WorldWideScience

Sample records for brownian movement

  1. Thermodynamic and Quantum Thermodynamic Analyses of Brownian Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Gyftopoulos, Elias P.

    2006-01-01

    Thermodynamic and quantum thermodynamic analyses of Brownian movement of a solvent and a colloid passing through neutral thermodynamic equilibrium states only. It is shown that Brownian motors and E. coli do not represent Brownian movement.

  2. Brownian movement and microscopic irreversibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, L. G. M.

    1981-02-01

    An extension of the hypothetical experiment of Szilard, which involved the action of a one-molecule gas in an isolated isothermal system, is developed to illustrate how irreversibility may arise out of Brownian motion. As this development requires a consideration of nonmolecular components such as wheels and pistons, the thought-experiment is remodeled in molecular terms and appears to function as a perpetuum mobile.

  3. Mapping migratory flyways in Asia using dynamic Brownian bridge movement models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Eric C; Newman, Scott H; Prosser, Diann J; Xiao, Xiangming; Ze, Luo; Batbayar, Nyambayar; Balachandran, Sivananinthaperumal; Takekawa, John Y

    2015-01-01

    Identifying movement routes and stopover sites is necessary for developing effective management and conservation strategies for migratory animals. In the case of migratory birds, a collection of migration routes, known as a flyway, is often hundreds to thousands of kilometers long and can extend across political boundaries. Flyways encompass the entire geographic range between the breeding and non-breeding areas of a population, species, or a group of species, and they provide spatial frameworks for management and conservation across international borders. Existing flyway maps are largely qualitative accounts based on band returns and survey data rather than observed movement routes. In this study, we use satellite and GPS telemetry data and dynamic Brownian bridge movement models to build upon existing maps and describe waterfowl space use probabilistically in the Central Asian and East Asian-Australasian Flyways. Our approach provided new information on migratory routes that was not easily attainable with existing methods to describe flyways. Utilization distributions from dynamic Brownian bridge movement models identified key staging and stopover sites, migration corridors and general flyway outlines in the Central Asian and East Asian-Australasian Flyways. A map of space use from ruddy shelducks depicted two separate movement corridors within the Central Asian Flyway, likely representing two distinct populations that show relatively strong connectivity between breeding and wintering areas. Bar-headed geese marked at seven locations in the Central Asian Flyway showed heaviest use at several stopover sites in the same general region of high-elevation lakes along the eastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Our analysis of data from multiple Anatidae species marked at sites throughout Asia highlighted major movement corridors across species and confirmed that the Central Asian and East Asian-Australasian Flyways were spatially distinct. The dynamic Brownian bridge

  4. Chiral Brownian heat pump

    OpenAIRE

    van den Broek, Martijn; Van den Broeck, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We present the exact analysis of a chiral Brownian motor and heat pump. Optimization of the construction predicts, for a nanoscale device, frequencies of the order of kHz and cooling rates of the order of femtojoule per second.

  5. Chiral brownian heat pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, M; Van den Broeck, C

    2008-04-04

    We present the exact analysis of a chiral Brownian motor and heat pump. Optimization of the construction predicts, for a nanoscale device, frequencies of the order of kHz and cooling rates of the order of femtojoule per second.

  6. Chiral Brownian heat pump

    OpenAIRE

    Broek, M. van den; Broeck, C. Van Den

    2007-01-01

    We present the exact analysis of a chiral Brownian motor and heat pump. Optimization of the construction predicts, for a nanoscale device, frequencies of the order of kHz and cooling rates of the order of femtojoule per second.

  7. Electrical autonomous Brownian gyrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, K.-H.; Lee, C.-L.; Lai, P.-Y.; Chen, Y.-F.

    2017-09-01

    We study experimentally and theoretically the steady-state dynamics of a simple stochastic electronic system featuring two resistor-capacitor circuits coupled by a third capacitor. The resistors are subject to thermal noises at real temperatures. The voltage fluctuation across each resistor can be compared to a one-dimensional Brownian motion. However, the collective dynamical behavior, when the resistors are subject to distinct thermal baths, is identical to that of a Brownian gyrator, as first proposed by Filliger and Reimann [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 230602 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.230602]. The average gyrating dynamics is originated from the absence of detailed balance due to unequal thermal baths. We look into the details of this stochastic gyrating dynamics, its dependences on the temperature difference and coupling strength, and the mechanism of heat transfer through this simple electronic circuit. Our work affirms the general principle and the possibility of a Brownian ratchet working near room temperature scale.

  8. Irreversible Brownian Heat Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taye, Mesfin Asfaw

    2017-10-01

    We model a Brownian heat engine as a Brownian particle that hops in a periodic ratchet potential where the ratchet potential is coupled with a linearly decreasing background temperature. We show that the efficiency of such Brownian heat engine approaches the efficiency of endoreversible engine η =1-√{{Tc/Th}} [23]. On the other hand, the maximum power efficiency of the engine approaches η ^{MAX}=1-({Tc/Th})^{1\\over 4}. It is shown that the optimized efficiency always lies between the efficiency at quasistatic limit and the efficiency at maximum power while the efficiency at maximum power is always less than the optimized efficiency since the fast motion of the particle comes at the expense of the energy cost. If the heat exchange at the boundary of the heat baths is included, we show that such a Brownian heat engine has a higher performance when acting as a refrigerator than when operating as a device subjected to a piecewise constant temperature. The role of time on the performance of the motor is also explored via numerical simulations. Our numerical results depict that the time t and the external load dictate the direction of the particle velocity. Moreover, the performance of the heat engine improves with time. At large t (steady state), the velocity, the efficiency and the coefficient of performance of the refrigerator attain their maximum value. Furthermore, we study the effect of temperature by considering a viscous friction that decreases exponentially as the background temperature increases. Our result depicts that the Brownian particle exhibits a fast unidirectional motion when the viscous friction is temperature dependent than that of constant viscous friction. Moreover, the efficiency of this motor is considerably enhanced when the viscous friction is temperature dependent. On the hand, the motor exhibits a higher performance of the refrigerator when the viscous friction is taken to be constant.

  9. 100 years of Einstein's Theory of Brownian Motion: From Pollen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the gambler corresponds to the directed movement of the Brownian particle in Figure 2. The ratcheting via time-dependent potential discussed above is not merely a theoretical possibility but nature exploits this for driving a class of molecular motors in- side cells of living organisms; this includes KIFIA, a family of kinesin ...

  10. q-deformed Brownian motion

    CERN Document Server

    Man'ko, V I

    1993-01-01

    Brownian motion may be embedded in the Fock space of bosonic free field in one dimension.Extending this correspondence to a family of creation and annihilation operators satisfying a q-deformed algebra, the notion of q-deformation is carried from the algebra to the domain of stochastic processes.The properties of q-deformed Brownian motion, in particular its non-Gaussian nature and cumulant structure,are established.

  11. Brownian Motion and General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    O'Hara, Paul

    2013-01-01

    We construct a model of Brownian Motion on a pseudo-Riemannian manifold associated with general relativity. There are two aspects of the problem: The first is to define a sequence of stopping times associated with the Brownian "kicks" or impulses. The second is to define the dynamics of the particle along geodesics in between the Brownian kicks. When these two aspects are taken together, we can associate various distributions with the motion. We will find that the statistics of space-time events will obey a temperature dependent four dimensional Gaussian distribution defined over the quaternions which locally can be identified with Minkowski space. Analogously, the statistics of the 4-velocities will obey a kind of Maxwell-Juttner distribution. In contrast to previous work, our processes are characterized by two independent proper time variables defined with respect to the laboratory frame: a discrete one corresponding to the stopping times when the impulses take place and a continuous one corresponding to th...

  12. Brownian motion and stochastic calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Karatzas, Ioannis

    1998-01-01

    This book is designed as a text for graduate courses in stochastic processes. It is written for readers familiar with measure-theoretic probability and discrete-time processes who wish to explore stochastic processes in continuous time. The vehicle chosen for this exposition is Brownian motion, which is presented as the canonical example of both a martingale and a Markov process with continuous paths. In this context, the theory of stochastic integration and stochastic calculus is developed. The power of this calculus is illustrated by results concerning representations of martingales and change of measure on Wiener space, and these in turn permit a presentation of recent advances in financial economics (option pricing and consumption/investment optimization). This book contains a detailed discussion of weak and strong solutions of stochastic differential equations and a study of local time for semimartingales, with special emphasis on the theory of Brownian local time. The text is complemented by a large num...

  13. White noise flashing Brownian pump

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez-Marin, A.; Sancho, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    A Brownian pump of particles powered by a stochastic flashing ratchet mechanism is studied. The pumping device is embedded in a finite region and bounded by particle reservoirs. In the steady state, we exactly calculate the spatial density profile, the concentration ratio between both reservoirs and the particle flux. A simple numerical scheme is presented allowing for the consistent evaluation of all such observable quantities.

  14. Extremes of multifractional Brownian motion

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Long

    2017-01-01

    Let $B_{H}(t), t\\geq [0,T], T\\in(0,\\infty)$ be the standard Multifractional Brownian Motion(mBm), in this contribution we are concerned with the exact asymptotics of \\begin{eqnarray*} \\mathbb{P}\\left\\{\\sup_{t\\in[0,T]}B_{H}(t)>u\\right\\} \\end{eqnarray*} as $u\\rightarrow\\infty$. Mainly depended on the structures of $H(t)$, the results under several important cases are investigated.

  15. Brownian dynamics without Green's functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delong, Steven; Usabiaga, Florencio Balboa; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael; Griffith, Boyce E; Donev, Aleksandar

    2014-04-07

    We develop a Fluctuating Immersed Boundary (FIB) method for performing Brownian dynamics simulations of confined particle suspensions. Unlike traditional methods which employ analytical Green's functions for Stokes flow in the confined geometry, the FIB method uses a fluctuating finite-volume Stokes solver to generate the action of the response functions "on the fly." Importantly, we demonstrate that both the deterministic terms necessary to capture the hydrodynamic interactions among the suspended particles, as well as the stochastic terms necessary to generate the hydrodynamically correlated Brownian motion, can be generated by solving the steady Stokes equations numerically only once per time step. This is accomplished by including a stochastic contribution to the stress tensor in the fluid equations consistent with fluctuating hydrodynamics. We develop novel temporal integrators that account for the multiplicative nature of the noise in the equations of Brownian dynamics and the strong dependence of the mobility on the configuration for confined systems. Notably, we propose a random finite difference approach to approximating the stochastic drift proportional to the divergence of the configuration-dependent mobility matrix. Through comparisons with analytical and existing computational results, we numerically demonstrate the ability of the FIB method to accurately capture both the static (equilibrium) and dynamic properties of interacting particles in flow.

  16. The Diffusion Process in Small Particles and Brownian Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnevisan, M.

    Albert Einstein in 1926 published his book entitled ''INVESTIGATIONS ON THE THEORY OF THE BROWNIAN MOVEMENT''. He investigated the process of diffusion in an undissociated dilute solution. The diffusion process is subject to Brownian motion. Furthermore, he elucidated the fact that the heat content of a substance will change the position of the single molecules in an irregular fashion. In this paper, I have shown that in order for the displacement of the single molecules to be proportional to the square root of the time, and for v/2 - v 1 Δ =dv/dx , (where v1 and v2 are the concentrations in two cross sections that are separated by a very small distance), ∫ - ∞ ∞ Φ (Δ) dΔ = I and I/τ ∫ - ∞ ∞Δ2/2 Φ (Δ) dΔ = D conditions to hold, then equation (7a) D =√{ 2 D }√{ τ} must be changed to Δ =√{ 2 D }√{ τ} . I have concluded that D =√{ 2 D }√{ τ} is an unintended error, and it has not been amended for almost 90 years in INVESTIGATIONS ON THE THEORY OF THE BROWNIAN MOVEMENT, 1926 publication.

  17. Operator Fractional Brownian Motion and Martingale Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongshuai Dai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that martingale difference sequences are very useful in applications and theory. On the other hand, the operator fractional Brownian motion as an extension of the well-known fractional Brownian motion also plays an important role in both applications and theory. In this paper, we study the relation between them. We construct an approximation sequence of operator fractional Brownian motion based on a martingale difference sequence.

  18. Stochastic Current of Bifractional Brownian Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjun Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the regularity of stochastic current defined as Skorohod integral with respect to bifractional Brownian motion through Malliavin calculus. Moreover, we similarly derive some results in the case of multidimensional multiparameter. Finally, we consider stochastic current of bifractional Brownian motion as a distribution in Watanabe spaces.

  19. Brownian motion in AdS/CFT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, J.; Hubeny, V.E.; Rangamani, M.; Shigemori, M.

    2009-01-01

    We study Brownian motion and the associated Langevin equation in AdS/CFT. The Brownian particle is realized in the bulk spacetime as a probe fundamental string in an asymptotically AdS black hole background, stretching between the AdS boundary and the horizon. The modes on the string are excited by

  20. Generalized functionals of Brownian motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. U. Ahmed

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss some recent developments in the theory of generalized functionals of Brownian motion. First we give a brief summary of the Wiener-Ito multiple Integrals. We discuss some of their basic properties, and related functional analysis on Wiener measure space. then we discuss the generalized functionals constructed by Hida. The generalized functionals of Hida are based on L2-Sobolev spaces, thereby, admitting only Hs, s∈R valued kernels in the multiple stochastic integrals. These functionals are much more general than the classical Wiener-Ito class. The more recent development, due to the author, introduces a much more broad class of generalized functionals which are based on Lp-Sobolev spaces admitting kernels from the spaces p,s, s∈R. This allows analysis of a very broad class of nonlinear functionals of Brownian motion, which can not be handled by either the Wiener-Ito class or the Hida class. For s≤0, they represent generalized functionals on the Wiener measure space like Schwarz distributions on finite dimensional spaces. In this paper we also introduce some further generalizations, and construct a locally convex topological vector space of generalized functionals. We also present some discussion on the applications of these results.

  1. Brownian Functionals in Physics and Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Satya N.

    This is a brief review on Brownian functionals in one dimension and their various applications. After a brief description of Einstein's original derivation of the diffusion equation, this article provides a pedagogical introduction to the path integral methods leading to the derivation of the celebrated Feynman-Kac formula. The usefulness of this technique in calculating the statistical properties of Brownian functionals is illustrated with several examples in physics and probability theory, with particular emphasis on applications in computer science. The statistical properties of "first-passage Brownian functionals" and their applications are also discussed.

  2. On some generalization of fractional Brownian motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xiaotian [School of Management, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liang Xiangqian [Department of Applied Mathematics, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266510, Shandong (China); Ren Fuyao [Institute of Mathematics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang Shiying [School of Management, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)]. E-mail: swa001@126.com

    2006-05-15

    The multifractional Brownian motion (mBm) is a continuous Gaussian process that extends the classical fractional Brownian motion (fBm) defined by Barton and Vincent Poor [Barton RJ, Vincent Poor H. IEEE Trans Inform 1988;34(5):943] and Decreusefond and Ustuenel [Decreusefond L, Ustuenel AS. Potential Anal 1999;10:177]. In addition, an innovational representation of fBm is given.

  3. Fractional Brownian motion and motion governed by the fractional Langevin equation in confined geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Metzler, Ralf

    2010-02-01

    Motivated by subdiffusive motion of biomolecules observed in living cells, we study the stochastic properties of a non-Brownian particle whose motion is governed by either fractional Brownian motion or the fractional Langevin equation and restricted to a finite domain. We investigate by analytic calculations and simulations how time-averaged observables (e.g., the time-averaged mean-squared displacement and displacement correlation) are affected by spatial confinement and dimensionality. In particular, we study the degree of weak ergodicity breaking and scatter between different single trajectories for this confined motion in the subdiffusive domain. The general trend is that deviations from ergodicity are decreased with decreasing size of the movement volume and with increasing dimensionality. We define the displacement correlation function and find that this quantity shows distinct features for fractional Brownian motion, fractional Langevin equation, and continuous time subdiffusion, such that it appears an efficient measure to distinguish these different processes based on single-particle trajectory data.

  4. Coupling of lever arm swing and biased Brownian motion in actomyosin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Miao Nie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An important unresolved problem associated with actomyosin motors is the role of Brownian motion in the process of force generation. On the basis of structural observations of myosins and actins, the widely held lever-arm hypothesis has been proposed, in which proteins are assumed to show sequential structural changes among observed and hypothesized structures to exert mechanical force. An alternative hypothesis, the Brownian motion hypothesis, has been supported by single-molecule experiments and emphasizes more on the roles of fluctuating protein movement. In this study, we address the long-standing controversy between the lever-arm hypothesis and the Brownian motion hypothesis through in silico observations of an actomyosin system. We study a system composed of myosin II and actin filament by calculating free-energy landscapes of actin-myosin interactions using the molecular dynamics method and by simulating transitions among dynamically changing free-energy landscapes using the Monte Carlo method. The results obtained by this combined multi-scale calculation show that myosin with inorganic phosphate (Pi and ADP weakly binds to actin and that after releasing Pi and ADP, myosin moves along the actin filament toward the strong-binding site by exhibiting the biased Brownian motion, a behavior consistent with the observed single-molecular behavior of myosin. Conformational flexibility of loops at the actin-interface of myosin and the N-terminus of actin subunit is necessary for the distinct bias in the Brownian motion. Both the 5.5-11 nm displacement due to the biased Brownian motion and the 3-5 nm displacement due to lever-arm swing contribute to the net displacement of myosin. The calculated results further suggest that the recovery stroke of the lever arm plays an important role in enhancing the displacement of myosin through multiple cycles of ATP hydrolysis, suggesting a unified movement mechanism for various members of the myosin family.

  5. Static structure of active Brownian hard disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo Biniossek, N.; Löwen, H.; Voigtmann, Th; Smallenburg, F.

    2018-02-01

    We explore the changes in static structure of a two-dimensional system of active Brownian particles (ABP) with hard-disk interactions, using event-driven Brownian dynamics simulations. In particular, the effect of the self-propulsion velocity and the rotational diffusivity on the orientationally-averaged fluid structure factor is discussed. Typically activity increases structural ordering and generates a structure factor peak at zero wave vector which is a precursor of motility-induced phase separation. Our results provide reference data to test future statistical theories for the fluid structure of active Brownian systems. This manuscript was submitted for the special issue of the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter associated with the Liquid Matter Conference 2017.

  6. Dynamical 3-Space: Anisotropic Brownian Motion Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2014 Jiapei Dai reported evidence of anisotropic Brownian motion of a toluidine blue colloid solution in water. In 2015 Felix Scholkmann analysed the Dai data and detected a sidereal time dependence, indicative of a process driving the preferred Brownian mo- tion diffusion direction to a star-based preferred direction. Here we further analyse the Dai data and extract the RA and Dec of that preferred direction, and relate the data to previous determinations from NASA Spacecraft Earth-flyby Doppler shift data, and other determinations.

  7. A series expansion of fractional Brownian motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.O. Dzhaparidze (Kacha); J.H. van Zanten (Harry)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractLet $B$ be a fractional Brownian motion with Hurst index $H in (0,1)$. Denote by $x_1 < x_2 < cdots$ the positive, real zeros of the Bessel function $J_{-H$ of the first kind of order $-H$, and let $y_1 < y_2 < cdots$ be the positive zeros of $J_{1-H$. We prove the series

  8. Brownian Motion Problem: Random Walk and Beyond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 8. Brownian Motion Problem: Random Walk and Beyond. Shama Sharma Vishwamittar. General Article Volume 10 Issue 8 August 2005 pp 49-66. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. Brownian coagulation at high particle concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trzeciak, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    The process of Brownian coagulation, whereby particles are brought together by thermal motion and grow by collisions, is one of the most fundamental processes influencing the final properties of particulate matter in a variety of technically important systems. It is of importance in colloids,

  10. Brownian Warps for Non-Rigid Registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads; Johansen, Peter; Jackson, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    A Brownian motion model in the group of diffeomorphisms has been introduced as inducing a least committed prior on warps. This prior is source-destination symmetric, fulfills a natural semi-group property for warps, and with probability 1 creates invertible warps. Using this as a least committed...

  11. A Brownian Bridge Movement Model to Track Mobile Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Vietnam, the Philippines, Taiwan, Malaysia and Brunei have competing claims in the South China Sea, as depicted in Figure 1. China’s claim is the most...has been upset with the election of the Democratic Progressive Party 14 (DPP) into Taiwanese government, a party that has strongly advocated the

  12. Brownian motion, martingales, and stochastic calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Le Gall, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a rigorous and self-contained presentation of stochastic integration and stochastic calculus within the general framework of continuous semimartingales. The main tools of stochastic calculus, including Itô’s formula, the optional stopping theorem and Girsanov’s theorem, are treated in detail alongside many illustrative examples. The book also contains an introduction to Markov processes, with applications to solutions of stochastic differential equations and to connections between Brownian motion and partial differential equations. The theory of local times of semimartingales is discussed in the last chapter. Since its invention by Itô, stochastic calculus has proven to be one of the most important techniques of modern probability theory, and has been used in the most recent theoretical advances as well as in applications to other fields such as mathematical finance. Brownian Motion, Martingales, and Stochastic Calculus provides a strong theoretical background to the reader interested i...

  13. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of multifractional Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setty, Venkat; Sharma, Surjalal

    2013-03-01

    Multifractional Brownian Motion (mBm) is a generalization of Fractional Brownian motion (fBm) with a time varying Hurst exponent, H (t) . Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) is a technique used to study the scaling behavior representing long term correlations in various dynamical systems. In our work, we apply DFA to calculate a time averaged Hurst exponent, in mBm data. The accuracy of estimation of was shown to depend on the range and variability of H (t) . Furthermore, the effect of uniform random noise in H (t) on the nature of scaling observed in DFA is studied. Our research focusses on the robustness and applicability of the DFA technique for studying long term correlations in systems with time varying Hurst exponents akin to mBm .

  14. Velocity Gradient Power Functional for Brownian Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Las Heras, Daniel; Schmidt, Matthias

    2018-01-12

    We present an explicit and simple approximation for the superadiabatic excess (over ideal gas) free power functional, admitting the study of the nonequilibrium dynamics of overdamped Brownian many-body systems. The functional depends on the local velocity gradient and is systematically obtained from treating the microscopic stress distribution as a conjugate field. The resulting superadiabatic forces are beyond dynamical density functional theory and are of a viscous nature. Their high accuracy is demonstrated by comparison to simulation results.

  15. Active Brownian motion tunable by light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttinoni, Ivo; Volpe, Giovanni; Kümmel, Felix; Volpe, Giorgio; Bechinger, Clemens

    2012-07-18

    Active Brownian particles are capable of taking up energy from their environment and converting it into directed motion; examples range from chemotactic cells and bacteria to artificial micro-swimmers. We have recently demonstrated that Janus particles, i.e. gold-capped colloidal spheres, suspended in a critical binary liquid mixture perform active Brownian motion when illuminated by light. In this paper, we investigate in more detail their swimming mechanism, leading to active Brownian motion. We show that the illumination-borne heating induces a local asymmetric demixing of the binary mixture, generating a spatial chemical concentration gradient which is responsible for the particle's self-diffusiophoretic motion. We study this effect as a function of the functionalization of the gold cap, the particle size and the illumination intensity: the functionalization determines what component of the binary mixture is preferentially adsorbed at the cap and the swimming direction (towards or away from the cap); the particle size determines the rotational diffusion and, therefore, the random reorientation of the particle; and the intensity tunes the strength of the heating and, therefore, of the motion. Finally, we harness this dependence of the swimming strength on the illumination intensity to investigate the behavior of a micro-swimmer in a spatial light gradient, where its swimming properties are space-dependent.

  16. Quantum dynamical framework for Brownian heat engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, G S; Chaturvedi, S

    2013-07-01

    We present a self-contained formalism modeled after the Brownian motion of a quantum harmonic oscillator for describing the performance of microscopic Brownian heat engines such as Carnot, Stirling, and Otto engines. Our theory, besides reproducing the standard thermodynamics results in the steady state, enables us to study the role dissipation plays in determining the efficiency of Brownian heat engines under actual laboratory conditions. In particular, we analyze in detail the dynamics associated with decoupling a system in equilibrium with one bath and recoupling it to another bath and obtain exact analytical results, which are shown to have significant ramifications on the efficiencies of engines involving such a step. We also develop a simple yet powerful technique for computing corrections to the steady state results arising from finite operation time and use it to arrive at the thermodynamic complementarity relations for various operating conditions and also to compute the efficiencies of the three engines cited above at maximum power. Some of the methods and exactly solvable models presented here are interesting in their own right and could find useful applications in other contexts as well.

  17. From N-parameter fractional Brownian motions to N-parameter multifractional Brownian motions

    OpenAIRE

    Herbin, E.

    2005-01-01

    International audience; Multifractional Brownian motion is an extension of the well-known fractional Brownian motion where the H¨older regularity is allowed to vary along the paths. In this paper, two kinds of multi-parameter extensions of mBm are studied: one is isotropic while the other is not. For each of these processes, a moving average representation, a harmonizable representation, and the covariance structure are given. The H¨older regularity is then studied. In particular, the case of...

  18. From fractional Brownian motion to multifractional and multistable motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    Fractional Brownian motion, introduced by Benoit Mandelbrot and John Van Ness in 1968, has had a major impact on stochastic processes and their applications. We survey a few of the many developments that have stemmed from their ideas. In particular we discuss the local structure of fractional and multifractional Brownian, stable and multistable processes, emphasising the `diagonal' construction of such processes. In all this, the ubiquity and centrality of fractional Brownian motion is striking.

  19. Quantum Darwinism in Quantum Brownian Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2008-12-01

    Quantum Darwinism—the redundant encoding of information about a decohering system in its environment—was proposed to reconcile the quantum nature of our Universe with apparent classicality. We report the first study of the dynamics of quantum Darwinism in a realistic model of decoherence, quantum Brownian motion. Prepared in a highly squeezed state—a macroscopic superposition—the system leaves records whose redundancy increases rapidly with initial delocalization. Redundancy appears rapidly (on the decoherence time scale) and persists for a long time.

  20. Saccadic Tracking with Random Walk (brownian Motion) Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Douglas Gordon

    This study was designed to evaluate the saccadic system's response to continuously presented random walk (Brownian motion) stimuli. Our goals were: (1) to examine how closely timed consecutive saccades interact; and (2) to estimate the response modification time for the new position of the stimulus to give an estimate of integration and decision delays. Horizontal eye movements resulting from rapid continuous random target movements were recorded. Step amplitudes of 1.5 and 3.0 degrees were alternated between single- and rapid double-step movements every 200 to 400 msec. From these random multiple stimulus step sequences, saccadic responses to single 3.0 degree step stimuli were collected for subjects to evaluate interactions of consecutive saccades. The results showed that: (1) subjects are capable of making independent goal directed saccades with intersaccadic intervals as short as 50 msec, and (2) subjects had individual biases in the direction of the successive saccades. The main interaction between saccades was related to the spatial error of the preceding saccade combining with the new stimulus step to yield the new error signal for the next saccade. The magnitude of the new retinal error signal was reflected in the latency of the following saccade. To evaluate the decision period of the saccadic system, the single-step responses were used as templates to assess the modification times for staircase, pulse under -return and pulse over-return double-step stimuli. The responses were organized by whether consecutive saccades continued in the same direction or in the opposite direction. The results on the modification times indicate saccadic responses are directed to the new stimulus 85 to 90 msec after the new position of the stimulus. This modification time was independent of stimuli and preferred direction of responses. The 85-90 msec modification delay is used to estimate the time interval needed to program the next saccade.

  1. Mean-field theory of quantum Brownian motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allahverdyan, A.; Balian, R.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate a mean-field approach to a quantum Brownian particle interacting with a quantum thermal bath at temperature T, and subjected to a non-linear potential. An exact, partially classical description of quantum Brownian motion is proposed, which uses negative probabilities in its

  2. Brownian motion of a particle with arbitrary shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichocki, Bogdan; Ekiel-Jeżewska, Maria L; Wajnryb, Eligiusz

    2015-06-07

    Brownian motion of a particle with an arbitrary shape is investigated theoretically. Analytical expressions for the time-dependent cross-correlations of the Brownian translational and rotational displacements are derived from the Smoluchowski equation. The role of the particle mobility center is determined and discussed.

  3. CNT based thermal Brownian motor to pump water in nanodevices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oyarzua, Elton; Zambrano, Harvey; Walther, Jens Honore

    2016-01-01

    Brownian molecular motors are nanoscale machines that exploit thermal fluctuations for directional motion by employing mechanisms such as the Feynman-Smoluchowski ratchet. In this study, using Non Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics, we propose a novel thermal Brownian motor for pumping water through...

  4. Estimation of the global regularity of a multifractional Brownian motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebovits, Joachim; Podolskij, Mark

    This paper presents a new estimator of the global regularity index of a multifractional Brownian motion. Our estimation method is based upon a ratio statistic, which compares the realized global quadratic variation of a multifractional Brownian motion at two different frequencies. We show...

  5. Tested Demonstrations. Brownian Motion: A Classroom Demonstration and Student Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirksey, H. Graden; Jones, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    Shows how video recordings of the Brownian motion of tiny particles may be made. Describes a classroom demonstration and cites a reported experiment designed to show the random nature of Brownian motion. Suggests a student experiment to discover the distance a tiny particle travels as a function of time. (MVL)

  6. Geometric Brownian Motion, Option Pricing, and Simulation: Some Spreadsheet-Based Exercises in Financial Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D. Brewer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some Excel-based simulation exercises that are suitable for use in financial modeling courses. Such exercises are based on a stochastic process of stock price movements, called geometric Brownian motion, that underlies the derivation of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. Guidance is provided in assigning appropriate values of the drift parameter in the stochastic process for such exercises. Some further simulation exercises are also suggested. As the analytical underpinning of the materials involved is provided, this paper is expected to be of interest also to instructors and students of investment courses.

  7. Fractional Brownian motion and multifractional Brownian motion of Riemann-Liouville type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. C.

    2001-02-01

    The relationship between standard fractional Brownian motion (FBM) and FBM based on the Riemann-Liouville fractional integral (or RL-FBM) is clarified. The absence of stationary property in the increment process of RL-FBM is compensated by a weaker property of local stationarity, and the stationary property for the increments of the large-time asymptotic RL-FBM. Generalization of RL-FBM to the RL-multifractional Brownian motion (RL-MBM) can be carried out by replacing the constant Hölder exponent by a time-dependent function. RL-MBM is shown to satisfy a weaker scaling property known as the local asymptotic self-similarity. This local scaling property can be translated into the small-scale behaviour of the associated scalogram by using the wavelet transform.

  8. Rectified brownian transport in corrugated channels: Fractional brownian motion and Lévy flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bao-quan; Shao, Zhi-gang; Zhong, Wei-rong

    2012-11-07

    We study fractional brownian motion and Lévy flights in periodic corrugated channels without any external driving forces. From numerical simulations, we find that both fractional gaussian noise and Lévy-stable noise in asymmetric corrugated channels can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce directed transport. The rectified mechanisms for fractional brownian motion and Lévy flights are different. The former is caused by non-uniform spectral distribution (low or high frequencies) of fractional gaussian noise, while the latter is due to the nonthermal character (occasional long jumps) of the Lévy-stable noise. For fractional brownian motion, average velocity increases with the Hurst exponent for the persistent case, while for the antipersistent case there exists an optimal value of Hurst exponent at which average velocity takes its maximal value. For Lévy flights, the group velocity decreases monotonically as the Lévy index increases. In addition, for both cases, the optimized periodicity and radius at the bottleneck can facilitate the directed transport. Our results could be implemented in constrained structures with narrow channels and pores where the particles undergo anomalous diffusion.

  9. Cost and Precision of Brownian Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Barato, Andre C

    2016-01-01

    Brownian clocks are biomolecular networks that can count time. A paradigmatic example are proteins that go through a cycle thus regulating some oscillatory behaviour in a living system. Typically, such a cycle requires free energy often provided by ATP hydrolysis. We investigate the relation between the precision of such a clock and its thermodynamic costs. For clocks driven by a constant thermodynamic force, a given precision requires a minimal cost that diverges as the uncertainty of the clock vanishes. In marked contrast, we show that a clock driven by a periodic variation of an external protocol can achieve arbitrary precision at arbitrarily low cost. This result constitutes a fundamental difference between processes driven by a fixed thermodynamic force and those driven periodically. As a main technical tool, we map a periodically driven system with a deterministic protocol to one subject to an external protocol that changes in stochastic time intervals, which simplifies calculations significantly. In th...

  10. Hybrid scheme for Brownian semistationary processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Mikkel; Lunde, Asger; Pakkanen, Mikko S.

    is to approximate the kernel function by a power function near zero and by a step function elsewhere. The resulting approximation of the process is a combination of Wiener integrals of the power function and a Riemann sum, which is why we call this method a hybrid scheme. Our main theoretical result describes...... the asymptotics of the mean square error of the hybrid scheme and we observe that the scheme leads to a substantial improvement of accuracy compared to the ordinary forward Riemann-sum scheme, while having the same computational complexity. We exemplify the use of the hybrid scheme by two numerical experiments......We introduce a simulation scheme for Brownian semistationary processes, which is based on discretizing the stochastic integral representation of the process in the time domain. We assume that the kernel function of the process is regularly varying at zero. The novel feature of the scheme...

  11. Predicting Protein Interactions by Brownian Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan-Yu Meng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a newly adapted Brownian-Dynamics (BD-based protein docking method for predicting native protein complexes. The approach includes global BD conformational sampling, compact complex selection, and local energy minimization. In order to reduce the computational costs for energy evaluations, a shell-based grid force field was developed to represent the receptor protein and solvation effects. The performance of this BD protein docking approach has been evaluated on a test set of 24 crystal protein complexes. Reproduction of experimental structures in the test set indicates the adequate conformational sampling and accurate scoring of this BD protein docking approach. Furthermore, we have developed an approach to account for the flexibility of proteins, which has been successfully applied to reproduce the experimental complex structure from the structure of two unbounded proteins. These results indicate that this adapted BD protein docking approach can be useful for the prediction of protein-protein interactions.

  12. Communication: Memory effects and active Brownian diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Pulak K. [Department of Chemistry, Presidency University, Kolkata 700073 (India); Li, Yunyun, E-mail: yunyunli@tongji.edu.cn [Center for Phononics and Thermal Energy Science, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Marchegiani, Giampiero [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Marchesoni, Fabio [Center for Phononics and Thermal Energy Science, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy)

    2015-12-07

    A self-propelled artificial microswimmer is often modeled as a ballistic Brownian particle moving with constant speed aligned along one of its axis, but changing direction due to random collisions with the environment. Similarly to thermal noise, its angular randomization is described as a memoryless stochastic process. Here, we speculate that finite-time correlations in the orientational dynamics can affect the swimmer’s diffusivity. To this purpose, we propose and solve two alternative models. In the first one, we simply assume that the environmental fluctuations governing the swimmer’s propulsion are exponentially correlated in time, whereas in the second one, we account for possible damped fluctuations of the propulsion velocity around the swimmer’s axis. The corresponding swimmer’s diffusion constants are predicted to get, respectively, enhanced or suppressed upon increasing the model memory time. Possible consequences of this effect on the interpretation of the experimental data are discussed.

  13. Brownian motion in dynamically disordered media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkoskie, James B; Yang, Shilong; Cao, Jianshu

    2002-11-01

    The motion of Brownian test particles in a model random potential with time dependent correlations is investigated using four methods: renormalized perturbation, perturbation using Martin, Siggia, and Rose functional formalism (MSR), the Edwards variational method on the MSR functional, and renormalization group with the MSR function. The disorder averaged one-particle propagators determined by the renormalized perturbation expansion and MSR perturbation expansion are identical to the second and possibly higher order, and the two-particle propagators determined by these perturbation methods are identical at the first and possibly higher order. The one-particle propagator determined by the Edwards method is identical to the perturbation expansions at the first order, but the second-order analogue of the Edwards method has a more complex expression, which reduces to the second-order perturbation expression with additional higher-order terms. The diffusion constant and two-particle correlations are calculated from these propagators and are used to determine the effects of the random potential on the Brownian particles. Generally, the diffusion rate decreases with the disorder strength and increases with the temporal decay rate. The two competing mechanisms result in an enhancement of the diffusion constant for weak potentials with fast temporal fluctuations. The system exhibits two-particle correlations that are inherently non-Gaussian and indicate clustering behavior. The diffusion constant is also determined from a simple one-loop renormalization group calculation. In the static limit, the diffusion constant calculated by the renormalization group recovers the results of Deem and Chandler [M.W. Deem and D. Chandler, J. Stat. Phys. 76, 911 (1994)].

  14. Brownian motion of a nano-colloidal particle: the role of the solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Carbajal, Alexis; Herrera-Velarde, Salvador; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2015-07-15

    Brownian motion is a feature of colloidal particles immersed in a liquid-like environment. Usually, it can be described by means of the generalised Langevin equation (GLE) within the framework of the Mori theory. In principle, all quantities that appear in the GLE can be calculated from the molecular information of the whole system, i.e., colloids and solvent molecules. In this work, by means of extensive Molecular Dynamics simulations, we study the effects of the microscopic details and the thermodynamic state of the solvent on the movement of a single nano-colloid. In particular, we consider a two-dimensional model system in which the mass and size of the colloid are two and one orders of magnitude, respectively, larger than the ones associated with the solvent molecules. The latter ones interact via a Lennard-Jones-type potential to tune the nature of the solvent, i.e., it can be either repulsive or attractive. We choose the linear momentum of the Brownian particle as the observable of interest in order to fully describe the Brownian motion within the Mori framework. We particularly focus on the colloid diffusion at different solvent densities and two temperature regimes: high and low (near the critical point) temperatures. To reach our goal, we have rewritten the GLE as a second kind Volterra integral in order to compute the memory kernel in real space. With this kernel, we evaluate the momentum-fluctuating force correlation function, which is of particular relevance since it allows us to establish when the stationarity condition has been reached. Our findings show that even at high temperatures, the details of the attractive interaction potential among solvent molecules induce important changes in the colloid dynamics. Additionally, near the critical point, the dynamical scenario becomes more complex; all the correlation functions decay slowly in an extended time window, however, the memory kernel seems to be only a function of the solvent density. Thus, the

  15. Directed transport of Brownian particles in a changing temperature field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillo, A [DMFCI, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Catania. Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Jinha, A [HPL-Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Federico, S [HPL-Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Ait-Haddou, R [HPL-Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Herzog, W [HPL-Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Giaquinta, G [DMFCI, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Catania. Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy)

    2008-01-11

    We study the interaction of Brownian particles with a changing temperature field in the presence of a one-dimensional periodic adiabatic potential. We show the existence of directed transport through the determination of the overall current of Brownian particles crossing the boundary of the system. With respect to the case of Brownian particles in a thermal bath, we determine a current which exhibits a contribution explicitly related to the presence of a thermal gradient. Beyond the self-consistent calculation of the temperature and probability density distribution of Brownian particles, we evaluate the energy consumption for directed transport to take place. Our description is based on Streater's model, and solutions are obtained by perturbing the system from its initial thermodynamic equilibrium state.

  16. Random times and enlargements of filtrations in a Brownian setting

    CERN Document Server

    Mansuy, Roger

    2006-01-01

    In November 2004, M. Yor and R. Mansuy jointly gave six lectures at Columbia University, New York. These notes follow the contents of that course, covering expansion of filtration formulae; BDG inequalities up to any random time; martingales that vanish on the zero set of Brownian motion; the Azéma-Emery martingales and chaos representation; the filtration of truncated Brownian motion; attempts to characterize the Brownian filtration. The book accordingly sets out to acquaint its readers with the theory and main examples of enlargements of filtrations, of either the initial or the progressive kind. It is accessible to researchers and graduate students working in stochastic calculus and excursion theory, and more broadly to mathematicians acquainted with the basics of Brownian motion.

  17. Rotational Brownian Dynamics simulations of clathrin cage formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilie, Ioana M.; Briels, Wim J. [Computational BioPhysics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Otter, Wouter K. den, E-mail: w.k.denotter@utwente.nl [Computational BioPhysics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Multi Scale Mechanics, Faculty of Engineering Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-08-14

    The self-assembly of nearly rigid proteins into ordered aggregates is well suited for modeling by the patchy particle approach. Patchy particles are traditionally simulated using Monte Carlo methods, to study the phase diagram, while Brownian Dynamics simulations would reveal insights into the assembly dynamics. However, Brownian Dynamics of rotating anisotropic particles gives rise to a number of complications not encountered in translational Brownian Dynamics. We thoroughly test the Rotational Brownian Dynamics scheme proposed by Naess and Elsgaeter [Macromol. Theory Simul. 13, 419 (2004); Naess and Elsgaeter Macromol. Theory Simul. 14, 300 (2005)], confirming its validity. We then apply the algorithm to simulate a patchy particle model of clathrin, a three-legged protein involved in vesicle production from lipid membranes during endocytosis. Using this algorithm we recover time scales for cage assembly comparable to those from experiments. We also briefly discuss the undulatory dynamics of the polyhedral cage.

  18. Reflected Backward Stochastic Differential Equations Driven by Countable Brownian Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengju Duan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a new class of reflected backward stochastic differential equations driven by countable Brownian motions. The existence and uniqueness of the RBSDEs are obtained via Snell envelope and fixed point theorem.

  19. QUANTUM STOCHASTIC PROCESSES: BOSON AND FERMION BROWNIAN MOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E.Kobryn

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of quantum systems which are stochastically perturbed by linear coupling to the reservoir can be studied in terms of quantum stochastic differential equations (for example, quantum stochastic Liouville equation and quantum Langevin equation. In order to work it out one needs to define the quantum Brownian motion. As far as only its boson version has been known until recently, in the present paper we present the definition which makes it possible to consider the fermion Brownian motion as well.

  20. Estimation of the global regularity of a multifractional Brownian motion

    OpenAIRE

    Lebovits, Joachim; Podolskij, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new estimator of the global regularity index of a multifractional Brownian motion. Our estimation method is based upon a ratio statistic, which compares the realized global quadratic variation of a multifractional Brownian motion at two different frequencies. We show that a logarithmic transformation of this statistic converges in probability to the minimum of the Hurst functional parameter, which is, under weak assumptions, identical to the global regularity index of th...

  1. From Brownian motion to power of fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Berche

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The year 2012 marks the 140th birth anniversary of Marian Smoluchowski (28.05.1872-5.09.1917, a man who "made ground-breaking contribution to the theory of Brownian motion, the theory of sedimentation, the statistical nature of the Second Law, the theory and practice of density fluctuations (critical opalescence. During his final years of scientific creativity his pioneering theory of coagulation and diffusion-limited reaction rate appeared. These outstanding achievements present true gems which dominate the description of soft matter physics and chemical physics as well as the related areas up till now!" This quotation was taken from the lecture by Peter Hanggi given at international conference Statistical Physics: Modern Trends and Applications that took place in Lviv, Ukraine on July 3-6, 2012 (see conference web-page for more details and was dedicated to the commemoration of Smoluchowski's work. This and forthcoming issues of the Condensed Matter Physics contain papers presented at this conference.

  2. Cost and Precision of Brownian Clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre C. Barato

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Brownian clocks are biomolecular networks that can count time. A paradigmatic example are proteins that go through a cycle, thus regulating some oscillatory behavior in a living system. Typically, such a cycle requires free energy often provided by ATP hydrolysis. We investigate the relation between the precision of such a clock and its thermodynamic costs. For clocks driven by a constant thermodynamic force, a given precision requires a minimal cost that diverges as the uncertainty of the clock vanishes. In marked contrast, we show that a clock driven by a periodic variation of an external protocol can achieve arbitrary precision at arbitrarily low cost. This result constitutes a fundamental difference between processes driven by a fixed thermodynamic force and those driven periodically. As a main technical tool, we map a periodically driven system with a deterministic protocol to one subject to an external protocol that changes in stochastic time intervals, which simplifies calculations significantly. In the nonequilibrium steady state of the resulting bipartite Markov process, the uncertainty of the clock can be deduced from the calculable dispersion of a corresponding current.

  3. Cost and Precision of Brownian Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-10-01

    Brownian clocks are biomolecular networks that can count time. A paradigmatic example are proteins that go through a cycle, thus regulating some oscillatory behavior in a living system. Typically, such a cycle requires free energy often provided by ATP hydrolysis. We investigate the relation between the precision of such a clock and its thermodynamic costs. For clocks driven by a constant thermodynamic force, a given precision requires a minimal cost that diverges as the uncertainty of the clock vanishes. In marked contrast, we show that a clock driven by a periodic variation of an external protocol can achieve arbitrary precision at arbitrarily low cost. This result constitutes a fundamental difference between processes driven by a fixed thermodynamic force and those driven periodically. As a main technical tool, we map a periodically driven system with a deterministic protocol to one subject to an external protocol that changes in stochastic time intervals, which simplifies calculations significantly. In the nonequilibrium steady state of the resulting bipartite Markov process, the uncertainty of the clock can be deduced from the calculable dispersion of a corresponding current.

  4. Shear thinning in non-Brownian suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatté, Guillaume; Comtet, Jean; Niguès, Antoine; Bocquet, Lydéric; Siria, Alessandro; Ducouret, Guylaine; Lequeux, François; Lenoir, Nicolas; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Colin, Annie

    2018-02-14

    We study the flow of suspensions of non-Brownian particles dispersed into a Newtonian solvent. Combining capillary rheometry and conventional rheometry, we evidence a succession of two shear thinning regimes separated by a shear thickening one. Through X-ray radiography measurements, we show that during each of those regimes, the flow remains homogeneous and does not involve particle migration. Using a quartz-tuning fork based atomic force microscope, we measure the repulsive force profile and the microscopic friction coefficient μ between two particles immersed into the solvent, as a function of normal load. Coupling measurements from those three techniques, we propose that (1) the first shear-thinning regime at low shear rates occurs for a lubricated rheology and can be interpreted as a decrease of the effective volume fraction under increasing particle pressures, due to short-ranged repulsive forces and (2) the second shear thinning regime after the shear-thickening transition occurs for a frictional rheology and can be interpreted as stemming from a decrease of the microscopic friction coefficient at large normal load.

  5. Single particle Brownian motion with solid friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prasenjit; Puri, Sanjay; Schwartz, Moshe

    2017-06-01

    We study the Brownian dynamics of a solid particle on a vibrating solid surface. Phenomenologically, the interaction between the two solid surfaces is modeled by solid friction, and the Gaussian white noise models the vibration of the solid surface. The solid friction force is proportional to the sign of relative velocity. We derive the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation for the time-dependent probability distribution to find the particle at a given location. We calculate analytically the steady state velocity distribution function, mean-square velocity and diffusion coefficient in d-dimensions. We present a generic method of calculating the autocorrelations in d-dimensions. This results in one dimension in an exact evaluation of the steady state velocity autocorrelation. In higher dimensions our exact general expression enables the analytic evaluation of the autocorrelation to any required approximation. We present approximate analytic expressions in two and three dimensions. Next, we numerically calculate the mean-square velocity and steady state velocity autocorrelation function up to d = 3 . Our numerical results are in good agreement with the analytically obtained results.

  6. Instantaneous ballistic velocity of suspended Brownian nanocrystals measured by upconversion nanothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brites, Carlos D. S.; Xie, Xiaoji; Debasu, Mengistie L.; Qin, Xian; Chen, Runfeng; Huang, Wei; Rocha, João; Liu, Xiaogang; Carlos, Luís D.

    2016-10-01

    Brownian motion is one of the most fascinating phenomena in nature. Its conceptual implications have a profound impact in almost every field of science and even economics, from dissipative processes in thermodynamic systems, gene therapy in biomedical research, artificial motors and galaxy formation to the behaviour of stock prices. However, despite extensive experimental investigations, the basic microscopic knowledge of prototypical systems such as colloidal particles in a fluid is still far from being complete. This is particularly the case for the measurement of the particles' instantaneous velocities, elusive due to the rapid random movements on extremely short timescales. Here, we report the measurement of the instantaneous ballistic velocity of Brownian nanocrystals suspended in both aqueous and organic solvents. To achieve this, we develop a technique based on upconversion nanothermometry. We find that the population of excited electronic states in NaYF4:Yb/Er nanocrystals at thermal equilibrium can be used for temperature mapping of the nanofluid with great thermal sensitivity (1.15% K-1 at 296 K) and a high spatial resolution (<1 μm). A distinct correlation between the heat flux in the nanofluid and the temporal evolution of Er3+ emission allows us to measure the instantaneous velocity of nanocrystals with different sizes and shapes.

  7. Brownian versus Newtonian devitrification of hard-sphere glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero de Hijes, Pablo; Rosales-Pelaez, Pablo; Valeriani, Chantal; Pusey, Peter N.; Sanz, Eduardo

    2017-08-01

    In a recent molecular dynamics simulation work it has been shown that glasses composed of hard spheres crystallize via cooperative, stochastic particle displacements called avalanches [E. Sanz et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 111, 75 (2014), 10.1073/pnas.1308338110]. In this Rapid Communication we investigate if such a devitrification mechanism is also present when the dynamics is Brownian rather than Newtonian. The research is motivated in part by the fact that colloidal suspensions, an experimental realization of hard-sphere systems, undergo Brownian motion. We find that Brownian hard-sphere glasses do crystallize via avalanches with very similar characteristics to those found in the Newtonian case. We briefly discuss the implications of these findings for experiments on colloids.

  8. Cosmophysical Factors in the Fluctuation Amplitude Spectrum of Brownian Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaminsky A. V.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Phenomenon of the regular variability of the fine structure of the fluctuation in the am- plitude distributions (shapes of related histograms for the case of Brownian motion was investigated. We took an advantage of the dynamic light scattering method (DLS to get a stochastically fluctuated signal determined by Brownian motion. Shape of the histograms is most likely to vary, synchronous, in two proximally located independent cells containing Brownian particles. The synchronism persists in the cells distant at 2 m from each other, and positioned meridionally. With a parallel-wise positioning of the cells, high probability of the synchronous variation in the shape of the histograms by local time has been observed. This result meets the previous conclusion about the dependency of histogram shapes (“fluctuation amplitudes” of the spectra of stochastic processes upon rotation of the Earth.

