community action and fewer policies. Differences between similar cases are linked to country-specific contexts. Framework application and comparative analysis indicates how to relate theory to empirical research and complex data sets. In-depth analysis of country-specific contexts and longitudinal observation on changes within and between countries might advise on how to integrate the framework into intervention research.

  2. Comparative Study of Graphite-Supported LDI- and ESI-FT-ICR-MS of a Pyrolysis Liquid from a German Brown Coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathsack, Philipp; Wolf, Bianca; Kroll, Marius M; Otto, Matthias

    2015-08-04

    Pyrolysis liquids from coal are complex mixtures of organic compounds with low to high molecular mass and low to high polarity. Compared to low-molecular-weight compounds, little information is available regarding high-molecular-weight compounds in pyrolysis liquids, although their characterization is important for the elucidation of degradation pathways. In this study, laser desorption ionization (LDI) using graphite powder as the support material has been used in conjunction with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) for the analysis of a pyrolysis liquid from brown coal. The acquired data is compared to previous results of the same sample using electrospray ionization (ESI). Using LDI, compounds with masses between 300 and 900 Da were detected by LDI. An evaluation of the spectra was based on the frequency of molecular formulas with a different number of heteroatoms. Hydrocarbon compounds and heteroatomic compounds containing oxygen and sulfur were found. A comparison to ESI results shows that the numbers of observed molecular formulas are virtually the same, but a higher quantity of molecular formulas with a low number of oxygen can be detected by LDI. The observation of molecular formulas without oxygen is a unique feature of the LDI spectra. A more detailed investigation was possible by the utilization of double bond equivalent plots versus carbon number, which revealed a prevalence of LDI for the ionization of compounds with higher DBE.

  3. A Q-TWiST analysis comparing panitumumab plus best supportive care (BSC) with BSC alone in patients with wild-type KRAS metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Zhao, Z; Barber, B; Sherrill, B; Peeters, M; Wiezorek, J

    2011-06-07

    Panitumumab+best supportive care (BSC) significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) vs BSC alone in patients with chemo-refractory wild-type KRAS metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We applied the quality-adjusted time without symptoms of disease or toxicity (Q-TWiST) analysis to provide an integrated measure of clinical benefit, with the objective of comparing quality-adjusted survival between the two arms. As the trial design allowed patients on BSC alone to receive panitumumab after disease progression, which confounded overall survival (OS), the focus of this analysis was on PFS. For each treatment group, the time spent in the toxicity (grade 3 or 4 adverse events; TOX), time without symptoms of disease or toxicity (TWiST), and relapse (after disease progression; REL) states were estimated by the product-limit method, and adjusted using utility weights derived from patient-reported EuroQoL 5-dimensions measures. Sensitivity analyses were performed in which utility weights (varying from 0 to 1) were applied to time in the TOX and REL health states. There was a significant difference between groups favouring panitumumab+BSC in quality-adjusted PFS (12.3 weeks vs 5.8 weeks, respectively, PBSC significantly improved quality-adjusted survival compared with BSC alone.

  4. Laser-welded titanium frameworks supported by implants in the partially edentulous mandible: a 10-year comparative follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortorp, Anders; Jemt, Torsten

    2008-09-01

    Comparative long-term knowledge of different framework materials in the partially edentulous implant patient is not available. To report and compare 10-year data on free-standing implant-supported partial prostheses with laser-welded titanium (test) and conventional gold alloy (control) frameworks. Altogether, 52 partially edentulous patients were consecutively provided with laser-welded prostheses (n = 60) in the partially edentulous lower jaw (test group). A control group of 52 randomly selected patients with gold alloy castings (n = 60) was used for comparison. Clinical and radiographic 10-year data were retrospectively collected and evaluated for both groups. The overall 10-year implant cumulative survival rate (CSR) was 93.0% (loaded implants, 96.4%), with a 10-year implant CSR of 91.5 and 94.7% for test and control implants, respectively (p > .05). Out of a total of 22 lost implants, 17 implants (77.3%) were shorter than 10 mm. The overall 10-year prosthesis CSR was 93.7%, with a corresponding 10-year CSR of 88.4 and 100% for test and control groups, respectively (p implants had >3 mm accumulated bone loss after 10 years. Altogether, 10 of the prostheses in both groups had implant component mechanical problems (8.3%). None of the frameworks or implants fractured, but more fractures of porcelain veneers were observed in the test group (p implant treatment in the partially edentulous jaw functioned well during 10 years, although prosthodontic maintenance was required. However, laser-welded titanium frameworks presented more problems as compared with gold alloy frameworks. More loaded implants were lost (p < .05), and higher incidence of porcelain chipping was noted in the test group (p < .05). However, bone loss was on an average lower for the test group during the 10 years of follow-up (p < .001).

  5. Single implant-supported crowns in the aesthetic zone: patient satisfaction with aesthetic appearance compared with appraisals by laypeople and dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Joseph; Lin, Mark; Zahran, Mohammed; Jokstad, Asbjorn

    2015-10-01

    To appraise the patients' satisfaction with aesthetic outcomes following an implant restoration in the anterior maxilla as compared to appraisals made by dentists and laypeople. Randomly selected patients (n = 116) restored with an implant-retained crown in the anterior maxilla were invited to rate their satisfaction with aesthetic outcomes using a questionnaire containing seven criteria, each graded from excellent to poor. Projected images of the patient smiles were appraised by dentists (n = 8) and laypeople (n = 6) using the same assessment criteria in a room setting. In addition, the laypeople judged the same cases on printed 10 × 15 cm photographs in a separate setting. Jemt papilla scores, pink aesthetic score (PES) and white esthetic score (WES) were assigned by the dentists. Differences in the levels of satisfaction between the patient, and appraisals by the dentists and the laypeople were compared using non-parametric statistical tests. Patients' opinions of their aesthetic appearance following the placement of a single implant-supported crown in the aesthetic zone were in general very favourable. The laypeople were more critical than the dentists when the aesthetic outcomes were appraised on magnified images projected onto a screen. Laypeople became less critical when evaluating the aesthetic outcomes on printed photographs compared to appraisals on a screen. Patient satisfaction with their aesthetic appearance differed from dentists' and laypeople's appraisals. Factors other than the actual aesthetic outcome itself appear to influence patients' satisfaction with their end results. Laypeople's appraisal is influenced by the magnification and method used for appraising the aesthetic outcomes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Comparative efficacy of the Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy versus Supportive Psychotherapy for early onset chronic depression: design and rationale of a multisite randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective treatment strategies for chronic depression are urgently needed since it is not only a common and particularly disabling disorder, but is also considered treatment resistant by most clinicians. There are only a few studies on chronic depression indicating that traditional psycho- and pharmacological interventions are not as effective as in acute, episodic depression. Current medications are no more effective than those introduced 50 years ago whereas the only psychotherapy developed specifically for the subgroup of chronic depression, the Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP), faired well in one large trial. However, CBASP has never been directly compared to a non-specific control treatment. Methods/Design The present article describes the study protocol of a multisite parallel-group randomized controlled trial in Germany. The purpose of the study is to estimate the efficacy of CBASP compared to supportive psychotherapy in 268 non-medicated early-onset chronically depressed outpatients. The intervention includes 20 weeks of acute treatment with 24 individual sessions followed by 28 weeks of continuation treatment with another 8 sessions. Depressive symptoms are evaluated 20 weeks after randomisation by means of the 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale of Depression (HRSD). Secondary endpoints are depressive symptoms after 12 and 48 weeks, and remission after 12, 20, and 48 weeks. Primary outcome will be analysed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) controlled for pre-treatment scores and site. Analyses of continuous secondary variables will be performed using linear mixed models. For remission rates, chi-squared tests and logistic regression will be applied. Discussion The study evaluates the comparative effects of a disorder-specific psychotherapy and a well designed non-specific psychological approach in the acute and continuation treatment phase in a large sample of early-onset chronically depressed patients. Trial

  7. Randomized controlled pilot trial of mindfulness-based stress reduction compared to psychoeducational support for persistently fatigued breast and colorectal cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Shelley A; Brown, Linda F; Beck-Coon, Kathleen; Talib, Tasneem L; Monahan, Patrick O; Giesler, R Brian; Tong, Yan; Wilhelm, Laura; Carpenter, Janet S; Von Ah, Diane; Wagner, Christina D; de Groot, Mary; Schmidt, Karen; Monceski, Diane; Danh, Marie; Alyea, Jennifer M; Miller, Kathy D; Kroenke, Kurt

    2016-10-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a disruptive symptom for many survivors. Despite promising evidence for efficacy of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) in reducing CRF, no trials comparing it to an active comparator for fatigued survivors have been published. The purpose of this trial was to compare MBSR to psychoeducation for CRF and associated symptoms. Breast (n = 60) and colorectal (n = 11) cancer survivors (stage 0-III) with clinically significant CRF after completing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy an average of 28 months prior to enrollment were randomized to MBSR or psychoeducation/support groups (PES). MBSR focused on mindfulness training; PES focused on CRF self-management. Outcomes included CRF interference (primary), CRF severity and global improvement, vitality, depression, anxiety, sleep disturbance, and pain. Outcomes were assessed at baseline (T1), post-intervention (T2), and 6-month follow-up (T3) using intent-to-treat analysis. Between-group differences in CRF interference were not significant at any time point; however, there was a trend favoring MBSR (d = -0.46, p = 0.073) at T2. MBSR participants reported significantly greater improvement in vitality (d = 0.53, p = 0.003) and were more likely to report CRF as moderately to completely improved compared to the PES group (χ2 (1) = 4.1765, p = 0.041) at T2. MBSR participants also reported significantly greater reductions in pain at T2 (d = 0.53, p = 0.014). In addition, both MBSR and PES produced moderate-to-large and significant within-group improvements in all fatigue outcomes, depression, anxiety, and sleep at T2 and T3 compared to T1. MBSR and PES appear efficacious for CRF and related symptoms. Larger trials including a usual care arm are warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01724333.

  8. Comparative effectiveness of peer leaders and community health workers in diabetes self-management support: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tricia S; Funnell, Martha; Sinco, Brandy; Piatt, Gretchen; Palmisano, Gloria; Spencer, Michael S; Kieffer, Edith C; Heisler, Michele

    2014-06-01

    To compare a peer leader (PL) versus a community health worker (CHW) telephone outreach intervention in sustaining improvements in HbA1c over 12 months after a 6-month diabetes self-management education (DSME) program. One hundred and sixteen Latino adults with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a federally qualified health center and randomized to (1) a 6-month DSME program followed by 12 months of weekly group sessions delivered by PLs with telephone outreach to those unable to attend or (2) a 6-month DSME program followed by 12 months of monthly telephone outreach delivered by CHWs. The primary outcome was HbA1c. Secondary outcomes were cardiovascular disease risk factors, diabetes distress, and diabetes social support. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. After DSME, the PL group achieved a reduction in mean HbA1c (8.2-7.5% or 66-58 mmol/mol, P vs. 7.3% or 62 vs. 56 mmol/mol, P = 0.0004) post-6 month DSME; however, it was attenuated at 18 months (-0.3% or -3.3 mmol/mol from baseline, within-group P = 0.234). Only the PL group maintained improvements achieved in blood pressure at 18 months. At the 18-month follow-up, both groups maintained improvements in waist circumference, diabetes support, and diabetes distress, with no significant differences between groups. Both low-cost maintenance programs led by either a PL or a CHW maintained improvements in key patient-reported diabetes outcomes, but the PL intervention may have additional benefit in sustaining clinical improvements beyond 12 months. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association.

  9. Use of the learning conversation improves instructor confidence in life support training: An open randomised controlled cross-over trial comparing teaching feedback mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Lydia J L; Jones, Christopher M; Hulme, Jonathan; Owen, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Feedback is vital for the effective delivery of skills-based education. We sought to compare the sandwich technique and learning conversation structured methods of feedback delivery in competency-based basic life support (BLS) training. Open randomised crossover study undertaken between October 2014 and March 2015 at the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. Six-hundred and forty healthcare students undertaking a European Resuscitation Council (ERC) BLS course were enrolled, each of whom was randomised to receive teaching using either the sandwich technique or the learning conversation. Fifty-eight instructors were randomised to initially teach using either the learning conversation or sandwich technique, prior to crossing-over and teaching with the alternative technique after a pre-defined time period. Outcome measures included skill acquisition as measured by an end-of-course competency assessment, instructors' perception of teaching with each feedback technique and candidates' perception of the feedback they were provided with. Scores assigned to use of the learning conversation by instructors were significantly more favourable than for the sandwich technique across all but two assessed domains relating to instructor perception of the feedback technique, including all skills-based domains. No difference was seen in either assessment pass rates (80.9% sandwich technique vs. 77.2% learning conversation; OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.85-1.84; p=0.29) or any domain relating to candidates' perception of their teaching technique. This is the first direct comparison of two feedback techniques in clinical medical education using both quantitative and qualitative methodology. The learning conversation is preferred by instructors providing competency-based life support training and is perceived to favour skills acquisition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Knowledge-based systems as decision support tools in an ecosystem approach to fisheries: Comparing a fuzzy-logic and a rule-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarre, Astrid; Paterson, Barbara; Moloney, Coleen L.; Miller, David C. M.; Field, John G.; Starfield, Anthony M.

    2008-10-01

    In an ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF), management must draw on information of widely different types, and information addressing various scales. Knowledge-based systems assist in the decision-making process by summarising this information in a logical, transparent and reproducible way. Both rule-based Boolean and fuzzy-logic models have been used successfully as knowledge-based decision support tools. This study compares two such systems relevant to fisheries management in an EAF developed for the southern Benguela. The first is a rule-based system for the prediction of anchovy recruitment and the second is a fuzzy-logic tool to monitor implementation of an EAF in the sardine fishery. We construct a fuzzy-logic counterpart to the rule-based model, and a rule-based counterpart to the fuzzy-logic model, compare their results, and include feedback from potential users of these two decision support tools in our evaluation of the two approaches. With respect to the model objectives, no method clearly outperformed the other. The advantages of numerically processing continuous variables, and interpreting the final output, as in fuzzy-logic models, can be weighed up against the advantages of using a few, qualitative, easy-to-understand categories as in rule-based models. The natural language used in rule-based implementations is easily understood by, and communicated among, users of these systems. Users unfamiliar with fuzzy-set theory must “trust” the logic of the model. Graphical visualization of intermediate and end results is an important advantage of any system. Applying the two approaches in parallel improved our understanding of the model as well as of the underlying problems. Even for complex problems, small knowledge-based systems such as the ones explored here are worth developing and using. Their strengths lie in (i) synthesis of the problem in a logical and transparent framework, (ii) helping scientists to deliberate how to apply their science to

  11. A comparative study of early-delayed skin grafting and late or non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative study of early-delayed skin grafting and late or non-grafting of deep partial thickness burns at the University Teaching Hospital. ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more ...

