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Sample records for brownian dynamics simulation

  1. Rotational Brownian Dynamics simulations of clathrin cage formation

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    Ilie, Ioana M.; Briels, Wim J. [Computational BioPhysics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Otter, Wouter K. den, E-mail: w.k.denotter@utwente.nl [Computational BioPhysics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Multi Scale Mechanics, Faculty of Engineering Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-08-14

    The self-assembly of nearly rigid proteins into ordered aggregates is well suited for modeling by the patchy particle approach. Patchy particles are traditionally simulated using Monte Carlo methods, to study the phase diagram, while Brownian Dynamics simulations would reveal insights into the assembly dynamics. However, Brownian Dynamics of rotating anisotropic particles gives rise to a number of complications not encountered in translational Brownian Dynamics. We thoroughly test the Rotational Brownian Dynamics scheme proposed by Naess and Elsgaeter [Macromol. Theory Simul. 13, 419 (2004); Naess and Elsgaeter Macromol. Theory Simul. 14, 300 (2005)], confirming its validity. We then apply the algorithm to simulate a patchy particle model of clathrin, a three-legged protein involved in vesicle production from lipid membranes during endocytosis. Using this algorithm we recover time scales for cage assembly comparable to those from experiments. We also briefly discuss the undulatory dynamics of the polyhedral cage.

  2. Predicting Protein Interactions by Brownian Dynamics Simulations

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    Xuan-Yu Meng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a newly adapted Brownian-Dynamics (BD-based protein docking method for predicting native protein complexes. The approach includes global BD conformational sampling, compact complex selection, and local energy minimization. In order to reduce the computational costs for energy evaluations, a shell-based grid force field was developed to represent the receptor protein and solvation effects. The performance of this BD protein docking approach has been evaluated on a test set of 24 crystal protein complexes. Reproduction of experimental structures in the test set indicates the adequate conformational sampling and accurate scoring of this BD protein docking approach. Furthermore, we have developed an approach to account for the flexibility of proteins, which has been successfully applied to reproduce the experimental complex structure from the structure of two unbounded proteins. These results indicate that this adapted BD protein docking approach can be useful for the prediction of protein-protein interactions.

  3. Fast simulation of Brownian dynamics in a crowded environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen; Grima, Ramon

    2017-01-14

    Brownian dynamics simulations are an increasingly popular tool for understanding spatially extended biochemical reaction systems. Recent improvements in our understanding of the cellular environment show that volume exclusion effects are fundamental to reaction networks inside cells. These systems are frequently studied by incorporating inert hard spheres (crowders) into three-dimensional Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations; however these methods are extremely slow owing to the sheer number of possible collisions between particles. Here we propose a rigorous "crowder-free" method to dramatically increase the simulation speed for crowded biochemical reaction systems by eliminating the need to explicitly simulate the crowders. We consider both the cases where the reactive particles are point particles, and where they themselves occupy a volume. Using simulations of simple chemical reaction networks, we show that the "crowder-free" method is up to three orders of magnitude faster than conventional BD and yet leads to nearly indistinguishable results from the latter.

  4. Analysis of Brownian Dynamics Simulations of Reversible Bimolecular Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Lipková, Jana

    2011-01-01

    A class of Brownian dynamics algorithms for stochastic reaction-diffusion models which include reversible bimolecular reactions is presented and analyzed. The method is a generalization of the λ-bcȳ model for irreversible bimolecular reactions which was introduced in [R. Erban and S. J. Chapman, Phys. Biol., 6(2009), 046001]. The formulae relating the experimentally measurable quantities (reaction rate constants and diffusion constants) with the algorithm parameters are derived. The probability of geminate recombination is also investigated. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  5. Large shear deformation of particle gels studied by Brownian Dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rzepiela, A.A.; Opheusden, van J.H.J.; Vliet, van T.

    2004-01-01

    Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulations have been performed to study structure and rheology of particle gels under large shear deformation. The model incorporates soft spherical particles, and reversible flexible bond formation. Two different methods of shear deformation are discussed, namely affine and

  6. An iterative method for hydrodynamic interactions in Brownian dynamics simulations of polymer dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Linling; Young, Charles D.; Sing, Charles E.

    2017-07-01

    Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulations are a standard tool for understanding the dynamics of polymers in and out of equilibrium. Quantitative comparison can be made to rheological measurements of dilute polymer solutions, as well as direct visual observations of fluorescently labeled DNA. The primary computational challenge with BD is the expensive calculation of hydrodynamic interactions (HI), which are necessary to capture physically realistic dynamics. The full HI calculation, performed via a Cholesky decomposition every time step, scales with the length of the polymer as O(N3). This limits the calculation to a few hundred simulated particles. A number of approximations in the literature can lower this scaling to O(N2 - N2.25), and explicit solvent methods scale as O(N); however both incur a significant constant per-time step computational cost. Despite this progress, there remains a need for new or alternative methods of calculating hydrodynamic interactions; large polymer chains or semidilute polymer solutions remain computationally expensive. In this paper, we introduce an alternative method for calculating approximate hydrodynamic interactions. Our method relies on an iterative scheme to establish self-consistency between a hydrodynamic matrix that is averaged over simulation and the hydrodynamic matrix used to run the simulation. Comparison to standard BD simulation and polymer theory results demonstrates that this method quantitatively captures both equilibrium and steady-state dynamics after only a few iterations. The use of an averaged hydrodynamic matrix allows the computationally expensive Brownian noise calculation to be performed infrequently, so that it is no longer the bottleneck of the simulation calculations. We also investigate limitations of this conformational averaging approach in ring polymers.

  7. Multiscale simulations of anisotropic particles combining Brownian Dynamics and Green's Function Reaction Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Wolde, Pieter Rein ten; Bolhuis, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    The modeling of complex reaction-diffusion processes in, for instance, cellular biochemical networks or self-assembling soft matter can be tremendously sped up by employing a multiscale algorithm which combines the mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method with explicit stochastic Brownian, Langevin, or deterministic Molecular Dynamics to treat reactants at the microscopic scale [A. Vijaykumar, P.G. Bolhuis and P.R. ten Wolde, J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 43}, 21: 214102 (2015)]. Here we extend this multiscale BD-GFRD approach to include the orientational dynamics that is crucial to describe the anisotropic interactions often prevalent in biomolecular systems. We illustrate the novel algorithm using a simple patchy particle model. After validation of the algorithm we discuss its performance. The rotational BD-GFRD multiscale method will open up the possibility for large scale simulations of e.g. protein signalling networks.

  8. Equivalence of Brownian dynamics and dynamic Monte Carlo simulations in multicomponent colloidal suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuetos, Alejandro; Patti, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    We propose a simple but powerful theoretical framework to quantitatively compare Brownian dynamics (BD) and dynamic Monte Carlo (DMC) simulations of multicomponent colloidal suspensions. By extending our previous study focusing on monodisperse systems of rodlike colloids, here we generalize the formalism described there to multicomponent colloidal mixtures and validate it by investigating the dynamics in isotropic and liquid crystalline phases containing spherical and rodlike particles. In order to investigate the dynamics of multicomponent colloidal systems by DMC simulations, it is key to determine the elementary time step of each species and establish a unique timescale. This is crucial to consistently study the dynamics of colloidal particles with different geometry. By analyzing the mean-square displacement, the orientation autocorrelation functions, and the self part of the van Hove correlation functions, we show that DMC simulation is a very convenient and reliable technique to describe the stochastic dynamics of any multicomponent colloidal system. Our theoretical formalism can be easily extended to any colloidal system containing size and/or shape polydisperse particles.

  9. Modeling of rheological behavior for polymer nanocomposites via Brownian dynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Dong Gi; Youn, Jae Ryoun; Song, Young Seok

    2016-11-01

    Reptation dynamics of the coarse-grained polymer molecular chain is investigated to predict rheological behavior of polymeric nanocomposites by applying Brownian dynamics simulation to the proposed full chain reptation model. Extensibility of polymer chain and constraint release from chain stretch or retraction are of main concern in describing the nanocomposite systems. Rheological results are well predicted by applying the improved simulation algorithm using stepwise Wiener processes. Strong shear thinning and elongational strain hardening are predicted and compared with the experimental results of polyamide 6/organoclay nanocomposites. The full chain reptation model enables us to predict dynamic motion of the polymer chain segments and understand mechanisms for characteristic rheological behaviors.

  10. Brownian dynamics simulations on CPU and GPU with BD_BOX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Długosz, Maciej; Zieliński, Paweł; Trylska, Joanna

    2011-09-01

    There has been growing interest in simulating biological processes under in vivo conditions due to recent advances in experimental techniques dedicated to study single particle behavior in crowded environments. We have developed a software package, BD_BOX, for multiscale Brownian dynamics simulations. BD_BOX can simulate either single molecules or multicomponent systems of diverse, interacting molecular species using flexible, coarse-grained bead models. BD_BOX is written in C and employs modern computer architectures and technologies; these include MPI for distributed-memory architectures, OpenMP for shared-memory platforms, NVIDIA CUDA framework for GPGPU, and SSE vectorization for CPU. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Simulation for Sludge Flocculation I: Brownian Dynamic Simulation for Perikinetic Flocculation of Charged Particle

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    Linshuang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate sludge drying process, a numerical simulation based on Brownian dynamic for the floc with uncharged and charged particles was conducted. The Langevin equation is used as dynamical equation for tracking each particle in a floc. An initial condition and periodic boundary condition which well conformed to reality is used for calculating the floc growth process. Each cell consists of 1000 primary particles with diameter 0.1 ∼ 4 μm. Floc growth is related to the thermal force and the electrostatic force. The electrostatic force on a particle in the simulation cell is considered as the sum of electrostatic forces from other particles in the original cell and its replicate cells. It is assumed that flocs are charged with precharged primary particles in dispersion system by ionization. By the analysis of the simulation figures, on one hand, the effects of initial particle size and sludge density on floc smashing time, floc radius of gyration, and fractal dimension were discussed. On the other hand, the effects of ionization on floc smashing time and floc structure were presented. This study has important practical value in the high-turbidity water treatment, especially for sludge drying.

  12. Smoldyn on graphics processing units: massively parallel Brownian dynamics simulations.

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    Dematté, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Space is a very important aspect in the simulation of biochemical systems; recently, the need for simulation algorithms able to cope with space is becoming more and more compelling. Complex and detailed models of biochemical systems need to deal with the movement of single molecules and particles, taking into consideration localized fluctuations, transportation phenomena, and diffusion. A common drawback of spatial models lies in their complexity: models can become very large, and their simulation could be time consuming, especially if we want to capture the systems behavior in a reliable way using stochastic methods in conjunction with a high spatial resolution. In order to deliver the promise done by systems biology to be able to understand a system as whole, we need to scale up the size of models we are able to simulate, moving from sequential to parallel simulation algorithms. In this paper, we analyze Smoldyn, a widely diffused algorithm for stochastic simulation of chemical reactions with spatial resolution and single molecule detail, and we propose an alternative, innovative implementation that exploits the parallelism of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). The implementation executes the most computational demanding steps (computation of diffusion, unimolecular, and bimolecular reaction, as well as the most common cases of molecule-surface interaction) on the GPU, computing them in parallel on each molecule of the system. The implementation offers good speed-ups and real time, high quality graphics output

  13. Self-assembly of actin monomers into long filaments: Brownian Dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2009-01-01

    Brownian dynamics simulations are used to study the dynamical process of self-assembly of actin monomers into long filaments containing up to 1000 actin protomers. In order to overcome the large separation of time scales between the diffusive motion of the freemonomers and the relatively slow....../detachment events. When a single filament is allowed to grow in a bath of constant concentration of free ADP-actin monomers, its growth rate increases linearly with the free monomer concentration in quantitative agreement with in vitro experiments. Theresults also show that the waiting time is governed by...

  14. Cluster growth mechanisms in Lennard-Jones fluids: A comparison between molecular dynamics and Brownian dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jiyun; Lee, Jumin; Kim, Jun Soo

    2015-03-01

    We present a simulation study on the mechanisms of a phase separation in dilute fluids of Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles as a model of self-interacting molecules. Molecular dynamics (MD) and Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of the LJ fluids are employed to model the condensation of a liquid droplet in the vapor phase and the mesoscopic aggregation in the solution phase, respectively. With emphasis on the cluster growth at late times well beyond the nucleation stage, we find that the growth mechanisms can be qualitatively different: cluster diffusion and coalescence in the MD simulations and Ostwald ripening in the BD simulations. We also show that the rates of the cluster growth have distinct scaling behaviors during cluster growth. This work suggests that in the solution phase the random Brownian nature of the solute dynamics may lead to the Ostwald ripening that is qualitatively different from the cluster coalescence in the vapor phase.

  15. Structure Analysis of Jungle-Gym-Type Gels by Brownian Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Noriyoshi; Ono, Kohki; Takasu, Masako; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2008-02-01

    We investigated the structure and the formation process of two kinds of gels by Brownian dynamics simulation. The effect of flexibility of main chain oligomer was studied. From our results, hard gel with rigid main chain forms more homogeneous network structure than soft gel with flexible main chain. In soft gel, many small loops are formed, and clusters tend to shrink. This heterogeneous network structure may be caused by microgels. In the low density case, soft gel shows more heterogeneity than the high density case.

  16. Brownian dynamics simulation of the cross-talking effect among modified histones on conformations of nucleosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhao-Wen; Li, Wei; Xie, Ping; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2010-04-01

    Using Brownian dynamics simulation, we studied the effect of histone modifications on conformations of an array of nucleosomes in a segment of chromatin. The simulation demonstrated that the segment of chromatin shows the dynamic behaviour that its conformation can switch between a state with nearly all of the histones being wrapped by DNA and a state with nearly all of the histones being unwrapped by DNA, thus involving the “cross-talking" interactions among the histones. Each state can stay for a sufficiently long time. These conformational states are essential for gene expression or gene silence. The simulation also shows that these conformational states can be inherited by the daughter DNAs during DNA replication, giving a theoretical explanation of the epigenetic phenomenon.

  17. Brownian dynamics simulation of insulin microsphere formation from break-up of a fractal network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Gunton, J D; Khan, Siddique J; Schoelz, J K; Chakrabarti, A

    2011-01-14

    Motivated by a recent experiment on insulin microsphere formation where polyethylene glycol (PEG) is used as the precipitating agent, we have developed a simple theoretical model that can predict the formation of a fractal network of insulin monomers and the subsequent break-up of the fractal network into microsphere aggregates. In our approach the effect of PEG on insulin is modeled via a standard depletion attraction mechanism via the Asakura-Oosawa model. We show that even in the context of this simple model, it is possible to mimic important aspects of the insulin experiment in a brownian dynamics simulation. We simulate the effect of changing temperature in our model by changing the well depth of the Asakura-Oosawa potential. A fractal network is observed in a "deep quench" of the system, followed by a "heating" that results in a break-up of the network and subsequent formation of microspheres.

  18. Brownian dynamics without Green's functions.

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    Delong, Steven; Usabiaga, Florencio Balboa; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael; Griffith, Boyce E; Donev, Aleksandar

    2014-04-07

    We develop a Fluctuating Immersed Boundary (FIB) method for performing Brownian dynamics simulations of confined particle suspensions. Unlike traditional methods which employ analytical Green's functions for Stokes flow in the confined geometry, the FIB method uses a fluctuating finite-volume Stokes solver to generate the action of the response functions "on the fly." Importantly, we demonstrate that both the deterministic terms necessary to capture the hydrodynamic interactions among the suspended particles, as well as the stochastic terms necessary to generate the hydrodynamically correlated Brownian motion, can be generated by solving the steady Stokes equations numerically only once per time step. This is accomplished by including a stochastic contribution to the stress tensor in the fluid equations consistent with fluctuating hydrodynamics. We develop novel temporal integrators that account for the multiplicative nature of the noise in the equations of Brownian dynamics and the strong dependence of the mobility on the configuration for confined systems. Notably, we propose a random finite difference approach to approximating the stochastic drift proportional to the divergence of the configuration-dependent mobility matrix. Through comparisons with analytical and existing computational results, we numerically demonstrate the ability of the FIB method to accurately capture both the static (equilibrium) and dynamic properties of interacting particles in flow.

  19. 3D Lattice Boltzmann-Brownian Dynamics Simulations of Nanoparticle Deposition in Evaporating Liquid Masses

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    Zhao, Mingfei; Yong, Xin

    2017-11-01

    Nanoparticle deposition coupled to hydrodynamics plays important roles in materials printing and thin-film processing. Investigations of nanoparticle dynamics in evaporating colloidal dispersions could elicit a greater understanding of the processing-structure relationship for evaporation-induced self-assembly and deposition. A 3D free-energy lattice Boltzmann method combined with Brownian dynamics is developed to simulate evaporating colloidal droplets and rivulets. In this work, we explore the deposition on solid substrates with different wetting properties, namely static contact angle and contact line motion. We highlight the influence of convective flows on the assembly kinetics and deposit patterns using the developed model. We introduce a novel approach to impose a pinned contact line for most of droplet lifetime. The time evolutions of contact angle and droplet volume are examined to characterize the pinning scheme. We observe the process of nanoparticle self-assembly during the evaporation of droplets and rivulets and quantitatively analyze the deposit structure. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1538090.

  20. Brownian dynamics simulations of electrostatic adsorption and ordering of charged colloidal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Singh, Jennifer; Barrera, Enrique; Varshney, Vikas; Kelley, John; Vaia, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Self-limiting assembly of nanoparticle (NP) and biomacromolecular arrays promises to revolutionize compliant device fabrication by enabling print-on-demand. Presently, quantitative understanding of the relationship between the array order, nanoparticle size, surface characteristics, and process conditions remain elusive. Previous simulations have shown that tuning particle and surface potentials, screening lengths, and particle concentrations can lead to ordering. However, identifying the experimental conditions to observe these in-plane order-disorder and order-order transitions for NPs remains a challenge. Here in, the absorption of electrostatically stabilized NPs with increasing ratio of particle-particle repulsion to particle-surface attraction via Brownian dynamics simulations is discussed. The orientation correlation function follows the KTHNY theory of phase transition as particle and surface potentials are tuned. Detailed Voronoi analysis reveals movement and defect annihilation during the final stages of adsorption. Identifying the transition between liquid, hexatic, and crystalline NP arrays will provide experimental conditions necessary to create high resolution patterns and smaller devices.

  1. Filamentous biopolymers on surfaces: atomic force microscopy images compared with Brownian dynamics simulation of filament deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Mücke

    Full Text Available Nanomechanical properties of filamentous biopolymers, such as the persistence length, may be determined from two-dimensional images of molecules immobilized on surfaces. For a single filament in solution, two principal adsorption scenarios are possible. Both scenarios depend primarily on the interaction strength between the filament and the support: i For interactions in the range of the thermal energy, the filament can freely equilibrate on the surface during adsorption; ii For interactions much stronger than the thermal energy, the filament will be captured by the surface without having equilibrated. Such a 'trapping' mechanism leads to more condensed filament images and hence to a smaller value for the apparent persistence length. To understand the capture mechanism in more detail we have performed Brownian dynamics simulations of relatively short filaments by taking the two extreme scenarios into account. We then compared these 'ideal' adsorption scenarios with observed images of immobilized vimentin intermediate filaments on different surfaces. We found a good agreement between the contours of the deposited vimentin filaments on mica ('ideal' trapping and on glass ('ideal' equilibrated with our simulations. Based on these data, we have developed a strategy to reliably extract the persistence length of short worm-like chain fragments or network forming filaments with unknown polymer-surface interactions.

  2. Coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations of protein translocation through nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Po-Hsien; Helms, Volkhard; Geyer, Tihamér

    2012-10-01

    A crucial process in biological cells is the translocation of newly synthesized proteins across cell membranes via integral membrane protein pores termed translocons. Recent improved techniques now allow producing artificial membranes with pores of similar dimensions of a few nm as the translocon system. For the translocon system, the protein has to be unfolded, whereas the artificial pores are wide enough so that small proteins can pass through even when folded. To study how proteins permeate through such membrane pores, we used coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations where the proteins were modeled as single beads or bead-spring polymers for both folded and unfolded states. The pores were modeled as cylindrical holes through the membrane with various radii and lengths. Diffusion was driven by a concentration gradient created across the porous membrane. Our results for both folded and unfolded configurations show the expected reciprocal relation between the flow rate and the pore length in agreement with an analytical solution derived by Brunn et al. [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 37, 311 (1984)], 10.1093/qjmam/37.2.311. Furthermore, we find that the geometric constriction by the narrow pore leads to an accumulation of proteins at the pore entrance, which in turn compensates for the reduced diffusivity of the proteins inside the pore.

  3. Velocity Gradient Power Functional for Brownian Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Las Heras, Daniel; Schmidt, Matthias

    2018-01-12

    We present an explicit and simple approximation for the superadiabatic excess (over ideal gas) free power functional, admitting the study of the nonequilibrium dynamics of overdamped Brownian many-body systems. The functional depends on the local velocity gradient and is systematically obtained from treating the microscopic stress distribution as a conjugate field. The resulting superadiabatic forces are beyond dynamical density functional theory and are of a viscous nature. Their high accuracy is demonstrated by comparison to simulation results.

  4. GPU accelerated Monte Carlo simulation of Brownian motors dynamics with CUDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiechowicz, J.; Kostur, M.; Machura, L.

    2015-06-01

    This work presents an updated and extended guide on methods of a proper acceleration of the Monte Carlo integration of stochastic differential equations with the commonly available NVIDIA Graphics Processing Units using the CUDA programming environment. We outline the general aspects of the scientific computing on graphics cards and demonstrate them with two models of a well known phenomenon of the noise induced transport of Brownian motors in periodic structures. As a source of fluctuations in the considered systems we selected the three most commonly occurring noises: the Gaussian white noise, the white Poissonian noise and the dichotomous process also known as a random telegraph signal. The detailed discussion on various aspects of the applied numerical schemes is also presented. The measured speedup can be of the astonishing order of about 3000 when compared to a typical CPU. This number significantly expands the range of problems solvable by use of stochastic simulations, allowing even an interactive research in some cases.

  5. COMPUTER SIMULATION OF LOCAL MOBILITY IN DENDRIMERS WITH ASYMMETRIC BRANCHING BY BROWNIAN DYNAMICS METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Shavykin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Brownian dynamics method has been used to study the effect of the branching asymmetry on the local orientational mobility of segments and bonds in dendrimers in good solvent. “Coarse-grained” models of flexible dendrimers with different branching symmetry but with the same average segment length were considered. The frequency dependences of the rate of the spin-lattice relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR [1/T1H(H] for segments or bonds located at different distances from terminal monomers were calculated. After the exclusion of the contribution of the overall dendrimer rotation the position of the maxima of the frequency dependences [1/T1H(ωH] for different segments with the same length doesn’t depend on their location inside a dendrimer both for phantom models and for models with excluded volume interactions. This effect doesn’t depend also on the branching symmetry, but the position of the maximum [1/T1H(ωH] is determined by the segment length. For bonds inside segments the positions of the maximum [1/T1H(ωH] coincide for all models considered. Therefore, the obtained earlier conclusion about the weak influence of the excluded volume interactions on the local dynamics in the flexible symmetric dendrimers can be generalized for dendrimers with an asymmetric branching.

  6. Atomic detail brownian dynamics simulations of concentrated protein solutions with a mean field treatment of hydrodynamic interactions.

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    Mereghetti, Paolo; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-07-26

    High macromolecular concentrations are a distinguishing feature of living organisms. Understanding how the high concentration of solutes affects the dynamic properties of biological macromolecules is fundamental for the comprehension of biological processes in living systems. In this paper, we describe the implementation of mean field models of translational and rotational hydrodynamic interactions into an atomically detailed many-protein brownian dynamics simulation method. Concentrated solutions (30-40% volume fraction) of myoglobin, hemoglobin A, and sickle cell hemoglobin S were simulated, and static structure factors, oligomer formation, and translational and rotational self-diffusion coefficients were computed. Good agreement of computed properties with available experimental data was obtained. The results show the importance of both solvent mediated interactions and weak protein-protein interactions for accurately describing the dynamics and the association properties of concentrated protein solutions. Specifically, they show a qualitative difference in the translational and rotational dynamics of the systems studied. Although the translational diffusion coefficient is controlled by macromolecular shape and hydrodynamic interactions, the rotational diffusion coefficient is affected by macromolecular shape, direct intermolecular interactions, and both translational and rotational hydrodynamic interactions.

  7. From local to hydrodynamic friction in Brownian motion: A multiparticle collision dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theers, Mario; Westphal, Elmar; Gompper, Gerhard; Winkler, Roland G

    2016-03-01

    The friction and diffusion coefficients of rigid spherical colloidal particles dissolved in a fluid are determined from velocity and force autocorrelation functions by mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations. Colloids with both slip and no-slip boundary conditions are considered, which are embedded in fluids modeled by multiparticle collision dynamics with and without angular momentum conservation. For no-slip boundary conditions, hydrodynamics yields the well-known Stokes law, while for slip boundary conditions the lack of angular momentum conservation leads to a reduction of the hydrodynamic friction coefficient compared to the classical result. The colloid diffusion coefficient is determined by integration of the velocity autocorrelation function, where the numerical result at shorter times is combined with the theoretical hydrodynamic expression for longer times. The suitability of this approach is confirmed by simulations of sedimenting colloids. In general, we find only minor deviations from the Stokes-Einstein relation, which even disappear for larger colloids. Importantly, for colloids with slip boundary conditions, our simulation results contradict the frequently assumed additivity of local and hydrodynamic diffusion coefficients.

  8. Introduction to practice of molecular simulation molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo, Brownian dynamics, lattice Boltzmann and dissipative particle dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Satoh, Akira

    2010-01-01

    This book presents the most important and main concepts of the molecular and microsimulation techniques. It enables readers to improve their skills in developing simulation programs by providing physical problems and sample simulation programs for them to use. Provides tools to develop skills in developing simulations programs Includes sample simulation programs for the reader to use Appendix explains Fortran and C languages in simple terms to allow the non-expert to use them.

  9. Chameleon behaviour of α-synuclein: brownian dynamics simulations of protein aggregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilie, Ioana Mariuca

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades a large number of studies have been carried out in order to determine the physiological function of α-synuclein and its implication in Parkinson's disease. A complementary tool to experiments are computer simulations, which are intensively used for problems for which

  10. Three steps to gold: mechanism of protein adsorption revealed by Brownian and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozboyaci, M; Kokh, D B; Wade, R C

    2016-04-21

    The addition of three N-terminal histidines to β-lactamase inhibitor protein was shown experimentally to increase its binding potency to an Au(111) surface substantially but the binding mechanism was not resolved. Here, we propose a complete adsorption mechanism for this fusion protein by means of a multi-scale simulation approach and free energy calculations. We find that adsorption is a three-step process: (i) recognition of the surface predominantly by the histidine fusion peptide and formation of an encounter complex facilitated by a reduced dielectric screening of water in the interfacial region, (ii) adsorption of the protein on the surface and adoption of a specific binding orientation, and (iii) adaptation of the protein structure on the metal surface accompanied by induced fit. We anticipate that the mechanistic features of protein adsorption to an Au(111) surface revealed here can be extended to other inorganic surfaces and proteins and will therefore aid the design of specific protein-surface interactions.

  11. Rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of non-interacting magnetized ellipsoidal particles in d.c. and a.c. magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Jorge H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez campus, P.O. Box 9046, Mayaguez, PR 00681 (Puerto Rico); Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Medellin (Colombia); Rinaldi, Carlos [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez campus, P.O. Box 9046, Mayaguez, PR 00681 (Puerto Rico)], E-mail: crinaldi@uprm.edu

    2009-10-15

    The rotational Brownian motion of magnetized tri-axial ellipsoidal particles (orthotropic particles) suspended in a Newtonian fluid, in the dilute suspension limit, under applied d.c. and a.c. magnetic fields was studied using rotational Brownian dynamics simulations. The algorithm describing the change in the suspension magnetization was obtained from the stochastic angular momentum equation using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and a quaternion formulation of orientation space. Simulation results are in agreement with the Langevin function for equilibrium magnetization and with single-exponential relaxation from equilibrium at small fields using Perrin's effective relaxation time. Dynamic susceptibilities for ellipsoidal particles of different aspect ratios were obtained from the response to oscillating magnetic fields of different frequencies and described by Debye's model for the complex susceptibility using Perrin's effective relaxation time. Simulations at high equilibrium and probe fields indicate that Perrin's effective relaxation time continues to describe relaxation from equilibrium and response to oscillating fields even beyond the small field limit.

  12. Multiscale Reaction-Diffusion Algorithms: PDE-Assisted Brownian Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Franz, Benjamin

    2013-06-19

    Two algorithms that combine Brownian dynami cs (BD) simulations with mean-field partial differential equations (PDEs) are presented. This PDE-assisted Brownian dynamics (PBD) methodology provides exact particle tracking data in parts of the domain, whilst making use of a mean-field reaction-diffusion PDE description elsewhere. The first PBD algorithm couples BD simulations with PDEs by randomly creating new particles close to the interface, which partitions the domain, and by reincorporating particles into the continuum PDE-description when they cross the interface. The second PBD algorithm introduces an overlap region, where both descriptions exist in parallel. It is shown that the overlap region is required to accurately compute variances using PBD simulations. Advantages of both PBD approaches are discussed and illustrative numerical examples are presented. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  13. Quantum dynamical framework for Brownian heat engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, G S; Chaturvedi, S

    2013-07-01

    We present a self-contained formalism modeled after the Brownian motion of a quantum harmonic oscillator for describing the performance of microscopic Brownian heat engines such as Carnot, Stirling, and Otto engines. Our theory, besides reproducing the standard thermodynamics results in the steady state, enables us to study the role dissipation plays in determining the efficiency of Brownian heat engines under actual laboratory conditions. In particular, we analyze in detail the dynamics associated with decoupling a system in equilibrium with one bath and recoupling it to another bath and obtain exact analytical results, which are shown to have significant ramifications on the efficiencies of engines involving such a step. We also develop a simple yet powerful technique for computing corrections to the steady state results arising from finite operation time and use it to arrive at the thermodynamic complementarity relations for various operating conditions and also to compute the efficiencies of the three engines cited above at maximum power. Some of the methods and exactly solvable models presented here are interesting in their own right and could find useful applications in other contexts as well.

  14. Dynamics of colloidal suspensions of ferromagnetic particles in plane Couette flow: comparison of approximate solutions with Brownian dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, Patrick; Kröger, Martin; Hess, Siegfried; Zubarev, Andrey Yu

    2003-06-01

    The stationary and oscillatory properties of dilute ferromagnetic colloidal suspensions in plane Couette flow are studied. Analytical expressions for the off-equilibrium magnetization and the shear viscosity are obtained within the so-called effective field approximation. We also investigate the predictions of a different approximation based on the linearized moment expansion. Direct numerical simulation of the kinetic model are performed in order to test the range of validity of these approximations.

  15. Regime of aggregate structures and magneto-rheological characteristics of a magnetic rod-like particle suspension: Monte Carlo and Brownian dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Kazuya [School of Akita Prefectural University, Yurihonjo (Japan); Satoh, Akira, E-mail: asatoh@akita-pu.ac.jp [Department of Machine Intelligence and System Engineering, Akita Prefectural University, Yurihonjo (Japan)

    2017-09-01

    Highlights: • Monte Carlo simulations have been employed for the aggregate structures. • Brownian dynamics simulations have been employed for the magneto-rheology. • Even a weak shear flow induces a significant regime change in the aggregates. • A strong external magnetic field drastically changes the aggregates. • The dependence of the viscosity on these factors is governed in a complex manner. - Abstract: In the present study, we address a suspension composed ferromagnetic rod-like particles to elucidate a regime change in the aggregate structures and the magneto-rheological characteristics. Monte Carlo simulations have been employed for investigating the aggregate structures in thermodynamic equilibrium, and Brownian dynamics simulations for magneto-rheological features in a simple shear flow. The main results obtained here are summarized as follows. For the case of thermodynamic equilibrium, the rod-like particles aggregate to form thick chain-like clusters and the neighboring clusters incline in opposite directions. If the external magnetic field is increased, the thick chain-like clusters in the magnetic field direction grow thicker by adsorbing the neighboring clusters that incline in the opposite direction. Hence, a significant phase change in the particle aggregates is not induced by an increase in the magnetic field strength. For the case of a simple shear flow, even a weak shear flow induces a significant regime change from the thick chain-like clusters of thermodynamic equilibrium into wall-like aggregates composed of short raft-like clusters. A strong external magnetic field drastically changes these aggregates into wall-like aggregates composed of thick chain-like clusters rather than the short raft-like clusters. The internal structure of these aggregates is not strongly influenced by a shear flow, and the formation of the short raft-like clusters is maintained inside the aggregates. The main contribution to the net viscosity is the

  16. Brownian dynamics of confined suspensions of active microrollers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Delmotte, Blaise; Donev, Aleksandar

    2017-04-01

    We develop efficient numerical methods for performing many-body Brownian dynamics simulations of a recently observed fingering instability in an active suspension of colloidal rollers sedimented above a wall [M. Driscoll, B. Delmotte, M. Youssef, S. Sacanna, A. Donev, and P. Chaikin, Nat. Phys. (2016), preprint arXiv:1609.08673. We present a stochastic Adams-Bashforth integrator for the equations of Brownian dynamics, which has the same cost but is more accurate than the widely used Euler-Maruyama scheme, and use a random finite difference to capture the stochastic drift proportional to the divergence of the configuration-dependent mobility matrix. We generate the Brownian increments using a Krylov method and show that for particles confined to remain in the vicinity of a no-slip wall by gravity or active flows, the number of iterations is independent of the number of particles. Our numerical experiments with active rollers show that the thermal fluctuations set the characteristic height of the colloids above the wall, both in the initial condition and the subsequent evolution dominated by active flows. The characteristic height in turn controls the time scale and wavelength for the development of the fingering instability.

  17. An elementary singularity-free Rotational Brownian Dynamics algorithm for anisotropic particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilie, Ioana Mariuca; Briels, Willem J.; den Otter, Wouter K.