  9. Brownian dynamics of emulsion film formation and droplet coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Mendoza, Jhoan; Petsev, Dimiter N

    2010-05-01

    We analyze the evolution in thickness and radius of the film formed during the collision of two deformable emulsion Brownian droplets. These variables exhibit random fluctuations due to thermal disturbances from the continuous liquid phase. As a result, the system probes a random trajectory in the configurational space until it reaches a critical film thickness, at which point the droplets coalesce. Therefore, the film is modeled as a disk with thicknesses and radi that can fluctuate. Our analysis is based on a Langevin-Brownian dynamics approach, which accounts for the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions in the lubrication approximation. We examine the effect of parameters such as droplet size, interfacial mobility, and electrolyte concentration on the coalescence of small Brownian droplets. The results suggest that the coalescence times depend on a complex interplay between the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions.

  10. Quantum Brownian motion model for the stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangyi; Zhang, Jian-Wei; Guo, Hong

    2016-06-01

    It is believed by the majority today that the efficient market hypothesis is imperfect because of market irrationality. Using the physical concepts and mathematical structures of quantum mechanics, we construct an econophysical framework for the stock market, based on which we analogously map massive numbers of single stocks into a reservoir consisting of many quantum harmonic oscillators and their stock index into a typical quantum open system-a quantum Brownian particle. In particular, the irrationality of stock transactions is quantitatively considered as the Planck constant within Heisenberg's uncertainty relationship of quantum mechanics in an analogous manner. We analyze real stock data of Shanghai Stock Exchange of China and investigate fat-tail phenomena and non-Markovian behaviors of the stock index with the assistance of the quantum Brownian motion model, thereby interpreting and studying the limitations of the classical Brownian motion model for the efficient market hypothesis from a new perspective of quantum open system dynamics.

  11. Stochastic calculus for fractional Brownian motion and related processes

    CERN Document Server

    Mishura, Yuliya S

    2008-01-01

    The theory of fractional Brownian motion and other long-memory processes are addressed in this volume. Interesting topics for PhD students and specialists in probability theory, stochastic analysis and financial mathematics demonstrate the modern level of this field. Among these are results about Levy characterization of fractional Brownian motion, maximal moment inequalities for Wiener integrals including the values 0Brownian SDE. The author develops optimal filtering of mixed models including linear case, and studies financial applications and statistical inference with hypotheses testing and parameter estimation. She proves that the market with stock guided by the mixed model is arbitrage-free without any restriction on the dependence of the components and deduces different forms of the Black-Scholes equation for fractional mark...

  12. Brownian motion of solitons in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aycock, Lauren M; Hurst, Hilary M; Efimkin, Dmitry K; Genkina, Dina; Lu, Hsin-I; Galitski, Victor M; Spielman, I B

    2017-03-07

    We observed and controlled the Brownian motion of solitons. We launched solitonic excitations in highly elongated [Formula: see text] Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) and showed that a dilute background of impurity atoms in a different internal state dramatically affects the soliton. With no impurities and in one dimension (1D), these solitons would have an infinite lifetime, a consequence of integrability. In our experiment, the added impurities scatter off the much larger soliton, contributing to its Brownian motion and decreasing its lifetime. We describe the soliton's diffusive behavior using a quasi-1D scattering theory of impurity atoms interacting with a soliton, giving diffusion coefficients consistent with experiment.

  13. Brownian motion with adhesion: harmonic oscillator with fluctuating mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitterman, M; Klyatskin, V I

    2010-05-01

    In contrast to the cases usually studied of a harmonic oscillator subject to a random force (Brownian motion) or having random frequency or random damping, we consider a random mass which corresponds to an oscillator for which the particles of the surrounding medium adhere to it for some (random) time after the collision, thereby changing the oscillator mass. This model, which describes Brownian motion with adhesion, can be useful for the analysis of chemical and biological solutions as well as nanotechnological devices. We consider dichotomous noise and its limiting case, white noise.

  14. The Intersection Probability of Brownian Motion and SLEκ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shizhong Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By using excursion measure Poisson kernel method, we obtain a second-order differential equation of the intersection probability of Brownian motion and SLEκ. Moreover, we find a transformation such that the second-order differential equation transforms into a hypergeometric differential equation. Then, by solving the hypergeometric differential equation, we obtain the explicit formula of the intersection probability for the trace of the chordal SLEκ and planar Brownian motion started from distinct points in an upper half-plane H-.

  15. Generalized Multifractional Brownian Motion: Definition and Preliminary Results

    OpenAIRE

    Ayache, Antoine; Lévy Véhel, Jacques

    1999-01-01

    The Multifractional Brownian Motion (MBM) is a generalization of the well known Fractional Brownian Motion. One of the main reasons that makes the MBM interesting for modelization, is that one can prescribe its regularity: given any Hölder function H(t), with values in ]0,1[, one can construct an MBM admitting at any t0, a Hölder exponent equal to H(t0). However, the continuity of the function H(t) is sometimes undesirable, since it restricts the field of application. In this work we define a...

  16. Lévy flight and Brownian search patterns of a free-ranging predator reflect different prey field characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, David W; Humphries, Nicolas E; Bradford, Russell W; Bruce, Barry D

    2012-03-01

    1. Search processes play an important role in physical, chemical and biological systems. In animal foraging, the search strategy predators should use to search optimally for prey is an enduring question. Some models demonstrate that when prey is sparsely distributed, an optimal search pattern is a specialised random walk known as a Lévy flight, whereas when prey is abundant, simple Brownian motion is sufficiently efficient. These predictions form part of what has been termed the Lévy flight foraging hypothesis (LFF) which states that as Lévy flights optimise random searches, movements approximated by optimal Lévy flights may have naturally evolved in organisms to enhance encounters with targets (e.g. prey) when knowledge of their locations is incomplete. 2. Whether free-ranging predators exhibit the movement patterns predicted in the LFF hypothesis in response to known prey types and distributions, however, has not been determined. We tested this using vertical and horizontal movement data from electronic tagging of an apex predator, the great white shark Carcharodon carcharias, across widely differing habitats reflecting different prey types. 3. Individual white sharks exhibited movement patterns that predicted well the prey types expected under the LFF hypothesis. Shark movements were best approximated by Brownian motion when hunting near abundant, predictable sources of prey (e.g. seal colonies, fish aggregations), whereas movements approximating truncated Lévy flights were present when searching for sparsely distributed or potentially difficult-to-detect prey in oceanic or shelf environments, respectively. 4. That movement patterns approximated by truncated Lévy flights and Brownian behaviour were present in the predicted prey fields indicates search strategies adopted by white sharks appear to be the most efficient ones for encountering prey in the habitats where such patterns are observed. This suggests that C. carcharias appears capable of exhibiting

  17. The valuation of currency options by fractional Brownian motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrollahi, Foad; Kılıçman, Adem

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to investigate a model for pricing of currency options in which value governed by the fractional Brownian motion model (FBM). The fractional partial differential equation and some Greeks are also obtained. In addition, some properties of our pricing formula and simulation studies are presented, which demonstrate that the FBM model is easy to use.

  18. Entropy production of a Brownian ellipsoid in the overdamped limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Raffaele; Eichhorn, Ralf; Aurell, Erik

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the translational and rotational motion of an ellipsoidal Brownian particle from the viewpoint of stochastic thermodynamics. The particle's Brownian motion is driven by external forces and torques and takes place in an heterogeneous thermal environment where friction coefficients and (local) temperature depend on space and time. Our analysis of the particle's stochastic thermodynamics is based on the entropy production associated with single particle trajectories. It is motivated by the recent discovery that the overdamped limit of vanishing inertia effects (as compared to viscous fricion) produces a so-called "anomalous" contribution to the entropy production, which has no counterpart in the overdamped approximation, when inertia effects are simply discarded. Here we show that rotational Brownian motion in the overdamped limit generates an additional contribution to the "anomalous" entropy. We calculate its specific form by performing a systematic singular perturbation analysis for the generating function of the entropy production. As a side result, we also obtain the (well-known) equations of motion in the overdamped limit. We furthermore investigate the effects of particle shape and give explicit expressions of the "anomalous entropy" for prolate and oblate spheroids and for near-spherical Brownian particles.

  19. Trajectories of Brownian particles with space-correlated noise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Langevin equation used to model Brownian motion includes a stochastic process that is routinely assumed to be a Gaussian white noise. Spatial correlations of the noise are usually ruled out, and the paths traced by the random walkers are statistically independent. In this study, I consider instead noise which is white in ...

  20. Brownian Motion: Theory and Experiment A Simple Classroom ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 3. Brownian Motion: Theory and Experiment A Simple Classroom Measurement of the Diffusion Coefficient. Kasturi Basu Kopijol Baishya. Classroom Volume 8 Issue 3 March 2003 pp 71-80 ...

  1. A Brownian model for multiclass queueing networks with finite buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wanyang

    2002-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the heavy traffic behavior of a type of multiclass queueing networks with finite buffers. The network consists of d single server stations and is populated by K classes of customers. Each station has a finite capacity waiting buffer and operates under first-in first-out (FIFO) service discipline. The network is assumed to have a feedforward routing structure under a blocking scheme. A server stops working when the downstream buffer is full. The focus of this paper is on the Brownian model formulation. More specifically, the approximating Brownian model for the networks is proposed via the method of showing a pseudo-heavy-traffic limit theorem which states that the limit process is a reflecting Brownian motion (RBM) if the properly normalized d-dimensional workload process converges in distribution to a continuous process. Numerical algorithm with finite element method has been designed to effectively compute the solution of the Brownian model (W. Dai, Ph.D. thesis (1996); X. Shen et al. The finite element method for computing the stationary distribution of an SRBM in a hypercube with applications to finite buffer queueing networks, under revision for Queueing Systems).

  2. Brownian motion as a new probe of wettability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jianyong; Simha, Akarsh; Raizen, Mark G.

    2017-04-01

    Understanding wettability is crucial for optimizing oil recovery, semiconductor manufacturing, pharmaceutical industry, and electrowetting. In this letter, we study the effects of wettability on Brownian motion. We consider the cases of a sphere in an unbounded fluid medium, as well as a sphere placed in the vicinity of a plane wall. For the first case, we show the effects of wettability on the statistical properties of the particles' motion, such as velocity autocorrelation, velocity, and thermal force power spectra over a large range of time scales. We also propose a new method to measure wettability based on the particles' Brownian motion. In addition, we compare the boundary effects on Brownian motion imposed by both no-slip and perfect-slip flat walls. We emphasize the surprising boundary effects on Brownian motion imposed by a perfect-slip wall in the parallel direction, such as a higher particle mobility parallel to a perfect flat wall compared to that in the absence of the wall, as well as compared to a particle near a no-slip flat wall.

  3. Brownian pump powered by a white-noise flashing ratchet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Marin, A; Sancho, J M

    2008-03-01

    A Brownian pump of particles powered by a stochastic flashing ratchet mechanism is studied. The pumping device is embedded in a finite region and bounded by particle reservoirs. In the steady state, we exactly calculate the spatial density profile, the concentration ratio between both reservoirs and the particle flux. We propose a simulation framework for the consistent evaluation of such observable quantities.

  4. Response to "Rotational velocity autocorrelation function of interacting Brownian particles"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowe, C.P.; Hagen, M. H. J.; Frenkel, D.

    2001-01-01

    Comment on "Response to ‘Rotational velocity autocorrelation function of interacting Brownian particles’", Referred to by: Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Volume 297, Issues 1-2, 1 August 2001, Pages 115-116. B. Cichocki, and B. U. Felderhof

  5. Suspended particle transport through constriction channel with Brownian motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Walther, Jens Honore

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that translocation events of a polymer or rod through pores or narrower parts of micro- and nanochannels have a stochastic nature due to the Brownian motion. However, it is not clear whether the objects of interest need to have a larger size than the entrance to exhibit the devia...

  6. 100 years of Einstein's Theory of Brownian Motion: From Pollen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 11. 100 years of Einstein's Theory of Brownian Motion: From Pollen Grains to Protein Trains – 2. Debashish Chowdhury. General Article Volume 10 Issue 11 November 2005 pp 42-54 ...

  7. 100 years of Einstein's Theory of Brownian Motion: from Pollen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 9. 100 Years of Einstein's Theory of Brownian Motion: from Pollen Grains to Protein Trains – 1. Debashish Chowdhury. General Article Volume 10 Issue 9 September 2005 pp 63-78 ...

  8. Structure-based molecular simulations reveal the enhancement of biased Brownian motions in single-headed kinesin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Kanada

    Full Text Available Kinesin is a family of molecular motors that move unidirectionally along microtubules (MT using ATP hydrolysis free energy. In the family, the conventional two-headed kinesin was experimentally characterized to move unidirectionally through "walking" in a hand-over-hand fashion by coordinated motions of the two heads. Interestingly a single-headed kinesin, a truncated KIF1A, still can generate a biased Brownian movement along MT, as observed by in vitro single molecule experiments. Thus, KIF1A must use a different mechanism from the conventional kinesin to achieve the unidirectional motions. Based on the energy landscape view of proteins, for the first time, we conducted a set of molecular simulations of the truncated KIF1A movements over an ATP hydrolysis cycle and found a mechanism exhibiting and enhancing stochastic forward-biased movements in a similar way to those in experiments. First, simulating stand-alone KIF1A, we did not find any biased movements, while we found that KIF1A with a large friction cargo-analog attached to the C-terminus can generate clearly biased Brownian movements upon an ATP hydrolysis cycle. The linked cargo-analog enhanced the detachment of the KIF1A from MT. Once detached, diffusion of the KIF1A head was restricted around the large cargo which was located in front of the head at the time of detachment, thus generating a forward bias of the diffusion. The cargo plays the role of a diffusional anchor, or cane, in KIF1A "walking."

  9. Some new results on Brownian Directed Polymers in Random Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Comets, F

    2004-01-01

    We prove some new results on Brownian directed polymers in random environment recently introduced by the authors. The directed polymer in this model is a $d$-dimensional Brownian motion (up to finite time $t$) viewed under a Gibbs measure which is built up with a Poisson random measure on $\\R_+ \\times \\R^d$ (=time $\\times$ space). Here, the Poisson random measure plays the role of the random environment which is independent both in time and in space. We prove that (i) For $d \\ge 3$ and the inverse temperature $\\beta$ smaller than a certain positive value $\\beta_0$, the central limit theorem for the directed polymer holds almost surely with respect to the environment. (ii) If $d=1$ and $\\beta \

  10. Driven Brownian transport through arrays of symmetric obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Steffen; Ghosh, Pulak K.; Hänggi, Peter; Marchesoni, Fabio; Nori, Franco; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz; Schmid, Gerhard

    2012-02-01

    The transport of a suspended overdamped Brownian particle driven through a two-dimensional rectangular array of circular obstacles with finite radius is numerically investigated [P. K. Ghosh et. al., Phys. Rev. E, submitted (2011)]. Two limiting cases are considered in detail, namely, when the constant drive is parallel to the principal or the diagonal array axes. This corresponds to studying the Brownian transport in periodic channels with reflecting walls of different topologies. The mobility and diffusivity of the transported particle in such channels are determined as functions of the drive and the array geometric parameters. Prominent transport features, like negative differential mobilities, excess diffusion peaks, and unconventional asymptotic behaviors, are explained in terms of two distinct lengths, the size of single obstacles (trapping length) and the lattice constant of the array (local correlation length). Local correlation effects are further analyzed by continuously rotating the drive between the two limiting orientations.

  11. On a nonstandard Brownian motion and its maximal function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Bernardo B. de

    2015-07-01

    This article uses Radically Elementary Probability Theory (REPT) to prove results about the Wiener walk (the radically elementary Brownian motion) without the technical apparatus required by stochastic integration. The techniques used replace measure-theoretic tools by discrete probability and the rigorous use of infinitesimals. Specifically, REPT is applied to the results in Palacios (The American Statistician, 2008) to calculate certain expectations related to the Wiener walk and its maximal function. Because Palacios uses mostly combinatorics and no measure theory his results carry over through REPT with minimal changes. The paper also presents a construction of the Wiener walk which is intended to mimic the construction of Brownian motion from "continuous" white noise. A brief review of the nonstandard model on which REPT is based is given in the Appendix in order to minimize the need for previous exposure to the subject.

  12. Resonance of Brownian vortices in viscoelastic shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laas, K.; Mankin, R.

    2015-10-01

    The dynamics of a Brownian particle in an oscillatory viscoelastic shear flow is considered using the generalized Langevin equation. The interaction with fluctuations of environmental parameters is modeled by an additive external white noise and by an internal Mittag-Leffer noise with a finite memory time. Focusing on the mean angular momentum of particles it is shown that the presence of memory has a profound effect on the behavior of the Brownian vortices. Particularly, if an external noise dominates over the internal noise, a resonance-like dependence of the mean angular momentum of "free" particles, trapped due to the cage effect, on the characteristic memory time is observed. Moreover, it is established that memory effects can induce two kinds of resonance peaks: one resonance peak is related to the presence of external noise and the other is related to the initial positional distribution of particles. The bona fide resonance versus the shear frequency is also discussed.

  13. Multiscale Reaction-Diffusion Algorithms: PDE-Assisted Brownian Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Franz, Benjamin

    2013-06-19

    Two algorithms that combine Brownian dynami cs (BD) simulations with mean-field partial differential equations (PDEs) are presented. This PDE-assisted Brownian dynamics (PBD) methodology provides exact particle tracking data in parts of the domain, whilst making use of a mean-field reaction-diffusion PDE description elsewhere. The first PBD algorithm couples BD simulations with PDEs by randomly creating new particles close to the interface, which partitions the domain, and by reincorporating particles into the continuum PDE-description when they cross the interface. The second PBD algorithm introduces an overlap region, where both descriptions exist in parallel. It is shown that the overlap region is required to accurately compute variances using PBD simulations. Advantages of both PBD approaches are discussed and illustrative numerical examples are presented. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  14. Human behavioral regularity, fractional Brownian motion, and exotic phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Yang, Guang; An, Kenan; Huang, Jiping

    2016-08-01

    The mix of competition and cooperation (C&C) is ubiquitous in human society, which, however, remains poorly explored due to the lack of a fundamental method. Here, by developing a Janus game for treating C&C between two sides (suppliers and consumers), we show, for the first time, experimental and simulation evidences for human behavioral regularity. This property is proved to be characterized by fractional Brownian motion associated with an exotic transition between periodic and nonperiodic phases. Furthermore, the periodic phase echoes with business cycles, which are well-known in reality but still far from being well understood. Our results imply that the Janus game could be a fundamental method for studying C&C among humans in society, and it provides guidance for predicting human behavioral activity from the perspective of fractional Brownian motion.

  15. On some possible generalizations of fractional Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. C.; Muniandy, S. V.

    2000-02-01

    Fractional Brownian motion (fBm) can be generalized to multifractional Brownian motion (mBm) if the Hurst exponent H is replaced by a deterministic function H( t). The two possible generalizations of mBm based on the moving average representation and the harmonizable representation are first shown to be equivalent up to a multiplicative deterministic function of time by Cohen [S. Cohen, in: M. Dekking et al. (Eds.), Fractals: Theory and Applications in Engineering, Springer, Berlin, 1999, p. 3.] using the Fourier transform method. In this Letter, we give an alternative verification of such an equivalence based on the direct computation of the covariances of these two Gaussian processes. There also exists another equivalent representation of mBm, which is a variant version of the harmonizable representation. Finally, we consider a generalization based on the Riemann-Liouville fractional integral, and study the large time asymptotic properties of this version of mBm.

  16. Fractional Brownian Motion:. Theory and Application to DNA Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. C.; Muniandy, S. V.

    2001-09-01

    This paper briefly reviews the theory of fractional Brownian motion (FBM) and its generalization to multifractional Brownian motion (MBM). FBM and MBM are applied to a biological system namely the DNA sequence. By considering a DNA sequence as a fractal random walk, it is possible to model the noncoding sequence of human retinoblastoma DNA as a discrete version of FBM. The average scaling exponent or Hurst exponent of the DNA walk is estimated to be H = 0.60 ± 0.05 using the monofractal R/S analysis. This implies that the mean square fluctuation of DNA walk belongs to anomalous superdiffusion type. We also show that the DNA landscape is not monofractal, instead one has multifractal DNA landscape. The empirical estimates of the Hurst exponent falls approximately within the range H ~ 0.62 - 0.72. We propose two multifractal models, namely the MBM and multiscale FBM to describe the existence of different Hurst exponents in DNA walk.

  17. Fast simulation of Brownian dynamics in a crowded environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen; Grima, Ramon

    2017-01-14

    Brownian dynamics simulations are an increasingly popular tool for understanding spatially extended biochemical reaction systems. Recent improvements in our understanding of the cellular environment show that volume exclusion effects are fundamental to reaction networks inside cells. These systems are frequently studied by incorporating inert hard spheres (crowders) into three-dimensional Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations; however these methods are extremely slow owing to the sheer number of possible collisions between particles. Here we propose a rigorous "crowder-free" method to dramatically increase the simulation speed for crowded biochemical reaction systems by eliminating the need to explicitly simulate the crowders. We consider both the cases where the reactive particles are point particles, and where they themselves occupy a volume. Using simulations of simple chemical reaction networks, we show that the "crowder-free" method is up to three orders of magnitude faster than conventional BD and yet leads to nearly indistinguishable results from the latter.

  18. The underdamped Brownian duet and stochastic linear irreversible thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proesmans, Karel; Van den Broeck, Christian

    2017-10-01

    Building on our earlier work [Proesmans et al., Phys. Rev. X 6, 041010 (2016)], we introduce the underdamped Brownian duet as a prototype model of a dissipative system or of a work-to-work engine. Several recent advances from the theory of stochastic thermodynamics are illustrated with explicit analytic calculations and corresponding Langevin simulations. In particular, we discuss the Onsager-Casimir symmetry, the trade-off relations between power, efficiency and dissipation, and stochastic efficiency.

  19. Brownian Motion, Fractal Structure and Verification of A. Einstein's Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Dragiša; Nešić, Ljubiša

    2010-01-01

    The work offers a simple experimental verification of A. Einstein and M. Smoluhovski's formula for Brownian motion. In this experiment we used latex solved in water, glycerin and alcohol while the observations and recording were done with a binocular optical microscope and a digital camera. Video material is recorded in separate files put on the Internet and can be downloaded and used for demonstration in class or further computer processing.

  20. On moments of the integrated exponential Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravelli, Francesco; Mansour, Toufik; Sindoni, Lorenzo; Severini, Simone

    2016-07-01

    We present new exact expressions for a class of moments of the geometric Brownian motion in terms of determinants, obtained using a recurrence relation and combinatorial arguments for the case of a Itô's Wiener process. We then apply the obtained exact formulas to computing averages of the solution of the logistic stochastic differential equation via a series expansion, and compare the results to the solution obtained via Monte Carlo.

  1. Brownian Duet: A Novel Tale of Thermodynamic Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Proesmans

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We calculate analytically the stochastic thermodynamic properties of an isothermal Brownian engine driven by a duo of time-periodic forces, including its Onsager coefficients, the stochastic work of each force, and the corresponding stochastic entropy production. We verify the relations between different operational regimes, maximum power, maximum efficiency, and minimum dissipation, and reproduce the signature features of the stochastic efficiency. All of these results are experimentally tested without adjustable parameters on a colloidal system.

  2. Quantum Dissipation versus Classical Dissipation for Generalized Brownian Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, D

    1997-01-01

    We try to clarify what are the genuine quantal effects that are associated with generalized Brownian Motion (BM). All the quantal effects that are associated with the Zwanzig-Feynman-Vernon-Caldeira-Leggett model are (formally) a solution of the classical Langevin equation. Non-stochastic, genuine quantum mechanical effects, are found for a model that takes into account either the disordered or the chaotic nature of some environment.

  3. Gibbs measures relative to Brownian motion and Nelson's model

    OpenAIRE

    Betz, Volker

    2007-01-01

    Nelson's model describes a quantum mechanical particle interacting with its own bosonic field. Usually the Fock space is used in order to describe the field, but it was noticed already in 1964 by E. Nelson that the field may be alternatively described by an infinite dimensional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. For the free field, this point of view was extremely successful. The case where a coupling is present is more involved and leads to the theory of Gibbs measures relative to Brownian motion. ...

  4. On the Generalized Brownian Motion and its Applications in Finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høg, Esben; Frederiksen, Per; Schiemert, Daniel

    This paper deals with dynamic term structure models (DTSMs) and proposes a new way to handle the limitation of the classical affine models. In particular, the paper expands the exibility of the DTSMs by applying generalized Brownian motions with dependent increments as the governing force of the ...... to other markets or multi factors. As a complement the paper shows an example of how to derive the implied bond pricing parameters using the ordinary Kalman filter....

  5. Synchronization and collective motion of globally coupled Brownian particles

    OpenAIRE

    Sevilla, Francisco J.; Dossetti, Victor; Heiblum-Robles, Alexandro

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we study a system of passive Brownian (non-self-propelled) particles in two dimensions, interacting only through a social-like force (velocity alignment in this case) that resembles Kuramoto's coupling among phase oscillators. We show that the kinematical stationary states of the system go from a phase in thermal equilibrium with no net flux of particles, to far-from-equilibrium phases exhibiting collective motion by increasing the coupling among particles. The mechanism that le...

  6. Brownian Motion of Arbitrarily Shaped Particles in Two-Dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Chakrabarty, Ayan; Konya, Andrew; Wang, Feng; Selinger, Jonathan V.; Sun, Kai; Wei, Qi-Huo

    2014-01-01

    Here we implement microfabricated boomerang particles with unequal arm lengths as a model for non-symmetry particles and study their Brownian motion in a quasi-two dimensional geometry by using high precision single particle motion tracking. We show that due to the coupling between translation and rotation, the mean squared displacements of a single asymmetric boomerang particle exhibit a non-linear crossover from short time faster to long time slower diffusion, and the mean displacements for...

  7. Reflected Brownian motions in the KPZ universality class

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Thomas; Spohn, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a detailed study of a system of interacting Brownian motions in one dimension. The interaction is point-like such that the n-th Brownian motion is reflected from the Brownian motion with label n-1. This model belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class. In fact, because of the singular interaction, many universal properties can be established with rigor. They depend on the choice of initial conditions. Discussion addresses packed and periodic initial conditions (Chapter 5), stationary initial conditions (Chapter 6), and mixtures thereof (Chapter 7). The suitably scaled spatial process will be proven to converge to an Airy process in the long time limit. A chapter on determinantal random fields and another one on Airy processes are added to have the notes self-contained. These notes serve as an introduction to the KPZ universality class, illustrating the main concepts by means of a single model only. The notes will be of interest to readers from interacting diffusion processe...

  8. Brownian dynamics of confined suspensions of active microrollers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Delmotte, Blaise; Donev, Aleksandar

    2017-04-01

    We develop efficient numerical methods for performing many-body Brownian dynamics simulations of a recently observed fingering instability in an active suspension of colloidal rollers sedimented above a wall [M. Driscoll, B. Delmotte, M. Youssef, S. Sacanna, A. Donev, and P. Chaikin, Nat. Phys. (2016), preprint arXiv:1609.08673. We present a stochastic Adams-Bashforth integrator for the equations of Brownian dynamics, which has the same cost but is more accurate than the widely used Euler-Maruyama scheme, and use a random finite difference to capture the stochastic drift proportional to the divergence of the configuration-dependent mobility matrix. We generate the Brownian increments using a Krylov method and show that for particles confined to remain in the vicinity of a no-slip wall by gravity or active flows, the number of iterations is independent of the number of particles. Our numerical experiments with active rollers show that the thermal fluctuations set the characteristic height of the colloids above the wall, both in the initial condition and the subsequent evolution dominated by active flows. The characteristic height in turn controls the time scale and wavelength for the development of the fingering instability.

  9. Semicircular Canals Circumvent Brownian Motion Overload of Mechanoreceptor Hair Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mees Muller

    Full Text Available Vertebrate semicircular canals (SCC first appeared in the vertebrates (i.e. ancestral fish over 600 million years ago. In SCC the principal mechanoreceptors are hair cells, which as compared to cochlear hair cells are distinctly longer (70 vs. 7 μm, 10 times more compliant to bending (44 vs. 500 nN/m, and have a 100-fold higher tip displacement threshold (< 10 μm vs. <400 nm. We have developed biomechanical models of vertebrate hair cells where the bundle is approximated as a stiff, cylindrical elastic rod subject to friction and thermal agitation. Our models suggest that the above differences aid SCC hair cells in circumventing the masking effects of Brownian motion noise of about 70 nm, and thereby permit transduction of very low frequency (<10 Hz signals. We observe that very low frequency mechanoreception requires increased stimulus amplitude, and argue that this is adaptive to circumvent Brownian motion overload at the hair bundles. We suggest that the selective advantage of detecting such low frequency stimuli may have favoured the evolution of large guiding structures such as semicircular canals and otoliths to overcome Brownian Motion noise at the level of the mechanoreceptors of the SCC.

  10. Fractional Brownian motions: memory, diffusion velocity, and correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuliński, A.

    2017-02-01

    Fractional Brownian motions (FBMs) have been observed recently in the measured trajectories of individual molecules or small particles in the cytoplasm of living cells and in other dense composite systems, among others. Various types of FBMs differ in a number of ways, including the strength, range and type of damping of the memory encoded in their definitions, but share several basic characteristics: distributions, non-ergodic properties, and scaling of the second moment, which makes it difficult to determine which type of Brownian motion (fractional or normal) the measured trajectory belongs to. Here, we show, by introducing FBMs with regulated range and strength of memory, that it is the structure of memory which determines their physical properties, including mean velocity of diffusion; therefore, the course and kinetics of several processes (including coagulation and some chemical reactions). We also show that autocorrelation functions possess characteristic features which enable identification of an observed FBM, and of the type of memory governing its trajectory. In memoriam Marian Smoluchowski, on the 100th anniversary of the publication of his seminal papers on Brownian motion and diffusion-limited kinetics.

  11. Stochastically gated local and occupation times of a Brownian particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2017-01-01

    We generalize the Feynman-Kac formula to analyze the local and occupation times of a Brownian particle moving in a stochastically gated one-dimensional domain. (i) The gated local time is defined as the amount of time spent by the particle in the neighborhood of a point in space where there is some target that only receives resources from (or detects) the particle when the gate is open; the target does not interfere with the motion of the Brownian particle. (ii) The gated occupation time is defined as the amount of time spent by the particle in the positive half of the real line, given that it can only cross the origin when a gate placed at the origin is open; in the closed state the particle is reflected. In both scenarios, the gate randomly switches between the open and closed states according to a two-state Markov process. We derive a stochastic, backward Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) for the moment-generating function of the two types of gated Brownian functional, given a particular realization of the stochastic gate, and analyze the resulting stochastic FPE using a moments method recently developed for diffusion processes in randomly switching environments. In particular, we obtain dynamical equations for the moment-generating function, averaged with respect to realizations of the stochastic gate.

  12. Brownian motion of arbitrarily shaped particles in two dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Ayan; Konya, Andrew; Wang, Feng; Selinger, Jonathan V; Sun, Kai; Wei, Qi-Huo

    2014-11-25

    We implement microfabricated boomerang particles with unequal arm lengths as a model for nonsymmetric particles and study their Brownian motion in a quasi-two-dimensional geometry by using high-precision single-particle motion tracking. We show that because of the coupling between translation and rotation, the mean squared displacements of a single asymmetric boomerang particle exhibit a nonlinear crossover from short-time faster to long-time slower diffusion, and the mean displacements for fixed initial orientation are nonzero and saturate out at long times. The measured anisotropic diffusion coefficients versus the tracking point position indicate that there exists one unique point, i.e., the center of hydrodynamic stress (CoH), at which all coupled diffusion coefficients vanish. This implies that in contrast to motion in three dimensions where the CoH exists only for high-symmetry particles, the CoH always exists for Brownian motion in two dimensions. We develop an analytical model based on Langevin theory to explain the experimental results and show that among the six anisotropic diffusion coefficients only five are independent because the translation-translation coupling originates from the translation-rotation coupling. Finally, we classify the behavior of two-dimensional Brownian motion of arbitrarily shaped particles into four groups based on the particle shape symmetry group and discussed potential applications of the CoH in simplifying understanding of the circular motions of microswimmers.

  13. Movement and Man at the end of the Random Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Sacripanti, Attilio

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, it is presented the well known aspect of non linearity of internal human body structures. Similarity on the basis of the Fractional Brownian Motion from the static ones, as the geometrical fractals like the Intestine and placenta linings, Airways in lungs, Arterial system in kidneys and so on. To the kinematics ones, as the temporal fractals like Heart beat sequences, Electroencephalograms, Respiratory tidal volumes, DNA sequences mapping and so on. But this internal well known knowledge is astonishing extendible from the internal, through the Brownian basis of the muscular contraction, to the macroscopic external human movements, like the orthostatic equilibrium, gait, running training, judo contest and soccer, basketball, football or water polo games, by means of the ubiquitous continuous presence; the Brownian Dynamics.

  14. Karhunen-Loève Expansion for the Second Order Detrended Brownian Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchun Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the norm in the Hilbert Space L2[0,1], the second order detrended Brownian motion is defined as the orthogonal component of projection of the standard Brownian motion into the space spanned by nonlinear function subspace. Karhunen-Loève expansion for this process is obtained together with the relationship of that of a generalized Brownian bridge. As applications, Laplace transform, large deviation, and small deviation are given.

  15. Brownian semi-stationary processes, turbulence and smooth processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbina, José Ulises Márquez

    This thesis analysis the use of Brownian semi-stationary (BSS) processes to model the main statistical features present in turbulent time series, and some asymptotic properties of certain classes of smooth processes.  Turbulence is a complex phenomena governed by the Navier-Stokes equations....... We also studied the distributional properties of the increments of BSS processes with the intent to better understand why the BSS processes seem to accurately reproduce the temporal turbulent dynamics.  BSS processes in general are not semimartingales. However, there are conditions which make a BSS...

  16. Continuum Theory of Phase Separation Kinetics for Active Brownian Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Tiribocchi, Adriano; Allen, Rosalind J.; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E.

    2013-10-01

    Active Brownian particles (ABPs), when subject to purely repulsive interactions, are known to undergo activity-induced phase separation broadly resembling an equilibrium (attraction-induced) gas-liquid coexistence. Here we present an accurate continuum theory for the dynamics of phase-separating ABPs, derived by direct coarse graining, capturing leading-order density gradient terms alongside an effective bulk free energy. Such gradient terms do not obey detailed balance; yet we find coarsening dynamics closely resembling that of equilibrium phase separation. Our continuum theory is numerically compared to large-scale direct simulations of ABPs and accurately accounts for domain growth kinetics, domain topologies, and coexistence densities.

  17. Analysis of Brownian Dynamics Simulations of Reversible Bimolecular Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Lipková, Jana

    2011-01-01

    A class of Brownian dynamics algorithms for stochastic reaction-diffusion models which include reversible bimolecular reactions is presented and analyzed. The method is a generalization of the λ-bcȳ model for irreversible bimolecular reactions which was introduced in [R. Erban and S. J. Chapman, Phys. Biol., 6(2009), 046001]. The formulae relating the experimentally measurable quantities (reaction rate constants and diffusion constants) with the algorithm parameters are derived. The probability of geminate recombination is also investigated. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  18. On the calculation of the self-diffusion coefficient of interacting Brownian particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Dhont, J.K.G.

    1984-01-01

    We consider two ways to calculate the self-diffusion coefficient of interacting Brownian particles. The first approach is based on the calculation of the mean square displacement of a Brownian particle starting from the Smoluchowski equation. In the second approach the self-diffusion coefficient is

  19. A Simplified Treatment of Brownian Motion and Stochastic Differential Equations Arising in Financial Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlar, Mahmut

    2004-01-01

    Brownian motion is an important stochastic process used in modelling the random evolution of stock prices. In their 1973 seminal paper--which led to the awarding of the 1997 Nobel prize in Economic Sciences--Fischer Black and Myron Scholes assumed that the random stock price process is described (i.e., generated) by Brownian motion. Despite its…

  20. Ergodic properties of fractional Brownian-Langevin motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Weihua; Barkai, Eli

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the time average mean-square displacement delta;{2}[over ](x(t))=integral_{0};{t-Delta}[x(t;{'}+Delta)-x(t;{'})];{2}dt;{'}(t-Delta) for fractional Brownian-Langevin motion where x(t) is the stochastic trajectory and Delta is the lag time. Unlike the previously investigated continuous-time random-walk model, delta;{2}[over ] converges to the ensemble average x;{2} approximately t;{2H} in the long measurement time limit. The convergence to ergodic behavior is slow, however, and surprisingly the Hurst exponent H=3/4 marks the critical point of the speed of convergence. When Hballistic limit H-->1 ergodicity is broken and E_{B} approximately 2 . The critical point H=3/4 is marked by the divergence of the coefficient k(H) . Fractional Brownian motion as a model for recent experiments of subdiffusion of mRNA in the cell is briefly discussed, and a comparison with the continuous-time random-walk model is made.

  1. Suspended particle transport through constriction channel with Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Walther, Jens H.

    2017-08-01

    It is well known that translocation events of a polymer or rod through pores or narrower parts of micro- and nanochannels have a stochastic nature due to the Brownian motion. However, it is not clear whether the objects of interest need to have a larger size than the entrance to exhibit the deviation from the dynamics of the surrounding fluid. We show by numerical analysis that the particle injection into the narrower part of the channel is affected by thermal fluctuation, where the particles have spherical symmetry and are smaller than the height of the constriction. The Péclet number (Pe) is the order parameter that governs the phenomena, which clarifies the spatio-temporal significance of Brownian motion compared to hydrodynamics. Furthermore, we find that there exists an optimal condition of Pe to attain the highest flow rate of particles relative to the dispersant fluid flow. Our finding is important in science and technology from nanopore DNA sequencers and lab-on-a-chip devices to filtration by porous materials and chromatography.

  2. Transient aging in fractional Brownian and Langevin-equation motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursawe, Jochen; Schulz, Johannes; Metzler, Ralf

    2013-12-01

    Stochastic processes driven by stationary fractional Gaussian noise, that is, fractional Brownian motion and fractional Langevin-equation motion, are usually considered to be ergodic in the sense that, after an algebraic relaxation, time and ensemble averages of physical observables coincide. Recently it was demonstrated that fractional Brownian motion and fractional Langevin-equation motion under external confinement are transiently nonergodic-time and ensemble averages behave differently-from the moment when the particle starts to sense the confinement. Here we show that these processes also exhibit transient aging, that is, physical observables such as the time-averaged mean-squared displacement depend on the time lag between the initiation of the system at time t=0 and the start of the measurement at the aging time t(a). In particular, it turns out that for fractional Langevin-equation motion the aging dependence on t(a) is different between the cases of free and confined motion. We obtain explicit analytical expressions for the aged moments of the particle position as well as the time-averaged mean-squared displacement and present a numerical analysis of this transient aging phenomenon.

  3. Intermittency and multifractional Brownian character of geomagnetic time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Consolini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's magnetosphere exhibits a complex behavior in response to the solar wind conditions. This behavior, which is described in terms of mutifractional Brownian motions, could be the consequence of the occurrence of dynamical phase transitions. On the other hand, it has been shown that the dynamics of the geomagnetic signals is also characterized by intermittency at the smallest temporal scales. Here, we focus on the existence of a possible relationship in the geomagnetic time series between the multifractional Brownian motion character and the occurrence of intermittency. In detail, we investigate the multifractional nature of two long time series of the horizontal intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as measured at L'Aquila Geomagnetic Observatory during two years (2001 and 2008, which correspond to different conditions of solar activity. We propose a possible double origin of the intermittent character of the small-scale magnetic field fluctuations, which is related to both the multifractional nature of the geomagnetic field and the intermittent character of the disturbance level. Our results suggest a more complex nature of the geomagnetic response to solar wind changes than previously thought.

  4. Intermittency and multifractional Brownian character of geomagnetic time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolini, G.; De Marco, R.; De Michelis, P.

    2013-07-01

    The Earth's magnetosphere exhibits a complex behavior in response to the solar wind conditions. This behavior, which is described in terms of mutifractional Brownian motions, could be the consequence of the occurrence of dynamical phase transitions. On the other hand, it has been shown that the dynamics of the geomagnetic signals is also characterized by intermittency at the smallest temporal scales. Here, we focus on the existence of a possible relationship in the geomagnetic time series between the multifractional Brownian motion character and the occurrence of intermittency. In detail, we investigate the multifractional nature of two long time series of the horizontal intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as measured at L'Aquila Geomagnetic Observatory during two years (2001 and 2008), which correspond to different conditions of solar activity. We propose a possible double origin of the intermittent character of the small-scale magnetic field fluctuations, which is related to both the multifractional nature of the geomagnetic field and the intermittent character of the disturbance level. Our results suggest a more complex nature of the geomagnetic response to solar wind changes than previously thought.

  5. Mathematical interpretation of Brownian motor model: Limit cycles and directed transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianqiang; Ma, Hong; Zhong, Suchuang

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we first suggest that the attractor of Brownian motor model is one of the reasons for the directed transport phenomenon of Brownian particle. We take the classical Smoluchowski-Feynman (SF) ratchet model as an example to investigate the relationship between limit cycles and directed transport phenomenon of the Brownian particle. We study the existence and variation rule of limit cycles of SF ratchet model at changing parameters through mathematical methods. The influences of these parameters on the directed transport phenomenon of a Brownian particle are then analyzed through numerical simulations. Reasonable mathematical explanations for the directed transport phenomenon of Brownian particle in SF ratchet model are also formulated on the basis of the existence and variation rule of the limit cycles and numerical simulations. These mathematical explanations provide a theoretical basis for applying these theories in physics, biology, chemistry, and engineering.

  6. Brownian dynamics simulations of electrostatic adsorption and ordering of charged colloidal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Singh, Jennifer; Barrera, Enrique; Varshney, Vikas; Kelley, John; Vaia, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Self-limiting assembly of nanoparticle (NP) and biomacromolecular arrays promises to revolutionize compliant device fabrication by enabling print-on-demand. Presently, quantitative understanding of the relationship between the array order, nanoparticle size, surface characteristics, and process conditions remain elusive. Previous simulations have shown that tuning particle and surface potentials, screening lengths, and particle concentrations can lead to ordering. However, identifying the experimental conditions to observe these in-plane order-disorder and order-order transitions for NPs remains a challenge. Here in, the absorption of electrostatically stabilized NPs with increasing ratio of particle-particle repulsion to particle-surface attraction via Brownian dynamics simulations is discussed. The orientation correlation function follows the KTHNY theory of phase transition as particle and surface potentials are tuned. Detailed Voronoi analysis reveals movement and defect annihilation during the final stages of adsorption. Identifying the transition between liquid, hexatic, and crystalline NP arrays will provide experimental conditions necessary to create high resolution patterns and smaller devices.

  7. Brownian dynamics of a protein-polymer chain complex in a solid-state nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Craig C.; Melnikov, Dmitriy V.; Gracheva, Maria E.

    2017-08-01

    We study the movement of a polymer attached to a large protein inside a nanopore in a thin silicon dioxide membrane submerged in an electrolyte solution. We use Brownian dynamics to describe the motion of a negatively charged polymer chain of varying lengths attached to a neutral protein modeled as a spherical bead with a radius larger than that of the nanopore, allowing the chain to thread the nanopore but preventing it from translocating. The motion of the protein-polymer complex within the pore is also compared to that of a freely translocating polymer. Our results show that the free polymer's standard deviations in the direction normal to the pore axis is greater than that of the protein-polymer complex. We find that restrictions imposed by the protein, bias, and neighboring chain segments aid in controlling the position of the chain in the pore. Understanding the behavior of the protein-polymer chain complex may lead to methods that improve molecule identification by increasing the resolution of ionic current measurements.

  8. Large scale Brownian dynamics of confined suspensions of rigid particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Brennan; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Patankar, Neelesh A; Donev, Aleksandar

    2017-12-28

    We introduce methods for large-scale Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulation of many rigid particles of arbitrary shape suspended in a fluctuating fluid. Our method adds Brownian motion to the rigid multiblob method [F. Balboa Usabiaga et al., Commun. Appl. Math. Comput. Sci. 11(2), 217-296 (2016)] at a cost comparable to the cost of deterministic simulations. We demonstrate that we can efficiently generate deterministic and random displacements for many particles using preconditioned Krylov iterative methods, if kernel methods to efficiently compute the action of the Rotne-Prager-Yamakawa (RPY) mobility matrix and its "square" root are available for the given boundary conditions. These kernel operations can be computed with near linear scaling for periodic domains using the positively split Ewald method. Here we study particles partially confined by gravity above a no-slip bottom wall using a graphical processing unit implementation of the mobility matrix-vector product, combined with a preconditioned Lanczos iteration for generating Brownian displacements. We address a major challenge in large-scale BD simulations, capturing the stochastic drift term that arises because of the configuration-dependent mobility. Unlike the widely used Fixman midpoint scheme, our methods utilize random finite differences and do not require the solution of resistance problems or the computation of the action of the inverse square root of the RPY mobility matrix. We construct two temporal schemes which are viable for large-scale simulations, an Euler-Maruyama traction scheme and a trapezoidal slip scheme, which minimize the number of mobility problems to be solved per time step while capturing the required stochastic drift terms. We validate and compare these schemes numerically by modeling suspensions of boomerang-shaped particles sedimented near a bottom wall. Using the trapezoidal scheme, we investigate the steady-state active motion in dense suspensions of confined microrollers, whose

  9. Large scale Brownian dynamics of confined suspensions of rigid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Brennan; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Patankar, Neelesh A.; Donev, Aleksandar

    2017-12-01

    We introduce methods for large-scale Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulation of many rigid particles of arbitrary shape suspended in a fluctuating fluid. Our method adds Brownian motion to the rigid multiblob method [F. Balboa Usabiaga et al., Commun. Appl. Math. Comput. Sci. 11(2), 217-296 (2016)] at a cost comparable to the cost of deterministic simulations. We demonstrate that we can efficiently generate deterministic and random displacements for many particles using preconditioned Krylov iterative methods, if kernel methods to efficiently compute the action of the Rotne-Prager-Yamakawa (RPY) mobility matrix and its "square" root are available for the given boundary conditions. These kernel operations can be computed with near linear scaling for periodic domains using the positively split Ewald method. Here we study particles partially confined by gravity above a no-slip bottom wall using a graphical processing unit implementation of the mobility matrix-vector product, combined with a preconditioned Lanczos iteration for generating Brownian displacements. We address a major challenge in large-scale BD simulations, capturing the stochastic drift term that arises because of the configuration-dependent mobility. Unlike the widely used Fixman midpoint scheme, our methods utilize random finite differences and do not require the solution of resistance problems or the computation of the action of the inverse square root of the RPY mobility matrix. We construct two temporal schemes which are viable for large-scale simulations, an Euler-Maruyama traction scheme and a trapezoidal slip scheme, which minimize the number of mobility problems to be solved per time step while capturing the required stochastic drift terms. We validate and compare these schemes numerically by modeling suspensions of boomerang-shaped particles sedimented near a bottom wall. Using the trapezoidal scheme, we investigate the steady-state active motion in dense suspensions of confined microrollers, whose

  10. A statistical study on nanoparticle movements in a microfluidic channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Rin; Chang, Yoon-Suk; Choi, Jae-Boong; Kim, Young-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic channels have received much attention because they can be used to control and transport nanoscale objects such as nanoparticles, nanowires, carbon nanotubes, DNA and cells. However, so far, practical channels have not been easy to design because they require very expensive fabrication and sensitive experiments. Numerical approaches can be alternatives or supplementary measures to predict the performance of new channels because they efficiently explain nanoscale multi-physics phenomena and successfully solve nanowire alignment and cell adhesion problems. In this paper, a newly updated immersed finite element method that accounts for collision force and Brownian motion as well as fluid-solid interaction is proposed, and is applied to simulate nanoparticle movements in a microfluidic channel. As part of the simulation, Brownian motion effects in a single nanoparticle focusing lens system are examined under different temperature conditions, and the resulting transport efficiencies are discussed. Furthermore, nanoparticle movements in a double focusing lens system are predicted to show the enhancement of focusing efficiency.

  11. Diffusion in crowded biological environments: applications of Brownian dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Długosz Maciej

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Biochemical reactions in living systems occur in complex, heterogeneous media with total concentrations of macromolecules in the range of 50 - 400 mgml. Molecular species occupy a significant fraction of the immersing medium, up to 40% of volume. Such complex and volume-occupied environments are generally termed 'crowded' and/or 'confined'. In crowded conditions non-specific interactions between macromolecules may hinder diffusion - a major process determining metabolism, transport, and signaling. Also, the crowded media can alter, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the reactions in vivo in comparison with their in vitro counterparts. This review focuses on recent developments in particle-based Brownian dynamics algorithms, their applications to model diffusive transport in crowded systems, and their abilities to reproduce and predict the behavior of macromolecules under in vivo conditions.

  12. Brownian Motion as a Limit to Physical Measuring Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss, Martin

    2016-01-01

    formulated a general conclusion concerning the nature of physical measurements, namely that there is a definite limit to the ultimate sensitivity of measuring instruments beyond which we cannot advance, and that this limit is determined by Brownian motion. Ising’s conclusion agreed with experiments......In this paper, we examine the history of the idea that noise presents a fundamental limit to physical measuring processes. This idea had its origins in research aimed at improving the accuracy of instruments for electrical measurements. Out of these endeavors, the Swedish physicist Gustaf A. Ising...... and received widespread recognition, but his way of modeling the system was contested by his contemporaries. With the more embracing notion of noise that developed during and after World War II, Ising’s conclusion was reinterpreted as showing that noise puts a limit on physical measurement processes. Hence...