  12. Comparing Efficacy of Four Preventive Methods on Attitude of Drug Substance Abuse and Self–Esteem in Students Supported by Emdad Committee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    aziz allah agha babaei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was aimed to compare the efficacy of four drug substance abuse preventive methods: cognitive–behavioral social traioning, life skills training, poster presentation and short message system on attitude change and enhancement self-esteem in students supported by Emdad Committee. Method:This was a quasi experimental study. 150 students were selected and randomly assigned to the four experimental and control groups. The groups were completed attitude of drug substance abuse and self-esteem inventories. Experimental groups received: group 1 received 10 sessions of group cognitive-behavioral social training 120 minutes each, group 2, 10 sessions of life skills training, 120 minutes each, group 3 for 10 weeks into presented of 40 posters and group 4 short message service for 10 weeks. Findings: The results revealed that preventive techniques were effected on attitude and self–esteem. Also results of post-hoc (LSD test revealed that preventive techniques with difference effectiveness were effected on change attitude of substance abuse. Also cognitive–behavioral social training and life skills training techniques were effected on self esteem. Conclusion: The results of the study revealed that all the four techniques were effective in the generation negative attitude into drug abuse, otherwise only cognitive–behavioral social training and life skills training enhancement on self esteem.

  13. Support vector regression and artificial neural network models for stability indicating analysis of mebeverine hydrochloride and sulpiride mixtures in pharmaceutical preparation: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naguib, Ibrahim A.; Darwish, Hany W.

    2012-02-01

    A comparison between support vector regression (SVR) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) multivariate regression methods is established showing the underlying algorithm for each and making a comparison between them to indicate the inherent advantages and limitations. In this paper we compare SVR to ANN with and without variable selection procedure (genetic algorithm (GA)). To project the comparison in a sensible way, the methods are used for the stability indicating quantitative analysis of mixtures of mebeverine hydrochloride and sulpiride in binary mixtures as a case study in presence of their reported impurities and degradation products (summing up to 6 components) in raw materials and pharmaceutical dosage form via handling the UV spectral data. For proper analysis, a 6 factor 5 level experimental design was established resulting in a training set of 25 mixtures containing different ratios of the interfering species. An independent test set consisting of 5 mixtures was used to validate the prediction ability of the suggested models. The proposed methods (linear SVR (without GA) and linear GA-ANN) were successfully applied to the analysis of pharmaceutical tablets containing mebeverine hydrochloride and sulpiride mixtures. The results manifest the problem of nonlinearity and how models like the SVR and ANN can handle it. The methods indicate the ability of the mentioned multivariate calibration models to deconvolute the highly overlapped UV spectra of the 6 components' mixtures, yet using cheap and easy to handle instruments like the UV spectrophotometer.

  14. Support vector regression and artificial neural network models for stability indicating analysis of mebeverine hydrochloride and sulpiride mixtures in pharmaceutical preparation: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naguib, Ibrahim A; Darwish, Hany W

    2012-02-01

    A comparison between support vector regression (SVR) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) multivariate regression methods is established showing the underlying algorithm for each and making a comparison between them to indicate the inherent advantages and limitations. In this paper we compare SVR to ANN with and without variable selection procedure (genetic algorithm (GA)). To project the comparison in a sensible way, the methods are used for the stability indicating quantitative analysis of mixtures of mebeverine hydrochloride and sulpiride in binary mixtures as a case study in presence of their reported impurities and degradation products (summing up to 6 components) in raw materials and pharmaceutical dosage form via handling the UV spectral data. For proper analysis, a 6 factor 5 level experimental design was established resulting in a training set of 25 mixtures containing different ratios of the interfering species. An independent test set consisting of 5 mixtures was used to validate the prediction ability of the suggested models. The proposed methods (linear SVR (without GA) and linear GA-ANN) were successfully applied to the analysis of pharmaceutical tablets containing mebeverine hydrochloride and sulpiride mixtures. The results manifest the problem of nonlinearity and how models like the SVR and ANN can handle it. The methods indicate the ability of the mentioned multivariate calibration models to deconvolute the highly overlapped UV spectra of the 6 components' mixtures, yet using cheap and easy to handle instruments like the UV spectrophotometer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Retrospective comparative ten-year study of cumulative survival rates of remaining teeth in large edentulism treated with implant-supported fixed partial dentures or removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Seiya; Arakawa, Hikaru; Maekawa, Kenji; Hara, Emilio Satoshi; Noda, Kinji; Minakuchi, Hajime; Sonoyama, Wataru; Matsuka, Yoshizo; Kuboki, Takuo

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to compare the survival rates of remaining teeth between implant-supported fixed dentures (IFDs) and removable partial dentures (RPDs) in patients with large edentulous cases. The second goal was to assess the risk factors for remaining tooth loss. The study subjects were selected among those who received prosthodontic treatment at Okayama University Dental Hospital for their edentulous space exceeding at least four continuous missing teeth. Twenty-one patients were included in the IFD group and 82 patients were included in the RPD group. Survival rates of remaining teeth were calculated in three subcategories: (1) whole remaining teeth, (2) adjacent teeth to intended edentulous space, and (3) opposing teeth to intended edentulous space. The ten-year cumulative survival rate of the whole remaining teeth was significantly higher in the IFD group (40.0%) than in the RPD group (24.4%). On the other hand, there was no significant difference between two groups in the survival rate of teeth adjacent or opposing to intended edentulous space. A Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that RPD restoration and gender (male) were the significant risk factors for remaining tooth loss (whole remaining teeth). These results suggest that IFD treatment can reduce the incidence of remaining tooth loss in large edentulous cases. Copyright © 2013 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Systematic Review of User Interface Issues Related to PDA-based Decision Support Systems in Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Nam-Ju; Starren, Justin; Bakken, Suzanne

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores user interface issues in the design and implementation of a personal digital assistant-based decision support system (PDA-DSS) in health care. An automated literature search found 15 studies addressing the main PDA user interface issues, which can be categorized as display, security, memory, Web browser, and communication.

  17. Comparative cost-benefit analysis of tele-homecare for community-dwelling elderly in Japan: Non-Government versus Government Supported Funding Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Miki; Abraham, Chon

    2017-08-01

    Tele-homecare is gaining prominence as a viable care alternative, as evidenced by the increase in financial support from international governments to fund initiatives in their respective countries. The primary reason for the funding is to support efforts to reduce lags and increase capacity in access to care as well as to promote preventive measures that can avert costly emergent issues from arising. These efforts are especially important to super-aged and aging societies such as in Japan, many European countries, and the United States (US). However, to date and to our knowledge, a direct comparison of non-government vs. government-supported funding models for tele-homecare is particularly lacking in Japan. The aim of this study is to compare these operational models (i.e., non-government vs. government-supported funding) from a cost-benefit perspective. This simulation study applies to a Japanese hypothetical cohort with implications for other super-aged and aging societies abroad. We performed a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) on two operational models for enabling tele-homecare for elderly community-dwelling cohorts based on a decision tree model, which we created with parameters from published literature. The two models examined are (a) Model 1-non-government-supported funding that includes monthly fixed charges paid by users for a portion of the operating costs, and (b) Model 2-government-supported funding that includes startup and installation costs only (i.e., no operating costs) and no monthly user charges. We performed base case cost-benefit analysis and probabilistic cost-benefit analysis with a Monte Carlo simulation. We calculated net benefit and benefit-to-cost ratios (BCRs) from the societal perspective with a five-year time horizon applying a 3% discount rate for both cost and benefit values. The cost of tele-homecare included (a) the startup system expense, averaged over a five-year depreciation period, and (b) operation expenses (i.e., labor and non

  18. Taking advantage of HTML5 browsers to realize the concepts of session state and workflow sharing in web-tool applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suftin, I.; Read, J. S.; Walker, J.

    2013-12-01

    Scientists prefer not having to be tied down to a specific machine or operating system in order to analyze local and remote data sets or publish work. Increasingly, analysis has been migrating to decentralized web services and data sets, using web clients to provide the analysis interface. While simplifying workflow access, analysis, and publishing of data, the move does bring with it its own unique set of issues. Web clients used for analysis typically offer workflows geared towards a single user, with steps and results that are often difficult to recreate and share with others. Furthermore, workflow results often may not be easily used as input for further analysis. Older browsers further complicate things by having no way to maintain larger chunks of information, often offloading the job of storage to the back-end server or trying to squeeze it into a cookie. It has been difficult to provide a concept of "session storage" or "workflow sharing" without a complex orchestration of the back-end for storage depending on either a centralized file system or database. With the advent of HTML5, browsers gained the ability to store more information through the use of the Web Storage API (a browser-cookie holds a maximum of 4 kilobytes). Web Storage gives us the ability to store megabytes of arbitrary data in-browser either with an expiration date or just for a session. This allows scientists to create, update, persist and share their workflow without depending on the backend to store session information, providing the flexibility for new web-based workflows to emerge. In the DSASWeb portal ( http://cida.usgs.gov/DSASweb/ ), using these techniques, the representation of every step in the analyst's workflow is stored as plain-text serialized JSON, which we can generate as a text file and provide to the analyst as an upload. This file may then be shared with others and loaded back into the application, restoring the application to the state it was in when the session file

  19. Comparative study on cubic and tetragonal CexZr1-xO2 supported MoO3-catalysts for sulfur-resistant methanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaopeng; Xu, Yan; Cheng, Jiaming; Wang, Weihan; Wang, Baowei; Li, Zhenhua; Ma, Xinbin

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, two kinds of CexZr1-xO2 solid solution carriers with different Ce/Zr ratio were prepared by one-step co-precipitation method: the cubic Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 and the tetragonal Ce0.2Zr0.8O2 support. The MoO3/Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 and MoO3/Ce0.2Zr0.8O2 catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation method for comparative study on sulfur-resistant methanation reaction. The N2 adsorption/desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), X-ray photoelectron (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), temperature-programmed reduction by hydrogen (H2-TPR) were undertaken to characterize the physico-chemical properties of the samples. The results indicated that the prepared MoO3/CexZr1-xO2 catalysts have a mesoporous structure with high surface area and uniform pore size distribution, achieving good MoO3 dispersion on CexZr1-xO2 supports. As for the catalytic performance of sulfur-resistant methanation, the cubic MoO3/Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 exhibited better than the tetragonal MoO3/Ce0.2Zr0.8O2 catalyst at reaction temperature 400 °C and 450 °C. CO conversion on the cubic MoO3/Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 catalyst was 50.1% at 400 °C and 75.5% at 450 °C, which is respectively 7% and 20% higher than that on the tetragonal MoO3/Ce0.2Zr0.8O2 catalyst. These were mainly attributed to higher content of active MoS2 on the surface of catalyst, the enhanced oxygen mobility, increased Mo-species dispersion as well as the excellent reducibility resulted from the increased amount of the reducible Ce3+ on the cubic MoO3/Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 catalyst.

  20. Ability and Use of Comparative Effectiveness Research by P&T Committee Members and Support Staff: A 1-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Jill; Warholak, Terri L; Hines, Lisa E; Sun, Diana; Brown, Mary; Hurwitz, Jason; Taylor, Ann M; Brixner, Diana; Cobaugh, Daniel J; Schlaifer, Marissa; Malone, Daniel C

    2016-06-01

    use CER (83.0%), and use of CER studies (58.7%). Health professionals attending a continuing education CER program reported higher use of EHC CER materials compared with nonattendees. Additionally, attendees reported increased use of CER in clinical decision making. A continuing education program such as this may provide an effective avenue for introducing CER methods and resources to the P&T committee and clinical decision-making processes. This project was supported by grant number R18HS019220 from the Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality. Augustine has stock in Pfizer. The authors declared no other potential conflicts of interest associated with this study. Study concept and design were primarily contributed by Malone, along with Warholak, Hines, Brown, Hurwitz, and Taylor. Warholak, Hines, Brown, Hurwitz, and Taylor collected the data, assisted by Malone, Brixner, Cobaugh, and Schlaifer. Data interpretation was performed by Malone and Augustine, with assistance from the other authors. The manuscript was written primarily by Augustine, with assistance from Malone, Sun, Warholak, Hines, Brown, Hurwitz, and Taylor. Malone revised the manuscript, assisted by Warholak, Hines, Brown, Hurwitz, Taylor, Brixner, Cobaugh, and Schlaifer.

  1. Psychophysics in a Web browser? Comparing response times collected with JavaScript and Psychophysics Toolbox in a visual search task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Joshua R; Motz, Benjamin A

    2016-03-01

    Behavioral researchers are increasingly using Web-based software such as JavaScript to conduct response time experiments. Although there has been some research on the accuracy and reliability of response time measurements collected using JavaScript, it remains unclear how well this method performs relative to standard laboratory software in psychologically relevant experimental manipulations. Here we present results from a visual search experiment in which we measured response time distributions with both Psychophysics Toolbox (PTB) and JavaScript. We developed a methodology that allowed us to simultaneously run the visual search experiment with both systems, interleaving trials between two independent computers, thus minimizing the effects of factors other than the experimental software. The response times measured by JavaScript were approximately 25 ms longer than those measured by PTB. However, we found no reliable difference in the variability of the distributions related to the software, and both software packages were equally sensitive to changes in the response times as a result of the experimental manipulations. We concluded that JavaScript is a suitable tool for measuring response times in behavioral research.

  2. Comparative analysis of deutocerebral neuropils in Chilopoda (Myriapoda: implications for the evolution of the arthropod olfactory system and support for the Mandibulata concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sombke Andy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Originating from a marine ancestor, the myriapods most likely invaded land independently of the hexapods. As these two evolutionary lineages conquered land in parallel but separately, we are interested in comparing the myriapod chemosensory system to that of hexapods to gain insights into possible adaptations for olfaction in air. Our study connects to a previous analysis of the brain and behavior of the chilopod (centipede Scutigera coleoptrata in which we demonstrated that these animals do respond to volatile substances and analyzed the structure of their central olfactory pathway. Results Here, we examined the architecture of the deutocerebral brain areas (which process input from the antennae in seven additional representatives of the Chilopoda, covering all major subtaxa, by histology, confocal laser-scan microscopy, and 3D reconstruction. We found that in all species that we studied the majority of antennal afferents target two separate neuropils, the olfactory lobe (chemosensory, composed of glomerular neuropil compartments and the corpus lamellosum (mechanosensory. The numbers of olfactory glomeruli in the different chilopod taxa ranged from ca. 35 up to ca. 90 and the shape of the glomeruli ranged from spheroid across ovoid or drop-shape to elongate. Conclusion A split of the afferents from the (first pair of antennae into separate chemosensory and mechanosensory components is also typical for Crustacea and Hexapoda, but this set of characters is absent in Chelicerata. We suggest that this character set strongly supports the Mandibulata hypothesis (Myriapoda + (Crustacea + Hexapoda as opposed to the Myriochelata concept (Myriapoda + Chelicerata. The evolutionary implications of our findings, particularly the plasticity of glomerular shape, are discussed.