    2015-01-01

    Brownian Dynamics is the designated technique to simulate the collective dynamics of colloidal particles suspended in a solution, e.g., the self-assembly of patchy particles. Simulating the rotational dynamics of anisotropic particles by a first-order Langevin equation, however, gives rise to a

  18. An elementary singularity-free Rotational Brownian Dynamics algorithm for anisotropic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilie, Ioana M.; Briels, Wim J. [Computational Biophysics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Otter, Wouter K. den, E-mail: w.k.denotter@utwente.nl [Computational Biophysics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Multi Scale Mechanics, Faculty of Engineering Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2015-03-21

    Brownian Dynamics is the designated technique to simulate the collective dynamics of colloidal particles suspended in a solution, e.g., the self-assembly of patchy particles. Simulating the rotational dynamics of anisotropic particles by a first-order Langevin equation, however, gives rise to a number of complications, ranging from singularities when using a set of three rotational coordinates to subtle metric and drift corrections. Here, we derive and numerically validate a quaternion-based Rotational Brownian Dynamics algorithm that handles these complications in a simple and elegant way. The extension to hydrodynamic interactions is also discussed.

  19. Dynamical 3-Space: Anisotropic Brownian Motion Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2014 Jiapei Dai reported evidence of anisotropic Brownian motion of a toluidine blue colloid solution in water. In 2015 Felix Scholkmann analysed the Dai data and detected a sidereal time dependence, indicative of a process driving the preferred Brownian mo- tion diffusion direction to a star-based preferred direction. Here we further analyse the Dai data and extract the RA and Dec of that preferred direction, and relate the data to previous determinations from NASA Spacecraft Earth-flyby Doppler shift data, and other determinations.

  20. Regime of aggregate structures and magneto-rheological characteristics of a magnetic rod-like particle suspension: Monte Carlo and Brownian dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kazuya; Satoh, Akira

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, we address a suspension composed ferromagnetic rod-like particles to elucidate a regime change in the aggregate structures and the magneto-rheological characteristics. Monte Carlo simulations have been employed for investigating the aggregate structures in thermodynamic equilibrium, and Brownian dynamics simulations for magneto-rheological features in a simple shear flow. The main results obtained here are summarized as follows. For the case of thermodynamic equilibrium, the rod-like particles aggregate to form thick chain-like clusters and the neighboring clusters incline in opposite directions. If the external magnetic field is increased, the thick chain-like clusters in the magnetic field direction grow thicker by adsorbing the neighboring clusters that incline in the opposite direction. Hence, a significant phase change in the particle aggregates is not induced by an increase in the magnetic field strength. For the case of a simple shear flow, even a weak shear flow induces a significant regime change from the thick chain-like clusters of thermodynamic equilibrium into wall-like aggregates composed of short raft-like clusters. A strong external magnetic field drastically changes these aggregates into wall-like aggregates composed of thick chain-like clusters rather than the short raft-like clusters. The internal structure of these aggregates is not strongly influenced by a shear flow, and the formation of the short raft-like clusters is maintained inside the aggregates. The main contribution to the net viscosity is the viscosity component due to magnetic particle-particle interaction forces in relation to the present volumetric fraction. Hence, a larger magnetic interaction strength and also a stronger external magnetic field give rise to a larger magneto-rheological effect. However, the dependence of the viscosity on these factors is governed in a complex manner by whether or not the wall-like aggregates are composed mainly of short raft

  1. Momentum conserving Brownian dynamics propagator for complex soft matter fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padding, J. T. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Briels, W. J. [Computational Biophysics, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-12-28

    We present a Galilean invariant, momentum conserving first order Brownian dynamics scheme for coarse-grained simulations of highly frictional soft matter systems. Friction forces are taken to be with respect to moving background material. The motion of the background material is described by locally averaged velocities in the neighborhood of the dissolved coarse coordinates. The velocity variables are updated by a momentum conserving scheme. The properties of the stochastic updates are derived through the Chapman-Kolmogorov and Fokker-Planck equations for the evolution of the probability distribution of coarse-grained position and velocity variables, by requiring the equilibrium distribution to be a stationary solution. We test our new scheme on concentrated star polymer solutions and find that the transverse current and velocity time auto-correlation functions behave as expected from hydrodynamics. In particular, the velocity auto-correlation functions display a long time tail in complete agreement with hydrodynamics.

  2. Large scale Brownian dynamics of confined suspensions of rigid particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Brennan; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Patankar, Neelesh A; Donev, Aleksandar

    2017-12-28

    We introduce methods for large-scale Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulation of many rigid particles of arbitrary shape suspended in a fluctuating fluid. Our method adds Brownian motion to the rigid multiblob method [F. Balboa Usabiaga et al., Commun. Appl. Math. Comput. Sci. 11(2), 217-296 (2016)] at a cost comparable to the cost of deterministic simulations. We demonstrate that we can efficiently generate deterministic and random displacements for many particles using preconditioned Krylov iterative methods, if kernel methods to efficiently compute the action of the Rotne-Prager-Yamakawa (RPY) mobility matrix and its "square" root are available for the given boundary conditions. These kernel operations can be computed with near linear scaling for periodic domains using the positively split Ewald method. Here we study particles partially confined by gravity above a no-slip bottom wall using a graphical processing unit implementation of the mobility matrix-vector product, combined with a preconditioned Lanczos iteration for generating Brownian displacements. We address a major challenge in large-scale BD simulations, capturing the stochastic drift term that arises because of the configuration-dependent mobility. Unlike the widely used Fixman midpoint scheme, our methods utilize random finite differences and do not require the solution of resistance problems or the computation of the action of the inverse square root of the RPY mobility matrix. We construct two temporal schemes which are viable for large-scale simulations, an Euler-Maruyama traction scheme and a trapezoidal slip scheme, which minimize the number of mobility problems to be solved per time step while capturing the required stochastic drift terms. We validate and compare these schemes numerically by modeling suspensions of boomerang-shaped particles sedimented near a bottom wall. Using the trapezoidal scheme, we investigate the steady-state active motion in dense suspensions of confined microrollers, whose

  3. Large scale Brownian dynamics of confined suspensions of rigid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Brennan; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Patankar, Neelesh A.; Donev, Aleksandar

    2017-12-01

    We introduce methods for large-scale Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulation of many rigid particles of arbitrary shape suspended in a fluctuating fluid. Our method adds Brownian motion to the rigid multiblob method [F. Balboa Usabiaga et al., Commun. Appl. Math. Comput. Sci. 11(2), 217-296 (2016)] at a cost comparable to the cost of deterministic simulations. We demonstrate that we can efficiently generate deterministic and random displacements for many particles using preconditioned Krylov iterative methods, if kernel methods to efficiently compute the action of the Rotne-Prager-Yamakawa (RPY) mobility matrix and its "square" root are available for the given boundary conditions. These kernel operations can be computed with near linear scaling for periodic domains using the positively split Ewald method. Here we study particles partially confined by gravity above a no-slip bottom wall using a graphical processing unit implementation of the mobility matrix-vector product, combined with a preconditioned Lanczos iteration for generating Brownian displacements. We address a major challenge in large-scale BD simulations, capturing the stochastic drift term that arises because of the configuration-dependent mobility. Unlike the widely used Fixman midpoint scheme, our methods utilize random finite differences and do not require the solution of resistance problems or the computation of the action of the inverse square root of the RPY mobility matrix. We construct two temporal schemes which are viable for large-scale simulations, an Euler-Maruyama traction scheme and a trapezoidal slip scheme, which minimize the number of mobility problems to be solved per time step while capturing the required stochastic drift terms. We validate and compare these schemes numerically by modeling suspensions of boomerang-shaped particles sedimented near a bottom wall. Using the trapezoidal scheme, we investigate the steady-state active motion in dense suspensions of confined microrollers, whose

  4. Brownian dynamics of emulsion film formation and droplet coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Mendoza, Jhoan; Petsev, Dimiter N

    2010-05-01

    We analyze the evolution in thickness and radius of the film formed during the collision of two deformable emulsion Brownian droplets. These variables exhibit random fluctuations due to thermal disturbances from the continuous liquid phase. As a result, the system probes a random trajectory in the configurational space until it reaches a critical film thickness, at which point the droplets coalesce. Therefore, the film is modeled as a disk with thicknesses and radi that can fluctuate. Our analysis is based on a Langevin-Brownian dynamics approach, which accounts for the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions in the lubrication approximation. We examine the effect of parameters such as droplet size, interfacial mobility, and electrolyte concentration on the coalescence of small Brownian droplets. The results suggest that the coalescence times depend on a complex interplay between the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions.

  5. From Brownian Dynamics to Markov Chain: An Ion Channel Example

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wan

    2014-02-27

    A discrete rate theory for multi-ion channels is presented, in which the continuous dynamics of ion diffusion is reduced to transitions between Markovian discrete states. In an open channel, the ion permeation process involves three types of events: an ion entering the channel, an ion escaping from the channel, or an ion hopping between different energy minima in the channel. The continuous dynamics leads to a hierarchy of Fokker-Planck equations, indexed by channel occupancy. From these the mean escape times and splitting probabilities (denoting from which side an ion has escaped) can be calculated. By equating these with the corresponding expressions from the Markov model, one can determine the Markovian transition rates. The theory is illustrated with a two-ion one-well channel. The stationary probability of states is compared with that from both Brownian dynamics simulation and the hierarchical Fokker-Planck equations. The conductivity of the channel is also studied, and the optimal geometry maximizing ion flux is computed. © 2014 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  6. Brownian motion in dynamically disordered media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkoskie, James B; Yang, Shilong; Cao, Jianshu

    2002-11-01

    The motion of Brownian test particles in a model random potential with time dependent correlations is investigated using four methods: renormalized perturbation, perturbation using Martin, Siggia, and Rose functional formalism (MSR), the Edwards variational method on the MSR functional, and renormalization group with the MSR function. The disorder averaged one-particle propagators determined by the renormalized perturbation expansion and MSR perturbation expansion are identical to the second and possibly higher order, and the two-particle propagators determined by these perturbation methods are identical at the first and possibly higher order. The one-particle propagator determined by the Edwards method is identical to the perturbation expansions at the first order, but the second-order analogue of the Edwards method has a more complex expression, which reduces to the second-order perturbation expression with additional higher-order terms. The diffusion constant and two-particle correlations are calculated from these propagators and are used to determine the effects of the random potential on the Brownian particles. Generally, the diffusion rate decreases with the disorder strength and increases with the temporal decay rate. The two competing mechanisms result in an enhancement of the diffusion constant for weak potentials with fast temporal fluctuations. The system exhibits two-particle correlations that are inherently non-Gaussian and indicate clustering behavior. The diffusion constant is also determined from a simple one-loop renormalization group calculation. In the static limit, the diffusion constant calculated by the renormalization group recovers the results of Deem and Chandler [M.W. Deem and D. Chandler, J. Stat. Phys. 76, 911 (1994)].

  7. Studying protein assembly with reversible Brownian dynamics of patchy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Heinrich C. R. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schwarz, Ulrich S., E-mail: ulrich.schwarz@bioquant.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); BioQuant, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-05-14

    Assembly of protein complexes like virus shells, the centriole, the nuclear pore complex, or the actin cytoskeleton is strongly determined by their spatial structure. Moreover, it is becoming increasingly clear that the reversible nature of protein assembly is also an essential element for their biological function. Here we introduce a computational approach for the Brownian dynamics of patchy particles with anisotropic assemblies and fully reversible reactions. Different particles stochastically associate and dissociate with microscopic reaction rates depending on their relative spatial positions. The translational and rotational diffusive properties of all protein complexes are evaluated on-the-fly. Because we focus on reversible assembly, we introduce a scheme which ensures detailed balance for patchy particles. We then show how the macroscopic rates follow from the microscopic ones. As an instructive example, we study the assembly of a pentameric ring structure, for which we find excellent agreement between simulation results and a macroscopic kinetic description without any adjustable parameters. This demonstrates that our approach correctly accounts for both the diffusive and reactive processes involved in protein assembly.

  8. Brownian dynamics of confined rigid bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delong, Steven; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Donev, Aleksandar, E-mail: donev@courant.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    We introduce numerical methods for simulating the diffusive motion of rigid bodies of arbitrary shape immersed in a viscous fluid. We parameterize the orientation of the bodies using normalized quaternions, which are numerically robust, space efficient, and easy to accumulate. We construct a system of overdamped Langevin equations in the quaternion representation that accounts for hydrodynamic effects, preserves the unit-norm constraint on the quaternion, and is time reversible with respect to the Gibbs-Boltzmann distribution at equilibrium. We introduce two schemes for temporal integration of the overdamped Langevin equations of motion, one based on the Fixman midpoint method and the other based on a random finite difference approach, both of which ensure that the correct stochastic drift term is captured in a computationally efficient way. We study several examples of rigid colloidal particles diffusing near a no-slip boundary and demonstrate the importance of the choice of tracking point on the measured translational mean square displacement (MSD). We examine the average short-time as well as the long-time quasi-two-dimensional diffusion coefficient of a rigid particle sedimented near a bottom wall due to gravity. For several particle shapes, we find a choice of tracking point that makes the MSD essentially linear with time, allowing us to estimate the long-time diffusion coefficient efficiently using a Monte Carlo method. However, in general, such a special choice of tracking point does not exist, and numerical techniques for simulating long trajectories, such as the ones we introduce here, are necessary to study diffusion on long time scales.

  9. Dynamics of a magnetic active Brownian particle under a uniform magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Urquiza, Glenn C.; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo M.

    2017-11-01

    The dynamics of a magnetic active Brownian particle undergoing three-dimensional Brownian motion, both translation and rotation, under the influence of a uniform magnetic field is investigated. The particle self-propels at a constant speed along its magnetic dipole moment, which reorients due to the interplay between Brownian and magnetic torques, quantified by the Langevin parameter α . In this work, the time-dependent active diffusivity and the crossover time (τcross)—from ballistic to diffusive regimes—are calculated through the time-dependent correlation function of the fluctuations of the propulsion direction. The results reveal that, for any value of α , the particle undergoes a directional (or ballistic) propulsive motion at very short times (t ≪τcross ). In this regime, the correlation function decreases linearly with time, and the active diffusivity increases with it. It the opposite time limit (t ≫τcross ), the particle moves in a purely diffusive regime with a correlation function that decays asymptotically to zero and an active diffusivity that reaches a constant value equal to the long-time active diffusivity of the particle. As expected in the absence of a magnetic field (α =0 ), the crossover time is equal to the characteristic time scale for rotational diffusion, τrot. In the presence of a magnetic field (α >0 ), the correlation function, the active diffusivity, and the crossover time decrease with increasing α . The magnetic field regulates the regimes of propulsion of the particle. Here, the field reduces the period of time at which the active particle undergoes a directional motion. Consequently, the active particle rapidly reaches a diffusive regime at τcross≪τrot . In the limit of weak fields (α ≪1 ), the crossover time decreases quadratically with α , while in the limit of strong fields (α ≫1 ) it decays asymptotically as α-1. The results are in excellent agreement with those obtained by Brownian dynamics

  10. Diffusion in crowded biological environments: applications of Brownian dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Długosz Maciej

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Biochemical reactions in living systems occur in complex, heterogeneous media with total concentrations of macromolecules in the range of 50 - 400 mgml. Molecular species occupy a significant fraction of the immersing medium, up to 40% of volume. Such complex and volume-occupied environments are generally termed 'crowded' and/or 'confined'. In crowded conditions non-specific interactions between macromolecules may hinder diffusion - a major process determining metabolism, transport, and signaling. Also, the crowded media can alter, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the reactions in vivo in comparison with their in vitro counterparts. This review focuses on recent developments in particle-based Brownian dynamics algorithms, their applications to model diffusive transport in crowded systems, and their abilities to reproduce and predict the behavior of macromolecules under in vivo conditions.

  11. Hybrid finite element and Brownian dynamics method for charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Gary A., E-mail: ghuber@ucsd.edu; Miao, Yinglong [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0365 (United States); Zhou, Shenggao [Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Center for Interdiscipline Research, Soochow University, 1 Shizi Street, Suzhou, 215006 Jiangsu (China); Li, Bo [Department of Mathematics and Quantitative Biology Graduate Program, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0112 (United States); McCammon, J. Andrew [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0365 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0636 (United States)

    2016-04-28

    Diffusion is often the rate-determining step in many biological processes. Currently, the two main computational methods for studying diffusion are stochastic methods, such as Brownian dynamics, and continuum methods, such as the finite element method. A previous study introduced a new hybrid diffusion method that couples the strengths of each of these two methods, but was limited by the lack of interactions among the particles; the force on each particle had to be from an external field. This study further develops the method to allow charged particles. The method is derived for a general multidimensional system and is presented using a basic test case for a one-dimensional linear system with one charged species and a radially symmetric system with three charged species.

  12. Electrostatic channeling in P. falciparum DHFR-TS: Brownian dynamics and Smoluchowski modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Vincent T; Eun, Changsun; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M; Huber, Gary; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-11-18

    We perform Brownian dynamics simulations and Smoluchowski continuum modeling of the bifunctional Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (P. falciparum DHFR-TS) with the objective of understanding the electrostatic channeling of dihydrofolate generated at the TS active site to the DHFR active site. The results of Brownian dynamics simulations and Smoluchowski continuum modeling suggest that compared to Leishmania major DHFR-TS, P. falciparum DHFR-TS has a lower but significant electrostatic-mediated channeling efficiency (?15-25%) at physiological pH (7.0) and ionic strength (150 mM). We also find that removing the electric charges from key basic residues located between the DHFR and TS active sites significantly reduces the channeling efficiency of P. falciparum DHFR-TS. Although several protozoan DHFR-TS enzymes are known to have similar tertiary and quaternary structure, subtle differences in structure, active-site geometry, and charge distribution appear to influence both electrostatic-mediated and proximity-based substrate channeling.

  13. Electrostatic Channeling in P. falciparum DHFR-TS: Brownian Dynamics and Smoluchowski Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Vincent T.; Eun, Changsun; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M.; Huber, Gary; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We perform Brownian dynamics simulations and Smoluchowski continuum modeling of the bifunctional Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (P. falciparum DHFR-TS) with the objective of understanding the electrostatic channeling of dihydrofolate generated at the TS active site to the DHFR active site. The results of Brownian dynamics simulations and Smoluchowski continuum modeling suggest that compared to Leishmania major DHFR-TS, P. falciparum DHFR-TS has a lower but significant electrostatic-mediated channeling efficiency (∼15–25%) at physiological pH (7.0) and ionic strength (150 mM). We also find that removing the electric charges from key basic residues located between the DHFR and TS active sites significantly reduces the channeling efficiency of P. falciparum DHFR-TS. Although several protozoan DHFR-TS enzymes are known to have similar tertiary and quaternary structure, subtle differences in structure, active-site geometry, and charge distribution appear to influence both electrostatic-mediated and proximity-based substrate channeling. PMID:25418308

  14. Density profiles of granular gases studied by molecular dynamics and Brownian bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuñuri, F.; Montoya, J. A.; Carvente, O.

    2018-02-01

    Despite the inherent frictional forces and dissipative collisions, confined granular matter can be regarded as a system in a stationary state if we inject energy continuously. Under these conditions, both the density and the granular temperature are, in general, non-monotonic variables along the height of the container. In consequence, an analytical description of a granular system is hard to conceive. Here, by using molecular dynamics simulations, we measure the packing fraction profiles for a vertically vibrating three-dimensional granular system in several gaseous-like stationary states. We show that by using the Brownian bridge concept, the determined packing fraction profiles can be reproduced accurately and give a complete description of the distribution of the particles inside the simulation box.

  15. A Brownian dynamics study on ferrofluid colloidal dispersions using an iterative constraint method to satisfy Maxwell’s equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubina, Sean Hyun, E-mail: sdubin2@uic.edu; Wedgewood, Lewis Edward, E-mail: wedge@uic.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 810 S. Clinton St. (MC 110), Chicago, Illinois 60607-4408 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Ferrofluids are often favored for their ability to be remotely positioned via external magnetic fields. The behavior of particles in ferromagnetic clusters under uniformly applied magnetic fields has been computationally simulated using the Brownian dynamics, Stokesian dynamics, and Monte Carlo methods. However, few methods have been established that effectively handle the basic principles of magnetic materials, namely, Maxwell’s equations. An iterative constraint method was developed to satisfy Maxwell’s equations when a uniform magnetic field is imposed on ferrofluids in a heterogeneous Brownian dynamics simulation that examines the impact of ferromagnetic clusters in a mesoscale particle collection. This was accomplished by allowing a particulate system in a simple shear flow to advance by a time step under a uniformly applied magnetic field, then adjusting the ferroparticles via an iterative constraint method applied over sub-volume length scales until Maxwell’s equations were satisfied. The resultant ferrofluid model with constraints demonstrates that the magnetoviscosity contribution is not as substantial when compared to homogeneous simulations that assume the material’s magnetism is a direct response to the external magnetic field. This was detected across varying intensities of particle-particle interaction, Brownian motion, and shear flow. Ferroparticle aggregation was still extensively present but less so than typically observed.

  16. Equilibrium stochastic dynamics of a Brownian particle in inhomogeneous space: Derivation of an alternative model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyay, A.

    2018-03-01

    An alternative equilibrium stochastic dynamics for a Brownian particle in inhomogeneous space is derived. Such a dynamics can model the motion of a complex molecule in its conformation space when in equilibrium with a uniform heat bath. The derivation is done by a simple generalization of the formulation due to Zwanzig for a Brownian particle in homogeneous heat bath. We show that, if the system couples to different number of bath degrees of freedom at different conformations then the alternative model gets derived. We discuss results of an experiment by Faucheux and Libchaber which probably has indicated possible limitation of the Boltzmann distribution as equilibrium distribution of a Brownian particle in inhomogeneous space and propose experimental verification of the present theory using similar methods.

  17. Dynamics in crowded environments: is non-Gaussian Brownian diffusion normal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Gyemin; Sung, Bong June; Yethiraj, Arun

    2014-07-17

    The dynamics of colloids and proteins in dense suspensions is of fundamental importance, from a standpoint of understanding the biophysics of proteins in the cytoplasm and for the many interesting physical phenomena in colloidal dispersions. Recent experiments and simulations have raised questions about our understanding of the dynamics of these systems. Experiments on vesicles in nematic fluids and colloids in an actin network have shown that the dynamics of particles can be "non-Gaussian"; that is, the self-part of the van Hove correlation function, Gs(r,t), is an exponential rather than Gaussian function of r, in regimes where the mean-square displacement is linear in t. It is usually assumed that a linear mean-square displacement implies a Gaussian Gs(r,t). In a different result, simulations of a mixture of proteins, aimed at mimicking the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli, have shown that hydrodynamic interactions (HI) play a key role in slowing down the dynamics of proteins in concentrated (relative to dilute) solutions. In this work, we study a simple system, a dilute tracer colloidal particle immersed in a concentrated solution of larger spheres, using simulations with and without HI. The simulations reproduce the non-Gaussian Brownian diffusion of the tracer, implying that this behavior is a general feature of colloidal dynamics and is a consequence of local heterogeneities on intermediate time scales. Although HI results in a lower diffusion constant, Gs(r,t) is very similar to and without HI, provided they are compared at the same value of the mean-square displacement.

  18. A hybrid Brownian Dynamics model for yielding, aging, and rejuvenation in deforming polymeric glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Weizhong; Larson, Ronald

    2015-03-01

    We describe the rheology of polymeric glasses by combining a simple constitutive equation for the fast segmental modes, borrowed from Fielding, et al., with Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of the slow polymer modes. The BD simulations determine the polymeric stress from ensembles of finitely extensible bead-spring chains, where the bead drag coefficient is governed by solutions to the equation for segmental relaxation. Thus the model treats the short glassy segmental mode as ``solvent'' for the polymer modes. With rubbery modulus for the slow-relaxing polymer modes as one of our model parameters, stress-dependent relaxation, physical aging, flow rejuvenation as well as strain-hardening and recovery can be successfully accounted for in uniaxial extension and steady shear, without the use of an artificial ``crinkle factor'' used to account for recoil dynamics in previous work. Our simulation results remarkably agree with the experimental data from Lee et al. A comparison between our model and the barrier-hopping theory is also made. The authors acknowledge discussions with M. E. Cates and S. M. Fielding.

  19. Brownian agents and active particles collective dynamics in the natural and social sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Schweitzer, Frank

    2007-01-01

    ""This book lays out a vision for a coherent framework for understanding complex systems"" (from the foreword by J. Doyne Farmer). By developing the genuine idea of Brownian agents, the author combines concepts from informatics, such as multiagent systems, with approaches of statistical many-particle physics. This way, an efficient method for computer simulations of complex systems is developed which is also accessible to analytical investigations and quantitative predictions. The book demonstrates that Brownian agent models can be successfully applied in many different contexts, ranging from

  20. Multi-Dielectric Brownian Dynamics and Design-Space-Exploration Studies of Permeation in Ion Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siksik, May; Krishnamurthy, Vikram

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes a multi-dielectric Brownian dynamics simulation framework for design-space-exploration (DSE) studies of ion-channel permeation. The goal of such DSE studies is to estimate the channel modeling-parameters that minimize the mean-squared error between the simulated and expected "permeation characteristics." To address this computational challenge, we use a methodology based on statistical inference that utilizes the knowledge of channel structure to prune the design space. We demonstrate the proposed framework and DSE methodology using a case study based on the KcsA ion channel, in which the design space is successfully reduced from a 6-D space to a 2-D space. Our results show that the channel dielectric map computed using the framework matches with that computed directly using molecular dynamics with an error of 7%. Finally, the scalability and resolution of the model used are explored, and it is shown that the memory requirements needed for DSE remain constant as the number of parameters (degree of heterogeneity) increases.

  1. A hybrid Brownian dynamics/constitutive model for yielding, aging, and rejuvenation in deforming polymeric glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Weizhong; Larson, Ronald G

    2016-08-10

    We present a hybrid model for polymeric glasses under deformation that combines a minimal model of segmental dynamics with a beads-and-springs model of a polymer, solved by Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations, whose relaxation is coupled to the segmental dynamics through the drag coefficient of the beads. This coarse-grained model allows simulations that are much faster than molecular dynamics and successfully capture the entire range of mechanical response including yielding, plastic flow, strain-hardening, and incomplete strain recovery. The beads-and-springs model improves upon the dumbbell model for glassy polymers proposed by Fielding et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 2012, 108, 048301) by capturing the small elastic recoil seen experimentally without the use of ad hoc adjustments of parameters required in the model of Fielding et al. With appropriate choice of parameters, predictions of creep, recovery, and segmental relaxation are found to be in good agreement with poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) data of Lee et al. (Science, 2009, 323, 231-234). Our model shows dramatic differences in behavior of the segmental relaxation time between extensional creep and steady extension, and between extension and shear. The non-monotonic response of the segmental relaxation time to extensional creep and the small elastic recovery after removal of stress are shown to arise from sub-chains that are trapped between folds, and that become highly oriented and stretched at strains of order unity, connecting the behavior of glassy polymers under creep to that of dilute polymer solutions under fast extensional flows. We are also able to predict the effects of polymer pre-orientation in the parallel or orthogonal direction on the subsequent response to extensional deformation.

  2. Anomalous diffusion and multifractional Brownian motion: simulating molecular crowding and physical obstacles in systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Lago, T T; Leier, A; Burrage, K

    2012-08-01

    There have been many recent studies from both experimental and simulation perspectives in order to understand the effects of spatial crowding in molecular biology. These effects manifest themselves in protein organisation on the plasma membrane, on chemical signalling within the cell and in gene regulation. Simulations are usually done with lattice- or meshless-based random walks but insights can also be gained through the computation of the underlying probability density functions of these stochastic processes. Until recently much of the focus had been on continuous time random walks, but some very recent work has suggested that fractional Brownian motion may be a good descriptor of spatial crowding effects in some cases. The study compares both fractional Brownian motion and continuous time random walks and highlights how well they can represent different types of spatial crowding and physical obstacles. Simulated spatial data, mimicking experimental data, was first generated by using the package Smoldyn. We then attempted to characterise this data through continuous time anomalously diffusing random walks and multifractional Brownian motion (MFBM) by obtaining MFBM paths that match the statistical properties of our sample data. Although diffusion around immovable obstacles can be reasonably characterised by a single Hurst exponent, we find that diffusion in a crowded environment seems to exhibit multifractional properties in the form of a different short- and long-time behaviour.

  3. Brownian dynamic study of an enzyme metabolon in the TCA cycle: Substrate kinetics and channeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ming M; Huber, Gary A; Wang, Nuo; Minteer, Shelley D; McCammon, J Andrew

    2018-02-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and citrate synthase (CS) are two pacemaking enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Oxaloacetate (OAA) molecules are the intermediate substrates that are transferred from the MDH to CS to carry out sequential catalysis. It is known that, to achieve a high flux of intermediate transport and reduce the probability of substrate leaking, a MDH-CS metabolon forms to enhance the OAA substrate channeling. In this study, we aim to understand the OAA channeling within possible MDH-CS metabolons that have different structural orientations in their complexes. Three MDH-CS metabolons from native bovine, wild-type porcine, and recombinant sources, published in recent work, were selected to calculate OAA transfer efficiency by Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations and to study, through electrostatic potential calculations, a possible role of charges that drive the substrate channeling. Our results show that an electrostatic channel is formed in the metabolons of native bovine and recombinant porcine enzymes, which guides the oppositely charged OAA molecules passing through the channel and enhances the transfer efficiency. However, the channeling probability in a suggested wild-type porcine metabolon conformation is reduced due to an extended diffusion length between the MDH and CS active sites, implying that the corresponding arrangements of MDH and CS result in the decrease of electrostatic steering between substrates and protein surface and then reduce the substrate transfer efficiency from one active site to another. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  4. Estimating the contribution of Brownian and Néel relaxation in a magnetic fluid through dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado-Camargo, L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Torres-Díaz, I. [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Chiu-Lam, A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Hernández, M. [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Rinaldi, C., E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We demonstrate how dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements (DMS) can be used to estimate the relative contributions of Brownian and Néel relaxation to the dynamic magnetic response of a magnetic fluid, a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles. The method applies to suspensions with particles that respond through Brownian or Néel relaxation and for which the characteristic Brownian and Néel relaxation times are widely separated. First, we illustrate this using magnetic fluids consisting of mixtures of particles that relax solely by the Brownian or Néel mechanisms. Then, it is shown how the same approach can be applied to estimate the relative contributions of Brownian and Néel relaxation in a suspension consisting of particles obtained from a single synthesis and whose size distribution straddles the transition from Néel to Brownian relaxation. - Highlights: • Method to estimate the contributions of the relaxation mechanism to the magnetic response. • Method applies to cases where the Brownian and Néel peaks do not overlap. • The method applies for ferrofluids prepared with as–synthesized particles.

  5. Geometric Brownian Motion, Option Pricing, and Simulation: Some Spreadsheet-Based Exercises in Financial Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D. Brewer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some Excel-based simulation exercises that are suitable for use in financial modeling courses. Such exercises are based on a stochastic process of stock price movements, called geometric Brownian motion, that underlies the derivation of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. Guidance is provided in assigning appropriate values of the drift parameter in the stochastic process for such exercises. Some further simulation exercises are also suggested. As the analytical underpinning of the materials involved is provided, this paper is expected to be of interest also to instructors and students of investment courses.

  6. Dynamical Gibbs-non-Gibbs transitions and Brownian percolation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, Julian Facundo

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with two different models in two different contexts. The first part deals with dynamical Gibbs-non-Gibbs transitions. Gibbs measures describe the equilibrium states of a system consisting of a large number of components that interact with each other. Due to the large number of

  7. Conserved linear dynamics of single-molecule Brownian motion

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2017-06-06

    Macromolecular diffusion in homogeneous fluid at length scales greater than the size of the molecule is regarded as a random process. The mean-squared displacement (MSD) of molecules in this regime increases linearly with time. Here we show that non-random motion of DNA molecules in this regime that is undetectable by the MSD analysis can be quantified by characterizing the molecular motion relative to a latticed frame of reference. Our lattice occupancy analysis reveals unexpected sub-modes of motion of DNA that deviate from expected random motion in the linear, diffusive regime. We demonstrate that a subtle interplay between these sub-modes causes the overall diffusive motion of DNA to appear to conform to the linear regime. Our results show that apparently random motion of macromolecules could be governed by non-random dynamics that are detectable only by their relative motion. Our analytical approach should advance broad understanding of diffusion processes of fundamental relevance.

  8. Brownian cluster dynamics with short range patchy interactions: Its application to polymers and step-growth polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, A.; Babu, S. B.; Dolado, J. S.; Gimel, J.-C.

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel simulation technique derived from Brownian cluster dynamics used so far to study the isotropic colloidal aggregation. It now implements the classical Kern-Frenkel potential to describe patchy interactions between particles. This technique gives access to static properties, dynamics and kinetics of the system, even far from the equilibrium. Particle thermal motions are modeled using billions of independent small random translations and rotations, constrained by the excluded volume and the connectivity. This algorithm, applied to a single polymer chain leads to correct static and dynamic properties, in the framework where hydrodynamic interactions are ignored. By varying patch angles, various local chain flexibilities can be obtained. We have used this new algorithm to model step-growth polymerization under various solvent qualities. The polymerization reaction is modeled by an irreversible aggregation between patches while an isotropic finite square-well potential is superimposed to mimic the solvent quality. In bad solvent conditions, a competition between a phase separation (due to the isotropic interaction) and polymerization (due to patches) occurs. Surprisingly, an arrested network with a very peculiar structure appears. It is made of strands and nodes. Strands gather few stretched chains that dip into entangled globular nodes. These nodes act as reticulation points between the strands. The system is kinetically driven and we observe a trapped arrested structure. That demonstrates one of the strengths of this new simulation technique. It can give valuable insights about mechanisms that could be involved in the formation of stranded gels.