  13. Generalized Fokker-Planck equation, Brownian motion, and ergodicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyukhin, A V

    2008-06-01

    Microscopic theory of Brownian motion of a particle of mass M in a bath of molecules of mass mforce, and the generalized Fokker-Planck equation involves derivatives of order higher than 2. These equations are derived from first principles with coefficients expressed in terms of correlation functions of microscopic force on the particle. The coefficients are evaluated explicitly for a generalized Rayleigh model with a finite time of molecule-particle collisions. In the limit of a low-density bath, we recover the results obtained previously for a model with instantaneous binary collisions. In the general case, the equations contain additional corrections, quadratic in bath density, originating from a finite collision time. These corrections survive to order (m/M)2 and are found to make the stationary distribution non-Maxwellian. Some relevant numerical simulations are also presented.

  14. Exact analytical thermodynamic expressions for a Brownian heat engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taye, Mesfin Asfaw

    2015-09-01

    The nonequilibrium thermodynamics feature of a Brownian motor operating between two different heat baths is explored as a function of time t. Using the Gibbs entropy and Schnakenberg microscopic stochastic approach, we find exact closed form expressions for the free energy, the rate of entropy production, and the rate of entropy flow from the system to the outside. We show that when the system is out of equilibrium, it constantly produces entropy and at the same time extracts entropy out of the system. Its entropy production and extraction rates decrease in time and saturate to a constant value. In the long time limit, the rate of entropy production balances the rate of entropy extraction, and at equilibrium both entropy production and extraction rates become zero. Furthermore, via the present model, many thermodynamic theories can be checked.

  15. First-passage time of Brownian motion with dry friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yaming; Just, Wolfram

    2014-02-01

    We provide an analytic solution to the first-passage time (FPT) problem of a piecewise-smooth stochastic model, namely Brownian motion with dry friction, using two different but closely related approaches which are based on eigenfunction decompositions on the one hand and on the backward Kolmogorov equation on the other. For the simple case containing only dry friction, a phase-transition phenomenon in the spectrum is found which relates to the position of the exit point, and which affects the tail of the FPT distribution. For the model containing as well a driving force and viscous friction the impact of the corresponding stick-slip transition and of the transition to ballistic exit is evaluated quantitatively. The proposed model is one of the very few cases where FPT properties are accessible by analytical means.

  16. Brownian rotational relaxation and power absorption in magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goya, G.F. [Institute of Nanoscience of Aragon (INA), University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)]. E-mail: goya@unizar.es; Fernandez-Pacheco, R. [Institute of Nanoscience of Aragon (INA), University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Arruebo, M. [Institute of Nanoscience of Aragon (INA), University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Cassinelli, N. [Electronics Division, Bauer and Associates, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Facultad de Ingenieria, UNLP (Argentina); Ibarra, M.R. [Institute of Nanoscience of Aragon (INA), University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2007-09-15

    We present a study of the power absorption efficiency in several magnetite-based colloids, to asses their potential as magnetic inductive hyperthermia (MIH) agents. Relaxation times {tau} were measured through the imaginary susceptibility component {chi}{sup '}'(T), and analyzed within Debye's theory of dipolar fluid. The results indicated Brownian rotational relaxation and allowed to calculate the hydrodynamic radius close to the values obtained from photon correlation. The study of the colloid performances as power absorbers showed no detectable increase of temperature for dextran-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, whereas a second Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-based dispersion of similar concentration could be heated up to 12K after 30min under similar experimental conditions. The different power absorption efficiencies are discussed in terms of the magnetic structure of the nanoparticles.

  17. BROWNIAN HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT IN THE TURBULENT REGIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Chandrasekhar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents convection heat transfer of a turbulent flow Al2O3/water nanofluid in a circular duct. The duct is a under constant and uniform heat flux. The paper computationally investigates the system’s thermal behavior in a wide range of Reynolds number and also volume concentration up to 6%. To obtain the nanofluid thermophysical properties, the Hamilton-Crosser model along with the Brownian motion effect are utilized. Then the thermal performance of the system with the nanofluid is compared to the conventional systems which use water as the working fluid. The results indicate that the use of nanofluid of 6% improves the heat transfer rate up to 36.8% with respect to pure water. Therefore, using the Al2O3/water nanofluid instead of water can be a great choice when better heat transfer is needed.

  18. Large-deviation properties of Brownian motion with dry friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yaming; Just, Wolfram

    2014-10-01

    We investigate piecewise-linear stochastic models with regard to the probability distribution of functionals of the stochastic processes, a question that occurs frequently in large deviation theory. The functionals that we are looking into in detail are related to the time a stochastic process spends at a phase space point or in a phase space region, as well as to the motion with inertia. For a Langevin equation with discontinuous drift, we extend the so-called backward Fokker-Planck technique for non-negative support functionals to arbitrary support functionals, to derive explicit expressions for the moments of the functional. Explicit solutions for the moments and for the distribution of the so-called local time, the occupation time, and the displacement are derived for the Brownian motion with dry friction, including quantitative measures to characterize deviation from Gaussian behavior in the asymptotic long time limit.

  19. Confined mobility in biomembranes modeled by early stage Brownian motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmachowski, Lech

    2014-08-01

    An equation of motion, derived from the fractal analysis of the Brownian particle trajectory, makes it possible to calculate the time dependence of the mean square displacement for early times, before the Einstein formula becomes valid. The diffusion coefficient increases with the distance travelled which can be restricted by the geometrical conditions. The corresponding diffusion coefficient cannot increase further to achieve a value characteristic for unrestricted environment. Explicit formula is derived for confined diffusivity related to the unrestricted one as dependent on the maximum particle mean square displacement possible normalized by the square of its mean free path. The model describes the lipid and protein diffusion in tubular membranes with different radii, originally fitted by the modified Saffman-Delbrück equation, and the lateral mobility of synthetic model peptides for which the diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the radius of the diffusing object and to the thickness of the membrane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Micro rectennas: Brownian ratchets for thermal-energy harvesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Y.; Powell, C. V.; Balocco, C., E-mail: claudio.balocco@durham.ac.uk [School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Song, A. M. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-22

    We experimentally demonstrated the operation of a rectenna for harvesting thermal (blackbody) radiation and converting it into dc electric power. The device integrates an ultrafast rectifier, the self-switching nanodiode, with a wideband log-periodic spiral microantenna. The radiation from the thermal source drives the rectenna out of thermal equilibrium, permitting the rectification of the excess thermal fluctuations from the antenna. The power conversion efficiency increases with the source temperatures up to 0.02% at 973 K. The low efficiency is attributed mainly to the impedance mismatch between antenna and rectifier, and partially to the large field of view of the antenna. Our device not only opens a potential solution for harvesting thermal energy but also provides a platform for experimenting with Brownian ratchets.

  1. Micro rectennas: Brownian ratchets for thermal-energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.; Powell, C. V.; Song, A. M.; Balocco, C.

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrated the operation of a rectenna for harvesting thermal (blackbody) radiation and converting it into dc electric power. The device integrates an ultrafast rectifier, the self-switching nanodiode, with a wideband log-periodic spiral microantenna. The radiation from the thermal source drives the rectenna out of thermal equilibrium, permitting the rectification of the excess thermal fluctuations from the antenna. The power conversion efficiency increases with the source temperatures up to 0.02% at 973 K. The low efficiency is attributed mainly to the impedance mismatch between antenna and rectifier, and partially to the large field of view of the antenna. Our device not only opens a potential solution for harvesting thermal energy but also provides a platform for experimenting with Brownian ratchets.

  2. Crystallization and melting of bacteria colonies and Brownian bugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Francisco; López, Cristóbal; Hernández-García, Emilio; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2008-02-01

    Motivated by the existence of remarkably ordered cluster arrays of bacteria colonies growing in Petri dishes and related problems, we study the spontaneous emergence of clustering and patterns in a simple nonequilibrium system: the individual-based interacting Brownian bug model. We map this discrete model into a continuous Langevin equation which is the starting point for our extensive numerical analyses. For the two-dimensional case we report on the spontaneous generation of localized clusters of activity as well as a melting-freezing transition from a disordered or isotropic phase to an ordered one characterized by hexagonal patterns. We study in detail the analogies and differences with the well-established Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young theory of equilibrium melting, as well as with another competing theory. For that, we study translational and orientational correlations and perform a careful defect analysis. We find a nonstandard one-stage, defect-mediated transition whose nature is only partially elucidated.

  3. Momentum conserving Brownian dynamics propagator for complex soft matter fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padding, J. T. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Briels, W. J. [Computational Biophysics, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-12-28

    We present a Galilean invariant, momentum conserving first order Brownian dynamics scheme for coarse-grained simulations of highly frictional soft matter systems. Friction forces are taken to be with respect to moving background material. The motion of the background material is described by locally averaged velocities in the neighborhood of the dissolved coarse coordinates. The velocity variables are updated by a momentum conserving scheme. The properties of the stochastic updates are derived through the Chapman-Kolmogorov and Fokker-Planck equations for the evolution of the probability distribution of coarse-grained position and velocity variables, by requiring the equilibrium distribution to be a stationary solution. We test our new scheme on concentrated star polymer solutions and find that the transverse current and velocity time auto-correlation functions behave as expected from hydrodynamics. In particular, the velocity auto-correlation functions display a long time tail in complete agreement with hydrodynamics.

  4. Semicircular canals circumvent Brownian Motion overload of mechanoreceptor hair cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Mees; Heeck, Kier; Elemans, Coen P H

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate semicircular canals (SCC) first appeared in the vertebrates (i.e. ancestral fish) over 600 million years ago. In SCC the principal mechanoreceptors are hair cells, which as compared to cochlear hair cells are distinctly longer (70 vs. 7 μm), 10 times more compliant to bending (44 vs. 500...... nN/m), and have a 100-fold higher tip displacement threshold (hair cells where the bundle is approximated as a stiff, cylindrical elastic rod subject to friction and thermal agitation. Our models suggest that the above...... differences aid SCC hair cells in circumventing the masking effects of Brownian motion noise of about 70 nm, and thereby permit transduction of very low frequency (

  5. Hybrid finite element and Brownian dynamics method for charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Gary A., E-mail: ghuber@ucsd.edu; Miao, Yinglong [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0365 (United States); Zhou, Shenggao [Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Center for Interdiscipline Research, Soochow University, 1 Shizi Street, Suzhou, 215006 Jiangsu (China); Li, Bo [Department of Mathematics and Quantitative Biology Graduate Program, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0112 (United States); McCammon, J. Andrew [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0365 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0636 (United States)

    2016-04-28

    Diffusion is often the rate-determining step in many biological processes. Currently, the two main computational methods for studying diffusion are stochastic methods, such as Brownian dynamics, and continuum methods, such as the finite element method. A previous study introduced a new hybrid diffusion method that couples the strengths of each of these two methods, but was limited by the lack of interactions among the particles; the force on each particle had to be from an external field. This study further develops the method to allow charged particles. The method is derived for a general multidimensional system and is presented using a basic test case for a one-dimensional linear system with one charged species and a radially symmetric system with three charged species.

  6. A Stability Result for Stochastic Differential Equations Driven by Fractional Brownian Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Saussereau

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the stability of the solutions of stochastic differential equations driven by fractional Brownian motions with Hurst parameter greater than half. We prove that when the initial conditions, the drift, and the diffusion coefficients as well as the fractional Brownian motions converge in a suitable sense, then the sequence of the solutions of the corresponding equations converge in Hölder norm to the solution of a stochastic differential equation. The limit equation is driven by the limit fractional Brownian motion and its coefficients are the limits of the sequence of the coefficients.

  7. The rate of collisions due to Brownian or gravitational motion of small drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Davis, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of the collision rate of two spherical drops undergoing Brownian diffusion or gravitational sedimentation are presented. The diffusion equation for relative Brownian motion of two drops is derived, and the relative motion of pairs of drops in gravitational sedimentation is traced via a trajectory analysis in order to develop theoretical models to determine the collision efficiencies, both with and without interparticle forces applied between the drops. It is concluded that finite collision rates between nondeforming fluid drops are possible for Brownian diffusion or gravitational sedimentation in the absence of attractive forces, in stark contrast to the prediction that lubrication forces prevent rigid spheres from contacting each other unless an attractive force that becomes infinite as the separation approaches zero is applied. Collision rates are shown to increase as the viscosity of the drop-phase decreases. In general, hydrodynamic interactions reduce the collision rates more for gravitational collisions than for Brownian collisions.

  8. Actuarial approach in a mixed fractional Brownian motion with jumps environment for pricing currency option

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shokrollahi, Foad; Kılıçman, Adem

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to investigate the strategy of fair insurance premium actuarial approach for pricing currency option, when the value of foreign currency option follows the mixed fractional Brownian...

  9. Bowel Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... passes through the large intestine too slowly. Bowel incontinence is a problem controlling your bowel movements. Other abnormalities with bowel movements may be a sign of a digestive problem. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  10. 100 years of Einstein's Theory of Brownian Motion:from Pollen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... random 'kicks' to the. Brownian particle are also responsible for its energy dis- sipation because of viscous drag. The incessant ran- dom motion of the Brownian particle is maintained for ever by the delicate balance of the random kicks it gets. -76-----------------------------~~--------RE-S-O-N-A-N-C-E-I--se-p-te-m-b-e-r--zo-o-s ...

  11. Electromagnetic scattering on fractional Brownian surfaces and estimation of the Hurst exponent

    OpenAIRE

    Guérin, Charles-Antoine; Saillard, Marc

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Fractional Brownian motion is known to be a realistic model for many natural rough surfaces. It is defined by means of a single parameter, the Hurst exponent, which determines the fractal characteristics of the surface. We propose a method to estimate the Hurst exponent of a fractional Brownian profile from the electromagnetic scattering data. The method is developed in the framework of three usual approximations, with different domains of validity: the Kirchhoff appro...

  12. Relativistic Brownian motion: From a microscopic binary collision model to the Langevin equation

    OpenAIRE

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hänggi, Peter (Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult.)

    2006-01-01

    The Langevin equation (LE) for the one-dimensional relativistic Brownian motion is derived from a microscopic collision model. The model assumes that a heavy point-like Brownian particle interacts with the lighter heat bath particles via elastic hard-core collisions. First, the commonly known, non-relativistic LE is deduced from this model, by taking into account the non-relativistic conservation laws for momentum and kinetic energy. Subsequently, this procedure is generalized to the relativi...

  13. The law of a stochastic integral with two independent fractional Brownian motions

    OpenAIRE

    Bardina, Xavier; Tudor, Ciprian

    2007-01-01

    Using the tools of the stochastic integration with respect to the fractional Brownian motion, we obtain the expression of the characteristic function of the random variable $\\int_{0}^{1}B^{\\alpha }_{s}dB^{H}_{s}$ where $B^{\\alpha }$ and $B^{H}$ are two independent fractional Brownian motions with Hurst parameters $\\alpha\\in(0,1) $ and $H>\\frac12$ respectively. The two-parameter case is also considered.

  14. Integrated fractional white noise as an alternative to multifractional Brownian motion

    OpenAIRE

    Sly, Allan

    2007-01-01

    Multifractional Brownian motion is a Gaussian process which has changing scaling properties generated by varying the local Hölder exponent. We show that multifractional Brownian motion is very sensitive to changes in the selected Hölder exponent and has extreme changes in magnitude. We suggest an alternative stochastic process, called integrated fractional white noise, which retains the important local properties but avoids the undesirable oscillations in magnitude. We also show h...

  15. The Pricing of Vulnerable Options in a Fractional Brownian Motion Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the assumption of the stock price, interest rate, and default intensity obeying the stochastic differential equation driven by fractional Brownian motion, the jump-diffusion model is established for the financial market in fractional Brownian motion setting. With the changes of measures, the traditional pricing method is simplified and the general pricing formula is obtained for the European vulnerable option with stochastic interest rate. At the same time, the explicit expression for it comes into being.

  16. Deposition and reentrainment of Brownian particles in porous media under unfavorable chemical conditions: some concepts and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Melinda W; O'Meliae, Charles R

    2004-01-01

    The deposition and reentrainment of particles in porous media have been examined theoretically and experimentally. A Brownian Dynamics/Monte Carlo (MC/BD) model has been developed that simulates the movement of Brownian particles near a collector under "unfavorable" chemical conditions and allows deposition in primary and secondary minima. A simple Maxwell approach has been used to estimate particle attachment efficiency by assuming deposition in the secondary minimum and calculating the probability of reentrainment. The MC/BD simulations and the Maxwell calculations support an alternative view of the deposition and reentrainment of Brownian particles under unfavorable chemical conditions. These calculations indicate that deposition into and subsequent release from secondary minima can explain reported discrepancies between classic model predictions that assume irreversible deposition in a primary well and experimentally determined deposition efficiencies that are orders of magnitude larger than Interaction Force Boundary Layer (IFBL) predictions. The commonly used IFBL model, for example, is based on the notion of transport over an energy barrier into the primary well and does not address contributions of secondary minimum deposition. A simple Maxwell model based on deposition into and reentrainment from secondary minima is much more accurate in predicting deposition rates for column experiments at low ionic strengths. It also greatly reduces the substantial particle size effects inherent in IFBL models, wherein particle attachment rates are predicted to decrease significantly with increasing particle size. This view is consistent with recent work by others addressing the composition and structure of the first few nanometers at solid-water interfaces including research on modeling water at solid-liquid interfaces, surface speciation, interfacial force measurements, and the rheological properties of concentrated suspensions. It follows that deposition under these

  17. Thon rings from amorphous ice and implications of beam-induced Brownian motion in single particle electron cryo-microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMullan, G., E-mail: gm2@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk; Vinothkumar, K.R.; Henderson, R.

    2015-11-15

    We have recorded dose-fractionated electron cryo-microscope images of thin films of pure flash-frozen amorphous ice and pre-irradiated amorphous carbon on a Falcon II direct electron detector using 300 keV electrons. We observe Thon rings [1] in both the power spectrum of the summed frames and the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. The Thon rings from amorphous carbon images are always more visible in the power spectrum of the summed frames whereas those of amorphous ice are more visible in the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. This difference indicates that while pre-irradiated carbon behaves like a solid during the exposure, amorphous ice behaves like a fluid with the individual water molecules undergoing beam-induced motion. Using the measured variation in the power spectra amplitude with number of electrons per image we deduce that water molecules are randomly displaced by a mean squared distance of ∼1.1 Å{sup 2} for every incident 300 keV e{sup −}/Å{sup 2}. The induced motion leads to an optimal exposure with 300 keV electrons of 4.0 e{sup −}/Å{sup 2} per image with which to observe Thon rings centred around the strong 3.7 Å scattering peak from amorphous ice. The beam-induced movement of the water molecules generates pseudo-Brownian motion of embedded macromolecules. The resulting blurring of single particle images contributes an additional term, on top of that from radiation damage, to the minimum achievable B-factor for macromolecular structure determination. - Highlights: • Thon rings can be seen from amorphous ice. • Radiation damage to amorphous ice randomly displaces water molecules. • Each incident 300 keV e{sup −}/Å{sup 2} displaces water molecules on average by ∼1 Å. • Macromolecules embedded in amorphous ice undergo beam induced Brownian motion.

  18. Bose polaron as an instance of quantum Brownian motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniello Lampo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the dynamics of a quantum impurity immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate as an open quantum system in the framework of the quantum Brownian motion model. We derive a generalized Langevin equation for the position of the impurity. The Langevin equation is an integrodifferential equation that contains a memory kernel and is driven by a colored noise. These result from considering the environment as given by the degrees of freedom of the quantum gas, and thus depend on its parameters, e.g. interaction strength between the bosons, temperature, etc. We study the role of the memory on the dynamics of the impurity. When the impurity is untrapped, we find that it exhibits a super-diffusive behavior at long times. We find that back-flow in energy between the environment and the impurity occurs during evolution. When the particle is trapped, we calculate the variance of the position and momentum to determine how they compare with the Heisenberg limit. One important result of this paper is that we find position squeezing for the trapped impurity at long times. We determine the regime of validity of our model and the parameters in which these effects can be observed in realistic experiments.

  19. Biased Brownian motion in narrow channels with asymmetry and anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Kiwing; Peng, Zheng

    2016-11-01

    We study Brownian motion of a single millimeter size bead confined in a quasi-two-dimensional horizontal channel with built-in anisotropy and asymmetry. Channel asymmetry is implemented by ratchet walls while anisotropy is introduced using a channel base that is grooved along the channel axis so that a bead can acquire a horizontal impulse perpendicular to the longitudinal direction when it collides with the base. When energy is injected to the channel by vertical vibration, the combination of asymmetric walls and anisotropic base induces an effective force which drives the bead into biased diffusive motion along the channel axis with diffusivity and drift velocity increase with vibration strength. The magnitude of this driving force, which can be measured in experiments of tilted channel, is found to be consistent to those obtained from dynamic mobility and position probability distribution measurements. These results are explained by a simple collision model that suggests the random kinetic energies transfer between different translational degrees of freedom may be turned into useful work in the presence of asymmetry and anisotropy.

  20. Intermediate scattering function of an anisotropic active Brownian particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzthaler, Christina; Leitmann, Sebastian; Franosch, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Various challenges are faced when animalcules such as bacteria, protozoa, algae, or sperms move autonomously in aqueous media at low Reynolds number. These active agents are subject to strong stochastic fluctuations, that compete with the directed motion. So far most studies consider the lowest order moments of the displacements only, while more general spatio-temporal information on the stochastic motion is provided in scattering experiments. Here we derive analytically exact expressions for the directly measurable intermediate scattering function for a mesoscopic model of a single, anisotropic active Brownian particle in three dimensions. The mean-square displacement and the non-Gaussian parameter of the stochastic process are obtained as derivatives of the intermediate scattering function. These display different temporal regimes dominated by effective diffusion and directed motion due to the interplay of translational and rotational diffusion which is rationalized within the theory. The most prominent feature of the intermediate scattering function is an oscillatory behavior at intermediate wavenumbers reflecting the persistent swimming motion, whereas at small length scales bare translational and at large length scales an enhanced effective diffusion emerges. We anticipate that our characterization of the motion of active agents will serve as a reference for more realistic models and experimental observations.

  1. Studying protein assembly with reversible Brownian dynamics of patchy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Heinrich C. R. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schwarz, Ulrich S., E-mail: ulrich.schwarz@bioquant.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); BioQuant, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-05-14

    Assembly of protein complexes like virus shells, the centriole, the nuclear pore complex, or the actin cytoskeleton is strongly determined by their spatial structure. Moreover, it is becoming increasingly clear that the reversible nature of protein assembly is also an essential element for their biological function. Here we introduce a computational approach for the Brownian dynamics of patchy particles with anisotropic assemblies and fully reversible reactions. Different particles stochastically associate and dissociate with microscopic reaction rates depending on their relative spatial positions. The translational and rotational diffusive properties of all protein complexes are evaluated on-the-fly. Because we focus on reversible assembly, we introduce a scheme which ensures detailed balance for patchy particles. We then show how the macroscopic rates follow from the microscopic ones. As an instructive example, we study the assembly of a pentameric ring structure, for which we find excellent agreement between simulation results and a macroscopic kinetic description without any adjustable parameters. This demonstrates that our approach correctly accounts for both the diffusive and reactive processes involved in protein assembly.

  2. Modelling Collective Opinion Formation by Means of Active Brownian Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Schweitzer, F; Schweitzer, Frank; Holyst, Janusz

    1999-01-01

    The concept of active Brownian particles is used to model a collective opinion formation process. It is assumed that individuals in community create a two-component communication field that influences the change of opinions of other persons and/or can induce their migration. The communication field is described by a reaction-diffusion equation, meaning that it has a certain lifetime, which models memory effects, further it can spread out in the community. Within our stochastic approach, the opinion change of the individuals is described by a master equation, while the migration is described by a set of Langevin equations, coupled by the communication field. In the mean-field limit which holds for fast communication, we derive a critical population size, above which the community separates into a majority and a minority with opposite opinions. The existence of external support (e.g. from mass media) can change the ratio between minority and majority, until above a critical external support the supported subpop...

  3. Unsteady sedimentation of flocculating non-Brownian suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    Microstructural evolution and temporal dynamics of the sedimentation rate U(t) are studied for a monodisperse suspension of non-Brownian spherical particles subject to van der Waals attraction and electrostatic repulsion in the realistic range of colloidal parameters (Hamaker constant, surface potential, double layer thickness etc.). A novel economical high-order multipole algorithm is used to fully resolve hydrodynamical interactions in the dynamical simulations with up to 500 spheres in a periodic box and O(106) time steps, combined with geometry perturbation to incorporate lubrication and extend the solution to arbitrarily small particle separations. The total colloidal force near the secondary minimum often greatly exceeds the effective gravity/buoyancy force, resulting in the formation of strong but flexible bonds and large clusters as the suspension evolves from an initial well-mixed state of non-aggregated spheres. Ensemble averaging over many initial configurations is used to predict U(t) for particle volume fractions between 0.1 and 0.25. The results are fully convergent, system-size independent and cover a 2-2.5 fold growth of U(t) after a latency time.

  4. From Brownian Dynamics to Markov Chain: An Ion Channel Example

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wan

    2014-02-27

    A discrete rate theory for multi-ion channels is presented, in which the continuous dynamics of ion diffusion is reduced to transitions between Markovian discrete states. In an open channel, the ion permeation process involves three types of events: an ion entering the channel, an ion escaping from the channel, or an ion hopping between different energy minima in the channel. The continuous dynamics leads to a hierarchy of Fokker-Planck equations, indexed by channel occupancy. From these the mean escape times and splitting probabilities (denoting from which side an ion has escaped) can be calculated. By equating these with the corresponding expressions from the Markov model, one can determine the Markovian transition rates. The theory is illustrated with a two-ion one-well channel. The stationary probability of states is compared with that from both Brownian dynamics simulation and the hierarchical Fokker-Planck equations. The conductivity of the channel is also studied, and the optimal geometry maximizing ion flux is computed. © 2014 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  5. Quantum Brownian motion and its conflict with the second law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.; Allahverdyan, Armen E.

    2002-11-01

    The Brownian motion of a harmonically bound quantum particle and coupled to a harmonic quantum bath is exactly solvable. At low enough temperatures the stationary state is non-Gibbsian due to an entanglement with the bath. This happens when a cloud of bath modes around the particle is formed. Equilibrium thermodynamics for particle plus bath together, does not imply standard thermodynamics for the particle itself at low T. Various formulations of the second law are then invalid. First, the Clausius inequality can be violated. Second, when the width of the confining potential is suddenly changed, there occurs a relaxation to equilibrium during which the rate of entropy production is partly negative. Third, for non-adiabatic changes of system parameters the rate of energy dissipation can be negative, and, out of equilibrium, cyclic processes are possible which extract work from the bath. Conditions are put forward under which perpetuum mobile of the second kind, having several work extraction cycles, enter the realm of condensed matter physics.

  6. Beyond multifractional Brownian motion: new stochastic models for geophysical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lévy Véhel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Multifractional Brownian motion (mBm has proved to be a useful tool in various areas of geophysical modelling. Although a versatile model, mBm is of course not always an adequate one. We present in this work several other stochastic processes which could potentially be useful in geophysics. The first alternative type is that of self-regulating processes: these are models where the local regularity is a function of the amplitude, in contrast to mBm where it is tuned exogenously. We demonstrate the relevance of such models for digital elevation maps and for temperature records. We also briefly describe two other types of alternative processes, which are the counterparts of mBm and of self-regulating processes when the intensity of local jumps is considered in lieu of local regularity: multistable processes allow one to prescribe the local intensity of jumps in space/time, while this intensity is governed by the amplitude for self-stabilizing processes.

  7. Beyond multifractional Brownian motion: new stochastic models for geophysical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy Véhel, J.

    2013-09-01

    Multifractional Brownian motion (mBm) has proved to be a useful tool in various areas of geophysical modelling. Although a versatile model, mBm is of course not always an adequate one. We present in this work several other stochastic processes which could potentially be useful in geophysics. The first alternative type is that of self-regulating processes: these are models where the local regularity is a function of the amplitude, in contrast to mBm where it is tuned exogenously. We demonstrate the relevance of such models for digital elevation maps and for temperature records. We also briefly describe two other types of alternative processes, which are the counterparts of mBm and of self-regulating processes when the intensity of local jumps is considered in lieu of local regularity: multistable processes allow one to prescribe the local intensity of jumps in space/time, while this intensity is governed by the amplitude for self-stabilizing processes.

  8. Characterizing Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of multifractional Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setty, V. A.; Sharma, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    The Hurst exponent (H) is widely used to quantify long range dependence in time series data and is estimated using several well known techniques. Recognizing its ability to remove trends the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) is used extensively to estimate a Hurst exponent in non-stationary data. Multifractional Brownian motion (mBm) broadly encompasses a set of models of non-stationary data exhibiting time varying Hurst exponents, H(t) as against a constant H. Recently, there has been a growing interest in time dependence of H(t) and sliding window techniques have been used to estimate a local time average of the exponent. This brought to fore the ability of DFA to estimate scaling exponents in systems with time varying H(t) , such as mBm. This paper characterizes the performance of DFA on mBm data with linearly varying H(t) and further test the robustness of estimated time average with respect to data and technique related parameters. Our results serve as a bench-mark for using DFA as a sliding window estimator to obtain H(t) from time series data.

  9. Relation between cooperative molecular motors and active Brownian particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touya, Clément; Schwalger, Tilo; Lindner, Benjamin

    2011-05-01

    Active Brownian particles (ABPs), obeying a nonlinear Langevin equation with speed-dependent drift and noise amplitude, are well-known models used to describe self-propelled motion in biology. In this paper we study a model describing the stochastic dynamics of a group of coupled molecular motors (CMMs). Using two independent numerical methods, one based on the stationary velocity distribution of the motors and the other one on the local increments (also known as the Kramers-Moyal coefficients) of the velocity, we establish a connection between the CMM and the ABP models. The parameters extracted for the ABP via the two methods show good agreement for both symmetric and asymmetric cases and are independent of N, the number of motors, provided that N is not too small. This indicates that one can indeed describe the CMM problem with a simpler ABP model. However, the power spectrum of velocity fluctuations in the CMM model reveals a peak at a finite frequency, a peak which is absent in the velocity spectrum of the ABP model. This implies richer dynamic features of the CMM model which cannot be captured by an ABP model.

  10. [Stereotypic movements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alvarez, E

    2003-02-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive patterns of movement with certain peculiar features that make them especially interesting. Their physiopathology and their relationship with the neurobehavioural disorders they are frequently associated with are unknown. In this paper our aim is to offer a simple analysis of their dominant characteristics, their differentiation from other processes and a hypothesis of the properties of stereotypic movements, which could all set the foundations for research work into their physiopathology.

  11. Modeling single-file diffusion with step fractional Brownian motion and a generalized fractional Langevin equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. C.; Teo, L. P.

    2009-08-01

    Single-file diffusion behaves as normal diffusion at small time and as subdiffusion at large time. These properties can be described in terms of fractional Brownian motion with variable Hurst exponent or multifractional Brownian motion. We introduce a new stochastic process called Riemann-Liouville step fractional Brownian motion which can be regarded as a special case of multifractional Brownian motion with a step function type of Hurst exponent tailored for single-file diffusion. Such a step fractional Brownian motion can be obtained as a solution of the fractional Langevin equation with zero damping. Various kinds of fractional Langevin equations and their generalizations are then considered in order to decide whether their solutions provide the correct description of the long and short time behaviors of single-file diffusion. The cases where the dissipative memory kernel is a Dirac delta function, a power-law function and a combination of these functions are studied in detail. In addition to the case where the short time behavior of single-file diffusion behaves as normal diffusion, we also consider the possibility of a process that begins as ballistic motion.

  12. Analytical Solutions of a Model for Brownian Motion in the Double Well Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ai-Jie; Zheng, Lian-Cun; Ma, Lian-Xi; Zhang, Xin-Xin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the analytical solutions of Schrödinger equation for Brownian motion in a double well potential are acquired by the homotopy analysis method and the Adomian decomposition method. Double well potential for Brownian motion is always used to obtain the solutions of Fokker—Planck equation known as the Klein—Kramers equation, which is suitable for separation and additive Hamiltonians. In essence, we could study the random motion of Brownian particles by solving Schrödinger equation. The analytical results obtained from the two different methods agree with each other well. The double well potential is affected by two parameters, which are analyzed and discussed in details with the aid of graphical illustrations. According to the final results, the shapes of the double well potential have significant influence on the probability density function.

  13. Equilibrium stochastic dynamics of a Brownian particle in inhomogeneous space: Derivation of an alternative model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyay, A.

    2018-03-01

    An alternative equilibrium stochastic dynamics for a Brownian particle in inhomogeneous space is derived. Such a dynamics can model the motion of a complex molecule in its conformation space when in equilibrium with a uniform heat bath. The derivation is done by a simple generalization of the formulation due to Zwanzig for a Brownian particle in homogeneous heat bath. We show that, if the system couples to different number of bath degrees of freedom at different conformations then the alternative model gets derived. We discuss results of an experiment by Faucheux and Libchaber which probably has indicated possible limitation of the Boltzmann distribution as equilibrium distribution of a Brownian particle in inhomogeneous space and propose experimental verification of the present theory using similar methods.

  14. Steady nanofluid flow between parallel plates considering thermophoresis and Brownian effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sheikholeslami

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, heat and mass transfer behavior of steady nanofluid flow between parallel plates in the presence of uniform magnetic field is studied. The important effect of Brownian motion and thermophoresis has been included in the model of nanofluid. The governing equations are solved via the Differential Transformation Method. The validity of this method was verified by comparison of previous work which is done for viscous fluid. The analysis is carried out for different parameters namely: viscosity parameter, Magnetic parameter, thermophoretic parameter and Brownian parameter. Results reveal that skin friction coefficient enhances with rise of viscosity and Magnetic parameters. Also it can be found that Nusselt number augments with an increase of viscosity parameters but it decreases with augment of Magnetic parameter, thermophoretic parameter and Brownian parameter.

  15. Brownian ratchets from statistical physics to bio and nano-motors

    CERN Document Server

    Cubero, David

    2016-01-01

    Illustrating the development of Brownian ratchets, from their foundations, to their role in the description of life at the molecular scale and in the design of artificial nano-machinery, this text will appeal to both advanced graduates and researchers entering the field. Providing a self-contained introduction to Brownian ratchets, devices which rectify microscopic fluctuations, Part I avoids technicalities and sets out the broad range of physical systems where the concept of ratchets is relevant. Part II supplies a single source for a complete and modern theoretical analysis of ratchets in regimes such as classical vs quantum and stochastic vs deterministic, and in Part III readers are guided through experimental developments in different physical systems, each highlighting a specific unique feature of ratchets. The thorough and systematic approach to the topic ensures that this book provides a complete guide to Brownian ratchets for newcomers and established researchers in physics, biology and biochemistry.

  16. Variance change point detection for fractional Brownian motion based on the likelihood ratio test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharczyk, Daniel; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Sikora, Grzegorz

    2018-01-01

    Fractional Brownian motion is one of the main stochastic processes used for describing the long-range dependence phenomenon for self-similar processes. It appears that for many real time series, characteristics of the data change significantly over time. Such behaviour one can observe in many applications, including physical and biological experiments. In this paper, we present a new technique for the critical change point detection for cases where the data under consideration are driven by fractional Brownian motion with a time-changed diffusion coefficient. The proposed methodology is based on the likelihood ratio approach and represents an extension of a similar methodology used for Brownian motion, the process with independent increments. Here, we also propose a statistical test for testing the significance of the estimated critical point. In addition to that, an extensive simulation study is provided to test the performance of the proposed method.

  17. Improved diffusion Monte Carlo and the Brownian fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weare, J.; Hairer, M.

    2012-12-01

    rigorously in the simplest possible situation of a random walk, biased by a linear potential. The resulting limiting object, which we call the ``Brownian fan'', is a very natural new mathematical object of independent interest.The reconstruction (dotted lines) of a trajectory of stochastic Lorenz 63 (solid lines) by DMC (the standard particle filter). The reconstruction by the modified DMC algorithm.

  18. Brownian Motion Problem: Random Walk and Beyond -RE ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    University, Chandigarh and his present research activities are in non eqUilibrium statistical mechanics. He has written articles on teaching of physics, history and .... 2 Review article entitled 'Brown- ian Movement and Molecular. Reality' based on his work. has been translated into English by. F Soddy and published by Tay-.

  19. Brownian motion after Einstein and Smoluchowski: Some new applications and new experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dávid, Selmeczi; Tolic-Nørrelykke, S.F.; Schäffer, E.

    2007-01-01

    The first half of this review describes the development in mathematical models of Brownian motion after Einstein's and Smoluchowski's seminal papers and current applications to optical tweezers. This instrument of choice among single-molecule biophysicists is also an instrument of such precision...... that it requires an understanding of Brownian motion beyond Einstein's and Smoluchowski's for its calibration, and can measure effects not present in their theories. This is illustrated with some applications, current and potential. It is also shown how addition of a controlled forced motion on the nano...

  20. An elementary singularity-free Rotational Brownian Dynamics algorithm for anisotropic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilie, Ioana M.; Briels, Wim J. [Computational Biophysics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Otter, Wouter K. den, E-mail: w.k.denotter@utwente.nl [Computational Biophysics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Multi Scale Mechanics, Faculty of Engineering Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2015-03-21

    Brownian Dynamics is the designated technique to simulate the collective dynamics of colloidal particles suspended in a solution, e.g., the self-assembly of patchy particles. Simulating the rotational dynamics of anisotropic particles by a first-order Langevin equation, however, gives rise to a number of complications, ranging from singularities when using a set of three rotational coordinates to subtle metric and drift corrections. Here, we derive and numerically validate a quaternion-based Rotational Brownian Dynamics algorithm that handles these complications in a simple and elegant way. The extension to hydrodynamic interactions is also discussed.

  1. Brownian agents and active particles collective dynamics in the natural and social sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Schweitzer, Frank

    2007-01-01

    ""This book lays out a vision for a coherent framework for understanding complex systems"" (from the foreword by J. Doyne Farmer). By developing the genuine idea of Brownian agents, the author combines concepts from informatics, such as multiagent systems, with approaches of statistical many-particle physics. This way, an efficient method for computer simulations of complex systems is developed which is also accessible to analytical investigations and quantitative predictions. The book demonstrates that Brownian agent models can be successfully applied in many different contexts, ranging from

  2. A weak limit theorem for numerical approximation of Brownian semi-stationary processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podolskij, Mark; Thamrongrat, Nopporn

    -parameter stochastic field. For the latter they use a simple iteration procedure and study the strong approximation error of the resulting numerical scheme given that the volatility process is fully observed. In this work we present the corresponding weak limit theorem for the setting, where the volatility/drift......In this paper we present a weak limit theorem for a numerical approximation of Brownian semi-stationary processes studied in [14]. In the original work of [14] the authors propose to use Fourier transformation to embed a given one dimensional (Levy) Brownian semi-stationary process into a two...

  3. Brownian Motion in a Weyl Chamber, Non-Colliding Particles, and Random Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Grabiner, David J.

    1997-01-01

    Let $n$ particles move in standard Brownian motion in one dimension, with the process terminating if two particles collide. This is a specific case of Brownian motion constrained to stay inside a Weyl chamber; the Weyl group for this chamber is $A_{n-1}$, the symmetric group. For any starting positions, we compute a determinant formula for the density function for the particles to be at specified positions at time $t$ without having collided by time $t$. We show that the probability that ther...

  4. Large shear deformation of particle gels studied by Brownian Dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rzepiela, A.A.; Opheusden, van J.H.J.; Vliet, van T.

    2004-01-01

    Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulations have been performed to study structure and rheology of particle gels under large shear deformation. The model incorporates soft spherical particles, and reversible flexible bond formation. Two different methods of shear deformation are discussed, namely affine and

  5. Enhancement of transport properties of a Brownian particle due to quantum effects: Smoluchowski limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shit, Anindita [Department of Chemistry, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Chattopadhyay, Sudip, E-mail: sudip_chattopadhyay@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim Ray, E-mail: jprc_8@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Katwa College, Katwa, Burdwan 713130 (India)

    2012-03-13

    Graphical abstract: By invoking physically motivated coordinate transformation into quantum Smoluchowski equation, we have presented a transparent treatment for the determination of the effective diffusion coefficient and current of a quantum Brownian particle. Substantial enhancement in the efficiency of the diffusive transport is envisaged due to the quantum correction effects. Highlights:: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport of a quantum Brownian particle in a periodic potential has been addressed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Governing quantum Smoluchowski equation (QSE) includes state dependent diffusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A coordinate transformation is used to recast QSE with constant diffusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport properties increases in comparison to the corresponding classical result. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This enhancement is purely a quantum effect. - Abstract: The transport property of a quantum Brownian particle that interacts strongly with a bath (in which a typical damping constant by far exceeds a characteristic frequency of the isolated system) under the influence of a tilted periodic potential has been studied by solving quantum Smoluchowski equation (QSE). By invoking physically motivated coordinate transformation into QSE, we have presented a transparent treatment for the determination of the effective diffusion coefficient of a quantum Brownian particle and the current (the average stationary velocity). Substantial enhancement in the efficiency of the diffusive transport is envisaged due to the quantum correction effects only if the bath temperature hovers around an appropriate range of intermediate values. Our findings also confirm the results obtained in the classical cases.

  6. On stochastic integration for volatility modulated Brownian-driven Volterra processes via white noise analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.; Benth, Fred Espen; Szozda, Benedykt

    This paper generalizes the integration theory for volatility modulated Brownian-driven Volterra processes onto the space G∗ of Potthoff--Timpel distributions. Sufficient conditions for integrability of generalized processes are given, regularity results and properties of the integral are discusse...

  7. On stochastic integration for volatility modulated Brownian-driven Volterra processes via white noise analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E. Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole; Benth, Fred Espen; Szozda, Benedykt

    This paper generalizes the integration theory for volatility modulated Brownian-driven Volterra processes onto the space G* of Potthoff-Timpel distributions. Sufficient conditions for integrability of generalized processes are given, regularity results and properties of the integral are discussed...

  8. An elementary singularity-free Rotational Brownian Dynamics algorithm for anisotropic particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilie, Ioana Mariuca; Briels, Willem J.; den Otter, Wouter K.

    2015-01-01

    Brownian Dynamics is the designated technique to simulate the collective dynamics of colloidal particles suspended in a solution, e.g., the self-assembly of patchy particles. Simulating the rotational dynamics of anisotropic particles by a first-order Langevin equation, however, gives rise to a

  9. On-chip measurements of Brownian relaxation vs. concentration of 40nm magnetic beads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2012-01-01

    We present on-chip Brownian relaxation measurements on a logarithmic dilution series of 40 nm beads dispersed in water with bead concentrations between 16 mu g/ml and 4000 mu g/ml. The measurements are performed using a planar Hall effect bridge sensor at frequencies up to 1 MHz. No external fiel...

  10. Functional limit theorems for generalized variations of the fractional Brownian sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkanen, Mikko; Réveillac, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    We prove functional central and non-central limit theorems for generalized variations of the anisotropic d-parameter fractional Brownian sheet (fBs) for any natural number d. Whether the central or the non-central limit theorem applies depends on the Hermite rank of the variation functional...

  11. Functional limit theorems for generalized variations of the fractional Brownian sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkanen, Mikko; Réveillac, Anthony

    We prove functional central and non-central limit theorems for generalized variations of the anisotropic d-parameter fractional Brownian sheet (fBs) for any natural number d. Whether the central or the non-central limit theorem applies depends on the Hermite rank of the variation functional...

  12. Global Uniqueness Result for Functional Differential Equations Driven by a Wiener Process and Fractional Brownian Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toufik Guendouzi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We prove a global existence and uniqueness result for the solution of a mixed stochastic functional differential equation driven by a Wiener process and fractional Brownian motion with Hurst index H > 1/2. We also study the dependence of the solution on the initial condition.

  13. Measurements of Brownian relaxation of magnetic nanobeads using planar Hall effect bridge sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Zardán Gómez de la Torre, T.

    2013-01-01

    We compare measurements of the Brownian relaxation response of magnetic nanobeads in suspension using planar Hall effect sensors of cross geometry and a newly proposed bridge geometry. We find that the bridge sensor yields six times as large signals as the cross sensor, which results in a more...

  14. A series expansion of fractional Brownian motion with Hurst index exceeding 1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.O. Dzhaparidze (Kacha); J.H. van Zanten (Harry)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractLet $B$ be a fractional Brownian motion with Hurst index $H ge 1/2$. Denote by $x_1 < x_2 < cdots$ the positive, real zeros of the Bessel function $J_{-H$ of the first kind of order $-H$, and by $y_1 < y_2 < cdots$ the positive zeros of $J_{1-H$. We prove the series representation

  15. On the tail asymptotics of the area swept under the Brownian storage graph

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arendarczyk, M.; Dȩbicki, K.; Mandjes, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the area swept under the workload graph is analyzed: with {Q(t): t≥0} denoting the stationary workload process, the asymptotic behavior of πT(u)(u):=P(∫T(u)0Q(r)dr>u) is analyzed. Focusing on regulated Brownian motion, first the exact asymptotics of πT(u)(u) are given for the case

  16. On-chip measurement of the Brownian relaxation frequency of magnetic beads using magnetic tunneling junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, M.; Sogne, E.; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the detection of the Brownian relaxation frequency of 250 nm diameter magnetic beads using a lab-on-chip platform based on current lines for exciting the beads with alternating magnetic fields and highly sensitive magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensors with a superparamagnetic free...

  17. A modified Brownian force for ultrafine particle penetration through building crack modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Zhao, Bin

    2017-12-01

    Combustion processes related to industry, traffic, agriculture, and waste treatment and disposal increase the amount of outdoor ultrafine particles (UFPs), which have adverse effects on human health. Given that people spend the majority of their time indoors, it is critical to understand the penetration of outdoor UFPs through building cracks in order to estimate human exposure to outdoor-originated UFPs. Lagrangian tracking is an efficient approach for modeling particle penetration. However, the Brownian motion for Lagrangian tracking in ANSYS Fluent®, a widely used software for particle dispersion modeling, is not able to model UFP dispersion accurately. In this study, we modified the Brownian force by rewriting the Brownian diffusion coefficient and particle integration time step with a user-defined function in ANSYS Fluent® to model particle penetration through building cracks. The results obtained using the modified model agree much better with the experimental results, with the averaged relative error less than 14% for the smooth crack cases and 21% for the rough crack case. We expect the modified Brownian force model proposed herein to be applied for UFP dispersion modeling in more indoor air quality studies.

  18. On-chip Brownian relaxation measurements of magnetic nanobeads in the time domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2013-01-01

    the time and frequency domain methods on Brownian relaxation detection of clustering of streptavidin coated magnetic beads in the presence of different concentrations of biotin-conjugated bovine serum albumin and obtain comparable results. In the time domain, a measurement is carried out in less than 30 s...

  19. Chaotic expansion and smoothness of some functionals of the fractional Brownian motion

    OpenAIRE

    Eddahbi, M’hamed; Vives, Josep

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with some additive functionals of the fractional Brownian motion that arise as limits in law of some occupation times of this process. In concrete, this functionals are obtained via the Cauchy principal value and the Hadamard finite part. We derive some regularity properties of theses functionals in Sobolev-Watanabe sense.

  20. Mixed Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2010-01-01

    levels than those related to building, and this exploration is a special challenge and competence implicit artistic development work. The project Mixed Movements generates drawing-material, not primary as representation, but as a performance-based media, making the body being-in-the-media felt and appear......Mixed Movements is a research project engaged in performance-based architectural drawing. Architectonic implementation questions relations between the human body and a body of architecture by the different ways we handle drawing materials. A drawing may explore architectonic problems at other...

  1. Nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion with multiple hidden states for remaining useful life prediction of rechargeable batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Fangfang; Tsui, Kwok-Leung

    2017-09-01

    Brownian motion with adaptive drift has attracted much attention in prognostics because its first hitting time is highly relevant to remaining useful life prediction and it follows the inverse Gaussian distribution. Besides linear degradation modeling, nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion has been developed to model nonlinear degradation. Moreover, the first hitting time distribution of the nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion has been approximated by time-space transformation. In the previous studies, the drift coefficient is the only hidden state used in state space modeling of the nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion. Besides the drift coefficient, parameters of a nonlinear function used in the nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion should be treated as additional hidden states of state space modeling to make the nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion more flexible. In this paper, a prognostic method based on nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion with multiple hidden states is proposed and then it is applied to predict remaining useful life of rechargeable batteries. 26 sets of rechargeable battery degradation samples are analyzed to validate the effectiveness of the proposed prognostic method. Moreover, some comparisons with a standard particle filter based prognostic method, a spherical cubature particle filter based prognostic method and two classic Bayesian prognostic methods are conducted to highlight the superiority of the proposed prognostic method. Results show that the proposed prognostic method has lower average prediction errors than the particle filter based prognostic methods and the classic Bayesian prognostic methods for battery remaining useful life prediction.