  3. Comparative analysis of deutocerebral neuropils in Chilopoda (Myriapoda): implications for the evolution of the arthropod olfactory system and support for the Mandibulata concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sombke, Andy; Lipke, Elisabeth; Kenning, Matthes; Müller, Carsten Hg; Hansson, Bill S; Harzsch, Steffen

    2012-01-03

    Originating from a marine ancestor, the myriapods most likely invaded land independently of the hexapods. As these two evolutionary lineages conquered land in parallel but separately, we are interested in comparing the myriapod chemosensory system to that of hexapods to gain insights into possible adaptations for olfaction in air. Our study connects to a previous analysis of the brain and behavior of the chilopod (centipede) Scutigera coleoptrata in which we demonstrated that these animals do respond to volatile substances and analyzed the structure of their central olfactory pathway. Here, we examined the architecture of the deutocerebral brain areas (which process input from the antennae) in seven additional representatives of the Chilopoda, covering all major subtaxa, by histology, confocal laser-scan microscopy, and 3D reconstruction. We found that in all species that we studied the majority of antennal afferents target two separate neuropils, the olfactory lobe (chemosensory, composed of glomerular neuropil compartments) and the corpus lamellosum (mechanosensory). The numbers of olfactory glomeruli in the different chilopod taxa ranged from ca. 35 up to ca. 90 and the shape of the glomeruli ranged from spheroid across ovoid or drop-shape to elongate. A split of the afferents from the (first) pair of antennae into separate chemosensory and mechanosensory components is also typical for Crustacea and Hexapoda, but this set of characters is absent in Chelicerata. We suggest that this character set strongly supports the Mandibulata hypothesis (Myriapoda + (Crustacea + Hexapoda)) as opposed to the Myriochelata concept (Myriapoda + Chelicerata). The evolutionary implications of our findings, particularly the plasticity of glomerular shape, are discussed.

  4. Fewer specialists support using medical marijuana and CBD in treating epilepsy patients compared with other medical professionals and patients: result of Epilepsia's survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathern, Gary W; Beninsig, Laurie; Nehlig, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    From May 20 to September 1 2014, Epilepsia conducted an online survey seeking opinions about the use of medical marijuana and cannabidiol (CBD) for people with epilepsy. This study reports the findings of that poll. The survey consisted of eight questions. Four questions asked if there were sufficient safety and efficacy data, whether responders would advise trying medical marijuana in cases of severe refractory epilepsy, and if pharmacologic grade compounds containing CBD should be available. Four questions addressed occupation, geographic region of residence, if responders had read the paper, and if they were International League Against Epilepsy/International Bureau for Epilepsy (ILAE/IBE) members. Of 776 who started or completed the survey, 58% were patients from North America, and 22% were epileptologists and general neurologists from Europe and North America. A minority of epileptologists and general neurologists said that there were sufficient safety (34%) and efficacy (28%) data, and 48% would advise using medical marijuana in severe cases of epilepsy. By comparison, nearly all patients and the public said there were sufficient safety (96%) and efficacy (95%) data, and 98% would recommend medical marijuana in cases of severe epilepsy. General physicians, basic researchers, nurses, and allied health professions sided more with patients, saying that there were sufficient safety (70%) and efficacy (71%) data, and 83% would advise using marijuana in severe cases. A majority (78%) said there should be pharmacologic grade compounds containing CBD, and there were no differences between specialists, general medical personal, and patients and the public. This survey indicates that there is a wide disparity in opinion on the use of medical marijuana and CBD in the treatment of people with epilepsy, which varied substantially, with fewer medical specialists supporting its use compared with general medical personal, and patients and the public. Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  5. Sex Reversal and Comparative Data Undermine the W Chromosome and Support Z-linked DMRT1 as the Regulator of Gonadal Sex Differentiation in Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Claire E; Major, Andrew T; Ayers, Katie L; Brown, Rosie J; Mariette, Mylene; Sackton, Timothy B; Smith, Craig A

    2017-09-01

    The exact genetic mechanism regulating avian gonadal sex differentiation has not been completely resolved. The most likely scenario involves a dosage mechanism, whereby the Z-linked DMRT1 gene triggers testis development. However, the possibility still exists that the female-specific W chromosome may harbor an ovarian determining factor. In this study, we provide evidence that the universal gene regulating gonadal sex differentiation in birds is Z-linked DMRT1 and not a W-linked (ovarian) factor. Three candidate W-linked ovarian determinants are HINTW, female-expressed transcript 1 (FET1), and female-associated factor (FAF). To test the association of these genes with ovarian differentiation in the chicken, we examined their expression following experimentally induced female-to-male sex reversal using the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole (FAD). Administration of FAD on day 3 of embryogenesis induced a significant loss of aromatase enzyme activity in female gonads and masculinization. However, expression levels of HINTW, FAF, and FET1 were unaltered after experimental masculinization. Furthermore, comparative analysis showed that FAF and FET1 expression could not be detected in zebra finch gonads. Additionally, an antibody raised against the predicted HINTW protein failed to detect it endogenously. These data do not support a universal role for these genes or for the W sex chromosome in ovarian development in birds. We found that DMRT1 (but not the recently identified Z-linked HEMGN gene) is male upregulated in embryonic zebra finch and emu gonads, as in the chicken. As chicken, zebra finch, and emu exemplify the major evolutionary clades of birds, we propose that Z-linked DMRT1, and not the W sex chromosome, regulates gonadal sex differentiation in birds. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  6. Phylogenetic relationship and virulence inference of Streptococcus Anginosus Group: curated annotation and whole-genome comparative analysis support distinct species designation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    VNTR numbers that occurred over the course of one year. Conclusions The comparative genomic analysis of the SAG clarifies the phylogenetics of these bacteria and supports the distinct species classification. Numerous potential virulence determinants were identified and provide a foundation for further studies into SAG pathogenesis. Furthermore, the data may be used to enable the development of rapid diagnostic assays and therapeutics for these pathogens. PMID:24341328

  7. Randomized controlled clinical trial comparing one-piece and two-piece dental implants supporting fixed and removable dental prostheses: 4- to 6-year observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamper, Felix B; Benic, Goran I; Sanz-Martin, Ignacio; Asgeirsson, Asgeir G; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Thoma, Daniel S

    2017-05-29

    To test whether or not a one- (S1) and a two-piece (S2) dental implant systems render the same biological, technical, and esthetic outcomes regarding implants and implant-supported reconstructions over an observation period of 4 to 6 years. Sixty patients were randomly assigned to receive S1 or S2 implants. The implants were restored with either fixed or removable prostheses. The insertion of the final reconstruction was chosen as baseline. One-year and 4- to 6-year (FU-5) measurements included biological (e.g. marginal bone level, probing pocket depth, peri-implant mucositis, and peri-implantitis), technical (e.g. fracture or loosening of prosthetic screws, fracture or loosening of abutments, fracture of framework, and/or veneering ceramic (minor, major), loss of retention for cemented restorations), and esthetic parameters (visibility of the crown margin, shimmering of the implant through the mucosa, the level of the facial margo mucosae compared to the contralateral tooth or implant site and the modified papilla index) for implants and reconstructions. Survival and success rates of implants and reconstructions were calculated. Because of the asymmetric data distributions, nonparametric statistical methods were applied. The implant-based analysis revealed a cumulative implant survival rate of 97.9% (S1: 96.6%; S2: 98.9%) at FU-5. The median marginal bone level for group S1 changed from 0.51 mm at baseline to 0.49 mm at FU-5 and for group S2 from 1.02 mm to 1.35 mm (P rate was 94.6% (S1: 92.3%; S2: 96.7%). The overall patient-based biological complication rate amounted to 15.4% (S1) and to 23.3% (S2) (P = 0.517), whereas the overall technical complication rates were 30.8% (S1) and 13.3% (S2) (P = 0.349). The prosthetic survival rates were 93.1% for S1 and 100% for S2 (P > 0.05). Both implant systems reveal high survival rates on the implant and prosthetic level. Apart from marginal bone-level changes, biological and technical outcomes did not reveal

  8. Phylogenomics and comparative genomic studies delineate six main clades within the family Enterobacteriaceae and support the reclassification of several polyphyletic members of the family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnajar, Seema; Gupta, Radhey S

    2017-10-01

    The family Enterobacteriaceae harbors many important pathogens, however it has proven difficult to reliably distinguish different members of this family or discern their interrelationships. To understand the interrelationships among the Enterobacteriaceae species, we have constructed two comprehensive phylogenetic trees for 78 genome-sequenced Enterobacteriaceae species based on 2487 core genome proteins, and another set of 118 conserved proteins. The genome sequences of Enterobacteriaceae species were also analyzed for genetic relatedness based on average amino acid identity and 16S rRNA sequence similarity. In parallel, comparative genomic studies on protein sequences from the Enterobacteriaceae have identified 88 molecular markers in the form of conserved signature indels (CSIs) that are uniquely shared by specific members of the family. All of these multiple lines of investigations provide consistent evidence that most of the species/genera within the family can be assigned to 6 different subfamily level clades which are designated as the "Escherichia clade", "Klebsiella clade", "Enterobacter clade", "Kosakonia clade", "Cronobacter clade" and "Cedecea clade". The members of the six described clades, in addition to their distinct branching in phylogenetic trees, can now be reliably demarcated in molecular terms on the basis of multiple identified CSIs that are exclusively shared by the group members. Several additional CSIs identified in this work that are either specific for individual genera (viz. Kosakonia, Kluyvera and Escherichia-Shigella), or are present at various taxonomic depths, offer information regarding the interrelationships among the different clades. The described molecular markers provide novel means for diagnostic as well as genetic and biochemical studies on the Enterobacteriaceae species and for resolving the polyphyly of its several genera viz. Escherichia, Enterobacter and Kluyvera. On the bases of our results, we are proposing the

  9. Decision Making Support in Wastewater Management: Comparative analysis of techniques and tools used in centralized and decentralized system layouts UDK 628.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmony Musiyarira

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater management has been seen primarily as a technical and economic issue but it is now recognised that these are some of the elements in an array of other factors that affect sustainability of wastewater systems. Literature studies point out that municipal authorities have a general and long-standing tradition of using indicators in monitoring performance, reviewing progress and reporting the state of the environment as part of the regulatory enacted compliance. However, they have neglected other critical aspects of use of these indicators such as their input into the planning and decision making process. This research advocates for the use of sustainable indicators in a context based planning approach and the utilisation of Multi Criteria Decision Aid (MCDA in a two step approach for comparative analysis and assessment of the sustainability of wastewater systems. The overall objective was to develop a methodology for wastewater systems selection and to produce a practical planning tool to aid in decision making for municipalities. Another objective was to provide recommendations for wastewater and sanitation management improvement in the case study area. The methodology consisted of comprehensive literature review, case study analysis, a review of the Decision Support Systems (DSS in use and the development of the DSS for Gauteng Province. The full spectrum of viable wastewater or sanitation options was incorporated into the DSS. From the sustainability assessments carried out using Multi criteria decision analysis, one result showed that varying degrees of sustainability are obtainable with each treatment technology involved and decentralised technologies appear more sustainable. Based on the local context and indicators used in this research, the DSS results suggest that land treatment systems, stabilisation ponds and ecological treatment methods are more sustainable. One major finding from literature is that no technology is

  10. 'Intimate mothering publics': comparing face-to-face support groups and Internet use for women seeking information and advice in the transition to first-time motherhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sophia Alice

    2015-01-01

    This paper seeks to contribute to an understanding of the changing nature of support and information-seeking practices for women in the transition to first-time motherhood. In the context of increasing digitalisation, the significance of new virtual spaces for parenting is discussed. The paper demonstrates how women seek out alternative forms of expertise (specifically, non-medical expertise) and social support. The author argues for the importance of 'intimate mothering publics' through which women gather experiential information and practical support. These publics can act as a space for women to 'test' or legitimise their new identity as a mother. Intimate mothering publics are particularly useful for thinking about the meaning-making practices and learning experiences that occur during intimate online and face-to-face interactions. A variety of types of online support may be used during pregnancy. Surreptitious support in particular involves users invisibly receiving advice, information and reassurance that might otherwise be lacking. Access to intimate mothering publics is motivated by a number of factors, including feelings of community or acceptance, the desire to be a good mother or parent, emotional support and the need for practical and experiential advice.

  11. Risk implications of renewable support instruments: Comparative analysis of feed-in tariffs and premiums using a mean-variance approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitzing, Lena

    2014-01-01

    Different support instruments for renewable energy expose investors differently to market risks. This has implications on the attractiveness of investment. We use mean-variance portfolio analysis to identify the risk implications of two support instruments: feed-in tariffs and feed-in premiums....... Using cash flow analysis, Monte Carlo simulations and mean-variance analysis, we quantify risk-return relationships for an exemplary offshore wind park in a simplified setting. We show that feedin tariffs systematically require lower direct support levels than feed-in premiums while providing the same...... attractiveness for investment, because they expose investors to less market risk. These risk implications should be considered when designing policy schemes....

  12. Comparative Effects of Mindfulness and Support and Information Group Interventions for Parents of Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Other Developmental Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsky, Yona; P Hastings, Richard; Weiss, Jonathan A; M Palucka, Anna; Hutton, Sue; White, Karen

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluated two community based interventions for parents of adults with autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disabilities. Parents in the mindfulness group reported significant reductions in psychological distress, while parents in the support and information group did not. Reduced levels of distress in the mindfulness group were maintained at 20 weeks follow-up. Mindfulness scores and mindful parenting scores and related constructs (e.g., self-compassion) did not differ between the two groups. Results suggest the psychological components of the mindfulness based group intervention were effective over and above the non-specific effects of group processes and informal support.

  13. Can peer support be cost saving? An economic evaluation of RAPSID: a randomized controlled trial of peer support in diabetes compared to usual care alone in East of England communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, La'Marcus; Graffy, Jonathan; Holman, Daniel; Simmons, David

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes peer support, where one person with diabetes helps others, may improve diabetes management. The objective of this study was to perform a cost analysis of peer support strategies used in RAndomized controlled trial of Peer Support in type 2 Diabetes. We performed a 2×2 factorial randomized cluster controlled trial in England. People with type 2 diabetes were invited to participate as either 'peer' or 'peer support facilitator' (PSF) through postal invitation predominantly from general practice. Clusters, based on local communities, were each randomly assigned to one arm of group, 1:1, both group and 1:1 or control interventions. The intervention was delivered over 8-12 months by trained PSFs, supported by monthly meetings with a diabetes nurse. Out-of-pocket expenses/service utilization were self-reported at baseline, midpoint and on trial completion. Intervention costs were collated. Non-hospital costs used National Health Service (NHS) reference costs. Hospital payments were obtained from one local commissioning group and mean payments calculated. The analysis employed a societal perspective. Costs were evaluated at the conclusion of the trial. Participants (n=1299) were recruited across 130 clusters. The four arms were well balanced and matched (60% male, mean diabetes duration 9.5 years, mean glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) 7.4+/-1.3%, 17% insulin treated). Implementation costs at 2013 rates were £13.84/participant/annum, participant out-of-pocket expenses for any intervention were £11.41/participant/annum and the NHS-incurred costs were reduced by £138.38/participant/annum. Savings for the 1:1, group and any intervention were £233.65, £90.52 and £113.13/participant/annum, respectively. We conclude that both 1:1 and group diabetes peer support over 8-12 months are cost saving in this setting, although much of the benefit is largely derived by differences in self-reported healthcare utilization. Long-term benefits should be investigated. ISRCTN

  14. A prospective randomized multicentre study comparing vaginal progesterone gel and vaginal micronized progesterone tablets for luteal support after in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergh, Christina; Lindenberg, Svend; Al Humaidan, Peter Samir Heskjær

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY QUESTION: Is vaginal progesterone gel equivalent to vaginal micronized progesterone tablets concerning ongoing pregnancy rate and superior concerning patient convenience when used for luteal support after IVF/ICSI? SUMMARY ANSWER: Equivalence of treatments in terms of ongoing live intraut...