  9. Mapping migratory flyways in Asia using dynamic Brownian bridge movement models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Eric C; Newman, Scott H; Prosser, Diann J; Xiao, Xiangming; Ze, Luo; Batbayar, Nyambayar; Balachandran, Sivananinthaperumal; Takekawa, John Y

    2015-01-01

    Identifying movement routes and stopover sites is necessary for developing effective management and conservation strategies for migratory animals. In the case of migratory birds, a collection of migration routes, known as a flyway, is often hundreds to thousands of kilometers long and can extend across political boundaries. Flyways encompass the entire geographic range between the breeding and non-breeding areas of a population, species, or a group of species, and they provide spatial frameworks for management and conservation across international borders. Existing flyway maps are largely qualitative accounts based on band returns and survey data rather than observed movement routes. In this study, we use satellite and GPS telemetry data and dynamic Brownian bridge movement models to build upon existing maps and describe waterfowl space use probabilistically in the Central Asian and East Asian-Australasian Flyways. Our approach provided new information on migratory routes that was not easily attainable with existing methods to describe flyways. Utilization distributions from dynamic Brownian bridge movement models identified key staging and stopover sites, migration corridors and general flyway outlines in the Central Asian and East Asian-Australasian Flyways. A map of space use from ruddy shelducks depicted two separate movement corridors within the Central Asian Flyway, likely representing two distinct populations that show relatively strong connectivity between breeding and wintering areas. Bar-headed geese marked at seven locations in the Central Asian Flyway showed heaviest use at several stopover sites in the same general region of high-elevation lakes along the eastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Our analysis of data from multiple Anatidae species marked at sites throughout Asia highlighted major movement corridors across species and confirmed that the Central Asian and East Asian-Australasian Flyways were spatially distinct. The dynamic Brownian bridge

  10. Brownian and advective dynamics in microflow studied by coherent X-ray scattering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, Raphael; Westermeier, Fabian; Banusch, Benjamin; Sprung, Michael; Pfohl, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Combining microfluidics with coherent X-ray illumination offers the possibility to not only measure the structure but also the dynamics of flowing samples in a single-scattering experiment. Here, the power of this combination is demonstrated by studying the advective and Brownian dynamics of colloidal suspensions in microflow of different geometries. Using an experimental setup with a fast two-dimensional detector and performing X-ray correlation spectroscopy by calculating two-dimensional maps of the intensity auto-correlation functions, it was possible to evaluate the sample structure and furthermore to characterize the detailed flow behavior, including flow geometry, main flow directions, advective flow velocities and diffusive dynamics. By scanning a microfocused X-ray beam over a microfluidic device, the anisotropic auto-correlation functions of driven colloidal suspensions in straight, curved and constricted microchannels were mapped with the spatial resolution of the X-ray beam. This method has not only a huge potential for studying flow patterns in complex fluids but also to generally characterize anisotropic dynamics in materials.

  11. Multiscale simulations of anisotropic particles combining molecular dynamics and Green's function reaction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Ouldridge, Thomas E; Ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Bolhuis, Peter G

    2017-03-21

    The modeling of complex reaction-diffusion processes in, for instance, cellular biochemical networks or self-assembling soft matter can be tremendously sped up by employing a multiscale algorithm which combines the mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method with explicit stochastic Brownian, Langevin, or deterministic molecular dynamics to treat reactants at the microscopic scale [A. Vijaykumar, P. G. Bolhuis, and P. R. ten Wolde, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 214102 (2015)]. Here we extend this multiscale MD-GFRD approach to include the orientational dynamics that is crucial to describe the anisotropic interactions often prevalent in biomolecular systems. We present the novel algorithm focusing on Brownian dynamics only, although the methodology is generic. We illustrate the novel algorithm using a simple patchy particle model. After validation of the algorithm, we discuss its performance. The rotational Brownian dynamics MD-GFRD multiscale method will open up the possibility for large scale simulations of protein signalling networks.

  12. Multiscale simulations of anisotropic particles combining molecular dynamics and Green's function reaction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2017-03-01

    The modeling of complex reaction-diffusion processes in, for instance, cellular biochemical networks or self-assembling soft matter can be tremendously sped up by employing a multiscale algorithm which combines the mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method with explicit stochastic Brownian, Langevin, or deterministic molecular dynamics to treat reactants at the microscopic scale [A. Vijaykumar, P. G. Bolhuis, and P. R. ten Wolde, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 214102 (2015)]. Here we extend this multiscale MD-GFRD approach to include the orientational dynamics that is crucial to describe the anisotropic interactions often prevalent in biomolecular systems. We present the novel algorithm focusing on Brownian dynamics only, although the methodology is generic. We illustrate the novel algorithm using a simple patchy particle model. After validation of the algorithm, we discuss its performance. The rotational Brownian dynamics MD-GFRD multiscale method will open up the possibility for large scale simulations of protein signalling networks.

  13. Brownian dynamics of a protein-polymer chain complex in a solid-state nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Craig C.; Melnikov, Dmitriy V.; Gracheva, Maria E.

    2017-08-01

    We study the movement of a polymer attached to a large protein inside a nanopore in a thin silicon dioxide membrane submerged in an electrolyte solution. We use Brownian dynamics to describe the motion of a negatively charged polymer chain of varying lengths attached to a neutral protein modeled as a spherical bead with a radius larger than that of the nanopore, allowing the chain to thread the nanopore but preventing it from translocating. The motion of the protein-polymer complex within the pore is also compared to that of a freely translocating polymer. Our results show that the free polymer's standard deviations in the direction normal to the pore axis is greater than that of the protein-polymer complex. We find that restrictions imposed by the protein, bias, and neighboring chain segments aid in controlling the position of the chain in the pore. Understanding the behavior of the protein-polymer chain complex may lead to methods that improve molecule identification by increasing the resolution of ionic current measurements.

  14. Electrical autonomous Brownian gyrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, K.-H.; Lee, C.-L.; Lai, P.-Y.; Chen, Y.-F.

    2017-09-01

    We study experimentally and theoretically the steady-state dynamics of a simple stochastic electronic system featuring two resistor-capacitor circuits coupled by a third capacitor. The resistors are subject to thermal noises at real temperatures. The voltage fluctuation across each resistor can be compared to a one-dimensional Brownian motion. However, the collective dynamical behavior, when the resistors are subject to distinct thermal baths, is identical to that of a Brownian gyrator, as first proposed by Filliger and Reimann [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 230602 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.230602]. The average gyrating dynamics is originated from the absence of detailed balance due to unequal thermal baths. We look into the details of this stochastic gyrating dynamics, its dependences on the temperature difference and coupling strength, and the mechanism of heat transfer through this simple electronic circuit. Our work affirms the general principle and the possibility of a Brownian ratchet working near room temperature scale.

  15. Brownian Dynamics of a Suspension of Particles with Constrained Voronoi Cell Volumes

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, John P.

    2015-06-23

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Solvent-free polymer-grafted nanoparticle fluids consist of inorganic core particles fluidized by polymers tethered to their surfaces. The attachment of the suspending fluid to the particle surface creates a strong penalty for local variations in the fluid volume surrounding the particles. As a model of such a suspension we perform Brownian dynamics of an equilibrium system consisting of hard spheres which experience a many-particle potential proportional to the variance of the Voronoi volumes surrounding each particle (E = α(Vi-V0)2). The coefficient of proportionality α can be varied such that pure hard sphere dynamics is recovered as α → 0, while an incompressible array of hairy particles is obtained as α →. As α is increased the distribution of Voronoi volumes becomes narrower, the mean coordination number of the particle increases and the variance in the number of nearest neighbors decreases. The nearest neighbor peaks in the pair distribution function are suppressed and shifted to larger radial separations as the constraint acts to maintain relatively uniform interstitial regions. The structure factor of the model suspension satisfies S(k=0) → 0 as α → in accordance with expectation for a single component (particle plus tethered fluid) incompressible system. The tracer diffusivity of the particles is reduced by the volume constraint and goes to zero at φ 0.52, indicating an earlier glass transition than has been observed in hard sphere suspensions. The total pressure of the suspension grows in proportion to (αkBT)1/2 as the strength of the volume-constraint potential grows. This stress arises primarily from the interparticle potential forces, while the hard-sphere collisional contribution to the stress is suppressed by the volume constraint.

  16. Brownian Dynamics of a Suspension of Particles with Constrained Voronoi Cell Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, John P; Walsh, Stuart D C; Koch, Donald L

    2015-06-23

    Solvent-free polymer-grafted nanoparticle fluids consist of inorganic core particles fluidized by polymers tethered to their surfaces. The attachment of the suspending fluid to the particle surface creates a strong penalty for local variations in the fluid volume surrounding the particles. As a model of such a suspension we perform Brownian dynamics of an equilibrium system consisting of hard spheres which experience a many-particle potential proportional to the variance of the Voronoi volumes surrounding each particle (E = α(Vi-V0)(2)). The coefficient of proportionality α can be varied such that pure hard sphere dynamics is recovered as α → 0, while an incompressible array of hairy particles is obtained as α → ∞. As α is increased the distribution of Voronoi volumes becomes narrower, the mean coordination number of the particle increases and the variance in the number of nearest neighbors decreases. The nearest neighbor peaks in the pair distribution function are suppressed and shifted to larger radial separations as the constraint acts to maintain relatively uniform interstitial regions. The structure factor of the model suspension satisfies S(k=0) → 0 as α → ∞ in accordance with expectation for a single component (particle plus tethered fluid) incompressible system. The tracer diffusivity of the particles is reduced by the volume constraint and goes to zero at ϕ ∼ 0.52, indicating an earlier glass transition than has been observed in hard sphere suspensions. The total pressure of the suspension grows in proportion to (αkBT)(1/2) as the strength of the volume-constraint potential grows. This stress arises primarily from the interparticle potential forces, while the hard-sphere collisional contribution to the stress is suppressed by the volume constraint.

  17. Static structure of active Brownian hard disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo Biniossek, N.; Löwen, H.; Voigtmann, Th; Smallenburg, F.

    2018-02-01

    We explore the changes in static structure of a two-dimensional system of active Brownian particles (ABP) with hard-disk interactions, using event-driven Brownian dynamics simulations. In particular, the effect of the self-propulsion velocity and the rotational diffusivity on the orientationally-averaged fluid structure factor is discussed. Typically activity increases structural ordering and generates a structure factor peak at zero wave vector which is a precursor of motility-induced phase separation. Our results provide reference data to test future statistical theories for the fluid structure of active Brownian systems. This manuscript was submitted for the special issue of the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter associated with the Liquid Matter Conference 2017.

  18. BROMOC suite: Monte Carlo/Brownian dynamics suite for studies of ion permeation and DNA transport in biological and artificial pores with effective potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Biase, Pablo M; Markosyan, Suren; Noskov, Sergei

    2015-02-05

    The transport of ions and solutes by biological pores is central for cellular processes and has a variety of applications in modern biotechnology. The time scale involved in the polymer transport across a nanopore is beyond the accessibility of conventional MD simulations. Moreover, experimental studies lack sufficient resolution to provide details on the molecular underpinning of the transport mechanisms. BROMOC, the code presented herein, performs Brownian dynamics simulations, both serial and parallel, up to several milliseconds long. BROMOC can be used to model large biological systems. IMC-MACRO software allows for the development of effective potentials for solute-ion interactions based on radial distribution function from all-atom MD. BROMOC Suite also provides a versatile set of tools to do a wide variety of preprocessing and postsimulation analysis. We illustrate a potential application with ion and ssDNA transport in MspA nanopore. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The special theory of Brownian relativity: equivalence principle for dynamic and static random paths and uncertainty relation for diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzasalma, Stefano A

    2007-03-15

    The theoretical basis of a recent theory of Brownian relativity for polymer solutions is deepened and reexamined. After the problem of relative diffusion in polymer solutions is addressed, its two postulates are formulated in all generality. The former builds a statistical equivalence between (uncorrelated) timelike and shapelike reference frames, that is, among dynamical trajectories of liquid molecules and static configurations of polymer chains. The latter defines the "diffusive horizon" as the invariant quantity to work with in the special version of the theory. Particularly, the concept of universality in polymer physics corresponds in Brownian relativity to that of covariance in the Einstein formulation. Here, a "universal" law consists of a privileged observation, performed from the laboratory rest frame and agreeing with any diffusive reference system. From the joint lack of covariance and simultaneity implied by the Brownian Lorentz-Poincaré transforms, a relative uncertainty arises, in a certain analogy with quantum mechanics. It is driven by the difference between local diffusion coefficients in the liquid solution. The same transformation class can be used to infer Fick's second law of diffusion, playing here the role of a gauge invariance preserving covariance of the spacetime increments. An overall, noteworthy conclusion emerging from this view concerns the statistics of (i) static macromolecular configurations and (ii) the motion of liquid molecules, which would be much more related than expected.

  20. Self-diffusion in sheared suspensions by dynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, David R.; Brady, John F.

    1999-12-01

    The behaviour of the long-time self-diffusion tensor in concentrated colloidal dispersions is studied using dynamic simulation. The simulations are of a suspension of monodisperse Brownian hard spheres in simple shear flow as a function of the Péclet number, Pe, which measures the relative importance of shear and Brownian forces, and the volume fraction, [phi]. Here, Pe = &[gamma]dot;a2/D0, where &[gamma]dot; is the shear rate, a the particle size and D0 = kT/6[pi][eta]a is the Stokes Einstein diffusivity of an isolated particle of size a with thermal energy kT in a solvent of viscosity [eta]. Two simulations algorithms are used: Stokesian Dynamics for inclusion of the many-body hydrodynamic interactions, and Brownian Dynamics for suspensions without hydrodynamic interactions. A new procedure for obtaining high-quality diffusion data based on averaging the results of many short simulations is presented and utilized. At low shear rates, low Pe, Brownian diffusion due to a random walk process dominates and the characteristic scale for diffusion is the Stokes Einstein diffusivity, D0. At zero Pe the diffusivity is found to be a decreasing function of [phi]. As Pe is slowly increased, O(Pe) and O(Pe3/2) corrections to the diffusivity due to the flow are clearly seen in the Brownian Dynamics system in agreement with the theoretical results of Morris & Brady (1996). At large shear rates, large Pe, both systems exhibit diffusivities that grow linearly with the shear rate by the non-Brownian mechanism of shear-induced diffusion. In contrast to the behaviour at low Pe, this shear-induced diffusion mode is an increasing function of [phi]. Long-time rotational self-diffusivities are of interest in the Stokesian Dynamics system and show similar behaviour to their translational analogues. An off-diagonal long-time self-diffusivity, Dxy, is reported for both systems. Results for both the translational and rotational Dxy show a sign change from low Pe to high Pe due to different

  1. Structure-based molecular simulations reveal the enhancement of biased Brownian motions in single-headed kinesin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Kanada

    Full Text Available Kinesin is a family of molecular motors that move unidirectionally along microtubules (MT using ATP hydrolysis free energy. In the family, the conventional two-headed kinesin was experimentally characterized to move unidirectionally through "walking" in a hand-over-hand fashion by coordinated motions of the two heads. Interestingly a single-headed kinesin, a truncated KIF1A, still can generate a biased Brownian movement along MT, as observed by in vitro single molecule experiments. Thus, KIF1A must use a different mechanism from the conventional kinesin to achieve the unidirectional motions. Based on the energy landscape view of proteins, for the first time, we conducted a set of molecular simulations of the truncated KIF1A movements over an ATP hydrolysis cycle and found a mechanism exhibiting and enhancing stochastic forward-biased movements in a similar way to those in experiments. First, simulating stand-alone KIF1A, we did not find any biased movements, while we found that KIF1A with a large friction cargo-analog attached to the C-terminus can generate clearly biased Brownian movements upon an ATP hydrolysis cycle. The linked cargo-analog enhanced the detachment of the KIF1A from MT. Once detached, diffusion of the KIF1A head was restricted around the large cargo which was located in front of the head at the time of detachment, thus generating a forward bias of the diffusion. The cargo plays the role of a diffusional anchor, or cane, in KIF1A "walking."

  2. Brownian versus Newtonian devitrification of hard-sphere glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero de Hijes, Pablo; Rosales-Pelaez, Pablo; Valeriani, Chantal; Pusey, Peter N.; Sanz, Eduardo

    2017-08-01

    In a recent molecular dynamics simulation work it has been shown that glasses composed of hard spheres crystallize via cooperative, stochastic particle displacements called avalanches [E. Sanz et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 111, 75 (2014), 10.1073/pnas.1308338110]. In this Rapid Communication we investigate if such a devitrification mechanism is also present when the dynamics is Brownian rather than Newtonian. The research is motivated in part by the fact that colloidal suspensions, an experimental realization of hard-sphere systems, undergo Brownian motion. We find that Brownian hard-sphere glasses do crystallize via avalanches with very similar characteristics to those found in the Newtonian case. We briefly discuss the implications of these findings for experiments on colloids.

  3. Irreversible Brownian Heat Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taye, Mesfin Asfaw

    2017-10-01

    We model a Brownian heat engine as a Brownian particle that hops in a periodic ratchet potential where the ratchet potential is coupled with a linearly decreasing background temperature. We show that the efficiency of such Brownian heat engine approaches the efficiency of endoreversible engine η =1-√{{Tc/Th}} [23]. On the other hand, the maximum power efficiency of the engine approaches η ^{MAX}=1-({Tc/Th})^{1\\over 4}. It is shown that the optimized efficiency always lies between the efficiency at quasistatic limit and the efficiency at maximum power while the efficiency at maximum power is always less than the optimized efficiency since the fast motion of the particle comes at the expense of the energy cost. If the heat exchange at the boundary of the heat baths is included, we show that such a Brownian heat engine has a higher performance when acting as a refrigerator than when operating as a device subjected to a piecewise constant temperature. The role of time on the performance of the motor is also explored via numerical simulations. Our numerical results depict that the time t and the external load dictate the direction of the particle velocity. Moreover, the performance of the heat engine improves with time. At large t (steady state), the velocity, the efficiency and the coefficient of performance of the refrigerator attain their maximum value. Furthermore, we study the effect of temperature by considering a viscous friction that decreases exponentially as the background temperature increases. Our result depicts that the Brownian particle exhibits a fast unidirectional motion when the viscous friction is temperature dependent than that of constant viscous friction. Moreover, the efficiency of this motor is considerably enhanced when the viscous friction is temperature dependent. On the hand, the motor exhibits a higher performance of the refrigerator when the viscous friction is taken to be constant.

  4. Dynamics simulations for engineering macromolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Mosher, Avi; Shinar, Tamar; Silver, Pamela A.; Way, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    The predictable engineering of well-behaved transcriptional circuits is a central goal of synthetic biology. The artificial attachment of promoters to transcription factor genes usually results in noisy or chaotic behaviors, and such systems are unlikely to be useful in practical applications. Natural transcriptional regulation relies extensively on protein-protein interactions to insure tightly controlled behavior, but such tight control has been elusive in engineered systems. To help engineer protein-protein interactions, we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation framework that simplifies features of proteins moving by constrained Brownian motion, with the goal of performing long simulations. The behavior of a simulated protein system is determined by summation of forces that include a Brownian force, a drag force, excluded volume constraints, relative position constraints, and binding constraints that relate to experimentally determined on-rates and off-rates for chosen protein elements in a system. Proteins are abstracted as spheres. Binding surfaces are defined radially within a protein. Peptide linkers are abstracted as small protein-like spheres with rigid connections. To address whether our framework could generate useful predictions, we simulated the behavior of an engineered fusion protein consisting of two 20 000 Da proteins attached by flexible glycine/serine-type linkers. The two protein elements remained closely associated, as if constrained by a random walk in three dimensions of the peptide linker, as opposed to showing a distribution of distances expected if movement were dominated by Brownian motion of the protein domains only. We also simulated the behavior of fluorescent proteins tethered by a linker of varying length, compared the predicted Förster resonance energy transfer with previous experimental observations, and obtained a good correspondence. Finally, we simulated the binding behavior of a fusion of two ligands that could

  5. Application of nonuniform magnetic fields in a Brownian dynamics model of ferrofluids with an iterative constraint scheme to fulfill Maxwell's equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubina, Sean Hyun; Wedgewood, Lewis Edward

    2017-09-01

    Ferrofluids are steadily rising in applications across many fields, preferred for their ability to be remotely positioned and controlled via external magnetic fields. In magnetic separation operations, nonuniform magnetic fields elicit a phenomenon known as magnetophoresis so that the ferroparticles will undergo migration toward areas of higher magnetism. To comprehend this behavior, the authors developed a Brownian dynamics simulation of particles in ferromagnetic clusters under the influences of a simple shear flow and an applied magnetic field gradient. An iterative constraint mechanism was implemented to satisfy Maxwell's equations throughout the dense colloidal suspension, ensuring that essential laws of magnetostatics are rigorously fulfilled at all times over small, finite sub-volumes of the system. Because of the presence of nonuniform magnetic fields, magnetophoresis and magnetic separation behavior were analyzed to assess the effectiveness of the model. Results showed that, when compared to "unconstrained" models, separation caused by magnetic field gradients occurred at a decreased rate under the constraint scheme due to relatively weaker non-Newtonian aggregation property trends. Through application of a dimensionless number analysis to observe varied levels of particle-particle interactions, thermal fluctuations, and viscous shearing, it was confirmed that the aggregation and magnetic separation modeling of ferrofluid colloidal suspensions without acceptable adherence to Maxwell's equations produces an unreliable representation of current ferrofluids.

  6. The stress generated by non-Brownian fibers in turbulent channel flow simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillissen, J.J.J.; Boersma, B.J.; Mortensen, P.H.; Andersson, H.I.

    2007-01-01

    Turbulent fiber suspension channel flow is studied using direct numerical simulation. The effect of the fibers on the fluid mechanics is governed by a stress tensor, involving the distribution of fiber position and orientation. Properties of this function in channel flow are studied by computing the

  7. Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Korn, Granino A

    2010-01-01

    Showing you how to use personal computers for modeling and simulation, Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation, Second Edition provides a practical tutorial on interactive dynamic-system modeling and simulation. It discusses how to effectively simulate dynamical systems, such as aerospace vehicles, power plants, chemical processes, control systems, and physiological systems. Written by a pioneer in simulation, the book introduces dynamic-system models and explains how software for solving differential equations works. After demonstrating real simulation programs with simple examples, the author

  8. Ultrafast optical dynamics of HITCI in ethylene glycol. A non-Markovian Brownian oscillator description

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boeij, Wim P; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Duppen, Koos; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1994-01-01

    Femtosecond photon echo, chirped four-wave mixing and pump-probe experiments are reported, using a 13 fs cavity-dumped Ti: sapphire laser for excitation. It is shown that the optical dynamics of HITCI in ethylene glycol occurs on distinctly different time scales. The ultrafast solvent response is

  9. Bopp operators and phase-space spin dynamics: application to rotational quantum Brownian motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zueco, D [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada e, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, C.S.I.C.-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Calvo, I [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-04-27

    For non-relativistic spinless particles, Bopp operators give an elegant and simple way to compute the dynamics of quasiprobability distributions in the phase-space formulation of Quantum Mechanics. In this work, we present a generalization of Bopp operators for spins and apply our results to the case of open spin systems. This approach allows to take the classical limit in a transparent way, recovering the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation.

  10. Brownian Motion and General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    O'Hara, Paul

    2013-01-01

    We construct a model of Brownian Motion on a pseudo-Riemannian manifold associated with general relativity. There are two aspects of the problem: The first is to define a sequence of stopping times associated with the Brownian "kicks" or impulses. The second is to define the dynamics of the particle along geodesics in between the Brownian kicks. When these two aspects are taken together, we can associate various distributions with the motion. We will find that the statistics of space-time events will obey a temperature dependent four dimensional Gaussian distribution defined over the quaternions which locally can be identified with Minkowski space. Analogously, the statistics of the 4-velocities will obey a kind of Maxwell-Juttner distribution. In contrast to previous work, our processes are characterized by two independent proper time variables defined with respect to the laboratory frame: a discrete one corresponding to the stopping times when the impulses take place and a continuous one corresponding to th...

  11. Two-dimensional dynamics of a trapped active Brownian particle in a shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunyun; Marchesoni, Fabio; Debnath, Tanwi; Ghosh, Pulak K

    2017-12-01

    We model the two-dimensional dynamics of a pointlike artificial microswimmer diffusing in a harmonic trap subject to the shear flow of a highly viscous medium. The particle is driven simultaneously by the linear restoring force of the trap, the drag force exerted by the flow, and the torque due to the shear gradient. For a Couette flow, elliptical orbits in the noiseless regime, and the correlation functions between the particle's displacements parallel and orthogonal to the flow are computed analytically. The effects of thermal fluctuations (translational) and self-propulsion fluctuations (angular) are treated separately. Finally, we discuss how to extend our approach to the diffusion of a microswimmer in a Poiseuille flow. These results provide an accurate reference solution to investigate, both numerically and experimentally, hydrodynamics corrections to the diffusion of active matter in confined geometries.

  12. Dynamical reweighting: improved estimates of dynamical properties from simulations at multiple temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodera, John D; Swope, William C; Noé, Frank; Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Shirts, Michael R; Pande, Vijay S

    2011-06-28

    Dynamical averages based on functionals of dynamical trajectories, such as time-correlation functions, play an important role in determining kinetic or transport properties of matter. At temperatures of interest, the expectations of these quantities are often dominated by contributions from rare events, making the precise calculation of these quantities by molecular dynamics simulation difficult. Here, we present a reweighting method for combining simulations from multiple temperatures (or from simulated or parallel tempering simulations) to compute an optimal estimate of the dynamical properties at the temperature of interest without the need to invoke an approximate kinetic model (such as the Arrhenius law). Continuous and differentiable estimates of these expectations at any temperature in the sampled range can also be computed, along with an assessment of the associated statistical uncertainty. For rare events, aggregating data from multiple temperatures can produce an estimate with the desired precision at greatly reduced computational cost compared with simulations conducted at a single temperature. Here, we describe use of the method for the canonical (NVT) ensemble using four common models of dynamics (canonical distribution of Hamiltonian trajectories, Andersen thermostatting, Langevin, and overdamped Langevin or Brownian dynamics), but it can be applied to any thermodynamic ensemble provided the ratio of path probabilities at different temperatures can be computed. To illustrate the method, we compute a time-correlation function for solvated terminally-blocked alanine peptide across a range of temperatures using trajectories harvested using a modified parallel tempering protocol.

  13. Continuum Theory of Phase Separation Kinetics for Active Brownian Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Tiribocchi, Adriano; Allen, Rosalind J.; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E.

    2013-10-01

    Active Brownian particles (ABPs), when subject to purely repulsive interactions, are known to undergo activity-induced phase separation broadly resembling an equilibrium (attraction-induced) gas-liquid coexistence. Here we present an accurate continuum theory for the dynamics of phase-separating ABPs, derived by direct coarse graining, capturing leading-order density gradient terms alongside an effective bulk free energy. Such gradient terms do not obey detailed balance; yet we find coarsening dynamics closely resembling that of equilibrium phase separation. Our continuum theory is numerically compared to large-scale direct simulations of ABPs and accurately accounts for domain growth kinetics, domain topologies, and coexistence densities.

  14. A dynamic mesh refinement technique for Lattice Boltzmann simulations on octree-like grids

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Philipp

    2012-04-27

    In this contribution, we present our new adaptive Lattice Boltzmann implementation within the Peano framework, with special focus on nanoscale particle transport problems. With the continuum hypothesis not holding anymore on these small scales, new physical effects - such as Brownian fluctuations - need to be incorporated. We explain the overall layout of the application, including memory layout and access, and shortly review the adaptive algorithm. The scheme is validated by different benchmark computations in two and three dimensions. An extension to dynamically changing grids and a spatially adaptive approach to fluctuating hydrodynamics, allowing for the thermalisation of the fluid in particular regions of interest, is proposed. Both dynamic adaptivity and adaptive fluctuating hydrodynamics are validated separately in simulations of particle transport problems. The application of this scheme to an oscillating particle in a nanopore illustrates the importance of Brownian fluctuations in such setups. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Chiral Brownian heat pump

    OpenAIRE

    van den Broek, Martijn; Van den Broeck, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We present the exact analysis of a chiral Brownian motor and heat pump. Optimization of the construction predicts, for a nanoscale device, frequencies of the order of kHz and cooling rates of the order of femtojoule per second.

  16. Chiral brownian heat pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, M; Van den Broeck, C

    2008-04-04

    We present the exact analysis of a chiral Brownian motor and heat pump. Optimization of the construction predicts, for a nanoscale device, frequencies of the order of kHz and cooling rates of the order of femtojoule per second.

  17. Chiral Brownian heat pump

    OpenAIRE

    Broek, M. van den; Broeck, C. Van Den

    2007-01-01

    We present the exact analysis of a chiral Brownian motor and heat pump. Optimization of the construction predicts, for a nanoscale device, frequencies of the order of kHz and cooling rates of the order of femtojoule per second.

  18. CNT based thermal Brownian motor to pump water in nanodevices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oyarzua, Elton; Zambrano, Harvey; Walther, Jens Honore

    2016-01-01

    Brownian molecular motors are nanoscale machines that exploit thermal fluctuations for directional motion by employing mechanisms such as the Feynman-Smoluchowski ratchet. In this study, using Non Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics, we propose a novel thermal Brownian motor for pumping water through...

  19. Multiscale simulations of patchy particle systems combining Molecular Dynamics, Path Sampling and Green's Function Reaction Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhuis, Peter

    Important reaction-diffusion processes, such as biochemical networks in living cells, or self-assembling soft matter, span many orders in length and time scales. In these systems, the reactants' spatial dynamics at mesoscopic length and time scales of microns and seconds is coupled to the reactions between the molecules at microscopic length and time scales of nanometers and milliseconds. This wide range of length and time scales makes these systems notoriously difficult to simulate. While mean-field rate equations cannot describe such processes, the mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method enables efficient simulation at the particle level provided the microscopic dynamics can be integrated out. Yet, many processes exhibit non-trivial microscopic dynamics that can qualitatively change the macroscopic behavior, calling for an atomistic, microscopic description. The recently developed multiscale Molecular Dynamics Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (MD-GFRD) approach combines GFRD for simulating the system at the mesocopic scale where particles are far apart, with microscopic Molecular (or Brownian) Dynamics, for simulating the system at the microscopic scale where reactants are in close proximity. The association and dissociation of particles are treated with rare event path sampling techniques. I will illustrate the efficiency of this method for patchy particle systems. Replacing the microscopic regime with a Markov State Model avoids the microscopic regime completely. The MSM is then pre-computed using advanced path-sampling techniques such as multistate transition interface sampling. I illustrate this approach on patchy particle systems that show multiple modes of binding. MD-GFRD is generic, and can be used to efficiently simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the particle level, including the orientational dynamics, opening up the possibility for large-scale simulations of e.g. protein signaling networks.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanoindentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K; Figge, MT; De Raedt, H; De Hosson, JTM; Landau, DP; Lewis, SP; Schuttler, HB

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the nucleation and dynamics of dislocations during nanoindentation of a (111) FCC plane. The core structure around the dislocation is visualized by coloring the atoms with deviating coordination number and its Burgers vector is automatically

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanoindentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.; Figge, M.T.; Raedt, H. De; Hosson, J.T.M. De

    2004-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the nucleation and dynamics of dislocations during nanoindentation of a (111) FCC plane. The core structure around the dislocation is visualized by coloring the atoms with deviating coordination number and its Burgers vector is automatically

  2. Coupling of lever arm swing and biased Brownian motion in actomyosin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Miao Nie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An important unresolved problem associated with actomyosin motors is the role of Brownian motion in the process of force generation. On the basis of structural observations of myosins and actins, the widely held lever-arm hypothesis has been proposed, in which proteins are assumed to show sequential structural changes among observed and hypothesized structures to exert mechanical force. An alternative hypothesis, the Brownian motion hypothesis, has been supported by single-molecule experiments and emphasizes more on the roles of fluctuating protein movement. In this study, we address the long-standing controversy between the lever-arm hypothesis and the Brownian motion hypothesis through in silico observations of an actomyosin system. We study a system composed of myosin II and actin filament by calculating free-energy landscapes of actin-myosin interactions using the molecular dynamics method and by simulating transitions among dynamically changing free-energy landscapes using the Monte Carlo method. The results obtained by this combined multi-scale calculation show that myosin with inorganic phosphate (Pi and ADP weakly binds to actin and that after releasing Pi and ADP, myosin moves along the actin filament toward the strong-binding site by exhibiting the biased Brownian motion, a behavior consistent with the observed single-molecular behavior of myosin. Conformational flexibility of loops at the actin-interface of myosin and the N-terminus of actin subunit is necessary for the distinct bias in the Brownian motion. Both the 5.5-11 nm displacement due to the biased Brownian motion and the 3-5 nm displacement due to lever-arm swing contribute to the net displacement of myosin. The calculated results further suggest that the recovery stroke of the lever arm plays an important role in enhancing the displacement of myosin through multiple cycles of ATP hydrolysis, suggesting a unified movement mechanism for various members of the myosin family.

  3. Optimisation of NMR dynamic models I. Minimisation algorithms and their performance within the model-free and Brownian rotational diffusion spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Auvergne, Edward J; Gooley, Paul R

    2008-02-01

    The key to obtaining the model-free description of the dynamics of a macromolecule is the optimisation of the model-free and Brownian rotational diffusion parameters using the collected R (1), R (2) and steady-state NOE relaxation data. The problem of optimising the chi-squared value is often assumed to be trivial, however, the long chain of dependencies required for its calculation complicates the model-free chi-squared space. Convolutions are induced by the Lorentzian form of the spectral density functions, the linear recombinations of certain spectral density values to obtain the relaxation rates, the calculation of the NOE using the ratio of two of these rates, and finally the quadratic form of the chi-squared equation itself. Two major topological features of the model-free space complicate optimisation. The first is a long, shallow valley which commences at infinite correlation times and gradually approaches the minimum. The most severe convolution occurs for motions on two timescales in which the minimum is often located at the end of a long, deep, curved tunnel or multidimensional valley through the space. A large number of optimisation algorithms will be investigated and their performance compared to determine which techniques are suitable for use in model-free analysis. Local optimisation algorithms will be shown to be sufficient for minimisation not only within the model-free space but also for the minimisation of the Brownian rotational diffusion tensor. In addition the performance of the programs Modelfree and Dasha are investigated. A number of model-free optimisation failures were identified: the inability to slide along the limits, the singular matrix failure of the Levenberg-Marquardt minimisation algorithm, the low precision of both programs, and a bug in Modelfree. Significantly, the singular matrix failure of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm occurs when internal correlation times are undefined and is greatly amplified in model-free analysis by

  4. Simulation visualization through dynamic instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisset, K.R.

    1998-09-01

    The goal of the instrument composition system is to allow a simulation user to dynamically create instruments as a simulation executes. Instruments can include graphical displays, data collectors, and debugging aides. Instruments are made up of small building blocks which can be easily combined into larger, more complex instruments. Through the sue of an Attribute Server (a distributed publication/subscription mechanism), the actors and instruments in a simulation can interact without direct knowledge of each other. Instead, each actor publishes the attributes which it has available. An instrument subscribes to the attributes in which it is interested, and is notified whenever the value of one of these attribute changes. An instrument can also publish attributes for use by other instruments. Since the Attribute Server is distributed, the publisher of an attribute need not execute on the same machine as the subscriber. This allows CPU intensive data visualization to execute on separate machines from the simulation, minimizing the impact on the simulation.