  2. Estimating the contribution of Brownian and Néel relaxation in a magnetic fluid through dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado-Camargo, L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Torres-Díaz, I. [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Chiu-Lam, A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Hernández, M. [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Rinaldi, C., E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We demonstrate how dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements (DMS) can be used to estimate the relative contributions of Brownian and Néel relaxation to the dynamic magnetic response of a magnetic fluid, a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles. The method applies to suspensions with particles that respond through Brownian or Néel relaxation and for which the characteristic Brownian and Néel relaxation times are widely separated. First, we illustrate this using magnetic fluids consisting of mixtures of particles that relax solely by the Brownian or Néel mechanisms. Then, it is shown how the same approach can be applied to estimate the relative contributions of Brownian and Néel relaxation in a suspension consisting of particles obtained from a single synthesis and whose size distribution straddles the transition from Néel to Brownian relaxation. - Highlights: • Method to estimate the contributions of the relaxation mechanism to the magnetic response. • Method applies to cases where the Brownian and Néel peaks do not overlap. • The method applies for ferrofluids prepared with as–synthesized particles.

  3. Striking movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    Like all music performance, percussion playing requires high control over timing and sound properties. Specific to percussionists, however, is the need to adjust the movement to different instruments with varying physical properties and tactile feedback to the player. Furthermore, the well defined...

  4. Psychodynamic Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This chapter/article describes the historical development of the disciplin Psychodynamic Movement. The importance of this disciplin for self-experience and for training in developing a therapist identy for the music therapy students are emphasized. Prototypeexercises developed and simplified...

  5. Covering Ground: Movement Patterns and Random Walk Behavior in Aquilonastra anomala Sea Stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Amanda C; Evangelista, Dennis; Waldrop, Lindsay D; Mah, Christopher L; Hedrick, Tyson L

    2016-10-01

    The paths animals take while moving through their environments affect their likelihood of encountering food and other resources; thus, models of foraging behavior abound. To collect movement data appropriate for comparison with these models, we used time-lapse photography to track movements of a small, hardy, and easy-to-obtain organism, Aquilonastra anomala sea stars. We recorded the sea stars in a tank over many hours, with and without a food cue. With food present, they covered less distance, as predicted by theory; this strategy would allow them to remain near food. We then compared the paths of the sea stars to three common models of animal movement: Brownian motion, Lévy walks, and correlated random walks; we found that the sea stars' movements most closely resembled a correlated random walk. Additionally, we compared the search performance of models of Brownian motion, a Lévy walk, and a correlated random walk to that of a model based on the sea stars' movements. We found that the behavior of the modeled sea star walk was similar to that of the modeled correlated random walk and the Brownian motion model, but that the sea star walk was slightly more likely than the other walks to find targets at intermediate distances. While organisms are unlikely to follow an idealized random walk in all details, our data suggest that comparing the effectiveness of an organism's paths to those from theory can give insight into the organism's actual movement strategy. Finally, automated optical tracking of invertebrates proved feasible, and A. anomala was revealed to be a tractable, 2D-movement study system.

  6. Gracious Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Kreft

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In 1984 Christopher Cordner offered a critical view on theories of graceful movement in sport developed by Ng. G. Wulk, David Best and Joseph Kupfer. In 2001 Paul Davis criticized his view. Cordner responded, rejecting all the criticism. More than a century before, Herbert Spencer and Jean-Marie Guyau had a similar controversy over grace. Both exchanges of opinion involve three positions: that grace is the most efficient movement and therefore something quantitative and measurable; that grace is expression of the wholeness of person and the world; and that grace is something which neither science nor philosophy can explain. To clarify these conflicting issues, this article proposes to examine the history of the notion which goes back to the Latin gratia and has root in the Ancient Greek charis, and to apply the concepts of cultural anchor and thin coherence, following John R. Searle’s explanation that we produce epistemically objective accounts of ontologically subjective reality.

  7. Pricing of Two Kinds of Power Options under Fractional Brownian Motion, Stochastic Rate, and Jump-Diffusion Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaili Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Option pricing is always one of the critical issues in financial mathematics and economics. Brownian motion is the basic hypothesis of option pricing model, which questions the fractional property of stock price. In this paper, under the assumption that the exchange rate follows the extended Vasicek model, we obtain the closed form of the pricing formulas for two kinds of power options under fractional Brownian Motion (FBM jump-diffusion models.

  8. Computational movement analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Laube, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief discusses the characteristics of spatiotemporal movement data, including uncertainty and scale. It investigates three core aspects of Computational Movement Analysis: Conceptual modeling of movement and movement spaces, spatiotemporal analysis methods aiming at a better understanding of movement processes (with a focus on data mining for movement patterns), and using decentralized spatial computing methods in movement analysis. The author presents Computational Movement Analysis as an interdisciplinary umbrella for analyzing movement processes with methods from a range of fi

  9. Work distribution function for a Brownian particle driven by a nonconservative force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bappa; Mukherji, Sutapa

    2015-06-01

    We derive the distribution function of work performed by a harmonic force acting on a uniformly dragged Brownian particle subjected to a rotational torque. Following the Onsager and Machlup's functional integral approach, we obtain the transition probability of finding the Brownian particle at a particular position at time t given that it started the journey from a specific location at an earlier time. The difference between the forward and the time-reversed form of the generalized Onsager-Machlup's Lagrangian is identified as the rate of medium entropy production which further helps us develop the stochastic thermodynamics formalism for our model. The probability distribution for the work done by the harmonic trap is evaluated for an equilibrium initial condition. Although this distribution has a Gaussian form, it is found that the distribution does not satisfy the conventional work fluctuation theorem.

  10. Relativistic Brownian motion: from a microscopic binary collision model to the Langevin equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hänggi, Peter

    2006-11-01

    The Langevin equation (LE) for the one-dimensional relativistic Brownian motion is derived from a microscopic collision model. The model assumes that a heavy pointlike Brownian particle interacts with the lighter heat bath particles via elastic hard-core collisions. First, the commonly known, nonrelativistic LE is deduced from this model, by taking into account the nonrelativistic conservation laws for momentum and kinetic energy. Subsequently, this procedure is generalized to the relativistic case. There, it is found that the relativistic stochastic force is still delta correlated (white noise) but no longer corresponds to a Gaussian white noise process. Explicit results for the friction and momentum-space diffusion coefficients are presented and discussed.

  11. Neuronal shot noise and Brownian 1/f2 behavior in the local field potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Milstein

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that human electrophysiological recordings of the local field potential (LFP from intracranial electrodes, acquired from a variety of cerebral regions, show a ubiquitous 1/f(2 scaling within the power spectrum. We develop a quantitative model that treats the generation of these fields in an analogous way to that of electronic shot noise, and use this model to specifically address the cause of this 1/f(2 Brownian noise. The model gives way to two analytically tractable solutions, both displaying Brownian noise: 1 uncorrelated cells that display sharp initial activity, whose extracellular fields slowly decay in time and 2 rapidly firing, temporally correlated cells that generate UP-DOWN states.

  12. A note on 'Langevin theory of anomalous Brownian motion made simple'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tothova, Jana; Vasziova, Gabriela; Lisy, Vladimir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Informatics, Technical University of Kosice, Park Komenskeho 2, 042 00 Kosice (Slovakia); Glod, Lukas, E-mail: vladimir.lisy@tuke.sk [Department of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Security Management, Kukucinova 17, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2011-11-15

    In our recent paper (Tothova et al 2011 Eur. J. Phys. 32 645), we extensively used a rule allowing us to convert linear stochastic equations of motion for the position of a Brownian particle to deterministic equations for its mean square displacement. This rule was established in a little known and hardly accessible work (Vladimirsky 1942 Z. Eksp. Teor. Phys. 12 199, in Russian), and so far it has not been used in solving the generalized Langevin equations with memory. To make our paper more self-contained and readable for students, we present a very simple substantiation of our approach, which is suitable for the description of both normal and anomalous Brownian motion. (letters and comments)

  13. Characterization of turbulence stability through the identification of multifractional Brownian motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. C.

    2013-02-01

    Multifractional Brownian motions have become popular as flexible models in describing real-life signals of high-frequency features in geoscience, microeconomics, and turbulence, to name a few. The time-changing Hurst exponent, which describes regularity levels depending on time measurements, and variance, which relates to an energy level, are two parameters that characterize multifractional Brownian motions. This research suggests a combined method of estimating the time-changing Hurst exponent and variance using the local variation of sampled paths of signals. The method consists of two phases: initially estimating global variance and then accurately estimating the time-changing Hurst exponent. A simulation study shows its performance in estimation of the parameters. The proposed method is applied to characterization of atmospheric stability in which descriptive statistics from the estimated time-changing Hurst exponent and variance classify stable atmosphere flows from unstable ones.

  14. Characterization of turbulence stability through the identification of multifractional Brownian motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Lee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Multifractional Brownian motions have become popular as flexible models in describing real-life signals of high-frequency features in geoscience, microeconomics, and turbulence, to name a few. The time-changing Hurst exponent, which describes regularity levels depending on time measurements, and variance, which relates to an energy level, are two parameters that characterize multifractional Brownian motions. This research suggests a combined method of estimating the time-changing Hurst exponent and variance using the local variation of sampled paths of signals. The method consists of two phases: initially estimating global variance and then accurately estimating the time-changing Hurst exponent. A simulation study shows its performance in estimation of the parameters. The proposed method is applied to characterization of atmospheric stability in which descriptive statistics from the estimated time-changing Hurst exponent and variance classify stable atmosphere flows from unstable ones.

  15. Smoldyn on graphics processing units: massively parallel Brownian dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dematté, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Space is a very important aspect in the simulation of biochemical systems; recently, the need for simulation algorithms able to cope with space is becoming more and more compelling. Complex and detailed models of biochemical systems need to deal with the movement of single molecules and particles, taking into consideration localized fluctuations, transportation phenomena, and diffusion. A common drawback of spatial models lies in their complexity: models can become very large, and their simulation could be time consuming, especially if we want to capture the systems behavior in a reliable way using stochastic methods in conjunction with a high spatial resolution. In order to deliver the promise done by systems biology to be able to understand a system as whole, we need to scale up the size of models we are able to simulate, moving from sequential to parallel simulation algorithms. In this paper, we analyze Smoldyn, a widely diffused algorithm for stochastic simulation of chemical reactions with spatial resolution and single molecule detail, and we propose an alternative, innovative implementation that exploits the parallelism of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). The implementation executes the most computational demanding steps (computation of diffusion, unimolecular, and bimolecular reaction, as well as the most common cases of molecule-surface interaction) on the GPU, computing them in parallel on each molecule of the system. The implementation offers good speed-ups and real time, high quality graphics output

  16. Pest Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod Bhar

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of woody borders surrounding crop fields is desirable for biodiversity conservation. However, for crop pest management, the desirability of woody borders depends on the trade-off between their effects at the local field scale and the landscape scale. At the local scale, woody borders can reduce pest populations by increasing predation rates, but they can also increase pest populations by providing complementary habitats and reducing movement rate of pests out of crop fields. At the regional scale, woody borders can reduce pest populations by reducing colonization of newly planted crop fields. Our objective was to develop guidelines for maximizing pest control while maintaining woody borders in the landscape. We wished to determine the conditions under which the regional effect of borders on colonization can outweigh local enhancement effects of borders on pest populations. We built a stochastic, individual-based, spatially implicit simulation model of a specialist insect population in a landscape divided into a number of crop fields. We conducted simulations to determine the conditions under which woody borders enhance vs. reduce the regional pest population size. The following factors were considered: landscape fragmentation, crop rotation period, barrier effect of woody borders, disperser success rate, and effect of woody borders on local survival. The simulation results suggest that woody borders are most likely to enhance regional control of crop pests if (1 the woody borders are very effective in reducing insect movement from one crop field to another, and (2 crop rotation is on a very short cycle. Based on these results, our preliminary recommendations are that woody borders should contain dense, tall vegetation to reduce insect movement, and crops should be rotated on as short a cycle as possible. These conditions should ensure that woody borders can be maintained for their conservation value without enhancing crop pest

  17. Long-range interactions in mammalian platelet aggregation. I. Evidence from kinetic studies in brownian diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Longmire, K.; Frojmovic, M.

    1990-01-01

    The Smoluchowski theory describing aggregation in suspensions of spherical colloidal particles due to Brownian diffusion-controlled two-body collisions, was used to obtain collision efficiencies, alpha B, for adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation in citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) from humans, dogs, and rabbits. For these diffusion studies, PRP was stirred with 10 microM ADP for 0.5 s, then kept nonstirred at 37 degrees C for varying times before fixation; the percent a...

  18. Level-statistics in Disordered Systems: A single parametric scaling and Connection to Brownian Ensembles

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Pragya

    2004-01-01

    We find that the statistics of levels undergoing metal-insulator transition in systems with multi-parametric Gaussian disorders and non-interacting electrons behaves in a way similar to that of the single parametric Brownian ensembles \\cite{dy}. The latter appear during a Poisson $\\to$ Wigner-Dyson transition, driven by a random perturbation. The analogy provides the analytical evidence for the single parameter scaling of the level-correlations in disordered systems as well as a tool to obtai...

  19. Weak convergence of the past and future of Brownian motion given ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The limiting distribution is that of a pair of coupled processes Y + B 1 , Y + B 2 where Y , B 1 , B 2 are independent, Y is uniformly distributed on U and B 1 , B 2 are standard d -dimensional Brownian motions. Let σ t , d t be respectively, the last entrance time before time t into the set U and the first exit time after t from U . When ...

  20. First passage time statistics of Brownian motion with purely time dependent drift and diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Molini, Annalisa; Talkner, Peter; Katul, Gabriel G.; Porporato, Amilcare

    2010-01-01

    Systems where resource availability approaches a critical threshold are common to many engineering and scientific applications and often necessitate the estimation of first passage time statistics of a Brownian motion (Bm) driven by time-dependent drift and diffusion coefficients. Modeling such systems requires solving the associated Fokker-Planck equation subject to an absorbing barrier. Transitional probabilities are derived via the method of images, whose applicability to time dependent pr...

  1. Study of Submicron Particle Size Distributions by Laser Doppler Measurement of Brownian Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-29

    acquisition and recording apparatus; and c) Development of appropriate software for analysis of signals obtained from the Brownian motion instrument...time scales (e.g., the transit time of the A-17 .- -. . , " 2.0 19 _j 1.2 08 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 0 500 1000 1500 2000 TIPOE STEP (10 ns/step) 2.0 1.8

  2. Brownian motion with adaptive drift for remaining useful life prediction: Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Tsui, Kwok-Leung

    2018-01-01

    Linear Brownian motion with constant drift is widely used in remaining useful life predictions because its first hitting time follows the inverse Gaussian distribution. State space modelling of linear Brownian motion was proposed to make the drift coefficient adaptive and incorporate on-line measurements into the first hitting time distribution. Here, the drift coefficient followed the Gaussian distribution, and it was iteratively estimated by using Kalman filtering once a new measurement was available. Then, to model nonlinear degradation, linear Brownian motion with adaptive drift was extended to nonlinear Brownian motion with adaptive drift. However, in previous studies, an underlying assumption used in the state space modelling was that in the update phase of Kalman filtering, the predicted drift coefficient at the current time exactly equalled the posterior drift coefficient estimated at the previous time, which caused a contradiction with the predicted drift coefficient evolution driven by an additive Gaussian process noise. In this paper, to alleviate such an underlying assumption, a new state space model is constructed. As a result, in the update phase of Kalman filtering, the predicted drift coefficient at the current time evolves from the posterior drift coefficient at the previous time. Moreover, the optimal Kalman filtering gain for iteratively estimating the posterior drift coefficient at any time is mathematically derived. A discussion that theoretically explains the main reasons why the constructed state space model can result in high remaining useful life prediction accuracies is provided. Finally, the proposed state space model and its associated Kalman filtering gain are applied to battery prognostics.

  3. GaAs-Based Nanowire Devices with Multiple Asymmetric Gates for Electrical Brownian Ratchets

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Nakano, Yuki; Kasai, Seiya

    2013-01-01

    GaAs-based nanowire devices having multiple asymmetric gates for electrical Brownian ratchets were fabricated and characterized. From three-dimensional potential simulation results and current–voltage characteristics, we confirmed the formation of the asymmetric potential in our device design. Direct current was generated at room temperature by repeatedly switching the potential in a multiple-asymmetric-gate device on and off. Such current was not observed in either a single-asymmetric-gate d...

  4. Local times for multifractional Brownian motion in higher dimensions: A white noise approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Wolfgang; da Silva, José Luís; Suryawan, Herry P.

    2016-11-01

    We present the expansion of the multifractional Brownian motion (mBm) local time in higher dimensions, in terms of Wick powers of white noises (or multiple Wiener integrals). If a suitable number of kernels is subtracted, they exist in the sense of generalized white noise functionals. Moreover, we show the convergence of the regularized truncated local times for mBm in the sense of Hida distributions.

  5. Dynamics of a magnetic active Brownian particle under a uniform magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Urquiza, Glenn C.; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo M.

    2017-11-01

    The dynamics of a magnetic active Brownian particle undergoing three-dimensional Brownian motion, both translation and rotation, under the influence of a uniform magnetic field is investigated. The particle self-propels at a constant speed along its magnetic dipole moment, which reorients due to the interplay between Brownian and magnetic torques, quantified by the Langevin parameter α . In this work, the time-dependent active diffusivity and the crossover time (τcross)—from ballistic to diffusive regimes—are calculated through the time-dependent correlation function of the fluctuations of the propulsion direction. The results reveal that, for any value of α , the particle undergoes a directional (or ballistic) propulsive motion at very short times (t ≪τcross ). In this regime, the correlation function decreases linearly with time, and the active diffusivity increases with it. It the opposite time limit (t ≫τcross ), the particle moves in a purely diffusive regime with a correlation function that decays asymptotically to zero and an active diffusivity that reaches a constant value equal to the long-time active diffusivity of the particle. As expected in the absence of a magnetic field (α =0 ), the crossover time is equal to the characteristic time scale for rotational diffusion, τrot. In the presence of a magnetic field (α >0 ), the correlation function, the active diffusivity, and the crossover time decrease with increasing α . The magnetic field regulates the regimes of propulsion of the particle. Here, the field reduces the period of time at which the active particle undergoes a directional motion. Consequently, the active particle rapidly reaches a diffusive regime at τcross≪τrot . In the limit of weak fields (α ≪1 ), the crossover time decreases quadratically with α , while in the limit of strong fields (α ≫1 ) it decays asymptotically as α-1. The results are in excellent agreement with those obtained by Brownian dynamics

  6. Dual-frequency magnetic particle imaging of the Brownian particle contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viereck, Thilo; Kuhlmann, Christian; Draack, Sebastian; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging medical imaging modality based on the non-linear response of magnetic nanoparticles to an exciting magnetic field. MPI has been recognized as a fast imaging technique with high spatial resolution in the mm range. For some applications of MPI, especially in the field of functional imaging, the determination of the particle mobility (Brownian rotation) is of great interest, as it enables binding detection in MPI. It also enables quantitative imaging in the presence of Brownian-dominated particles, which is otherwise implausible. Discrimination of different particle responses in MPI is possible via the joint reconstruction approach. In this contribution, we propose a dual-frequency acquisition scheme to enhance sensitivity and contrast in the detection of different particle mobilities compared to a standard single-frequency MPI protocol. The method takes advantage of the fact, that the magnetization response of the tracer is strongly frequency-dependent, i.e. for low excitation frequencies a stronger Brownian contribution is observed.

  7. Separation of superparamagnetic particles through ratcheted Brownian motion and periodically switching magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Jiang, Li; Tan, Huei Ming; Yadav, Ashutosh; Biswas, Preetika; van der Maarel, Johan R. C.; Nijhuis, Christian A.; van Kan, Jeroen A.

    2016-01-01

    Brownian ratchet based particle separation systems for application in lab on chip devices have drawn interest and are subject to ongoing theoretical and experimental investigations. We demonstrate a compact microfluidic particle separation chip, which implements an extended on-off Brownian ratchet scheme that actively separates and sorts particles using periodically switching magnetic fields, asymmetric sawtooth channel sidewalls, and Brownian motion. The microfluidic chip was made with Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography of SU-8 molds, which in turn was fabricated using Proton Beam Writing. After bonding of the PDMS chip to a glass substrate through surface activation by oxygen plasma treatment, embedded electromagnets were cofabricated by the injection of InSn metal into electrode channels. This fabrication process enables rapid production of high resolution and high aspect ratio features, which results in parallel electrodes accurately aligned with respect to the separation channel. The PDMS devices were tested with mixtures of 1.51 μm, 2.47 μm, and 2.60 μm superparamagnetic particles suspended in water. Experimental results show that the current device design has potential for separating particles with a size difference around 130 nm. Based on the promising results, we will be working towards extending this design for the separation of cells or biomolecules. PMID:27917252

  8. Fractional Brownian motion, the Matérn process, and stochastic modeling of turbulent dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Jonathan M.; Sykulski, Adam M.; Early, Jeffrey J.; Olhede, Sofia C.

    2017-08-01

    Stochastic processes exhibiting power-law slopes in the frequency domain are frequently well modeled by fractional Brownian motion (fBm), with the spectral slope at high frequencies being associated with the degree of small-scale roughness or fractal dimension. However, a broad class of real-world signals have a high-frequency slope, like fBm, but a plateau in the vicinity of zero frequency. This low-frequency plateau, it is shown, implies that the temporal integral of the process exhibits diffusive behavior, dispersing from its initial location at a constant rate. Such processes are not well modeled by fBm, which has a singularity at zero frequency corresponding to an unbounded rate of dispersion. A more appropriate stochastic model is a much lesser-known random process called the Matérn process, which is shown herein to be a damped version of fractional Brownian motion. This article first provides a thorough introduction to fractional Brownian motion, then examines the details of the Matérn process and its relationship to fBm. An algorithm for the simulation of the Matérn process in O(NlogN) operations is given. Unlike fBm, the Matérn process is found to provide an excellent match to modeling velocities from particle trajectories in an application to two-dimensional fluid turbulence.

  9. Anomalous diffusion and multifractional Brownian motion: simulating molecular crowding and physical obstacles in systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Lago, T T; Leier, A; Burrage, K

    2012-08-01

    There have been many recent studies from both experimental and simulation perspectives in order to understand the effects of spatial crowding in molecular biology. These effects manifest themselves in protein organisation on the plasma membrane, on chemical signalling within the cell and in gene regulation. Simulations are usually done with lattice- or meshless-based random walks but insights can also be gained through the computation of the underlying probability density functions of these stochastic processes. Until recently much of the focus had been on continuous time random walks, but some very recent work has suggested that fractional Brownian motion may be a good descriptor of spatial crowding effects in some cases. The study compares both fractional Brownian motion and continuous time random walks and highlights how well they can represent different types of spatial crowding and physical obstacles. Simulated spatial data, mimicking experimental data, was first generated by using the package Smoldyn. We then attempted to characterise this data through continuous time anomalously diffusing random walks and multifractional Brownian motion (MFBM) by obtaining MFBM paths that match the statistical properties of our sample data. Although diffusion around immovable obstacles can be reasonably characterised by a single Hurst exponent, we find that diffusion in a crowded environment seems to exhibit multifractional properties in the form of a different short- and long-time behaviour.

  10. Thon rings from amorphous ice and implications of beam-induced Brownian motion in single particle electron cryo-microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, G; Vinothkumar, K R; Henderson, R

    2015-11-01

    We have recorded dose-fractionated electron cryo-microscope images of thin films of pure flash-frozen amorphous ice and pre-irradiated amorphous carbon on a Falcon II direct electron detector using 300 keV electrons. We observe Thon rings [1] in both the power spectrum of the summed frames and the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. The Thon rings from amorphous carbon images are always more visible in the power spectrum of the summed frames whereas those of amorphous ice are more visible in the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. This difference indicates that while pre-irradiated carbon behaves like a solid during the exposure, amorphous ice behaves like a fluid with the individual water molecules undergoing beam-induced motion. Using the measured variation in the power spectra amplitude with number of electrons per image we deduce that water molecules are randomly displaced by a mean squared distance of ∼1.1 Å(2) for every incident 300 keV e(-)/Å(2). The induced motion leads to an optimal exposure with 300 keV electrons of 4.0 e(-)/Å(2) per image with which to observe Thon rings centred around the strong 3.7 Å scattering peak from amorphous ice. The beam-induced movement of the water molecules generates pseudo-Brownian motion of embedded macromolecules. The resulting blurring of single particle images contributes an additional term, on top of that from radiation damage, to the minimum achievable B-factor for macromolecular structure determination. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dependence of Brownian and Néel relaxation times on magnetic field strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deissler, Robert J; Wu, Yong; Martens, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    In magnetic particle imaging (MPI) and magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) the relaxation time of the magnetization in response to externally applied magnetic fields is determined by the Brownian and Néel relaxation mechanisms. Here the authors investigate the dependence of the relaxation times on the magnetic field strength and the implications for MPI and MPS. The Fokker-Planck equation with Brownian relaxation and the Fokker-Planck equation with Néel relaxation are solved numerically for a time-varying externally applied magnetic field, including a step-function, a sinusoidally varying, and a linearly ramped magnetic field. For magnetic fields that are applied as a step function, an eigenvalue approach is used to directly calculate both the Brownian and Néel relaxation times for a range of magnetic field strengths. For Néel relaxation, the eigenvalue calculations are compared to Brown's high-barrier approximation formula. The relaxation times due to the Brownian or Néel mechanisms depend on the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. In particular, the Néel relaxation time is sensitive to the magnetic field strength, and varies by many orders of magnitude for nanoparticle properties and magnetic field strengths relevant for MPI and MPS. Therefore, the well-known zero-field relaxation times underestimate the actual relaxation times and, in particular, can underestimate the Néel relaxation time by many orders of magnitude. When only Néel relaxation is present--if the particles are embedded in a solid for instance--the authors found that there can be a strong magnetization response to a sinusoidal driving field, even if the period is much less than the zero-field relaxation time. For a ferrofluid in which both Brownian and Néel relaxation are present, only one relaxation mechanism may dominate depending on the magnetic field strength, the driving frequency (or ramp time), and the phase of the magnetization relative to the applied magnetic field. A simple

  12. Movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoessl, A Jon; Mckeown, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Movement disorders can be hypokinetic (e.g., parkinsonism), hyperkinetic, or dystonic in nature and commonly arise from altered function in nuclei of the basal ganglia or their connections. As obvious structural changes are often limited, standard imaging plays less of a role than in other neurologic disorders. However, structural imaging is indicated where clinical presentation is atypical, particularly if the disorder is abrupt in onset or remains strictly unilateral. More recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may allow for differentiation between Parkinson's disease and atypical forms of parkinsonism. Functional imaging can assess regional cerebral blood flow (functional MRI (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)), cerebral glucose metabolism (PET), neurochemical and neuroreceptor status (PET and SPECT), and pathologic processes such as inflammation or abnormal protein deposition (PET) (Table 49.1). Cerebral blood flow can be assessed at rest, during the performance of motor or cognitive tasks, or in response to a variety of stimuli. In appropriate situations, the correct imaging modality and/or combination of modalities can be used to detect early disease or even preclinical disease, and to monitor disease progression and the effects of disease-modifying interventions. Various approaches are reviewed here. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantum harmonic Brownian motion in a general environment: A modified phase-space approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Leehwa [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-06-23

    After extensive investigations over three decades, the linear-coupling model and its equivalents have become the standard microscopic models for quantum harmonic Brownian motion, in which a harmonically bound Brownian particle is coupled to a quantum dissipative heat bath of general type modeled by infinitely many harmonic oscillators. The dynamics of these models have been studied by many authors using the quantum Langevin equation, the path-integral approach, quasi-probability distribution functions (e.g., the Wigner function), etc. However, the quantum Langevin equation is only applicable to some special problems, while other approaches all involve complicated calculations due to the inevitable reduction (i.e., contraction) operation for ignoring/eliminating the degrees of freedom of the heat bath. In this dissertation, the author proposes an improved methodology via a modified phase-space approach which employs the characteristic function (the symplectic Fourier transform of the Wigner function) as the representative of the density operator. This representative is claimed to be the most natural one for performing the reduction, not only because of its simplicity but also because of its manifestation of geometric meaning. Accordingly, it is particularly convenient for studying the time evolution of the Brownian particle with an arbitrary initial state. The power of this characteristic function is illuminated through a detailed study of several physically interesting problems, including the environment-induced damping of quantum interference, the exact quantum Fokker-Planck equations, and the relaxation of non-factorizable initial states. All derivations and calculations axe shown to be much simplified in comparison with other approaches. In addition to dynamical problems, a novel derivation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem which is valid for all quantum linear systems is presented.

  14. Modeling of rheological behavior for polymer nanocomposites via Brownian dynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Dong Gi; Youn, Jae Ryoun; Song, Young Seok

    2016-11-01

    Reptation dynamics of the coarse-grained polymer molecular chain is investigated to predict rheological behavior of polymeric nanocomposites by applying Brownian dynamics simulation to the proposed full chain reptation model. Extensibility of polymer chain and constraint release from chain stretch or retraction are of main concern in describing the nanocomposite systems. Rheological results are well predicted by applying the improved simulation algorithm using stepwise Wiener processes. Strong shear thinning and elongational strain hardening are predicted and compared with the experimental results of polyamide 6/organoclay nanocomposites. The full chain reptation model enables us to predict dynamic motion of the polymer chain segments and understand mechanisms for characteristic rheological behaviors.

  15. Lookback Option Pricing with Fixed Proportional Transaction Costs under Fractional Brownian Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiao-Jiao; Zhou, Shengwu; Zhang, Yan; Han, Miao; Wang, Fei

    2014-01-01

    The pricing problem of lookback option with a fixed proportion of transaction costs is investigated when the underlying asset price follows a fractional Brownian motion process. Firstly, using Leland's hedging method a partial differential equation satisfied by the value of the lookback option is derived. Then we obtain its numerical solution by constructing a Crank-Nicolson format. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed form is verified through a numerical example. Meanwhile, the impact of transaction cost rate and volatility on lookback option value is discussed. PMID:27433525

  16. Thermal equilibrium of a Brownian particle in a fluctuating fluid: a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Nie, Deming

    2017-07-01

    In this work the fluctuating lattice Boltzmann method was adopted to simulate the motion of a Brownian particle in a fluid in two dimensions. The temperatures characterizing the translation motion and rotational motion of the particle were calculated to evaluate the thermal equilibrium between the particle and the fluid. Furthermore, the effects of the fluid temperature and viscosity on the fluid pressure fluctuation were investigated. The linear relationships were observed in a log-log coordinate. Besides, the slopes of the linear relation were obtained, which keeps constant for all cases studied.

  17. On Drift Parameter Estimation in Models with Fractional Brownian Motion by Discrete Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Mishura

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We study a problem of an unknown drift parameter estimation in a stochastic differen- tial equation driven by fractional Brownian motion. We represent the likelihood ratio as a function of the observable process. The form of this representation is in general rather complicated. However, in the simplest case it can be simplified and we can discretize it to establish the a. s. convergence of the discretized version of maximum likelihood estimator to the true value of parameter. We also investigate a non-standard estimator of the drift parameter showing further its strong consistency. 

  18. Ordering transition of non-Brownian suspensions in confined steady shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Kyongmin; Maxey, Martin R

    2010-05-01

    We report on ordering transitions of concentrated non-Brownian suspensions confined by two parallel walls under steady shear. At a volume fraction as low as ϕ=0.48, particles near the wall assemble into strings which are organized as a simple hexagonal array by hydrodynamic interactions. The suspension exhibits a complex phase behavior depending on the ratio of the channel height to the particle radius, Hy/a. In a strongly confined system Hy/aplane changes between hexagonal and rectangular structures depending on Hy/a. It is shown that the relative viscosity is a function of both the volume fraction and the ordered state.

  19. Brownian-motion ensembles of random matrix theory: A classification scheme and an integral transform method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo-Junior, A.F. [Departamento de Fisica, Laboratorio de Fisica Teorica e Computacional, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil)]. E-mail: ailton@df.ufpe.br; Macedo, A.M.S. [Departamento de Fisica, Laboratorio de Fisica Teorica e Computacional, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2006-09-25

    We study a class of Brownian-motion ensembles obtained from the general theory of Markovian stochastic processes in random-matrix theory. The ensembles admit a complete classification scheme based on a recent multivariable generalization of classical orthogonal polynomials and are closely related to Hamiltonians of Calogero-Sutherland-type quantum systems. An integral transform is proposed to evaluate the n-point correlation function for a large class of initial distribution functions. Applications of the classification scheme and of the integral transform to concrete physical systems are presented in detail.

  20. Brownian dynamics simulations on CPU and GPU with BD_BOX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Długosz, Maciej; Zieliński, Paweł; Trylska, Joanna

    2011-09-01

    There has been growing interest in simulating biological processes under in vivo conditions due to recent advances in experimental techniques dedicated to study single particle behavior in crowded environments. We have developed a software package, BD_BOX, for multiscale Brownian dynamics simulations. BD_BOX can simulate either single molecules or multicomponent systems of diverse, interacting molecular species using flexible, coarse-grained bead models. BD_BOX is written in C and employs modern computer architectures and technologies; these include MPI for distributed-memory architectures, OpenMP for shared-memory platforms, NVIDIA CUDA framework for GPGPU, and SSE vectorization for CPU. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A Mechanical Model of Brownian Motion for One Massive Particle Including Slow Light Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Song

    2018-01-01

    We provide a connection between Brownian motion and a classical mechanical system. Precisely, we consider a system of one massive particle interacting with an ideal gas, evolved according to non-random mechanical principles, via interaction potentials, without any assumption requiring that the initial velocities of the environmental particles should be restricted to be "fast enough". We prove the convergence of the (position, velocity)-process of the massive particle under a certain scaling limit, such that the mass of the environmental particles converges to 0 while the density and the velocities of them go to infinity, and give the precise expression of the limiting process, a diffusion process.

  2. Self-assembly of actin monomers into long filaments: Brownian Dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2009-01-01

    Brownian dynamics simulations are used to study the dynamical process of self-assembly of actin monomers into long filaments containing up to 1000 actin protomers. In order to overcome the large separation of time scales between the diffusive motion of the freemonomers and the relatively slow....../detachment events. When a single filament is allowed to grow in a bath of constant concentration of free ADP-actin monomers, its growth rate increases linearly with the free monomer concentration in quantitative agreement with in vitro experiments. Theresults also show that the waiting time is governed by...

  3. Structure Analysis of Jungle-Gym-Type Gels by Brownian Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Noriyoshi; Ono, Kohki; Takasu, Masako; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2008-02-01

    We investigated the structure and the formation process of two kinds of gels by Brownian dynamics simulation. The effect of flexibility of main chain oligomer was studied. From our results, hard gel with rigid main chain forms more homogeneous network structure than soft gel with flexible main chain. In soft gel, many small loops are formed, and clusters tend to shrink. This heterogeneous network structure may be caused by microgels. In the low density case, soft gel shows more heterogeneity than the high density case.

  4. GaAs-Based Nanowire Devices with Multiple Asymmetric Gates for Electrical Brownian Ratchets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Nakano, Yuki; Kasai, Seiya

    2013-06-01

    GaAs-based nanowire devices having multiple asymmetric gates for electrical Brownian ratchets were fabricated and characterized. From three-dimensional potential simulation results and current-voltage characteristics, we confirmed the formation of the asymmetric potential in our device design. Direct current was generated at room temperature by repeatedly switching the potential in a multiple-asymmetric-gate device on and off. Such current was not observed in either a single-asymmetric-gate device or a multiple-symmetric-gate device. The current direction and input frequency dependences of the net current indicated that the observed current was generated by the flashing-ratchet mechanism.

  5. Phase diagrams for quantum Brownian motion on two-dimensional Bravais lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Grace H.

    2017-11-01

    We study quantum Brownian motion (QBM) models for a particle in a dissipative environment coupled to a periodic potential. We review QBM for a particle in a one-dimensional periodic potential and extend the study to that for a particle in two-dimensional (2D) periodic potentials of four Bravais lattice types: square, rectangular, triangular (hexagonal), and centered rectangular. We perform perturbative renormalization group analyses to derive the zero temperature flow diagrams and phase boundaries for a particle in these potentials, and observe localization behavior dependent on the anisotropy of the lattice parameters.

  6. Stochastic heating of a single Brownian particle by charge fluctuations in a radio-frequency produced plasma sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christian; Piel, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    The Brownian motion of a single particle in the plasma sheath is studied to separate the effect of stochastic heating by charge fluctuations from heating by collective effects. By measuring the particle velocities in the ballistic regime and by carefully determining the particle mass from the Epstein drag it is shown that for a pressure of 10 Pa, which is typical of many experiments, the proper kinetic temperature of the Brownian particle remains close to the gas temperature and rises only slightly with particle size. This weak effect is confirmed by a detailed model for charging and charge fluctuations in the sheath. A substantial temperature rise is found for decreasing pressure, which approximately shows the expected scaling with p(-2). The system under study is an example for non-equilibrium Brownian motion under the influence of white noise without corresponding dissipation.

  7. Upside/Downside statistical mechanics of nonequilibrium Brownian motion. I. Distributions, moments, and correlation functions of a free particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Galen T.; Nitzan, Abraham

    2018-01-01

    Statistical properties of Brownian motion that arise by analyzing, separately, trajectories over which the system energy increases (upside) or decreases (downside) with respect to a threshold energy level are derived. This selective analysis is applied to examine transport properties of a nonequilibrium Brownian process that is coupled to multiple thermal sources characterized by different temperatures. Distributions, moments, and correlation functions of a free particle that occur during upside and downside events are investigated for energy activation and energy relaxation processes and also for positive and negative energy fluctuations from the average energy. The presented results are sufficiently general and can be applied without modification to the standard Brownian motion. This article focuses on the mathematical basis of this selective analysis. In subsequent articles in this series, we apply this general formalism to processes in which heat transfer between thermal reservoirs is mediated by activated rate processes that take place in a system bridging them.

  8. APM_GUI: analyzing particle movement on the cell membrane and determining confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchón, Silvia A; Martín, Mauricio G; Dotti, Carlos G

    2012-02-20

    Single-particle tracking is a powerful tool for tracking individual particles with high precision. It provides useful information that allows the study of diffusion properties as well as the dynamics of movement. Changes in particle movement behavior, such as transitions between Brownian motion and temporary confinement, can reveal interesting biophysical interactions. Although useful applications exist to determine the paths of individual particles, only a few software implementations are available to analyze these data, and these implementations are generally not user-friendly and do not have a graphical interface,. Here, we present APM_GUI (Analyzing Particle Movement), which is a MatLab-implemented application with a Graphical User Interface. This user-friendly application detects confined movement considering non-random confinement when a particle remains in a region longer than a Brownian diffusant would remain. In addition, APM_GUI exports the results, which allows users to analyze this information using software that they are familiar with. APM_GUI provides an open-source tool that quantifies diffusion coefficients and determines whether trajectories have non-random confinements. It also offers a simple and user-friendly tool that can be used by individuals without programming skills.

  9. Correlational approach to study interactions between dust Brownian particles in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisin, E. A.; Vaulina, O. S.; Petrov, O. F.

    2018-01-01

    A general approach to the correlational analysis of Brownian motion of strongly coupled particles in open dissipative systems is described. This approach can be applied to the theoretical description of various non-ideal statistically equilibrium systems (including non-Hamiltonian systems), as well as for the analysis of experimental data. In this paper, we consider an application of the correlational approach to the problem of experimental exploring the wake-mediated nonreciprocal interactions in complex plasmas. We derive simple analytic equations, which allows one to calculate the gradients of forces acting on a microparticle due to each of other particles as well as the gradients of external field, knowing only the information on time-averaged correlations of particles displacements and velocities. We show the importance of taking dissipative and random processes into account, without which consideration of a system with a nonreciprocal interparticle interaction as linearly coupled oscillators leads to significant errors in determining the characteristic frequencies in a system. In the examples of numerical simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed original approach could be an effective instrument in exploring the longitudinal wake structure of a microparticle in a plasma. Unlike the previous attempts to study the wake-mediated interactions in complex plasmas, our method does not require any external perturbations and is based on Brownian motion analysis only.

  10. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dettmer, Simon L.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Pagliara, Stefano [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g., electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces.

  11. Electrostatic channeling in P. falciparum DHFR-TS: Brownian dynamics and Smoluchowski modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Vincent T; Eun, Changsun; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M; Huber, Gary; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-11-18

    We perform Brownian dynamics simulations and Smoluchowski continuum modeling of the bifunctional Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (P. falciparum DHFR-TS) with the objective of understanding the electrostatic channeling of dihydrofolate generated at the TS active site to the DHFR active site. The results of Brownian dynamics simulations and Smoluchowski continuum modeling suggest that compared to Leishmania major DHFR-TS, P. falciparum DHFR-TS has a lower but significant electrostatic-mediated channeling efficiency (?15-25%) at physiological pH (7.0) and ionic strength (150 mM). We also find that removing the electric charges from key basic residues located between the DHFR and TS active sites significantly reduces the channeling efficiency of P. falciparum DHFR-TS. Although several protozoan DHFR-TS enzymes are known to have similar tertiary and quaternary structure, subtle differences in structure, active-site geometry, and charge distribution appear to influence both electrostatic-mediated and proximity-based substrate channeling.

  12. Electrostatic Channeling in P. falciparum DHFR-TS: Brownian Dynamics and Smoluchowski Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Vincent T.; Eun, Changsun; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M.; Huber, Gary; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We perform Brownian dynamics simulations and Smoluchowski continuum modeling of the bifunctional Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (P. falciparum DHFR-TS) with the objective of understanding the electrostatic channeling of dihydrofolate generated at the TS active site to the DHFR active site. The results of Brownian dynamics simulations and Smoluchowski continuum modeling suggest that compared to Leishmania major DHFR-TS, P. falciparum DHFR-TS has a lower but significant electrostatic-mediated channeling efficiency (∼15–25%) at physiological pH (7.0) and ionic strength (150 mM). We also find that removing the electric charges from key basic residues located between the DHFR and TS active sites significantly reduces the channeling efficiency of P. falciparum DHFR-TS. Although several protozoan DHFR-TS enzymes are known to have similar tertiary and quaternary structure, subtle differences in structure, active-site geometry, and charge distribution appear to influence both electrostatic-mediated and proximity-based substrate channeling. PMID:25418308

  13. Comparisons of characteristic timescales and approximate models for Brownian magnetic nanoparticle rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Daniel B.; Weaver, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are promising tools for a host of therapeutic and diagnostic medical applications. The dynamics of rotating magnetic nanoparticles in applied magnetic fields depend strongly on the type and strength of the field applied. There are two possible rotation mechanisms and the decision for the dominant mechanism is often made by comparing the equilibrium relaxation times. This is a problem when particles are driven with high-amplitude fields because they are not necessarily at equilibrium at all. Instead, it is more appropriate to consider the “characteristic timescales” that arise in various applied fields. Approximate forms for the characteristic time of Brownian particle rotations do exist and we show agreement between several analytical and phenomenological-fit models to simulated data from a stochastic Langevin equation approach. We also compare several approximate models with solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation to determine their range of validity for general fields and relaxation times. The effective field model is an excellent approximation, while the linear response solution is only useful for very low fields and frequencies for realistic Brownian particle rotations. PMID:26130846

  14. Brownian motion, old and new, and Irwin's role in my academic life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenberg, Katja

    2015-03-01

    Irwin Oppenheim's early work on Langevin equations, master equations, and Brownian motion was one of the earliest and strongest reasons for my change of direction from my PhD work in condensed matter theory to my later and lifelong interest in Brownian motion and, more broadly, statistical mechanics. I will talk about some of my most recent work on subdiffusion, a form of anomalous diffusion that describes random motions in crowded or disordered media where motions are hindered by the medium. On a personal note, I knew Irwin for decades, from the time before he had a family (he was a sworn bachelor...until he met his wife) until shortly before his death. For many years, first alone and then with family, Irwin would spend some portion of the cold Boston winter in warm La Jolla, and we would always get together during these visits. For a period of a number of years we decided to take advantage of these visits to write the definitive text in traditional Thermodynamics. We did not make it past about 2/3 of the project, but it was a great learning experience for me while it lasted. Irwin's knowledge and understanding of the subject were breathtaking.

  15. Diffusion mechanism of non-interacting Brownian particles through a deformed substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfa, Lahcen; Ouahmane, Mehdi; El Arroum, Lahcen

    2018-02-01

    We study the diffusion mechanism of non-interacting Brownian particles through a deformed substrate. The study is done at low temperature for different values of the friction. The deformed substrate is represented by a periodic Remoissenet-Peyrard potential with deformability parameter s. In this potential, the particles (impurity, adatoms…) can diffuse. We ignore the interactions between these mobile particles consider them merely as non-interacting Brownian particles and this system is described by a Fokker-Planck equation. We solve this equation numerically using the matrix continued fraction method to calculate the dynamic structure factor S(q , ω) . From S(q , ω) some relevant correlation functions are also calculated. In particular, we determine the half-width line λ(q) of the peak of the quasi-elastic dynamic structure factor S(q , ω) and the diffusion coefficient D. Our numerical results show that the diffusion mechanism is described, depending on the structure of the potential, either by a simple jump diffusion process with jump length close to the lattice constant a or by a combination of a jump diffusion model with jump length close to lattice constant a and a liquid-like motion inside the unit cell. It shows also that, for different friction regimes and various potential shapes, the friction attenuates the diffusion mechanism. It is found that, in the high friction regime, the diffusion process is more important through a deformed substrate than through a non-deformed one.

  16. Modeling of locally self-similar processes using multifractional Brownian motion of Riemann-Liouville type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniandy, S. V.; Lim, S. C.

    2001-04-01

    Fractional Brownian motion (FBM) is widely used in the modeling of phenomena with power spectral density of power-law type. However, FBM has its limitation since it can only describe phenomena with monofractal structure or a uniform degree of irregularity characterized by the constant Holder exponent. For more realistic modeling, it is necessary to take into consideration the local variation of irregularity, with the Holder exponent allowed to vary with time (or space). One way to achieve such a generalization is to extend the standard FBM to multifractional Brownian motion (MBM) indexed by a Holder exponent that is a function of time. This paper proposes an alternative generalization to MBM based on the FBM defined by the Riemann-Liouville type of fractional integral. The local properties of the Riemann-Liouville MBM (RLMBM) are studied and they are found to be similar to that of the standard MBM. A numerical scheme to simulate the locally self-similar sample paths of the RLMBM for various types of time-varying Holder exponents is given. The local scaling exponents are estimated based on the local growth of the variance and the wavelet scalogram methods. Finally, an example of the possible applications of RLMBM in the modeling of multifractal time series is illustrated.

  17. Polarized and depolarized light-scattering studies on Brownian diffusional and critical fluid systems: theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, C.M.

    1976-01-01

    An effort to expand light-scattering autocorrelation techniques to Brownian diffusional and critical fluid systems in which multiple scattering effects are important, and to understand the observed similarity of the Rayleigh linewidth of light scattered from these two seemingly different systems is discussed. A formalism was developed to find the light field multiply scattered from a suspension of Brownian diffusing particles. For the field doubly scattered from a system of noninteracting Brownian particles, the intensity and correlation time were much less dependent on the scattering angle than for the singly scattered component. The polarized and depolarized correlation times of light scattered from Brownian particle systems were measured. The double-scattering formalism was extended to light scattered from critical fluid systems. In the region k xi greater than 5 the doubly and singly scattered correlation times were nearly equal. The dynamic droplet model of critical phenomena was developed which gives the proper, experimentally verified, forms for the intensity and linewidth of light scattered from a critical fluid. To test the dynamic droplet model and the mode theories Rayleigh linewidth predictions, light-scattering measurements were performed on the critical fluid system methanol and cyclohexane. The data agreed with both the dynamic droplet and decoupled mode theory predictions. The depolarized scattered spectra from a critical fluid were measured, and qualitative agreement with the double-scattering theory was found. 57 figures, 5 tables.

  18. Solution of the Master Equation for Quantum Brownian Motion Given by the Schrödinger Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sinuvasan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider the master equation of quantum Brownian motion, and with the application of the group invariant transformation, we show that there exists a surface on which the solution of the master equation is given by an autonomous one-dimensional Schrödinger Equation.

  19. Long-range interactions in mammalian platelet aggregation. I. Evidence from kinetic studies in brownian diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, K.; Frojmovic, M.

    1990-01-01

    The Smoluchowski theory describing aggregation in suspensions of spherical colloidal particles due to Brownian diffusion-controlled two-body collisions, was used to obtain collision efficiencies, alpha B, for adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation in citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) from humans, dogs, and rabbits. For these diffusion studies, PRP was stirred with 10 microM ADP for 0.5 s, then kept nonstirred at 37 degrees C for varying times before fixation; the percent aggregation was computed from the decrease in particle concentration with time measured with a resistive particle counter. Up to 20% of rabbit platelets formed microaggregates within 60 s of ADP addition to such nonstirred suspensions, corresponding to mean alpha B values of approximately 0.9. However, human and dog platelets aggregated approximately 10 times and 2-3 times faster than rabbit platelets within the first 60 s of ADP addition, corresponding to alpha B approximately 8 and 2, respectively. These high alpha B (much greater than 1) for human platelets were independent of initial platelet count and were equally observed with the calcium ionophore A23187 as activator. In about one-third of human, dog, or rabbit PRP, comparable and lower values of alpha B (less than 0.5) were obtained for a slower second phase of aggregation seen for the nonstirred PRP over 60-300 s post ADP-addition. Platelet aggregability in continually stirred PRP was distinct from that observed in Brownian diffusion (nonstirred) because comparable aggregation was observed for all three species' stirred PRP, whereas greater than 3-8 times more ADP is required to yield 50% of maximal rates of aggregation for nonstirred than for stirred PRP. The above results point to the existence of long-range interactions mediating platelet aggregation in Brownian diffusion-controlled platelet collisions which varies according to human > dog > rabbit platelets. The roles for platelet pseudopods and adhesive sites in

  20. Transport and diffusion properties of Brownian particles powered by a rotating wheel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bao-Quan

    2017-07-01

    Diffusion and rectification of Brownian particles powered by a rotating wheel are numerically investigated in a two-dimensional channel. The nonequilibrium driving comes from the rotating wheel, which can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport in an asymmetric potential. It is found that the direction of the transport along the potential is determined by the asymmetry of the potential and the position of the wheel. The average velocity is a peaked function of the angular speed (or the diffusion coefficient) and the position of the peak shifts to large angular speed (or diffusion coefficient) when the diffusion coefficient (or the angular speed) increases. There exists an optimal angular speed (or diffusion coefficient) at which the effective diffusion coefficient takes its maximal value. Remarkably, the giant acceleration of diffusion is observed by suitably adjusting the system parameters. The parameters corresponding to the maximum effective diffusion coefficient are not the same as the parameters at which average velocity is maximum.