  15. Comparative Effects of Mindfulness and Support and Information Group Interventions for Parents of Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Other Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsky, Yona; Hastings, Richard P.; Weiss, Jonathan A.; Palucka, Anna M.; Hutton, Sue; White, Karen

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated two community based interventions for parents of adults with autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disabilities. Parents in the mindfulness group reported significant reductions in psychological distress, while parents in the support and information group did not. Reduced levels of distress in the mindfulness group…

  16. Organizational Support Systems for Innovation and Intrapreneurship: A Comparative Analysis of Innovative Cases from R&D Centres and Operating Departments of Large Corporations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimala, Mathew J.; Jose, P.D.; Thomas, K. Raju

    2007-01-01

    The research literature is rich on innovations in R&D-specific organizations and provides useful information on support systems and other organizational features associated with such specialized organizations. An implied assumption of many studies is that R&D exists as an independent entity, without controls or influences from the other…

  17. Critical Needs and Level of Support for the Military Spouse: A Comparative Study of the National Guard and Active Army during the Iraq War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilas, Cynthia Nikki

    2009-01-01

    National Guard units have been asked to serve in ways never before experienced since the beginning of the Iraq War and throughout the continued war on terror. Multiple deployments, frequent long-term separations from families, communities, and jobs may have far reaching implications. Family Readiness Groups and a climate of support shown by…

  18. Comparative analysis of selected biomechanic characteristics between a support backward swing and support swing for the 1 1/4 straddle-piked forward salto on the parallel bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Edvard; Kolar, Katarina Andlovic; Stuhec, Stanko

    2002-01-01

    The aim of our research was to study the relationships between performance variables in a support backward swing (SBS), which was used as a progressive step in the learning procedure for a 1 1/4 straddle-piked front somersault and the swing prior to a 1 1/4 straddle-piked front somersault from support to bent arm support on the parallel bars (5/4S). Mitja Petkovsek, parallel bars gold medallist at the 2000 EC in Bremen, performed these elements. Kinematic analysis involved CMAS software (Praha, 1993), and the Suskana body segment model that has 17 points and 15 segments. Kinetic variables were estimated using 2D IMGIM software, which has 8 points and 6 segments (Colja and Cuk, 1994). The results indicated that some kinematic aspects of the two types of swings were similar but there were important differences in kinetic aspects of the motion. During the swing for the 5/4S, force and torque were higher than in the SBS.

  19. Support for Farmers' Cooperatives : case study report structure and strategy of wine cooperatives: comparing Veneto, Italy, to Castilla-La Mancha, Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Bijman, J.; Gijselinckx, C.; Poppe, K.J.

    2012-01-01

    The imbalances in bargaining power between the contracting parties in the food supply chain have drawn much attention, also from policy makers. The European Commission is committed to facilitate the restructuring of the sector by encouraging the creation of voluntary agricultural producer organisations. DG Agriculture and Rural Development has launched a large study, “Support for Farmers' Cooperatives”, that will provide the background knowledge that will help farmers organise themselves in c...

  20. Ruthenium oxide/carbon composites with microporous or mesoporous carbon as support and prepared by two procedures. A comparative study as supercapacitor electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pico, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049-Madrid (Spain); Morales, E. [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Polimeros (ICTP), CSIC, Juan de la Cierva 3, E-28006-Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, J.A.; Centeno, T.A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR), CSIC, Francisco Pintado Fe 26, E-33011-Oviedo (Spain); Ibanez, J. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas (CENIM), CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, E-28040-Madrid (Spain); Rojas, R.M.; Amarilla, J.M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049-Madrid (Spain); Rojo, J.M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049-Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jmrojo@icmm.csic.es

    2009-03-01

    Composites are prepared by deposition of nanoparticles of RuO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O (1-4 nm) on two carbons: microporous carbon (1.3 nm of average micropore size) and mesoporous carbon (11 nm of average mesopore size). Two-preparation procedures are used: (i) procedure A consisting of repetitive impregnations of the carbons with RuCl{sub 3}.0.5H{sub 2}O solutions, and (ii) procedure B based on impregnation of the carbons with Ru(acac){sub 3} vapour. The procedure B leads to supported RuO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O particles that appear more crystalline than those obtained by the procedure A. Specific capacitance and specific surface area of the composites are discussed as functions of the RuO{sub 2} content, and different dependences for the composites derived from the two carbons are found. Mesoporous carbon is better support than microporous carbon. Procedure A leads to supported RuO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O particles with higher specific capacitance than the particles deposited by procedure B.

  1. A Phase III randomized controlled trial comparing the efficacy, safety and tolerability of oral dydrogesterone versus micronized vaginal progesterone for luteal support in in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournaye, Herman; Sukhikh, Gennady T; Kahler, Elke; Griesinger, Georg

    2017-05-01

    Is oral dydrogesterone 30 mg daily (10 mg three times daily [TID]) non-inferior to micronized vaginal progesterone (MVP) 600 mg daily (200 mg TID) for luteal support in in vitro fertilization (IVF), assessed by the presence of fetal heartbeats determined by transvaginal ultrasound at 12 weeks of gestation? Non-inferiority of oral dydrogesterone versus MVP was demonstrated at 12 weeks of gestation, with a difference in pregnancy rate and an associated confidence interval (CI) that were both within the non-inferiority margin. MVP is routinely used in most clinics for luteal support in IVF, but it is associated with side effects, such as vaginal irritation and discharge, as well as poor patient acceptance. Dydrogesterone may be an alternative treatment due to its patient-friendly oral administration. Lotus I was an international Phase III randomized controlled trial, performed across 38 sites, from August 2013 to March 2016. Subjects were premenopausal women (>18 to birth rates of 34.6% (172 mothers with 213 newborns) and 29.8% (142 mothers with 158 newborns) were obtained in the dydrogesterone and MVP groups, respectively (difference 4.9%; 95% CI: -0.8-10.7%). Oral dydrogesterone was well tolerated and had a similar safety profile to MVP. The analysis of the results was powered to consider the clinical pregnancy rate, but the live birth rate may be of greater clinical interest. Conclusions relating to the differences between treatments in live birth rate, observed in this study, should therefore be made with caution. Oral dydrogesterone may replace MVP as the standard of care for luteal phase support in IVF, owing to the oral route being more patient-friendly than intravaginal administration, as well as it being a well tolerated and efficacious treatment. Sponsored and supported by Abbott Established Pharmaceuticals Division. H.T.'s institution has received grants from Merck, MSD, Goodlife, Cook, Roche, Besins, Ferring and Mithra (now Allergan) and H.T. has received

  2. Psychological impact, support and information needs for women with an abnormal Pap smear: comparative results of a questionnaire in three European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Anna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive information on cervical cancer is currently available. Its effectiveness in reducing anxiety in women receiving abnormal Pap tests is not clear. We investigated current practices of communicating abnormal Pap results to evaluate women's reactions and determine the sources of information they use subsequently. Methods A self-administered questionnaire-based study was performed in 1475 women in France, Spain and Portugal who had received an abnormal Pap smear result in the 12 months prior to completing the questionnaire. Questions covered methods of communication of the result, emotional reactions, support received (from the physician and entourage, and information sources, using pre-specified check box options and rating scales. Data were analyzed by country. Results Pap test results were mostly communicated by phone to Spanish women (76%, while physician letters were common in France (59% and Portugal (36%. Frequent reactions were anxiety, panic and stress, which were less common in Spanish women than their French and Portuguese counterparts. After discussing with their physician, half of the participants were worried, despite rating highly the psychological support received. Over 90% of women in each country discussed their results with family or friends. Partners provided a high level of support. Overall, the abnormal diagnosis and consequences had a low to medium impact on daily, professional and family life and their relationships with their partner. Impact was higher in Spanish women than the French or Portuguese. Information on the diagnosis and its treatment was rated average, and nearly 80% of participants wanted more information, notably French women. Preferred sources were the physician and the Internet. Conclusions Women expressed a strong wish for more information about cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases, and that their physician play a major role in its provision and in support. There was a

  3. Surfing for Data: A Gathering Trend in Data Storage Is the Use of Web-Based Applications that Make It Easy for Authorized Users to Access Hosted Server Content with Just a Computing Device and Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, the widespread availability of networks and the flexibility of Web browsers have shifted the industry from a client-server model to a Web-based one. In the client-server model of computing, clients run applications locally, with the servers managing storage, printing functions, and network traffic. Because every client is…

  4. Erratum: Google Earth as Geoscience Data Browser Project: Development of a Tool to Convert JAMSTEC Research Vessel Navigation Data to KML [Data Science Journal, Volume 8, 30 March 2009. S85-S91

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Yamagishi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The following PDF indicates errata for the original article entitled "Google Earth as Geoscience Data Browser Project: Development of a Tool to Convert JAMSTEC Research Vessel Navigation Data to KML" by Y Yamagishi, H Nagao, K Suzuki, H Tamura, T Hatakeyama, H Yanaka and S Tsuboi.

  5. Comparative Advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jie; Jensen, Camilla

    2007-01-01

    that are typically explained from the supply-side variables, the comparative advantage of the exporting countries. A simple model is proposed and tested. The results render strong support for the relevance of supply-side factors such as natural endowments, technology, and infrastructure in explaining international...

  6. Acti-Tape™ (elastic therapeutic tape as compared with a knee guard in providing support to the knee joint: an open-label, randomized, crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui HK

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hoong Keong Hui,1 Narayan J Karne,2 Navneet Sonawane31Nutriworks Ltd, Kowloon, Hong Kong; 2Karne Hospital, Pune, India; 3Vedic Lifesciences Pvt Ltd, Mumbai, IndiaStudy design: Randomized, open-label, crossover, controlled study.Background: Elastic taping methods are used to provide support to the musculoskeletal system in athletes. Acti-Tape™ (an elastic therapeutic tape has been marketed for the last 2–3 years and has shown good results in providing support to the joints. This pilot study was planned to collect data on the clinical outcomes and to assess if a single tape application of Acti-Tape over the knee joint could provide benefits similar to a traditionally used knee guard.Methods: Thirteen subjects aged 30–65 years visiting an orthopedic center in Pune, India who were suffering from osteoarthritis were randomly assigned to either Acti-Tape (n=6 or a knee guard (n=7 in the first intervention period (6 days and were crossed over to the other group in the second intervention period (6 days after a washout of 1 day. Main outcome measures were change from day 0 to day 6 in pain visual analog score (VAS; timed up and go (TUG, medial step down (MSD, and unilateral anterior reach (UAR tests; and subject's preference.Results: Data for all the 13 subjects were pooled and analyzed by Student's t-test as treatment-by-period interaction was not significant by analysis of variance (P>0.05. The changes (mean ± standard deviation after using Acti-Tape and a knee guard, respectively, were pain VAS, –10±5.4 versus (vs –11.5±5.83; TUG, –0.62±1.33 vs –0.46±1.56; UAR, 0.15±1.07 vs 0.75±0.44; and MSD, 1.08±095 vs 0.85±1.14. These were statistically significant with both devices for pain VAS, UAR, and MSD, but not for TUG. Between the treatments however, no statistically significant difference was seen. Eleven of 13 (85% subjects preferred Acti-Tape for future use (P<0.05 by McNemar’s χ2 test. No safety concerns were reported by the

  7. [Comparative evaluation of productivity of several green cultures as potential higher plant components of bio-regenerative systems of life support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakova, S A; Tikhomirov, A A; Velichko, V V; Golovko, T G; Tabalenkova, G N; Zakhozhiĭ, I G; Matusevich, V V

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the investigation was to select, analyze and evaluate green plant species known for assisting resistance to diseases and improving physiological functions in humans, and to test allelopathic compatibility of selected species with basic systems for life support. Nutrient substrates were freshly made soil-like substrate (SLS) and clayite. Green cultures were 6 spinach species, 2 lettuces, 2 leaf cabbage species and ruccola. The investigations showed that plant productivity was either equal to or better on freshly made SLS than on clayite; however, the greens accumulated large quantities of nitrate nitrogen. The highest productivity distinguished leaf cabbage; the best antiradical properties was demonstrated by lettuces and the worst, by some spinach species. None of the species displayed a negative allelopathic effect on productivity of the reddish test culture.

  8. Two possible driving forces supporting the evolution of animal communication. Comment on "Towards a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology: Framing the language-ready brain" by Michael A. Arbib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin-Frier, Clément; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.

    2016-03-01

    In the target paper [1], M.A. Arbib proposes a quite exhaustive review of the (often computational) models developed during the last decades that support his detailed scenario on language evolution (the Mirror System Hypothesis, MSH). The approach considers that language evolved from a mirror system for grasping already present in LCA-m (the last common ancestor of macaques and humans), to a simple imitation system for grasping present in LCA-c (the last common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans), to a complex imitation system for grasping that developed in the hominid line since that ancestor. MSH considers that this complex imitation system is a key evolutionary step for a language-ready brain, providing all the required elements for an open-ended gestural communication system. The transition from the gestural (bracchio-manual and visual) to the vocal (articulatory and auditory) domain is supposed to be a less important evolutionary step.

  9. Findings of a Four-Year Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Two-Piece and One-Piece Zirconia Abutments Supporting Single Prosthetic Restorations in Maxillary Anterior Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerino Paolantoni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this randomized controlled study is to investigate the clinical results obtained over four years and incidence of complications associated with one- versus two-piece custom made zirconia anchorages, in single tooth implant-supported restorations of the maxillary anterior region. Sixty-five patients, with a total of 74 missing maxillary teeth, were selected in the period from February 2007 to July 2010. Two different ways of custom made zirconia abutment and final prosthetic restoration were evaluated: a standard zirconia abutment associated with a pressed layer of lithium disilicate with an all-ceramic cemented restoration versus one-piece restoration with the facing porcelain fired and pressed straight to the custom made zirconia abutment. In 29 cases, the restoration consisted of an all-ceramic restoration for cementation (two pieces; in 45 cases the restoration was a screw-retained restoration (one piece. Three all-ceramic restorations broke during the observation time. Two one-piece restorations fractured after 26 months. At follow-up examination there were no significant differences between one-piece and two-piece groups regarding the PI, BI, and MBL. Awaiting studies with longer follow-up times, a careful conclusion is that zirconia anchorages for single-implant restorations seem to demonstrate good short-term technical and biological results.

  10. Findings of a Four-Year Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Two-Piece and One-Piece Zirconia Abutments Supporting Single Prosthetic Restorations in Maxillary Anterior Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolantoni, Guerino; Marenzi, Gaetano; Blasi, Andrea; Mignogna, Jolanda; Sammartino, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled study is to investigate the clinical results obtained over four years and incidence of complications associated with one- versus two-piece custom made zirconia anchorages, in single tooth implant-supported restorations of the maxillary anterior region. Sixty-five patients, with a total of 74 missing maxillary teeth, were selected in the period from February 2007 to July 2010. Two different ways of custom made zirconia abutment and final prosthetic restoration were evaluated: a standard zirconia abutment associated with a pressed layer of lithium disilicate with an all-ceramic cemented restoration versus one-piece restoration with the facing porcelain fired and pressed straight to the custom made zirconia abutment. In 29 cases, the restoration consisted of an all-ceramic restoration for cementation (two pieces); in 45 cases the restoration was a screw-retained restoration (one piece). Three all-ceramic restorations broke during the observation time. Two one-piece restorations fractured after 26 months. At follow-up examination there were no significant differences between one-piece and two-piece groups regarding the PI, BI, and MBL. Awaiting studies with longer follow-up times, a careful conclusion is that zirconia anchorages for single-implant restorations seem to demonstrate good short-term technical and biological results.