  5. Optimisation of NMR dynamic models II. A new methodology for the dual optimisation of the model-free parameters and the Brownian rotational diffusion tensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Auvergne, Edward J. [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department of NMR-based Structural Biology (Germany)], E-mail: edward@nmr-relax.com; Gooley, Paul R. [University of Melbourne, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute of Biotechnology and Molecular Science (Australia)

    2008-02-15

    Finding the dynamics of an entire macromolecule is a complex problem as the model-free parameter values are intricately linked to the Brownian rotational diffusion of the molecule, mathematically through the autocorrelation function of the motion and statistically through model selection. The solution to this problem was formulated using set theory as an element of the universal set U-the union of all model-free spaces (d'Auvergne EJ and Gooley PR (2007) Mol BioSyst 3(7), 483-494). The current procedure commonly used to find the universal solution is to initially estimate the diffusion tensor parameters, to optimise the model-free parameters of numerous models, and then to choose the best model via model selection. The global model is then optimised and the procedure repeated until convergence. In this paper a new methodology is presented which takes a different approach to this diffusion seeded model-free paradigm. Rather than starting with the diffusion tensor this iterative protocol begins by optimising the model-free parameters in the absence of any global model parameters, selecting between all the model-free models, and finally optimising the diffusion tensor. The new model-free optimisation protocol will be validated using synthetic data from Schurr JM et al. (1994) J Magn Reson B 105(3), 211-224 and the relaxation data of the bacteriorhodopsin (1-36)BR fragment from Orekhov VY (1999) J Biomol NMR 14(4), 345-356. To demonstrate the importance of this new procedure the NMR relaxation data of the Olfactory Marker Protein (OMP) of Gitti R et al. (2005) Biochem 44(28), 9673-9679 is reanalysed. The result is that the dynamics for certain secondary structural elements is very different from those originally reported.

  6. Vehicle dynamics modeling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, Dieter; Bardini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The authors examine in detail the fundamentals and mathematical descriptions of the dynamics of automobiles. In this context different levels of complexity will be presented, starting with basic single-track models up to complex three-dimensional multi-body models. A particular focus is on the process of establishing mathematical models on the basis of real cars and the validation of simulation results. The methods presented are explained in detail by means of selected application scenarios.

  7. Rotation and migration of nanoparticles for heat transfer augmentation in nanofluids by molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzheng Cui

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanofluids are a new generation of high-efficiency refrigerant with abnormal increased thermal conductivity and convective heat transfer properties. In view of the paucity of research work on the contribution of nanoparticle Brownian motion for the thermal conductivity augmentation, the present paper carries out a series of MD simulations to explorer the order of magnitude of nanoparticle Brownian motion and discusses the effect of nanoparticle Brownian motion for thermal conductivity enhancement of nanofluids. Various influence factors including nanoparticle shapes, sizes, and materials are considered. The Brownian motion of nanoparticles is decomposed into rotation and migration and calculated by MD simulation. By means of Peclet number, the effect of nanoparticle Brownian motion for thermal conductivity enhancement of nanofluids is discussed.

  8. Static and dynamic properties of dissipative particle dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsh, C.A.; Backx, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304846724; Ernst, M.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/114179247

    The algorithm for the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) fluid, the dynamics of which is conceptually a combination of molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, and lattice gas automata, is designed for simulating rheological properties of complex fluids on hydrodynamic time scales. This paper

  9. QUANTUM STOCHASTIC PROCESSES: BOSON AND FERMION BROWNIAN MOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E.Kobryn

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of quantum systems which are stochastically perturbed by linear coupling to the reservoir can be studied in terms of quantum stochastic differential equations (for example, quantum stochastic Liouville equation and quantum Langevin equation. In order to work it out one needs to define the quantum Brownian motion. As far as only its boson version has been known until recently, in the present paper we present the definition which makes it possible to consider the fermion Brownian motion as well.

  10. Human motion simulation predictive dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Malek, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Simulate realistic human motion in a virtual world with an optimization-based approach to motion prediction. With this approach, motion is governed by human performance measures, such as speed and energy, which act as objective functions to be optimized. Constraints on joint torques and angles are imposed quite easily. Predicting motion in this way allows one to use avatars to study how and why humans move the way they do, given specific scenarios. It also enables avatars to react to infinitely many scenarios with substantial autonomy. With this approach it is possible to predict dynamic motion without having to integrate equations of motion -- rather than solving equations of motion, this approach solves for a continuous time-dependent curve characterizing joint variables (also called joint profiles) for every degree of freedom. Introduces rigorous mathematical methods for digital human modelling and simulation Focuses on understanding and representing spatial relationships (3D) of biomechanics Develops an i...

  11. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of multifractional Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setty, Venkat; Sharma, Surjalal

    2013-03-01

    Multifractional Brownian Motion (mBm) is a generalization of Fractional Brownian motion (fBm) with a time varying Hurst exponent, H (t) . Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) is a technique used to study the scaling behavior representing long term correlations in various dynamical systems. In our work, we apply DFA to calculate a time averaged Hurst exponent, in mBm data. The accuracy of estimation of was shown to depend on the range and variability of H (t) . Furthermore, the effect of uniform random noise in H (t) on the nature of scaling observed in DFA is studied. Our research focusses on the robustness and applicability of the DFA technique for studying long term correlations in systems with time varying Hurst exponents akin to mBm .

  12. Rotation of Magnetization Derived from Brownian Relaxation in Magnetic Fluids of Different Viscosity Evaluated by Dynamic Hysteresis Measurements over a Wide Frequency Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ota

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of magnetic relaxation on particle parameters, such as the size and anisotropy, has been conventionally discussed. In addition, the influences of external conditions, such as the intensity and frequency of the applied field, the surrounding viscosity, and the temperature on the magnetic relaxation have been researched. According to one of the basic theories regarding magnetic relaxation, the faster type of relaxation dominates the process. However, in this study, we reveal that Brownian and Néel relaxations coexist and that Brownian relaxation can occur after Néel relaxation despite having a longer relaxation time. To understand the mechanisms of Brownian rotation, alternating current (AC hysteresis loops were measured in magnetic fluids of different viscosities. These loops conveyed the amplitude and phase delay of the magnetization. In addition, the intrinsic loss power (ILP was calculated using the area of the AC hysteresis loops. The ILP also showed the magnetization response regarding the magnetic relaxation over a wide frequency range. To develop biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles, such as hyperthermia and magnetic particle imaging, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms of magnetic relaxation.

  13. Dynamic simulation of concentrated macromolecular solutions with screened long-range hydrodynamic interactions: algorithm and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Tadashi; Chow, Edmond; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2013-09-28

    Hydrodynamic interactions exert a critical effect on the dynamics of macromolecules. As the concentration of macromolecules increases, by analogy to the behavior of semidilute polymer solutions or the flow in porous media, one might expect hydrodynamic screening to occur. Hydrodynamic screening would have implications both for the understanding of macromolecular dynamics as well as practical implications for the simulation of concentrated macromolecular solutions, e.g., in cells. Stokesian dynamics (SD) is one of the most accurate methods for simulating the motions of N particles suspended in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number, in that it considers both far-field and near-field hydrodynamic interactions. This algorithm traditionally involves an O(N(3)) operation to compute Brownian forces at each time step, although asymptotically faster but more complex SD methods are now available. Motivated by the idea of hydrodynamic screening, the far-field part of the hydrodynamic matrix in SD may be approximated by a diagonal matrix, which is equivalent to assuming that long range hydrodynamic interactions are completely screened. This approximation allows sparse matrix methods to be used, which can reduce the apparent computational scaling to O(N). Previously there were several simulation studies using this approximation for monodisperse suspensions. Here, we employ newly designed preconditioned iterative methods for both the computation of Brownian forces and the solution of linear systems, and consider the validity of this approximation in polydisperse suspensions. We evaluate the accuracy of the diagonal approximation method using an intracellular-like suspension. The diffusivities of particles obtained with this approximation are close to those with the original method. However, this approximation underestimates intermolecular correlated motions, which is a trade-off between accuracy and computing efficiency. The new method makes it possible to perform large

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of Fire Dynamics Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.; Petersen, Arnkell J.

    2007-01-01

    In case of fire dynamics simulation requirements to reliable results are most often very high due to the severe consequences of erroneous results. At the same time it is a well known fact that fire dynamics simulation constitutes rather complex physical phenomena which apart from flow and energy ...

  15. q-deformed Brownian motion

    CERN Document Server

    Man'ko, V I

    1993-01-01

    Brownian motion may be embedded in the Fock space of bosonic free field in one dimension.Extending this correspondence to a family of creation and annihilation operators satisfying a q-deformed algebra, the notion of q-deformation is carried from the algebra to the domain of stochastic processes.The properties of q-deformed Brownian motion, in particular its non-Gaussian nature and cumulant structure,are established.

  16. Particle dynamics in two-dimensional random-energy landscapes: Experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Florian; Zunke, Christoph; Hanes, Richard D. L.; Bewerunge, Jörg; Ladadwa, Imad; Heuer, Andreas; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2013-08-01

    The dynamics of individual colloidal particles in random potential energy landscapes was investigated experimentally and by Monte Carlo simulations. The value of the potential at each point in the two-dimensional energy landscape follows a Gaussian distribution. The width of the distribution, and hence the degree of roughness of the energy landscape, was varied and its effect on the particle dynamics studied. This situation represents an example of Brownian dynamics in the presence of disorder. In the experiments, the energy landscapes were generated optically using a holographic setup with a spatial light modulator, and the particle trajectories were followed by video microscopy. The dynamics is characterized using, e.g., the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, the mean squared displacement, the van Hove function, and the non-Gaussian parameter. In both experiments and simulations the dynamics is initially diffusive, showing an extended subdiffusive regime at intermediate times before diffusive motion is recovered at very long times. The dependence of the long-time diffusion coefficient on the width of the Gaussian distribution agrees with theoretical predictions. Compared to the dynamics in a one-dimensional potential energy landscape, the localization at intermediate times is weaker and the diffusive regime at long times reached earlier, which is due to the possibility to avoid local maxima in two-dimensional energy landscapes.

  17. Quantum Darwinism in Quantum Brownian Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2008-12-01

    Quantum Darwinism—the redundant encoding of information about a decohering system in its environment—was proposed to reconcile the quantum nature of our Universe with apparent classicality. We report the first study of the dynamics of quantum Darwinism in a realistic model of decoherence, quantum Brownian motion. Prepared in a highly squeezed state—a macroscopic superposition—the system leaves records whose redundancy increases rapidly with initial delocalization. Redundancy appears rapidly (on the decoherence time scale) and persists for a long time.

  18. [Using Molecular Simulations to Understand Complex Nanoscale Dynamic Phenomena in Polymer Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Grant

    2004-01-01

    The first half of the project concentrated on molecular simulation studies of the translocation of model molecules for single-stranded DNA through a nanosized pore. This has resulted in the publication, Translocation of a polymer chain across a nanopore: A Brownian dynamics simulation study, by Pu Tian and Grant D. Smith, JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS VOLUME 119, NUMBER 21 1 DECEMBER 2003, which is attached to this report. In this work we carried out Brownian dynamics simulation studies of the translocation of single polymer chains across a nanosized pore under the driving of an applied field (chemical potential gradient) designed to mimic an electrostatic field. The translocation process can be either dominated by the entropic barrier resulted from restricted motion of flexible polymer chains or by applied forces (or chemical gradient). We focused on the latter case in our studies. Calculation of radius of gyration of the translocating chain at the two opposite sides of the wall shows that the polymer chains are not in equilibrium during the translocation process. Despite this fact, our results show that the one-dimensional diffusion and the nucleation model provide an excellent description of the dependence of average translocation time on the chemical potential gradients, the polymer chain length and the solvent viscosity. In good agreement with experimental results and theoretical predictions, the translocation time distribution of our simple model shows strong non-Gaussian characteristics. It is observed that even for this simple tube-like pore geometry, more than one peak of translocation time distribution can be generated for proper pore diameter and applied field strengths. Both repulsive Weeks-Chandler-Anderson and attractive Lennard-Jones polymer-nanopore interaction were studied. Attraction facilitates the translocation process by shortening the total translocation time and dramatically improve the capturing of polymer chain. The width of the translocation

  19. Diffusion dynamics and concentration of toxic materials from quantum dots-based nanotechnologies: an agent-based modeling simulation framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agusdinata, Datu Buyung, E-mail: bagusdinata@niu.edu; Amouie, Mahbod [Northern Illinois University, Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering and Environment, Sustainability, & Energy Institute (United States); Xu, Tao [Northern Illinois University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Due to their favorable electrical and optical properties, quantum dots (QDs) nanostructures have found numerous applications including nanomedicine and photovoltaic cells. However, increased future production, use, and disposal of engineered QD products also raise concerns about their potential environmental impacts. The objective of this work is to establish a modeling framework for predicting the diffusion dynamics and concentration of toxic materials released from Trioctylphosphine oxide-capped CdSe. To this end, an agent-based model simulation with reaction kinetics and Brownian motion dynamics was developed. Reaction kinetics is used to model the stability of surface capping agent particularly due to oxidation process. The diffusion of toxic Cd{sup 2+} ions in aquatic environment was simulated using an adapted Brownian motion algorithm. A calibrated parameter to reflect sensitivity to reaction rate is proposed. The model output demonstrates the stochastic spatial distribution of toxic Cd{sup 2+} ions under different values of proxy environmental factor parameters. With the only chemistry considered was oxidation, the simulation was able to replicate Cd{sup 2+} ion release from Thiol-capped QDs in aerated water. The agent-based method is the first to be developed in the QDs application domain. It adds both simplicity of the solubility and rate of release of Cd{sup 2+} ions and complexity of tracking of individual atoms of Cd at the same time.

  20. Brownian motion of a nano-colloidal particle: the role of the solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Carbajal, Alexis; Herrera-Velarde, Salvador; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2015-07-15

    Brownian motion is a feature of colloidal particles immersed in a liquid-like environment. Usually, it can be described by means of the generalised Langevin equation (GLE) within the framework of the Mori theory. In principle, all quantities that appear in the GLE can be calculated from the molecular information of the whole system, i.e., colloids and solvent molecules. In this work, by means of extensive Molecular Dynamics simulations, we study the effects of the microscopic details and the thermodynamic state of the solvent on the movement of a single nano-colloid. In particular, we consider a two-dimensional model system in which the mass and size of the colloid are two and one orders of magnitude, respectively, larger than the ones associated with the solvent molecules. The latter ones interact via a Lennard-Jones-type potential to tune the nature of the solvent, i.e., it can be either repulsive or attractive. We choose the linear momentum of the Brownian particle as the observable of interest in order to fully describe the Brownian motion within the Mori framework. We particularly focus on the colloid diffusion at different solvent densities and two temperature regimes: high and low (near the critical point) temperatures. To reach our goal, we have rewritten the GLE as a second kind Volterra integral in order to compute the memory kernel in real space. With this kernel, we evaluate the momentum-fluctuating force correlation function, which is of particular relevance since it allows us to establish when the stationarity condition has been reached. Our findings show that even at high temperatures, the details of the attractive interaction potential among solvent molecules induce important changes in the colloid dynamics. Additionally, near the critical point, the dynamical scenario becomes more complex; all the correlation functions decay slowly in an extended time window, however, the memory kernel seems to be only a function of the solvent density. Thus, the

  1. Mathematical interpretation of Brownian motor model: Limit cycles and directed transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianqiang; Ma, Hong; Zhong, Suchuang

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we first suggest that the attractor of Brownian motor model is one of the reasons for the directed transport phenomenon of Brownian particle. We take the classical Smoluchowski-Feynman (SF) ratchet model as an example to investigate the relationship between limit cycles and directed transport phenomenon of the Brownian particle. We study the existence and variation rule of limit cycles of SF ratchet model at changing parameters through mathematical methods. The influences of these parameters on the directed transport phenomenon of a Brownian particle are then analyzed through numerical simulations. Reasonable mathematical explanations for the directed transport phenomenon of Brownian particle in SF ratchet model are also formulated on the basis of the existence and variation rule of the limit cycles and numerical simulations. These mathematical explanations provide a theoretical basis for applying these theories in physics, biology, chemistry, and engineering.

  2. Computational Simulation of Droplet Collision Dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Law, Chung

    2000-01-01

    ..., and the energy partition among the various modes was identified. By using the molecular dynamics method, bouncing and coalescence were successfully simulated for the first time without the artificial manipulation of the inter-droplet gaseous film...

  3. SPATKIN: a simulator for rule-based modeling of biomolecular site dynamics on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanczyk, Marek; Hlavacek, William S; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2017-11-15

    Rule-based modeling is a powerful approach for studying biomolecular site dynamics. Here, we present SPATKIN, a general-purpose simulator for rule-based modeling in two spatial dimensions. The simulation algorithm is a lattice-based method that tracks Brownian motion of individual molecules and the stochastic firing of rule-defined reaction events. Because rules are used as event generators, the algorithm is network-free, meaning that it does not require to generate the complete reaction network implied by rules prior to simulation. In a simulation, each molecule (or complex of molecules) is taken to occupy a single lattice site that cannot be shared with another molecule (or complex). SPATKIN is capable of simulating a wide array of membrane-associated processes, including adsorption, desorption and crowding. Models are specified using an extension of the BioNetGen language, which allows to account for spatial features of the simulated process. The C ++ source code for SPATKIN is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU GPLv3 license. The source code can be compiled for execution on popular platforms (Windows, Mac and Linux). An installer for 64-bit Windows and a macOS app are available. The source code and precompiled binaries are available at the SPATKIN Web site (http://pmbm.ippt.pan.pl/software/spatkin). spatkin.simulator@gmail.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  4. Program Complex For Cyclotron Beam Dynamic Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Glazov, A A; Karamysheva, G A; Lisenkova, O E

    2004-01-01

    The program complex in MATLAB intended for particle dynamic simulations is described. Programming in an easy-to-use environment permits creation of models in a short space of time. Advanced graphical tools of MATLAB give good visualization features to created models. The beam dynamic modelling results by the example of two different cyclotron designs are presented.

  5. Visualizing Structure and Dynamics of Disaccharide Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, J. F.; Beckham, G. T.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the effect of several solvent models on the conformational properties and dynamics of disaccharides such as cellobiose and lactose. Significant variation in timescale for large scale conformational transformations are observed. Molecular dynamics simulation provides enough detail to enable insight through visualization of multidimensional data sets. We present a new way to visualize conformational space for disaccharides with Ramachandran plots.

  6. Cosmophysical Factors in the Fluctuation Amplitude Spectrum of Brownian Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaminsky A. V.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Phenomenon of the regular variability of the fine structure of the fluctuation in the am- plitude distributions (shapes of related histograms for the case of Brownian motion was investigated. We took an advantage of the dynamic light scattering method (DLS to get a stochastically fluctuated signal determined by Brownian motion. Shape of the histograms is most likely to vary, synchronous, in two proximally located independent cells containing Brownian particles. The synchronism persists in the cells distant at 2 m from each other, and positioned meridionally. With a parallel-wise positioning of the cells, high probability of the synchronous variation in the shape of the histograms by local time has been observed. This result meets the previous conclusion about the dependency of histogram shapes (“fluctuation amplitudes” of the spectra of stochastic processes upon rotation of the Earth.

  7. Quantum Brownian motion model for the stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangyi; Zhang, Jian-Wei; Guo, Hong

    2016-06-01

    It is believed by the majority today that the efficient market hypothesis is imperfect because of market irrationality. Using the physical concepts and mathematical structures of quantum mechanics, we construct an econophysical framework for the stock market, based on which we analogously map massive numbers of single stocks into a reservoir consisting of many quantum harmonic oscillators and their stock index into a typical quantum open system-a quantum Brownian particle. In particular, the irrationality of stock transactions is quantitatively considered as the Planck constant within Heisenberg's uncertainty relationship of quantum mechanics in an analogous manner. We analyze real stock data of Shanghai Stock Exchange of China and investigate fat-tail phenomena and non-Markovian behaviors of the stock index with the assistance of the quantum Brownian motion model, thereby interpreting and studying the limitations of the classical Brownian motion model for the efficient market hypothesis from a new perspective of quantum open system dynamics.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of impact test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahoshi, Y. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan); Schmauder, S.; Ludwig, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes an impact test by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to evaluate embrittlement of bcc Fe at different temperatures. A new impact test model is developed for MD simulation. The typical fracture behaviors show transition from brittle to ductile fracture, and a history of the impact loads also demonstrates its transition. We conclude that the impact test by MD could be feasible. (orig.)

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Owner F.; Wengerter, Brian C.; Taylor, Ramona S.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment, in which students were given the opportunity to perform molecular dynamics simulations on a series of molecular liquids using the Amber suite of programs, is presented. They were introduced to both physical theories underlying classical mechanics simulations and to the atom-atom pair distribution function.

  10. The valuation of currency options by fractional Brownian motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrollahi, Foad; Kılıçman, Adem

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to investigate a model for pricing of currency options in which value governed by the fractional Brownian motion model (FBM). The fractional partial differential equation and some Greeks are also obtained. In addition, some properties of our pricing formula and simulation studies are presented, which demonstrate that the FBM model is easy to use.

  11. Brownian pump powered by a white-noise flashing ratchet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Marin, A; Sancho, J M

    2008-03-01

    A Brownian pump of particles powered by a stochastic flashing ratchet mechanism is studied. The pumping device is embedded in a finite region and bounded by particle reservoirs. In the steady state, we exactly calculate the spatial density profile, the concentration ratio between both reservoirs and the particle flux. We propose a simulation framework for the consistent evaluation of such observable quantities.

  12. Simulation of wetlands forest vegetation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program, SWAMP, was designed to simulate the effects of flood frequency and depth to water table on southern wetlands forest vegetation dynamics. By incorporating these hydrologic characteristics into the model, forest vegetation and vegetation dynamics can be simulated. The model, based on data from the White River National Wildlife Refuge near De Witt, Arkansas, "grows" individual trees on a 20 x 20-m plot taking into account effects on the tree growth of flooding, depth to water table, shade tolerance, overtopping and crowding, and probability of death and reproduction. A potential application of the model is illustrated with simulations of tree fruit production following flood-control implementation and lumbering. ?? 1979.

  13. Combining molecular dynamics with mesoscopic Green's function reaction dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Bolhuis, Peter G; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2015-12-07

    In many reaction-diffusion processes, ranging from biochemical networks, catalysis, to complex self-assembly, the spatial distribution of the reactants and the stochastic character of their interactions are crucial for the macroscopic behavior. The recently developed mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method enables efficient simulation at the particle level provided the microscopic dynamics can be integrated out. Yet, many processes exhibit non-trivial microscopic dynamics that can qualitatively change the macroscopic behavior, calling for an atomistic, microscopic description. We propose a novel approach that combines GFRD for simulating the system at the mesoscopic scale where particles are far apart, with a microscopic technique such as Langevin dynamics or Molecular Dynamics (MD), for simulating the system at the microscopic scale where reactants are in close proximity. This scheme defines the regions where the particles are close together and simulated with high microscopic resolution and those where they are far apart and simulated with lower mesoscopic resolution, adaptively on the fly. The new multi-scale scheme, called MD-GFRD, is generic and can be used to efficiently simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the particle level.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation methods revised

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, Hendrik

    1996-01-01

    Korte beschrijving: In this thesis, all the subjects mentioned in the previous section are revised, except neighbor searching and integration. So, the following subjects are discussed: non-bonded force calculations, bonded force calculations, constraint dynamics, and box shapes. Moreover, mapping

  15. Rectified brownian transport in corrugated channels: Fractional brownian motion and Lévy flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bao-quan; Shao, Zhi-gang; Zhong, Wei-rong

    2012-11-07

    We study fractional brownian motion and Lévy flights in periodic corrugated channels without any external driving forces. From numerical simulations, we find that both fractional gaussian noise and Lévy-stable noise in asymmetric corrugated channels can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce directed transport. The rectified mechanisms for fractional brownian motion and Lévy flights are different. The former is caused by non-uniform spectral distribution (low or high frequencies) of fractional gaussian noise, while the latter is due to the nonthermal character (occasional long jumps) of the Lévy-stable noise. For fractional brownian motion, average velocity increases with the Hurst exponent for the persistent case, while for the antipersistent case there exists an optimal value of Hurst exponent at which average velocity takes its maximal value. For Lévy flights, the group velocity decreases monotonically as the Lévy index increases. In addition, for both cases, the optimized periodicity and radius at the bottleneck can facilitate the directed transport. Our results could be implemented in constrained structures with narrow channels and pores where the particles undergo anomalous diffusion.

  16. Computational plasticity algorithm for particle dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbenhoft, K.; Lyamin, A. V.; Vignes, C.

    2018-01-01

    The problem of particle dynamics simulation is interpreted in the framework of computational plasticity leading to an algorithm which is mathematically indistinguishable from the common implicit scheme widely used in the finite element analysis of elastoplastic boundary value problems. This algorithm provides somewhat of a unification of two particle methods, the discrete element method and the contact dynamics method, which usually are thought of as being quite disparate. In particular, it is shown that the former appears as the special case where the time stepping is explicit while the use of implicit time stepping leads to the kind of schemes usually labelled contact dynamics methods. The framing of particle dynamics simulation within computational plasticity paves the way for new approaches similar (or identical) to those frequently employed in nonlinear finite element analysis. These include mixed implicit-explicit time stepping, dynamic relaxation and domain decomposition schemes.

  17. Cellular automata : dynamics, simulations, traces

    OpenAIRE

    Guillon, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    A cellular automaton is a discrete dynamical system which can model objects that evolve parallelly and asynchronously : the space is divided into cells, each of which has a state evolving according to some single local rule and a finite number of neighboring cells. Though this system can easily be formalized, very complex behaviors can appear ; it turns out to be a powerful computational model. That complexity can be studied with respect to various theories : topology, measure, decidability, ...

  18. Dynamic large eddy simulation: Stability via realizability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarpoor, Reza; Heinz, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    The concept of dynamic large eddy simulation (LES) is highly attractive: such methods can dynamically adjust to changing flow conditions, which is known to be highly beneficial. For example, this avoids the use of empirical, case dependent approximations (like damping functions). Ideally, dynamic LES should be local in physical space (without involving artificial clipping parameters), and it should be stable for a wide range of simulation time steps, Reynolds numbers, and numerical schemes. These properties are not trivial, but dynamic LES suffers from such problems over decades. We address these questions by performing dynamic LES of periodic hill flow including separation at a high Reynolds number Re = 37 000. For the case considered, the main result of our studies is that it is possible to design LES that has the desired properties. It requires physical consistency: a PDF-realizable and stress-realizable LES model, which requires the inclusion of the turbulent kinetic energy in the LES calculation. LES models that do not honor such physical consistency can become unstable. We do not find support for the previous assumption that long-term correlations of negative dynamic model parameters are responsible for instability. Instead, we concluded that instability is caused by the stable spatial organization of significant unphysical states, which are represented by wall-type gradient streaks of the standard deviation of the dynamic model parameter. The applicability of our realizability stabilization to other dynamic models (including the dynamic Smagorinsky model) is discussed.

  19. Induction generator models in dynamic simulation tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans; Akhmatov, Vladislav

    1999-01-01

    For AC network with large amount of induction generators (windmills) the paper demonstrates a significant discrepancy in the simulated voltage recovery after fault in weak networks when comparing dynamic and transient stability descriptions and the reasons of discrepancies are explained. It is fo......For AC network with large amount of induction generators (windmills) the paper demonstrates a significant discrepancy in the simulated voltage recovery after fault in weak networks when comparing dynamic and transient stability descriptions and the reasons of discrepancies are explained...

  20. Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    ARL-TR-8234 ● DEC 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics Simulations by DeCarlos E...return it to the originator. ARL-TR-8234● DEC 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics...REPORT TYPE Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 October 2015–30 September 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Visualizing Energy on Target

  1. Dynamic Fracture Simulations of Explosively Loaded Cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, Carly W. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Goto, D. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-11-30

    This report documents the modeling results of high explosive experiments investigating dynamic fracture of steel (AerMet® 100 alloy) cylinders. The experiments were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during 2007 to 2008 [10]. A principal objective of this study was to gain an understanding of dynamic material failure through the analysis of hydrodynamic computer code simulations. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational cylinder models were analyzed using the ALE3D multi-physics computer code.

  2. Dynamics modeling and simulation of flexible airships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuwen

    The resurgence of airships has created a need for dynamics models and simulation capabilities of these lighter-than-air vehicles. The focus of this thesis is a theoretical framework that integrates the flight dynamics, structural dynamics, aerostatics and aerodynamics of flexible airships. The study begins with a dynamics model based on a rigid-body assumption. A comprehensive computation of aerodynamic effects is presented, where the aerodynamic forces and moments are categorized into various terms based on different physical effects. A series of prediction approaches for different aerodynamic effects are unified and applied to airships. The numerical results of aerodynamic derivatives and the simulated responses to control surface deflection inputs are verified by comparing to existing wind-tunnel and flight test data. With the validated aerodynamics and rigid-body modeling, the equations of motion of an elastic airship are derived by the Lagrangian formulation. The airship is modeled as a free-free Euler-Bernoulli beam and the bending deformations are represented by shape functions chosen as the free-free normal modes. In order to capture the coupling between the aerodynamic forces and the structural elasticity, local velocity on the deformed vehicle is used in the computation of aerodynamic forces. Finally, with the inertial, gravity, aerostatic and control forces incorporated, the dynamics model of a flexible airship is represented by a single set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The proposed model is implemented as a dynamics simulation program to analyze the dynamics characteristics of the Skyship-500 airship. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the influence of structural deformation on the aerodynamic forces and the dynamics behavior of the airship. The nonlinear equations of motion are linearized numerically for the purpose of frequency domain analysis and for aeroelastic stability analysis. The results from the latter for the

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation study of methanesulfonic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Canales Gabriel, Manel; Alemán Llansó, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation study of methanesulfonic acid has been carried out using a reliable force field in a large range of temperatures. Several thermodynamic, structural, and dynamical properties have been calculated and compared with the available experimental data. The density, the shear viscosity, the heat of vaporization, and the melting temperature results, calculated from this force field, are in a good agreement with the experimental data. Analysis of the influence of the hyd...

  4. Gas Turbine Plant Modeling for Dynamic Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Endale Turie, Samson

    2012-01-01

    Gas turbines have become effective in industrial applications for electric and thermal energy production partly due to their quick response to load variations. A gas turbine power plant is a complex assembly of a varietyof components that are designed on the basis of aero thermodynamiclaws. This thesis work presents model development of a single-shaft gas turbine plant cycle that can operate at wide range of load settings in complete dynamic GTP simulator. The modeling and simulation has been...

  5. Flow of colloidal solids and fluids through constrictions: dynamical density functional theory versus simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Urs; Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-06-22

    Using both dynamical density functional theory and particle-resolved Brownian dynamics simulations, we explore the flow of two-dimensional colloidal solids and fluids driven through a linear channel with a constriction. The flow is generated by a constant external force acting on all colloids. The initial configuration is equilibrated in the absence of flow and then the external force is switched on instantaneously. Upon starting the flow, we observe four different scenarios: a complete blockade, a monotonic decay to a constant particle flux (typical for a fluid), a damped oscillatory behaviour in the particle flux, and a long-lived stop-and-go behaviour in the flow (typical for a solid). The dynamical density functional theory describes all four situations but predicts infinitely long undamped oscillations in the flow which are always damped in the simulations. We attribute the mechanisms of the underlying stop-and-go flow to symmetry conditions on the flowing solid. Our predictions are verifiable in real-space experiments on magnetic colloidal monolayers which are driven through structured microchannels and can be exploited to steer the flow throughput in microfluidics.

  6. Unsteady sedimentation of flocculating non-Brownian suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    Microstructural evolution and temporal dynamics of the sedimentation rate U(t) are studied for a monodisperse suspension of non-Brownian spherical particles subject to van der Waals attraction and electrostatic repulsion in the realistic range of colloidal parameters (Hamaker constant, surface potential, double layer thickness etc.). A novel economical high-order multipole algorithm is used to fully resolve hydrodynamical interactions in the dynamical simulations with up to 500 spheres in a periodic box and O(106) time steps, combined with geometry perturbation to incorporate lubrication and extend the solution to arbitrarily small particle separations. The total colloidal force near the secondary minimum often greatly exceeds the effective gravity/buoyancy force, resulting in the formation of strong but flexible bonds and large clusters as the suspension evolves from an initial well-mixed state of non-aggregated spheres. Ensemble averaging over many initial configurations is used to predict U(t) for particle volume fractions between 0.1 and 0.25. The results are fully convergent, system-size independent and cover a 2-2.5 fold growth of U(t) after a latency time.

  7. Monte carlo simulation for soot dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2012-01-01

    A new Monte Carlo method termed Comb-like frame Monte Carlo is developed to simulate the soot dynamics. Detailed stochastic error analysis is provided. Comb-like frame Monte Carlo is coupled with the gas phase solver Chemkin II to simulate soot formation in a 1-D premixed burner stabilized flame. The simulated soot number density, volume fraction, and particle size distribution all agree well with the measurement available in literature. The origin of the bimodal distribution of particle size distribution is revealed with quantitative proof.

  8. Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, Constantine

    2009-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics: Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner. The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming. This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice. There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes. Two distinguishing features of the discourse are: solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty. Matlab codes are presented and discussed for ...

  9. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2001-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes Two distinguishing features of the discourse are solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty Matlab codes are presented and discussed for a broad...

  10. Brownian motion and stochastic calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Karatzas, Ioannis

    1998-01-01

    This book is designed as a text for graduate courses in stochastic processes. It is written for readers familiar with measure-theoretic probability and discrete-time processes who wish to explore stochastic processes in continuous time. The vehicle chosen for this exposition is Brownian motion, which is presented as the canonical example of both a martingale and a Markov process with continuous paths. In this context, the theory of stochastic integration and stochastic calculus is developed. The power of this calculus is illustrated by results concerning representations of martingales and change of measure on Wiener space, and these in turn permit a presentation of recent advances in financial economics (option pricing and consumption/investment optimization). This book contains a detailed discussion of weak and strong solutions of stochastic differential equations and a study of local time for semimartingales, with special emphasis on the theory of Brownian local time. The text is complemented by a large num...