  1. Double-temperature ratchet model and current reversal of coupled Brownian motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen-Pu; Chen, Hong-Bin; Zheng, Zhi-Gang

    2017-12-01

    On the basis of the transport features and experimental phenomena observed in studies of molecular motors, we propose a double-temperature ratchet model of coupled motors to reveal the dynamical mechanism of cooperative transport of motors with two heads, where the interactions and asynchrony between two motor heads are taken into account. We investigate the collective unidirectional transport of coupled system and find that the direction of motion can be reversed under certain conditions. Reverse motion can be achieved by modulating the coupling strength, coupling free length, and asymmetric coefficient of the periodic potential, which is understood in terms of the effective potential theory. The dependence of the directed current on various parameters is studied systematically. Directed transport of coupled Brownian motors can be manipulated and optimized by adjusting the pulsation period or the phase shift of the pulsation temperature.

  2. Localization and Ballistic Diffusion for the Tempered Fractional Brownian-Langevin Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Wang, Xudong; Deng, Weihua

    2017-10-01

    This paper discusses the tempered fractional Brownian motion (tfBm), its ergodicity, and the derivation of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation. Then we introduce the generalized Langevin equation with the tempered fractional Gaussian noise for a free particle, called tempered fractional Langevin equation (tfLe). While the tfBm displays localization diffusion for the long time limit and for the short time its mean squared displacement (MSD) has the asymptotic form t^{2H}, we show that the asymptotic form of the MSD of the tfLe transits from t^2 (ballistic diffusion for short time) to t^{2-2H}, and then to t^2 (again ballistic diffusion for long time). On the other hand, the overdamped tfLe has the transition of the diffusion type from t^{2-2H} to t^2 (ballistic diffusion). The tfLe with harmonic potential is also considered.

  3. Brownian dynamics simulation of the cross-talking effect among modified histones on conformations of nucleosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhao-Wen; Li, Wei; Xie, Ping; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2010-04-01

    Using Brownian dynamics simulation, we studied the effect of histone modifications on conformations of an array of nucleosomes in a segment of chromatin. The simulation demonstrated that the segment of chromatin shows the dynamic behaviour that its conformation can switch between a state with nearly all of the histones being wrapped by DNA and a state with nearly all of the histones being unwrapped by DNA, thus involving the “cross-talking" interactions among the histones. Each state can stay for a sufficiently long time. These conformational states are essential for gene expression or gene silence. The simulation also shows that these conformational states can be inherited by the daughter DNAs during DNA replication, giving a theoretical explanation of the epigenetic phenomenon.

  4. Observing fluctuating spectral density of subdiffusive overdamped Brownian particles in periodic potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang Yanmei [Department of Applied Mathematics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Jiang Jun; Xie Yong, E-mail: kangyanmei2002@yahoo.com.cn [School of Aerospace, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2011-01-21

    The aim of this paper is to develop a simple and efficient method for observing the fluctuating spectral density of subdiffusive Brownian motion in an overdamped periodic potential for exploring the subdiffusive property in frequency domain. Based on the general frame of linear response theory for subdiffusive fractional Fokker-Planck equation systems, an explicit relation between fluctuating spectral density and linear dynamical susceptibility is deduced, and then a method of moments based on the expansion of trigonometric functions is proposed for calculating the linear dynamic susceptibility. With the linear dynamic susceptibility available, the fluctuating spectral density is finally obtained. The numerical results demonstrate that subdiffusion weakens coherent oscillations in the periodic system, but enhances aperiodic components. Our observation embodies the fact of the Mittag-Leffler residence time distribution with an infinite mean in the subdiffusive process from the frequency domain.

  5. Anomalous Brownian motion of colloidal particle in a nematic environment: effect of the director fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Turiv

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As recently reported [Turiv T. et al., Science, 2013, Vol. 342, 1351], fluctuations in the orientation of the liquid crystal (LC director can transfer momentum from the LC to a colloid, such that the diffusion of the colloid becomes anomalous on a short time scale. Using video microscopy and single particle tracking, we investigate random thermal motion of colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal for the time scales shorter than the expected time of director fluctuations. At long times, compared to the characteristic time of the nematic director relaxation we observe typical anisotropic Brownian motion with the mean square displacement (MSD linear in time τ and inversly proportional to the effective viscosity of the nematic medium. At shorter times, however, the dynamics is markedly nonlinear with MSD growing more slowly (subdiffusion or faster (superdiffusion than τ. These results are discussed in the context of coupling of colloidal particle's dynamics to the director fluctuation dynamics.

  6. Prediction of Brownian particle deposition in porous media using the constricted tube model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, You-Im; Chen, Shan-Chih; Lee, Eric

    2003-10-01

    The deposition of colloidal particles onto the collector surfaces of porous media is investigated using the Brownian dynamics simulation method. The pore structure in a filter bed was characterized by the constricted tube model. The effects of various shapes of the total interaction energy curves of DLVO theory and the effects of different particle diameters on the collection efficiencies of particles are examined. The simulation results show that the particle collection efficiency is strongly dependent on the geometry of the tube and on the shape of the total interaction energy curve. In a comparison with the available experimental measurements of the filter coefficient, it is found that the present model can give a smaller discrepancy than that of the convective diffusion model in the unfavorable deposition region.

  7. Change in spectrum of Brownian fluctuations of optically trapped red blood cells due to malarial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraogi, Vishal; Padmapriya, P.; Paul, Apurba; Tatu, Utpal S.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2010-05-01

    We study the properties of single red blood cells (RBCs) held in an optical-tweezers trap. We observe a change in the spectrum of Brownian fluctuations between RBCs from normal and malaria-infected samples. The change, caused by infection-induced structural changes in the cell, appears as a statistical increase in the mean (by 25%) and standard deviation (by 200%) of the corner frequency measured over ~100 cells. The increase is observed even though the ensemble of cells being measured consists mostly of cells that do not actually host the parasite, but are from an infected pool. This bystander effect appears to vindicate other observations that infected cells can affect the biomechanical properties of uninfected cells. The change is also observed to be independent of the stage of infection and its duration, highlighting its potential for disease detection.

  8. Brownian dynamics simulation of insulin microsphere formation from break-up of a fractal network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Gunton, J D; Khan, Siddique J; Schoelz, J K; Chakrabarti, A

    2011-01-14

    Motivated by a recent experiment on insulin microsphere formation where polyethylene glycol (PEG) is used as the precipitating agent, we have developed a simple theoretical model that can predict the formation of a fractal network of insulin monomers and the subsequent break-up of the fractal network into microsphere aggregates. In our approach the effect of PEG on insulin is modeled via a standard depletion attraction mechanism via the Asakura-Oosawa model. We show that even in the context of this simple model, it is possible to mimic important aspects of the insulin experiment in a brownian dynamics simulation. We simulate the effect of changing temperature in our model by changing the well depth of the Asakura-Oosawa potential. A fractal network is observed in a "deep quench" of the system, followed by a "heating" that results in a break-up of the network and subsequent formation of microspheres.

  9. Volume fraction instability in an oscillating non-Brownian iso-dense suspension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roht Y.L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The instability of an iso-dense non-Brownian suspension of polystyrene beads of diameter 40 μm dispersed in a water-glycerol mixture submitted to a periodic square wave oscillating flow in a Hele-Shaw cell is studied experimentally. The instability gives rise to stationary bead concentration waves transverse to the flow. It has been observed for average particle volume fractions between 0.25 and 0.4, for periods of the square wave flow variation between 0.4 and 10 s and in finite intervals of the amplitude of the fluid displacement. The study shows that the wavelength λ increases roughly linearly with the amplitude of the oscillatory flow; on the other hand, λ is independent of the particle concentration and of the period of oscillation of the flow although the minimum threshold amplitude for observing the instability increases with the period.

  10. From single molecule fluctuations to muscle contraction: a Brownian model of A.F. Huxley's hypotheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Marcucci

    Full Text Available Muscular force generation in response to external stimuli is the result of thermally fluctuating, cyclical interactions between myosin and actin, which together form the actomyosin complex. Normally, these fluctuations are modelled using transition rate functions that are based on muscle fiber behaviour, in a phenomenological fashion. However, such a basis reduces the predictive power of these models. As an alternative, we propose a model which uses direct single molecule observations of actomyosin fluctuations reported in the literature. We precisely estimate the actomyosin potential bias and use diffusion theory to obtain a brownian ratchet model that reproduces the complete cross-bridge cycle. The model is validated by simulating several macroscopic experimental conditions, while its interpretation is compatible with two different force-generating scenarios.

  11. Density profiles of granular gases studied by molecular dynamics and Brownian bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuñuri, F.; Montoya, J. A.; Carvente, O.

    2018-02-01

    Despite the inherent frictional forces and dissipative collisions, confined granular matter can be regarded as a system in a stationary state if we inject energy continuously. Under these conditions, both the density and the granular temperature are, in general, non-monotonic variables along the height of the container. In consequence, an analytical description of a granular system is hard to conceive. Here, by using molecular dynamics simulations, we measure the packing fraction profiles for a vertically vibrating three-dimensional granular system in several gaseous-like stationary states. We show that by using the Brownian bridge concept, the determined packing fraction profiles can be reproduced accurately and give a complete description of the distribution of the particles inside the simulation box.

  12. GPU accelerated Monte Carlo simulation of Brownian motors dynamics with CUDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiechowicz, J.; Kostur, M.; Machura, L.

    2015-06-01

    This work presents an updated and extended guide on methods of a proper acceleration of the Monte Carlo integration of stochastic differential equations with the commonly available NVIDIA Graphics Processing Units using the CUDA programming environment. We outline the general aspects of the scientific computing on graphics cards and demonstrate them with two models of a well known phenomenon of the noise induced transport of Brownian motors in periodic structures. As a source of fluctuations in the considered systems we selected the three most commonly occurring noises: the Gaussian white noise, the white Poissonian noise and the dichotomous process also known as a random telegraph signal. The detailed discussion on various aspects of the applied numerical schemes is also presented. The measured speedup can be of the astonishing order of about 3000 when compared to a typical CPU. This number significantly expands the range of problems solvable by use of stochastic simulations, allowing even an interactive research in some cases.

  13. Multiscale simulations of anisotropic particles combining Brownian Dynamics and Green's Function Reaction Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Wolde, Pieter Rein ten; Bolhuis, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    The modeling of complex reaction-diffusion processes in, for instance, cellular biochemical networks or self-assembling soft matter can be tremendously sped up by employing a multiscale algorithm which combines the mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method with explicit stochastic Brownian, Langevin, or deterministic Molecular Dynamics to treat reactants at the microscopic scale [A. Vijaykumar, P.G. Bolhuis and P.R. ten Wolde, J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 43}, 21: 214102 (2015)]. Here we extend this multiscale BD-GFRD approach to include the orientational dynamics that is crucial to describe the anisotropic interactions often prevalent in biomolecular systems. We illustrate the novel algorithm using a simple patchy particle model. After validation of the algorithm we discuss its performance. The rotational BD-GFRD multiscale method will open up the possibility for large scale simulations of e.g. protein signalling networks.

  14. Inference on the hurst parameter and the variance of diffusions driven by fractional Brownian motion

    CERN Document Server

    Berzin, Corinne; León, José R

    2014-01-01

    This book is devoted to a number of stochastic models that display scale invariance. It primarily focuses on three issues: probabilistic properties, statistical estimation and simulation of the processes considered. It will be of interest to probability specialists, who will find here an uncomplicated presentation of statistics tools, and to those statisticians who wants to tackle the most recent theories in probability in order to develop Central Limit Theorems in this context; both groups will also benefit from the section on simulation. Algorithms are described in great detail, with a focus on procedures that is not usually found in mathematical treatises. The models studied are fractional Brownian motions and processes that derive from them through stochastic differential equations. Concerning the proofs of the limit theorems, the “Fourth Moment Theorem” is systematically used, as it produces rapid and helpful proofs that can serve as models for the future. Readers will also find elegant and new proof...

  15. Brownian yet Non-Gaussian Diffusion: From Superstatistics to Subordination of Diffusing Diffusivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei V. Chechkin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of biological, soft, and active matter systems are observed to exhibit normal diffusive dynamics with a linear growth of the mean-squared displacement, yet with a non-Gaussian distribution of increments. Based on the Chubinsky-Slater idea of a diffusing diffusivity, we here establish and analyze a minimal model framework of diffusion processes with fluctuating diffusivity. In particular, we demonstrate the equivalence of the diffusing diffusivity process with a superstatistical approach with a distribution of diffusivities, at times shorter than the diffusivity correlation time. At longer times, a crossover to a Gaussian distribution with an effective diffusivity emerges. Specifically, we establish a subordination picture of Brownian but non-Gaussian diffusion processes, which can be used for a wide class of diffusivity fluctuation statistics. Our results are shown to be in excellent agreement with simulations and numerical evaluations.

  16. Composite generalized Langevin equation for Brownian motion in different hydrodynamic and adhesion regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hsiu-Yu; Eckmann, David M; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2015-05-01

    We present a composite generalized Langevin equation as a unified framework for bridging the hydrodynamic, Brownian, and adhesive spring forces associated with a nanoparticle at different positions from a wall, namely, a bulklike regime, a near-wall regime, and a lubrication regime. The particle velocity autocorrelation function dictates the dynamical interplay between the aforementioned forces, and our proposed methodology successfully captures the well-known hydrodynamic long-time tail with context-dependent scaling exponents and oscillatory behavior due to the binding interaction. Employing the reactive flux formalism, we analyze the effect of hydrodynamic variables on the particle trajectory and characterize the transient kinetics of a particle crossing a predefined milestone. The results suggest that both wall-hydrodynamic interactions and adhesion strength impact the particle kinetics.

  17. Modeling Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index Using Weighted Geometric Brownian Motion Forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayo Willy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index (PSEi is the main stock index of the Philippine Stock Exchange (PSE. PSEi is computed using a weighted mean of the top 30 publicly traded companies in the Philippines, called component stocks. It provides a single value by which the performance of the Philippine stock market is measured. Unfortunately, these weights, which may vary for every trading day, are not disclosed by the PSE. In this paper, we propose a model of forecasting the PSEi by estimating the weights based on historical data and forecasting each component stock using Monte Carlo simulation based on a Geometric Brownian Motion (GBM assumption. The model performance is evaluated and its forecast compared is with the results using a direct GBM forecast of PSEi over different forecast periods. Results showed that the forecasts using WGBM will yield smaller error compared to direct GBM forecast of PSEi.

  18. An iterative method for hydrodynamic interactions in Brownian dynamics simulations of polymer dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Linling; Young, Charles D.; Sing, Charles E.

    2017-07-01

    Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulations are a standard tool for understanding the dynamics of polymers in and out of equilibrium. Quantitative comparison can be made to rheological measurements of dilute polymer solutions, as well as direct visual observations of fluorescently labeled DNA. The primary computational challenge with BD is the expensive calculation of hydrodynamic interactions (HI), which are necessary to capture physically realistic dynamics. The full HI calculation, performed via a Cholesky decomposition every time step, scales with the length of the polymer as O(N3). This limits the calculation to a few hundred simulated particles. A number of approximations in the literature can lower this scaling to O(N2 - N2.25), and explicit solvent methods scale as O(N); however both incur a significant constant per-time step computational cost. Despite this progress, there remains a need for new or alternative methods of calculating hydrodynamic interactions; large polymer chains or semidilute polymer solutions remain computationally expensive. In this paper, we introduce an alternative method for calculating approximate hydrodynamic interactions. Our method relies on an iterative scheme to establish self-consistency between a hydrodynamic matrix that is averaged over simulation and the hydrodynamic matrix used to run the simulation. Comparison to standard BD simulation and polymer theory results demonstrates that this method quantitatively captures both equilibrium and steady-state dynamics after only a few iterations. The use of an averaged hydrodynamic matrix allows the computationally expensive Brownian noise calculation to be performed infrequently, so that it is no longer the bottleneck of the simulation calculations. We also investigate limitations of this conformational averaging approach in ring polymers.

  19. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  20. Stereotypic movement disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001548.htm Stereotypic movement disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stereotypic movement disorder is a condition in which a person makes ...

  1. Eye Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder ... of the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over ...

  2. Movement and Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard Hansen, Thomas; Eriksson, Eva; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we explore the space in which movement based interaction takes place. We have in several projects explored how fixed and mobile cameras can be used in movement based interaction and will shortly describe these projects. Based on our experience with working with movement...

  3. Linking Literacy and Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Rae

    2010-01-01

    There are many links between literacy and movement. Movement and language are both forms of communication and self-expression. Rhythm is an essential component of both language and movement. While people may think of rhythm primarily in musical terms, there is a rhythm to words and sentences as well. Individuals develop an internal rhythm when…

  4. Social movements and science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The article examines the role of social movements in the development of scientific knowledge. Interactions between social movements and science in broad, historical terms are discussed. The relations between the new social movements of the 1960s and 1970s and changes in the contemporary scientific...

  5. Phase space master equations for quantum Brownian motion in a periodic potential: comparison of various kinetic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleary, Liam; Coffey, William T; Dowling, William J [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Kalmykov, Yuri P [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique, Universite de Perpignan Via Domitia, 52, Avenue de Paul Alduy, 66860 Perpignan Cedex (France); Titov, Serguey V, E-mail: kalmykov@univ-perp.fr [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Vvedenskii Square 1, Fryazino, 141190 (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-25

    The dynamics of quantum Brownian particles in a cosine periodic potential are studied using the phase space formalism associated with the Wigner representation of quantum mechanics. Various kinetic phase space master equation models describing quantum Brownian motion in a potential are compared by evaluating the dynamic structure factor and escape rate from the differential recurrence relations generated by the models. The numerical solution is accomplished via matrix continued fractions in the manner customarily used for the classical Fokker-Planck equation. The results of numerical calculations of the escape rate from a well of the cosine potential are compared with those given analytically by the quantum-mechanical reaction rate theory solution of the Kramers turnover problem for a periodic potential, given by Georgievskii and Pollak (1994 Phys. Rev. E 49 5098), enabling one to appraise each model. (paper)

  6. Interplay between optical, viscous and elastic forces on an optically trapped Brownian particle immersed in a viscoelastic fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Domínguez-García, P; Jeney, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    We provide a detailed study of the interplay between the different interactions which appear in the Brownian motion of a micronsized sphere immersed in a viscoelastic fluid measured with optical trapping interferometry. To explore a wide range of viscous, elastic and optical forces, we analyze two different viscoelastic solutions at various concentrations, which provide a dynamic polymeric structure surrounding the Brownian sphere. Our experiments show that, depending of the fluid, optical forces, even if small, slightly modify the complex modulus at low frequencies. Based on our findings, we propose an alternative methodology to calibrate this kind of experimental set-up when non-Newtonian fluids are used. Understanding the influence of the optical potential is essential for a correct interpretation of the mechanical properties obtained by optically-trapped probe-based studies of biomaterials and living matter.

  7. Cluster growth mechanisms in Lennard-Jones fluids: A comparison between molecular dynamics and Brownian dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jiyun; Lee, Jumin; Kim, Jun Soo

    2015-03-01

    We present a simulation study on the mechanisms of a phase separation in dilute fluids of Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles as a model of self-interacting molecules. Molecular dynamics (MD) and Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of the LJ fluids are employed to model the condensation of a liquid droplet in the vapor phase and the mesoscopic aggregation in the solution phase, respectively. With emphasis on the cluster growth at late times well beyond the nucleation stage, we find that the growth mechanisms can be qualitatively different: cluster diffusion and coalescence in the MD simulations and Ostwald ripening in the BD simulations. We also show that the rates of the cluster growth have distinct scaling behaviors during cluster growth. This work suggests that in the solution phase the random Brownian nature of the solute dynamics may lead to the Ostwald ripening that is qualitatively different from the cluster coalescence in the vapor phase.

  8. Longest interval between zeros of the tied-down random walk, the Brownian bridge and related renewal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godrèche, Claude

    2017-05-01

    The probability distribution of the longest interval between two zeros of a simple random walk starting and ending at the origin, and of its continuum limit, the Brownian bridge, was analysed in the past by Rosén and Wendel, then extended by the latter to stable processes. We recover and extend these results using simple concepts of renewal theory, which allows to revisit past and recent works of the physics literature.

  9. Exponential stability and interval stability of a class of stochastic hybrid systems driven by both Brownian motion and Poisson jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingmei; Xu, Meng

    2017-12-01

    A class of stochastic singular hybrid systems driven by both Brownian motion and Poisson jumps are studied. This paper is devoted to discussing the exponential stability and interval stability of such stochastic singular hybrid systems. The concept of interval admissibility is proposed. Sufficient conditions are given for exponential mean square admissibility and interval admissibility by using Itô's formula, H-representation and spectrum technique. Finally, two simulation cases are presented to demonstrate the theoretical results.

  10. Structural parameter dependence of directed current generation in GaAs nanowire-based electron Brownian ratchet devices

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, Yushi; Kuroda, Ryota; Ying, Xiang; Sato, Masaki; Tanaka, Takayuki; Kasai, Seiya

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the structural parameter dependence of the directed current in GaAs-nanowire-based Brownian ratchet devices. The directed current was generated by flashing a ratchet potential array repeatedly using multiple asymmetric gates with a periodic signal. The amount of current in the fabricated device increased as the nanowire width W decreased, which contradicted the theoretical model. The current also depended on the number of the gates N, when N was smaller than 6. We discussed th...

  11. Brownian motion on \\lbrack 0,\\infty) with linear drift, reflected at zero: exact asymptotics for ergodic means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatalov, V. R.

    2017-07-01

    For the Brownian motion X_μ(t) on the half-axis \\lbrack 0,∞) with linear drift μ, reflected at zero and for fixed numbers p>0, δ>0, d>0, a ≥ 0, we calculate the exact asymptotics as T\\to∞ of the mathematical expectations and probabilities \\displaystyle \\mathsf E\\biggl \\lbrack \\exp\\biggl\\{-δ\\int_0T X_μ......l\\{\\frac1 T\\int_0T X_μ^p(t) dt as well as of their conditional versions. For p=1 we give explicit formulae for the emerging constants via the Airy function. We consider an application of the results obtained to the problem of studying the behaviour of a Brownian particle in a gravitational field in a container bounded below by an impenetrable wall when μ=-mg/(2kT K), where m is the mass of the Brownian particle, g is the gravitational acceleration, k is the Boltzmann constant, T K is the temperature in the Kelvin scale. The analysis is conducted by the Laplace method for the sojourn time of homogeneous Markov processes. Bibliography: 31 titles.

  12. On the first crossing distributions in fractional Brownian motion and the mass function of dark matter haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiotelis, Nicos; Del Popolo, Antonino

    2017-03-01

    We construct an integral equation for the first crossing distributions for fractional Brownian motion in the case of a constant barrier and we present an exact analytical solution. Additionally we present first crossing distributions derived by simulating paths from fractional Brownian motion. We compare the results of the analytical solutions with both those of simulations and those of some approximated solutions which have been used in the literature. Finally, we present multiplicity functions for dark matter structures resulting from our analytical approach and we compare with those resulting from N-body simulations. We show that the results of analytical solutions are in good agreement with those of path simulations but differ significantly from those derived from approximated solutions. Additionally, multiplicity functions derived from fractional Brownian motion are poor fits of the those which result from N-body simulations. We also present comparisons with other models which are exist in the literature and we discuss different ways of improving the agreement between analytical results and N-body simulations.

  13. Joule heating effect on a continuously moving thin needle in MHD Sakiadis flow with thermophoresis and Brownian moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulochana, C.; Ashwinkumar, G. P.; Sandeep, N.

    2017-09-01

    In the current study, we investigated the impact of thermophoresis and Brownian moment on the boundary layer 2D forced convection flow of a magnetohydrodynamic nanofluid along a persistently moving horizontal needle with frictional heating effect. The various pertinent parameters are taken into account in the present analysis, namely, the thermophoresis and Brownian moment, uneven heat source/sink, Joule heating and frictional heating effects. To check the variation in the boundary layer behavior, we considered two distinct nanoparticles namely Al50Cu50 (alloy with 50% alumina and 50% copper) and Cu with water as base liquid. Numerical solutions are derived for the reduced system of governing PDEs by employing the shooting process. Computational results of the flow, energy and mass transport are interpreted with the support of tables and graphical illustrations. The obtained results indicate that the increase in the needle size significantly reduces the flow and thermal fields. In particular, the velocity field of the Cu-water nanofluid is highly affected when compared with the Al50Cu50 -water nanofluid. Also, we showed that the thermophoresis and Brownian moment parameters are capable of enhancing the thermal conductivity to a great extent.

  14. The special theory of Brownian relativity: equivalence principle for dynamic and static random paths and uncertainty relation for diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzasalma, Stefano A

    2007-03-15

    The theoretical basis of a recent theory of Brownian relativity for polymer solutions is deepened and reexamined. After the problem of relative diffusion in polymer solutions is addressed, its two postulates are formulated in all generality. The former builds a statistical equivalence between (uncorrelated) timelike and shapelike reference frames, that is, among dynamical trajectories of liquid molecules and static configurations of polymer chains. The latter defines the "diffusive horizon" as the invariant quantity to work with in the special version of the theory. Particularly, the concept of universality in polymer physics corresponds in Brownian relativity to that of covariance in the Einstein formulation. Here, a "universal" law consists of a privileged observation, performed from the laboratory rest frame and agreeing with any diffusive reference system. From the joint lack of covariance and simultaneity implied by the Brownian Lorentz-Poincaré transforms, a relative uncertainty arises, in a certain analogy with quantum mechanics. It is driven by the difference between local diffusion coefficients in the liquid solution. The same transformation class can be used to infer Fick's second law of diffusion, playing here the role of a gauge invariance preserving covariance of the spacetime increments. An overall, noteworthy conclusion emerging from this view concerns the statistics of (i) static macromolecular configurations and (ii) the motion of liquid molecules, which would be much more related than expected.

  15. A Brownian dynamics study on ferrofluid colloidal dispersions using an iterative constraint method to satisfy Maxwell’s equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubina, Sean Hyun, E-mail: sdubin2@uic.edu; Wedgewood, Lewis Edward, E-mail: wedge@uic.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 810 S. Clinton St. (MC 110), Chicago, Illinois 60607-4408 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Ferrofluids are often favored for their ability to be remotely positioned via external magnetic fields. The behavior of particles in ferromagnetic clusters under uniformly applied magnetic fields has been computationally simulated using the Brownian dynamics, Stokesian dynamics, and Monte Carlo methods. However, few methods have been established that effectively handle the basic principles of magnetic materials, namely, Maxwell’s equations. An iterative constraint method was developed to satisfy Maxwell’s equations when a uniform magnetic field is imposed on ferrofluids in a heterogeneous Brownian dynamics simulation that examines the impact of ferromagnetic clusters in a mesoscale particle collection. This was accomplished by allowing a particulate system in a simple shear flow to advance by a time step under a uniformly applied magnetic field, then adjusting the ferroparticles via an iterative constraint method applied over sub-volume length scales until Maxwell’s equations were satisfied. The resultant ferrofluid model with constraints demonstrates that the magnetoviscosity contribution is not as substantial when compared to homogeneous simulations that assume the material’s magnetism is a direct response to the external magnetic field. This was detected across varying intensities of particle-particle interaction, Brownian motion, and shear flow. Ferroparticle aggregation was still extensively present but less so than typically observed.

  16. Plant nuclear photorelocation movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, Takeshi; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2014-06-01

    Organelle movement and positioning are essential for proper cellular function. A nucleus moves dynamically during cell division and differentiation and in response to environmental changes in animal, fungal, and plant cells. Nuclear movement is well-studied and the mechanisms have been mostly elucidated in animal and fungal cells, but not in plant cells. In prothallial cells of the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and leaf cells of the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana, light induces nuclear movement and nuclei change their position according to wavelength, intensity, and direction of light. This nuclear photorelocation movement shows some common features with the photorelocation movement of chloroplasts, which is one of the best-characterized plant organelle movements. This review summarizes nuclear movement and positioning in plant cells, especially plant-specific nuclear photorelocation movement and discusses the relationship between nuclear photorelocation movement and chloroplast photorelocation movement. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Phase structure of XX0 spin chain and nonintersecting Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedian, M.; Zahabi, A.

    2018-01-01

    We study finite size and temperature XX0 Heisenberg spin chain in weak and strong coupling regimes. By using an elegant connection of the model to integrable combinatorics and probability, we explore and interpret a possible phase structure of the model in asymptotic limit: the limit of large inverse temperature and size. First, the partition function and free energy of the model are derived by using techniques and results from random matrix models and nonintersecting Brownian motion. We show that, in the asymptotic limit, partition function of the model, written in terms of matrix integral, is governed by the Tracy–Widom distribution. Second, the exact analytic results for the free energy, which is obtained by the asymptotic analysis of the Tracy–Widom distribution, indicate a completely new and sophisticated phase structure of the model. This phase structure consists of second- and third-order phase transitions. Finally, to shed light on our new results, we provide a possible new interpretation of the phase structure in terms of dynamical behaviour of magnons in the spin chain. We demonstrate distinct features of the phases with schematic spin configurations which have definite features in each region of the phase diagram.

  18. Active Brownian particles and run-and-tumble particles separate inside a maze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Maryam; Wolff, Katrin; Pohl, Oliver; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza; Stark, Holger

    2016-11-01

    A diverse range of natural and artificial self-propelled particles are known and are used nowadays. Among them, active Brownian particles (ABPs) and run-and-tumble particles (RTPs) are two important classes. We numerically study non-interacting ABPs and RTPs strongly confined to different maze geometries in two dimensions. We demonstrate that by means of geometrical confinement alone, ABPs are separable from RTPs. By investigating Matryoshka-like mazes with nested shells, we show that a circular maze has the best filtration efficiency. Results on the mean first-passage time reveal that ABPs escape faster from the center of the maze, while RTPs reach the center from the rim more easily. According to our simulations and a rate theory, which we developed, ABPs in steady state accumulate in the outermost region of the Matryoshka-like mazes, while RTPs occupy all locations within the maze with nearly equal probability. These results suggest a novel technique for separating different types of self-propelled particles by designing appropriate confining geometries without using chemical or biological agents.

  19. COMPUTER SIMULATION OF LOCAL MOBILITY IN DENDRIMERS WITH ASYMMETRIC BRANCHING BY BROWNIAN DYNAMICS METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Shavykin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Brownian dynamics method has been used to study the effect of the branching asymmetry on the local orientational mobility of segments and bonds in dendrimers in good solvent. “Coarse-grained” models of flexible dendrimers with different branching symmetry but with the same average segment length were considered. The frequency dependences of the rate of the spin-lattice relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR [1/T1H(H] for segments or bonds located at different distances from terminal monomers were calculated. After the exclusion of the contribution of the overall dendrimer rotation the position of the maxima of the frequency dependences [1/T1H(ωH] for different segments with the same length doesn’t depend on their location inside a dendrimer both for phantom models and for models with excluded volume interactions. This effect doesn’t depend also on the branching symmetry, but the position of the maximum [1/T1H(ωH] is determined by the segment length. For bonds inside segments the positions of the maximum [1/T1H(ωH] coincide for all models considered. Therefore, the obtained earlier conclusion about the weak influence of the excluded volume interactions on the local dynamics in the flexible symmetric dendrimers can be generalized for dendrimers with an asymmetric branching.

  20. Coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations of protein translocation through nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Po-Hsien; Helms, Volkhard; Geyer, Tihamér

    2012-10-01

    A crucial process in biological cells is the translocation of newly synthesized proteins across cell membranes via integral membrane protein pores termed translocons. Recent improved techniques now allow producing artificial membranes with pores of similar dimensions of a few nm as the translocon system. For the translocon system, the protein has to be unfolded, whereas the artificial pores are wide enough so that small proteins can pass through even when folded. To study how proteins permeate through such membrane pores, we used coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations where the proteins were modeled as single beads or bead-spring polymers for both folded and unfolded states. The pores were modeled as cylindrical holes through the membrane with various radii and lengths. Diffusion was driven by a concentration gradient created across the porous membrane. Our results for both folded and unfolded configurations show the expected reciprocal relation between the flow rate and the pore length in agreement with an analytical solution derived by Brunn et al. [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 37, 311 (1984)], 10.1093/qjmam/37.2.311. Furthermore, we find that the geometric constriction by the narrow pore leads to an accumulation of proteins at the pore entrance, which in turn compensates for the reduced diffusivity of the proteins inside the pore.

  1. A Computational Approach to Increase Time Scales in Brownian Dynamics–Based Reaction-Diffusion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Particle-based Brownian dynamics simulations offer the opportunity to not only simulate diffusion of particles but also the reactions between them. They therefore provide an opportunity to integrate varied biological data into spatially explicit models of biological processes, such as signal transduction or mitosis. However, particle based reaction-diffusion methods often are hampered by the relatively small time step needed for accurate description of the reaction-diffusion framework. Such small time steps often prevent simulation times that are relevant for biological processes. It is therefore of great importance to develop reaction-diffusion methods that tolerate larger time steps while maintaining relatively high accuracy. Here, we provide an algorithm, which detects potential particle collisions prior to a BD-based particle displacement and at the same time rigorously obeys the detailed balance rule of equilibrium reactions. We can show that for reaction-diffusion processes of particles mimicking proteins, the method can increase the typical BD time step by an order of magnitude while maintaining similar accuracy in the reaction diffusion modelling. PMID:22697237

  2. Thermodynamic feature of a Brownian heat engine operating between two heat baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaw, Mesfin

    2014-01-01

    A generalized theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics for a Brownian motor operating between two different heat baths is presented. Via a simple paradigmatic model, we not only explore the thermodynamic feature of the engine in the regime of the nonequilibrium steady state but also study the short time behavior of the system for either the isothermal case with load or, in general, the nonisothermal case with or without load. Many elegant thermodynamic theories can be checked via the present model. Furthermore the dependence of the velocity, the efficiency, and the performance of the refrigerator on time t is examined. Our study reveals a current reversal due to time t. In the early system relaxation period, the model works neither as a heat engine nor as a refrigerator and only after a certain period of time does the model start functioning as a heat engine or as a refrigerator. The performance of the engine also improves with time and at steady state the engine manifests a higher efficiency or performance as a refrigerator. Furthermore the effect of energy exchange via the kinetic energy on the performance of the heat engine is explored.

  3. Brownian dynamic study of an enzyme metabolon in the TCA cycle: Substrate kinetics and channeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ming M; Huber, Gary A; Wang, Nuo; Minteer, Shelley D; McCammon, J Andrew

    2018-02-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and citrate synthase (CS) are two pacemaking enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Oxaloacetate (OAA) molecules are the intermediate substrates that are transferred from the MDH to CS to carry out sequential catalysis. It is known that, to achieve a high flux of intermediate transport and reduce the probability of substrate leaking, a MDH-CS metabolon forms to enhance the OAA substrate channeling. In this study, we aim to understand the OAA channeling within possible MDH-CS metabolons that have different structural orientations in their complexes. Three MDH-CS metabolons from native bovine, wild-type porcine, and recombinant sources, published in recent work, were selected to calculate OAA transfer efficiency by Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations and to study, through electrostatic potential calculations, a possible role of charges that drive the substrate channeling. Our results show that an electrostatic channel is formed in the metabolons of native bovine and recombinant porcine enzymes, which guides the oppositely charged OAA molecules passing through the channel and enhances the transfer efficiency. However, the channeling probability in a suggested wild-type porcine metabolon conformation is reduced due to an extended diffusion length between the MDH and CS active sites, implying that the corresponding arrangements of MDH and CS result in the decrease of electrostatic steering between substrates and protein surface and then reduce the substrate transfer efficiency from one active site to another. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  4. 3D Lattice Boltzmann-Brownian Dynamics Simulations of Nanoparticle Deposition in Evaporating Liquid Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingfei; Yong, Xin

    2017-11-01

    Nanoparticle deposition coupled to hydrodynamics plays important roles in materials printing and thin-film processing. Investigations of nanoparticle dynamics in evaporating colloidal dispersions could elicit a greater understanding of the processing-structure relationship for evaporation-induced self-assembly and deposition. A 3D free-energy lattice Boltzmann method combined with Brownian dynamics is developed to simulate evaporating colloidal droplets and rivulets. In this work, we explore the deposition on solid substrates with different wetting properties, namely static contact angle and contact line motion. We highlight the influence of convective flows on the assembly kinetics and deposit patterns using the developed model. We introduce a novel approach to impose a pinned contact line for most of droplet lifetime. The time evolutions of contact angle and droplet volume are examined to characterize the pinning scheme. We observe the process of nanoparticle self-assembly during the evaporation of droplets and rivulets and quantitatively analyze the deposit structure. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1538090.

  5. Robust unidirectional rotation in three-tooth Brownian rotary ratchet systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutu, Hiroki; Nagata, Soichiro

    2013-02-01

    We apply a simple Brownian ratchet model to an artificial molecular rotary system mounted in a biological membrane, in which the rotor always maintains unidirectional rotation in response to a linearly polarized weak ac field. Because the rotor and stator compose a ratchet system, we describe the motion of the rotor tip with the Langevin equation for a particle in a two-dimensional three-tooth ratchet potential of threefold symmetry. Unidirectional rotation can be induced under the field and optimized by stochastic resonance, wherein the mean angular momentum (MAM) of the rotor exhibits a bell-shaped curve for the noise strength. We obtain analytical expressions for the MAM and power loss from the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation, via a Markov transition model for coarse-grained states (six-state model). The MAM expression reveals a significant effect depending on the chirality of the ratchet potential: in achiral cases, the MAM approximately vanishes with respect to the polarization angle ϕ of the field; in chiral cases, the MAM does not crucially depend on ϕ, but depends on the direction of the ratchet; i.e., the parity of the unidirectional rotation is inherent in the ratchet structure. This feature is useful for artificial rotary systems to maintain robust unidirectional rotation independent of the mounting condition.

  6. Simulation for Sludge Flocculation I: Brownian Dynamic Simulation for Perikinetic Flocculation of Charged Particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linshuang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate sludge drying process, a numerical simulation based on Brownian dynamic for the floc with uncharged and charged particles was conducted. The Langevin equation is used as dynamical equation for tracking each particle in a floc. An initial condition and periodic boundary condition which well conformed to reality is used for calculating the floc growth process. Each cell consists of 1000 primary particles with diameter 0.1 ∼ 4 μm. Floc growth is related to the thermal force and the electrostatic force. The electrostatic force on a particle in the simulation cell is considered as the sum of electrostatic forces from other particles in the original cell and its replicate cells. It is assumed that flocs are charged with precharged primary particles in dispersion system by ionization. By the analysis of the simulation figures, on one hand, the effects of initial particle size and sludge density on floc smashing time, floc radius of gyration, and fractal dimension were discussed. On the other hand, the effects of ionization on floc smashing time and floc structure were presented. This study has important practical value in the high-turbidity water treatment, especially for sludge drying.

  7. Stochastic Stokes' Drift, Homogenized Functional Inequalities, and Large Time Behavior of Brownian Ratchets

    KAUST Repository

    Blanchet, Adrien

    2009-01-01

    A periodic perturbation of a Gaussian measure modifies the sharp constants in Poincarae and logarithmic Sobolev inequalities in the homogeniz ation limit, that is, when the period of a periodic perturbation converges to zero. We use variational techniques to determine the homogenized constants and get optimal convergence rates toward s equilibrium of the solutions of the perturbed diffusion equations. The study of these sharp constants is motivated by the study of the stochastic Stokes\\' drift. It also applies to Brownian ratchets and molecular motors in biology. We first establish a transport phenomenon. Asymptotically, the center of mass of the solution moves with a constant velocity, which is determined by a doubly periodic problem. In the reference frame attached to the center of mass, the behavior of the solution is governed at large scale by a diffusion with a modified diffusion coefficient. Using the homogenized logarithmic Sobolev inequality, we prove that the solution converges in self-similar variables attached to t he center of mass to a stationary solution of a Fokker-Planck equation modulated by a periodic perturbation with fast oscillations, with an explicit rate. We also give an asymptotic expansion of the traveling diffusion front corresponding to the stochastic Stokes\\' drift with given potential flow. © 2009 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  8. A hybrid Brownian Dynamics model for yielding, aging, and rejuvenation in deforming polymeric glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Weizhong; Larson, Ronald

    2015-03-01

    We describe the rheology of polymeric glasses by combining a simple constitutive equation for the fast segmental modes, borrowed from Fielding, et al., with Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of the slow polymer modes. The BD simulations determine the polymeric stress from ensembles of finitely extensible bead-spring chains, where the bead drag coefficient is governed by solutions to the equation for segmental relaxation. Thus the model treats the short glassy segmental mode as ``solvent'' for the polymer modes. With rubbery modulus for the slow-relaxing polymer modes as one of our model parameters, stress-dependent relaxation, physical aging, flow rejuvenation as well as strain-hardening and recovery can be successfully accounted for in uniaxial extension and steady shear, without the use of an artificial ``crinkle factor'' used to account for recoil dynamics in previous work. Our simulation results remarkably agree with the experimental data from Lee et al. A comparison between our model and the barrier-hopping theory is also made. The authors acknowledge discussions with M. E. Cates and S. M. Fielding.

  9. First passage time statistics of Brownian motion with purely time dependent drift and diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molini, A.; Talkner, P.; Katul, G. G.; Porporato, A.

    2011-06-01

    Systems where resource availability approaches a critical threshold are common to many engineering and scientific applications and often necessitate the estimation of first passage time statistics of a Brownian motion (Bm) driven by time-dependent drift and diffusion coefficients. Modeling such systems requires solving the associated Fokker-Planck equation subject to an absorbing barrier. Transitional probabilities are derived via the method of images, whose applicability to time dependent problems is shown to be limited to state-independent drift and diffusion coefficients that only depend on time and are proportional to each other. First passage time statistics, such as the survival probabilities and first passage time densities are obtained analytically. The analysis includes the study of different functional forms of the time dependent drift and diffusion, including power-law time dependence and different periodic drivers. As a case study of these theoretical results, a stochastic model of water resources availability in snowmelt dominated regions is presented, where both temperature effects and snow-precipitation input are incorporated.

  10. Correlation Properties of (Discrete Fractional Gaussian Noise and Fractional Brownian Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Delignières

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fractional Gaussian noise/fractional Brownian motion framework (fGn/fBm has been widely used for modeling and interpreting physiological and behavioral data. The concept of 1/f noise, reflecting a kind of optimal complexity in the underlying systems, is of central interest in this approach. It is generally considered that fGn and fBm represent a continuum, punctuated by the boundary of “ideal” 1/f noise. In the present paper, we focus on the correlation properties of discrete-time versions of these processes (dfGn and dfBm. We especially derive a new analytical expression of the autocorrelation function (ACF of dfBm. We analyze the limit behavior of dfGn and dfBm when they approach their upper and lower limits, respectively. We show that, as H approaches 1, the ACF of dfGn tends towards 1 at all lags, suggesting that dfGn series tend towards straight line. Conversely, as H approaches 0, the ACF of dfBm tends towards 0 at all lags, suggesting that dfBm series tend towards white noise. These results reveal a severe breakdown of correlation properties around the 1/f boundary and challenge the idea of a smooth transition between dfGn and dfBm processes. We discuss the implications of these findings for the application of the dfGn/dfBm model to experimental series, in terms of theoretical interpretation and modeling.

  11. Brownian motion in non-equilibrium systems and the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck stochastic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donado, F; Moctezuma, R E; López-Flores, L; Medina-Noyola, M; Arauz-Lara, J L

    2017-10-03

    The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck stochastic process is an exact mathematical model providing accurate representations of many real dynamic processes in systems in a stationary state. When applied to the description of random motion of particles such as that of Brownian particles, it provides exact predictions coinciding with those of the Langevin equation but not restricted to systems in thermal equilibrium but only conditioned to be stationary. Here, we investigate experimentally single particle motion in a two-dimensional granular system in a stationary state, consisting of 1 mm stainless balls on a plane circular surface. The motion of the particles is produced by an alternating magnetic field applied perpendicular to the surface of the container. The mean square displacement of the particles is measured for a range of low concentrations and it is found that following an appropriate scaling of length and time, the short-time experimental curves conform a master curve covering the range of particle motion from ballistic to diffusive in accordance with the description of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model.

  12. Height distribution tails in the Kardar–Parisi–Zhang equation with Brownian initial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerson, Baruch; Schmidt, Johannes

    2017-10-01

    For stationary interface growth, governed by the Kardar–Parisi–Zhang (KPZ) equation in 1 + 1 dimensions, typical fluctuations of the interface height at long times are described by the Baik–Rains distribution. Recently Chhita et al (2016 arXiv:1611.06690) used the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) to study the height fluctuations in systems of the KPZ universality class for Brownian interfaces with arbitrary diffusion constant. They showed that there is a one-parameter family of long-time distributions, parameterized by the diffusion constant of the initial random height profile. They also computed these distributions numerically by using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Here we address this problem analytically and focus on the distribution tails at short times. We determine the (stretched exponential) tails of the height distribution by applying the optimal fluctuation method (OFM) to the KPZ equation. We argue that, by analogy with other initial conditions, the ‘slow’ tail holds at arbitrary times and therefore provides a proper asymptotic to the family of long-time distributions studied in Chhita et al (2016 arXiv:1611.06690). We verify this hypothesis by performing large-scale MC simulations of a TASEP with a parallel-update rule. The ‘fast’ tail, predicted by the OFM, is also expected to hold at arbitrary times, at sufficiently large heights.

  13. Filamentous biopolymers on surfaces: atomic force microscopy images compared with Brownian dynamics simulation of filament deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Mücke

    Full Text Available Nanomechanical properties of filamentous biopolymers, such as the persistence length, may be determined from two-dimensional images of molecules immobilized on surfaces. For a single filament in solution, two principal adsorption scenarios are possible. Both scenarios depend primarily on the interaction strength between the filament and the support: i For interactions in the range of the thermal energy, the filament can freely equilibrate on the surface during adsorption; ii For interactions much stronger than the thermal energy, the filament will be captured by the surface without having equilibrated. Such a 'trapping' mechanism leads to more condensed filament images and hence to a smaller value for the apparent persistence length. To understand the capture mechanism in more detail we have performed Brownian dynamics simulations of relatively short filaments by taking the two extreme scenarios into account. We then compared these 'ideal' adsorption scenarios with observed images of immobilized vimentin intermediate filaments on different surfaces. We found a good agreement between the contours of the deposited vimentin filaments on mica ('ideal' trapping and on glass ('ideal' equilibrated with our simulations. Based on these data, we have developed a strategy to reliably extract the persistence length of short worm-like chain fragments or network forming filaments with unknown polymer-surface interactions.

  14. Equivalence of Brownian dynamics and dynamic Monte Carlo simulations in multicomponent colloidal suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuetos, Alejandro; Patti, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    We propose a simple but powerful theoretical framework to quantitatively compare Brownian dynamics (BD) and dynamic Monte Carlo (DMC) simulations of multicomponent colloidal suspensions. By extending our previous study focusing on monodisperse systems of rodlike colloids, here we generalize the formalism described there to multicomponent colloidal mixtures and validate it by investigating the dynamics in isotropic and liquid crystalline phases containing spherical and rodlike particles. In order to investigate the dynamics of multicomponent colloidal systems by DMC simulations, it is key to determine the elementary time step of each species and establish a unique timescale. This is crucial to consistently study the dynamics of colloidal particles with different geometry. By analyzing the mean-square displacement, the orientation autocorrelation functions, and the self part of the van Hove correlation functions, we show that DMC simulation is a very convenient and reliable technique to describe the stochastic dynamics of any multicomponent colloidal system. Our theoretical formalism can be easily extended to any colloidal system containing size and/or shape polydisperse particles.

  15. Multi-Dielectric Brownian Dynamics and Design-Space-Exploration Studies of Permeation in Ion Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siksik, May; Krishnamurthy, Vikram

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes a multi-dielectric Brownian dynamics simulation framework for design-space-exploration (DSE) studies of ion-channel permeation. The goal of such DSE studies is to estimate the channel modeling-parameters that minimize the mean-squared error between the simulated and expected "permeation characteristics." To address this computational challenge, we use a methodology based on statistical inference that utilizes the knowledge of channel structure to prune the design space. We demonstrate the proposed framework and DSE methodology using a case study based on the KcsA ion channel, in which the design space is successfully reduced from a 6-D space to a 2-D space. Our results show that the channel dielectric map computed using the framework matches with that computed directly using molecular dynamics with an error of 7%. Finally, the scalability and resolution of the model used are explored, and it is shown that the memory requirements needed for DSE remain constant as the number of parameters (degree of heterogeneity) increases.