  11. Comparative investigation of vibration and current monitoring for prediction of mechanical and electrical faults in induction motor based on multiclass-support vector machine algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangsar, Purushottam; Tiwari, Rajiv

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents an investigation of vibration and current monitoring for effective fault prediction in induction motor (IM) by using multiclass support vector machine (MSVM) algorithms. Failures of IM may occur due to propagation of a mechanical or electrical fault. Hence, for timely detection of these faults, the vibration as well as current signals was acquired after multiple experiments of varying speeds and external torques from an experimental test rig. Here, total ten different fault conditions that frequently encountered in IM (four mechanical fault, five electrical fault conditions and one no defect condition) have been considered. In the case of stator winding fault, and phase unbalance and single phasing fault, different level of severity were also considered for the prediction. In this study, the identification has been performed of the mechanical and electrical faults, individually and collectively. Fault predictions have been performed using vibration signal alone, current signal alone and vibration-current signal concurrently. The one-versus-one MSVM has been trained at various operating conditions of IM using the radial basis function (RBF) kernel and tested for same conditions, which gives the result in the form of percentage fault prediction. The prediction performance is investigated for the wide range of RBF kernel parameter, i.e. gamma, and selected the best result for one optimal value of gamma for each case. Fault predictions has been performed and investigated for the wide range of operational speeds of the IM as well as external torques on the IM.

  12. Findings of a Four-Year Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Two-Piece and One-Piece Zirconia Abutments Supporting Single Prosthetic Restorations in Maxillary Anterior Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolantoni, Guerino; Marenzi, Gaetano; Blasi, Andrea; Mignogna, Jolanda; Sammartino, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled study is to investigate the clinical results obtained over four years and incidence of complications associated with one- versus two-piece custom made zirconia anchorages, in single tooth implant-supported restorations of the maxillary anterior region. Sixty-five patients, with a total of 74 missing maxillary teeth, were selected in the period from February 2007 to July 2010. Two different ways of custom made zirconia abutment and final prosthetic restoration were evaluated: a standard zirconia abutment associated with a pressed layer of lithium disilicate with an all-ceramic cemented restoration versus one-piece restoration with the facing porcelain fired and pressed straight to the custom made zirconia abutment. In 29 cases, the restoration consisted of an all-ceramic restoration for cementation (two pieces); in 45 cases the restoration was a screw-retained restoration (one piece). Three all-ceramic restorations broke during the observation time. Two one-piece restorations fractured after 26 months. At follow-up examination there were no significant differences between one-piece and two-piece groups regarding the PI, BI, and MBL. Awaiting studies with longer follow-up times, a careful conclusion is that zirconia anchorages for single-implant restorations seem to demonstrate good short-term technical and biological results. PMID:27027093

  13. Support vector machine and fuzzy C-mean clustering-based comparative evaluation of changes in motor cortex electroencephalogram under chronic alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Surendra; Ghosh, Subhojit; Tetarway, Suhash; Sinha, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the magnitude and spatial distribution of frequency spectrum in the resting electroencephalogram (EEG) were examined to address the problem of detecting alcoholism in the cerebral motor cortex. The EEG signals were recorded from chronic alcoholic conditions (n = 20) and the control group (n = 20). Data were taken from motor cortex region and divided into five sub-bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta-1 and beta-2). Three methodologies were adopted for feature extraction: (1) absolute power, (2) relative power and (3) peak power frequency. The dimension of the extracted features is reduced by linear discrimination analysis and classified by support vector machine (SVM) and fuzzy C-mean clustering. The maximum classification accuracy (88 %) with SVM clustering was achieved with the EEG spectral features with absolute power frequency on F4 channel. Among the bands, relatively higher classification accuracy was found over theta band and beta-2 band in most of the channels when computed with the EEG features of relative power. Electrodes wise CZ, C3 and P4 were having more alteration. Considering the good classification accuracy obtained by SVM with relative band power features in most of the EEG channels of motor cortex, it can be suggested that the noninvasive automated online diagnostic system for the chronic alcoholic condition can be developed with the help of EEG signals.

  14. Trial participants' experiences of early enhanced speech and language therapy after stroke compared with employed visitor support: a qualitative study nested within a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Alys; Gomersall, Timothy; Bowen, Audrey

    2013-02-01

    To explore trial participants' experiences of the process and outcomes of early, enhanced speech and language therapy after stroke with support from an employed visitor. Qualitative study nested within a randomized controlled trial. Twney-two people who, after stroke, had a diagnosis of aphasia (12), dysarthria (5) or both (5) and who participated in the ACT NoW study. Eight English NHS usual care settings. Individual interviews. Thematic content analysis assisted by a bespoke data transformation protocol for incorporating non-verbal and semantically ambiguous data. Participants highly regarded regular and sustained contact with someone outside of immediate family/friends who engaged them in deliberate activities/communication in the early months after stroke. Participants identified differences in the process of intervention between speech and language therapists and employed visitors. But no major discriminations were made between the impact or value of this contact according to whether provided by a speech and language therapist or employed visitor. Participant-defined criteria for effectiveness of contact included: impact on mood and confidence, self-recognition of progress and the meeting of individual needs. As in the randomized controlled trial, participants reported no evidence of added benefit of early communication therapy beyond that from attention control. The findings do not imply that regular contact with any non-professional can have beneficial effects for someone with aphasia or dysarthria in the early weeks following a stroke. The study points to specific conditions that would have to be met for contact to have a positive effect.

  15. Hydroconversion of Waste Cooking Oil into Green Biofuel over Hierarchical USY-Supported NiMo Catalyst: A Comparative Study of Desilication and Dealumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongwei Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The hydroconversion of waste cooking oil into hydrocarbon fuel was investigated over the hierarchical USY zeolite-supported NiMo catalysts which were prepared by dealumination ((NH42SiF6/desilication (NaOH. The physical and acidity properties of the hierarchical catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine (Py-IR, ammonia temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD, and H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR. The Brønsted/Lewis (B/L acid distribution was little affected by dealumination and the acid density decreased significantly. However, the highly-desilicated catalysts decreased the B/L ratio obviously. Therefore, many more Mo species in the NiMoO4− and MoO3 phases were produced in the AHFS-treated catalysts, while more high-valence-state Mo species in the NiMoO4− phase were formed in the NaOH-treated catalysts. The AHFS-treated catalysts showed higher catalytic activity and better DCO2 selectivity and selective cracking for jet fuel. The 42.3% selectivity of jet fuel and 13.5% selectivity of jet-range aromatics was achieved over the 8 wt % (NH42SiF6-treated catalyst with 67% DCO2 selectivity.

  16. arrayCGHbase: an analysis platform for comparative genomic hybridization microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau Yves

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of the human genome sequence as well as the large number of physically accessible oligonucleotides, cDNA, and BAC clones across the entire genome has triggered and accelerated the use of several platforms for analysis of DNA copy number changes, amongst others microarray comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH. One of the challenges inherent to this new technology is the management and analysis of large numbers of data points generated in each individual experiment. Results We have developed arrayCGHbase, a comprehensive analysis platform for arrayCGH experiments consisting of a MIAME (Minimal Information About a Microarray Experiment supportive database using MySQL underlying a data mining web tool, to store, analyze, interpret, compare, and visualize arrayCGH results in a uniform and user-friendly format. Following its flexible design, arrayCGHbase is compatible with all existing and forthcoming arrayCGH platforms. Data can be exported in a multitude of formats, including BED files to map copy number information on the genome using the Ensembl or UCSC genome browser. Conclusion ArrayCGHbase is a web based and platform independent arrayCGH data analysis tool, that allows users to access the analysis suite through the internet or a local intranet after installation on a private server. ArrayCGHbase is available at http://medgen.ugent.be/arrayCGHbase/.

  17. GeoNotebook: Browser based Interactive analysis and visualization workflow for very large climate and geospatial datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, D.; Chaudhary, A.; Votava, P.; Kotfila, C.

    2016-12-01

    Jointly developed by Kitware and NASA Ames, GeoNotebook is an open source tool designed to give the maximum amount of flexibility to analysts, while dramatically simplifying the process of exploring geospatially indexed datasets. Packages like Fiona (backed by GDAL), Shapely, Descartes, Geopandas, and PySAL provide a stack of technologies for reading, transforming, and analyzing geospatial data. Combined with the Jupyter notebook and libraries like matplotlib/Basemap it is possible to generate detailed geospatial visualizations. Unfortunately, visualizations generated is either static or does not perform well for very large datasets. Also, this setup requires a great deal of boilerplate code to create and maintain. Other extensions exist to remedy these problems, but they provide a separate map for each input cell and do not support map interactions that feed back into the python environment. To support interactive data exploration and visualization on large datasets we have developed an extension to the Jupyter notebook that provides a single dynamic map that can be managed from the Python environment, and that can communicate back with a server which can perform operations like data subsetting on a cloud-based cluster.

  18. Trial participants’ experiences of early enhanced speech and language therapy after stroke compared with employed visitor support: a qualitative study nested within a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomersall, Timothy; Bowen, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To explore trial participants’ experiences of the process and outcomes of early, enhanced speech and language therapy after stroke with support from an employed visitor. Design: Qualitative study nested within a randomized controlled trial. Participants: Twney-two people who, after stroke, had a diagnosis of aphasia (12), dysarthria (5) or both (5) and who participated in the ACT NoW study. Setting: Eight English NHS usual care settings. Method: Individual interviews. Thematic content analysis assisted by a bespoke data transformation protocol for incorporating non-verbal and semantically ambiguous data. Results: Participants highly regarded regular and sustained contact with someone outside of immediate family/friends who engaged them in deliberate activities/communication in the early months after stroke. Participants identified differences in the process of intervention between speech and language therapists and employed visitors. But no major discriminations were made between the impact or value of this contact according to whether provided by a speech and language therapist or employed visitor. Participant-defined criteria for effectiveness of contact included: impact on mood and confidence, self-recognition of progress and the meeting of individual needs. Conclusions: As in the randomized controlled trial, participants reported no evidence of added benefit of early communication therapy beyond that from attention control. The findings do not imply that regular contact with any non-professional can have beneficial effects for someone with aphasia or dysarthria in the early weeks following a stroke. The study points to specific conditions that would have to be met for contact to have a positive effect. PMID:22837542

  19. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis data in support of leaf comparative proteomics of two citrus species differing in boron-tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Sang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Here, we provide the data from a comparative proteomics approach used to investigate the response of boron (B-tolerant ‘Xuegan’ (Citrus sinensis and B-intolerant ‘Sour pummelo’ (Citrus grandis leaves to B-toxicity. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE technique, we identified 50 and 45 protein species with a fold change of more than 1.5 and a P-value of less than 0.05 from B-toxic C. sinensis and C. grandis leaves. These B-toxicity-responsive protein species were mainly involved in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, antioxidation and detoxification, stress responses, coenzyme biosynthesis, protein and amino acid metabolism, signal transduction, cell transport, cytoskeleton, nucleotide metabolism, and cell cycle and DNA processing. A detailed analysis of this data may be obtained from Sang et al. (J. Proteomics 114 (2015[1].

  20. dbCRY: a Web-based comparative and evolutionary genomics platform for blue-light receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Min; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Hye-Young; Lee, Gir-Won; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Choi, Doil

    2014-01-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins that play a central role in the circadian oscillations of all living organisms except archaea. Cryptochromes are clustered into three subfamilies: plant-type cryptochromes, animal-type cryptochromes and cryptochrome-DASH proteins. These subfamilies are composed of photolyase/cryptochrome superfamily with 6-4 photolyase and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase. Cryptochromes have conserved domain architectures with two distinct domains, an N-terminal photolyase-related domain and a C-terminal domain. Although the molecular function and domain architecture of cryptochromes are conserved, their molecular mechanisms differ between plants and animals. Thus, cryptochromes are one of the best candidates for comparative and evolutionary studies. Here, we have developed a Web-based platform for comparative and evolutionary studies of cryptochromes, dbCRY (http://www.dbcryptochrome.org/). A pipeline built upon the consensus domain profile was applied to 1438 genomes and identified 1309 genes. To support comparative and evolutionary genomics studies, the Web interface provides diverse functions such as (i) browsing by species, (ii) protein domain analysis, (iii) multiple sequence alignment, (iv) homology search and (v) extended analysis opportunities through the implementation of 'Favorite Browser' powered by the Comparative Fungal Genomics Platform 2.0 (CFGP 2.0; http://cfgp.snu.ac.kr/). dbCRY would serve as a standardized and systematic solution for cryptochrome genomics studies. Database URL: http://www.dbcryptochrome.org/

  1. The GPlates Portal: Cloud-based interactive 3D and 4D visualization of global geological and geophysical data and models in a browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Dietmar; Qin, Xiaodong; Sandwell, David; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; Williams, Simon; Flament, Nicolas; Maus, Stefan; Seton, Maria

    2017-04-01

    The pace of scientific discovery is being transformed by the availability of 'big data' and open access, open source software tools. These innovations open up new avenues for how scientists communicate and share data and ideas with each other, and with the general public. Here, we describe our efforts to bring to life our studies of the Earth system, both at present day and through deep geological time. The GPlates Portal (portal.gplates.org) is a gateway to a series of virtual globes based on the Cesium Javascript library. The portal allows fast interactive visualization of global geophysical and geological data sets, draped over digital terrain models. The globes use WebGL for hardware-accelerated graphics and are cross-platform and cross-browser compatible with complete camera control. The globes include a visualization of a high-resolution global digital elevation model and the vertical gradient of the global gravity field, highlighting small-scale seafloor fabric such as abyssal hills, fracture zones and seamounts in unprecedented detail. The portal also features globes portraying seafloor geology and a global data set of marine magnetic anomaly identifications. The portal is specifically designed to visualize models of the Earth through geological time. These space-time globes include tectonic reconstructions of the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields, and several models of long-wavelength surface dynamic topography through time, including the interactive plotting of vertical motion histories at selected locations. The portal has been visited over half a million times since its inception in October 2015, as tracked by google analytics, and the globes have been featured in numerous media articles around the world. This demonstrates the high demand for fast visualization of global spatial big data, both for the present-day as well as through geological time. The globes put the on-the-fly visualization of massive data sets at the fingertips of end-users to

  2. Predicting Bank Financial Failures Using Discriminant Analysis And Support Vector Machines Methods A Comparative Analysis In Commercial Banks In Sudan 2006-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. SirElkhatim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Bank failures threaten the economic system as a whole. Therefore predicting bank financial failures is crucial to prevent andor lessen its negative effects on the economic system. Financial crises affecting both emerging markets and advanced countries over the centuries have severe economic consequences but they can be hard to prevent and predict identifying financial crises causes remains both science and art said Stijn Claessens assistant director of the International Monetary Fund. While it would be better to mitigate risks financial crises will recur often in waves and better crisis management is therefore important. Analyses of recurrent causes suggest that to prevent crises governments should consider reforms in many underlying areas. That includes developing prudent fiscal and monetary policies better regulating the financial sector including reducing the problem of too-big-to-fail banks and developing effective macro-prudential policies. Despite new regulations and better supervision crises are likely to recur in part because they can reflect deeper problems related to income inequality the political economy and common human behavior. As such improvements in crisis management are also needed. This is originally a classification problem to categorize banks as healthy or non-healthy ones. This study aims to apply Discriminant analysis and Support Vector Machines methods to the bank failure prediction problem in a Sudanese case and to present a comprehensive computational comparison of the classification performances of the techniques tested. Eleven financial and non-financial ratios with six feature groups including capital adequacy asset quality Earning and liquidity CAMELS are selected as predictor variables in the study. Credit risk also been evaluated using logistic analysis to study the effect of Islamic finance modes sectors and payment types used by Sudanese banks with regard to their possibilities of failure. Experimental results