  11. White noise flashing Brownian pump

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez-Marin, A.; Sancho, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    A Brownian pump of particles powered by a stochastic flashing ratchet mechanism is studied. The pumping device is embedded in a finite region and bounded by particle reservoirs. In the steady state, we exactly calculate the spatial density profile, the concentration ratio between both reservoirs and the particle flux. A simple numerical scheme is presented allowing for the consistent evaluation of all such observable quantities.

  12. Brownian movement and microscopic irreversibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, L. G. M.

    1981-02-01

    An extension of the hypothetical experiment of Szilard, which involved the action of a one-molecule gas in an isolated isothermal system, is developed to illustrate how irreversibility may arise out of Brownian motion. As this development requires a consideration of nonmolecular components such as wheels and pistons, the thought-experiment is remodeled in molecular terms and appears to function as a perpetuum mobile.

  13. Extremes of multifractional Brownian motion

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Long

    2017-01-01

    Let $B_{H}(t), t\\geq [0,T], T\\in(0,\\infty)$ be the standard Multifractional Brownian Motion(mBm), in this contribution we are concerned with the exact asymptotics of \\begin{eqnarray*} \\mathbb{P}\\left\\{\\sup_{t\\in[0,T]}B_{H}(t)>u\\right\\} \\end{eqnarray*} as $u\\rightarrow\\infty$. Mainly depended on the structures of $H(t)$, the results under several important cases are investigated.

  14. molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KEYWORDS: Molecular dynamic simulation; iron surface; adsorption; imidazoline derivatives; quantum chemical calculations ..... break any bond. This means that the closer the nuclei of the bonding atoms are a greater supply of energy is needed to separate the atoms due to large force of attraction between the atoms.

  15. Modular simulation of reefer container dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kresten Kjær; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    of components with different dynamical speeds is presented with an improvement of previous results. The simulation speed is improved by 350% with no reduction in accuracy of the solution, by substituting the MATLAB ode15s solver with an explicit first order solver with a step size calculation algorithm...

  16. Simulation of Gas-Surface Dynamical Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    surface. The substrate with lattice constant a is represented in a simple ball and spring picture. on the particular problem. Time-independent...παvwell , (26) Simulation of Gas-Surface Dynamical Interactions 4 - 10 RTO-EN-AVT-142 g E ad v mvc ∆ v’well vc cM Figure 4

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular dynamic simulation results indicate that the imidazoline derivative molecules uses the imidazoline ring to effectively adsorb on the surface of iron, with the alkyl hydrophobic tail forming an n shape (canopy like covering) at geometry optimization and at 353 K. The n shape canopy like covering to a large extent may ...

  18. Generator dynamics in aeroelastic analysis and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, T.J.; Hansen, M.H.; Iov, F.

    2003-05-01

    This report contains a description of a dynamic model for a doubly-fed induction generator implemented in the aeroelastic code HAWC. The model has physical input parameters (resistance, reactance etc.) and input variables (stator and rotor voltage and rotor speed). The model can be used to simulate the generator torque as well as the rotor and stator currents, active and reactive power. A perturbation method has been used to reduce the original generator model equations to a set of equations which can be solved with the same time steps as a typical aeroelastic code. The method is used to separate the fast transients of the model from the slow variations and deduce a reduced order expression for the slow part. Dynamic effects of the first order terms in the model as well as the influence on drive train eigenfrequencies and damping has been investigated. Load response during time simulation of wind turbine response have been compared to simulations with a linear static generator model originally implemented i HAWC. A 2 MW turbine has been modelled in the aeroelastic code HAWC. When using the new dynamic generator model there is an interesting coupling between the generator dynamics and a global turbine vibration mode at 4.5 Hz, which only occurs when a dynamic formulation of the generator equations is applied. This frequency can especially be seen in the electrical power of the generator and the rotational speed of the generator, but also as torque variations in the drive train. (au)

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of layered double hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KALINICHEV,ANDREY G.; WANG,JIANWEI; KIRKPATRICK,R. JAMES; CYGAN,RANDALL T.

    2000-05-19

    The interlayer structure and the dynamics of Cl{sup {minus}} ions and H{sub 2}O molecules in the interlayer space of two typical LDH [Layered Double Hydroxide] phases were investigated by molecular dynamics computer simulations. The simulations of hydrocalumite, [Ca{sub 2}Al(OH){sub 6}]Cl{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O reveal significant dynamic disorder in the orientations of interlayer water molecules. The hydration energy of hydrotalcite, [Mg{sub 2}Al(0H){sub 6}]Cl{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O, is found to have a minimum at approximately n = 2, in good agreement with experiment. The calculated diffusion coefficient of Cl{sup {minus}} as an outer-sphere surface complex is almost three times that of inner-sphere Cl{sup {minus}}, but is still about an order of magnitude less than that of Cl{sup {minus}} in bulk solution. The simulations demonstrate unique capabilities of combined NMR and molecular dynamics studies to understand the structure and dynamics of surface and interlayer species in mineral/water systems.

  20. Brownian parametric oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbe, Christine; Jung, Peter; Hänggi, Peter

    1994-05-01

    We discuss the stochastic dynamics of dissipative, white-noise-driven Floquet oscillators, characterized by a time-periodic stiffness. Thus far, little attention has been paid to these exactly solvable nonstationary systems, although they carry a rich potential for several experimental applications. Here, we calculate and discuss the mean values and variances, as well as the correlation functions and the Floquet spectrum. As one main result, we find for certain parameter values that the fluctuations of the position coordinate are suppressed as compared to the equilibrium value of a harmonic oscillator (parametric squeezing).

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of magnetized dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Alexander; Reichstein, Torben; Wilms, Jochen

    2012-10-01

    The combination of the electric field that confines a dust cloud with a static magnetic field generally leads to a rotation of the dust cloud. In weak magnetic fields, the Hall component of the ion flow exerts a drag force that sets the dust in rotation. We have performed detailed molecular-dynamics simulations of the dynamics of torus-shaped dust clouds in anodic plasmas. The stationary flow [1] is characterized by a shell structure in the laminar dust flow and by the spontaneous formation of a shear-flow around a stationary vortex. Here we present new results on dynamic phenomena, among them fluctuations due to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear-flow. The simulations are compared with experimental results. [4pt] [1] T. Reichstein, A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 18, 083705 (2011)

  2. Communication: Memory effects and active Brownian diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Pulak K. [Department of Chemistry, Presidency University, Kolkata 700073 (India); Li, Yunyun, E-mail: yunyunli@tongji.edu.cn [Center for Phononics and Thermal Energy Science, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Marchegiani, Giampiero [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Marchesoni, Fabio [Center for Phononics and Thermal Energy Science, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy)

    2015-12-07

    A self-propelled artificial microswimmer is often modeled as a ballistic Brownian particle moving with constant speed aligned along one of its axis, but changing direction due to random collisions with the environment. Similarly to thermal noise, its angular randomization is described as a memoryless stochastic process. Here, we speculate that finite-time correlations in the orientational dynamics can affect the swimmer’s diffusivity. To this purpose, we propose and solve two alternative models. In the first one, we simply assume that the environmental fluctuations governing the swimmer’s propulsion are exponentially correlated in time, whereas in the second one, we account for possible damped fluctuations of the propulsion velocity around the swimmer’s axis. The corresponding swimmer’s diffusion constants are predicted to get, respectively, enhanced or suppressed upon increasing the model memory time. Possible consequences of this effect on the interpretation of the experimental data are discussed.

  3. Hybrid scheme for Brownian semistationary processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Mikkel; Lunde, Asger; Pakkanen, Mikko S.

    is to approximate the kernel function by a power function near zero and by a step function elsewhere. The resulting approximation of the process is a combination of Wiener integrals of the power function and a Riemann sum, which is why we call this method a hybrid scheme. Our main theoretical result describes...... the asymptotics of the mean square error of the hybrid scheme and we observe that the scheme leads to a substantial improvement of accuracy compared to the ordinary forward Riemann-sum scheme, while having the same computational complexity. We exemplify the use of the hybrid scheme by two numerical experiments......We introduce a simulation scheme for Brownian semistationary processes, which is based on discretizing the stochastic integral representation of the process in the time domain. We assume that the kernel function of the process is regularly varying at zero. The novel feature of the scheme...

  4. Engineering dynamics from the Lagrangian to simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Gans, Roger F

    2013-01-01

    This engineering dynamics textbook is aimed at beginning graduate students in mechanical engineering and other related engineering disciplines who need training in dynamics as applied to engineering mechanisms. It introduces the formal mathematical development of Lagrangian mechanics (and its corollaries), while solving numerous engineering applications. The author’s goal is to instill an understanding of the basic physics required for engineering dynamics, while providing a recipe (algorithm) for the simulation of engineering mechanisms such as robots. The book is reasonably self-contained so that the practicing engineer interested in this area can also make use of it. This book is made accessible to the widest possible audience by numerous, solved examples and diagrams that apply the principles to real engineering applications. • Provides an applied textbook for intermediate/advanced engineering dynamics courses; • Discusses Lagrangian mechanics in the context of numerous engineering applications...

  5. Operator Fractional Brownian Motion and Martingale Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongshuai Dai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that martingale difference sequences are very useful in applications and theory. On the other hand, the operator fractional Brownian motion as an extension of the well-known fractional Brownian motion also plays an important role in both applications and theory. In this paper, we study the relation between them. We construct an approximation sequence of operator fractional Brownian motion based on a martingale difference sequence.

  6. Dynamic simulation of the mastication muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingaertner, Tim; Albrecht, Jochen

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of a simulated operation system in craniofacial surgery is to evaluate and visualize the results of operations on the overall facial shape of the patient and on the functionality of his jaw. This paper presents the analyzation of muscle movements in the mastication system by applying real jaw movements to the simulation. With this method an accurate modeling of the mastication muscles can be performed which is a prerequisite for a realistic simulation and precise intra- operative registration. According to this results a large- scale musculoskeletal model of the mastication system is generated including kinematic and dynamic parameters. By integrating distance sensors in the simulation of a segmented CT (computer tomograph) image of the maxilla and mandible the motions of the masticatory muscles during different kinds of jaw movements have been analyzed. The data for this motions have been recorded by a commercial system (CONDYLOCOMP LR3) on a test person and transformed to the graphical simulation system. This method for the first time allows to observe the dynamics of the mastication muscles and their different parameters like muscle length ratio and velocity. The integration of a kinematic model for the jaw movement makes it possible to analyze non traced movements.

  7. ANALOG SIMULATION PROBLEMS NONSTATIONARY GAS DYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the possibility of using hydraulic analog simulation in the study of problems of unsteady gas dynamics is considered. The analysis of differential equations of unsteady motion of bodies in supersonic flow using the theory of similarity and dimensional analysis. Obtained similarity criteria that must be identical for both the real gas flow and the modeling of fluid flow. Using a hydraulic analog modeling for research in non-stationary gas dynamics provides valuable information necessary for understanding the physics of the processes and the construction of more sophisticated mathematical models.

  8. Prediction of Brownian particle deposition in porous media using the constricted tube model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, You-Im; Chen, Shan-Chih; Lee, Eric

    2003-10-01

    The deposition of colloidal particles onto the collector surfaces of porous media is investigated using the Brownian dynamics simulation method. The pore structure in a filter bed was characterized by the constricted tube model. The effects of various shapes of the total interaction energy curves of DLVO theory and the effects of different particle diameters on the collection efficiencies of particles are examined. The simulation results show that the particle collection efficiency is strongly dependent on the geometry of the tube and on the shape of the total interaction energy curve. In a comparison with the available experimental measurements of the filter coefficient, it is found that the present model can give a smaller discrepancy than that of the convective diffusion model in the unfavorable deposition region.

  9. Accurate simulation of protein dynamics in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitt, M.; Sharon, R. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel))

    1988-10-01

    Simulation of the molecular dynamics of a small protein, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, was found to be more realistic when water molecules were included than when in vacuo: the time-averaged structure was much more like that observed in high-resolution x-ray studies, the amplitudes of atomic vibration in solution were smaller, and fewer incorrect hydrogen bonds were formed. The authors approach, which provides a sound basis for reliable simulation of diverse properties of biological macromolecules in solution, uses atom-centered forces and classical mechanics.

  10. Thermodynamic and Quantum Thermodynamic Analyses of Brownian Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Gyftopoulos, Elias P.

    2006-01-01

    Thermodynamic and quantum thermodynamic analyses of Brownian movement of a solvent and a colloid passing through neutral thermodynamic equilibrium states only. It is shown that Brownian motors and E. coli do not represent Brownian movement.

  11. Temperature Dependent Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, R. A.; Rapini, M.; Costa, B. V.; Coura, P. Z.

    2006-01-01

    In this work we present a molecular dynamics simulation of a FFM experiment. The tip-sample interaction is studied by varying the normal force in the tip and the temperature of the surface. The friction force, cA, at zero load and the friction coefficient, $\\mu$, were obtained. Our results strongly support the idea that the effective contact area, A, decreases with increasing temperature and the friction coefficient presents a clear signature of the premelting process of the surface.

  12. SPH simulation of liquid metal target dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Massidda, L; Massidda, Luca

    2010-01-01

    An implementation of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method to study the dynamics of liquid metal targets under the effect of high power proton beams is presented The accuracy of the method is verified through the comparison of numerical simulations with experimental results on liquid mercury performed in ISOLDE/CERN The results are in good agreement and allow to have a better insight on the physics of the phenomenon (C) 2010 Elsevier B V All rights reserved

  13. On the Generalized Brownian Motion and its Applications in Finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høg, Esben; Frederiksen, Per; Schiemert, Daniel

    This paper deals with dynamic term structure models (DTSMs) and proposes a new way to handle the limitation of the classical affine models. In particular, the paper expands the exibility of the DTSMs by applying generalized Brownian motions with dependent increments as the governing force of the ...... to other markets or multi factors. As a complement the paper shows an example of how to derive the implied bond pricing parameters using the ordinary Kalman filter....

  14. The underdamped Brownian duet and stochastic linear irreversible thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proesmans, Karel; Van den Broeck, Christian

    2017-10-01

    Building on our earlier work [Proesmans et al., Phys. Rev. X 6, 041010 (2016)], we introduce the underdamped Brownian duet as a prototype model of a dissipative system or of a work-to-work engine. Several recent advances from the theory of stochastic thermodynamics are illustrated with explicit analytic calculations and corresponding Langevin simulations. In particular, we discuss the Onsager-Casimir symmetry, the trade-off relations between power, efficiency and dissipation, and stochastic efficiency.

  15. MDLab: a molecular dynamics simulation prototyping environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cickovski, Trevor; Chatterjee, Santanu; Wenger, Jacob; Sweet, Christopher R; Izaguirre, Jesús A

    2010-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation involves solving Newton's equations of motion for a system of atoms, by calculating forces and updating atomic positions and velocities over a timestep Deltat. Despite the large amount of computing power currently available, the timescale of MD simulations is limited by both the small timestep required for propagation, and the expensive algorithm for computing pairwise forces. These issues are currently addressed through the development of efficient simulation methods, some of which make acceptable approximations and as a result can afford larger timesteps. We present MDLab, a development environment for MD simulations built with Python which facilitates prototyping, testing, and debugging of these methods. MDLab provides constructs which allow the development of propagators, force calculators, and high level sampling protocols that run several instances of molecular dynamics. For computationally demanding sampling protocols which require testing on large biomolecules, MDL includes an interface to the OpenMM libraries of Friedrichs et al. which execute on graphical processing units (GPUs) and achieve considerable speedup over execution on the CPU. As an example of an interesting high level method developed in MDLab, we present a parallel implementation of the On-The-Fly string method of Maragliano and Vanden-Eijnden. MDLab is available at http://mdlab.sourceforge.net. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Dynamic simulator for PEFC propulsion plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraide, Masataka; Kaneda, Eiichi; Sato, Takao [Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    This report covers part of a joint study on a PEFC propulsion system for surface ships, summarized in a presentation to this Seminar, entitled {open_quote}Study on a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) Propulsion System for Surface Ships{close_quotes}, and which envisages application to a 1,500 DWT cargo vessel. The work presented here focuses on a simulation study on PEFC propulsion plant performance, and particularly on the system response to changes in load. Using a dynamic simulator composed of system components including fuel cell, various simulations were executed, to examine the performance of the system as a whole and of the individual system components under quick and large load changes such as occasioned by maneuvering operations and by racing when the propeller emerges above water in heavy sea.

  17. Probing Cellular Dynamics with Mesoscopic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    . Advances in computing hardware and software now allow explicit simulation of some aspects of cellular dynamics close to the molecular scale. Vesicle fusion is one example of such a process. Experiments, however, typically probe cellular behavior from the molecular scale up to microns. Standard particle......-based simulation techniques cannot capture such a broad range. Consequently, at long length scales, models have often been of the Mass Action variety, in which molecular constituents are represented by density fields that vary continuously in space and time, rather than involving discrete molecules....... But these models struggle to represent processes that are localized in space and time or involve the transport of material through a crowded environment. A novel class of mesoscopic simulation techniques are now able to span length and time scales from nanometers to microns for hundreds of microseconds, and may...

  18. Dynamic simulation of regulatory networks using SQUAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xenarios Ioannis

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ambition of most molecular biologists is the understanding of the intricate network of molecular interactions that control biological systems. As scientists uncover the components and the connectivity of these networks, it becomes possible to study their dynamical behavior as a whole and discover what is the specific role of each of their components. Since the behavior of a network is by no means intuitive, it becomes necessary to use computational models to understand its behavior and to be able to make predictions about it. Unfortunately, most current computational models describe small networks due to the scarcity of kinetic data available. To overcome this problem, we previously published a methodology to convert a signaling network into a dynamical system, even in the total absence of kinetic information. In this paper we present a software implementation of such methodology. Results We developed SQUAD, a software for the dynamic simulation of signaling networks using the standardized qualitative dynamical systems approach. SQUAD converts the network into a discrete dynamical system, and it uses a binary decision diagram algorithm to identify all the steady states of the system. Then, the software creates a continuous dynamical system and localizes its steady states which are located near the steady states of the discrete system. The software permits to make simulations on the continuous system, allowing for the modification of several parameters. Importantly, SQUAD includes a framework for perturbing networks in a manner similar to what is performed in experimental laboratory protocols, for example by activating receptors or knocking out molecular components. Using this software we have been able to successfully reproduce the behavior of the regulatory network implicated in T-helper cell differentiation. Conclusion The simulation of regulatory networks aims at predicting the behavior of a whole system when subject

  19. Stochastic Current of Bifractional Brownian Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjun Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the regularity of stochastic current defined as Skorohod integral with respect to bifractional Brownian motion through Malliavin calculus. Moreover, we similarly derive some results in the case of multidimensional multiparameter. Finally, we consider stochastic current of bifractional Brownian motion as a distribution in Watanabe spaces.

  20. Brownian motion in AdS/CFT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, J.; Hubeny, V.E.; Rangamani, M.; Shigemori, M.

    2009-01-01

    We study Brownian motion and the associated Langevin equation in AdS/CFT. The Brownian particle is realized in the bulk spacetime as a probe fundamental string in an asymptotically AdS black hole background, stretching between the AdS boundary and the horizon. The modes on the string are excited by

  1. Generalized functionals of Brownian motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. U. Ahmed

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss some recent developments in the theory of generalized functionals of Brownian motion. First we give a brief summary of the Wiener-Ito multiple Integrals. We discuss some of their basic properties, and related functional analysis on Wiener measure space. then we discuss the generalized functionals constructed by Hida. The generalized functionals of Hida are based on L2-Sobolev spaces, thereby, admitting only Hs, s∈R valued kernels in the multiple stochastic integrals. These functionals are much more general than the classical Wiener-Ito class. The more recent development, due to the author, introduces a much more broad class of generalized functionals which are based on Lp-Sobolev spaces admitting kernels from the spaces p,s, s∈R. This allows analysis of a very broad class of nonlinear functionals of Brownian motion, which can not be handled by either the Wiener-Ito class or the Hida class. For s≤0, they represent generalized functionals on the Wiener measure space like Schwarz distributions on finite dimensional spaces. In this paper we also introduce some further generalizations, and construct a locally convex topological vector space of generalized functionals. We also present some discussion on the applications of these results.

  2. Comparisons of characteristic timescales and approximate models for Brownian magnetic nanoparticle rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Daniel B.; Weaver, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are promising tools for a host of therapeutic and diagnostic medical applications. The dynamics of rotating magnetic nanoparticles in applied magnetic fields depend strongly on the type and strength of the field applied. There are two possible rotation mechanisms and the decision for the dominant mechanism is often made by comparing the equilibrium relaxation times. This is a problem when particles are driven with high-amplitude fields because they are not necessarily at equilibrium at all. Instead, it is more appropriate to consider the “characteristic timescales” that arise in various applied fields. Approximate forms for the characteristic time of Brownian particle rotations do exist and we show agreement between several analytical and phenomenological-fit models to simulated data from a stochastic Langevin equation approach. We also compare several approximate models with solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation to determine their range of validity for general fields and relaxation times. The effective field model is an excellent approximation, while the linear response solution is only useful for very low fields and frequencies for realistic Brownian particle rotations. PMID:26130846

  3. Resonance of Brownian vortices in viscoelastic shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laas, K.; Mankin, R.

    2015-10-01

    The dynamics of a Brownian particle in an oscillatory viscoelastic shear flow is considered using the generalized Langevin equation. The interaction with fluctuations of environmental parameters is modeled by an additive external white noise and by an internal Mittag-Leffer noise with a finite memory time. Focusing on the mean angular momentum of particles it is shown that the presence of memory has a profound effect on the behavior of the Brownian vortices. Particularly, if an external noise dominates over the internal noise, a resonance-like dependence of the mean angular momentum of "free" particles, trapped due to the cage effect, on the characteristic memory time is observed. Moreover, it is established that memory effects can induce two kinds of resonance peaks: one resonance peak is related to the presence of external noise and the other is related to the initial positional distribution of particles. The bona fide resonance versus the shear frequency is also discussed.

  4. Traffic flow dynamics data, models and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Treiber, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This textbook provides a comprehensive and instructive coverage of vehicular traffic flow dynamics and modeling. It makes this fascinating interdisciplinary topic, which to date was only documented in parts by specialized monographs, accessible to a broad readership. Numerous figures and problems with solutions help the reader to quickly understand and practice the presented concepts. This book is targeted at students of physics and traffic engineering and, more generally, also at students and professionals in computer science, mathematics, and interdisciplinary topics. It also offers material for project work in programming and simulation at college and university level. The main part, after presenting different categories of traffic data, is devoted to a mathematical description of the dynamics of traffic flow, covering macroscopic models which describe traffic in terms of density, as well as microscopic many-particle models in which each particle corresponds to a vehicle and its driver. Focus chapters on ...

  5. Dynamic simulation of flywheel-type fuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available Rounds of ammunition are normally armed with a fuse. In this study, a fuse is developed which uses a flywheel-type mechanism controlled by time or distance. Due to its simplicity of operation and construction, the concept is expected to have high reliabil­ity. The dynamic response of all the components of this flywheel-type fuse is mathematically modelled. Simulation software was developed which connects the mathematical models of the various components. With the definition of boundary values, the response of the projectile, flywheel and other components can be determined continuously for firing and in-flight conditions.

  6. Human behavioral regularity, fractional Brownian motion, and exotic phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Yang, Guang; An, Kenan; Huang, Jiping

    2016-08-01

    The mix of competition and cooperation (C&C) is ubiquitous in human society, which, however, remains poorly explored due to the lack of a fundamental method. Here, by developing a Janus game for treating C&C between two sides (suppliers and consumers), we show, for the first time, experimental and simulation evidences for human behavioral regularity. This property is proved to be characterized by fractional Brownian motion associated with an exotic transition between periodic and nonperiodic phases. Furthermore, the periodic phase echoes with business cycles, which are well-known in reality but still far from being well understood. Our results imply that the Janus game could be a fundamental method for studying C&C among humans in society, and it provides guidance for predicting human behavioral activity from the perspective of fractional Brownian motion.

  7. Osmosis : a molecular dynamics computer simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, Thomas

    Osmosis is a phenomenon of critical importance in a variety of processes ranging from the transport of ions across cell membranes and the regulation of blood salt levels by the kidneys to the desalination of water and the production of clean energy using potential osmotic power plants. However, despite its importance and over one hundred years of study, there is an ongoing confusion concerning the nature of the microscopic dynamics of the solvent particles in their transfer across the membrane. In this thesis the microscopic dynamical processes underlying osmotic pressure and concentration gradients are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. I first present a new derivation for the local pressure that can be used for determining osmotic pressure gradients. Using this result, the steady-state osmotic pressure is studied in a minimal model for an osmotic system and the steady-state density gradients are explained using a simple mechanistic hopping model for the solvent particles. The simulation setup is then modified, allowing us to explore the timescales involved in the relaxation dynamics of the system in the period preceding the steady state. Further consideration is also given to the relative roles of diffusive and non-diffusive solvent transport in this period. Finally, in a novel modification to the classic osmosis experiment, the solute particles are driven out-of-equilibrium by the input of energy. The effect of this modification on the osmotic pressure and the osmotic ow is studied and we find that active solute particles can cause reverse osmosis to occur. The possibility of defining a new "osmotic effective temperature" is also considered and compared to the results of diffusive and kinetic temperatures..

  8. Parallel Monte Carlo simulation of aerosol dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, K.

    2014-01-01

    A highly efficient Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm is developed for the numerical simulation of aerosol dynamics, that is, nucleation, surface growth, and coagulation. Nucleation and surface growth are handled with deterministic means, while coagulation is simulated with a stochastic method (Marcus-Lushnikov stochastic process). Operator splitting techniques are used to synthesize the deterministic and stochastic parts in the algorithm. The algorithm is parallelized using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The parallel computing efficiency is investigated through numerical examples. Near 60% parallel efficiency is achieved for the maximum testing case with 3.7 million MC particles running on 93 parallel computing nodes. The algorithm is verified through simulating various testing cases and comparing the simulation results with available analytical and/or other numerical solutions. Generally, it is found that only small number (hundreds or thousands) of MC particles is necessary to accurately predict the aerosol particle number density, volume fraction, and so forth, that is, low order moments of the Particle Size Distribution (PSD) function. Accurately predicting the high order moments of the PSD needs to dramatically increase the number of MC particles. 2014 Kun Zhou et al.

  9. Brownian yet Non-Gaussian Diffusion: From Superstatistics to Subordination of Diffusing Diffusivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei V. Chechkin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of biological, soft, and active matter systems are observed to exhibit normal diffusive dynamics with a linear growth of the mean-squared displacement, yet with a non-Gaussian distribution of increments. Based on the Chubinsky-Slater idea of a diffusing diffusivity, we here establish and analyze a minimal model framework of diffusion processes with fluctuating diffusivity. In particular, we demonstrate the equivalence of the diffusing diffusivity process with a superstatistical approach with a distribution of diffusivities, at times shorter than the diffusivity correlation time. At longer times, a crossover to a Gaussian distribution with an effective diffusivity emerges. Specifically, we establish a subordination picture of Brownian but non-Gaussian diffusion processes, which can be used for a wide class of diffusivity fluctuation statistics. Our results are shown to be in excellent agreement with simulations and numerical evaluations.

  10. Solvation shell dynamics studied by molecular dynamics simulation in relation to the translational and rotational dynamics of supercritical water and benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ken; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Nakahara, Masaru

    2007-11-01

    The solvation shell dynamics of supercritical water is analyzed by molecular dynamics simulation with emphasis on its relationship to the translational and rotational dynamics. The relaxation times of the solvation number (τS), the velocity autocorrelation function (τD), the angular momentum correlation function (τJ), and the second-order reorientational correlation function (τ2R) are studied at a supercritical temperature of 400°C over a wide density region of 0.01-1.5gcm-3. The relaxation times are decomposed into those conditioned by the solvation number n, and the effect of the short-ranged structure is examined in terms of its probability Pn of occurrence. In the low to medium-density range of 0.01-0.4gcm-3, the time scales of water dynamics are in the following sequence: τD>τS≳τJ≳τ2R. This means that the rotation in supercritical water is of the "in-shell" type while the translational diffusion is not. The comparison to supercritical benzene is also performed and the effect of hydrogen bonding is examined. The water diffusion is not of the in-shell type up to the ambient density of 1.0gcm-3, which corresponds to the absence of the transition from the collision to the Brownian picture, whereas such transition is present in the case of benzene. The absence of the transition in water comes from the fast reorganization of the hydrogen bonds and the enhanced mobility of the solvation shell in supercritical conditions.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of amorphous indomethacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Tian-Xiang; Anderson, Bradley D

    2013-01-07

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been conducted using an assembly consisting of 105 indomethacin (IMC) molecules and 12 water molecules to investigate the underlying dynamic (e.g., rotational and translational diffusivities and conformation relaxation rates) and structural properties (e.g., conformation, hydrogen-bonding distributions, and interactions of water with IMC) of amorphous IMC. These properties may be important in predicting physical stability of this metastable material. The IMC model was constructed using X-ray diffraction data with the force-field parameters mostly assigned by analogy with similar groups in Amber-ff03 and atomic charges calculated with the B3LYP/ccpVTZ30, IEFPCM, and RESP models. The assemblies were initially equilibrated in their molten state and cooled through the glass transition temperature to form amorphous solids. Constant temperature dynamic runs were then carried out above and below the T(g) (i.e., at 600 K (10 ns), 400 K (350 ns), and 298 K (240 ns)). The density (1.312 ± 0.003 g/cm(3)) of the simulated amorphous solid at 298 K was close to the experimental value (1.32 g/cm(3)) while the estimated T(g) (384 K) was ~64 degrees higher than the experimental value (320 K) due to the faster cooling rate. Due to the hindered rotation of its amide bond, IMC can exist in different diastereomeric states. Different IMC conformations were sufficiently sampled in the IMC melt or vapor, but transitions occurred rarely in the glass. The hydrogen-bonding patterns in amorphous IMC are more complex in the amorphous state than in the crystalline polymorphs. Carboxylic dimers that are dominant in α- and γ-crystals were found to occur at a much lower probability in the simulated IMC glasses while hydrogen-bonded IMC chains were more easily identified patterns in the simulated amorphous solids. To determine molecular diffusivity, a novel analytical method is proposed to deal with the non-Einsteinian behavior, in which the temporal

  12. Brownian Functionals in Physics and Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Satya N.

    This is a brief review on Brownian functionals in one dimension and their various applications. After a brief description of Einstein's original derivation of the diffusion equation, this article provides a pedagogical introduction to the path integral methods leading to the derivation of the celebrated Feynman-Kac formula. The usefulness of this technique in calculating the statistical properties of Brownian functionals is illustrated with several examples in physics and probability theory, with particular emphasis on applications in computer science. The statistical properties of "first-passage Brownian functionals" and their applications are also discussed.

  13. Atomistic Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Multiferroics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dawei; Weerasinghe, Jeevaka; Bellaiche, L.

    2012-08-01

    A first-principles-based approach is developed to simulate dynamical properties, including complex permittivity and permeability in the GHz-THz range, of multiferroics at finite temperatures. It includes both structural degrees of freedom and magnetic moments as dynamic variables in Newtonian and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equations within molecular dynamics, respectively, with the couplings between these variables being incorporated. The use of a damping coefficient and of the fluctuation field in the LLG equations is required to obtain equilibrated magnetic properties at any temperature. No electromagnon is found in the spin-canted structure of BiFeO3. On the other hand, two magnons with very different frequencies are predicted via the use of this method. The smallest-in-frequency magnon corresponds to oscillations of the weak ferromagnetic vector in the basal plane being perpendicular to the polarization while the second magnon corresponds to magnetic dipoles going in and out of this basal plane. The large value of the frequency of this second magnon is caused by static couplings between magnetic dipoles with electric dipoles and oxygen octahedra tiltings.

  14. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I. [Los Alamos National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  15. Stochastically gated local and occupation times of a Brownian particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2017-01-01

    We generalize the Feynman-Kac formula to analyze the local and occupation times of a Brownian particle moving in a stochastically gated one-dimensional domain. (i) The gated local time is defined as the amount of time spent by the particle in the neighborhood of a point in space where there is some target that only receives resources from (or detects) the particle when the gate is open; the target does not interfere with the motion of the Brownian particle. (ii) The gated occupation time is defined as the amount of time spent by the particle in the positive half of the real line, given that it can only cross the origin when a gate placed at the origin is open; in the closed state the particle is reflected. In both scenarios, the gate randomly switches between the open and closed states according to a two-state Markov process. We derive a stochastic, backward Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) for the moment-generating function of the two types of gated Brownian functional, given a particular realization of the stochastic gate, and analyze the resulting stochastic FPE using a moments method recently developed for diffusion processes in randomly switching environments. In particular, we obtain dynamical equations for the moment-generating function, averaged with respect to realizations of the stochastic gate.

  16. On some generalization of fractional Brownian motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xiaotian [School of Management, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liang Xiangqian [Department of Applied Mathematics, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266510, Shandong (China); Ren Fuyao [Institute of Mathematics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang Shiying [School of Management, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)]. E-mail: swa001@126.com

    2006-05-15

    The multifractional Brownian motion (mBm) is a continuous Gaussian process that extends the classical fractional Brownian motion (fBm) defined by Barton and Vincent Poor [Barton RJ, Vincent Poor H. IEEE Trans Inform 1988;34(5):943] and Decreusefond and Ustuenel [Decreusefond L, Ustuenel AS. Potential Anal 1999;10:177]. In addition, an innovational representation of fBm is given.

  17. CADS:Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffat, Harry K.

    2007-07-01

    This manual describes a library for aerosol kinetics and transport, called CADS (Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator), which employs a section-based approach for describing the particle size distributions. CADS is based upon Cantera, a set of C++ libraries and applications that handles gas phase species transport and reactions. The method uses a discontinuous Galerkin formulation to represent the particle distributions within each section and to solve for changes to the aerosol particle distributions due to condensation, coagulation, and nucleation processes. CADS conserves particles, elements, and total enthalpy up to numerical round-off error, in all of its formulations. Both 0-D time dependent and 1-D steady state applications (an opposing-flow flame application) have been developed with CADS, with the initial emphasis on developing fundamental mechanisms for soot formation within fires. This report also describes the 0-D application, TDcads, which models a time-dependent perfectly stirred reactor.