  16. Brownian and advective dynamics in microflow studied by coherent X-ray scattering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, Raphael; Westermeier, Fabian; Banusch, Benjamin; Sprung, Michael; Pfohl, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Combining microfluidics with coherent X-ray illumination offers the possibility to not only measure the structure but also the dynamics of flowing samples in a single-scattering experiment. Here, the power of this combination is demonstrated by studying the advective and Brownian dynamics of colloidal suspensions in microflow of different geometries. Using an experimental setup with a fast two-dimensional detector and performing X-ray correlation spectroscopy by calculating two-dimensional maps of the intensity auto-correlation functions, it was possible to evaluate the sample structure and furthermore to characterize the detailed flow behavior, including flow geometry, main flow directions, advective flow velocities and diffusive dynamics. By scanning a microfocused X-ray beam over a microfluidic device, the anisotropic auto-correlation functions of driven colloidal suspensions in straight, curved and constricted microchannels were mapped with the spatial resolution of the X-ray beam. This method has not only a huge potential for studying flow patterns in complex fluids but also to generally characterize anisotropic dynamics in materials.

  17. [Sleep related movement disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    Sleep related movement disorders (SRMD) are characterized by simple, stereotyped movements occur during sleep, with the exception of restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS has the following essential features; an urge to move the legs usually accompanied by uncomfortable sensation in the legs, improvement of symptoms after movement (non-stereotypical movements, such as walking and stretching, to reduce symptoms), and symptoms occur or worsen during periods of rest and in the evening and night. However, RLS is closely associated with periodic limb movement, which shows typical stererotyped limb movements. In the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd edition, sleep disturbances or daytime symptoms are prerequiste for a diagnosis of SRMD. We here review diagnosis and treatment of SRMD.

  18. The mathematics of movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Review of: Quantitative Analysis of Movement: Measuring and Modeling Population Redistribution in Animals and Plants. Peter Turchin. 1998. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA. 306 pages. $38.95 (paper).

  19. Sensation of Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sensation of Movement will discuss the role of sensation in the control of action, bodily self-recognition, and sense of agency. Sensing movement is dependent on a range of information received by the brain, from signalling in the peripheral sensory organs to the establishment of higher order goals....... This volume will question whether one type of information is more relevant for the ability to sense and control movements, and demonstrate the importance of integrating neuroscientific knowledge with philosophical perspectives, in order to arrive at new insights into how sensation of movement can be studied...

  20. Generalized Pareto for Pattern-Oriented Random Walk Modelling of Organisms' Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Sophie; Joo, Rocío; Fablet, Ronan

    2015-01-01

    How organisms move and disperse is crucial to understand how population dynamics relates to the spatial heterogeneity of the environment. Random walk (RW) models are typical tools to describe movement patterns. Whether Lévy or alternative RW better describes forager movements is keenly debated. We get around this issue using the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD). GPD includes as specific cases Normal, exponential and power law distributions, which underlie Brownian, Poisson-like and Lévy walks respectively. Whereas previous studies typically confronted a limited set of candidate models, GPD lets the most likely RW model emerge from the data. We illustrate the wide applicability of the method using GPS-tracked seabird foraging movements and fishing vessel movements tracked by Vessel Monitoring System (VMS), both collected in the Peruvian pelagic ecosystem. The two parameters from the fitted GPD, a scale and a shape parameter, provide a synoptic characterization of the observed movement in terms of characteristic scale and diffusive property. They reveal and quantify the variability, among species and individuals, of the spatial strategies selected by predators foraging on a common prey field. The GPD parameters constitute relevant metrics for (1) providing a synthetic and pattern-oriented description of movement, (2) using top predators as ecosystem indicators and (3) studying the variability of spatial behaviour among species or among individuals with different personalities.

  1. Generalized Pareto for Pattern-Oriented Random Walk Modelling of Organisms’ Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Sophie; Joo, Rocío; Fablet, Ronan

    2015-01-01

    How organisms move and disperse is crucial to understand how population dynamics relates to the spatial heterogeneity of the environment. Random walk (RW) models are typical tools to describe movement patterns. Whether Lévy or alternative RW better describes forager movements is keenly debated. We get around this issue using the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD). GPD includes as specific cases Normal, exponential and power law distributions, which underlie Brownian, Poisson-like and Lévy walks respectively. Whereas previous studies typically confronted a limited set of candidate models, GPD lets the most likely RW model emerge from the data. We illustrate the wide applicability of the method using GPS-tracked seabird foraging movements and fishing vessel movements tracked by Vessel Monitoring System (VMS), both collected in the Peruvian pelagic ecosystem. The two parameters from the fitted GPD, a scale and a shape parameter, provide a synoptic characterization of the observed movement in terms of characteristic scale and diffusive property. They reveal and quantify the variability, among species and individuals, of the spatial strategies selected by predators foraging on a common prey field. The GPD parameters constitute relevant metrics for (1) providing a synthetic and pattern–oriented description of movement, (2) using top predators as ecosystem indicators and (3) studying the variability of spatial behaviour among species or among individuals with different personalities. PMID:26172045

  2. Generalized Pareto for Pattern-Oriented Random Walk Modelling of Organisms' Movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Bertrand

    Full Text Available How organisms move and disperse is crucial to understand how population dynamics relates to the spatial heterogeneity of the environment. Random walk (RW models are typical tools to describe movement patterns. Whether Lévy or alternative RW better describes forager movements is keenly debated. We get around this issue using the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD. GPD includes as specific cases Normal, exponential and power law distributions, which underlie Brownian, Poisson-like and Lévy walks respectively. Whereas previous studies typically confronted a limited set of candidate models, GPD lets the most likely RW model emerge from the data. We illustrate the wide applicability of the method using GPS-tracked seabird foraging movements and fishing vessel movements tracked by Vessel Monitoring System (VMS, both collected in the Peruvian pelagic ecosystem. The two parameters from the fitted GPD, a scale and a shape parameter, provide a synoptic characterization of the observed movement in terms of characteristic scale and diffusive property. They reveal and quantify the variability, among species and individuals, of the spatial strategies selected by predators foraging on a common prey field. The GPD parameters constitute relevant metrics for (1 providing a synthetic and pattern-oriented description of movement, (2 using top predators as ecosystem indicators and (3 studying the variability of spatial behaviour among species or among individuals with different personalities.

  3. Fractal analysis of lateral movement in biomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmachowski, Lech

    2017-11-02

    Lateral movement of a molecule in a biomembrane containing small compartments (0.23-μm diameter) and large ones (0.75 μm) is analyzed using a fractal description of its walk. The early time dependence of the mean square displacement varies from linear due to the contribution of ballistic motion. In small compartments, walking molecules do not have sufficient time or space to develop an asymptotic relation and the diffusion coefficient deduced from the experimental records is lower than that measured without restrictions. The model makes it possible to deduce the molecule step parameters, namely the step length and time, from data concerning confined and unrestricted diffusion coefficients. This is also possible using experimental results for sub-diffusive transport. The transition from normal to anomalous diffusion does not affect the molecule step parameters. The experimental literature data on molecular trajectories recorded at a high time resolution appear to confirm the modeled value of the mean free path length of DOPE for Brownian and anomalous diffusion. Although the step length and time give the proper values of diffusion coefficient, the DOPE speed calculated as their quotient is several orders of magnitude lower than the thermal speed. This is interpreted as a result of intermolecular interactions, as confirmed by lateral diffusion of other molecules in different membranes. The molecule step parameters are then utilized to analyze the problem of multiple visits in small compartments. The modeling of the diffusion exponent results in a smooth transition to normal diffusion on entering a large compartment, as observed in experiments.

  4. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  5. Dynamics of human movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The part of (bio)mechanics that studies the interaction of forces on the human skeletal system and its effect on the resulting movement is called rigid body dynamics. Some basic concepts are presented: A mathematical formulation to describe human movement and how this relates on the mechanical loads

  6. A hybrid Brownian dynamics/constitutive model for yielding, aging, and rejuvenation in deforming polymeric glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Weizhong; Larson, Ronald G

    2016-08-10

    We present a hybrid model for polymeric glasses under deformation that combines a minimal model of segmental dynamics with a beads-and-springs model of a polymer, solved by Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations, whose relaxation is coupled to the segmental dynamics through the drag coefficient of the beads. This coarse-grained model allows simulations that are much faster than molecular dynamics and successfully capture the entire range of mechanical response including yielding, plastic flow, strain-hardening, and incomplete strain recovery. The beads-and-springs model improves upon the dumbbell model for glassy polymers proposed by Fielding et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 2012, 108, 048301) by capturing the small elastic recoil seen experimentally without the use of ad hoc adjustments of parameters required in the model of Fielding et al. With appropriate choice of parameters, predictions of creep, recovery, and segmental relaxation are found to be in good agreement with poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) data of Lee et al. (Science, 2009, 323, 231-234). Our model shows dramatic differences in behavior of the segmental relaxation time between extensional creep and steady extension, and between extension and shear. The non-monotonic response of the segmental relaxation time to extensional creep and the small elastic recovery after removal of stress are shown to arise from sub-chains that are trapped between folds, and that become highly oriented and stretched at strains of order unity, connecting the behavior of glassy polymers under creep to that of dilute polymer solutions under fast extensional flows. We are also able to predict the effects of polymer pre-orientation in the parallel or orthogonal direction on the subsequent response to extensional deformation.

  7. Brownian Dynamics of a Suspension of Particles with Constrained Voronoi Cell Volumes

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, John P.

    2015-06-23

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Solvent-free polymer-grafted nanoparticle fluids consist of inorganic core particles fluidized by polymers tethered to their surfaces. The attachment of the suspending fluid to the particle surface creates a strong penalty for local variations in the fluid volume surrounding the particles. As a model of such a suspension we perform Brownian dynamics of an equilibrium system consisting of hard spheres which experience a many-particle potential proportional to the variance of the Voronoi volumes surrounding each particle (E = α(Vi-V0)2). The coefficient of proportionality α can be varied such that pure hard sphere dynamics is recovered as α → 0, while an incompressible array of hairy particles is obtained as α →. As α is increased the distribution of Voronoi volumes becomes narrower, the mean coordination number of the particle increases and the variance in the number of nearest neighbors decreases. The nearest neighbor peaks in the pair distribution function are suppressed and shifted to larger radial separations as the constraint acts to maintain relatively uniform interstitial regions. The structure factor of the model suspension satisfies S(k=0) → 0 as α → in accordance with expectation for a single component (particle plus tethered fluid) incompressible system. The tracer diffusivity of the particles is reduced by the volume constraint and goes to zero at φ 0.52, indicating an earlier glass transition than has been observed in hard sphere suspensions. The total pressure of the suspension grows in proportion to (αkBT)1/2 as the strength of the volume-constraint potential grows. This stress arises primarily from the interparticle potential forces, while the hard-sphere collisional contribution to the stress is suppressed by the volume constraint.

  8. Solutions to Master equations of quantum Brownian motion in a general environment with external force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roura, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fleming, C H [UNIV OF MARYLAND; Hu, B L [UNIV OF MARYLAND

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the model of a system made up of a Brownian quantum oscillator linearly coupled to an environment made up of many quantum oscillators at finite temperature. We show that the HPZ master equation for the reduced density matrix derived earlier [B.L. Hu, J.P. Paz, Y. Zhang, Phys. Rev. D 45, 2843 (1992)] has incorrectly specified coefficients for the case of nonlocal dissipation. We rederive the QBM master equation, correctly specifying all coefficients, and determine the position uncertainty to be free of excessive cutoff sensitivity. Our coefficients and solutions are reduced entirely to contour integration for analytic spectra at arbitrary temperature, coupling strength, and cut-off. As an illustration we calculate the master equation coefficients and solve the master equation for ohmic coupling (with finite cutoff) and example supra-ohmic and sub-ohmic spectral densities. We determine the effect of an external force on the quantum oscillator and also show that our representation of the master equation and solutions naturally extends to a system of multiple oscillators bilinearly coupled to themselves and the bath in arbitrary fashion. This produces a formula for investigating the standard quantum limit which is central to addressing many theoretical issues in macroscopic quantum phenomena and experimental concerns related to low temperature precision measurements. We find that in a dissipative environment, all initial states settle down to a Gaussian density matrix whose covariance is determined by the thermal reservoir and whose mean is determined by the external force. We specify the thermal covariance for the spectral densities we explore.

  9. Dynamics in crowded environments: is non-Gaussian Brownian diffusion normal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Gyemin; Sung, Bong June; Yethiraj, Arun

    2014-07-17

    The dynamics of colloids and proteins in dense suspensions is of fundamental importance, from a standpoint of understanding the biophysics of proteins in the cytoplasm and for the many interesting physical phenomena in colloidal dispersions. Recent experiments and simulations have raised questions about our understanding of the dynamics of these systems. Experiments on vesicles in nematic fluids and colloids in an actin network have shown that the dynamics of particles can be "non-Gaussian"; that is, the self-part of the van Hove correlation function, Gs(r,t), is an exponential rather than Gaussian function of r, in regimes where the mean-square displacement is linear in t. It is usually assumed that a linear mean-square displacement implies a Gaussian Gs(r,t). In a different result, simulations of a mixture of proteins, aimed at mimicking the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli, have shown that hydrodynamic interactions (HI) play a key role in slowing down the dynamics of proteins in concentrated (relative to dilute) solutions. In this work, we study a simple system, a dilute tracer colloidal particle immersed in a concentrated solution of larger spheres, using simulations with and without HI. The simulations reproduce the non-Gaussian Brownian diffusion of the tracer, implying that this behavior is a general feature of colloidal dynamics and is a consequence of local heterogeneities on intermediate time scales. Although HI results in a lower diffusion constant, Gs(r,t) is very similar to and without HI, provided they are compared at the same value of the mean-square displacement.

  10. Numerically modeling Brownian thermal noise in amorphous and crystalline thin coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Geoffrey; Demos, Nicholas; Khan, Haroon

    2018-01-01

    Thermal noise is expected to be one of the noise sources limiting the astrophysical reach of Advanced LIGO (once commissioning is complete) and third-generation detectors. Adopting crystalline materials for thin, reflecting mirror coatings, rather than the amorphous coatings used in current-generation detectors, could potentially reduce thermal noise. Understanding and reducing thermal noise requires accurate theoretical models, but modeling thermal noise analytically is especially challenging with crystalline materials. Thermal noise models typically rely on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, which relates the power spectral density of the thermal noise to an auxiliary elastic problem. In this paper, we present results from a new, open-source tool that numerically solves the auxiliary elastic problem to compute the Brownian thermal noise for both amorphous and crystalline coatings. We employ the open-source deal.ii and PETSc frameworks to solve the auxiliary elastic problem using a finite-element method, adaptive mesh refinement, and parallel processing that enables us to use high resolutions capable of resolving the thin reflective coating. We verify numerical convergence, and by running on up to hundreds of compute cores, we resolve the coating elastic energy in the auxiliary problem to approximately 0.1%. We compare with approximate analytic solutions for amorphous materials, and we verify that our solutions scale as expected with changing beam size, mirror dimensions, and coating thickness. Finally, we model the crystalline coating thermal noise in an experiment reported by Cole et al (2013 Nat. Photon. 7 644–50), comparing our results to a simpler numerical calculation that treats the coating as an ‘effectively amorphous’ material. We find that treating the coating as a cubic crystal instead of as an effectively amorphous material increases the thermal noise by about 3%. Our results are a step toward better understanding and reducing thermal noise to

  11. Extremal-point density of scaling processes: From fractional Brownian motion to turbulence in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongxiang; Wang, Lipo; Schmitt, F. G.; Zheng, Xiaobo; Jiang, Nan; Liu, Yulu

    2017-07-01

    In recent years several local extrema-based methodologies have been proposed to investigate either the nonlinear or the nonstationary time series for scaling analysis. In the present work, we study systematically the distribution of the local extrema for both synthesized scaling processes and turbulent velocity data from experiments. The results show that for the fractional Brownian motion (fBm) without intermittency correction the measured extremal-point-density (EPD) agrees well with a theoretical prediction. For a multifractal random walk (MRW) with the lognormal statistics, the measured EPD is independent of the intermittency parameter μ , suggesting that the intermittency correction does not change the distribution of extremal points but changes the amplitude. By introducing a coarse-grained operator, the power-law behavior of these scaling processes is then revealed via the measured EPD for different scales. For fBm the scaling exponent ξ (H ) is found to be ξ (H )=H , where H is Hurst number, while for MRW ξ (μ ) shows a linear relation with the intermittency parameter μ . Such EPD approach is further applied to the turbulent velocity data obtained from a wind tunnel flow experiment with the Taylor scale λ -based Reynolds number Reλ=720 , and a turbulent boundary layer with the momentum thickness θ based Reynolds number Reθ=810 . A scaling exponent ξ ≃0.37 is retrieved for the former case. For the latter one, the measured EPD shows clearly four regimes, which agrees well with the corresponding sublayer structures inside the turbulent boundary layer.

  12. Brownian Dynamics of a Suspension of Particles with Constrained Voronoi Cell Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, John P; Walsh, Stuart D C; Koch, Donald L

    2015-06-23

    Solvent-free polymer-grafted nanoparticle fluids consist of inorganic core particles fluidized by polymers tethered to their surfaces. The attachment of the suspending fluid to the particle surface creates a strong penalty for local variations in the fluid volume surrounding the particles. As a model of such a suspension we perform Brownian dynamics of an equilibrium system consisting of hard spheres which experience a many-particle potential proportional to the variance of the Voronoi volumes surrounding each particle (E = α(Vi-V0)(2)). The coefficient of proportionality α can be varied such that pure hard sphere dynamics is recovered as α → 0, while an incompressible array of hairy particles is obtained as α → ∞. As α is increased the distribution of Voronoi volumes becomes narrower, the mean coordination number of the particle increases and the variance in the number of nearest neighbors decreases. The nearest neighbor peaks in the pair distribution function are suppressed and shifted to larger radial separations as the constraint acts to maintain relatively uniform interstitial regions. The structure factor of the model suspension satisfies S(k=0) → 0 as α → ∞ in accordance with expectation for a single component (particle plus tethered fluid) incompressible system. The tracer diffusivity of the particles is reduced by the volume constraint and goes to zero at ϕ ∼ 0.52, indicating an earlier glass transition than has been observed in hard sphere suspensions. The total pressure of the suspension grows in proportion to (αkBT)(1/2) as the strength of the volume-constraint potential grows. This stress arises primarily from the interparticle potential forces, while the hard-sphere collisional contribution to the stress is suppressed by the volume constraint.

  13. Auxin and chloroplast movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Waligórski, Piotr; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is involved in a wide spectrum of physiological processes in plants, including responses controlled by the blue light photoreceptors phototropins: phototropic bending and stomatal movement. However, the role of auxin in phototropin-mediated chloroplast movements has never been studied. To address this question we searched for potential interactions between auxin and the chloroplast movement signaling pathway using different experimental approaches and two model plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. We observed that the disturbance of auxin homeostasis by shoot decapitation caused a decrease in chloroplast movement parameters, which could be rescued by exogenous auxin application. In several cases, the impairment of polar auxin transport, by chemical inhibitors or in auxin carrier mutants, had a similar negative effect on chloroplast movements. This inhibition was not correlated with changes in auxin levels. Chloroplast relocations were also affected by the antiauxin p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid and mutations in genes encoding some of the elements of the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA auxin receptor complex. The observed changes in chloroplast movement parameters are not prominent, which points to a modulatory role of auxin in this process. Taken together, the obtained results suggest that auxin acts indirectly to regulate chloroplast movements, presumably by regulating gene expression via the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA-ARF pathway. Auxin does not seem to be involved in controlling the expression of phototropins. © 2015 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  14. Analytical pricing of geometric Asian power options on an underlying driven by a mixed fractional Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Guo; Li, Zhe; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we study the pricing problem of the continuously monitored fixed and floating strike geometric Asian power options in a mixed fractional Brownian motion environment. First, we derive both closed-form solutions and mixed fractional partial differential equations for fixed and floating strike geometric Asian power options based on delta-hedging strategy and partial differential equation method. Second, we present the lower and upper bounds of the prices of fixed and floating strike geometric Asian power options under the assumption that both risk-free interest rate and volatility are interval numbers. Finally, numerical studies are performed to illustrate the performance of our proposed pricing model.

  15. Chip-Based Measurements of Brownian Relaxation of Magnetic Beads Using a Planar Hall Effect Magnetic Field Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Snakenborg, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple 'click-on' fluidic system with integrated electrical contacts, which is suited for electrical measurements on chips in microfluidic systems. We show that microscopic magnetic field sensors based on the planar Hall effect can be used for detecting the complex magnetic response...... using only the self-field arising from the bias current applied to the sensors as excitation field. We present measurements on a suspension of magnetic beads with a nominal diameter of 250 nm vs. temperature and find that the observations are consistent with the Cole-Cole model for Brownian relaxation...... biosensor based on the detection of the dynamic response of magnetic beads....

  16. Structural parameter dependence of directed current generation in GaAs nanowire-based electron Brownian ratchet devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yushi; Kuroda, Ryota; Ying, Xiang; Sato, Masaki; Tanaka, Takayuki; Kasai, Seiya

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the structural parameter dependence of the directed current in GaAs-nanowire-based Brownian ratchet devices. The directed current was generated by flashing a ratchet potential array repeatedly using multiple asymmetric gates with a periodic signal. The amount of current in the fabricated device increased as the nanowire width W decreased, which contradicted the theoretical model. The current also depended on the number of the gates N, when N was smaller than 6. We discussed the obtained results in terms of the structural parameter dependence of carrier transfer efficiency and the effect of electron reservoirs on current generation in flashing ratchet operation.

  17. Noise-to-signal transition of a Brownian particle in the cubic potential: II. optical trapping geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemánek, Pavel; Šiler, Martin; Brzobohatý, Oto; Jákl, Petr; Filip, Radim

    2016-06-01

    The noise-to-signal transitions belong to an exciting group of processes in physics. In Filip and Zemánek (2016, J. Opt. 18 065401) we theoretically analyse the stochastic noise-to-signal transition of overdamped Brownian motion of a particle in the cubic potential. In this part, we propose a feasible experimental setup for a proof-of-principle experiment that uses methods of optical trapping in shaped laser beams which provide cubic and quadratic potentials. Theoretical estimates and results from the numerical simulations indicate that the noise-to-signal transition can be observed under realistic experimental conditions.

  18. Music and movement

    OpenAIRE

    Nasev, Lence

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm is one of the fundamental elements without which music would not exist. In plays with singing, a child learns to synchronize its movements with the rhythm of music from a very early age. The skill of movement plays a major role in the learning of music and thus deserves an important place in the school curriculum. In this paper, an overview is made of the most important music pedagogues who introduced movement, and at the same time perceived its importance in learning musical conte...

  19. Movements and feelings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Fernandez Poncela

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This text reviews the theory of recognition and focuses on the study of the role of emotions in collective action and social movements. It shows how emotion becomes feeling and creates a need to be met, leading to action. Anger, for example, as emotion, moves on to the feeling of indignation, and it is expressed in many forms, including the pursuit of justice and recognition. This point lands and deepens the study with the experience of the student movement in Mexico #YoSoy132 in 2012. The research is based on interviews with members of the movement. The presence and importance of feelings in collective action and social movements through the proposed case study is finally shown.

  20. Movement coordination during conversation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Latif

    Full Text Available Behavioral coordination and synchrony contribute to a common biological mechanism that maintains communication, cooperation and bonding within many social species, such as primates and birds. Similarly, human language and social systems may also be attuned to coordination to facilitate communication and the formation of relationships. Gross similarities in movement patterns and convergence in the acoustic properties of speech have already been demonstrated between interacting individuals. In the present studies, we investigated how coordinated movements contribute to observers' perception of affiliation (friends vs. strangers between two conversing individuals. We used novel computational methods to quantify motor coordination and demonstrated that individuals familiar with each other coordinated their movements more frequently. Observers used coordination to judge affiliation between conversing pairs but only when the perceptual stimuli were restricted to head and face regions. These results suggest that observed movement coordination in humans might contribute to perceptual decisions based on availability of information to perceivers.

  1. Rooted in Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The result of the synergy between four doctoral projects and an advanced MA-level course on Bronze Age Europe, this integrated assemblage of articles represents a variety of different subjects united by a single theme: movement. Ranging from theoretical discussion of the various responses...... period of European prehistory. In so doing, the text not only addresses transmission and reception, but also the conceptualization of mobility within a world which was literally Rooted in Movement....

  2. Spiraldynamik - intelligent movement

    OpenAIRE

    Wippert, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Spiraldynamik ® is an anatomically based movement and therapy concept. It was founded by the physiotherapist Yolanda Deswarte, and Dr. med. Christian Larsen. During the time that he was professionally active as a pediatrician, Christian Larsen repeatedly wondered: “is the universal principle of organization, the spiral, also embodied in man?” Observing the babies and toddlers that he worked with inspired him to research further into movement sequences. International interdisciplinary research...

  3. Statistical thermodynamics of quantum Brownian motion: Construction of perpetuum mobile of the second kind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Th. M.; Allahverdyan, A. E.

    2002-09-01

    The Brownian motion of a quantum particle in a harmonic confining potential and coupled to harmonic quantum thermal bath is exactly solvable. Though this system presents at high temperatures a pedagogic example to explain the laws of thermodynamics, it is shown that at low enough temperatures the stationary state is non-Gibbsian due to an entanglement with the bath. In physical terms, this happens when the cloud of bath modes around the particle starts to play a nontrivial role, namely, when the bath temperature T is smaller than the coupling energy. Indeed, equilibrium thermodynamics of the total system, particle plus bath, does not imply standard equilibrium thermodynamics for the particle itself at low T. Various formulations of the second law are found to be invalid at low T. First, the Clausius inequality can be violated, because heat can be extracted from the zero point energy of the cloud of bath modes. Second, when the width of the confining potential is suddenly changed, there occurs a relaxation to equilibrium during which the entropy production is partly negative. In this process the energy put on the particle does not relax monotonically, but oscillates between particle and bath, even in the limit of strong damping. Third, for nonadiabatic changes of system parameters the rate of energy dissipation can be negative, and, out of equilibrium, cyclic processes are possible which extract work from the bath. Conditions are put forward under which perpetuum mobility of the second kind, having one or several work extraction cycles, enter the realm of condensed matter physics. Fourth, it follows that the equivalence between different formulations of the second law (e.g., those by Clausius and Thomson) can be violated at low temperatures. These effects are the consequence of quantum entanglement in the presence of the slightly off-equilibrium nature of the thermal bath, and become important when the characteristic quantum time scale ħ/kBT is larger than or

  4. Nuclear movement in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xin

    2017-12-11

    Nuclear movement within a cell occurs in a variety of eukaryotic organisms including yeasts and filamentous fungi. Fungal molecular genetic studies identified the minus-end-directed microtubule motor cytoplasmic dynein as a critical protein for nuclear movement or orientation of the mitotic spindle contained in the nucleus. Studies in the budding yeast first indicated that dynein anchored at the cortex via its anchoring protein Num1 exerts pulling force on an astral microtubule to orient the anaphase spindle across the mother-daughter axis before nuclear division. Prior to anaphase, myosin V interacts with the plus end of an astral microtubule via Kar9-Bim1/EB1 and pulls the plus end along the actin cables to move the nucleus/spindle close to the bud neck. In addition, pushing or pulling forces generated from cortex-linked polymerization or depolymerization of microtubules drive nuclear movements in yeasts and possibly also in filamentous fungi. In filamentous fungi, multiple nuclei within a hyphal segment undergo dynein-dependent back-and-forth movements and their positioning is also influenced by cytoplasmic streaming toward the hyphal tip. In addition, nuclear movement occurs at various stages of fungal development and fungal infection of plant tissues. This review discusses our current understanding on the mechanisms of nuclear movement in fungal organisms, the importance of nuclear positioning and the regulatory strategies that ensure the proper positioning of nucleus/spindle. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. [Scenes in movement. Movement disorders on film].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares Romero, J

    2010-03-01

    There are publications in which various neurological diseases are analysed on film. However, no references have been found on movement disorders in this medium. A total of 104 documents were collected and reviewed using the internet movie data base (IMDb). The majority were associated with dystonia, Parkinson's and tics, were American commercial productions, and the most common genre was drama. The cinema usually depicts old men with developed Parkinson's disease. However, motor complications only appear in 19% and non-motor symptoms in 14%. The image of dystonia is generally that of a young man, with disabling dystonia secondary to childhood cerebral palsy. Tics appear associated with Tourette's syndrome, with the excessive use of obscene expressions and with very few references to other important aspects of this syndrome, such as mood and behavioural changes. The majority of tremors portrayed on film are associated with Parkinsonism and are not pathological. Myoclonus appears anecdotically and is normally symptomatic. Parkinson's disease is the type of movement disorder that the cinema portrays with greater neurological honesty and in a more dignified manner.

  6. Psychostimulants and movement disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres eAsser

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Psychostimulants are a diverse group of substances with their main psychomotor effects resembling those of amphetamine, methamphetamine, cocaine or cathinone. Due to their potential as drugs of abuse, recreational use of most of these substances is illegal since the 1971 Convention on Psychotropic Substances. In recent years, new psychoactive substances have emerged mainly as synthetic cathinones with new molecules frequently complementing the list.Psychostimulant related movement disorders are a known entity often seen in emergency rooms around the world. These admissions are becoming more frequent as are fatalities associated with drug abuse. Still the legal constraints of the novel synthetic molecules are bypassed. At the same time chronic and permanent movement disorders are much less frequently encountered. These disorders frequently manifest as a combination of movement disorders. The more common symptoms include agitation, tremor, hyperkinetic and stereotypical movements, cognitive impairment, and also hyperthermia and cardiovascular dysfunction.The pathophysiological mechanisms behind the clinical manifestations have been researched for decades. The common denominator is the monoaminergic signaling. Dopamine has received the most attention but further research has demonstrated involvement of other pathways. Common mechanisms linking psychostimulant use and several movement disorders exist.

  7. Psychostimulants and Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asser, Andres; Taba, Pille

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants are a diverse group of substances with their main psychomotor effects resembling those of amphetamine, methamphetamine, cocaine, or cathinone. Due to their potential as drugs of abuse, recreational use of most of these substances is illegal since 1971 Convention on Psychotropic Substances. In recent years, new psychoactive substances have emerged mainly as synthetic cathinones with new molecules frequently complementing the list. Psychostimulant related movement disorders are a known entity often seen in emergency rooms around the world. These admissions are becoming more frequent as are fatalities associated with drug abuse. Still the legal constraints of the novel synthetic molecules are bypassed. At the same time, chronic and permanent movement disorders are much less frequently encountered. These disorders frequently manifest as a combination of movement disorders. The more common symptoms include agitation, tremor, hyperkinetic and stereotypical movements, cognitive impairment, and also hyperthermia and cardiovascular dysfunction. The pathophysiological mechanisms behind the clinical manifestations have been researched for decades. The common denominator is the monoaminergic signaling. Dopamine has received the most attention but further research has demonstrated involvement of other pathways. Common mechanisms linking psychostimulant use and several movement disorders exist. PMID:25941511

  8. Pursuit Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauzlis, Rich; Stone, Leland; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    When viewing objects, primates use a combination of saccadic and pursuit eye movements to stabilize the retinal image of the object of regard within the high-acuity region near the fovea. Although these movements involve widespread regions of the nervous system, they mix seamlessly in normal behavior. Saccades are discrete movements that quickly direct the eyes toward a visual target, thereby translating the image of the target from an eccentric retinal location to the fovea. In contrast, pursuit is a continuous movement that slowly rotates the eyes to compensate for the motion of the visual target, minimizing the blur that can compromise visual acuity. While other mammalian species can generate smooth optokinetic eye movements - which track the motion of the entire visual surround - only primates can smoothly pursue a single small element within a complex visual scene, regardless of the motion elsewhere on the retina. This ability likely reflects the greater ability of primates to segment the visual scene, to identify individual visual objects, and to select a target of interest.

  9. Movement as utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couton, Philippe; López, José Julián

    2009-10-01

    Opposition to utopianism on ontological and political grounds has seemingly relegated it to a potentially dangerous form of antiquated idealism. This conclusion is based on a restrictive view of utopia as excessively ordered panoptic discursive constructions. This overlooks the fact that, from its inception, movement has been central to the utopian tradition. The power of utopianism indeed resides in its ability to instantiate the tension between movement and place that has marked social transformations in the modern era. This tension continues in contemporary discussions of movement-based social processes, particularly international migration and related identity formations, such as open borders transnationalism and cosmopolitanism. Understood as such, utopia remains an ongoing and powerful, albeit problematic instrument of social and political imagination.

  10. Movement Without Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Fortuna

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Johnson Simon, an artist based in West Palm Beach, FL, provided the cover art for the Fall 2017 edition of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy (OJOT. “Dancing in Motion” is a 36” x 60” painting made from acrylic on canvas. Johnson always wanted to become a dancer. He was born with cerebral palsy, and therefore physical limitations make it difficult for Johnson to coordinate his body movements. Through use of vibrant colors and bold strokes, Johnson’s expressionist paintings evoke movement and motion. Occupational therapy helped Johnson discover his artistic abilities. Painting empowered him to move without limitations

  11. Ribosome dynamics and tRNA movement by time-resolved electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Niels; Konevega, Andrey L; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V; Stark, Holger

    2010-07-15

    The translocation step of protein synthesis entails large-scale rearrangements of the ribosome-transfer RNA (tRNA) complex. Here we have followed tRNA movement through the ribosome during translocation by time-resolved single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Unbiased computational sorting of cryo-EM images yielded 50 distinct three-dimensional reconstructions, showing the tRNAs in classical, hybrid and various novel intermediate states that provide trajectories and kinetic information about tRNA movement through the ribosome. The structures indicate how tRNA movement is coupled with global and local conformational changes of the ribosome, in particular of the head and body of the small ribosomal subunit, and show that dynamic interactions between tRNAs and ribosomal residues confine the path of the tRNAs through the ribosome. The temperature dependence of ribosome dynamics reveals a surprisingly flat energy landscape of conformational variations at physiological temperature. The ribosome functions as a Brownian machine that couples spontaneous conformational changes driven by thermal energy to directed movement.

  12. Testing for Expected Return and Market Price of Risk in Chinese A-B Share Market: A Geometric Brownian Motion and Multivariate GARCH Model Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jie

    stock markets. Models with dynamic of Geometric Brownian Motion are adopted, multivariate GARCH models are also introduced to capture the feature of time-varying volatility in stock returns. The results suggest that the different pric- ing can be explained by the difference in expected returns between...

  13. A movement ecology paradigm for unifying organismal movement research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Ran; Getz, Wayne M.; Revilla, Eloy; Holyoak, Marcel; Kadmon, Ronen; Saltz, David; Smouse, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    Movement of individual organisms is fundamental to life, quilting our planet in a rich tapestry of phenomena with diverse implications for ecosystems and humans. Movement research is both plentiful and insightful, and recent methodological advances facilitate obtaining a detailed view of individual movement. Yet, we lack a general unifying paradigm, derived from first principles, which can place movement studies within a common context and advance the development of a mature scientific discipline. This introductory article to the Movement Ecology Special Feature proposes a paradigm that integrates conceptual, theoretical, methodological, and empirical frameworks for studying movement of all organisms, from microbes to trees to elephants. We introduce a conceptual framework depicting the interplay among four basic mechanistic components of organismal movement: the internal state (why move?), motion (how to move?), and navigation (when and where to move?) capacities of the individual and the external factors affecting movement. We demonstrate how the proposed framework aids the study of various taxa and movement types; promotes the formulation of hypotheses about movement; and complements existing biomechanical, cognitive, random, and optimality paradigms of movement. The proposed framework integrates eclectic research on movement into a structured paradigm and aims at providing a basis for hypothesis generation and a vehicle facilitating the understanding of the causes, mechanisms, and spatiotemporal patterns of movement and their role in various ecological and evolutionary processes. ”Now we must consider in general the common reason for moving with any movement whatever.“ (Aristotle, De Motu Animalium, 4th century B.C.) PMID:19060196

  14. Managing Movement as Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrell, Sinead

    2011-01-01

    The associate director of education at Hubbard Street Dance Chicago recounts her learning and teaching through managing the Movement as Partnership program. Included are detailed descriptions of encounters with teachers and students as they create choreography reflective of their inquiry into integrating dance and literacy arts curriculum in the…

  15. Psychogenic Movement Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty Ambar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychogenic movement Disorders (PMD may result from somatoform disorders, factitious disorders, malingering, depression anxiety disorders and less frequently, histrionic personality disorders. First recognized by Henry Head in early twentieth century, PMD s commonly encountered and clues to their differentiation from organic disease. A generally accepted management protocol has been outlined.

  16. Rhythm Training through Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveire, Janine H.

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that string playing, rhythm, pitch, and tone quality are all dependent on the movement and coordination of the player. Presents a rhythmic focus lesson plan for students who need improvement in rhythm skills. Includes a lesson plan diagram and suggested teacher resources. (CFR)

  17. Material and Affective Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lisa Rosén

    2014-01-01

    . The chapter traces the former pupil’s memories of physical and affective movements within the larger context of school and discovers surprisingly diverse modes of knowing, relating, and attending to things, teachers and classmates among and between the three generations. It thus taps into the rich realms...

  18. The Mastery of Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laban, Rudolf; Ullmann, Lisa

    In this third edition, some amendments and additions have been made to the original text, first published in 1950. As in past editions, the relationship between the inner motivation of movement and the outer functioning of the body is explored. Acting and dancing are shown as activities deeply concerned with man's urge to establish values and…

  19. [Architecture and movement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivallan, Armel

    2012-01-01

    Leading an architectural project means accompanying the movement which it induces within the teams. Between questioning, uncertainty and fear, the organisational changes inherent to the new facility must be subject to constructive and ongoing exchanges. Ethics, safety and training are revised and the unit projects are sometimes modified.

  20. Music, Movement, and Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Karla D.

    This paper's premise is that music, movement, and poetry are unique and creative methods to be used by the counselor in working with both children and adults. Through these media, the counselor generates material for the counseling session that may not be available through more traditional "talk therapies." The choice of music as a counseling…

  1. Editorial: Body Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Assuncao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, the juxtaposition between physical bodies and the gameworld is ever more fluid. Virtual Reality headsets are available at game stores with more AAA games being created for the format. The release of the Nintendo Switch and its dynamic JoyCon controllers reintroduce haptic movement based controls.  Pokémon GO’s augmented reality took gamers outdoors and has encouraged the Harry Potter franchise to follow in its mobile footsteps. Each development encourages a step further into the digital world. At the same time, the movement of bodies always has political dimensions. We live in a world where walls seem like solutions to the movement of bodies, while the mere meeting of bodies elsewhere – for sex, marriage and other reasons – is still forbidden by many states’ rules. Games and game-like interfaces have shown the ability to bend those rules, and to sometimes project other worlds and rule systems over our world in order to make bodies move and meet. For this special issue on ‘Body Movements’, Press Start invited authors to focus on embodiment, body movements, political bodies, community bodies, virtual bodies, physical bodies, feminine, masculine, trans- bodies, agency or its lack, and anything else in between. The response to this invitation was variegated, and provocative, as outlined here.

  2. Studying Social Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldam, Julie; McCurdy, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    and then draws specific links to how the method has been used in the study of activism and social movements. In doing so, this article brings together key academic debates on participant observation, which have been considered separately, such as insider/outsider and overt/covert, but not previously been brought...

  3. Measuring Facial Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Paul; Friesen, Wallace V.

    1976-01-01

    The Facial Action Code (FAC) was derived from an analysis of the anatomical basis of facial movement. The development of the method is explained, contrasting it to other methods of measuring facial behavior. An example of how facial behavior is measured is provided, and ideas about research applications are discussed. (Author)

  4. Movement: A Clinical Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Dalaie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: One major drawback of orthodontic treatment is its long duration due to slow tooth movement and the pain at the onset of treatment following application of forces. There is controversy regarding the efficacy of laser for decreasing the treatment time and pain of orthodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of low level diode laser on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and the associated pain.Materials and Methods: In this double blind randomized controlled clinical trial, 12 or- thodontic patients referring to Shahid Beheshti School of Dentistry for first premolar ex- traction were randomly selected and allocated to gallium aluminum-arsenide laser (Ga,Al,As diode laser, 880 nm, 100 mW, 5 j/cm2, 8 points, 80 seconds, continuous mode or control group. The patients initially underwent leveling and alignment using the sectional system. Force (150 gr was applied to each canine tooth via sectional closing loops. The loops were activated every month. The rate of tooth movement and pain were monitored over the treatment period and recorded on days 1, 3, 7, 30, 33, 37, 60, 63 and 67. Two-way ANOVA was used for comparison of groups.Results: There was no significant difference in terms of tooth movement and pain scores between the irradiated and non-irradiated sides at any time point (P>0.05.Conclusion: Although laser enhanced orthodontic tooth movement in the upper jaw, we failed to provide solid evidence to support the efficacy of laser for expediting tooth move- ment or reducing the associated pain.

  5. Diffusion of Brownian particles in a tilted periodic potential under the influence of an external Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhan-Wu; Zhang, Wei

    2018-01-01

    The diffusion behaviors of Brownian particles in a tilted periodic potential under the influence of an internal white noise and an external Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise are investigated through numerical simulation. In contrast to the case when the bias force is smaller or absent, the diffusion coefficient exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence on the correlation time of the external noise when bias force is large. A mechanism different from locked-to-running transition theory is presented for the diffusion enhancement by a bias force in intermediate to large damping. In the underdamped regime and the presence of external noise, the diffusion coefficient is a monotonically decreasing function of low temperature rather than a nonmonotonic function when external noise is absent. The diffusive process undergoes four regimes when bias force approaches but is less than its critical value and noises intensities are small. These behaviors can be attributed to the locked-to-running transition of particles.

  6. Two-time correlation and occupation time for the Brownian bridge and tied-down renewal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godrèche, Claude

    2017-07-01

    Tied-down renewal processes are generalisations of the Brownian bridge, where an event (or a zero crossing) occurs both at the origin of time and at the final observation time t. We give an analytical derivation of the two-time correlation function for such processes in the Laplace space of all temporal variables. This yields the exact asymptotic expression of the correlation in the Porod regime of short separations between the two times and in the persistence regime of large separations. We also investigate other quantities, such as the backward and forward recurrence times, as well as the occupation time of the process. The latter has a broad distribution which is determined exactly. Physical implications of these results for the Poland Scheraga and related models are given. These results also give exact answers to questions posed in the past in the context of stochastically evolving surfaces.

  7. Residual mean first-passage time for jump processes: theory and applications to Levy flights and fractional Brownian motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, V; Benichou, O; Voituriez, R [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de la Matiere Condensee (UMR 7600), Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75255 Paris Cedex (France); Metzler, Ralf, E-mail: voiturie@lptmc.jussieu.fr [Physics Department, Technical University of Munich, James Franck Strasse, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2011-06-24

    We derive a functional equation for the mean first-passage time (MFPT) of a generic self-similar Markovian continuous process to a target in a one-dimensional domain and obtain its exact solution. We show that the obtained expression of the MFPT for continuous processes is actually different from the large system size limit of the MFPT for discrete jump processes allowing leapovers. In the case considered here, the asymptotic MFPT admits non-vanishing corrections, which we call residual MFPT. The case of Levy flights with diverging variance of jump lengths is investigated in detail, in particular, with respect to the associated leapover behavior. We also show numerically that our results apply with good accuracy to fractional Brownian motion, despite its non-Markovian nature.

  8. Identification of Nonstandard Multifractional Brownian Motions under White Noise by Multiscale Local Variations of Its Sample Paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Il Ahn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hurst exponent and variance are two quantities that often characterize real-life, high-frequency observations. Such real-life signals are generally measured under noise environments. We develop a multiscale statistical method for simultaneous estimation of a time-changing Hurst exponent H(t and a variance parameter C in a multifractional Brownian motion model in the presence of white noise. The method is based on the asymptotic behavior of the local variation of its sample paths which applies to coarse scales of the sample paths. This work provides stable and simultaneous estimators of both parameters when independent white noise is present. We also discuss the accuracy of the simultaneous estimators compared with a few selected methods and the stability of computations with regard to adapted wavelet filters.

  9. Overlap of movement planning and movement execution reduces reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban de Xivry, Jean-Jacques; Legrain, Valéry; Lefèvre, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Motor planning is the process of preparing the appropriate motor commands in order to achieve a goal. This process has largely been thought to occur before movement onset and traditionally has been associated with reaction time. However, in a virtual line bisection task we observed an overlap between movement planning and execution. In this task performed with a robotic manipulandum, we observed that participants (n = 30) made straight movements when the line was in front of them (near target) but often made curved movements when the same target was moved sideways (far target, which had the same orientation) in such a way that they crossed the line perpendicular to its orientation. Unexpectedly, movements to the far targets had shorter reaction times than movements to the near targets (mean difference: 32 ms, SE: 5 ms, max: 104 ms). In addition, the curvature of the movement modulated reaction time. A larger increase in movement curvature from the near to the far target was associated with a larger reduction in reaction time. These highly curved movements started with a transport phase during which accuracy demands were not taken into account. We conclude that an accuracy demand imposes a reaction time penalty if processed before movement onset. This penalty is reduced if the start of the movement consists of a transport phase and if the movement plan can be refined with respect to accuracy demands later in the movement, hence demonstrating an overlap between movement planning and execution. In the planning of a movement, the brain has the opportunity to delay the incorporation of accuracy requirements of the motor plan in order to reduce the reaction time by up to 100 ms (average: 32 ms). Such shortening of reaction time is observed here when the first phase of the movement consists of a transport phase. This forces us to reconsider the hypothesis that motor plans are fully defined before movement onset. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Aging underdamped scaled Brownian motion: Ensemble- and time-averaged particle displacements, nonergodicity, and the failure of the overdamping approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdari, Hadiseh; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Chechkin, Aleksei V.; Bodrova, Anna; Metzler, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    We investigate both analytically and by computer simulations the ensemble- and time-averaged, nonergodic, and aging properties of massive particles diffusing in a medium with a time dependent diffusivity. We call this stochastic diffusion process the (aging) underdamped scaled Brownian motion (UDSBM). We demonstrate how the mean squared displacement (MSD) and the time-averaged MSD of UDSBM are affected by the inertial term in the Langevin equation, both at short, intermediate, and even long diffusion times. In particular, we quantify the ballistic regime for the MSD and the time-averaged MSD as well as the spread of individual time-averaged MSD trajectories. One of the main effects we observe is that, both for the MSD and the time-averaged MSD, for superdiffusive UDSBM the ballistic regime is much shorter than for ordinary Brownian motion. In contrast, for subdiffusive UDSBM, the ballistic region extends to much longer diffusion times. Therefore, particular care needs to be taken under what conditions the overdamped limit indeed provides a correct description, even in the long time limit. We also analyze to what extent ergodicity in the Boltzmann-Khinchin sense in this nonstationary system is broken, both for subdiffusive and superdiffusive UDSBM. Finally, the limiting case of ultraslow UDSBM is considered, with a mixed logarithmic and power-law dependence of the ensemble- and time-averaged MSDs of the particles. In the limit of strong aging, remarkably, the ordinary UDSBM and the ultraslow UDSBM behave similarly in the short time ballistic limit. The approaches developed here open ways for considering other stochastic processes under physically important conditions when a finite particle mass and aging in the system cannot be neglected.

  11. Mindfulness-Based Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Alexander R; Klepin, Heidi D; Porges, Stephen W; Rejeski, W Jack

    2016-12-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that physical activity is an effective intervention for cancer survivors, including for those undergoing active cancer treatments. However, to date most evidence has emerged from interventions that have promoted moderate to vigorous physical activity. In this conceptual review, we argue that attention should be given to the entire continuum of physical activity from reducing sedentary behavior to increasing higher levels of physical activity when possible. In addition, considerable evidence in the cancer literature supports the value of mindfulness-based interventions as a means of helping patients and survivors cope with the variety of threats that accompany this disease. Based on the success of these two areas of research, we argue for conceptualizing and promoting physical activity as Mindfulness-Based Movement, using Polyvagal Theory as a theoretical framework to understand the role and value of Mindfulness-Based Movement as a potential intervention for cancer care and control.

  12. [Neuropsychiatry Of Movement Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orjuela-Rojas, Juan Manuel; Barrios Vincos, Gustavo Adolfo; Martínez Gallego, Melisa Alejandra

    2017-10-01

    Movement disorders can be defined as neurological syndromes presenting with excessive or diminished automatic or voluntary movements not related to weakness or spasticity. Both Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD) are well-known examples of these syndromes. The high prevalence of comorbid psychiatric symptoms like depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, hallucinations, delusions, impulsivity, sleep disorders, apathy and cognitive impairment mean that these conditions must be regarded as neuropsychiatric diseases. In this article, we review neuroanatomical (structural and functional), psychopathological and neuropsychological aspects of PD and HD. The role of fronto-subcortical loops in non-motor functions is particularly emphasised in order to understand the clinical spectrum of both diseases, together with the influence of genetic, psychological and psychosocial aspects. A brief description of the main psychopharmacological approaches for both diseases is also included. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Studying frozen movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy White

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of Spyros Papapetros, On the Animation of the Inorganic: Art, Architecture, and the Extension of Life: Spyros Papapetros examines ideas about simulated movement and inorganic life during and after the turn of the twentieth century. Exploring works of a selection of important art historians as well as artists and architects of the period, the author maintains that the ability to identify with material objects was repressed by modernist culture, and yet found expression stylistically through depictions of inorganic forms. That expression is shown to have continuity with older medieval and renaissance depictions. The book is organized by a narrative that evokes the modes of inquiry documented and critiqued by the content of the book, employing movement as a narrative device, a metaphor, while serving as a subject of inquiry.

  14. UAVs and Patient Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    space.”62 UAVs were initially utilized for intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance , and targeting missions.63 However, UAVs are now being designed...AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY UAVs and PATIENT MOVEMENT by Brian R Blanchard, Major, USAF Doctor...time to care for wounded Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines lies in the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles ( UAVs ) for patient transport. An

  15. Confronting Islamic Jihadist Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Afzal Upal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that in order to win the long-term fight against Islamic Jihadist movements, we must confront their ideological foundations and provide the majority of Muslims with an alternative narrative that satisfies their social identity needs for a positive esteem.  By analysing social identity dynamics of Western-Muslim interactions, this paper presents some novel ideas that can lead to the creation of such a narrative.