  3. Ensuring comparability of benzene exposure estimates across three nested case-control studies in the petroleum industry in support of a pooled epidemiological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, D C; Armstrong, T W; Pearlman, E D; Verma, D K; Schnatter, A R; Rushton, L

    2010-03-19

    Three case-control studies each nested within a cohort of petroleum workers assessed exposure to benzene in relation to risk of haematopoietic cancers. These studies have each been updated and the cases will be pooled to derive a more powerful study. The benzene exposure of new leukemia cases and controls was estimated in accordance with each respective study's original methods. An essential component of the process of pooling the data was comparison and rationalisation of the exposure estimates to ensure accuracy and consistency of approach. This paper describes this process and presents comparative estimates before and after appropriate revision took place. The original petroleum industry studies, in Canada, the UK and Australia, were conducted at different points in time by different study teams, but the industry used similar technology in similar eras in each of these countries. A job history for each subject giving job title, dates of starting and leaving the job and location of work, was assembled. For each job or task, the average benzene exposure (Base Estimate (BE) in ppm) was derived from measurements collected at applicable worksites. Estimates of exposure intensity (workplace exposure estimates (WE)) were then calculated for each line of work history by adjusting the BEs for site- and era-specific exposure-related variables such as loading technology and percentage benzene in the product. To ensure that the exposure estimates were comparable among the studies, the WEs were allocated to generic Job Categories, e.g. Tanker Driver (by technology used e.g. bottom loading), Motor Mechanic. The WEs were stratified into eras, reflecting technological changes in the industry. The arithmetic mean (AM), geometric mean (GM) and range of the stratified WEs were calculated, by study, for each generic Job Category. These were then compared. The AMs of the WEs were regarded as substantially similar if they were within 20% in all three studies in one era or for at

  4. Fixation of 4-part fractures of the proximal humerus: Can we identify radiological criteria that support locking plates or IM nailing? Comparative, retrospective study of 107 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadea, F; Favard, L; Boileau, P; Cuny, C; d'Ollone, T; Saragaglia, D; Sirveaux, F

    2016-12-01

    No objective criteria exist to help surgeons choose between IM nailing and plate fixation for 4-part fractures of the proximal humerus. The goal of this study was to identify radiological criteria that would make one technique a better choice than the other. This was a comparative, multicentre, retrospective study of 54 cases of antegrade nailing and 53 cases of plating performed between 1st January 2009 and 31 December 2011 for 4-part fractures of the proximal humerus. All patients had a minimum radiological and clinical follow-up of 18 months. The functional outcomes were evaluated using the weighted Constant score; a poor result was defined as a weighted Constant scorehumeral head and tuberosities; morphology of the medial column (i.e. calcar comminution, posteromedial hinge, size of metaphyseal head extension); occurrence of avascular necrosis (AVN). After an average follow-up of 42 months, the weighted Constant scores and rate of poor outcomes were 77% and 48% in the nail group and 81% and 38% in the plate group, respectively (ns). The humeral head was reduced into an anatomical position, valgus or varus in 57%, 30% and 13% of cases in the nail group, and 58%, 29% and 13% in the plate group, respectively. The tuberosities healed in an anatomical position in 72% of nail cases and 70% of plate cases (ns). Only the presence of a medial hinge preoperatively had an effect on the functional outcomes in the nail and plate groups: the weighted Constant scores (P=0.05) and rate of poor outcomes (P=0.02) were 82% and 52% in the nail group and 97% and 9% in the plate group, respectively. The complication rates were comparable: the rates of AVN and articular screw penetration were 17% and 11% in the nail group, and 15% and 11% in the plate group, respectively. The surgical revision rate was 18.5% in the nail group and 30% in the plate group. If the medial hinge is preserved, we recommend locking plate fixation. In other cases, either technique can be used as long as the

  5. The communicative and organisational competencies of the librarian in networked learning support: a comparative analysis of the roles of the facilitator and the librarian.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trine Schreiber

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to compare the role of the facilitator with the role of the librarian. Firstly, a list of the role dimensions of the facilitation is described. Secondly, a case study of a facilitation proces is presented. Thirdly, the intermediary functions of the librarian is considered. The comparison shows that the similarities between the two roles concerns the communication, the identification of information needs and the translation of the user formulations into a systematized terminology. Moreover, we cannot exclude that two elements of the librarian's information seeking process; i.e., the searching activity and the evaluation of the results, may exist in the work of the facilitator. Still, the important difference is, that the information seeking process, carried out of the facilitator, may be based not on the information needs of the user but on the predetermined outcome of the communication process. However, a more explicit work with the functions of the librarian; i.e.. both the searching activity and the evaluation of the results, during a networked communication process, may strengthen the group understanding development. In this way, the role of the librarian could develop the role of the facilitator. At the same time, the attention of the facilitator to the needs of the group could bring an important aspect into the role of the librarian.

  6. Belts Evaluated as Limb Tourniquets: BELT Study Comparing Trouser Supporters Used as Medical Devices in a Manikin Model of Wound Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bequette, Blake W; Kragh, John F; Aden, James K; Dubick, Michael A

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of the present study is to compare several models of commercially designed belts as used as a tourniquet. In the Belts Evaluated as Limb Tourniquets (BELT) study, an experiment was designed to test the effectiveness of pants belts as nonimprovised medical devices to control hemorrhage in a manikin. Models of belts included Tourni-belt, Tourniquet Belt, ParaBelt, and Battle Buddy. Data collected included effectiveness, time to stop bleeding, total time of application, pressure, blood loss, and composite results (score count of good results; composite outcome good if every component was good). Differences in effectiveness percentages among models were not statistically significant. The difference in mean between users was statistically significant for stop time, total time, pressure, blood loss, composite score, and composite outcome. Mean time to stop bleeding differed for only 1 pair of models after the Tukey-Kramer adjustment; ParaBelt was faster than Tourniquet Belt. Mean total time of application differed between ParaBelt-Tourniquet Belt and Tourni-belt-Tourniquet Belt; the former model in both pairs was faster. No significant difference in mean blood loss measured by model was found. For composite outcome score, no pairwise difference between models was significant. For composite outcome (good-bad), ParaBelt had good results in 75% of tests; the other 3 models had significantly worse results. In a preliminary laboratory analysis of belt tourniquet models using a manikin, performance differed by model. ParaBelt performed better than other models for the composite outcome. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. A Comparative Nitrogen Balance and Productivity Analysis of Legume and Non-legume Supported Cropping Systems: The Potential Role of Biological Nitrogen Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetta, Pietro P M; Young, Mark; Bachinger, Johann; Bergkvist, Göran; Doltra, Jordi; Lopez-Bellido, Rafael J; Monti, Michele; Pappa, Valentini A; Reckling, Moritz; Topp, Cairistiona F E; Walker, Robin L; Rees, Robert M; Watson, Christine A; James, Euan K; Squire, Geoffrey R; Begg, Graham S

    2016-01-01

    The potential of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) to provide sufficient N for production has encouraged re-appraisal of cropping systems that deploy legumes. It has been argued that legume-derived N can maintain productivity as an alternative to the application of mineral fertilizer, although few studies have systematically evaluated the effect of optimizing the balance between legumes and non N-fixing crops to optimize production. In addition, the shortage, or even absence in some regions, of measurements of BNF in crops and forages severely limits the ability to design and evaluate new legume-based agroecosystems. To provide an indication of the magnitude of BNF in European agriculture, a soil-surface N-balance approach was applied to historical data from 8 experimental cropping systems that compared legume and non-legume crop types (e.g., grains, forages and intercrops) across pedoclimatic regions of Europe. Mean BNF for different legume types ranged from 32 to 115 kg ha(-1) annually. Output in terms of total biomass (grain, forage, etc.) was 30% greater in non-legumes, which used N to produce dry matter more efficiently than legumes, whereas output of N was greater from legumes. When examined over the crop sequence, the contribution of BNF to the N-balance increased to reach a maximum when the legume fraction was around 0.5 (legume crops were present in half the years). BNF was lower when the legume fraction increased to 0.6-0.8, not because of any feature of the legume, but because the cropping systems in this range were dominated by mixtures of legume and non-legume forages to which inorganic N as fertilizer was normally applied. Forage (e.g., grass and clover), as opposed to grain crops in this range maintained high outputs of biomass and N. In conclusion, BNF through grain and forage legumes has the potential to generate major benefit in terms of reducing or dispensing with the need for mineral N without loss of total output.

  8. A comparative nitrogen balance and productivity analysis of legume and non-legume supported cropping systems: the potential role of biological nitrogen fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro P M Iannetta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The potential of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF to provide sufficient N for production have encouraged re-appraisal of cropping systems that deploy legumes. It has been argued that legume-derived N can maintain productivity as an alternative to the application of mineral fertiliser, although few studies have systematically evaluated the effect of optimising the balance between legumes and non N-fixing crops to optimise production. In addition, the shortage, or even absence in some regions, of measurements of BNF in crops and forages severely limits the ability to design and evaluate new, legume–based agroecosystems. To provide an indication of the magnitude of BNF in European agriculture, a soil-surface N-balance approach was applied to historical data from 8 experimental cropping systems that compared legume and non-legume crop types (e.g. grains, forages and intercrops across pedoclimatic regions of Europe. Mean BNF for different legume types ranged from 32-115 kg ha-1 annually. Output in terms of total biomass (grain, forage, etc. was 30% greater in non-legumes, which used N to produce dry matter more efficiently than legumes, whereas output of N was greater from legumes. When examined over the crop sequence, the contribution of BNF to the N-balance increased to reach a maximum when the legume fraction was around 0.5 (legume crops were present in half the years. BNF was lower when the legume fraction increased to 0.6-0.8, not because of any feature of the legume, but because the cropping systems in this range were dominated by mixtures of legume and non-legume forages to which inorganic N as fertiliser was normally applied. Forage (e.g. grass and clover, as opposed to grain crops in this range maintained high outputs of biomass and N. In conclusion, BNF through grain and forage legumes have the potential to generate major benefit in terms of reducing or dispensing with the need for mineral N without loss of total output.

  9. TranscriptomeBrowser: a powerful and flexible toolbox to explore productively the transcriptional landscape of the Gene Expression Omnibus database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Lopez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As public microarray repositories are constantly growing, we are facing the challenge of designing strategies to provide productive access to the available data. METHODOLOGY: We used a modified version of the Markov clustering algorithm to systematically extract clusters of co-regulated genes from hundreds of microarray datasets stored in the Gene Expression Omnibus database (n = 1,484. This approach led to the definition of 18,250 transcriptional signatures (TS that were tested for functional enrichment using the DAVID knowledgebase. Over-representation of functional terms was found in a large proportion of these TS (84%. We developed a JAVA application, TBrowser that comes with an open plug-in architecture and whose interface implements a highly sophisticated search engine supporting several Boolean operators (http://tagc.univ-mrs.fr/tbrowser/. User can search and analyze TS containing a list of identifiers (gene symbols or AffyIDs or associated with a set of functional terms. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As proof of principle, TBrowser was used to define breast cancer cell specific genes and to detect chromosomal abnormalities in tumors. Finally, taking advantage of our large collection of transcriptional signatures, we constructed a comprehensive map that summarizes gene-gene co-regulations observed through all the experiments performed on HGU133A Affymetrix platform. We provide evidences that this map can extend our knowledge of cellular signaling pathways.

  10. TranscriptomeBrowser: a powerful and flexible toolbox to explore productively the transcriptional landscape of the Gene Expression Omnibus database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Fabrice; Textoris, Julien; Bergon, Aurélie; Didier, Gilles; Remy, Elisabeth; Granjeaud, Samuel; Imbert, Jean; Nguyen, Catherine; Puthier, Denis

    2008-01-01

    As public microarray repositories are constantly growing, we are facing the challenge of designing strategies to provide productive access to the available data. We used a modified version of the Markov clustering algorithm to systematically extract clusters of co-regulated genes from hundreds of microarray datasets stored in the Gene Expression Omnibus database (n = 1,484). This approach led to the definition of 18,250 transcriptional signatures (TS) that were tested for functional enrichment using the DAVID knowledgebase. Over-representation of functional terms was found in a large proportion of these TS (84%). We developed a JAVA application, TBrowser that comes with an open plug-in architecture and whose interface implements a highly sophisticated search engine supporting several Boolean operators (http://tagc.univ-mrs.fr/tbrowser/). User can search and analyze TS containing a list of identifiers (gene symbols or AffyIDs) or associated with a set of functional terms. As proof of principle, TBrowser was used to define breast cancer cell specific genes and to detect chromosomal abnormalities in tumors. Finally, taking advantage of our large collection of transcriptional signatures, we constructed a comprehensive map that summarizes gene-gene co-regulations observed through all the experiments performed on HGU133A Affymetrix platform. We provide evidences that this map can extend our knowledge of cellular signaling pathways.

  11. Support of the supporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiefel, F

    2008-02-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that health care professionals working with severely ill patients are in need of support. Beside "external" factors, such as heavy clinical patient volume or administrative duties, "intra-psychic stressors," related to the inner significance of contextual factors, are an important source of clinician's distress. Identification of and working through intrapsychic stressors can considerably reduce psychological distress and thus provide effective and long-lasting support of the oncology clinician. This article discusses key elements of intra-psychic stressors, namely (1) emotions towards the patient, (2) awareness of own limits, (3) confusion about empathy, identification, counter-transference and collusion, (4) the influence of early development and life trajectory on career choices and professional identity and (5) the conflicting roles a health care professional being in need of support has to face.