  18. Molecular dynamic simulation study of molten cesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeganegi Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study thermodynamics and structural properties of expanded caesium fluid. Internal pressure, radial distribution functions (RDFs, coordination numbers and diffusion coefficients have been calculated at temperature range 700–1600 K and pressure range 100–800 bar. We used the internal pressure to predict the metal–non-metal transition occurrence region. RDFs were calculated at wide ranges of temperature and pressure. The coordination numbers decrease and positions of the first peak of RDFs slightly increase as the temperature increases and pressure decreases. The calculated self-diffusion coefficients at various temperatures and pressures show no distinct boundary between Cs metallic fluid and its expanded fluid where it continuously increases with temperature.

  19. Assessing Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Solvatochromism Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Tobias

    2015-08-20

    For the modeling of solvatochromism with an explicit representation of the solvent molecules, the quality of preceding molecular dynamics simulations is crucial. Therefore, the possibility to apply force fields which are derived with as little empiricism as possible seems desirable. Such an approach is tested here by exploiting the sensitive solvatochromism of p-nitroaniline, and the use of reliable excitation energies based on approximate second-order coupled cluster results within a polarizable embedding scheme. The quality of the various MD settings for four different solvents, water, methanol, ethanol, and dichloromethane, is assessed. In general, good agreement with the experiment is observed when polarizable force fields and special treatment of hydrogen bonding are applied.

  20. Single particle Brownian motion with solid friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prasenjit; Puri, Sanjay; Schwartz, Moshe

    2017-06-01

    We study the Brownian dynamics of a solid particle on a vibrating solid surface. Phenomenologically, the interaction between the two solid surfaces is modeled by solid friction, and the Gaussian white noise models the vibration of the solid surface. The solid friction force is proportional to the sign of relative velocity. We derive the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation for the time-dependent probability distribution to find the particle at a given location. We calculate analytically the steady state velocity distribution function, mean-square velocity and diffusion coefficient in d-dimensions. We present a generic method of calculating the autocorrelations in d-dimensions. This results in one dimension in an exact evaluation of the steady state velocity autocorrelation. In higher dimensions our exact general expression enables the analytic evaluation of the autocorrelation to any required approximation. We present approximate analytic expressions in two and three dimensions. Next, we numerically calculate the mean-square velocity and steady state velocity autocorrelation function up to d = 3 . Our numerical results are in good agreement with the analytically obtained results.

  1. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo approach by virtual microscopy the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated with Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics methods. The 30 nm chromatin fiber was

  2. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractTo approach the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated with Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics methods. The 30 nm chromatin fiber was folded according to

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of microscale fluid transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.C.; Lopez, A.R.; Stevens, M.J.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1998-02-01

    Recent advances in micro-science and technology, like Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), have generated a group of unique liquid flow problems that involve characteristic length scales of a Micron. Also, in manufacturing processes such as coatings, current continuum models are unable to predict microscale physical phenomena that appear in these non-equilibrium systems. It is suspected that in these systems, molecular-level processes can control the interfacial energy and viscoelastic properties at the liquid/solid boundary. A massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code has been developed to better understand microscale transport mechanisms, fluid-structure interactions, and scale effects in micro-domains. Specifically, this MD code has been used to analyze liquid channel flow problems for a variety of channel widths, e.g. 0.005-0.05 microns. This report presents results from MD simulations of Poiseuille flow and Couette flow problems and addresses both scaling and modeling issues. For Poiseuille flow, the numerical predictions are compared with existing data to investigate the variation of the friction factor with channel width. For Couette flow, the numerical predictions are used to determine the degree of slip at the liquid/solid boundary. Finally, the results also indicate that shear direction with respect to the wall lattice orientation can be very important. Simulation results of microscale Couette flow and microscale Poiseuille flow for two different surface structures and two different shear directions will be presented.

  4. Dynamic Shade and Irradiance Simulation of Aquatic Landscapes and Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penumbra is a landscape shade and irradiance simulation model that simulates how solar energy spatially and temporally interacts within dynamic ecosystems such as riparian zones, forests, and other terrain that cast topological shadows. Direct and indirect solar energy accumulate...

  5. Dynamic Response and Simulations of Nanoparticle-Enhanced Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mantena, P. R; Al-Ostaz, Ahmed; Cheng, Alexander H

    2007-01-01

    ...) molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticle-enhanced composites and fly- ash based foams that are being considered for the future generation naval structures or retrofitting of existing ones...

  6. Deformation and fracture behavior of simulated particle gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rzepiela, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    In this PhD project rheological properties of model particle gels are investigated using Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulations. Particle gels are systems of colloidal particles that form weakly bonded percolating networks interpenetrated by a suspending fluid. They are characterized as

  7. Simulated queues in dynamic situations | Ojarikre | Journal of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Discrete event simulation of dynamic situation of queuing systems has been carried out using the next-event simulated time procedure for the Monte Carlo and Area approaches. Simulation of the queuing system will be from the arrival and departure of customers from a local commercial bank. Using simulation of events, ...

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of supercritical fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branam, Richard D.

    Axisymmetric injectors appear in a multitude of applications ranging from rocket engines to biotechnology. While experimentation is limited to larger injectors, much interest has been shown in the micro- and nano-scales as well. Experimentation at these scales can be cost prohibitive if even possible. Often, the operating regime involves supercritical fluids or complex geometries. Molecular dynamics modeling provides a unique way to explore these flow regimes, calculate hard to measure flow parameters accurately, and determine the value of potential improvements before investing in costly experiments or manufacturing. This research effort modeled sub- and supercritical fluid flow in a cylindrical tube being injected into a quiescent chamber. The ability of four wall models to provide an accurate simulation was compared. The simplest model, the diffuse wall, proved useful in getting results quickly but the results for the higher density cases are questionable, especially with respect to velocity profiles and density distributions. The one zone model, three layers of an fcc solid tethered to the lattice sites with a spring, proved very useful for this research primarily because it did not need as many CPU hours to equilibrate. The two zone wall uses springs as a two body potential and has a second stationary zone to hold the wall in place. The most complicated, the three zone wall, employed a reactionary zone, a stochastic zone and a stationary zone using a Lennard-Jones two body potential. Jet simulations were conducted on argon and nitrogen for liquid tube diameters from 20 to 65 A at both sub and supercritical temperatures (Ar: 130 K and 160 K, N2: 120 K and 130 K). The simulations focused on pressures above the critical pressure (Ar: 6 MPa, N2: 4 MPa). The diffusive wall showed some variation from the analytical velocity profile in the tube while the atomistically modeled walls performed very well. The walls were all able to maintain system temperature to reach

  9. An algorithm for emulsion stability simulations: account of flocculation, coalescence, surfactant adsorption and the process of Ostwald ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina-Villalba, German

    2009-03-01

    The first algorithm for Emulsion Stability Simulations (ESS) was presented at the V Conferencia Iberoamericana sobre Equilibrio de Fases y Diseño de Procesos [Luis, J.; García-Sucre, M.; Urbina-Villalba, G. Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Emulsion Stability In: Equifase 99. Libro de Actas, 1(st) Ed., Tojo J., Arce, A., Eds.; Solucion's: Vigo, Spain, 1999; Volume 2, pp. 364-369]. The former version of the program consisted on a minor modification of the Brownian Dynamics algorithm to account for the coalescence of drops. The present version of the program contains elaborate routines for time-dependent surfactant adsorption, average diffusion constants, and Ostwald ripening.

  10. Brownian semi-stationary processes, turbulence and smooth processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbina, José Ulises Márquez

    This thesis analysis the use of Brownian semi-stationary (BSS) processes to model the main statistical features present in turbulent time series, and some asymptotic properties of certain classes of smooth processes.  Turbulence is a complex phenomena governed by the Navier-Stokes equations....... We also studied the distributional properties of the increments of BSS processes with the intent to better understand why the BSS processes seem to accurately reproduce the temporal turbulent dynamics.  BSS processes in general are not semimartingales. However, there are conditions which make a BSS...

  11. Experiences on dynamic simulation software in chemical engineering education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komulainen, Tiina M.; Enemark-rasmussen, Rasmus; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    : basic chemical engineering, operability and safety analysis and process control. User experiences from both teachers and students are presented. The benefits of dynamic simulation as an additional teaching tool are discussed and summarized. The experiences confirm that commercial dynamic simulators...... provide realistic training and can be successfully integrated into undergraduate and graduate teaching, laboratory courses and research....

  12. System Design Description Salt Well Liquid Pumping Dynamic Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HARMSEN, R.W.

    1999-12-14

    The Salt Well Liquid (SWL) Pumping Dynamic Simulation used by the single-shell tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Project is described. A graphical dynamic simulation predicts SWL removal from 29 SSTs using an exponential function and unique time constant for each SST. Increasing quarterly efficiencies are applied to adjust the pumping rates during fiscal year 2000.

  13. Application of control theory to dynamic systems simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auslander, D. M.; Spear, R. C.; Young, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    The application of control theory is applied to dynamic systems simulation. Theory and methodology applicable to controlled ecological life support systems are considered. Spatial effects on system stability, design of control systems with uncertain parameters, and an interactive computing language (PARASOL-II) designed for dynamic system simulation, report quality graphics, data acquisition, and simple real time control are discussed.

  14. Dynamic Simulation over Long Time Periods with 100% Solar Generation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concepcion, Ricky James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Elliott, Ryan Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This project aimed to identify the path forward for dynamic simulation tools to accommodate these needs by characterizing the properties of power systems (with high PV penetration), analyzing how these properties affect dynamic simulation software, and offering solutions for potential problems.

  15. Annual Report 1999 Environmental Dynamics and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NS Foster-Mills

    2000-06-28

    This annual report describes selected 1999 research accomplishments for the Environmental Dynamics and Simulation (ED and S) directorate, one of six research organizations in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). These accomplishments are representative of the different lines of research underway in the ED and S directorate. EMSL is one of US Department of Energy's (DOE) national scientific user facilities and is the centerpiece of DOE's commitment to providing world-class experimental, theoretical, and computational capabilities for solving the nation's environmental problems. Capabilities in the EMSL include over 100 major instrument systems for use by the resident research staff, their collaborators, and users of the EMSL. These capabilities are used to address the fundamental science that will be the basis for finding solutions to national environmental issues such as cleaning up contamianted areas at DOE sites across the country and developing green technologies that will reduce or eliminate future pollution production. The capabilities are also used to further the understanding of global climate change and environmental issues relevant to energy production and use and health effects resulting from exposure to contaminated environments.

  16. Expansion techniques for collisionless stellar dynamical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meiron, Yohai [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics at Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Baile; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Spurzem, Rainer, E-mail: ymeiron@pku.edu.cn [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-09-10

    We present graphics processing unit (GPU) implementations of two fast force calculation methods based on series expansions of the Poisson equation. One method is the self-consistent field (SCF) method, which is a Fourier-like expansion of the density field in some basis set; the other method is the multipole expansion (MEX) method, which is a Taylor-like expansion of the Green's function. MEX, which has been advocated in the past, has not gained as much popularity as SCF. Both are particle-field methods and optimized for collisionless galactic dynamics, but while SCF is a 'pure' expansion, MEX is an expansion in just the angular part; thus, MEX is capable of capturing radial structure easily, while SCF needs a large number of radial terms. We show that despite the expansion bias, these methods are more accurate than direct techniques for the same number of particles. The performance of our GPU code, which we call ETICS, is profiled and compared to a CPU implementation. On the tested GPU hardware, a full force calculation for one million particles took ∼0.1 s (depending on expansion cutoff), making simulations with as many as 10{sup 8} particles fast for a comparatively small number of nodes.

  17. Surface Structure of Hydroxyapatite from Simulated Annealing Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Xu, Dingguo; Yang, Mingli; Zhang, Xingdong

    2016-05-10

    The surface structure of hydroxyapatite (HAP) is crucial for its bioactivity. Using a molecular dynamics simulated annealing method, we studied the structure and its variation with annealing temperature of the HAP (100) surface. In contrast to the commonly used HAP surface model, which is sliced from HAP crystal and then relaxed at 0 K with first-principles or force-field calculations, a new surface structure with gradual changes from ordered inside to disordered on the surface was revealed. The disordering is dependent on the annealing temperature, Tmax. When Tmax increases up to the melting point, which was usually adopted in experiments, the disordering increases, as reflected by its radial distribution functions, structural factors, and atomic coordination numbers. The disordering of annealed structures does not show significant changes when Tmax is above the melting point. The thickness of disordered layers is about 10 Å. The surface energy of the annealed structures at high temperature is significantly less than that of the crystal structure relaxed at room temperature. A three-layer model of interior, middle, and surface was then proposed to describe the surface structure of HAP. The interior layer retains the atomic configurations in crystal. The middle layer has its atoms moved and its groups rotated about their original locations. In the surface layer, the atomic arrangements are totally different from those in crystal. In particular for the hydroxyl groups, they move outward and cover the Ca(2+) ions, leaving holes occupied by the phosphate groups. Our study suggested a new model with disordered surface structures for studying the interaction of HAP-based biomaterials with other molecules.

  18. Experiences on dynamic simulation software in chemical engineering education

    OpenAIRE

    Komulainen, Tiina M.; Enemark-Rasmussen, Rasmus; Sin, Gürkan; Fletcher, John P.; Cameron, David

    2012-01-01

    Commercial process simulators are increasing interest in the chemical engineer education. In this paper, the use of commercial dynamic simulation software, D-SPICE® and K-Spice®, for three different chemical engineering courses is described and discussed. The courses cover the following topics: basic chemical engineering, operability and safety analysis and process control. User experiences from both teachers and students are presented. The benefits of dynamic simulation as an additional teac...

  19. Specification, Analysis and Simulation of the Dynamics Within an Organisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, C.M.; Treur, J.; Wijngaards, W.C.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a modelling approach to the dynamics within a multi-agent organisation is presented. A declarative, executable specification language for dynamics within an organisation is proposed as a basis for simulation. Moreover, to be able to specify and analyse dynamic properties within an

  20. Specification, analysis and simulation of the dynamics within an organisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Catholijn; Treur, Jan; Wijngaards, Wouter

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a modelling approach to the dynamics within a multi-agent organisation is presented. A declarative, executable specification language for dynamics within an organisation is proposed as a basis for simulation. Moreover, to be able to specify and analyse dynamic properties within an

  1. High tech supply chain simulation based on dynamical systems model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, X.; Ashayeri, J.

    2013-01-01

    During the last 45 years, system dynamics as a continuous type of simulation has been used for simulating various problems, ranging from economic to engineering and managerial when limited (historical) information is available. Control theory is another alternative for continuous simulation that

  2. Fractional Brownian motion and motion governed by the fractional Langevin equation in confined geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Metzler, Ralf

    2010-02-01

    Motivated by subdiffusive motion of biomolecules observed in living cells, we study the stochastic properties of a non-Brownian particle whose motion is governed by either fractional Brownian motion or the fractional Langevin equation and restricted to a finite domain. We investigate by analytic calculations and simulations how time-averaged observables (e.g., the time-averaged mean-squared displacement and displacement correlation) are affected by spatial confinement and dimensionality. In particular, we study the degree of weak ergodicity breaking and scatter between different single trajectories for this confined motion in the subdiffusive domain. The general trend is that deviations from ergodicity are decreased with decreasing size of the movement volume and with increasing dimensionality. We define the displacement correlation function and find that this quantity shows distinct features for fractional Brownian motion, fractional Langevin equation, and continuous time subdiffusion, such that it appears an efficient measure to distinguish these different processes based on single-particle trajectory data.

  3. Variance change point detection for fractional Brownian motion based on the likelihood ratio test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharczyk, Daniel; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Sikora, Grzegorz

    2018-01-01

    Fractional Brownian motion is one of the main stochastic processes used for describing the long-range dependence phenomenon for self-similar processes. It appears that for many real time series, characteristics of the data change significantly over time. Such behaviour one can observe in many applications, including physical and biological experiments. In this paper, we present a new technique for the critical change point detection for cases where the data under consideration are driven by fractional Brownian motion with a time-changed diffusion coefficient. The proposed methodology is based on the likelihood ratio approach and represents an extension of a similar methodology used for Brownian motion, the process with independent increments. Here, we also propose a statistical test for testing the significance of the estimated critical point. In addition to that, an extensive simulation study is provided to test the performance of the proposed method.

  4. Multiscale molecular dynamics simulations of rotary motor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekimoto, Toru; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori

    2017-12-04

    Protein functions require specific structures frequently coupled with conformational changes. The scale of the structural dynamics of proteins spans from the atomic to the molecular level. Theoretically, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a powerful tool to investigate protein dynamics because the MD simulation is capable of capturing conformational changes obeying the intrinsically structural features. However, to study long-timescale dynamics, efficient sampling techniques and coarse-grained (CG) approaches coupled with all-atom MD simulations, termed multiscale MD simulations, are required to overcome the timescale limitation in all-atom MD simulations. Here, we review two examples of rotary motor proteins examined using free energy landscape (FEL) analysis and CG-MD simulations. In the FEL analysis, FEL is calculated as a function of reaction coordinates, and the long-timescale dynamics corresponding to conformational changes is described as transitions on the FEL surface. Another approach is the utilization of the CG model, in which the CG parameters are tuned using the fluctuation matching methodology with all-atom MD simulations. The long-timespan dynamics is then elucidated straightforwardly by using CG-MD simulations.

  5. Intermittency and multifractional Brownian character of geomagnetic time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Consolini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's magnetosphere exhibits a complex behavior in response to the solar wind conditions. This behavior, which is described in terms of mutifractional Brownian motions, could be the consequence of the occurrence of dynamical phase transitions. On the other hand, it has been shown that the dynamics of the geomagnetic signals is also characterized by intermittency at the smallest temporal scales. Here, we focus on the existence of a possible relationship in the geomagnetic time series between the multifractional Brownian motion character and the occurrence of intermittency. In detail, we investigate the multifractional nature of two long time series of the horizontal intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as measured at L'Aquila Geomagnetic Observatory during two years (2001 and 2008, which correspond to different conditions of solar activity. We propose a possible double origin of the intermittent character of the small-scale magnetic field fluctuations, which is related to both the multifractional nature of the geomagnetic field and the intermittent character of the disturbance level. Our results suggest a more complex nature of the geomagnetic response to solar wind changes than previously thought.

  6. Intermittency and multifractional Brownian character of geomagnetic time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolini, G.; De Marco, R.; De Michelis, P.

    2013-07-01

    The Earth's magnetosphere exhibits a complex behavior in response to the solar wind conditions. This behavior, which is described in terms of mutifractional Brownian motions, could be the consequence of the occurrence of dynamical phase transitions. On the other hand, it has been shown that the dynamics of the geomagnetic signals is also characterized by intermittency at the smallest temporal scales. Here, we focus on the existence of a possible relationship in the geomagnetic time series between the multifractional Brownian motion character and the occurrence of intermittency. In detail, we investigate the multifractional nature of two long time series of the horizontal intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as measured at L'Aquila Geomagnetic Observatory during two years (2001 and 2008), which correspond to different conditions of solar activity. We propose a possible double origin of the intermittent character of the small-scale magnetic field fluctuations, which is related to both the multifractional nature of the geomagnetic field and the intermittent character of the disturbance level. Our results suggest a more complex nature of the geomagnetic response to solar wind changes than previously thought.

  7. Improved diffusion Monte Carlo and the Brownian fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weare, J.; Hairer, M.

    2012-12-01

    Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) is a workhorse of stochastic computing. It was invented forty years ago as the central component in a Monte Carlo technique for estimating various characteristics of quantum mechanical systems. Since then it has been used in applied in a huge number of fields, often as a central component in sequential Monte Carlo techniques (e.g. the particle filter). DMC computes averages of some underlying stochastic dynamics weighted by a functional of the path of the process. The weight functional could represent the potential term in a Feynman-Kac representation of a partial differential equation (as in quantum Monte Carlo) or it could represent the likelihood of a sequence of noisy observations of the underlying system (as in particle filtering). DMC alternates between an evolution step in which a collection of samples of the underlying system are evolved for some short time interval, and a branching step in which, according to the weight functional, some samples are copied and some samples are eliminated. Unfortunately for certain choices of the weight functional DMC fails to have a meaningful limit as one decreases the evolution time interval between branching steps. We propose a modification of the standard DMC algorithm. The new algorithm has a lower variance per workload, regardless of the regime considered. In particular, it makes it feasible to use DMC in situations where the ``naive'' generalization of the standard algorithm would be impractical, due to an exponential explosion of its variance. We numerically demonstrate the effectiveness of the new algorithm on a standard rare event simulation problem (probability of an unlikely transition in a Lennard-Jones cluster), as well as a high-frequency data assimilation problem. We then provide a detailed heuristic explanation of why, in the case of rare event simulation, the new algorithm is expected to converge to a limiting process as the underlying stepsize goes to 0. This is shown

  8. ReaDDy--a software for particle-based reaction-diffusion dynamics in crowded cellular environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Schöneberg

    Full Text Available We introduce the software package ReaDDy for simulation of detailed spatiotemporal mechanisms of dynamical processes in the cell, based on reaction-diffusion dynamics with particle resolution. In contrast to other particle-based reaction kinetics programs, ReaDDy supports particle interaction potentials. This permits effects such as space exclusion, molecular crowding and aggregation to be modeled. The biomolecules simulated can be represented as a sphere, or as a more complex geometry such as a domain structure or polymer chain. ReaDDy bridges the gap between small-scale but highly detailed molecular dynamics or Brownian dynamics simulations and large-scale but little-detailed reaction kinetics simulations. ReaDDy has a modular design that enables the exchange of the computing core by efficient platform-specific implementations or dynamical models that are different from Brownian dynamics.

  9. A Computational Approach to Increase Time Scales in Brownian Dynamics–Based Reaction-Diffusion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Particle-based Brownian dynamics simulations offer the opportunity to not only simulate diffusion of particles but also the reactions between them. They therefore provide an opportunity to integrate varied biological data into spatially explicit models of biological processes, such as signal transduction or mitosis. However, particle based reaction-diffusion methods often are hampered by the relatively small time step needed for accurate description of the reaction-diffusion framework. Such small time steps often prevent simulation times that are relevant for biological processes. It is therefore of great importance to develop reaction-diffusion methods that tolerate larger time steps while maintaining relatively high accuracy. Here, we provide an algorithm, which detects potential particle collisions prior to a BD-based particle displacement and at the same time rigorously obeys the detailed balance rule of equilibrium reactions. We can show that for reaction-diffusion processes of particles mimicking proteins, the method can increase the typical BD time step by an order of magnitude while maintaining similar accuracy in the reaction diffusion modelling. PMID:22697237

  10. Kinematics and dynamics analysis of a novel serial-parallel dynamic simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Bo; Zhang, Lian Dong; Yu, Jingjing [Parallel Robot and Mechatronic System Laboratory of Hebei Province, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei (China)

    2016-11-15

    A serial-parallel dynamics simulator based on serial-parallel manipulator is proposed. According to the dynamics simulator motion requirement, the proposed serial-parallel dynamics simulator formed by 3-RRS (active revolute joint-revolute joint-spherical joint) and 3-SPR (Spherical joint-active prismatic joint-revolute joint) PMs adopts the outer and inner layout. By integrating the kinematics, constraint and coupling information of the 3-RRS and 3-SPR PMs into the serial-parallel manipulator, the inverse Jacobian matrix, velocity, and acceleration of the serial-parallel dynamics simulator are studied. Based on the principle of virtual work and the kinematics model, the inverse dynamic model is established. Finally, the workspace of the (3-RRS)+(3-SPR) dynamics simulator is constructed.

  11. Dynamic fault simulation of wind turbines using commercial simulation tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Torsten; Eek, Jarle; Uski, Sanna

    2005-01-01

    This paper compares the commercial simulation tools: PSCAD/EMTDC, PowerFactory, SIMPOW and PSS/E for analysing fault sequences defined in the Danish grid code requirements for wind turbines connected to a voltage level below 100 kV. Both symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults are analysed. The devi......This paper compares the commercial simulation tools: PSCAD/EMTDC, PowerFactory, SIMPOW and PSS/E for analysing fault sequences defined in the Danish grid code requirements for wind turbines connected to a voltage level below 100 kV. Both symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults are analysed....... The deviations and the reasons for the deviations between the tools are stated. The simulation models are imple-mented using the built-in library components of the simulation tools with exception of the mechanical drive-train model, which had to be user-modeled in PowerFactory and PSS/E....

  12. Development Of Dynamic Probabilistic Safety Assessment: The Accident Dynamic Simulator (ADS) Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.H.; Mosleh, A.; Dang, V.N

    2003-03-01

    The development of a dynamic methodology for Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) addresses the complex interactions between the behaviour of technical systems and personnel response in the evolution of accident scenarios. This paper introduces the discrete dynamic event tree, a framework for dynamic PSA, and its implementation in the Accident Dynamic Simulator (ADS) tool. Dynamic event tree tools generate and quantify accident scenarios through coupled simulation models of the plant physical processes, its automatic systems, the equipment reliability, and the human response. The current research on the framework, the ADS tool, and on Human Reliability Analysis issues within dynamic PSA, is discussed. (author)

  13. Computational Dehydration of Crystalline Hydrates Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Støttrup; Rantanen, Jukka; Johansson, Kristoffer E

    2017-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have evolved to an increasingly reliable and accessible technique and are today implemented in many areas of biomedical sciences. We present a generally applicable method to study dehydration of hydrates based on MD simulations and apply this approach to the de......Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have evolved to an increasingly reliable and accessible technique and are today implemented in many areas of biomedical sciences. We present a generally applicable method to study dehydration of hydrates based on MD simulations and apply this approach...

  14. Protein dynamics and enzyme catalysis: insights from simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeagh, John D; Ranaghan, Kara E; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2011-08-01

    The role of protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis is one of the most active and controversial areas in enzymology today. Some researchers claim that protein dynamics are at the heart of enzyme catalytic efficiency, while others state that dynamics make no significant contribution to catalysis. What is the biochemist - or student - to make of the ferocious arguments in this area? Protein dynamics are complex and fascinating, as molecular dynamics simulations and experiments have shown. The essential question is: do these complex motions have functional significance? In particular, how do they affect or relate to chemical reactions within enzymes, and how are chemical and conformational changes coupled together? Biomolecular simulations can analyse enzyme reactions and dynamics in atomic detail, beyond that achievable in experiments: accurate atomistic modelling has an essential part to play in clarifying these issues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Dynamics: Experimental and Computational Approaches. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A series expansion of fractional Brownian motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.O. Dzhaparidze (Kacha); J.H. van Zanten (Harry)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractLet $B$ be a fractional Brownian motion with Hurst index $H in (0,1)$. Denote by $x_1 < x_2 < cdots$ the positive, real zeros of the Bessel function $J_{-H$ of the first kind of order $-H$, and let $y_1 < y_2 < cdots$ be the positive zeros of $J_{1-H$. We prove the series

  16. Brownian Motion Problem: Random Walk and Beyond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 8. Brownian Motion Problem: Random Walk and Beyond. Shama Sharma Vishwamittar. General Article Volume 10 Issue 8 August 2005 pp 49-66. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Brownian coagulation at high particle concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trzeciak, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    The process of Brownian coagulation, whereby particles are brought together by thermal motion and grow by collisions, is one of the most fundamental processes influencing the final properties of particulate matter in a variety of technically important systems. It is of importance in colloids,

  18. Brownian Warps for Non-Rigid Registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads; Johansen, Peter; Jackson, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    A Brownian motion model in the group of diffeomorphisms has been introduced as inducing a least committed prior on warps. This prior is source-destination symmetric, fulfills a natural semi-group property for warps, and with probability 1 creates invertible warps. Using this as a least committed...

  19. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Takahashi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD simulations are increasingly being used to analyze the behaviors of biological systems. When appropriately used, CGMD can simulate the behaviors of molecular systems several hundred times faster than elaborate all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with similar accuracy. CGMD parameters for lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, and some artificial substances such as carbon nanotubes have been suggested. Here we briefly discuss a method for CGMD system configuration and the types of analysis and perturbations that can be performed with CGMD simulations. We also describe specific examples to show how CGMD simulations have been applied to various situations, and then describe experimental results that were used to validate the simulation results. CGMD simulations are applicable to resolving problems for various biological systems.

  20. Dynamic bounds coupled with Monte Carlo simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajabali Nejad, Mohammadreza; Meester, L.E.; van Gelder, P.H.A.J.M.; Vrijling, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    For the reliability analysis of engineering structures a variety of methods is known, of which Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is widely considered to be among the most robust and most generally applicable. To reduce simulation cost of the MC method, variance reduction methods are applied. This paper

  1. Dynamic simulation of DH house substations. Simulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorsen, J.E. [Danfoss A/S, Nordborg (Denmark). Building Control Division

    2003-06-01

    Danfoss AS proceeds on developing simulation models of HVAC components including control equipment for district heating systems. The author presents an example of a simulated domestic hot water service station, describes some of the model components and shows the link between mathematical model and simulation model. Furthermore, an example of hardware in the loop simulation is presented. In this case a domestic heating system is built up in the laboratory by hardware components connected with real time simulations. This system forms the basis for test and evaluation of new control strategies. (orig.) [German] Danfoss AS, Nordborg/Daenemark, entwickelt Simulationsmodelle fuer Komponenten im Bereich Heizung/Lueftung/Klimatechnik einschliesslich der Regelungssysteme fuer Fernwaermeanlagen. Der Autor stellt das Simulationsmodell fuer einen Warmwassererwaermer dar. Darueber hinaus wird das Beispiel einer Simulation unter Einbeziehung von realen Komponenten beschrieben. Dabei wurde im Labor eine Heizanlage aufgebaut und an ein Echtzeit-Simulationsprogramm angeschlossen. Dieses System bildet die Grundlage fuer die Erprobung und Evaluierung neuer Regelungsstrategien. In den letzten 10 Jahren hat Danfoss mit dem Einsatz dynamischer Simulationen bei der Entwicklung von Regelungssystemen fuer Fernwaermeanlagen positive Erfahrungen gesammelt. Es hat sich gezeigt, dass die Simulation erfolgreich eingesetzt werden kann, und zwar nicht nur zur Erprobung besonderer Entwicklungsvorschlaege. Ebenso wichtig war es, Informationen und ein besseres Verstaendnis der Wechselbeziehungen zwischen verschiedenen Parametern zu gewinnen, die das Funktionieren einer Heizungs- oder Heisswasseranlage beeinflussen. Danfoss richtet zur Zeit ein Zentrum fuer die Anwendung von Gebaeudeautomatisierungssystemen ein. Dieses Zentrum wird Moeglichkeiten zur Fortbildung und praktischen Erfahrung auf dem Gebiet der Heizungs- Lueftungs- und Klimatechnik bieten. Die Simulationsprogramme werden einen

  2. Unified Nonlinear Flight Dynamics and Aeroelastic Simulator Tool Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology, Inc. (ZONA) proposes a R&D effort to develop a Unified Nonlinear Flight Dynamics and Aeroelastic Simulator (UNFDAS) Tool that will combine...

  3. The framework for simulation of dynamics of mechanical aggregates

    OpenAIRE

    Ivankov, Petr R.; Ivankov, Nikolay P.

    2007-01-01

    A framework for simulation of dynamics of mechanical aggregates has been developed. This framework enables us to build model of aggregate from models of its parts. Framework is a part of universal framework for science and engineering.

  4. DNA Basepair Step Deformability Inferred from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lankaš, Filip; Šponer, Jiří; Langowski, Jörg; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2003-01-01

    The sequence-dependent DNA deformability at the basepair step level was investigated using large-scale atomic resolution molecular dynamics simulation of two 18-bp DNA oligomers: d(GCCTATAAACGCCTATAA) and d(CTAGGTGGATGACTCATT...

  5. The use of system dynamics for EROI simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atlason, Reynir Smari

    to construct a systems dynamics model to represent a geothermal power plant and calculate the EROI3,i. The benefits of such models are their simplicity, and simulation power. The system simulated is adapted from Atlason et al. (2013) where the EROI for the Nesjavellir geothermal power plant was calculated....... The systems dynamics model essentially provides other researchers with a clear demonstration of inputs, outputs and assumptions used in the calculations. I propose, that EROI studies are supplemented with such models for clarity....

  6. A fast recursive algorithm for molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A.; Vaidehi, N.; Rodriguez, G.

    1993-01-01

    The present recursive algorithm for solving molecular systems' dynamical equations of motion employs internal variable models that reduce such simulations' computation time by an order of magnitude, relative to Cartesian models. Extensive use is made of spatial operator methods recently developed for analysis and simulation of the dynamics of multibody systems. A factor-of-450 speedup over the conventional O(N-cubed) algorithm is demonstrated for the case of a polypeptide molecule with 400 residues.

  7. Perspective: Computer simulations of long time dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elber, Ron [Department of Chemistry, The Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2016-02-14

    Atomically detailed computer simulations of complex molecular events attracted the imagination of many researchers in the field as providing comprehensive information on chemical, biological, and physical processes. However, one of the greatest limitations of these simulations is of time scales. The physical time scales accessible to straightforward simulations are too short to address many interesting and important molecular events. In the last decade significant advances were made in different directions (theory, software, and hardware) that significantly expand the capabilities and accuracies of these techniques. This perspective describes and critically examines some of these advances.

  8. Dynamic simulator for anaerobic digestion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstreuer, C; Poweigha, T

    1982-09-01

    A transient, two-culture model simulating methane production from biomass has been developed. The simulator, based partially on the work by Andrews and McCarty, is capable of calculating the hydrolysis products of several common organic materials, accommodating various substrate feeding modes, and simulating the transient physico-biochemical transport and conversion processes occurring in the biological, liquid, and gaseous phases of a well-mixed reactor. The mathematical representation of this bioconversion system consists of a set of 11 coupled, nonlinear first-order rate equations based on the principles of mass conservation and biochemical reaction kinetics. The model can be used in conjunction with laboratory investigations and as a simulator for evaluating process control strategies and cost developments.