  16. Monitoring underground movements

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    On 16 September 2015 at 22:54:33 (UTC), an 8.3-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of Chile. 11,650 km away, at CERN, a new-generation instrument – the Precision Laser Inclinometer (PLI) – recorded the extreme event. The PLI is being tested by a JINR/CERN/ATLAS team to measure the movements of underground structures and detectors.   The Precision Laser Inclinometer during assembly. The instrument has proven very accurate when taking measurements of the movements of underground structures at CERN.    The Precision Laser Inclinometer is an extremely sensitive device capable of monitoring ground angular oscillations in a frequency range of 0.001-1 Hz with a precision of 10-10 rad/Hz1/2. The instrument is currently installed in one of the old ISR transfer tunnels (TT1) built in 1970. However, its final destination could be the ATLAS cavern, where it would measure and monitor the fine movements of the underground structures, which can affect the precise posi...

  17. Movement Disorders and Neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward A. Shipton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders are neurological conditions affecting speed, fluency, quality, and ease of movement. Deep brain stimulation (DBS is used to treat advanced Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. Possible target sites for DBS include the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus, the globus pallidus internus, and the subthalamic nucleus. High-frequency DBS leads to a kind of functional deafferentation of the stimulated structure and to the modulation of cortical activity. This has a profound effect on the efficiency of movement. Indications for the use of DBS include the need to improve function, reduce medication dependency, and avoid ablative neurosurgery. Appropriate patient selection is critical for success. The implantation technique is briefly described. Programming stimulation parameters are performed via telemetry. The adverse effects of DBS are discussed. The future should see the development of “closed-loop” systems. Its use has promoted interdisciplinary team work and provided an improved understanding of the complex neurocircuitry associated with these disorders. DBS is a highly effective, safe, and reversible surgical treatment for advanced Parkinson’s disease, tremor, and dystonia. It is a useful therapeutic option in carefully selected patients that significantly improves motor symptoms, functional status, and quality of life.

  18. Paralyzed Patients Regain Voluntary Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Spinal Cord Stimulation Paralyzed Patients Regain Voluntary Movement Past Issues / Summer ... a lifelong sentence of permanent paralysis." Read More "Spinal Cord Stimulation" Articles Paralyzed Patients Regain Voluntary Movement / Progress in ...

  19. Human preference for air movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Tynel, A.

    2002-01-01

    Human preference for air movement was studied at slightly cool, neutral, and slightly warm overall thermal sensations and at temperatures ranging from 18 deg.C to 28 deg.C. Air movement preference depended on both thermal sensation and temperature, but large inter-individual differences existed...... between subjects. Preference for less air movement was linearly correlated with draught discomfort, but the percentage of subjects who felt draught was lower than the percentage who preferred less air movement....

  20. Antiglobalization movements and their critics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corry, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Antiglobalization movements are transnational social movements that challenge what they perceive as a monolithic global laissez-faire economic regime. From the 1990s, these movements have accused global political and economic networks of delivering too much power to dominant elites at the expense...... of ideological incoherence, self-interested protectionism, and illiberal and undemocratic political methods, and point to Western liberal elite dominance within the movements. The debate has ...

  1. Eye movements when viewing advertisements

    OpenAIRE

    Emily eHiggins; Mallorie eLeinenger; Keith eRayner

    2014-01-01

    In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind ...

  2. Social Movements and Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francisca Pinheiro Coelho

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study approaches the relationship between social movements and institutions in Brazil concerning three different stages of the process of re-democratization: the political transition; the National Constituent Assembly; and the new Constitutional Order. The general question is: what is the interface, reciprocity or conflict, between social movements and institutions in this context of social change? The paper examines the different roles of social movements and institutions in each specific period: in the pre-democratization moment, the movement for direct elections for president, Diretas-Já, is analyzed; in the National Constituent Assembly, the movement in defense for free public education is examined;  in the new constitutional order, the pro-reform political movement is studied.  The work focuses on the scope of the studies on social movements and democracy.  It belongs to the field of the studies about the representativeness and legitimacy of the demands of social movements in the context of democracy and its challenges. Key words: social movement, institution, reciprocity, conflict, democracy.   Social Movements and Institutions                               Resumen El estudio aborda la relación entre los movimientos sociales e instituciones en Brasil en tres etapas diferentes del proceso de redemocratización en las últimas décadas: la transición política; la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente; y el nuevo orden constitucional. La pregunta general es: ¿cuál es la relación, la reciprocidad o el conflito, entre los movimientos sociales y las instituciones en este contexto de cambio social? El artículo examina los diferentes roles de los movimientos sociales e instituciones en cada período específico: en el momento de la transición política analiza el movimiento de las elecciones directas para presidente, las Diretas-Já; en la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente aborda el movimiento en

  3. Diagnosing disconjugate eye movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Alessandro; Liao, Ke; Matta, Manuela; Leigh, R John

    2008-01-01

    Background: Saccades are fast eye movements that conjugately shift the point of fixation between distant features of interest in the visual environment. Several disorders, affecting sites from brainstem to extraocular muscle, may cause horizontal saccades to become disconjugate. Prior techniques for detection of saccadic disconjugacy, especially in internuclear ophthalmoparesis (INO), have compared only one point in abducting vs adducting saccades, such as peak velocity. Methods: We applied a phase-plane technique that compared each eye’s velocity as a function of change in position (normalized displacement) in 22 patients with disease variously affecting the brainstem reticular formation, the abducens nucleus, the medial longitudinal fasciculus, the oculomotor nerve, the abducens nerve, the neuromuscular junction, or the extraocular muscles; 10 age-matched subjects served as controls. Results: We found three different patterns of disconjugacy throughout the course of horizontal saccades: early abnormal velocity disconjugacy during the first 10% of the displacement in patients with INO, oculomotor or abducens nerve palsy, and advanced extraocular muscle disease; late disconjugacy in patients with disease affecting the neuromuscular junction; and variable middle-course disconjugacy in patients with pontine lesions. When normal subjects made disconjugate saccades between two targets aligned on one eye, the initial part of the movement remained conjugate. Conclusions: Along with conventional measures of saccades, such as peak velocity, phase planes provide a useful tool to determine the site, extent, and pathogenesis of disconjugacy. We hypothesize that the pale global extraocular muscle fibers, which drive the high-acceleration component of saccades, receive a neural command that ensures initial ocular conjugacy. GLOSSARY Abd. = abducens; CN = cranial nerve; CPEO = chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia; EM = eye movement; H = horizontal; INO = internuclear

  4. Knowledge through movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Kjær; Moser, T.

    2003-01-01

    In: Children and adolescents in movement - perspectives and ideas. The Danish Ministry of Culture, pages 150 - 162. 2003 Short description: the article debunks a lot of the myths surrounding body and learning, and replace them with a vision about another kind of learning. The aim is to reintroduce....... The current focus on the head and lack of attention to the body unifies society to focus on cognitive learning. This has implications for the values created by this system. Learning Lab Denmark aims to examine new ways of reintroducing the body into learning....

  5. Mungiki as Youth Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Like many other African countries, Kenya has a large and growing youth population. Some of the youths are mobilized into militant and political networks; one of these is the Mungiki movement. The article explores Mungiki’s combination of politics, religion and Kikuyu traditions. Using the examples...... of snuff tobacco, revolutionary talk and generational exclusion, it is argued that one way of understanding the connection between the various elements is to look at specific youth practices that cut across apparently separate activities. This reveals that youth in the Mungiki discourse is a highly...

  6. The Matter of Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayres, Phil

    2015-01-01

    This contribution concerns itself with the design and realisation of architectures that operate with material dynamics. It presents this concern as a counter to the consideration of movement in architecture as something conceptualised from the position of the observer. The contribution draws upon...... research from the Centre for Information Technology and Architecture (CITA) which has recently focused upon the investigation of materially active systems ranging from textile logics at architectural scale to bending active structures in both natural and synthetic fibre-based composites...... at the intersection between architecture (considered as both practice and spatial construct) and digital technologies....

  7. West African Antislavery Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahonou, Eric Komlavi; Pelckmans, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    the penal code of Mali. Anti-slavery activists not only address their claims to their national governments but also intend to initiate change at local level. In that respect the democratic decentralization reforms were significant because they allowed educated anti-slavery activists to appeal their brethren...... to unite, mobilize and struggle. Members of anti-slavery movements with slave origins accessed power positions through peaceful electoral processes in Benin, mali, Niger and Mauritania. People of slave origins gained ground in local politics of a number of municipalities. In localities where anti...

  8. Stereotypic movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Harvey S

    2011-01-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive, rhythmic, fixed, patterned in form, amplitude, and localization, but purposeless (e.g., hand shaking, waving, body rocking, head nodding). They are commonly seen in children; both in normal children (primary stereotypy) and in individuals with additional behavioral or neurological signs and symptoms (secondary stereotypy). They should be differentiated from compulsions (OCD), tics (tic disorders), trichotillomania, skin picking disorder, or the direct physiological effect of a substance. There is increasing evidence to support a neurobiological mechanism. Response to behavioral and pharmacological therapies is variable. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Energy and Movement

    CERN Document Server

    90, Sol

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, Energy and Movement, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  10. Magneto hall effect on unsteady elastico-viscous nanofluid slip flow in a channel in presence of thermal radiation and heat generation with Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, M. Enamul; Samad, M. Abdus; Ferdows, M.

    2017-06-01

    The present note investigates the magneto hall effect on unsteady flow of elastico-viscous nanofluid in a channel with slip boundary considering the presence of thermal radiation and heat generation with Brownian motion. Numerical results are achieved by solving the governing equations by the implicit Finite Difference Method (FDM) obtaining primary and secondary velocities, temperature, nanoparticles volume fraction and concentration distributions within the boundary layer entering into the problem. The influences of several interesting parameters such as elastico-viscous parameter, magnetic field, hall parameter, heat generation, thermal radiation and Brownian motion parameters on velocity, heat and mass transfer characteristics of the fluid flow are discussed with the help of graphs. Also the effects of the pertinent parameters, which are of physical and engineering interest, such as Skin friction parameter, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are sorted out. It is found that the flow field and other quantities of physical concern are significantly influenced by these parameters.

  11. Statistical mechanical theory for steady state systems. VIII. General theory for a Brownian particle driven by a time- and space-varying force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Phil; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2008-03-21

    A Brownian particle subject to a time- and space-varying force is studied with the second entropy theory for nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. A fluctuation expression is obtained for the second entropy of the path, and this is maximized to obtain the most likely path of the particle. Two approaches are used, one based on the velocity correlation function and one based on the position correlation function. The approaches are a perturbation about the free particle result and are exact for weak external forces. They provide a particularly simple way of including memory effects in time-varying driven diffusion. The theories are tested against computer simulation data for a Brownian particle trapped in an oscillating parabolic well. They accurately predict the phase lag and amplitude as a function of drive frequency, and they account quantitatively for the memory effects that are important at high frequencies and that are missing in the simplest Langevin equation.

  12. Embodied health movements: new approaches to social movements in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Phil; Zavestoski, Stephen; McCormick, Sabrina; Mayer, Brian; Morello-Frosch, Rachel; Gasior Altman, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Social movements organised around health-related issues have been studied for almost as long as they have existed, yet social movement theory has not yet been applied to these movements. Health social movements (HSMs) are centrally organised around health, and address: (a) access to or provision of health care services; (b) health inequality and inequity based on race, ethnicity, gender, class and/or sexuality; and/or (c) disease, illness experience, disability and contested illness. HSMs can be subdivided into three categories: health access movements seek equitable access to health care and improved provision of health care services; constituency-based health movements address health inequality and health inequity based on race, ethnicity, gender, class and/or sexuality differences; and embodied health movements (EHMs) address disease, disability or illness experience by challenging science on etiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention. These groups address disproportionate outcomes and oversight by the scientific community and/or weak science. This article focuses on embodied health movements, primarily in the US. These are unique in three ways: 1) they introduce the biological body to social movements, especially with regard to the embodied experience of people with the disease; 2) they typically include challenges to existing medical/scientific knowledge and practice; and 3) they often involve activists collaborating with scientists and health professionals in pursuing treatment, prevention, research and expanded funding. This article employs various elements of social movement theory to offer an approach to understanding embodied health movements, and provides a capsule example of one such movement, the environmental breast cancer movement.

  13. CONTROLS ON CAPITAL MOVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petris Sorina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, capital mobility was encouraged across national borders, because it was considered that such capital can seek the highest rate of return. However, recent global financial developments have shown that, due to contagion, the mobility of capital flows can cause severe financial imbalances. In the context of globalization, liberalization or maintaining controls on capital flows is a current topic, more debated by economists. This topic is very important, due to the impact of liberalization decision or maintaining controls on capital flows has on the overall macroeconomic framework. The paper analyzes the relationship between capital flows’ control and the income per capita, the degree of central bank independence, democracy country, the foreign exchange regime. Also, it analyzes the effectiveness in time of capital controls, taking account of financial system development and potential risks of instability. Over time, it was observed that a period in which they have imposed restrictions on capital movements was followed by a removal of such restrictions, and vice versa. Cyclic change of capital movements regime corresponds to the cyclic evolution of the global economy. Full capital account liberalization led to the emergence of currency and financial crises, so that the idea of maintaining controls on capital is not rejected by economists. After a full liberalization of capital flows, there is a change in the mentality of an increasing number of economists, who support the maintenance of controls, in a gradual liberalization.

  14. Supranuclear eye movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, João; Eggenberger, Eric

    2014-11-01

    This work reviews supranuclear ocular motor disorders, highlighting new data published during the past year. Perceptional adaptative mechanisms may explain recent research concerning the discrepancy between objective measurement of saccade abnormalities and their putative functional visual impairment. Eye movement classes seem to be selectively disrupted by different neurodegenerative disorders. Deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease patients may improve pursuit deficits, highlighting the role of basal ganglia in the control of smooth pursuit. Subcortical optokinetic pathways seem to play an important role in maintaining the monocular nasotemporal optokinetic asymmetry seen in patients with infantile esotropia. Vergence-vestibular interaction has been further delineated in patients with idiopathic bilateral vestibular failure. Pharmacological treatment of central vestibular disorders with 4-aminopyridine has been extended to patients with ataxia-telangiectasia in whom it seems to reduce slow-phase velocity of nystagmus. Recent data derived from anatomic and functional imaging studies are providing new insights into supranuclear ocular motor circuitry. Novel pharmacological and surgical therapies may have future implications in visual and vestibular rehabilitation of patients with supranuclear eye movement disorders.

  15. Fractionalization of the complex-valued Brownian motion of order n using Riemann-Liouville derivative. Applications to mathematical finance and stochastic mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jumarie, Guy [Department of Mathematics, University of Quebec at Montreal, P.O. Box 8888, Downtown Station, Montreal, QC, H3C 3P8 (Canada)]. E-mail: jumarie.guy@uqam.ca

    2006-06-15

    The (complex-valued) Brownian motion of order n is defined as the limit of a random walk on the complex roots of the unity. Real-valued fractional noises are obtained as fractional derivatives of the Gaussian white noise (or order two). Here one combines these two approaches and one considers the new class of fractional noises obtained as fractional derivative of the complex-valued Brownian motion of order n. The key of the approach is the relation between differential and fractional differential provided by the fractional Taylor's series of analytic function f(z+h)=E{sub {alpha}}(h{sup {alpha}}D{sub z}{sup {alpha}}).f(z), where E{sub {alpha}} is the Mittag-Leffler function on the one hand, and the generalized Maruyama's notation, on the other hand. Some questions are revisited such as the definition of fractional Brownian motion as integral w.r.t. (dt){sup {alpha}}, and the exponential growth equation driven by fractional Brownian motion, to which a new solution is proposed. As a first illustrative example of application, in mathematical finance, one proposes a new approach to the optimal management of a stochastic portfolio of fractional order via the Lagrange variational technique applied to the state moment dynamical equations. In the second example, one deals with non-random Lagrangian mechanics of fractional order. The last example proposes a new approach to fractional stochastic mechanics, and the solution so obtained gives rise to the question as to whether physical systems would not have their own internal random times.

  16. Rotation of Magnetization Derived from Brownian Relaxation in Magnetic Fluids of Different Viscosity Evaluated by Dynamic Hysteresis Measurements over a Wide Frequency Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ota

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of magnetic relaxation on particle parameters, such as the size and anisotropy, has been conventionally discussed. In addition, the influences of external conditions, such as the intensity and frequency of the applied field, the surrounding viscosity, and the temperature on the magnetic relaxation have been researched. According to one of the basic theories regarding magnetic relaxation, the faster type of relaxation dominates the process. However, in this study, we reveal that Brownian and Néel relaxations coexist and that Brownian relaxation can occur after Néel relaxation despite having a longer relaxation time. To understand the mechanisms of Brownian rotation, alternating current (AC hysteresis loops were measured in magnetic fluids of different viscosities. These loops conveyed the amplitude and phase delay of the magnetization. In addition, the intrinsic loss power (ILP was calculated using the area of the AC hysteresis loops. The ILP also showed the magnetization response regarding the magnetic relaxation over a wide frequency range. To develop biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles, such as hyperthermia and magnetic particle imaging, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms of magnetic relaxation.

  17. Framing the features of Brownian motion and thermophoresis on radiative nanofluid flow past a rotating stretching sheet with magnetohydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mabood

    Full Text Available This article addresses the combined effects of chemical reaction and viscous dissipation on MHD radiative heat and mass transfer of nanofluid flow over a rotating stretching surface. The model used for the nanofluid incorporates the effects of the Brownian motion and thermophoresis in the presence of heat source. Similarity transformation variables have been used to model the governing equations of momentum, energy, and nanoparticles concentration. Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method with shooting technique is applied to solve the resulting coupled ordinary differential equations. Physical features for all pertinent parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient, and heat and mass transfer rates are analyzed graphically. The numerical comparison has also presented for skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number as a special case for our study. It is noted that fluid velocity enhances when rotational parameter is increased. Surface heat transfer rate enhances for larger values of Prandtl number and heat source parameter while mass transfer rate increases for larger values of chemical reaction parameter. Keywords: Nanofluid, MHD, Chemical reaction, Rotating stretching sheet, Radiation

  18. Evaluation of Underground Zinc Mine Investment Based on Fuzzy-Interval Grey System Theory and Geometric Brownian Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Gligoric

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Underground mine projects are often associated with diverse sources of uncertainties. Having the ability to plan for these uncertainties plays a key role in the process of project evaluation and is increasingly recognized as critical to mining project success. To make the best decision, based on the information available, it is necessary to develop an adequate model incorporating the uncertainty of the input parameters. The model is developed on the basis of full discounted cash flow analysis of an underground zinc mine project. The relationships between input variables and economic outcomes are complex and often nonlinear. Fuzzy-interval grey system theory is used to forecast zinc metal prices while geometric Brownian motion is used to forecast operating costs over the time frame of the project. To quantify the uncertainty in the parameters within a project, such as capital investment, ore grade, mill recovery, metal content of concentrate, and discount rate, we have applied the concept of interval numbers. The final decision related to project acceptance is based on the net present value of the cash flows generated by the simulation over the time project horizon.

  19. Oil prices. Brownian motion or mean reversion? A study using a one year ahead density forecast criterion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meade, Nigel [Imperial College, Business School London (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-15

    For oil related investment appraisal, an accurate description of the evolving uncertainty in the oil price is essential. For example, when using real option theory to value an investment, a density function for the future price of oil is central to the option valuation. The literature on oil pricing offers two views. The arbitrage pricing theory literature for oil suggests geometric Brownian motion and mean reversion models. Empirically driven literature suggests ARMA-GARCH models. In addition to reflecting the volatility of the market, the density function of future prices should also incorporate the uncertainty due to price jumps, a common occurrence in the oil market. In this study, the accuracy of density forecasts for up to a year ahead is the major criterion for a comparison of a range of models of oil price behaviour, both those proposed in the literature and following from data analysis. The Kullbach Leibler information criterion is used to measure the accuracy of density forecasts. Using two crude oil price series, Brent and West Texas Intermediate (WTI) representing the US market, we demonstrate that accurate density forecasts are achievable for up to nearly two years ahead using a mixture of two Gaussians innovation processes with GARCH and no mean reversion. (author)

  20. Atomic detail brownian dynamics simulations of concentrated protein solutions with a mean field treatment of hydrodynamic interactions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-07-26

    High macromolecular concentrations are a distinguishing feature of living organisms. Understanding how the high concentration of solutes affects the dynamic properties of biological macromolecules is fundamental for the comprehension of biological processes in living systems. In this paper, we describe the implementation of mean field models of translational and rotational hydrodynamic interactions into an atomically detailed many-protein brownian dynamics simulation method. Concentrated solutions (30-40% volume fraction) of myoglobin, hemoglobin A, and sickle cell hemoglobin S were simulated, and static structure factors, oligomer formation, and translational and rotational self-diffusion coefficients were computed. Good agreement of computed properties with available experimental data was obtained. The results show the importance of both solvent mediated interactions and weak protein-protein interactions for accurately describing the dynamics and the association properties of concentrated protein solutions. Specifically, they show a qualitative difference in the translational and rotational dynamics of the systems studied. Although the translational diffusion coefficient is controlled by macromolecular shape and hydrodynamic interactions, the rotational diffusion coefficient is affected by macromolecular shape, direct intermolecular interactions, and both translational and rotational hydrodynamic interactions.

  1. Processive pectin methylesterases: the role of electrostatic potential, breathing motions and bond cleavage in the rectification of Brownian motions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Mercadante

    Full Text Available Pectin methylesterases (PMEs hydrolyze the methylester groups that are found on the homogalacturonan (HG chains of pectic polysaccharides in the plant cell wall. Plant and bacterial PMEs are especially interesting as the resulting de-methylesterified (carboxylated sugar residues are found to be arranged contiguously, indicating a so-called processive nature of these enzymes. Here we report the results of continuum electrostatics calculations performed along the molecular dynamics trajectory of a PME-HG-decasaccharide complex. In particular it was observed that, when the methylester groups of the decasaccharide were arranged in order to mimic the just-formed carboxylate product of de-methylesterification, a net unidirectional sliding of the model decasaccharide was subsequently observed along the enzyme's binding groove. The changes that occurred in the electrostatic binding energy and protein dynamics during this translocation provide insights into the mechanism by which the enzyme rectifies Brownian motions to achieve processivity. The free energy that drives these molecular motors is thus demonstrated to be incorporated endogenously in the methylesterified groups of the HG chains and is not supplied exogenously.

  2. Rheology and ordering transitions of non-Brownian suspensions in a confined shear flow: effects of external torques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Kyongmin; Maxey, Martin R

    2010-06-01

    We investigate the effect of an external torque, applied in the vorticity direction, to particles in a sheared non-Brownian suspension confined by rigid walls. At volume fractions of ϕ=0.48-0.52 such suspension flows undergo an ordering transition, developing a hexagonal structure of particle strings in the velocity gradient-vorticity plane. The hexagonal structure is disturbed by negative torques, leading to an increase in the shear viscosity. Positive torque has a favorable effect on the ordered state. However, if the magnitude of the positive torque exceeds a certain threshold, the hexagonal order begins to be weakened. Due to the significant changes in suspension microstructures, rheological parameters such as the shear and vortex viscosities exhibit nonlinear responses to the external torques. On the other hand, at lower volume fractions ϕ≤0.40, where ordered structures are not developed, suspension microstructure is not sensitive to an external torque and the apparent viscosity is a linear function of the torque.

  3. Theoretical Investigation on Particle Brownian Motion on Micro-air-bubble Characteristic in H2O Solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eka Putri, Irana; Gita Redhyka, Grace

    2017-07-01

    Micro-air-bubble has a high potential contribution in waste water, farming, and fishery treatment. In this research, submicron scale of micro-air-bubble was observed to determine its stability in H2O solvent. By increasing its stability, it can be used for several applications, such as bio-preservative for medical and food transport. The micro-air-bubble was assumed in spherical shape that in incompressible gas boundary condition. So, the random motion of particle (Brownian motion) can be solved by using Stokes-Einstein approximation. But, Hadamard and Rybczynski equation is promoted to solve for larger bubble (micro scale). While, the effect of physical properties (e.g. diffusion coefficient, density, and flow rate) have taken important role in its characteristics in water. According to the theoretical investigation that have been done, decreasing of bubble velocity indicates that the bubble dissolves away or shrinking to the surface. To obtain longevity bubble in pure water medium, it is recomended to apply some surfactant molecules (e.g. NaCl) in micro-air-bubble medium.

  4. Two-dimensional nature of the active Brownian motion of catalytic microswimmers at solid and liquid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Kilian; Renggli, Damian; Zanini, Michele; Volpe, Giovanni; Buttinoni, Ivo; Isa, Lucio

    2017-06-01

    Colloidal particles equipped with platinum patches can establish chemical gradients in H2O2-enriched solutions and undergo self-propulsion due to local diffusiophoretic migration. In bulk (3D), this class of active particles swim in the direction of the surface heterogeneities introduced by the patches and consequently reorient with the characteristic rotational diffusion time of the colloids. In this article, we present experimental and numerical evidence that planar 2D confinements defy this simple picture. Instead, the motion of active particles both on solid substrates and at flat liquid-liquid interfaces is captured by a 2D active Brownian motion model, in which rotational and translational motion are constrained in the xy-plane. This leads to an active motion that does not follow the direction of the surface heterogeneities and to timescales of reorientation that do not match the free rotational diffusion times. Furthermore, 2D-confinement at fluid-fluid interfaces gives rise to a unique distribution of swimming velocities: the patchy colloids uptake two main orientations leading to two particle populations with velocities that differ up to one order of magnitude. Our results shed new light on the behavior of active colloids in 2D, which is of interest for modeling and applications where confinements are present.

  5. Flows and torques in Brownian ferrofluids subjected to rotating uniform magnetic fields in a cylindrical and annular geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Diaz, I.; Cortes, A.; Rinaldi, C., E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico 00681-9000 (United States); Cedeño-Mattei, Y. [Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico 00681-9019 (United States); Perales-Perez, O. [Department of Engineering Science and Materials, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico 00681-9044 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Ferrofluid flow in cylindrical and annular geometries under the influence of a uniform rotating magnetic field was studied experimentally using aqueous ferrofluids consisting of low concentrations (<0.01 v/v) of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with Brownian relaxation to test the ferrohydrodynamic equations, elucidate the existence of couple stresses, and determine the value of the spin viscosity in these fluids. An ultrasound technique was used to measure bulk velocity profiles in the spin-up (cylindrical) and annular geometries, varying the intensity and frequency of the rotating magnetic field generated by a two pole stator winding. Additionally, torque measurements in the cylindrical geometry were made. Results show rigid-body like velocity profiles in the bulk, and no dependence on the axial direction. Experimental velocity profiles were in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the spin diffusion theory, with a value of the spin viscosity of ∼10{sup −8} kg m/s, two orders of magnitude larger than the value estimated earlier for iron oxide based ferrofluids, and 12 orders of magnitude larger than estimated using dimensional arguments valid in the infinite dilution limit. These results provide further evidence of the existence of couple stresses in ferrofluids and their role in driving the spin-up flow phenomenon.

  6. Protein brownian rotation at the glass transition temperature of a freeze-concentrated buffer probed by superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloi, J-C; Okuda, M; Jones, S E Ward; Schwarzacher, W

    2013-06-18

    For applications from food science to the freeze-thawing of proteins it is important to understand the often complex freezing behavior of solutions of biomolecules. Here we use a magnetic method to monitor the Brownian rotation of a quasi-spherical cage-shaped protein, apoferritin, approaching the glass transition Tg in a freeze-concentrated buffer (Tris-HCl). The protein incorporates a synthetic magnetic nanoparticle (Co-doped Fe3O4 (magnetite)). We use the magnetic signal from the nanoparticles to monitor the protein orientation. As T decreases toward Tg of the buffer solution the protein's rotational relaxation time increases exponentially, taking values in the range from a few seconds up to thousands of seconds, i.e., orders of magnitude greater than usually accessed, e.g., by NMR. The longest relaxation times measured correspond to estimated viscosities >2 MPa s. As well as being a means to study low-temperature, high-viscosity environments, our method provides evidence that, for the cooling protocol used, the following applies: 1), the concentration of the freeze-concentrated buffer at Tg is independent of its initial concentration; 2), little protein adsorption takes place at the interface between ice and buffer; and 3), the protein is free to rotate even at temperatures as low as 207 K. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Brownian cluster dynamics with short range patchy interactions: Its application to polymers and step-growth polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, A.; Babu, S. B.; Dolado, J. S.; Gimel, J.-C.

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel simulation technique derived from Brownian cluster dynamics used so far to study the isotropic colloidal aggregation. It now implements the classical Kern-Frenkel potential to describe patchy interactions between particles. This technique gives access to static properties, dynamics and kinetics of the system, even far from the equilibrium. Particle thermal motions are modeled using billions of independent small random translations and rotations, constrained by the excluded volume and the connectivity. This algorithm, applied to a single polymer chain leads to correct static and dynamic properties, in the framework where hydrodynamic interactions are ignored. By varying patch angles, various local chain flexibilities can be obtained. We have used this new algorithm to model step-growth polymerization under various solvent qualities. The polymerization reaction is modeled by an irreversible aggregation between patches while an isotropic finite square-well potential is superimposed to mimic the solvent quality. In bad solvent conditions, a competition between a phase separation (due to the isotropic interaction) and polymerization (due to patches) occurs. Surprisingly, an arrested network with a very peculiar structure appears. It is made of strands and nodes. Strands gather few stretched chains that dip into entangled globular nodes. These nodes act as reticulation points between the strands. The system is kinetically driven and we observe a trapped arrested structure. That demonstrates one of the strengths of this new simulation technique. It can give valuable insights about mechanisms that could be involved in the formation of stranded gels.

  8. Tracking the Poster Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Hjorth

    2015-01-01

    in the Museum to expose the poster-image as a medium in its own artistic, technical, historical and popular right; the article examines the event as a sign holding core characteristics of a ‘poster movement’ prevailing during the interwar years. The period made a varied scene for exhibitions promoting...... commercial and graphic design of various kinds of which British and Foreign Posters offers a particularly rich example. The exhibition attracted commercial, artistic and curatorial forces substantiating the idea of a movement, and approached commercial art from a perspective that raised new awareness towards...... graphic material in urban and museum space alike. To clarify the curatorial approach the analysis draws on a theoretical scheme of ecological semiotics, the concept of counterability and contextualising displays, which I name poster milieux: the 1931 case demonstrates how contemporary commercial art...

  9. Air movement - good or bad?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    Air movement - good or bad? The question can only be answered by those who are exposed when they are exposed. Human perception of air movement depends on environmental factors including air velocity, air velocity fluctuations, air temperature, and personal factors such as overall thermal sensation...... and activity level. Even for the same individual, sensitivity to air movement may change from day to day as a result of e.g. different levels of fatigue. Based on existing literature, the current paper summarizes factors influencing the human perception of air movement and attempts to specify in general terms...... when air movement is desirable and when it is not. At temperatures up to 22-23oC, at sedentary activity and with occupants feeling neutral or cooler there is a risk of air movement being perceived as unacceptable, even at low velocities. In particular, a cool overall thermal sensation negatively...

  10. The movement ecology of seagrasses

    OpenAIRE

    McMahon, Kathryn; van Dijk, Kor-jent; Ruiz-Montoya, Leonardo; Kendrick, Gary A.; Krauss, Siegfried L.; Waycott, Michelle; Verduin, Jennifer; Lowe, Ryan; Statton, John; Brown, Eloise; Duarte, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    A movement ecology framework is applied to enhance our understanding of the causes, mechanisms and consequences of movement in seagrasses: marine, clonal, flowering plants. Four life-history stages of seagrasses can move: pollen, sexual propagules, vegetative fragments and the spread of individuals through clonal growth. Movement occurs on the water surface, in the water column, on or in the sediment, via animal vectors and through spreading clones. A capacity for long-distance dispersal and ...

  11. Teaching Movement Activities as Performativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens-Ole

    2017-01-01

    -teaching the movement activities must be integrated in the academic and creative subjects as active teaching and brain breaks etc. or as organized activities during the extended school day. Movement activities has become a part of all subjects and all teachers’ professional task. Since these movement activities...... but also according to the subject. The following teaching roles are identified: Organizer, participator, performer, observer, caregiver, classroom leader, mood creator and culture creator. Integrating movement activities in the everyday life in school not only seems to be a challenge it also seems...

  12. The Explanatory Range of Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Torben

    2005-01-01

    Drawing a distinction between systemic and functional explanations of movement in general, I shall argue that the Chomskyan view of movement in language is originally functional. With the advent of the Minimimalist Program, however, it has become systemic, but no argument for this change has been...... forthcoming. I'll then present data (from Danish) to sustain the view that only functional type explanations of movement can be empirically motivated, and these only if movement is reinterpreted as transition states between representations of different kinds....

  13. Bewitched - The Tea Party Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashbee, Edward

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the development of the Tea Party movement, the character of its thinking and the nature of the interests and constituencies to which it is tied. The article suggests that despite the importance of ideas and interests, and the process of interaction between them, the movement....... The political friction that this creates has contributed to the anger that has characterised the movement. While the Tea Party movement may, as such, have only an ephemeral existence, independent conservatives are likely to remain a significant and potent constituency and will, within the institutional...

  14. Arousal facilitates involuntary eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGirolamo, Gregory J; Patel, Neha; Blaukopf, Clare L

    2016-07-01

    Attention plays a critical role in action selection. However, the role of attention in eye movements is complicated as these movements can be either voluntary or involuntary, with, in some circumstances (antisaccades), these two actions competing with each other for execution. But attending to the location of an impending eye movement is only one facet of attention that may play a role in eye movement selection. In two experiments, we investigated the effect of arousal on voluntary eye movements (antisaccades) and involuntary eye movements (prosaccadic errors) in an antisaccade task. Arousal, as caused by brief loud sounds and indexed by changes in pupil diameter, had a facilitation effect on involuntary eye movements. Involuntary eye movements were both significantly more likely to be executed and significantly faster under arousal conditions (Experiments 1 and 2), and the influence of arousal had a specific time course (Experiment 2). Arousal, one form of attention, can produce significant costs for human movement selection as potent but unplanned actions are benefited more than planned ones.

  15. Modelling group dynamic animal movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langrock, Roland; Hopcraft, J. Grant C.; Blackwell, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    , to date, practical statistical methods which can include group dynamics in animal movement models have been lacking. We consider a flexible modelling framework that distinguishes a group-level model, describing the movement of the group's centre, and an individual-level model, such that each individual...... makes its movement decisions relative to the group centroid. The basic idea is framed within the flexible class of hidden Markov models, extending previous work on modelling animal movement by means of multi-state random walks. While in simulation experiments parameter estimators exhibit some bias...

  16. Early Christian movements: Jesus movements and the renewal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article investigates the origins and development of the earliest Jesus movements within the context of persistent conflict between the Judean and Galilean peasantry and their Jerusalem and Roman rulers. It explores the prominence of popular prophetic and messianic movements and shows how the earliest ...

  17. Early Christian movements: Jesus movements and the renewal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UPuser

    Abstract. This article investigates the origins and development of the earliest. Jesus movements within the context of persistent conflict between the Judean and Galilean peasantry and their Jerusalem and Roman rulers. It explores the prominence of popular prophetic and messianic movements and shows how the earliest ...

  18. Movement disorders in spinocerebellar ataxias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Giunti, P.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) can present with a large variety of noncerebellar symptoms, including movement disorders. In fact, movement disorders are frequent in many of the various SCA subtypes, and they can be the presenting, dominant, or even isolated disease feature. When

  19. Movement Patterns in Educational Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Christensen, Bianca Clavio; Nielsen, Thorsten B.

    2018-01-01

    Although movement is essential in location-based games to get from one point of interest to the next, it is seldom taken into account for the game design and the selection of locations. Instead, player movement is usually analyzed after the fact, i.e. when the game is ready to play. In this paper......-based educational games....

  20. Trajectory Indexing Using Movement Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfoser, D.; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2005-01-01

    With the proliferation of mobile computing, the ability to index efficiently the movements of mobile objects becomes important. Objects are typically seen as moving in two-dimensional (x,y) space, which means that their movements across time may be embedded in the three-dimensional (x,y,t) space....

  1. 3-D eye movement analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchowski, Andrew; Medlin, Eric; Cournia, Nathan; Murphy, Hunter; Gramopadhye, Anand; Nair, Santosh; Vorah, Jeenal; Melloy, Brian

    2002-11-01

    This paper presents a novel three-dimensional (3-D) eye movement analysis algorithm for binocular eye tracking within virtual reality (VR). The user's gaze direction, head position, and orientation are tracked in order to allow recording of the user's fixations within the environment. Although the linear signal analysis approach is itself not new, its application to eye movement analysis in three dimensions advances traditional two-dimensional approaches, since it takes into account the six degrees of freedom of head movements and is resolution independent. Results indicate that the 3-D eye movement analysis algorithm can successfully be used for analysis of visual process measures in VR. Process measures not only can corroborate performance measures, but also can lead to discoveries of the reasons for performance improvements. In particular, analysis of users' eye movements in VR can potentially lead to further insights into the underlying cognitive processes of VR subjects.

  2. Exploring cattle movements in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensoy, Chellafe; Faes, Christel; Welby, Sarah; Van der Stede, Yves; Aerts, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Movement of animals from one farm to another is a potential risk and can lead to the spreading of livestock diseases. Therefore, in order to implement effective control measures, it is important to understand the movement network in a given area. Using the SANITEL data from 2005 to 2009, around 2 million cattle movements in Belgium were traced. Exploratory analysis revealed different spatial structures for the movement of different cattle types: fattening calves are mostly moved to the Antwerp region, adult cattle are moved to different parts in Belgium. Based on these differences, movement of cattle would more likely cause a spread of disease to a larger number of areas in Belgium as compared to the fattening calves. A closer inspection of the spatial and temporal patterns of cattle movement using a weighted negative binomial model, revealed a significant short-distance movement of bovine which could be an important factor contributing to the local spreading of a disease. The model however revealed hot spot areas of movement in Belgium; four areas in the Walloon region (Luxembourg, Hainaut, Namur and Liege) were found as hot spot areas while East and West Flanders are important "receivers" of movement. This implies that an introduction of a disease to these Walloon regions could result in a spread toward the East and West Flanders regions, as what happened in the case of Bluetongue BTV-8 outbreak in 2006. The temporal component in the model also revealed a linear trend and short- and long-term seasonality in the cattle movement with a peak around spring and autumn. The result of this explorative analysis enabled the identification of "hot spots" in time and space which is important in enhancing any existing monitoring and surveillance system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Brownian motion on reduced agglomeration of nanostructured metal oxide towards development of efficient cancer biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suveen; Ashish; Kumar, Saurabh; Augustine, Shine; Yadav, Santosh; Yadav, Birendra Kumar; Chauhan, Rishi Pal; Dewan, Ajay Kumar; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2018-04-15

    We report results of the studies relating to fabrication of nanostructured metal oxide (NMO) based cancer biosensor. With the help of 2D electroactive reduced graphene oxide (RGO), we successfully inhibited the Brownian motion of NMO that led to reduced agglomeration of NMO. The nanostructured hafnium oxide (nHfO2) was used as a model NMO. The reduced agglomeration of nHfO2 was achieved through controlled hydrothermal synthesis and investigated via nanoparticles tracking analysis (NTA). X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques were used for phase identification as well as morphological analysis of the synthesized nanohybrid (nHfO2@RGO) material. The 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) was used for the functionalization of nHfO2@RGO and electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique was used for its deposition onto ITO coated glass electrode. Further, antibodies of cancer biomarker (anti-CYFRA-21-1) were immobilized via EDC-NHS chemistry and Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used for blocking of the non-specific binding sites. The electrochemical response studies of fabricated immunoelectrode (BSA/anti-CYFRA-21-1/APTES/nHfO2@RGO/ITO) revealed higher sensitivity (18.24µAmLng-1), wide linear detection range (0 to 30ngmL-1), with remarkable lower detection limit (0.16ngmL-1). The obtained results showed good agreement with the concentration of CYFRA-21-1 obtained through enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in saliva samples of oral cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Does the cerebellum initiate movement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach, W T

    2014-02-01

    Opinion is divided on what the exact function of the cerebellum is. Experiments are summarized that support the following views: (1) the cerebellum is a combiner of multiple movement factors; (2) it contains anatomically fixed permanent focal representation of individual body parts (muscles and segments) and movement modes (e.g., vestibular driven vs. cognitive driven); (3) it contains flexible changing representations/memory of physical properties of the body parts including muscle strength, segment inertia, joint viscosity, and segmental interaction torques (dynamics); (4) it contains mechanisms for learning and storage of the properties in item no. 3 through trial-and-error practice; (5) it provides for linkage of body parts, motor modes, and motordynamics via the parallel fiber system; (6) it combines and integrates the many factors so as to initiate coordinated movements of the many body parts; (7) it is thus enabled to play the unique role of initiating coordinated movements; and (8) this unique causative role is evidenced by the fact that: (a) electrical stimulation of the cerebellum can initiate compound coordinated movements; (b) in naturally initiated compound movements, cerebellar discharge precedes that in downstream target structures such as motor cerebral cortex; and (c) cerebellar ablation abolishes the natural production of compound movements in the awake alert individuals.

  5. Pioneers of eye movement research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the technology affording eye movement recordings carry the risk of neglecting past achievements. Without the assistance of this modern armoury, great strides were made in describing the ways the eyes move. For Aristotle the fundamental features of eye movements were binocular, and he described the combined functions of the eyes. This was later given support using simple procedures like placing a finger over the eyelid of the closed eye and culminated in Hering's law of equal innervation. However, the overriding concern in the 19th century was with eye position rather than eye movements. Appreciating discontinuities of eye movements arose from studies of vertigo. The characteristics of nystagmus were recorded before those of saccades and fixations. Eye movements during reading were described by Hering and by Lamare in 1879; both used similar techniques of listening to sounds made during contractions of the extraocular muscles. Photographic records of eye movements during reading were made by Dodge early in the 20th century, and this stimulated research using a wider array of patterns. In the mid-20th century attention shifted to the stability of the eyes during fixation, with the emphasis on involuntary movements. The contributions of pioneers from Aristotle to Yarbus are outlined. PMID:23396982

  6. Pioneers of Eye Movement Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Wade

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the technology affording eye movement recordings carry the risk of neglecting past achievements. Without the assistance of this modern armoury, great strides were made in describing the ways the eyes move. For Aristotle the fundamental features of eye movements were binocular, and he described the combined functions of the eyes. This was later given support using simple procedures like placing a finger over the eyelid of the closed eye and culminated in Hering's law of equal innervation. However, the overriding concern in the 19th century was with eye position rather than eye movements. Appreciating discontinuities of eye movements arose from studies of vertigo. The characteristics of nystagmus were recorded before those of saccades and fixations. Eye movements during reading were described by Hering and by Lamare in 1879; both used similar techniques of listening to sounds made during contractions of the extraocular muscles. Photographic records of eye movements during reading were made by Dodge early in the 20th century, and this stimulated research using a wider array of patterns. In the mid-20th century attention shifted to the stability of the eyes during fixation, with the emphasis on involuntary movements. The contributions of pioneers from Aristotle to Yarbus are outlined.

  7. Jellyfish movement data - Determining Movement Patterns of Jellyfish

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project is to determine horizontal and vertical movement patterns of two jellyfish species in Hood Canal, in relation to environmental variables. It is being...

  8. Magnetoencephalographic study on facial movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensaku eMiki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we introduced our three studies that focused on facial movements. In the first study, we examined the temporal characteristics of neural responses elicited by viewing mouth movements, and assessed differences between the responses to mouth opening and closing movements and an averting eyes condition. Our results showed that the occipitotemporal area, the human MT/V5 homologue, was active in the perception of both mouth and eye motions. Viewing mouth and eye movements did not elicit significantly different activity in the occipitotemporal area, which indicated that perception of the movement of facial parts may be processed in the same manner, and this is different from motion in general. In the second study, we investigated whether early activity in the occipitotemporal region evoked by eye movements was influenced by a face contour and/or features such as the mouth. Our results revealed specific information processing for eye movements in the occipitotemporal region, and this activity was significantly influenced by whether movements appeared with the facial contour and/or features, in other words, whether the eyes moved, even if the movement itself was the same. In the third study, we examined the effects of inverting the facial contour (hair and chin and features (eyes, nose, and mouth on processing for static and dynamic face perception. Our results showed the following: (1 In static face perception, activity in the right fusiform area was affected more by the inversion of features while that in the left fusiform area was affected more by a disruption in the spatial relationship between the contour and features, and (2 In dynamic face perception, activity in the right occipitotemporal area was affected by the inversion of the facial contour.

  9. From Pseudorandom Walk to Pseudo-Brownian Motion: First Exit Time from a One-Sided or a Two-Sided Interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimé Lachal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Let N be a positive integer, c a positive constant and (ξnn≥1 be a sequence of independent identically distributed pseudorandom variables. We assume that the ξn’s take their values in the discrete set {-N,-N+1,…,N-1,N} and that their common pseudodistribution is characterized by the (positive or negative real numbers ℙ{ξn=k}=δk0+(-1k-1c(2Nk+N for any k∈{-N,-N+1,…,N-1,N}. Let us finally introduce (Snn≥0 the associated pseudorandom walk defined on ℤ by S0=0 and Sn=∑j=1n‍ξj for n≥1. In this paper, we exhibit some properties of (Snn≥0. In particular, we explicitly determine the pseudodistribution of the first overshooting time of a given threshold for (Snn≥0 as well as that of the first exit time from a bounded interval. Next, with an appropriate normalization, we pass from the pseudorandom walk to the pseudo-Brownian motion driven by the high-order heat-type equation ∂/∂t=(-1N-1c∂2N/∂x2N. We retrieve the corresponding pseudodistribution of the first overshooting time of a threshold for the pseudo-Brownian motion (Lachal, 2007. In the same way, we get the pseudodistribution of the first exit time from a bounded interval for the pseudo-Brownian motion which is a new result for this pseudoprocess.

  10. Dance movement therapy for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkou, Vicky; Meekums, Bonnie

    2017-02-03

    Dementia is a collective name for different degenerative brain syndromes which, according to Alzheimer's Disease International, affects approximately 35.6 million people worldwide. The latest NICE guideline for dementia highlights the value of diverse treatment options for the different stages and symptoms of dementia including non-pharmacological treatments. Relevant literature also argues for the value of interventions that acknowledge the complexity of the condition and address the person as a whole, including their physical, emotional, social and cognitive processes. At the same time, there is growing literature that highlights the capacity of the arts and embodied practices to address this complexity. Dance movement therapy is an embodied psychological intervention that can address complexity and thus, may be useful for people with dementia, but its effectiveness remains unclear. To assess the effects of dance movement therapy on behavioural, social, cognitive and emotional symptoms of people with dementia in comparison to no treatment, standard care or any other treatment. Also, to compare different forms of dance movement therapy (e.g. Laban-based dance movement therapy, Chacian dance movement therapy or Authentic Movement). Searches took place up to March 2016 through ALOIS, Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement's Specialized Register, which covers CENTRAL, a number of major healthcare databases and trial registers, and grey literature sources. We checked bibliographies of relevant studies and reviews, and contacted professional associations, educational programmes and experts from around the world. We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in any language, including cross-over design and cluster-RCTs for inclusion. Studies considered had to include people with dementia, in any age group and in any setting, with interventions delivered by a dance movement therapy practitioner who (i) had received formal training (ii) was a dance movement

  11. [Stereotactic radiosurgery for movement disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobstyl, Michał; Ząbek, Mirosław

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, functional neurosurgery is an established treatment for movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. The effectiveness and safety of neuromodulation procedures (deep brain stimulation) replaced in the last years ablative irreversible stereotactic lesions for movement disorders. Stereotactic radiosurgery with gamma knife is a non-invasive form of treatment for movement disorders. The main limitation of stereotactic radiosurgery is the impossibility of electrophysiological confirmation of the target structure. Nevertheless, patients with advanced age and significant medical conditions that preclude classic open stereotactic procedures or patients who must receive anticoagulation therapy may gain great functional benefit using gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery.

  12. Movement disorders in mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaoui, Roula; Sue, Carolyn M

    2018-01-06

    Mitochondrial disease presents with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that may appear at any age and cause multisystem dysfunction. A broad spectrum of movement disorders can manifest in mitochondrial diseases including ataxia, Parkinsonism, myoclonus, dystonia, choreoathetosis, spasticity, tremor, tic disorders and restless legs syndrome. There is marked heterogeneity of movement disorder phenotypes, even in patients with the same genetic mutation. Moreover, the advent of new technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, is likely to identify novel causative genes, expand the phenotype of known disease genes and improve the genetic diagnosis in these patients. Identification of the underlying genetic basis of the movement disorder is also a crucial step to allow for targeted therapies to be implemented as well as provide the basis for a better understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of the disease process. The aim of this review is to discuss the spectrum of movement disorders associated with mitochondrial disease.

  13. Social movements: A poststructuralist reading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antón Fernández de Rota Irimia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The present article tries to rethink social movements from a poststructuralist position, going beyond Synthesis Theory. For the last twenty years the synthesis of the theories of Resource Mobilization, Political Opportunity and Cognitive Framing has been taken to be the last word in the sociology of social movements. Nevertheless, far from being any sort of advance, Synthesis Theory has merely perpetuated previous theories, without, in my opinion,managing to reconceptualize the constitution of power, or the force and embodiment of movement. The lack of theoretical attention to the definition of movement is a curious absence which needs to be redressed . My aim is approach it not from the notion of "subject" or any other type of "institution", but rather in terms of the contingencies of everyday life.   