  12. A multicentre, randomised controlled trial comparing the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of early nutritional support via the parenteral versus the enteral route in critically ill patients (CALORIES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Sheila E; Parrott, Francesca; Harrison, David A; Sadique, M Zia; Grieve, Richard D; Canter, Ruth R; McLennan, Blair Kp; Tan, Jermaine Ck; Bear, Danielle E; Segaran, Ella; Beale, Richard; Bellingan, Geoff; Leonard, Richard; Mythen, Michael G; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2016-04-01

    Malnutrition is a common problem in critically ill patients in UK NHS critical care units. Early nutritional support is therefore recommended to address deficiencies in nutritional state and related disorders in metabolism. However, evidence is conflicting regarding the optimum route (parenteral or enteral) of delivery. To estimate the effect of early nutritional support via the parenteral route compared with the enteral route on mortality at 30 days and on incremental cost-effectiveness at 1 year. Secondary objectives were to compare the route of early nutritional support on duration of organ support; infectious and non-infectious complications; critical care unit and acute hospital length of stay; all-cause mortality at critical care unit and acute hospital discharge, at 90 days and 1 year; survival to 90 days and 1 year; nutritional and health-related quality of life, resource use and costs at 90 days and 1 year; and estimated lifetime incremental cost-effectiveness. A pragmatic, open, multicentre, parallel-group randomised controlled trial with an integrated economic evaluation. Adult general critical care units in 33 NHS hospitals in England. 2400 eligible patients. Five days of early nutritional support delivered via the parenteral (n = 1200) and enteral (n = 1200) route. All-cause mortality at 30 days after randomisation and incremental net benefit (INB) (at £20,000 per quality-adjusted life-year) at 1 year. By 30 days, 393 of 1188 (33.1%) patients assigned to receive early nutritional support via the parenteral route and 409 of 1195 (34.2%) assigned to the enteral route had died [p = 0.57; absolute risk reduction 1.15%, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.65 to 4.94; relative risk 0.97 (0.86 to 1.08)]. At 1 year, INB for the parenteral route compared with the enteral route was negative at -£1320 (95% CI -£3709 to £1069). The probability that early nutritional support via the parenteral route is more cost-effective - given the data - is < 20

  13. An efficient architecture to support digital pathology in standard medical imaging repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques Godinho, Tiago; Lebre, Rui; Silva, Luís Bastião; Costa, Carlos

    2017-07-01

    In the past decade, digital pathology and whole-slide imaging (WSI) have been gaining momentum with the proliferation of digital scanners from different manufacturers. The literature reports significant advantages associated with the adoption of digital images in pathology, namely, improvements in diagnostic accuracy and better support for telepathology. Moreover, it also offers new clinical and research applications. However, numerous barriers have been slowing the adoption of WSI, among which the most important are performance issues associated with storage and distribution of huge volumes of data, and lack of interoperability with other hospital information systems, most notably Picture Archive and Communications Systems (PACS) based on the DICOM standard. This article proposes an architecture of a Web Pathology PACS fully compliant with DICOM standard communications and data formats. The solution includes a PACS Archive responsible for storing whole-slide imaging data in DICOM WSI format and offers a communication interface based on the most recent DICOM Web services. The second component is a zero-footprint viewer that runs in any web-browser. It consumes data using the PACS archive standard web services. Moreover, it features a tiling engine especially suited to deal with the WSI image pyramids. These components were designed with special focus on efficiency and usability. The performance of our system was assessed through a comparative analysis of the state-of-the-art solutions. The results demonstrate that it is possible to have a very competitive solution based on standard workflows. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Relative Concentrations of Nutrients and Toxins Dictate Feeding by a Vertebrate Browser, the Greater Glider Petauroides volans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lora M Jensen

    Full Text Available Although ecologists believe that vertebrate herbivores must select a diet that allows them to meet their nutritional requirements, while avoiding intoxication by plant secondary metabolites, this is remarkably difficult to show. A long series of field and laboratory experiments means that we have a good understanding of the factors that affect feeding by leaf-eating marsupials. This knowledge and the natural intraspecific variation in Eucalyptus chemistry allowed us to test the hypothesis that the feeding decisions of greater gliders (Petauroides volans depend on the concentrations of available nitrogen (incorporating total nitrogen, dry matter digestibility and tannins and of formylated phloroglucinol compounds (FPCs, potent antifeedants unique to Eucalyptus. We offered captive greater gliders foliage from two species of Eucalyptus, E. viminalis and E. melliodora, which vary naturally in their concentrations of available nitrogen and FPCs. We then measured the amount of foliage eaten by each glider and compared this with our laboratory analyses of foliar total nitrogen, available nitrogen and FPCs for each tree offered. The concentration of FPCs was the main factor that determined how much gliders ate of E. viminalis and E. melliodora, but in gliders fed E. viminalis the concentration of available nitrogen was also a significant influence. In other words, greater gliders ate E. viminalis leaves with a particular combination of FPCs and available nitrogen that maximised the nutritional gain but minimised their ingestion of toxins. In contrast, the concentration of total nitrogen was not correlated with feeding. This study is among the first to empirically show that browsing herbivores select a diet that balances the potential gain (available nutrients and the potential costs (plant secondary chemicals of eating leaves. The major implication of the study is that it is essential to identify the limiting nutrients and relevant toxins in a system in

  15. The Relative Concentrations of Nutrients and Toxins Dictate Feeding by a Vertebrate Browser, the Greater Glider Petauroides volans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Lora M; Wallis, Ian R; Foley, William J

    2015-01-01

    Although ecologists believe that vertebrate herbivores must select a diet that allows them to meet their nutritional requirements, while avoiding intoxication by plant secondary metabolites, this is remarkably difficult to show. A long series of field and laboratory experiments means that we have a good understanding of the factors that affect feeding by leaf-eating marsupials. This knowledge and the natural intraspecific variation in Eucalyptus chemistry allowed us to test the hypothesis that the feeding decisions of greater gliders (Petauroides volans) depend on the concentrations of available nitrogen (incorporating total nitrogen, dry matter digestibility and tannins) and of formylated phloroglucinol compounds (FPCs), potent antifeedants unique to Eucalyptus. We offered captive greater gliders foliage from two species of Eucalyptus, E. viminalis and E. melliodora, which vary naturally in their concentrations of available nitrogen and FPCs. We then measured the amount of foliage eaten by each glider and compared this with our laboratory analyses of foliar total nitrogen, available nitrogen and FPCs for each tree offered. The concentration of FPCs was the main factor that determined how much gliders ate of E. viminalis and E. melliodora, but in gliders fed E. viminalis the concentration of available nitrogen was also a significant influence. In other words, greater gliders ate E. viminalis leaves with a particular combination of FPCs and available nitrogen that maximised the nutritional gain but minimised their ingestion of toxins. In contrast, the concentration of total nitrogen was not correlated with feeding. This study is among the first to empirically show that browsing herbivores select a diet that balances the potential gain (available nutrients) and the potential costs (plant secondary chemicals) of eating leaves. The major implication of the study is that it is essential to identify the limiting nutrients and relevant toxins in a system in order to

  16. Multi-Sector Sustainability Browser (MSSB) User Manual: A Decision Support Tool (DST) for Supporting Sustainability Efforts in Four Areas - Land Use, Transportation, Buildings and Infrastructure, and Materials Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s Sustainable and Healthy Communities (SHC) Research Program is developing methodologies, resources, and tools to assist community members and local decision makers in implementing policy choices that facilitate sustainable approaches in managing their resources affecti...

  17. Comparative Study of Teachers in Regular Schools and Teachers in Specialized Schools in France, Working with Students with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: Stress, Social Support, Coping Strategies and Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujut, Emilie; Dean, Annika; Grouselle, Amélie; Cappe, Emilie

    2016-09-01

    The inclusion of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in schools is a source of stress for teachers. Specialized teachers have, in theory, received special training. To compare the experiences of teachers dealing with students with ASD in different classroom environments. A total of 245 teachers filled out four self-report questionnaires measuring perceived stress, social support, coping strategies, and burnout. Specialized teachers perceive their teaching as a challenge, can count on receiving help from colleagues, use more problem-focused coping strategies and social support seeking behavior, and are less emotionally exhausted than teachers in regular classes. This study highlights that teachers in specialized schools and classes have better adjustment, probably due to their training, experience, and tailored classroom conditions.

  18. Response to dietary tannin challenges in view of the browser/grazer dichotomy in an Ethiopian setting: Bonga sheep versus Kaffa goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yisehak, Kechero; Kibreab, Yoseph; Taye, Tolemariam; Lourenço, Marta Ribeiro Alves; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that goats (typical browser) are better adapted to digest tannin-rich diets than sheep (typical grazer). To evaluate this, Bonga sheep and Kaffa goats were used in a 2 × 3 randomized crossover design with two species, three diets, and three periods (15-day adaptation + 7-day collection). The dietary treatments consisted of grass-based hay only (tannin-free diet = FT), a high-tannin diet (36% Albizia schimperiana (AS) + 9% Ficus elastica (FE) + 55% FT (HT)), and HT + polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG). Animals were individually fed at 50 g dry matter (DM)/kg body weight (BW) and had free access to clean drinking water and mineralized salt licks. Nutrient intake, apparent nutrient digestibility, nutrient conversion ratios, and live weight changes were determined. Condensed tannin concentrations in AS and FE were 110 and 191 g/kg DM, respectively. Both sheep and goats ate 47% more of HT than FT, and dry matter intake further increased by 9% when PEG was added, with clear difference in effect size between goats and sheep (P goats, but crude protein (CP) digestibility was higher in HT + PEG-fed goats than in sheep fed the same diet. However, PEG addition induced a larger improvement in growth performance and feed efficiency ratio in sheep than in goat (P < 0.001). The addition of PEG as a tannin binder improved digestion and performance in both species, but with the highest effect size in sheep.

  19. Comparative analysis of the fit of 3-unit implant-supported frameworks cast in nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys and commercially pure titanium after casting, laser welding, and simulated porcelain firings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiossi, Rodrigo; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; de Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the vertical misfit of 3-unit implant-supported nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy and commercially pure titanium (cpTi) frameworks after casting as 1 piece, after sectioning and laser welding, and after simulated porcelain firings. The results on the tightened side showed no statistically significant differences. On the opposite side, statistically significant differences were found for Co-Cr alloy (118.64 microm [SD: 91.48] to 39.90 microm [SD: 27.13]) and cpTi (118.56 microm [51.35] to 27.87 microm [12.71]) when comparing 1-piece to laser-welded frameworks. With both sides tightened, only Co-Cr alloy showed statistically significant differences after laser welding. Ni-Cr alloy showed the lowest misfit values, though the differences were not statistically significantly different. Simulated porcelain firings revealed no significant differences.

  20. Comparison of Three Browser Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanus Lintang Timur Aji Pamungkas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this era of globalization and modernity, it is important to obtain information, and the role of Internet in providing information is indispensable. The existence of the World Wide Web technology makes it easy for people to surf various websites. The elements on the website are the code javascript, css, and HTML5

  1. Secure multimedia browser over network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Shiguo; Liu, Zhongxuan; Wang, Jinwei; Ren, Zhen; Wang, Haila

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, a secure multimedia browsing scheme is proposed, which is constructed based on perceptual multimedia encryption and secure key distribution. In this scheme, multimedia data are encrypted perceptually under the control of user key and quality factor. This encryption process combining with Advanced Video Coding (AVC) is of low cost, and keeps file format unchanged. The key distribution scheme deals with user input, authenticates users, and controls the secure multimedia sharing process. Thus, only the users who have registered can obtain multimedia data. And they can be classified into several types according to their payment. The analyses and experimental results show that it is suitable for secure multimedia applications such as Video-on-Demand (VOD) system, Audio-on-Demand (AOD) system, pay-TV, videoconferencing systems, wireless or mobile multimedia, and so on.

  2. Comparative Evaluation of a Four-Implant-Supported Polyetherketoneketone Framework Prosthesis: A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis Based on Cone Beam Computed Tomography and Computer-Aided Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Sun; Shin, Sang-Wan; Lee, Sang-Pyo; Kim, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jee-Hwan; Lee, Jeong-Yol

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate and compare polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) with different framework materials for implant-supported prostheses by means of a three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA) based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and computer-aided design (CAD) data. A geometric model that consisted of four maxillary implants supporting a prosthesis framework was constructed from CBCT and CAD data of a treated patient. Three different materials (zirconia, titanium, and PEKK) were selected, and their material properties were simulated using FEA software in the generated geometric model. In the PEKK framework (ie, low elastic modulus) group, the stress transferred to the implant and simulated adjacent tissue was reduced when compressive stress was dominant, but increased when tensile stress was dominant. This study suggests that the shock-absorbing effects of a resilient implant-supported framework are limited in some areas and that rigid framework material shows a favorable stress distribution and safety of overall components of the prosthesis.

  3. [Parents support for the ban on television food advertising to children is particularly high in France, especially compared to the USA. This result should influence political decision-making to restrict food marketing targeting young people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalon, Hélène; Cogordan, Chloé; Arwidson, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Massive exposure of children to low-nutrient food advertising combined with the increasing prevalence of obesity have led to growing support for statutory regulations concerning food marketing targeting children. Food and advertising industries lobbies have nevertheless managed to stop such measures in many countries. In this context, civil society support for statutory regulation, especially by parents, is essential. The objective of this study was to describe and analyse factors associated with parents' opinion on the impact and possible banning of food TV advertisements targeting children. An online survey of 2,387 parents of children aged 3 to 17 was conducted in 2013. Associations between parents'opinion on food advertising and their socio-demographic characteristics were analysed by multivariate logistic regressions. The influence of food advertising on children' preferences was perceived by 64.7% of parents, 68.8% of parents were at least occasionally asked by their children to purchase food or beverages seen on television, 43.5% reported that their children influenced their food purchases and 73.7% supported a statutory regulation that would ban advertisements for excessively fatty, salty and sugary beverages and foods during television programmes for children or teenagers. This view was positively associated with high socio-economic status and a high perceived impact of advertising on children's food preferences. Parents support for the ban on television food advertising to children is particularly high in France, especially compared to the USA. This result should influence political decision-making to restrict food marketing targeting young people.

  4. Comparative Multi-Criteria Assessment of Climate Policies and Sustainable Development Strategies in Cameroon: Towards a GIS Decision-Support Tool for the Design of an Optimal REDD+ Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Gwanyebit Kehbila

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cameroon is committed to reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation plus conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of carbon stocks (REDD+. To achieve this goal, the government has introduced a series of policy reforms and formulated a number of key strategic planning documents to advance the REDD+ readiness process in Cameroon. This paper assesses the extent to which major cross-sectoral policies support or impede the development and implementation of an optimal REDD+ strategy in Cameroon from a comparative multi-criteria perspective. Study results reveal that a majority of the policy instruments reviewed appeared to be less prescriptive in terms of any tangible REDD+ strategy, as they do not have provisions for tangible measures to reduce deforestation and forest degradation. Given the lack of adequate flexibility, prompt review and responsiveness of these cross-sectoral policies to adapt themselves to new realities and respond to a changing environment, this paper introduces a GIS-REDD+ decision support system (GIS-REDD+DSS that is necessary to support the adaptive element of an adaptive REDD+ strategy in Cameroon. The GIS-REDD+DSS, an electronic REDD+agri intermediary hub, serves the following purpose: (1 host a database of locally-relevant climate information, improved input technologies, best practices as well as land use and forest cover geo-spatial maps; (2 host a virtual economic tool that performs economic valuations (costs and benefits and financial analysis of REDD+agri projects to aid investment decision-making; and (3 host an electronic marketplace to mediate any-to-any transactions among REDD+agri project developers, service providers, input suppliers, private and institutional investors and buyers (wholesalers and retailers, thereby creating value in two ways: aggregation and matching. This decision support tool, we argue, is a fundamental prerequisite for “policy and REDD+ safeguard

  5. Jules Verne Voyager: A Web Interactive Tool for Comparative Planetology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estey, L.; Pappalardo, R.; Meertens, C.