  9. Suspended particle transport through constriction channel with Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Walther, Jens H.

    2017-08-01

    It is well known that translocation events of a polymer or rod through pores or narrower parts of micro- and nanochannels have a stochastic nature due to the Brownian motion. However, it is not clear whether the objects of interest need to have a larger size than the entrance to exhibit the deviation from the dynamics of the surrounding fluid. We show by numerical analysis that the particle injection into the narrower part of the channel is affected by thermal fluctuation, where the particles have spherical symmetry and are smaller than the height of the constriction. The Péclet number (Pe) is the order parameter that governs the phenomena, which clarifies the spatio-temporal significance of Brownian motion compared to hydrodynamics. Furthermore, we find that there exists an optimal condition of Pe to attain the highest flow rate of particles relative to the dispersant fluid flow. Our finding is important in science and technology from nanopore DNA sequencers and lab-on-a-chip devices to filtration by porous materials and chromatography.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of a polysorbate 80 micelle in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amani, Amir; York, Peter; de Waard, Hans; Anwar, Jamshed

    2011-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of a single molecule of the nonionic surfactant polysorbate 80 (POE (20) sorbitan monooleate; Tween 80 (R)) as well as a micelle comprising sixty molecules of polysorbate 80 in water have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. In its free state in water the

  11. Simulation of capillary flow with a dynamic contact angle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mourik, S; Veldman, AEP; Dreyer, ME

    2005-01-01

    A number of theoretical and empirical dynamic contact angle (DCA) models have been tested in a numerical simulation of liquid reorientation in microgravity for which experimental validation data are available. It is observed that the DCA can have a large influence on liquid dynamics in microgravity.

  12. Simulating market dynamics : Interactions between consumer psychology and social networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.A; Jager, W.

    2003-01-01

    Markets can show different types of dynamics, from quiet markets dominated by one or a few products, to markets with continual penetration of new and reintroduced products. in a previous article we explored the dynamics of markets from a psychological perspective using a multi-agent simulation

  13. A Process for Comparing Dynamics of Distributed Space Systems Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cures, Edwin Z.; Jackson, Albert A.; Morris, Jeffery C.

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a process that was developed for comparing the primary orbital dynamics behavior between space systems distributed simulations. This process is used to characterize and understand the fundamental fidelities and compatibilities of the modeling of orbital dynamics between spacecraft simulations. This is required for high-latency distributed simulations such as NASA s Integrated Mission Simulation and must be understood when reporting results from simulation executions. This paper presents 10 principal comparison tests along with their rationale and examples of the results. The Integrated Mission Simulation (IMSim) (formerly know as the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES)) is a NASA research and development project focusing on the technologies and processes that are related to the collaborative simulation of complex space systems involved in the exploration of our solar system. Currently, the NASA centers that are actively participating in the IMSim project are the Ames Research Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Johnson Space Center (JSC), the Kennedy Space Center, the Langley Research Center and the Marshall Space Flight Center. In concept, each center participating in IMSim has its own set of simulation models and environment(s). These simulation tools are used to build the various simulation products that are used for scientific investigation, engineering analysis, system design, training, planning, operations and more. Working individually, these production simulations provide important data to various NASA projects.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Kinetic Models for Chiral Dominance in Soft Condensed Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxvaerd, Søren

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation, models for isomerization kinetics, origin of biomolecular chirality......Molecular dynamics simulation, models for isomerization kinetics, origin of biomolecular chirality...

  15. Isotropic averaging for cell-dynamical-system simulation of spinodal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anand Kumar. Research Articles Volume 61 Issue 1 July 2003 pp 1-5 ... Averagings are employed in the cell-dynamical-system simulation of spinodal decomposition for inter-cell coupling. The averagings used in ... CSIR Centre for Mathematical Modelling and Computer Simulation, Belur Campus, Bangalore 560 037, India ...

  16. Innovative Tools for Real-Time Simulation of Dynamic Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palli, Gianluca; Carloni, Raffaella; Melchiorri, Claudio

    In this paper, we present a software architecture, based on RTAI-Linux, for the real-time simulation of dynamic systems and for the rapid prototyping of digital controllers. Our aim is to simplify the testing phase of digital controllers by providing the real-time simulation of the plant with the

  17. Simulation, modeling and dynamical analysis of multibody flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Denis; Rosato, Anthony; Sen, Surajit; Wu, Hao

    2017-04-01

    Recent particulate flow research using a discrete element simulation-dynamical systems approach is described. The simulation code used is very efficient and the mathematical model is an integro-partial differential equation. Examples are presented to show the effectiveness of the approach.

  18. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of hot air flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation of air flow distribution, air velocity and pressure field pattern as it will affect moisture transient in a cabinet tray dryer is performed using SolidWorks Flow Simulation (SWFS) 2014 SP 4.0 program. The model used for the drying process in this experiment was designed with Solid ...

  19. Innovative tools for real-time simulation of dynamic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palli, Gianluca; Carloni, Raffaella; Melchiorri, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a software architecture, based on RTAI-Linux, for the real-time simulation of dynamic systems and for the rapid prototyping of digital controllers. Our aim is to simplify the testing phase of digital controllers by providing the real-time simulation of the plant with the

  20. Active site modeling in copper azurin molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizzuti, B; Swart, M; Sportelli, L; Guzzi, R

    Active site modeling in molecular dynamics simulations is investigated for the reduced state of copper azurin. Five simulation runs (5 ns each) were performed at room temperature to study the consequences of a mixed electrostatic/constrained modeling for the coordination between the metal and the

  1. Determining Equilibrium Constants for Dimerization Reactions from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Djurre H.; Schafer, Lars V.; De Vries, Alex H.; Marrink, Siewert J.; Berendsen, Herman J. C.; Grubmueller, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    With today's available computer power, free energy calculations from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations "via counting" become feasible for an increasing number of reactions. An example is the dimerization reaction of transmembrane alpha-helices. If an extended simulation of the two helices

  2. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an accessible introduction to the basic theory of fluid mechanics and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical computation. Methods of scientific computing are introduced alongside with theoretical analysis and MATLAB® codes are presented and discussed for a broad range of topics: from interfacial shapes in hydrostatics, to vortex dynamics, to viscous flow, to turbulent flow, to panel methods for flow past airfoils. The third edition includes new topics, additional examples, solved and unsolved problems, and revised images. It adds more computational algorithms and MATLAB programs. It also incorporates discussion of the latest version of the fluid dynamics software library FDLIB, which is freely available online. FDLIB offers an extensive range of computer codes that demonstrate the implementation of elementary and advanced algorithms and provide an invaluable resource for research, teaching, classroom instruction, and self-study. This ...

  3. Ensemble simulations with discrete classical dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2013-01-01

    {E}(h)$ is employed to determine the relation with the corresponding energy, $E$ for the analytic dynamics with $h=0$ and the zero-order estimate $E_0(h)$ of the energy for discrete dynamics, appearing in the literature for MD with VA. We derive a corresponding time reversible VA algorithm for canonical dynamics...... for the $(NV\\tilde{T}(h))$ ensemble and determine the relations between the energies and temperatures for the different ensembles, including the $(NVE_0(h))$ and $(NVT_0(h))$ ensembles. The differences in the energies and temperatures are proportional with $h^2$ and they are of the order a few tenths...... of a percent for a traditional value of $h$. The relations between $(NV\\tilde{E}(h))$ and $(NVE)$, and $(NV\\tilde{T}(h))$ and $(NVT)$ are easily determined for a given density and temperature, and allows for using larger time increments in MD. The accurate determinations of the energies are used to determine...

  4. Numerical simulations of blobs with ion dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Henry; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Madsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    including finite electron and ion temperature effects, drift wave dynamics on closed field lines, and sheath dynamics on open field lines. Particles and energy are mainly transported by intermittent blobs. Therefore, blobs have a significant influence on the corresponding profiles. The formation...... of a 'shoulder' in the SOL density profile can be obtained by increasing the collisionality or connection length, thus decreasing the efficiency of the SOL's ability to remove plasma. As the ion pressure has a larger perpendicular but smaller parallel dissipation rate compared to the electron pressure, ion...

  5. Movement Characteristics Analysis and Dynamic Simulation of Collaborative Measuring Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    guoqing, MA; li, LIU; zhenglin, YU; guohua, CAO; yanbin, ZHENG

    2017-03-01

    Human-machine collaboration is becoming increasingly more necessary, and so collaborative robot applications are also in high demand. We selected a UR10 robot as our research subject for this study. First, we applied D-H coordinate transformation of the robot to establish a link system, and we then used inverse transformation to solve the robot’s inverse kinematics and find all the joints. Use Lagrange method to analysis UR robot dynamics; use ADAMS multibody dynamics simulation software to dynamic simulation; verifying the correctness of the derived kinetic models.

  6. Dynamic modeling and simulation of power transformer maintenance costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Olga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the dynamic model of maintenance costs of the power transformer functional components. Reliability is modeled combining the exponential and Weibull's distribution. The simulation was performed with the aim of corrective maintenance and installation of the continuous monitoring system of the most critical components. Simulation Dynamic System (SDS method and VENSIM PLE software was used to simulate the cost. In this way, significant savings in maintenance costs will be achieved with a small initial investment. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 41025 i br. OI 171007

  7. Advanced molecular dynamics simulation methods for kinase drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aci-Sèche, Samia; Ziada, Sonia; Braka, Abdennour; Arora, Rohit; Bonnet, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Interest in the application of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations has increased in the field of protein kinase (PK) drug discovery. PKs belong to an important drug target class because they are directly involved in a number of diseases, including cancer. MD methods simulate dynamic biological and chemical events at an atomic level. This information can be combined with other in silico and experimental methods to efficiently target selected receptors. In this review, we present common and advanced methods of MD simulations and we focus on the recent applications of MD-based methodologies that provided significant insights into the elucidation of biological mechanisms involving PKs and into the discovery of novel kinase inhibitors.

  8. Topology in dynamical lattice QCD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Florian

    2012-08-20

    Lattice simulations of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the quantum field theory which describes the interaction between quarks and gluons, have reached a point were contact to experimental data can be made. The underlying mechanisms, like chiral symmetry breaking or the confinement of quarks, are however still not understood. This thesis focuses on topological structures in the QCD vacuum. Those are not only mathematically interesting but also closely related to chiral symmetry and confinement. We consider methods to identify these objects in lattice QCD simulations. Based on this, we explore the structures resulting from different discretizations and investigate the effect of a very strong electromagnetic field on the QCD vacuum.

  9. Computer simulation of multiple dynamic photorefractive gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben

    1998-01-01

    The benefits of a direct visualization of space-charge grating buildup are described. The visualization is carried out by a simple repetitive computer program, which simulates the basic processes in the band-transport model and displays the result graphically or in the form of numerical data....... The simulation sheds light on issues that are not amenable to analytical solutions, such as the spectral content of the wave forms, cross talk in three-beam interaction, and the range of applications of the band-transport model. (C) 1998 Optical Society of America....

  10. Test and validation for robot arm control dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yae, K. Harold; Kim, Sung-Soo; Haug, Edward J.; Seering, Warren; Sundaram, Kamala; Thompson, Bruce; Turner, James; Chun, Hon; Frisch, Harold P.; Schnurr, Richard

    1989-01-01

    The Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) program will require an ability to develop, in a cost effective manner, many simulation models for design, analysis, performance evaluation, and crew training. Computational speed and the degree of modeling fidelity associated with each simulation must be commensurate with problem objectives. To demonstrate evolving state-of-the-art general purpose multibody modeling capabilities, to validate these by laboratory testing, and to expose their modeling shortcomings, two focus problems at the opposite ends of the simulation spectrum are defined: (1) Coarse Acquisition Control Dynamics. Create a real time man-in-the-control-loop simulator. Provide animated graphical display of robot arm dynamics and tactile feedback sufficient for cueing the operator. Interface simulator software with human operated tactile feedback controller; i.e., the Kraft mini-master. (2) Fine, Precision Mode Control Dynamics. Create a high speed, high fidelity simulation model for the design, analysis, and performance evaluation of autonomous 7 degree-of-freedom (DOF) trajectory control algorithms. This model must contain detail dynamic models for all significant dynamics elements within the robot arm, such as joint drive mechanisms.

  11. Approximation of quantum observables by molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sandberg, Mattias

    2016-01-06

    In this talk I will discuss how to estimate the uncertainty in molecular dynamics simulations. Molecular dynamics is a computational method to study molecular systems in materials science, chemistry, and molecular biology. The wide popularity of molecular dynamics simulations relies on the fact that in many cases it agrees very well with experiments. If we however want the simulation to predict something that has no comparing experiment, we need a mathematical estimate of the accuracy of the computation. In the case of molecular systems with few particles, such studies are made by directly solving the Schrodinger equation. In this talk I will discuss theoretical results on the accuracy between quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics, to be used for systems that are too large to be handled computationally by the Schrodinger equation.

  12. Computational models of protein kinematics and dynamics: beyond simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Bryant; Hsu, David; Kavraki, Lydia E; Latombe, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Physics-based simulation represents a powerful method for investigating the time-varying behavior of dynamic protein systems at high spatial and temporal resolution. Such simulations, however, can be prohibitively difficult or lengthy for large proteins or when probing the lower-resolution, long-timescale behaviors of proteins generally. Importantly, not all questions about a protein system require full space and time resolution to produce an informative answer. For instance, by avoiding the simulation of uncorrelated, high-frequency atomic movements, a larger, domain-level picture of protein dynamics can be revealed. The purpose of this review is to highlight the growing body of complementary work that goes beyond simulation. In particular, this review focuses on methods that address kinematics and dynamics, as well as those that address larger organizational questions and can quickly yield useful information about the long-timescale behavior of a protein.

  13. New ways to boost molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krieger, E.; Vriend, G.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a set of algorithms that allow to simulate dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, a common benchmark) with the AMBER all-atom force field at 160 nanoseconds/day on a single Intel Core i7 5960X CPU (no graphics processing unit (GPU), 23,786 atoms, particle mesh Ewald (PME), 8.0 A cutoff, correct

  14. Brownian motion, martingales, and stochastic calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Le Gall, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a rigorous and self-contained presentation of stochastic integration and stochastic calculus within the general framework of continuous semimartingales. The main tools of stochastic calculus, including Itô’s formula, the optional stopping theorem and Girsanov’s theorem, are treated in detail alongside many illustrative examples. The book also contains an introduction to Markov processes, with applications to solutions of stochastic differential equations and to connections between Brownian motion and partial differential equations. The theory of local times of semimartingales is discussed in the last chapter. Since its invention by Itô, stochastic calculus has proven to be one of the most important techniques of modern probability theory, and has been used in the most recent theoretical advances as well as in applications to other fields such as mathematical finance. Brownian Motion, Martingales, and Stochastic Calculus provides a strong theoretical background to the reader interested i...

  15. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gottwald, Fabian; Ivanov, Sergei D; Kühn, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation (GLE), which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection (LP) technique. Within this framework a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here we discuss that this task is most naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importa...

  16. Stability of molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The existence of a shadow Hamiltonian for discrete classical dynamics, obtained by an asymptotic expansion for a discrete symplectic algorithm, is employed to determine the limit of stability for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with respect to the time-increment h of the discrete dynamics...... an improved stability with a factor of , but the overhead of computer time is a factor of at least two. The conclusion is that the second-order “Verlet”-algorithm, most commonly used in MD, is superior. It gives the exact dynamics within the limit of the asymptotic expansion and this limit can be estimated...

  17. Computer Simulation of Turbulent Reactive Gas Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn H. Hjertager

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available A simulation procedure capable of handling transient compressible flows involving combustion is presented. The method uses the velocity components and pressure as primary flow variables. The differential equations governing the flow are discretized by integration over control volumes. The integration is performed by application of up-wind differencing in a staggered grid system. The solution procedure is an extension of the SIMPLE-algorithm accounting for compressibility effects.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  19. Active Brownian motion tunable by light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttinoni, Ivo; Volpe, Giovanni; Kümmel, Felix; Volpe, Giorgio; Bechinger, Clemens

    2012-07-18

    Active Brownian particles are capable of taking up energy from their environment and converting it into directed motion; examples range from chemotactic cells and bacteria to artificial micro-swimmers. We have recently demonstrated that Janus particles, i.e. gold-capped colloidal spheres, suspended in a critical binary liquid mixture perform active Brownian motion when illuminated by light. In this paper, we investigate in more detail their swimming mechanism, leading to active Brownian motion. We show that the illumination-borne heating induces a local asymmetric demixing of the binary mixture, generating a spatial chemical concentration gradient which is responsible for the particle's self-diffusiophoretic motion. We study this effect as a function of the functionalization of the gold cap, the particle size and the illumination intensity: the functionalization determines what component of the binary mixture is preferentially adsorbed at the cap and the swimming direction (towards or away from the cap); the particle size determines the rotational diffusion and, therefore, the random reorientation of the particle; and the intensity tunes the strength of the heating and, therefore, of the motion. Finally, we harness this dependence of the swimming strength on the illumination intensity to investigate the behavior of a micro-swimmer in a spatial light gradient, where its swimming properties are space-dependent.

  20. Insights from molecular dynamics simulations for computational protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Matthew Carter; Daggett, Valerie

    2017-02-01

    A grand challenge in the field of structural biology is to design and engineer proteins that exhibit targeted functions. Although much success on this front has been achieved, design success rates remain low, an ever-present reminder of our limited understanding of the relationship between amino acid sequences and the structures they adopt. In addition to experimental techniques and rational design strategies, computational methods have been employed to aid in the design and engineering of proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) is one such method that simulates the motions of proteins according to classical dynamics. Here, we review how insights into protein dynamics derived from MD simulations have influenced the design of proteins. One of the greatest strengths of MD is its capacity to reveal information beyond what is available in the static structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. In this regard simulations can be used to directly guide protein design by providing atomistic details of the dynamic molecular interactions contributing to protein stability and function. MD simulations can also be used as a virtual screening tool to rank, select, identify, and assess potential designs. MD is uniquely poised to inform protein design efforts where the application requires realistic models of protein dynamics and atomic level descriptions of the relationship between dynamics and function. Here, we review cases where MD simulations was used to modulate protein stability and protein function by providing information regarding the conformation(s), conformational transitions, interactions, and dynamics that govern stability and function. In addition, we discuss cases where conformations from protein folding/unfolding simulations have been exploited for protein design, yielding novel outcomes that could not be obtained from static structures.

  1. Insights from molecular dynamics simulations for computational protein design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Matthew Carter; Daggett, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    A grand challenge in the field of structural biology is to design and engineer proteins that exhibit targeted functions. Although much success on this front has been achieved, design success rates remain low, an ever-present reminder of our limited understanding of the relationship between amino acid sequences and the structures they adopt. In addition to experimental techniques and rational design strategies, computational methods have been employed to aid in the design and engineering of proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) is one such method that simulates the motions of proteins according to classical dynamics. Here, we review how insights into protein dynamics derived from MD simulations have influenced the design of proteins. One of the greatest strengths of MD is its capacity to reveal information beyond what is available in the static structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. In this regard simulations can be used to directly guide protein design by providing atomistic details of the dynamic molecular interactions contributing to protein stability and function. MD simulations can also be used as a virtual screening tool to rank, select, identify, and assess potential designs. MD is uniquely poised to inform protein design efforts where the application requires realistic models of protein dynamics and atomic level descriptions of the relationship between dynamics and function. Here, we review cases where MD simulations was used to modulate protein stability and protein function by providing information regarding the conformation(s), conformational transitions, interactions, and dynamics that govern stability and function. In addition, we discuss cases where conformations from protein folding/unfolding simulations have been exploited for protein design, yielding novel outcomes that could not be obtained from static structures. PMID:28239489

  2. Enhanced sampling techniques in molecular dynamics simulations of biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Rafael C; Melo, Marcelo C R; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-05-01

    Molecular dynamics has emerged as an important research methodology covering systems to the level of millions of atoms. However, insufficient sampling often limits its application. The limitation is due to rough energy landscapes, with many local minima separated by high-energy barriers, which govern the biomolecular motion. In the past few decades methods have been developed that address the sampling problem, such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics, metadynamics and simulated annealing. Here we present an overview over theses sampling methods in an attempt to shed light on which should be selected depending on the type of system property studied. Enhanced sampling methods have been employed for a broad range of biological systems and the choice of a suitable method is connected to biological and physical characteristics of the system, in particular system size. While metadynamics and replica-exchange molecular dynamics are the most adopted sampling methods to study biomolecular dynamics, simulated annealing is well suited to characterize very flexible systems. The use of annealing methods for a long time was restricted to simulation of small proteins; however, a variant of the method, generalized simulated annealing, can be employed at a relatively low computational cost to large macromolecular complexes. Molecular dynamics trajectories frequently do not reach all relevant conformational substates, for example those connected with biological function, a problem that can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling algorithms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Recent developments of molecular dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of ribosome jam

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Shigenori

    2011-09-01

    We propose a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of ribosome molecules to study the dependence of translation process on environmental parameters. We found the model exhibits traffic jam property, which is consistent with an ASEP model. We estimated the influence of the temperature and concentration of molecules on the hopping probability used in the ASEP model. Our model can also treat environmental effects on the translation process that cannot be explained by such cellular automaton models. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Multiscale simulation of microbe structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Harshad; Singharoy, Abhishek; Sereda, Yuriy V; Cheluvaraja, Srinath C; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2011-10-01

    A multiscale mathematical and computational approach is developed that captures the hierarchical organization of a microbe. It is found that a natural perspective for understanding a microbe is in terms of a hierarchy of variables at various levels of resolution. This hierarchy starts with the N -atom description and terminates with order parameters characterizing a whole microbe. This conceptual framework is used to guide the analysis of the Liouville equation for the probability density of the positions and momenta of the N atoms constituting the microbe and its environment. Using multiscale mathematical techniques, we derive equations for the co-evolution of the order parameters and the probability density of the N-atom state. This approach yields a rigorous way to transfer information between variables on different space-time scales. It elucidates the interplay between equilibrium and far-from-equilibrium processes underlying microbial behavior. It also provides framework for using coarse-grained nanocharacterization data to guide microbial simulation. It enables a methodical search for free-energy minimizing structures, many of which are typically supported by the set of macromolecules and membranes constituting a given microbe. This suite of capabilities provides a natural framework for arriving at a fundamental understanding of microbial behavior, the analysis of nanocharacterization data, and the computer-aided design of nanostructures for biotechnical and medical purposes. Selected features of the methodology are demonstrated using our multiscale bionanosystem simulator DeductiveMultiscaleSimulator. Systems used to demonstrate the approach are structural transitions in the cowpea chlorotic mosaic virus, RNA of satellite tobacco mosaic virus, virus-like particles related to human papillomavirus, and iron-binding protein lactoferrin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics for sport simulation

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    All over the world sport plays a prominent role in society: as a leisure activity for many, as an ingredient of culture, as a business and as a matter of national prestige in such major events as the World Cup in soccer or the Olympic Games. Hence, it is not surprising that science has entered the realm of sports, and, in particular, that computer simulation has become highly relevant in recent years. This is explored in this book by choosing five different sports as examples, demonstrating that computational science and engineering (CSE) can make essential contributions to research on sports topics on both the fundamental level and, eventually, by supporting athletes’ performance.

  6. A dynamic simulation model of desertification in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rasmy

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of a system dynamic model to simulate and analyze potential future state of desertification in Egypt. The presented model enhances the MEDALUS methodology developed by European Commission. It illustrates the concept of desertification through different equations and simulation output graphs. It is supplemented with a causal loop diagram showing the feedback between different variables. For the purpose of testing and measuring the effect of different policy scenarios on desertification in Egypt, a simulation model using stock and flow diagram was designed. Multi-temporal data were used to figure out the dynamic changes in desertification sensitivity related to the dynamic nature of desert environment. The model was applied to Al Bihira governorate in western Nile Delta, Egypt, as the study area, and the results showed that the urban expansion, salinization, and not applying the policy enforcement are considered the most variables provoking the desertification.

  7. Generalized Fokker-Planck equation, Brownian motion, and ergodicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyukhin, A V

    2008-06-01

    Microscopic theory of Brownian motion of a particle of mass M in a bath of molecules of mass mforce, and the generalized Fokker-Planck equation involves derivatives of order higher than 2. These equations are derived from first principles with coefficients expressed in terms of correlation functions of microscopic force on the particle. The coefficients are evaluated explicitly for a generalized Rayleigh model with a finite time of molecule-particle collisions. In the limit of a low-density bath, we recover the results obtained previously for a model with instantaneous binary collisions. In the general case, the equations contain additional corrections, quadratic in bath density, originating from a finite collision time. These corrections survive to order (m/M)2 and are found to make the stationary distribution non-Maxwellian. Some relevant numerical simulations are also presented.

  8. From N-parameter fractional Brownian motions to N-parameter multifractional Brownian motions

    OpenAIRE

    Herbin, E.

    2005-01-01

    International audience; Multifractional Brownian motion is an extension of the well-known fractional Brownian motion where the H¨older regularity is allowed to vary along the paths. In this paper, two kinds of multi-parameter extensions of mBm are studied: one is isotropic while the other is not. For each of these processes, a moving average representation, a harmonizable representation, and the covariance structure are given. The H¨older regularity is then studied. In particular, the case of...

  9. From fractional Brownian motion to multifractional and multistable motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    Fractional Brownian motion, introduced by Benoit Mandelbrot and John Van Ness in 1968, has had a major impact on stochastic processes and their applications. We survey a few of the many developments that have stemmed from their ideas. In particular we discuss the local structure of fractional and multifractional Brownian, stable and multistable processes, emphasising the `diagonal' construction of such processes. In all this, the ubiquity and centrality of fractional Brownian motion is striking.

  10. Symplectic molecular dynamics simulations on specially designed parallel computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borstnik, Urban; Janezic, Dusanka

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a computer program for molecular dynamics (MD) simulation that implements the Split Integration Symplectic Method (SISM) and is designed to run on specialized parallel computers. The MD integration is performed by the SISM, which analytically treats high-frequency vibrational motion and thus enables the use of longer simulation time steps. The low-frequency motion is treated numerically on specially designed parallel computers, which decreases the computational time of each simulation time step. The combination of these approaches means that less time is required and fewer steps are needed and so enables fast MD simulations. We study the computational performance of MD simulation of molecular systems on specialized computers and provide a comparison to standard personal computers. The combination of the SISM with two specialized parallel computers is an effective way to increase the speed of MD simulations up to 16-fold over a single PC processor.

  11. Imprints of Dynamically Varying Vegetation on Simulated Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, R. D.; Walker, G.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction of soil moisture with the atmosphere has been known for decades to influence the climate simulated with Earth system models, 'reddening', for example, the spectra of simulated air temperature. A land surface model fitted with dynamic vegetation phenology (the 'Catchment-CN' model) allows for similar examinations of phenology impacts on simulated climate. Here we examine the climate variability inherent in three parallel multi-decadal simulations with the NASA/GMAO GEOS-5 atmosphere/land modeling system: (i) a simulation with phenological variations (LAI) set to climatological seasonal cycles, as determined from an offline simulation with the Catchment-CN model driven with observations-based meteorological forcing; (ii) a simulation with interannually-varying (but prescribed) phenological variations, as again determined from the offline simulation; and (iii) a simulation with fully interactive vegetation phenology. The spectral characters of temperature and precipitation generated in these simulations are quantified and compared. Comparison of the first and third simulations in particular indicate the 'memory' imparted to the climate system through memory in phenology.

  12. Dynamic modeling, simulation and control of energy generation

    CERN Document Server

    Vepa, Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    This book addresses the core issues involved in the dynamic modeling, simulation and control of a selection of energy systems such as gas turbines, wind turbines, fuel cells and batteries. The principles of modeling and control could be applied to other non-convention methods of energy generation such as solar energy and wave energy.A central feature of Dynamic Modeling, Simulation and Control of Energy Generation is that it brings together diverse topics in thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, electro-chemistry, electrical networks and electrical machines and focuses on their appli

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Laser Powered Carbon Nanotube Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Globus, Al; Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of laser powered carbon nanotube gears is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations with Brenner's hydrocarbon potential. We find that when the frequency of the laser electric field is much less than the intrinsic frequency of the carbon nanotube, the tube exhibits an oscillatory pendulam behavior. However, a unidirectional rotation of the gear with oscillating frequency is observed under conditions of resonance between the laser field and intrinsic gear frequencies. The operating conditions for stable rotations of the nanotube gears, powered by laser electric fields are explored, in these simulations.

  14. Explicit proton transfer in classical molecular dynamics simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Maarten G.; Groenhof, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    We present Hydrogen Dynamics (HYDYN), a method that allows explicit proton transfer in classical force field molecular dynamics simulations at thermodynamic equilibrium. HYDYN reproduces the characteristic properties of the excess proton in water, from the special pair dance, to the continuous fluctuation between the limiting Eigen and Zundel complexes, and the water reorientation beyond the first solvation layer. Advantages of HYDYN with respect to existing methods are computational efficien...

  15. Simulation of the Production Process Dynamics using Vensim and Stella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina SBUGHEA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to make a brief presentation of the principles of dynamic systems and to analyze two applications support for modeling and simulation of the evolution of these systems. For illustration, we chose a classic model of the dynamics of the production process, which we have implemented in Vensim and Stella, in order to obtain evolutionary trajectories of the endogenous variables and analyze the behavior of the system.

  16. Deposition and reentrainment of Brownian particles in porous media under unfavorable chemical conditions: some concepts and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Melinda W; O'Meliae, Charles R

    2004-01-01

    The deposition and reentrainment of particles in porous media have been examined theoretically and experimentally. A Brownian Dynamics/Monte Carlo (MC/BD) model has been developed that simulates the movement of Brownian particles near a collector under "unfavorable" chemical conditions and allows deposition in primary and secondary minima. A simple Maxwell approach has been used to estimate particle attachment efficiency by assuming deposition in the secondary minimum and calculating the probability of reentrainment. The MC/BD simulations and the Maxwell calculations support an alternative view of the deposition and reentrainment of Brownian particles under unfavorable chemical conditions. These calculations indicate that deposition into and subsequent release from secondary minima can explain reported discrepancies between classic model predictions that assume irreversible deposition in a primary well and experimentally determined deposition efficiencies that are orders of magnitude larger than Interaction Force Boundary Layer (IFBL) predictions. The commonly used IFBL model, for example, is based on the notion of transport over an energy barrier into the primary well and does not address contributions of secondary minimum deposition. A simple Maxwell model based on deposition into and reentrainment from secondary minima is much more accurate in predicting deposition rates for column experiments at low ionic strengths. It also greatly reduces the substantial particle size effects inherent in IFBL models, wherein particle attachment rates are predicted to decrease significantly with increasing particle size. This view is consistent with recent work by others addressing the composition and structure of the first few nanometers at solid-water interfaces including research on modeling water at solid-liquid interfaces, surface speciation, interfacial force measurements, and the rheological properties of concentrated suspensions. It follows that deposition under these

  17. The development of a dynamic, six-axis spine simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsgrove, Timothy Patrick; Gheduzzi, Sabina; Gill, Harinderjit Singh; Miles, Anthony W

    2014-07-01

    Although a great deal of research has been completed to characterize the stiffness of spinal specimens, there remains a limited understanding of the spine in 6 df and there is a lack of data from dynamic testing in six axes. This study details the development and validation of a dynamic six-axis spine simulator. Biomechanical study. A synthetic spinal specimen was used for the purpose of tuning the simulator, completing positional accuracy tests, and measuring frequency response under physiological conditions. The spine simulator was used to complete stiffness matrix tests of an L3-L4 lumbar porcine functional spinal unit. Five testing frequencies were used, ranging from quasistatic (0.00575 Hz) to dynamic (0.5 Hz). Tests were performed without an axial preload and with an axial preload of 500 N. The validation tests demonstrated that the simulator is capable of producing accurate positioning under loading at frequencies up to 0.5 Hz using both sine and triangle waveforms. The porcine stiffness matrix tests demonstrated that the stiffness matrix is not symmetrical about the principal stiffness diagonal. It was also shown that while an increase in test frequency generally increased the principal stiffness terms, axial preload had a much greater effect. The spine simulator is capable of characterizing the dynamic biomechanics of the spine in six axes and provides a means to better understand the complex behavior of the spine under physiological conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Computer simulation and image guidance for individualised dynamic spinal stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantelhardt, S R; Hausen, U; Kosterhon, M; Amr, A N; Gruber, K; Giese, A

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic implants for the human spine are used to re-establish regular segmental motion. However, the results have often been unsatisfactory and complications such as screw loosening are common. Individualisation of appliances and precision implantation are needed to improve the outcome of this procedure. Computer simulation, virtual implant optimisation and image guidance were used to improve the technique. A human lumbar spine computer model was developed using multi-body simulation software. The model simulates spinal motion under load and degenerative changes. After virtual degeneration of a L4/5 segment, virtual pedicle screw-based implants were introduced. The implants' positions and properties were iteratively optimised. The resulting implant positions were used as operative plan for image guidance and finally implemented in a physical spine model. In the simulation, the introduction and optimisation of virtually designed dynamic implants could partly compensate for the effects of virtual lumbar segment degeneration. The optimised operative plan was exported to two different image-guidance systems for transfer to a physical spine model. Three-dimensional computer graphic simulation is a feasible means to develop operative plans for dynamic spinal stabilization. These operative plans can be transferred to commercially available image-guidance systems for use in implantation of physical implants in a spine model. This concept has important potential in the design of operative plans and implants for individualised dynamic spine stabilization surgery.

  19. Dynamic wind turbine models in power system simulation tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A.; Jauch, Clemens; Soerensen, P.

    The present report describes the dynamic wind turbine models implemented in the power system simulation tool DIgSILENT. The developed models are a part of the results of a national research project, whose overall objective is to create a model database in different simulation tools. The report...... provides a description of the wind turbine modelling, both at a component level and at a system level....