  14. NSAIDs in orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukumar Karthi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic tooth movement is basically a biological response toward a mechanical force. The movement is induced by prolonged application of controlled mechanical forces, which create pressure and tension zones in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, causing remodeling of tooth sockets. Orthodontists often prescribe drugs to manage pain from force application to biologic tissues. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are the drugs usually prescribed. NSAIDs block prostaglandin synthesis and result in slower tooth movement. Prostaglandins have been found to play a direct role in bone resorption. Aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, vadecoxib, and celecoxib are the commonly prescribed drugs. Acetaminophen is the drug of choice for orthodontic pain without affecting orthodontic tooth movement.

  15. The Movements of Near Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, R.; Witt, D.

    1974-01-01

    Presents a computer program that uses radial and transverse star movements to make approximations of the closest approach in light years. In addition using the present actual visual magnitude the greatest magnitude attained is calculated. (Author/GS)

  16. Eye movements when viewing advertisements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Emily; Leinenger, Mallorie; Rayner, Keith

    2013-01-01

    In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind that appear on alcohol and tobacco ads), before turning to a consideration of advertisements in dynamic media (television and the Internet). Finally, we propose topics and methodological approaches that may prove to be useful in future research. PMID:24672500

  17. Eye movements when viewing advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Emily; Leinenger, Mallorie; Rayner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind that appear on alcohol and tobacco ads), before turning to a consideration of advertisements in dynamic media (television and the Internet). Finally, we propose topics and methodological approaches that may prove to be useful in future research.

  18. Eye Movements When Viewing Advertisements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily eHiggins

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind that appear on alcohol and tobacco ads, before turning to a consideration of advertisements in dynamic media (television and the Internet. Finally, we propose topics and methodological approaches that may prove to be useful in future research.

  19. Laban Movement Analysis in Dance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Toby

    1984-01-01

    Laban Movement Analysis is a system that helps dancers recognize and define the variety of elements that make up the movement event. This is not a method of teaching a movement style, but provides a means for creative expression. (DF)

  20. Mandibular movement range in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Barbara Cristina Zanandréa; Medeiros, Ana Paula Magalhães; Felício, Cláudia Maria de

    2009-01-01

    identification of the mandibular movement range is an important procedure in the evaluation of the stomatognathic system. However, there are few studies in children that focus on normal parameters or abnormalities. to determine the average range of mandibular movements in Brazilian children aged 6 to 12 years; to verify the difference between genders, in each age group, and between the different age groups: 6-8 years; 8.1-10 years; and 10.1-12 years. participants of the study were 240 healthy children selected among regular students from local schools of São Paulo State. The maximum mandibular opening, lateral excursion and protrusive movements, and deviation of the medium line, if present, were measured using a digital caliper. Student T test, Analysis of variance and Tukey test were considered significant for p mandibular opening; 7.71mm for lateral excursion to the right; 7.92mm for lateral excursion to the left; 7.45mm for protrusive movements. No statistical difference was observed between genders. There was a gradual increase in the range of mandibular movements, with significant differences mainly between the ages of 6-8 years and 10.1-12 years. during childhood the range of mandibular movements increases. Age should be considered in this analysis for a greater precision in the diagnosis.

  1. The movement ecology of seagrasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Kathryn; van Dijk, Kor-Jent; Ruiz-Montoya, Leonardo; Kendrick, Gary A; Krauss, Siegfried L; Waycott, Michelle; Verduin, Jennifer; Lowe, Ryan; Statton, John; Brown, Eloise; Duarte, Carlos

    2014-11-22

    A movement ecology framework is applied to enhance our understanding of the causes, mechanisms and consequences of movement in seagrasses: marine, clonal, flowering plants. Four life-history stages of seagrasses can move: pollen, sexual propagules, vegetative fragments and the spread of individuals through clonal growth. Movement occurs on the water surface, in the water column, on or in the sediment, via animal vectors and through spreading clones. A capacity for long-distance dispersal and demographic connectivity over multiple timeframes is the novel feature of the movement ecology of seagrasses with significant evolutionary and ecological consequences. The space-time movement footprint of different life-history stages varies. For example, the distance moved by reproductive propagules and vegetative expansion via clonal growth is similar, but the timescales range exponentially, from hours to months or centuries to millennia, respectively. Consequently, environmental factors and key traits that interact to influence movement also operate on vastly different spatial and temporal scales. Six key future research areas have been identified.

  2. Eventful places in the 2011 movements

    OpenAIRE

    Risager, Bjarke Skærlund

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by the Occupy movement, the Egyptian revolutionaries and other of the 2011 social movements, this paper investigates the relationship between social movement and place. Drawing on first-hand accounts from these movements, I argue that the relationship between movement and place is dialectical and mutually constitutive: the physical and symbolic characteristics of place influence the formation of the movement and its actions while the latter re-creates the place. This is a corrective ...

  3. Mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror movements are simultaneous, involuntary, identical movements occurring during contralateral voluntary movements. These movements are considered as soft neurologic signs seen uncommonly in clinical practice. The mirror movements are described in various neurological disorders which include parkinsonism, cranio veretebral junction anamolies, and hemiplegic cerebral palsy. These movements are intriguing and can pose significant disability. However, no such observation regarding mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy have been reported previously. We are reporting a teenage girl suffering from progressive hemifacial atrophy and epilepsy with demonstrable mirror movements in hand.

  4. The Brownian and Thermophoretic Analysis of the Non-Newtonian Williamson Fluid Flow of Thin Film in a Porous Space over an Unstable Stretching Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liaqat Ali

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores Liquid Film Flow of Williamson Fluid over an Unstable Stretching Surface in a Porous Space . The Brownian motion and Thermophoresis effect of the liquid film flow on a stretching sheet have been observed. This research include, to focus on the variation in the thickness of the liquid film in a porous space. The self-similarity variables have been applied to convert the modelled equations into a set of non-linear coupled differential equations. These non-linear differential equations have been treated through an analytical technique known as Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM. The effect of physical non-dimensional parameters like, Eckert Number, Prandtl Number, Porosity Parameter, Brownian Motion Parameter, Unsteadiness Parameter, Schmidt Number, Thermophoresis Parameter, Dimensionless Film Thickness, and Williamson Fluid Constant on the liquid film size are investigated and conferred in this endeavor. The obtained results through HAM are authenticated, from its comparison with numerical (ND-Solve Method. The graphical comparison of these two methods is elaborated. The numerical comparison with absolute errors are also been shown in the tables. The physical and numerical results using h curves for the residuals of the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are obtained

  5. Rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of non-interacting magnetized ellipsoidal particles in d.c. and a.c. magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Jorge H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez campus, P.O. Box 9046, Mayaguez, PR 00681 (Puerto Rico); Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Medellin (Colombia); Rinaldi, Carlos [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez campus, P.O. Box 9046, Mayaguez, PR 00681 (Puerto Rico)], E-mail: crinaldi@uprm.edu

    2009-10-15

    The rotational Brownian motion of magnetized tri-axial ellipsoidal particles (orthotropic particles) suspended in a Newtonian fluid, in the dilute suspension limit, under applied d.c. and a.c. magnetic fields was studied using rotational Brownian dynamics simulations. The algorithm describing the change in the suspension magnetization was obtained from the stochastic angular momentum equation using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and a quaternion formulation of orientation space. Simulation results are in agreement with the Langevin function for equilibrium magnetization and with single-exponential relaxation from equilibrium at small fields using Perrin's effective relaxation time. Dynamic susceptibilities for ellipsoidal particles of different aspect ratios were obtained from the response to oscillating magnetic fields of different frequencies and described by Debye's model for the complex susceptibility using Perrin's effective relaxation time. Simulations at high equilibrium and probe fields indicate that Perrin's effective relaxation time continues to describe relaxation from equilibrium and response to oscillating fields even beyond the small field limit.

  6. A new numerical method for investigation of thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects on MHD nanofluid flow and heat transfer between parallel plates partially filled with a porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib-Olah Sayehvand

    Full Text Available Numerical investigation the problem of nanofluid heat and mass transfer in a channel partially filled with a porous medium in the presence of uniform magnetic field is carried out by a new computational iterative approach known as the spectral local linearization method (SLLM. The similarity solution is used to reduce the governing system of partial differential equations to a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations which are then solved by SLLM and validity of our solutions is verified by the numerical results (fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme with the shooting method. In modeling the flow in the channel, the effects of flow inertia, Brinkman friction, nanoparticles concentration and thickness of the porous region are taken into account. The results are obtained for velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number. Also, effects of active parameters such as viscosity parameter, Hartmann number, Darcy number, Prandtl number, Schmidt number, Eckert number, Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis parameter and the thickness of porous region on the hydrodynamics, heat and mass transfer behaviors are investigated. Keywords: Brownian, Nanofluid, Porous medium, Spectral local linearization method, Thermophoresis

  7. Mindful Movement and Skilled Attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dav eClark

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bodily movement has long been employed as a foundation for cultivating mental skills such as attention, self-control or mindfulness, with recent studies documenting the positive impacts of mindful movement training, such as yoga and tai chi. A parallel mind-body connection has also been observed in many developmental disorders. We elaborate a spectrum of mindfulness by considering ADHD, in which deficient motor control correlates with impaired (disinhibited behavioral control contributing to defining features of excessive distractibility and impulsivity. These data provide evidence for an important axis of variation for wellbeing, in which skillful cognitive control covaries with a capacity for skillful movement. We review empirical and theoretical literature on attention, cognitive control, mind wandering, mindfulness and skill learning, endorsing a model of skilled attention in which motor plans, attention, and executive goals are seen as mutually co-defining aspects of skilled behavior that are linked by reciprocal inhibitory and excitatory connections. Thus, any movement training should engage higher-order inhibition and selection and develop a repertoire of rehearsed procedures that coordinate goals, attention and motor plans. However, we propose that mindful movement practice may improve the functional quality of rehearsed procedures, cultivating a transferrable skill of attention. We adopt Langer’s spectrum of mindful learning that spans from mindlessness to engagement with the details of the present task and contrast this with the mental attitudes cultivated in standard mindfulness meditation. We particularly follow Feldenkrais’ suggestion that mindful learning of skills for organizing the body in movement might transfer to other forms of mental activity. The results of mindful movement training should be observed in multiple complementary measures, and may have tremendous potential benefit for individuals with ADHD and other

  8. Mindful movement and skilled attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Dav; Schumann, Frank; Mostofsky, Stewart H

    2015-01-01

    Bodily movement has long been employed as a foundation for cultivating mental skills such as attention, self-control or mindfulness, with recent studies documenting the positive impacts of mindful movement training, such as yoga and tai chi. A parallel "mind-body connection" has also been observed in many developmental disorders. We elaborate a spectrum of mindfulness by considering ADHD, in which deficient motor control correlates with impaired (disinhibited) behavioral control contributing to defining features of excessive distractibility and impulsivity. These data provide evidence for an important axis of variation for wellbeing, in which skillful cognitive control covaries with a capacity for skillful movement. We review empirical and theoretical literature on attention, cognitive control, mind wandering, mindfulness and skill learning, endorsing a model of skilled attention in which motor plans, attention, and executive goals are seen as mutually co-defining aspects of skilled behavior that are linked by reciprocal inhibitory and excitatory connections. Thus, any movement training should engage "higher-order" inhibition and selection and develop a repertoire of rehearsed procedures that coordinate goals, attention and motor plans. However, we propose that mindful movement practice may improve the functional quality of rehearsed procedures, cultivating a transferrable skill of attention. We adopt Langer's spectrum of mindful learning that spans from "mindlessness" to engagement with the details of the present task and contrast this with the mental attitudes cultivated in standard mindfulness meditation. We particularly follow Feldenkrais' suggestion that mindful learning of skills for organizing the body in movement might transfer to other forms of mental activity. The results of mindful movement training should be observed in multiple complementary measures, and may have tremendous potential benefit for individuals with ADHD and other populations.

  9. Brownian parametric oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbe, Christine; Jung, Peter; Hänggi, Peter

    1994-05-01

    We discuss the stochastic dynamics of dissipative, white-noise-driven Floquet oscillators, characterized by a time-periodic stiffness. Thus far, little attention has been paid to these exactly solvable nonstationary systems, although they carry a rich potential for several experimental applications. Here, we calculate and discuss the mean values and variances, as well as the correlation functions and the Floquet spectrum. As one main result, we find for certain parameter values that the fluctuations of the position coordinate are suppressed as compared to the equilibrium value of a harmonic oscillator (parametric squeezing).

  10. Disorders of vergence eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Alessandro; Chen, Athena L; Leigh, R John

    2011-02-01

    The aim is to re-interpret disorders of vergence in the light of recent studies that view disjunctive eye movements as but one component of three-dimensional gaze control. Most natural eye movements combine vergence with saccades, pursuit and vestibular eye movements. Electrophysiological studies in epileptic patients, as well as evidence from monkeys, indicate that frontal and parietal cortex govern vergence as a component of three-dimensional gaze. Clinicians apply Hering's law of equal innervation to interpret disjunctive movements as the superposition of conjugate and vergence commands. However, electrophysiological studies indicate that disjunctive saccades are achieved by programming each eye's movement independently. Patients with internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) may have preserved vergence, which can be recruited to compensate for loss of conjugacy. Vergence may also enable gaze shifts in saccadic palsy. Some forms of nystagmus suppress or change with convergence; co-contraction of the horizontal rectus muscles does not appear to be the explanation. Rather, effects of near viewing on central vestibular mechanisms or differential activation of specific types of extra-ocular muscle fiber may be responsible. Interpretation of disorders of vergence is aided by applying a scheme in which their contributions to three-dimensional gaze control is considered.

  11. Movement sequencing in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Long, Jeffrey D; Lourens, Spencer G; Stout, Julie C; Mills, James A; Paulsen, Jane S

    2014-08-01

    To examine longitudinal changes in movement sequencing in prodromal Huntington's disease (HD) participants (795 prodromal HD; 225 controls) from the PREDICT-HD study. Prodromal HD participants were tested over seven annual visits and were stratified into three groups (low, medium, high) based on their CAG-Age Product (CAP) score, which indicates likely increasing proximity to diagnosis. A cued movement sequence task assessed the impact of advance cueing on response initiation and execution via three levels of advance information. Compared to controls, all CAP groups showed longer initiation and movement times across all conditions at baseline, demonstrating a disease gradient for the majority of outcomes. Across all conditions, the high CAP group had the highest mean for baseline testing, but also demonstrated an increase in movement time across the study. For initiation time, the high CAP group showed the highest mean baseline time across all conditions, but also faster decreasing rates of change over time. With progress to diagnosis, participants may increasingly use compensatory strategies, as evidenced by faster initiation. However, this occurred in conjunction with slowed execution times, suggesting a decline in effectively accessing control processes required to translate movement into effective execution.

  12. Eye movements in vestibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand, A; Colpak, A I; Zee, D S

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of patients with vestibular symptoms usually begins with the question: is the lesion central or is it peripheral? The answer commonly emerges from a careful examination of eye movements, especially when the lesion is located in otherwise clinically silent areas of the brain such as the vestibular portions of the cerebellum (flocculus, paraflocculus which is called the tonsils in humans, nodulus, and uvula) and the vestibular nuclei as well as immediately adjacent areas (the perihypoglossal nuclei and the paramedian nuclei and tracts). The neural circuitry that controls vestibular eye movements is intertwined with a larger network within the brainstem and cerebellum that also controls other types of conjugate eye movements. These include saccades and pursuit as well as the mechanisms that enable steady fixation, both straight ahead and in eccentric gaze positions. Navigating through this complex network requires a thorough knowledge about all classes of eye movements to help localize lesions causing a vestibular disorder. Here we review the different classes of eye movements and how to examine them, and then describe common ocular motor findings associated with central vestibular lesions from both a topographic and functional perspective. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Camera Movement in Narrative Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Isak

    2007-01-01

    Just like art historians have focused on e.g. composition or lighting, this dissertation takes a single stylistic parameter as its object of study: camera movement. Within film studies this localized avenue of middle-level research has become increasingly viable under the aegis of a perspective......, and that a given camera movement may activate one or more of the proposed functions at any given moment. Six main functions are proposed and defined: 1) Orientation: orienting the viewer spatially. 2) Pacing: contributing to the cinematic rhythm of the film. 3) Inflection: inflecting shots in a suggestive...... to illustrate how the functions may mesh in individual camera movements six concrete examples are analyzed. The analyses illustrate how the taxonomy presented can substantiate analysis and interpretation of film style. More generally, the dissertation - and particularly these in-depth analyses - illustrates how...

  14. Movements of Yellowstone grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Bonnie M.; Knight, Richard R.

    1991-01-01

    Ninety-seven grizzly bears Ursus arctos horribilis were radio-located 6299 times during 1975–1987. Annual range sizes differed by sex, age, reproductive status and amount of precipitation. Females exhibited greater fidelity to seasonal and annual ranges than males. Weaned female offspring generally remained in the vicinity of the maternal range, while weaned males often made substantial movements to unexplored country. Average total home range size was 884 km2 for females and 3757 km2 for males. Males consistently exhibited greater indices of movement and range sizes than females. All cohorts had larger mean ranges during this study than during the period 1959–1969 when the population had access to open garbage dumps. Movements and elevational distribution of all cohorts were related to availability of whitebark pine Pinus albicaulis seeds. We hypothesized that females with cubs-of-the-year and yearlings were displaced from most productive habitats during seasons and years of limited food availability.

  15. Yarbus, Eye Movements, and Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin W Tatler

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The impact of Yarbus's research on eye movements was enormous following the translation of his book Eye Movements and Vision into English in 1967. In stark contrast, the published material in English concerning his life is scant. We provide a brief biography of Yarbus and assess his impact on contemporary approaches to research on eye movements. While early interest in his work focused on his study of stabilised retinal images, more recently this has been replaced with interest in his work on the cognitive influences on scanning patterns. We extended his experiment on the effect of instructions on viewing a picture using a portrait of Yarbus rather than a painting. The results obtained broadly supported those found by Yarbus.

  16. Eye Movements, Perceptual Span, and Reading Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Keith

    1983-01-01

    Research is reviewed on eye movements during reading, on the perceptual span and control of eye movements during normal reading, and on the nature of eye movements in dyslexia. Rather than the cause of dyslexia, eye movements are said to reflect underlying cognitive or neurological problems. (CL)

  17. Sensorimotor integration in movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2003-03-01

    Although current knowledge attributes movement disorders to a dysfunction of the basal ganglia-motor cortex circuits, abnormalities in the peripheral afferent inputs or in their central processing may interfere with motor program execution. We review the abnormalities of sensorimotor integration described in the various types of movement disorders. Several observations, including those of parkinsonian patients' excessive reliance on ongoing visual information during movement tasks, suggest that proprioception is defective in Parkinson's disease (PD). The disturbance of proprioceptive regulation, possibly related to the occurrence of abnormal muscle-stretch reflexes, might be important for generating hypometric or bradykinetic movements. Studies with somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs), prepulse inhibition, and event-related potentials support the hypothesis of central abnormalities of sensorimotor integration in PD. In Huntington's disease (HD), changes in SEPs and long-latency stretch reflexes suggest that a defective gating of peripheral afferent input to the brain might impair sensorimotor integration in cortical motor areas, thus interfering with the processing of motor programs. Defective motor programming might contribute to some features of motor impairment in HD. Sensory symptoms are frequent in focal dystonia and sensory manipulation can modify the dystonic movements. In addition, specific sensory functions (kinaesthesia, spatial-temporal discrimination) can be impaired in patients with focal hand dystonia, thus leading to a "sensory overflow." Sensory input may be abnormal and trigger focal dystonia, or defective "gating" may cause an input-output mismatch in specific motor programs. Altogether, several observations strongly support the idea that sensorimotor integration is impaired in focal dystonia. Although elemental sensation is normal in patients with tics, tics can be associated with sensory phenomena. Some neurophysiological studies suggest that

  18. Wireless communication devices and movement monitoring methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorpik, James R.

    2006-10-31

    Wireless communication devices and movement monitoring methods are described. In one aspect, a wireless communication device includes a housing, wireless communication circuitry coupled with the housing and configured to communicate wireless signals, movement circuitry coupled with the housing and configured to provide movement data regarding movement sensed by the movement circuitry, and event processing circuitry coupled with the housing and the movement circuitry, wherein the event processing circuitry is configured to process the movement data, and wherein at least a portion of the event processing circuitry is configured to operate in a first operational state having a different power consumption rate compared with a second operational state.

  19. Proprioceptive Control of Human Movement. The Human Movement Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, John

    Various research studies concerned with the feedback from proprioceptors which accompany movement and the way in which this information is relevant to the control of activity are brought together in this volume. It is intended for the use of those who have some basic knowledge of human anatomy and physiology as well as an acquaintance with…

  20. Early Christian movements: Jesus movements and the renewal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UPuser

    Other peasant peoples usually had traditional principles and mechanisms that corresponded to Israelite covenantal commandments and sabbatical cancellation of debts. Thus the (renewed) Israelite covenant that forms a central aspect of Jesus movements would have been easily adapted by village communities across the ...

  1. Eye Movements in Gaze Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllenbach, Emilie; Hansen, John Paulin; Lillholm, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Gaze as a sole input modality must support complex navigation and selection tasks. Gaze interaction combines specific eye movements and graphic display objects (GDOs). This paper suggests a unifying taxonomy of gaze interaction principles. The taxonomy deals with three types of eye movements......: fixations, saccades and smooth pursuits and three types of GDOs: static, dynamic, or absent. This taxonomy is qualified through related research and is the first main contribution of this paper. The second part of the paper offers an experimental exploration of single stroke gaze gestures (SSGG). The main...

  2. Analysis of Functional Motions in Brownian Molecular Machines with an Efficient Block Normal Mode Approach: Myosin-II and Ca2+-ATPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guohui; Cui, Qiang

    2004-01-01

    The structural flexibilities of two molecular machines, myosin and Ca2+-ATPase, have been analyzed with normal mode analysis and discussed in the context of their energy conversion functions. The normal mode analysis with physical intermolecular interactions was made possible by an improved implementation of the block normal mode (BNM) approach. The BNM results clearly illustrated that the large-scale conformational transitions implicated in the functional cycles of the two motor systems can be largely captured with a small number of low-frequency normal modes. Therefore, the results support the idea that structural flexibility is an essential part of the construction principle of molecular motors through evolution. Such a feature is expected to be more prevalent in motor proteins than in simpler systems (e.g., signal transduction proteins) because in the former, large-scale conformational transitions often have to occur before the chemical events (e.g., ATP hydrolysis in myosin and ATP binding/phosphorylation in Ca2+-ATPase). This highlights the importance of Brownian motions associated with the protein domains that are involved in the functional transitions; in this sense, Brownian molecular machines is an appropriate description of molecular motors, although the normal mode results do not address the origin of the ratchet effect. The results also suggest that it might be more appropriate to describe functional transitions in some molecular motors as intrinsic elastic motions modulating local structural changes in the active site, which in turn gets stabilized by the subsequent chemical events, in contrast with the conventional idea of local changes somehow getting amplified into larger-scale motions. In the case of myosin, for example, we favor the idea that Brownian motions associated with the flexible converter propagates to the Switch I/II region, where the salt-bridge formation gets stabilized by ATP hydrolysis, in contrast with the textbook notion that ATP

  3. Movement of Movements: Culture Moves in the Long Civil Rights Struggle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Larry

    2008-01-01

    In what way do movements move? What do we mean by the movement of movements? While still a rather unconventional stance, I advance the argument that social movements are, at root, culture production agents. Regardless of whatever else they may accomplish, movements produce new cultural forms in the course of struggle; they often change and augment…

  4. Movement Opens Pathways to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppo, Marjorie; Davis, Diane

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a framework for movement activities upon which physical educators and early childhood teachers can build appropriate learning activities that reinforce the connection between the mind and body for children between the ages of two and seven. The authors discuss Piaget's stages of cognitive development. The authors hope that…

  5. Plasticity in eye movement control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Luo (Chongde)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe cerebellum plays an important role in the recalibration and adaptive adjustment of movements, as well as learning new motor skills and motor related associations. In this thesis, we investigated the mechanisms underlying cerebellar motor learning. To obtain a better understanding,

  6. Surgical management of movement disorders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Disability from movement disorders is often seen as par for the course in the ageing process. It is the price paid by those who are lucky enough to grow old. There are, however, also young patients who develop. Parkinson's disease (PD) and dystonia and have to discontinue their profession owing to a severely disabling ...

  7. Cranial functional (psychogenic) movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaski, Diego; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Edwards, Mark J; Stone, Jon

    2015-12-01

    Functional (psychogenic) neurological symptoms are frequently encountered in neurological practice. Cranial movement disorders--affecting the eyes, face, jaw, tongue, or palate--are an under-recognised feature of patients with functional symptoms. They can present in isolation or in the context of other functional symptoms; in particular, for functional eye movements, positive clinical signs such as convergence spasms can be triggered by the clinical examination. Although the specialty of functional neurological disorders has expanded, appreciation of cranial functional movement disorders is still insufficient. Identification of the positive features of cranial functional movement disorders such as convergence and unilateral platysmal spasm might lend diagnostic weight to a suspected functional neurological disorder. Understanding of the differential diagnosis, which is broad and includes many organic causes (eg, stroke), is essential to make an early and accurate diagnosis to prevent complications and initiate appropriate management. Increased understanding of these disorders is also crucial to drive clinical trials and studies of individually tailored therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ketotic hyperglycemia with movement disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disha Awasthi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chorea, hemichorea-hemiballismus and severe partial seizures may be the presenting features of nonketotic hyperglycemia in older adults with type 2 diabetes, but cases in young adults with type 1 diabetes are rare. We hereby report a very rare case of diabetic ketosis with movement disorder in a young patient.

  9. Differential movement and movement bias models for marine protected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langebrake, Jessica; Riotte-Lambert, Louise; Osenberg, Craig W; Leenheer, Patrick De

    2012-03-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are promoted as a tool to protect overfished stocks and increase fishery yields. Previous models suggested that adult mobility modified effects of MPAs by reducing densities of fish inside reserves, but increasing yields (i.e., increasing densities outside of MPAs). Empirical studies contradicted this prediction: as mobility increased, the relative density of fishes inside MPAs (relative to outside) increased or stayed constant. We hypothesized that this disparity between theoretical and empirical results was the result of differential movement of fish inside versus outside the MPA. We, therefore, developed a model with unequal and discontinuous diffusion, and analyzed its steady state and stability. We determined the abundance in the fishing grounds, the yield, the total abundance and the log ratio at steady-state and examined their response to adult mobility (while keeping the relative inequity in the diffusion constant). Abundance in the fishing grounds and yield increased, while total abundance and log-ratio decreased, as mobility increased. These results were all qualitatively consistent with the previous models assuming uniform diffusivity. Thus, the mismatch between empirical and theoretical results must result from other processes or other forms of differential movement. Therefore, we modified our original model by assuming that species located on the boundary of the MPA will preferentially move towards the MPA. This localized movement bias model gives rise to steady state profiles that can differ radically from the profiles in the unbiased model, especially when the bias is large. Moreover, for sufficiently large bias values, the monotonicity of the four measures with increased mobility is reversed, when compared with our original model. Thus, the movement bias model reconciles empirical data and theoretical results.

  10. A very efficient approach to compute the first-passage probability density function in a time-changed Brownian model: Applications in finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestra, Luca Vincenzo; Pacelli, Graziella; Radi, Davide

    2016-12-01

    We propose a numerical method to compute the first-passage probability density function in a time-changed Brownian model. In particular, we derive an integral representation of such a density function in which the integrand functions must be obtained solving a system of Volterra equations of the first kind. In addition, we develop an ad-hoc numerical procedure to regularize and solve this system of integral equations. The proposed method is tested on three application problems of interest in mathematical finance, namely the calculation of the survival probability of an indebted firm, the pricing of a single-knock-out put option and the pricing of a double-knock-out put option. The results obtained reveal that the novel approach is extremely accurate and fast, and performs significantly better than the finite difference method.

  11. BROMOC suite: Monte Carlo/Brownian dynamics suite for studies of ion permeation and DNA transport in biological and artificial pores with effective potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Biase, Pablo M; Markosyan, Suren; Noskov, Sergei

    2015-02-05

    The transport of ions and solutes by biological pores is central for cellular processes and has a variety of applications in modern biotechnology. The time scale involved in the polymer transport across a nanopore is beyond the accessibility of conventional MD simulations. Moreover, experimental studies lack sufficient resolution to provide details on the molecular underpinning of the transport mechanisms. BROMOC, the code presented herein, performs Brownian dynamics simulations, both serial and parallel, up to several milliseconds long. BROMOC can be used to model large biological systems. IMC-MACRO software allows for the development of effective potentials for solute-ion interactions based on radial distribution function from all-atom MD. BROMOC Suite also provides a versatile set of tools to do a wide variety of preprocessing and postsimulation analysis. We illustrate a potential application with ion and ssDNA transport in MspA nanopore. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A correlation for the collector efficiency of Brownian particles in clean-bed filtration in sphere packings by a Lattice-Boltzmann method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Wei; Hilpert, Markus

    2009-06-15

    In this paper, we develop a new correlation for the clean-bed filter coefficient (lambda0) for Brownian particles, for which diffusion is the main deposition mechanism. The correlation is based on numerical Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations in random packings of spheres of uniform diameter. We use LB methods to solve the Navier-Stokes equation for flow and then the advection-diffusion equation for particle transport. We determine a correlation for an "equivalent" single-collector diffusion efficiency, etaD, so that we can compare our predictions to "true" single-collector correlations stemming from unit-cell modeling approaches. We compared our new correlation to experiments on the filtration of latex particles. For small particle diameters, 50 nm etaG and nI terms from unit-cell correlations to our etaD model. The resulting correlation predicts experiments with latex particles of dp > 300 nm well.

  13. Communication: Generalizing Rosenfeld's excess-entropy scaling to predict long-time diffusivity in dense fluids of Brownian particles: from hard to ultrasoft interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pond, Mark J; Errington, Jeffrey R; Truskett, Thomas M

    2011-02-28

    Computer simulations are used to test whether a recently introduced generalization of Rosenfeld's excess-entropy scaling method for estimating transport coefficients in systems obeying molecular dynamics can be extended to predict long-time diffusivities in fluids of particles undergoing Brownian dynamics in the absence of interparticle hydrodynamic forces. Model fluids with inverse-power-law, Gaussian-core, and Hertzian pair interactions are considered. Within the generalized Rosenfeld scaling method, long-time diffusivities of ultrasoft Gaussian-core and Hertzian particle fluids, which display anomalous trends with increasing density, are predicted (to within 20%) based on knowledge of interparticle interactions, excess entropy, and scaling behavior of simpler inverse-power-law fluids.

  14. Early Christian movements: Jesus movements and the renewal of Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Horsley

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the origins and development of the earliest Jesus movements within the context of persistent conflict between the Judean and Galilean peasantry and their Jerusalem and Roman rulers. It explores the prominence of popular prophetic and messianic movements and shows how the earliest movements that formed in response to Jesus’ mission exhibit similar features and patterns. Jesus is not treated as separate from social roles and political-economic relationships. Viewing Jesus against the background of village communities in which people lived, the Gospels are understood as genuine communication with other people in historical social contexts. The article argues that the net effect of these interrelated factors of theologically determined New Testament interpretation is a combination of assumptions and procedures that would be unacceptable in the regular investigation of history. Another version of the essay was published in Horsley, Richard A (ed, A people’s history of Christianity, Volume 1: Christian origins, 23-46. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress.

  15. First-passage-time statistics of a Brownian particle driven by an arbitrary unidimensional potential with a superimposed exponential time-dependent drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio

    2015-12-01

    In one-dimensional systems, the dynamics of a Brownian particle are governed by the force derived from a potential as well as by diffusion properties. In this work, we obtain the first-passage-time statistics of a Brownian particle driven by an arbitrary potential with an exponential temporally decaying superimposed field up to a prescribed threshold. The general system analyzed here describes the sub-threshold signal integration of integrate-and-fire neuron models, of any kind, supplemented by an adaptation-like current, whereas the first-passage-time corresponds to the declaration of a spike. Following our previous studies, we base our analysis on the backward Fokker-Planck equation and study the survival probability and the first-passage-time density function in the space of the initial condition. By proposing a series solution we obtain a system of recurrence equations, which given the specific structure of the exponential time-dependent drift, easily admit a simpler Laplace representation. Naturally, the present general derivation agrees with the explicit solution we found previously for the Wiener process in (2012 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 45 185001). However, to demonstrate the generality of the approach, we further explicitly evaluate the first-passage-time statistics of the underlying Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. To test the validity of the series solution, we extensively compare theoretical expressions with the data obtained from numerical simulations in different regimes. As shown, agreement is precise whenever the series is truncated at an appropriate order. Beyond the fact that both the Wiener and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes have a direct interpretation in the context of neuronal models, given their ubiquity in different fields, our present results will be of interest in other settings where an additive state-independent temporal relaxation process is being developed as the particle diffuses.

  16. Movement

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data provide information on the relationship between California red-legged frogs and their habitat in a unique ecosystem to better conserve this threatened...

  17. Towards a discursive analytics of movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frello, Birgitta

    2008-01-01

    This paper takes as its point of departure the expanding scholarly interest in issues of mobility and movement. It argues that movement is not only a physical activity which is entangled in power and meaning but is fundamentally discursively constituted. Through discussions of theory and of three...... ‘movement' in the first place. Understanding movement in this way leads us to ask how various activities are given the status of ‘movement', as well as how they are given meaning and importance, by whom and with what consequences. This involves asking how the poles between which movement takes place...

  18. Sensory aspects of movement disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neepa; Jankovic, Joseph; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Movement disorders, which include disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, dystonia, Tourette’s syndrome, restless legs syndrome, and akathisia, have traditionally been considered to be disorders of impaired motor control resulting predominantly from dysfunction of the basal ganglia. This notion has been revised largely because of increasing recognition of associated behavioural, psychiatric, autonomic, and other non-motor symptoms. The sensory aspects of movement disorders include intrinsic sensory abnormalities and the effects of external sensory input on the underlying motor abnormality. The basal ganglia, cerebellum, thalamus, and their connections, coupled with altered sensory input, seem to play a key part in abnormal sensorimotor integration. However, more investigation into the phenomenology and physiological basis of sensory abnormalities, and about the role of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and related structures in somatosensory processing, and its effect on motor control, is needed. PMID:24331796

  19. Movement preparation in Parkinson's disease: Time course and distribution of movement-related potentials in a movement precueing task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Praamstra, P.; Meyer, A.S.; Cools, A.R.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.; Stegeman, D.F.

    1996-01-01

    Investigations of the effects of advance information on movement preparation in Parkinson's disease using reaction time (RT) measures have yielded contradictory results. In order to obtain direct information regarding the time course of movement preparation, we combined RT measurements in a movement

  20. Stereotactic radiosurgery for movement disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frighetto, Leonardo; Bizzi, Jorge; Annes, Rafael D’Agostini; Silva, Rodrigo dos Santos; Oppitz, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Initially designed for the treatment of functional brain targets, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has achieved an important role in the management of a wide range of neurosurgical pathologies. The interest in the application of the technique for the treatment of pain, and psychiatric and movement disorders has returned in the beginning of the 1990s, stimulated by the advances in neuroimaging, computerized dosimetry, treatment planning software systems, and the outstanding results of radiosurgery in other brain diseases. Since SRS is a neuroimaging-guided procedure, without the possibility of neurophysiological confirmation of the target, deep brain stimulation (DBS) and radiofrequency procedures are considered the best treatment options for movement-related disorders. Therefore, SRS is an option for patients who are not suitable for an open neurosurgical procedure. SRS thalamotomy provided results in tremor control, comparable to radiofrequency and DBS. The occurrence of unpredictable larger lesions than expected with permanent neurological deficits is a limitation of the procedure. Improvements in SRS technique with dose reduction, use of a single isocenter, and smaller collimators were made to reduce the incidence of this serious complication. Pallidotomies performed with radiosurgery did not achieve the same good results. Even though the development of DBS has supplanted lesioning as the first alternative in movement disorder surgery; SRS might still be the only treatment option for selected patients. PMID:22826805

  1. Brain-machine interface for eye movements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arnulf B. A. Graf; Richard A. Andersen

    2014-01-01

    ...), a cortical node in the NHP saccade system. Eye movement plans were predicted in real time using Bayesian inference from small ensembles of UP neurons without the animal making an eye movement...

  2. Immersion in Movement-Based Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasch, Marco; Bianchi-Berthouze, Nadia; van Dijk, Betsy; Nijholt, Anton

    The phenomenon of immersing oneself into virtual environments has been established widely. Yet to date (to our best knowledge) the physical dimension has been neglected in studies investigating immersion in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). In movement-based interaction the user controls the interface via body movements, e.g. direct manipulation of screen objects via gestures or using a handheld controller as a virtual tennis racket. It has been shown that physical activity affects arousal and that movement-based controllers can facilitate engagement in the context of video games. This paper aims at identifying movement features that influence immersion. We first give a brief survey on immersion and movement-based interfaces. Then, we report results from an interview study that investigates how users experience their body movements when interacting with movement-based interfaces. Based on the interviews, we identify four movement-specific features. We recommend them as candidates for further investigation.

  3. Functional jerks, tics, and paroxysmal movement disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreissen, Y. E. M.; Cath, D C; Tijssen, M A J; Hallet, Mark; Stone, Jon; Carson, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Functional jerks are among the most common functional movement disorders. The diagnosis of functional jerks is mainly based on neurologic examination revealing specific positive clinical signs. Differentiation from other jerky movements, such as tics, organic myoclonus, and primary paroxysmal

  4. The Functional Movement Screen's Ability to Detect Changes in Movement Patterns After a Training Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minthorn, Lindsay M; Fayson, Shirleeah D; Stobierski, Lisa M; Welch, Cailee E; Anderson, Barton E

    2015-08-01

    Clinical Scenario: Appropriate movement patterns during sports and physical activities are important for both athletic performance and injury prevention. The assessment of movement dysfunction can assist clinicians in implementing appropriate rehabilitation programs after injury, as well as developing injury-prevention plans. No gold standard test exists for the evaluation of movement capacity; however, the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) has been recommended as a tool to screen for movement-pattern limitations and side-to-side movement asymmetries. Limited research has suggested that movement limitations and asymmetries may be linked to increased risk for injury. While this line of research is continuing to evolve, the use of the FMS to measure movement capacity and the development of intervention programs to improve movement patterns has become popular. Recently, additional research examining changes in movement patterns after standardized intervention programs has emerged. Does an individualized training program improve movement patterns in adults who participate in high-intensity activities?

  5. Some factors affecting independence movements: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Rupayan Gupta

    2007-01-01

    The article outlines a game-theoretic framework that can be used to analyze the nature and outcomes of independence movements in disputed or occupied regions. It is seen that the nature of an independence movement depends on a complex interplay among personal characteristics of movement leaders, personal characteristics of the occupier, the proclivity of the citizens to participate in the movement, and the cost structure of the occupier. To a large extent, the results described in this articl...

  6. Techniques for the Analysis of Human Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieve, D. W.; And Others

    This book presents the major analytical techniques that may be used in the appraisal of human movement. Chapter 1 is devoted to the photopgraphic analysis of movement with particular emphasis on cine filming. Cine film may be taken with little or no restriction on the performer's range of movement; information on the film is permanent and…

  7. Recovering Disembodied Spirits: Teaching Movement to Musicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    Understanding physical movement is an integral part of learning to make music. This article presents the action research that the author has pursued while teaching movement to musicians. The narrative provides a theoretical underpinning for the teaching practices discussed. It provides examples of musicians' movement with analyses of the…

  8. Movement and Character. Lecture, London, 1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesorri, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Montessori's words from the 1946 London Lectures describe principles of intelligence and character, the work of the hand, and movement with a purpose as being integral to self-construction. The perfection of movement is spiritual, says Dr. Montessori. Repetition of practical life exercises are exercises in movement with the dignity of human…

  9. Eye Movement Disorders in Dyslexia. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festinger, Leon; And Others

    Eye movements of 18 male and seven female dyslexic children and 10 normal children were evaluated to determine if eye movement disorders may be the cause of some of the symptoms associated with dyslexia. Data on eye movements were collected while Ss moved their eyes from one fixation point to another in a nonreading situation. Errors in vertical…

  10. Latino Movement: A Target for Harassment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Members of the Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan (MEChA), which translates to Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, report that their movement is being targeted by school administrators across the country due to its demands for Chicano/Latino studies programs and protests against anti-immigration and anti-affirmative action movements.…

  11. Mixed movements/performance-based drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2011-01-01

    Mixed Movements is a research project engaged in performance-based architectural drawing. As one in a series working with architectonic implementation in relation to body and movements, the actual project relates body-movement and dynamic drawing and presents the material as interactive ‘space-time-tables’....

  12. Examining Age-Related Movement Representations for Sequential (Fine-Motor) Finger Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbard, Carl; Cacola, Priscila; Bobbio, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    Theory suggests that imagined and executed movement planning relies on internal models for action. Using a chronometry paradigm to compare the movement duration of imagined and executed movements, we tested children aged 7-11 years and adults on their ability to perform sequential finger movements. Underscoring this tactic was our desire to gain a…

  13. Influence of Persons' Movements on Ventilation Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Hyldig, Mikkel; Kamper, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Most often the ventilation effectiveness of a ventilated room is determined without considering the influence of persons´ movements. Even though the main reason for supplying the ventilation may be to create a healthy and productive environment for the occupants, their own influence...... on the ventilation is usually disregarded. This paper presents results from a systematic investigation of the movements´ influence on the ventilation effectiveness using human subjects combined with tracer gas measurements. Several typical "movements" are defined and carefully repeated to determine the influence......, even though the movements reduce the effectiveness. Furthermore, it is found that the influence of the different movements vary substantially....

  14. Bubbling controlled by needle movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vejrazka, Jiri; Fujasova, Maria; Stanovsky, Petr; Ruzicka, Marek C; Drahos, JirI [Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Prague (Czech Republic)], E-mail: vejrazka@icpf.cas.cz

    2008-07-30

    A device for 'on-demand' production of bubbles is presented. The device is based on a movable needle, through which air is injected. Bubbling is controlled by a rapid needle movement, which induces the bubble detachment. Conditions for proper function of the device include the restriction on the flow rate through the needle, sufficient needle pressure drop and adequate needle acceleration. Functionality of the device is demonstrated. Bubbling from a stationary needle is also discussed and a scaling for bubble size is proposed for the case of short needles, to which a constant flow rate is imposed through tubes of a finite volume.

  15. Gender and Awa Dance Movements

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Hisako

    2000-01-01

    At around the period when Japanese women began to seek the liberation from sexual segregation, the sex diffreence in the movements of the Awa Dance gradually widened, due to obtaining more attractive performance as tourism resources. Women danced a female dance and men danced a male dance. Despite clear differences in movements,some women came to challenge the male dance.This article attempts to make clear,through interviews, who began to dance the male dance and when and tries to describe th...

  16. Eye movement monitoring of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jennifer D; Riggs, Lily; McQuiggan, Douglas A; McQuiggan, Doug

    2010-08-15

    Explicit (often verbal) reports are typically used to investigate memory (e.g. "Tell me what you remember about the person you saw at the bank yesterday."), however such reports can often be unreliable or sensitive to response bias, and may be unobtainable in some participant populations. Furthermore, explicit reports only reveal when information has reached consciousness and cannot comment on when memories were accessed during processing, regardless of whether the information is subsequently accessed in a conscious manner. Eye movement monitoring (eye tracking) provides a tool by which memory can be probed without asking participants to comment on the contents of their memories, and access of such memories can be revealed on-line. Video-based eye trackers (either head-mounted or remote) use a system of cameras and infrared markers to examine the pupil and corneal reflection in each eye as the participant views a display monitor. For head-mounted eye trackers, infrared markers are also used to determine head position to allow for head movement and more precise localization of eye position. Here, we demonstrate the use of a head-mounted eye tracking system to investigate memory performance in neurologically-intact and neurologically-impaired adults. Eye movement monitoring procedures begin with the placement of the eye tracker on the participant, and setup of the head and eye cameras. Calibration and validation procedures are conducted to ensure accuracy of eye position recording. Real-time recordings of X,Y-coordinate positions on the display monitor are then converted and used to describe periods of time in which the eye is static (i.e. fixations) versus in motion (i.e., saccades). Fixations and saccades are time-locked with respect to the onset/offset of a visual display or another external event (e.g. button press). Experimental manipulations are constructed to examine how and when patterns of fixations and saccades are altered through different types of prior

  17. Stereotypic movement disorder: easily missed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Roger D; Soltanifar, Atefeh; Baer, Susan

    2010-08-01

    To expand the understanding of stereotypic movement disorder (SMD) and its differentiation from tics and autistic stereotypies. Forty-two children (31 males, mean age 6y 3mo, SD 2y 8mo; 11 females, mean age 6y 7mo, SD 1y 9mo) consecutively diagnosed with SMD, without-self-injurious behavior, intellectual disability, sensory impairment, or an autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), were assessed in a neuropsychiatry clinic. A list of probe questions on the nature of the stereotypy was administered to parents (and to children if developmentally ready). Questionnaires administered included the Stereotypy Severity Scale, Short Sensory Profile, Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, Repetitive Behavior Scale--Revised, and the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire. The stereotyped movement patterns were directly observed and in some cases further documented by video recordings made by parents. The probe questions were used again on follow-up at a mean age of 10 years 7 months (SD 4y 4mo). Mean age at onset was 17 months. Males exceeded females by 3:1. Family history of a pattern of SMD was reported in 13 and neuropsychiatric comorbidity in 30 (attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder in 16, tics in 18, and developmental coordination disorder in 16). Obsessive-compulsive disorder occurred in only two. The Short Sensory Profile correlated with comorbidity (p<0.001), the Stereotypy Severity Scale (p=0.009), and the Repetitive Behavior Scale (p<0.001); the last correlated with the Stereotypy Severity Scale (p=0.001). Children (but not their parents) liked their movements, which were usually associated with excitement or imaginative play. Mean length of follow-up was 4 years 8 months (SD 2y 10mo). Of the 39 children followed for longer than 6 months, the behavior stopped or was gradually shaped so as to occur primarily privately in 25. Misdiagnosis was common: 26 were initially referred as tics, 10 as ASD, five as compulsions, and one as epilepsy. Co-occurring facial

  18. Saccadic eye movement during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uri, John J.; Linder, Barry J.; Moore, Thomas P.; Pool, Sam L.; Thornton, William E.

    1989-01-01

    Saccadic eye movements were studied in six subjects during two Space Shuttle missions. Reaction time, peak velocity and accuracy of horizontal, visually-guided saccades were examined preflight, inflight and postflight. Conventional electro-oculography was used to record eye position, with the subjects responding to pseudo-randomly illuminated targets at 0 deg and + or - 10 deg and 20 deg visual angles. In all subjects, preflight measurements were within normal limits. Reaction time was significantly increased inflight, while peak velocity was significantly decreased. A tendency toward a greater proportion of hypometric saccades inflight was also noted. Possible explanations for these changes and possible correlations with space motion sickness are discussed.

  19. NETWORK ACTIVATION DURING BIMANUAL MOVEMENTS IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, RR; Small, SL; Chen, EE; Solodkin, A.

    2008-01-01

    The coordination of movement between the upper limbs is a function highly distributed across the animal kingdom. How the central nervous system generates such bilateral, synchronous movements, and how this differs from the generation of unilateral movements, remains uncertain. Electrophysiologic and functional imaging studies support that the activity of many brain regions during bimanual and unimanual movement are quite similar. Thus, the same brain regions (and indeed the same neurons) respond similarly during unimanual and bimanual movements as measured by electrophysiological responses. How then are different motor behaviors generated? To address this question, we studied unimanual and bimanual movements using fMRI and constructed networks of activation using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). Our results suggest that (1) the dominant hemisphere appears to initiate activity responsible for bimanual movement; (2) activation during bimanual movement does not reflect the sum of right and left unimanual activation; (3) production of unimanual movement involves a network that is distinct from, and not a mirror of, the network for contralateral unimanual movement; and (4) using SEM, it is possible to obtain robust group networks representative of a population and to identify individual networks which can be used to detect subtle differences both between subjects as well as within a single subject over time. In summary, these results highlight a differential role for the dominant and non-dominant hemispheres during bimanual movements, further elaborating the concept of handedness and dominance. This knowledge increases our understanding of cortical motor physiology in health and after neurological damage. PMID:18718872

  20. Preceding movement effects on sequential aiming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Darian T; De Grosbois, John; Smirl, Jonathan; Heath, Matthew; Binsted, Gordon

    2011-11-01

    In this study, two experiments were devised to examine the control strategy used by individuals when performing sequential aiming movements. Of particular interest was the aiming behavior displayed when task difficulty was changed midway through a sequence of movements. In Experiment 1, target size was manipulated, as the targets were made either larger or smaller, between the 8th and 12th movement of the sequence. In Experiment 2, the amplitude between the two targets was similarly changed while the target size remained constant. Results revealed that in Experiment 1, individuals took two movements following the perturbation to target size, to re-tune their movement times in order to correspond with the new task difficulty. Conversely for Experiment 2, movement time changed immediately and in correspondence with the new target amplitude. These findings demonstrate that participants can use information from the preceding movement to prepare and guide subsequent movements--but only when target size is changed. When response amplitude changes mid-sequence, it seems individuals rely more on immediate, target-derived information. Therefore, counter to some current accounts of visual movement control, it appears that memory representations of the preceding movement can guide subsequent movements; however, this information appears selectively accessed in a context-dependent fashion.