    2004-12-01

    A Web interactive map tool called "Jules Verne Voyager" was originally developed in 1999 by UNAVCO and continues to evolve. The Voyager tool can easily be used for comparative planetology studies by grades 8-14. Thematic mapping datasets, now totaling about 70 Gb, can be accessed by the tool and include global-scale maps of the inner solar system planets and moons, plus Jupiter and the Galilean moons. The map images are viewed on a Web browser created on demand by the server system. On the client-side, only a Java-enabled browser is required, and the Voyager Java applet runs well with common browsers like Netscape, Mozilla, Opera, and Internet Explorer. The applet sends a key-value pair URL to the http://jules.unavco.org server which queues incoming requests and sends them to a bank of computers dedicated to map image creation. The engine for map image creation makes use of the "Generic Mapping Tools" (GMT) software of Paul Wessel and Walter Smith, followed by image conversion of the GMT-created PostScript to GIF for raster image export and display back on the client browser. Because of the GMT-based engine on the server system, the student user can easily create the same type of images from real planetary data that researchers create. The tool also gives a student the ability to switch background datasets and overlay certain other thematic datasets, thus providing a minimal GIS capability. To our knowledge, the map tool has not yet formally been used in a 8-14 classroom environment, though informal use by students and teachers in these grades suggest that it would be well received. The server system is currently capable of handing a moderate level of requests that would result from classroom use; for example, as a system benchmark, over 800 Voyager images were created and served in about an hour during a DLESE 2003 annual meeting workshop. The Voyager map tool is being used by instructors in earth science and comparative planetology as a means to create customized

  6. Etat actuel des recherches fondamentales sur les catalyseurs bimétalliques à base de platine, sur support alumine, comparables à ceux utilisés dans l'industrie pétrolière. Current State of Fundamental Research on Platinum-Base Bimetallic Catalysts on an Alumina Support, Comparable to the Ones Used in the Petroleum Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charcosset H.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available L'article concerne essentiellement les couples (Pt, Re, (Pt, Ir, (Pt, Ru traités dans l'ordre - préparation des catalyseurs (imprégnation du support, réduction par l'hy-drogène; -- caractérisation des catalyseurs réduits ; - activités catalytiques ; - essais d'extrapolation aux catalyseurs industriels , - conclusions. On met l'accent en particulier sur I la difficulté d'obtenir des informations sur le degré de réduction qui soient significafives de l'état du catalyseur dans des conditions normales de travail, d'où la nécessité d'associer plusieurs techniques parmi : l'analyse thermique différentielle (ATD, l'analyse thermogravimétrique (ATG, la volumétrie, la catharométrie, la spectroscopie électronique (ESCA, la spectroscopie infrarouge, la thermodésorption de H2, les mesures des activités catalytiques ; 2 la différence entre diagrammes de phase des systèmes divisés et massiques ; 3 l'application des titrages par H2 de l'oxygène adsorbé, pour mettre en évi-dence la présence de petites particules de Mell pur dans un catalyseur (Pt, Mell/ AI203 , 4 la dépendance de l'état final du catalyseur du mode d'activation. Le couple (Pt, Re peut être stabilisé à l'état de particules d'alliage de compositions superfi-cielle et moyenne voisines ou à l'état de mélange de particules de (Pt, Re de teneur en Re inférieure à la composition nominale et de Re pur très bien dispersé. Les couples (Pt, Ir et surtout (Pt, Ru se caractérisent par la difficulté d'obtenir l'état alliage avec une composition constante d'une particule métallique à l'autre 5 les variations d'activité catalytique, dues à l'addition de Mell à Pt, reflétant un ou plusieurs des effets a augmentation de dispersion du Pt sans (ou avec modification de ses pro-priétés intrinsèques, par les ions de faible valence de W, Mo, Cr... b formation de Mell à l'état métallique donnant éventuellement un alliage avec Pt; c rôle des dépôts carbon

  7. Incidence of mental retardation as compared with other psychiatric disorders and necessary support to persons placed at the Public Institution for Placement of Persons with Mental Disabilities "Drin" Fojnica, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelošević, Edin; Karahmet, Amar; Hadžikapetanović, Halima; Bjelošević, Sonja

    2016-08-01

    Aim To compare the frequency of mental retardation with other psychiatric disorders at the Institute for Mentally Disabled Persons "Drin" Fojnica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, to asses psychosocial condition and necessary support to persons with mental retardation. Methods In this retrospective, descriptive and epidemiologic study neuropsychiatric findings and reports of the Institute's social services of 527 residents (beneficiaries) were analyzed in the period 2013-2014 (age, gender, mobility, years of life spent in the Institute, visits of family members and close relatives, visits to families, mental retardation - degree, required support). Results The research included 213 (40.42%) women and 314 (59.58%) men. The average age was 39.64 years. The average number of years spent in the Institute was 10.42.Fifty-four 25.47%) examinees with mental retardation had occasional visits to their families, while 69 (32.54%) had regular visits. Thirty-four (16.04%) examinees had mild mental retardation, 70 (33.02%) had moderate retardation, 52 (24.52%) were with severe, and 56(26.42%) with profound retardation. It was found that 66 (31.13%)beneficiaries with the diagnosis of mental retardation completely depended on other persons. Conclusion The degree of mental retardation has a direct impact on the process of resocialization. A very small number of people diagnosed with mental retardation had been successfully involved in the process of resocialization. It is necessary work intensively on thecreation of conditions for the realization of the Independent Living Support program, thus making a step forward to deinstitutionalization. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  8. PhyD3: a phylogenetic tree viewer with extended phyloXML support for functional genomics data visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreft, Lukasz; Botzki, Alexander; Coppens, Frederik; Vandepoele, Klaas; Van Bel, Michiel

    2017-09-15

    Comparative and evolutionary studies utilize phylogenetic trees to analyze and visualize biological data. Recently, several web-based tools for the display, manipulation and annotation of phylogenetic trees, such as iTOL and Evolview, have released updates to be compatible with the latest web technologies. While those web tools operate an open server access model with a multitude of registered users, a feature-rich open source solution using current web technologies is not available. Here, we present an extension of the widely used PhyloXML standard with several new options to accommodate functional genomics or annotation datasets for advanced visualization. Furthermore, PhyD3 has been developed as a lightweight tool using the JavaScript library D3.js to achieve a state-of-the-art phylogenetic tree visualization in the web browser, with support for advanced annotations. The current implementation is open source, easily adaptable and easy to implement in third parties' web sites. More information about PhyD3 itself, installation procedures and implementation links are available at http://phyd3.bits.vib.be and at http://github.com/vibbits/phyd3/ . klaas.vandepoele@ugent.vib.be or michiel.vanbel@ugent.vib.be. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  9. Mason: a JavaScript web site widget for visualizing and comparing annotated features in nucleotide or protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaschob, Daniel; Davis, Trisha N; Riffle, Michael

    2015-03-07

    Sequence feature annotations (e.g., protein domain boundaries, binding sites, and secondary structure predictions) are an essential part of biological research. Annotations are widely used by scientists during research and experimental design, and are frequently the result of biological studies. A generalized and simple means of disseminating and visualizing these data via the web would be of value to the research community. Mason is a web site widget designed to visualize and compare annotated features of one or more nucleotide or protein sequence. Annotated features may be of virtually any type, ranging from annotating transcription binding sites or exons and introns in DNA to secondary structure or domain boundaries in proteins. Mason is simple to use and easy to integrate into web sites. Mason has a highly dynamic and configurable interface supporting multiple sets of annotations per sequence, overlapping regions, customization of interface and user-driven events (e.g., clicks and text to appear for tooltips). It is written purely in JavaScript and SVG, requiring no 3(rd) party plugins or browser customization. Mason is a solution for dissemination of sequence annotation data on the web. It is highly flexible, customizable, simple to use, and is designed to be easily integrated into web sites. Mason is open source and freely available at https://github.com/yeastrc/mason.

  10. Tech Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beem, Kate

    2002-01-01

    Discusses technology-support issues, including staff training, cost, and outsourcing. Describes how various school districts manage technology-support services. Features the Technology Support Index, developed by the International Society for Technology in Education, to gauge the operation of school district technology-support programs. (PKP)

  11. Comparative Study on Theoretical and Machine Learning Methods for Acquiring Compressed Liquid Densities of 1,1,1,2,3,3,3-Heptafluoropropane (R227ea via Song and Mason Equation, Support Vector Machine, and Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available 1,1,1,2,3,3,3-Heptafluoropropane (R227ea is a good refrigerant that reduces greenhouse effects and ozone depletion. In practical applications, we usually have to know the compressed liquid densities at different temperatures and pressures. However, the measurement requires a series of complex apparatus and operations, wasting too much manpower and resources. To solve these problems, here, Song and Mason equation, support vector machine (SVM, and artificial neural networks (ANNs were used to develop theoretical and machine learning models, respectively, in order to predict the compressed liquid densities of R227ea with only the inputs of temperatures and pressures. Results show that compared with the Song and Mason equation, appropriate machine learning models trained with precise experimental samples have better predicted results, with lower root mean square errors (RMSEs (e.g., the RMSE of the SVM trained with data provided by Fedele et al. [1] is 0.11, while the RMSE of the Song and Mason equation is 196.26. Compared to advanced conventional measurements, knowledge-based machine learning models are proved to be more time-saving and user-friendly.

  12. Nutritional Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutritional support is therapy for people who cannot get enough nourishment by eating or drinking. You may need it ... nutrients through your digestive system You receive nutritional support through a needle or catheter placed in your ...

  13. A programmable rules engine to provide clinical decision support using HTML forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusinkveld, J; Geissbuhler, A; Sheshelidze, D; Miller, R

    1999-01-01

    The authors have developed a simple method for specifying rules to be applied to information on HTML forms. This approach allows clinical experts, who lack the programming expertise needed to write CGI scripts, to construct and maintain domain-specific knowledge and ordering capabilities within WizOrder, the order-entry and decision support system used at Vanderbilt Hospital. The clinical knowledge base maintainers use HTML editors to create forms and spreadsheet programs for rule entry. A test environment has been developed which uses Netscape to display forms; the production environment displays forms using an embedded browser.

  14. Proactive Support of Internet Browsing when Searching for Relevant Health Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rurik, Clas; Zowalla, Richard; Wiesner, Martin; Pfeifer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Many people use the Internet as one of the primary sources of health information. This is due to the high volume and easy access of freely available information regarding diseases, diagnoses and treatments. However, users may find it difficult to retrieve information which is easily understandable and does not require a deep medical background. In this paper, we present a new kind of Web browser add-on, in order to proactively support users when searching for relevant health information. Our add-on not only visualizes the understandability of displayed medical text but also provides further recommendations of Web pages which hold similar content but are potentially easier to comprehend.

  15. Supporting Families to Support Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John; Rossen, Eric; Cowan, Katherine C.

    2018-01-01

    Collaboration between students' families and the school is an essential component to promoting student mental and behavioral health. Many schools structure their mental health services using a Multi-Tiered System of Supports that offers three different tiers of support from universal supports to personalized help for students with serious…

  16. Recent Developments in Toxico-Cheminformatics; Supporting ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's National Center for Computational Toxicology is building capabilities to support a new paradigm for toxicity screening and prediction through the harnessing of legacy toxicity data, creation of data linkages, and generation of new high-content and high-thoughput screening data. In association with EPA's ToxCast, ToxRefDB, and ACToR projects, the DSSTox project provides cheminformatics support and, in addition, is improving public access to quality structure-annotated chemical toxicity information in less summarized forms than traditionally employed in SAR modeling, and in ways that facilitate data-mining and data read-across. The latest DSSTox version of the Carcinogenic Potency Database file (CPDBAS) illustrates ways in which various summary definitions of carcinogenic activity can be employed in modeling and data mining. DSSTox Structure-Browser provides structure searchability across all published DSSTox toxicity-related inventory, and is enabling linkages between previously isolated toxicity data resources associated with environmental and industrial chemicals. The public DSSTox inventory also has been integrated into PubChem, allowing a user to take full advantage of PubChem structure-activity and bioassay clustering features. Phase I of the ToxCast project is generating high-throughput screening data from several hundred biochemical and cell-based assays for a set of 320 chemicals, mostly pesticide actives with rich toxicology profiles. Incorporating

  17. MAINTENANCE SUPPORT FORMULAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research is reported on the development of a quantitative decision model that can be used in the selection of the most appropriate method of support ...which constitute a cost estimation model by which overall costs (including logistical costs) of alternate methods of support may be compared and the...item for study and the alternatives to be considered, including a major component formula; and (4) examples of model application to end items supported by Frankford Arsenal. (Author)

  18. BALLOON SUPPORT,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two instrument bearing arrays were supported by balloons on the Double Tracks event. One large balloon supported a 750-foot high by 1,500-foot wide...array at 2,500 feet downwind from ground zero, and 8 small evenly spaced balloons supported instruments up to 1,000 feet high over a 7,500foot wide...area at 13,000 feet downwind from ground zero. Air samplers, cascade impactors, and sticky cylinders were supported by the arrays. The balloons used for

  19. A phase 2, randomized, double-blind, multicenter study comparing siltuximab plus best supportive care (BSC) with placebo plus BSC in anemic patients with International Prognostic Scoring System low- or intermediate-1-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Gartenberg, Gary; Steensma, David P; Schipperus, Martin R; Breems, Dimitri A; de Paz, Raquel; Valcárcel, David; Kranenburg, Britte; Reddy, Manjula; Komrokji, Rami S

    2014-09-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) may play an important role in the pathophysiology of anemia of inflammation associated with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). This double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 study assessed the efficacy and safety of siltuximab, a chimeric anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody, in patients with low- and intermediate-1-risk MDS who require transfusions for MDS anemia. Patients were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to siltuximab 15 mg kg(-1) every 4 weeks + best supportive care (BSC) or placebo + BSC for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was reduction in red blood cell (RBC) transfusions to treat MDS anemia, defined as ≥50% relative decrease and ≥2-unit absolute decrease in RBC transfusions. Fifty and 26 patients were randomized to the siltuximab and placebo groups, respectively. The study did not meet its prespecified hypothesis, with six (12%) patients in the siltuximab group and one (3.8%) in the placebo group having reductions in RBC transfusions (P = 0.271). At the time of the planned futility analysis, the prespecified cutoff criteria were not met, and the study was terminated early due to lack of efficacy. No unexpected safety findings were observed. In conclusion, compared to placebo, treatment with siltuximab did not reduce RBC transfusions in transfusion-dependent patients with low- and intermediate-1-risk MDS. Future studies might explore siltuximab in patients with less iron overload and with elevated IL-6 levels and/or using higher doses for MDS. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Study protocol: Cost effectiveness of two strategies to implement the NVOG guidelines on hypertension in pregnancy: An innovative strategy including a computerised decision support system compared to a common strategy of professional audit and feedback, a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luitjes Susanne HE

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypertensive disease in pregnancy remains the leading cause of maternal mortality in the Netherlands. Seventeen percent of the clinical pregnancies are complicated by hypertension and 2% by preeclampsia. The Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (NVOG has developed evidence-based guidelines on the management of hypertension in pregnancy and chronic hypertension. Previous studies showed a low adherence rate to other NVOG guidelines and a large variation in usual care in the different hospitals. An explanation is that the NVOG has no general strategy of practical implementation and evaluation of its guidelines. The development of an effective and cost effective implementation strategy to improve adherence to the guidelines on hypertension in pregnancy is needed. Methods/Design The objective of this study is to assess the cost effectiveness of an innovative implementation strategy of the NVOG guidelines on hypertension including a computerised decision support system (BOS compared to a common strategy of professional audit and feedback. A cluster randomised controlled trial with an economic evaluation alongside will be performed. Both pregnant women who develop severe hypertension or pre-eclampsia and professionals involved in the care for these women will participate. The main outcome measures are a combined rate of major maternal complications and process indicators extracted from the guidelines. A total of 472 patients will be included in both groups. For analysis, descriptive as well as regression techniques will be used. A cost effectiveness and cost utility analysis will be performed according to the intention-to-treat principle and from a societal perspective. Cost effectiveness ratios will be calculated using bootstrapping techniques.