  20. Communication: Generalizing Rosenfeld's excess-entropy scaling to predict long-time diffusivity in dense fluids of Brownian particles: from hard to ultrasoft interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pond, Mark J; Errington, Jeffrey R; Truskett, Thomas M

    2011-02-28

    Computer simulations are used to test whether a recently introduced generalization of Rosenfeld's excess-entropy scaling method for estimating transport coefficients in systems obeying molecular dynamics can be extended to predict long-time diffusivities in fluids of particles undergoing Brownian dynamics in the absence of interparticle hydrodynamic forces. Model fluids with inverse-power-law, Gaussian-core, and Hertzian pair interactions are considered. Within the generalized Rosenfeld scaling method, long-time diffusivities of ultrasoft Gaussian-core and Hertzian particle fluids, which display anomalous trends with increasing density, are predicted (to within 20%) based on knowledge of interparticle interactions, excess entropy, and scaling behavior of simpler inverse-power-law fluids.

  1. Error and efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-10-28

    We derive simple analytical expressions for the error and computational efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (and by analogy replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations). The theory applies to the important case of systems whose dynamics at long times is dominated by the slow interconversion between two metastable states. As a specific example, we consider the folding and unfolding of a protein. The efficiency is defined as the rate with which the error in an estimated equilibrium property, as measured by the variance of the estimator over repeated simulations, decreases with simulation time. For two-state systems, this rate is in general independent of the particular property. Our main result is that, with comparable computational resources used, the relative efficiency of REMD and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is given by the ratio of the number of transitions between the two states averaged over all replicas at the different temperatures, and the number of transitions at the single temperature of the MD run. This formula applies if replica exchange is frequent, as compared to the transition times. High efficiency of REMD is thus achieved by including replica temperatures in which the frequency of transitions is higher than that at the temperature of interest. In tests of the expressions for the error in the estimator, computational efficiency, and the rate of equilibration we find quantitative agreement with the results both from kinetic models of REMD and from actual all-atom simulations of the folding of a peptide in water.

  2. Selecting a Dynamic Simulation Modeling Method for Health Care Delivery Research—Part 2: Report of the ISPOR Dynamic Simulation Modeling Emerging Good Practices Task Force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Deborah A.; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Crown, William; Padula, William V.; Wong, Peter K.; Pasupathy, Kalyan S.; Higashi, Mitchell K.; Osgood, Nathaniel D.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous report, the ISPOR Task Force on Dynamic Simulation Modeling Applications in Health Care Delivery Research Emerging Good Practices introduced the fundamentals of dynamic simulation modeling and identified the types of health care delivery problems for which dynamic simulation modeling

  3. Validating clustering of molecular dynamics simulations using polymer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Joshua L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular dynamics (MD simulation is a powerful technique for sampling the meta-stable and transitional conformations of proteins and other biomolecules. Computational data clustering has emerged as a useful, automated technique for extracting conformational states from MD simulation data. Despite extensive application, relatively little work has been done to determine if the clustering algorithms are actually extracting useful information. A primary goal of this paper therefore is to provide such an understanding through a detailed analysis of data clustering applied to a series of increasingly complex biopolymer models. Results We develop a novel series of models using basic polymer theory that have intuitive, clearly-defined dynamics and exhibit the essential properties that we are seeking to identify in MD simulations of real biomolecules. We then apply spectral clustering, an algorithm particularly well-suited for clustering polymer structures, to our models and MD simulations of several intrinsically disordered proteins. Clustering results for the polymer models provide clear evidence that the meta-stable and transitional conformations are detected by the algorithm. The results for the polymer models also help guide the analysis of the disordered protein simulations by comparing and contrasting the statistical properties of the extracted clusters. Conclusions We have developed a framework for validating the performance and utility of clustering algorithms for studying molecular biopolymer simulations that utilizes several analytic and dynamic polymer models which exhibit well-behaved dynamics including: meta-stable states, transition states, helical structures, and stochastic dynamics. We show that spectral clustering is robust to anomalies introduced by structural alignment and that different structural classes of intrinsically disordered proteins can be reliably discriminated from the clustering results. To our

  4. Rheology of Confined Non-Brownian Suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, Walter; Brandt, Luca; Chaudhuri, Pinaki; Lopez, Cyan Umbert; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Picano, Francesco

    2016-01-08

    We study the rheology of confined suspensions of neutrally buoyant rigid monodisperse spheres in plane-Couette flow using direct numerical simulations. We find that if the width of the channel is a (small) integer multiple of the sphere diameter, the spheres self-organize into two-dimensional layers that slide on each other and the effective viscosity of the suspension is significantly reduced. Each two-dimensional layer is found to be structurally liquidlike but its dynamics is frozen in time.

  5. A Thermodynamic Library for Simulation and Optimization of Dynamic Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritschel, Tobias Kasper Skovborg; Gaspar, Jozsef; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2017-01-01

    compounds and mixtures. However, rigorous thermodynamic models are generally computationally intensive and not available as open-source libraries for process simulation and optimization. In this paper, we describe the application of a novel open-source rigorous thermodynamic library, ThermoLib, which....... These derivatives are needed for efficient dynamic simulation and optimization. The analytical derivatives improve the computational performance by a factor between 12 and 35 as compared to finite difference approximations. We present two examples that use ThermoLib routines in their implementations: (1) simulation...

  6. Benchmarking of the REX-ISOLDE RFQ Beam Dynamics Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, MA; Posocco, PA

    2011-01-01

    The Institute of Applied Physics (IAP, Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main) version of the PARMTEQM code used to design the REX-ISOLDE RFQ was benchmarked with PARMTEQM v3.07 in order to validate its beam dynamics design. IAP input files existing at CERN and thought to describe the RFQ were investigated. The RFQ was finally simulated in PARMTEQM v3.07 to provide an input particle distribution for end-to-end simulations of the HIE-ISOLDE linac. The simulation was found to be consistent with the IAP code and with recent beam measurements [4].

  7. Thermal transport properties of uranium dioxide by molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Taku; Sinnott, Susan B. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Tulenko, James S. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Grimes, Robin W. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Schelling, Patrick K. [AMPAC and Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Phillpot, Simon R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)], E-mail: sphil@mse.ufl.edu

    2008-04-30

    The thermal conductivities of single crystal and polycrystalline UO{sub 2} are calculated using molecular dynamics simulations, with interatomic interactions described by two different potential models. For single crystals, the calculated thermal conductivities are found to be strongly dependent on the size of the simulation cell. However, a scaling analysis shows that the two models predict essentially identical values for the thermal conductivity for infinite system sizes. By contrast, simulations with the two potentials for identical fine polycrystalline structures yield estimated thermal conductivities that differ by a factor of two. We analyze the origin of this difference.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of oscillatory flows in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.S.; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we apply the direct non-equilibrium molecular dynamics technique to oscillatory flows of fluids in microscopic channels. Initially, we show that the microscopic simulations resemble the macroscopic predictions based on the Navier–Stokes equation very well for large channel width, high...... density and low temperature. Further simulations for high temperature and low density show that the non-slip boundary condition traditionally used in the macroscopic equation is greatly compromised when the fluid–wall interactions are the same as the fluid–fluid interactions. Simulations of a system...

  9. Simulation Analysis of Helicopter Ground Resonance Nonlinear Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Lu, Yu-hui; Ling, Ai-min

    2017-07-01

    In order to accurately predict the dynamic instability of helicopter ground resonance, a modeling and simulation method of helicopter ground resonance considering nonlinear dynamic characteristics of components (rotor lead-lag damper, landing gear wheel and absorber) is presented. The numerical integral method is used to calculate the transient responses of the body and rotor, simulating some disturbance. To obtain quantitative instabilities, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is conducted to estimate the modal frequencies, and the mobile rectangular window method is employed in the predictions of the modal damping in terms of the response time history. Simulation results show that ground resonance simulation test can exactly lead up the blade lead-lag regressing mode frequency, and the modal damping obtained according to attenuation curves are close to the test results. The simulation test results are in accordance with the actual accident situation, and prove the correctness of the simulation method. This analysis method used for ground resonance simulation test can give out the results according with real helicopter engineering tests.

  10. Randomized controlled trial comparing dynamic simulation with static simulation in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carden, Anthony J; Salcedo, Edgardo S; Leshikar, David E; Utter, Garth H; Wilson, Machelle D; Galante, Joseph M

    2016-05-01

    Current general surgery residents have limited exposure to open trauma operative cases. Simulation supplements variable rotation volume and provides experience with critical but rarely performed procedures. Open simulation classically focuses on static models with anatomic accuracy but lacks practicality when hemorrhage control is the lifesaving maneuver. We sought to evaluate whether training on a dynamic simulator, while much less expensive than training on a static cadaver, might be at least as effective in training surgery residents to expeditiously place temporary vascular shunts (TVSs). Our research team developed an inexpensive, reusable dynamic simulator with ongoing hemorrhage to instruct trainees in the steps of TVS placement. We enrolled 54 general surgery residents in a noninferiority randomized controlled trial comparing training of TVS placement on the dynamic simulator (n = 28) versus a cadaver arm (n = 26). After standardized video didactics, trainees practiced on either the simulator or cadaver arm. After the trainees achieved competency, they were tested on placing a TVS for a live swine femoral artery injury. Two blinded trauma surgeons evaluated the recorded performances. Residents did not differ in baseline characteristics between groups, and all residents in both groups successfully completed the TVS placement test. Subjects trained on the simulator placed the TVS faster than those trained on a cadaver (584 seconds vs. 751 seconds; difference, +167 seconds faster; 90% confidence interval [CI], +52 to +282 seconds), with a trend toward faster time to hemorrhage control (110 seconds vs. 148 seconds; difference, +38 seconds faster; 90% CI, -8 to +84). There was no significant difference in Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills scores (3.72 vs. 3.44; difference, +0.27 units better; 90% CI, -0.04 to +0.59). Training on a dynamic simulator resulted in noninferior time to completion of vascular shunt placement compared with training on

  11. Using simulation to assess the opportunities of dynamic waste collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mes, Martijn R.K.; Bangsow, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we illustrate the use of discrete event simulation to evaluate how dynamic planning methodologies can be best applied for the collection of waste from underground containers. We present a case study that took place at the waste collection company Twente Milieu, located in The

  12. A Neural Network Model for Dynamics Simulation | Bholoa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University of Mauritius Research Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 15, No 1 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. A Neural Network Model for Dynamics Simulation. Ajeevsing ...

  13. Computational fluid dynamics simulations and validations of results

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sitek, MA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available -1 Fifth International Conference on Structural Engineering, Mechanics and Computation, Cape Town South Africa, 2-4 September 2013 Computational fluid dynamics simulations and validation of results M.A. Sitek, M. Cwik, M.A. Gizejowski Warsaw...

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of a charged biological membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    López Cascales, J.J.; García de la Torre, J.; Marrink, S.J.; Berendsen, H.J.C.

    1996-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation of a membrane with net charge in its liquid-crystalline state was carried out. It was modeled by dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine lipids with net charge, sodium ions as counterions and water molecules. The behavior of this membrane differs from that was shown by other

  15. Classical dynamics simulations of interstellar glycine formation via ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 129; Issue 10. Classical dynamics simulations of interstellar glycine formation via CH₂ = NH + CO + H₂O reaction. YOGESHWARAN KRISHNAN ALLEN VINCENT MANIKANDAN PARANJOTHY. REGULAR ARTICLE Volume 129 Issue 10 October 2017 pp 1571- ...

  16. Dynamic materials response at multiscales: Experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Sheng-Nian

    One of the grand challenges in materials physics is dynamic responses to impulsive loading, including shock waves, radiation, and pulsed fields, due to their highly transient nature and extremely complex microstructure effects. Dynamic responses, such as plasticity, damage, cavitation, phase changes, and chemical reactions, are inherently multiscale and heavily dependent on microstructure. One has to resort to a suite of tools, including experiments, modeling and simulations, and theory. However, the gaps in spatial or temporal scales between experiments and simulations are still wide, while cross-scale theories are still in early development. To this end, we exploit large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, electron microscopy, and ultrafast synchrotron X-ray imaging and scattering, to probe materials response at length scales ranging from lattice to micron, and time scales, from picosecond to second. For examples, simultaneous, high-speed, X-ray imaging (mesoscale strain-field mapping) and diffraction measurements along with macroscopic measurements have been achieved. Based on classical nucleation theory and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate the equivalence between length and time scales for nucleation events, which provides a framework to bridge different scales. Certainly, advancing multiscale science requires sustained, concerted, experimental, modeling and theoretical efforts. We have benefited from the colleagues at the Advanced Photon Source, and the Peac Institute of Multiscales Sciences.

  17. Acidity constants of lumiflavin from first principles molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiliç, M.; Ensing, B.

    2014-01-01

    We have computed the free energy profiles of the deprotonation reactions of lumiflavin in the semiquinone and fully reduced oxidation states using constrained DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. In the semiquinone state, the N5 nitrogen atom and the N1 nitrogen atom can become protonated. We

  18. Using Simulation to Assess the Opportunities of Dynamic Waste Collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mes, Martijn R.K.

    In this paper, we illustrate the use of discrete event simulation to evaluate how dynamic planning methodologies can be best applied for the collection of waste from underground containers. We present a case study that took place at the waste collection company Twente Milieu, located in The

  19. Modelling of windmill induction generators in dynamic simulation programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akhmatov, Vladislav; Knudsen, Hans

    1999-01-01

    For AC networks with large amounts of induction generators-in case of e.g. windmills-the paper demonstrates a significant discrepancy in the simulated voltage recovery after faults in weak networks, when comparing result obtained with dynamic stability programs and transient programs, respectively...

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of cluster fission and fusion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia

    2004-01-01

    Results of molecular dynamics simulations of fission reactions Na_10^2+ --> Na_7^+ +Na_3^+ and Na_18^2+ --> 2Na_9^+ are presented. The dependence of the fission barriers on the isomer structure of the parent cluster is analyzed. It is demonstrated that the energy necessary for removing homothetic...

  1. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome...... simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations....

  2. Dynamic simulation for effective workforce management in new product development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mutingi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective planning and management of workforce for new product development (NPD projects is a great challenge to many organisations, especially in the presence of engineering changes during the product development process. The management objective in effective workforce management is to recruit, develop and deploy the right people at the right place at the right time so as to fulfill organizational objectives. In this paper, we propose a dynamic simulation model to address the workforce management problem in a typical NPD project consisting of design, prototyping, and production phases. We assume that workforce demand is a function of project work remaining and the current available skill pool. System dynamics simulation concepts are used to capture the causality relationships and feedback loops in the workforce system from a systems thinking. The evaluation of system dynamics simulation reveals the dynamic behaviour in NPD workforce management systems and shows how adaptive dynamic recruitment and training decisions can effectively balance the workforce system during the NPD process.

  3. Dynamic simulation of sustainable farm development scenarios using cognitive modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuzhyk Kateryna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic simulation of sustainable farm development scenarios using cognitive modeling. The paper presents a dynamic simulation system of sustainable development scenarios on farms using cognitive modeling. The system incorporates relevant variables which affect the sustainable development of farms. Its user provides answers to strategic issues connected with the level of farm sustainability over a long-term perspective of dynamic development. The work contains a description of the model structure as well as the results of simulations carried out on 16 farms in northern Ukraine. The results show that the process of sustainability is based mainly on the potential for innovation in agricultural production and biodiversity. The user is able to simulate various scenarios for the sustainable development of a farm and visualize the influence of factors on the economic and social situation, as well as on environmental aspects. Upon carrying out a series of simulations, it was determined that the development of farms characterized by sustainable development is based on additional profit, which serves as the main motivation for transforming a conventional farm into a sustainable one. Nevertheless, additional profit is not the only driving force in the system of sustainable development. The standard of living, market condition, and legal regulations as well as government support also play a significant motivational role.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Modeling and Simulation of Diamond Cutting of Cerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junjie; Zheng, Haibing; Shuai, Maobing; Li, Yao; Yang, Yang; Sun, Tao

    2017-07-01

    The coupling between structural phase transformations and dislocations induces challenges in understanding the deformation behavior of metallic cerium at the nanoscale. In the present work, we elucidate the underlying mechanism of cerium under ultra-precision diamond cutting by means of molecular dynamics modeling and simulations. The molecular dynamics model of diamond cutting of cerium is established by assigning empirical potentials to describe atomic interactions and evaluating properties of two face-centered cubic cerium phases. Subsequent molecular dynamics simulations reveal that dislocation slip dominates the plastic deformation of cerium under the cutting process. In addition, the analysis based on atomic radial distribution functions demonstrates that there are trivial phase transformations from the γ-Ce to the δ-Ce occurred in both machined surface and formed chip. Following investigations on machining parameter dependence reveal the optimal machining conditions for achieving high quality of machined surface of cerium.

  5. Linear optics simulation of quantum non-Markovian dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiuri, Andrea; Greganti, Chiara; Mazzola, Laura; Paternostro, Mauro; Mataloni, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The simulation of open quantum dynamics has recently allowed the direct investigation of the features of system-environment interaction and of their consequences on the evolution of a quantum system. Such interaction threatens the quantum properties of the system, spoiling them and causing the phenomenon of decoherence. Sometimes however a coherent exchange of information takes place between system and environment, memory effects arise and the dynamics of the system becomes non-Markovian. Here we report the experimental realisation of a non-Markovian process where system and environment are coupled through a simulated transverse Ising model. By engineering the evolution in a photonic quantum simulator, we demonstrate the role played by system-environment correlations in the emergence of memory effects.

  6. Ice Formation on Kaolinite: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Sosso, Gabriele C; Zen, Andrea; Pedevilla, Philipp; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    The formation of ice affects many aspects of our everyday life as well as technologies such as cryotherapy and cryopreservation. Foreign substances almost always aid water freezing through heterogeneous ice nucleation, but the molecular details of this process remain largely unknown. In fact, insight into the microscopic mechanism of ice formation on different substrates is difficult to obtain even via state-of-the-art experimental techniques. At the same time, atomistic simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation frequently face extraordinary challenges due to the complexity of the water-substrate interaction and the long timescales that characterize nucleation events. Here, we have investigated several aspects of molecular dynamics simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation considering as a prototypical ice nucleating material the clay mineral kaolinite, which is of relevance in atmospheric science. We show via seeded molecular dynamics simulations that ice nucleation on the hydroxylated (001) face of kaol...

  7. Parallel alternating direction preconditioner for isogeometric simulations of explicit dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Łoś, Marcin

    2015-04-27

    In this paper we present a parallel implementation of the alternating direction preconditioner for isogeometric simulations of explicit dynamics. The Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) algorithm, belongs to the category of matrix-splitting iterative methods, was proposed almost six decades ago for solving parabolic and elliptic partial differential equations, see [1–4]. The new version of this algorithm has been recently developed for isogeometric simulations of two dimensional explicit dynamics [5] and steady-state diffusion equations with orthotropic heterogenous coefficients [6]. In this paper we present a parallel version of the alternating direction implicit algorithm for three dimensional simulations. The algorithm has been incorporated as a part of PETIGA an isogeometric framework [7] build on top of PETSc [8]. We show the scalability of the parallel algorithm on STAMPEDE linux cluster up to 10,000 processors, as well as the convergence rate of the PCG solver with ADI algorithm as preconditioner.

  8. Understanding water: Molecular dynamics simulations of solubilized and crystallized myoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Gu; Garcia, A.E.; Schoenborn, B.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on CO myoglobin to evaluate the stability of the bound water molecules as determined in a neutron diffraction analysis. The myoglobin structure derived from the neutron analysis provided the starting coordinate set used in the simulations. The simulations show that only a few water molecules are tightly bound to protein atoms, while most solvent molecules are labile, breaking and reforming hydrogen bonds. Comparison between myoglobin in solution and in a single crystal highlighted some of the packing effects on the solvent structure and shows that water solvent plays an indispensable role in protein dynamics and structural stability. The described observations explain some of the differences in the experimental results of protein hydration as observed in NMR, neutron and X-ray diffraction studies.

  9. Energy conservation in molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren; Heilmann, Ole; Dyre, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Classical Newtonian dynamics is analytic and the energy of an isolated system is conserved. The energy of such a system, obtained by the discrete “Verlet” algorithm commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations, fluctuates but is conserved in the mean. This is explained by the existence...... in the time step length. Here we use the first non-trivial term in this expansion to obtain an improved estimate of the discrete values of the energy. The investigation is performed for a representative system with Lennard-Jones pair interactions. The simulations show that inclusion of this term reduces...... the standard deviation of the energy fluctuations by a factor of 100 for typical values of the time step length. Simulations further show that the energy is conserved for at least one hundred million time steps provided the potential and its first four derivatives are continuous at the cutoff. Finally, we show...

  10. GaAs-Based Nanowire Devices with Multiple Asymmetric Gates for Electrical Brownian Ratchets

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Nakano, Yuki; Kasai, Seiya

    2013-01-01

    GaAs-based nanowire devices having multiple asymmetric gates for electrical Brownian ratchets were fabricated and characterized. From three-dimensional potential simulation results and current–voltage characteristics, we confirmed the formation of the asymmetric potential in our device design. Direct current was generated at room temperature by repeatedly switching the potential in a multiple-asymmetric-gate device on and off. Such current was not observed in either a single-asymmetric-gate d...

  11. Probing the limits of metal plasticity with molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis A.; Stukowski, Alexander; Oppelstrup, Tomas; Bulatov, Vasily V.

    2017-10-01

    Ordinarily, the strength and plasticity properties of a metal are defined by dislocations--line defects in the crystal lattice whose motion results in material slippage along lattice planes. Dislocation dynamics models are usually used as mesoscale proxies for true atomistic dynamics, which are computationally expensive to perform routinely. However, atomistic simulations accurately capture every possible mechanism of material response, resolving every ``jiggle and wiggle'' of atomic motion, whereas dislocation dynamics models do not. Here we present fully dynamic atomistic simulations of bulk single-crystal plasticity in the body-centred-cubic metal tantalum. Our goal is to quantify the conditions under which the limits of dislocation-mediated plasticity are reached and to understand what happens to the metal beyond any such limit. In our simulations, the metal is compressed at ultrahigh strain rates along its [001] crystal axis under conditions of constant pressure, temperature and strain rate. To address the complexity of crystal plasticity processes on the length scales (85-340 nm) and timescales (1 ns-1μs) that we examine, we use recently developed methods of in situ computational microscopy to recast the enormous amount of transient trajectory data generated in our simulations into a form that can be analysed by a human. Our simulations predict that, on reaching certain limiting conditions of strain, dislocations alone can no longer relieve mechanical loads; instead, another mechanism, known as deformation twinning (the sudden re-orientation of the crystal lattice), takes over as the dominant mode of dynamic response. Below this limit, the metal assumes a strain-path-independent steady state of plastic flow in which the flow stress and the dislocation density remain constant as long as the conditions of straining thereafter remain unchanged. In this distinct state, tantalum flows like a viscous fluid while retaining its crystal lattice and remaining a strong

  12. Information diversity in structure and dynamics of simulated neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Nykter, Matti; Kesseli, Juha; Ruohonen, Keijo; Yli-Harja, Olli; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviors are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses. We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  13. Information Diversity in Structure and Dynamics of Simulated Neuronal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomo eMäki-Marttunen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance (NCD. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviours are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses.We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  14. Dynamic simulation for distortion image with turbulence atmospheric transmission effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huijie; Fei, Jindong; Qing, Duzheng; Zhao, Hongming; Yu, Hong; Cheng, Chen

    2013-09-01

    The imaging through atmospheric turbulence is an inevitable problem encountered by infrared imaging sensors working in the turbulence atmospheric environment. Before light-rays enter the window of the imaging sensors, the atmospheric turbulence will randomly interfere with the transmission of the light waves came from the objects, causing the distribution of image intensity values on the focal plane to diffuse, the peak value to decrease, the image to get blurred, and the pixels to deviate, and making image identification very difficult. Owing to the fact of the long processing time and that the atmospheric turbulent flow field is unknown and hard to be described by mathematical models, dynamic simulation for distortion Image with turbulence atmospheric transmission effects is much more difficult and challenging in the world. This paper discusses the dynamic simulation for distortion Image of turbulence atmospheric transmission effect. First of all, with the data and the optical transmission model of the turbulence atmospheric, the ray-tracing method is applied to obtain the propagation path of optical ray which propagates through the high-speed turbulent flow field, and then to calculate the OPD from the reference wave to the reconverted wave front and obtain the point spread function (PSF). Secondly, infrared characteristics models of typical scene were established according to the theory of infrared physics and heat conduction, and then the dynamic infrared image was generated by OpenGL. The last step is to obtain the distortion Image with turbulence atmospheric transmission effects .With the data of atmospheric transmission computation, infrared simulation image of every frame was processed according to the theory of image processing and the real-time image simulation, and then the dynamic distortion simulation images with effects of blurring, jitter and shifting were obtained. Above-mentioned simulation method can provide the theoretical bases for recovering

  15. Research on hyperspectral dynamic scene and image sequence simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dandan; Gao, Jiaobo; Sun, Kefeng; Hu, Yu; Li, Yu; Xie, Junhu; Zhang, Lei

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a simulation method of hyper-spectral dynamic scene and image sequence for hyper-spectral equipment evaluation and target detection algorithm. Because of high spectral resolution, strong band continuity, anti-interference and other advantages, in recent years, hyper-spectral imaging technology has been rapidly developed and is widely used in many areas such as optoelectronic target detection, military defense and remote sensing systems. Digital imaging simulation, as a crucial part of hardware in loop simulation, can be applied to testing and evaluation hyper-spectral imaging equipment with lower development cost and shorter development period. Meanwhile, visual simulation can produce a lot of original image data under various conditions for hyper-spectral image feature extraction and classification algorithm. Based on radiation physic model and material characteristic parameters this paper proposes a generation method of digital scene. By building multiple sensor models under different bands and different bandwidths, hyper-spectral scenes in visible, MWIR, LWIR band, with spectral resolution 0.01μm, 0.05μm and 0.1μm have been simulated in this paper. The final dynamic scenes have high real-time and realistic, with frequency up to 100 HZ. By means of saving all the scene gray data in the same viewpoint image sequence is obtained. The analysis results show whether in the infrared band or the visible band, the grayscale variations of simulated hyper-spectral images are consistent with the theoretical analysis results.

  16. Fast Simulation of Dynamic Ultrasound Images Using the GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storve, Sigurd; Torp, Hans

    2017-10-01

    Simulated ultrasound data is a valuable tool for development and validation of quantitative image analysis methods in echocardiography. Unfortunately, simulation time can become prohibitive for phantoms consisting of a large number of point scatterers. The COLE algorithm by Gao et al. is a fast convolution-based simulator that trades simulation accuracy for improved speed. We present highly efficient parallelized CPU and GPU implementations of the COLE algorithm with an emphasis on dynamic simulations involving moving point scatterers. We argue that it is crucial to minimize the amount of data transfers from the CPU to achieve good performance on the GPU. We achieve this by storing the complete trajectories of the dynamic point scatterers as spline curves in the GPU memory. This leads to good efficiency when simulating sequences consisting of a large number of frames, such as B-mode and tissue Doppler data for a full cardiac cycle. In addition, we propose a phase-based subsample delay technique that efficiently eliminates flickering artifacts seen in B-mode sequences when COLE is used without enough temporal oversampling. To assess the performance, we used a laptop computer and a desktop computer, each equipped with a multicore Intel CPU and an NVIDIA GPU. Running the simulator on a high-end TITAN X GPU, we observed two orders of magnitude speedup compared to the parallel CPU version, three orders of magnitude speedup compared to simulation times reported by Gao et al. in their paper on COLE, and a speedup of 27000 times compared to the multithreaded version of Field II, using numbers reported in a paper by Jensen. We hope that by releasing the simulator as an open-source project we will encourage its use and further development.

  17. Molecular dynamics and dynamic Monte-Carlo simulation of irradiation damage with focused ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Kaoru

    2017-03-01

    The focused ion beam (FIB) has become an important tool for micro- and nanostructuring of samples such as milling, deposition and imaging. However, this leads to damage of the surface on the nanometer scale from implanted projectile ions and recoiled material atoms. It is therefore important to investigate each kind of damage quantitatively. We present a dynamic Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation code to simulate the morphological and compositional changes of a multilayered sample under ion irradiation and a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation code to simulate dose-dependent changes in the backscattering-ion (BSI)/secondary-electron (SE) yields of a crystalline sample. Recent progress in the codes for research to simulate the surface morphology and Mo/Si layers intermixing in an EUV lithography mask irradiated with FIBs, and the crystalline orientation effect on BSI and SE yields relating to the channeling contrast in scanning ion microscopes, is also presented.

  18. Mean-field theory of quantum Brownian motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allahverdyan, A.; Balian, R.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate a mean-field approach to a quantum Brownian particle interacting with a quantum thermal bath at temperature T, and subjected to a non-linear potential. An exact, partially classical description of quantum Brownian motion is proposed, which uses negative probabilities in its

  19. Brownian motion of a particle with arbitrary shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichocki, Bogdan; Ekiel-Jeżewska, Maria L; Wajnryb, Eligiusz

    2015-06-07

    Brownian motion of a particle with an arbitrary shape is investigated theoretically. Analytical expressions for the time-dependent cross-correlations of the Brownian translational and rotational displacements are derived from the Smoluchowski equation. The role of the particle mobility center is determined and discussed.

  20. Estimation of the global regularity of a multifractional Brownian motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebovits, Joachim; Podolskij, Mark

    This paper presents a new estimator of the global regularity index of a multifractional Brownian motion. Our estimation method is based upon a ratio statistic, which compares the realized global quadratic variation of a multifractional Brownian motion at two different frequencies. We show...

  1. Tested Demonstrations. Brownian Motion: A Classroom Demonstration and Student Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirksey, H. Graden; Jones, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    Shows how video recordings of the Brownian motion of tiny particles may be made. Describes a classroom demonstration and cites a reported experiment designed to show the random nature of Brownian motion. Suggests a student experiment to discover the distance a tiny particle travels as a function of time. (MVL)

  2. Modeling of magnetic particle suspensions for simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Satoh, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of the book is to highlight the modeling of magnetic particles with different shapes and magnetic properties, to provide graduate students and young researchers information on the theoretical aspects and actual techniques for the treatment of magnetic particles in particle-based simulations. In simulation, we focus on the Monte Carlo, molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, lattice Boltzmann and stochastic rotation dynamics (multi-particle collision dynamics) methods. The latter two simulation methods can simulate both the particle motion and the ambient flow field simultaneously. In general, specialized knowledge can only be obtained in an effective manner under the supervision of an expert. The present book is written to play such a role for readers who wish to develop the skill of modeling magnetic particles and develop a computer simulation program using their own ability. This book is therefore a self-learning book for graduate students and young researchers. Armed with this knowledge,...

  3. Simulation and Experimental Investigation of Structural Dynamic Frequency Characteristics Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Li

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In general, mechanical equipment such as cars, airplanes, and machine tools all operate with constant frequency characteristics. These constant working characteristics should be controlled if the dynamic performance of the equipment demands improvement or the dynamic characteristics is intended to change with different working conditions. Active control is a stable and beneficial method for this, but current active control methods mainly focus on vibration control for reducing the vibration amplitudes in the time domain or frequency domain. In this paper, a new method of dynamic frequency characteristics active control (DFCAC is presented for a flat plate, which can not only accomplish vibration control but also arbitrarily change the dynamic characteristics of the equipment. The proposed DFCAC algorithm is based on a neural network including two parts of the identification implement and the controller. The effectiveness of the DFCAC method is verified by several simulation and experiments, which provide desirable results.

  4. Synthesis of recurrent neural networks for dynamical system simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trischler, Adam P; D'Eleuterio, Gabriele M T

    2016-08-01

    We review several of the most widely used techniques for training recurrent neural networks to approximate dynamical systems, then describe a novel algorithm for this task. The algorithm is based on an earlier theoretical result that guarantees the quality of the network approximation. We show that a feedforward neural network can be trained on the vector-field representation of a given dynamical system using backpropagation, then recast it as a recurrent network that replicates the original system's dynamics. After detailing this algorithm and its relation to earlier approaches, we present numerical examples that demonstrate its capabilities. One of the distinguishing features of our approach is that both the original dynamical systems and the recurrent networks that simulate them operate in continuous time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Building Energy Performance Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Tryggvason, Tryggvi

    An interconnection between a building energy performance simulation program and a Computational Fluid Dynamics program (CFD) for room air distribution will be introduced for improvement of the predictions of both the energy consumption and the indoor environment. The building energy performance...... simulation program requires a detailed description of the energy flow in the air movement which can be obtained by a CFD program. The paper describes an energy consumption calculation in a large building, where the building energy simulation program is modified by CFD predictions of the flow between three...... program and a building energy performance simulation program will improve both the energy consumption data and the prediction of thermal comfort and air quality in a selected area of the building....

  6. Determination of Reference Chemical Potential Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadeo Jatkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method implementing molecular dynamics (MD simulations for calculating the reference properties of simple gas hydrates has been proposed. The guest molecules affect interaction between adjacent water molecules distorting the hydrate lattice, which requires diverse values of reference properties for different gas hydrates. We performed simulations to validate the experimental data for determining Δ0, the chemical potential difference between water and theoretical empty cavity at the reference state, for structure II type gas hydrates. Simulations have also been used to observe the variation of the hydrate unit cell volume with temperature. All simulations were performed using TIP4P water molecules at the reference temperature and pressure conditions. The values were close to the experimental values obtained by the Lee-Holder model, considering lattice distortion.

  7. Survey of Dynamic Simulation Programs for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troy J. Tranter; Daryl R. Haefner

    2008-06-01

    The absence of any industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other industries. Modeling programs to simulate the dynamic behavior of nuclear fuel separations and processing were originally developed to support the US government’s mission of weapons production and defense fuel recovery. Consequently there has been little effort is the US devoted towards improving this specific process simulation capability during the last two or three decades. More recent work has been focused on elucidating chemical thermodynamics and developing better models of predicting equilibrium in actinide solvent extraction systems. These equilibrium models have been used to augment flowsheet development and testing primarily at laboratory scales. The development of more robust and complete process models has not kept pace with the vast improvements in computational power and user interface and is significantly behind simulation capability in other chemical processing and separation fields.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J. H.; Jaffe, R.; Halicioglu, T.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2000-01-01

    We study the hydrophobic/hydrophilic behavior of carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. The energetics of the carbon-water interface are mainly dispersive but in the present study augmented with a carbon quadrupole term acting on the charge sites of the water. The simulations indicate that this contribution is negligible in terms of modifying the structural properties of water at the interface. Simulations of two carbon nanotubes in water display a wetting and drying of the interface between the nanotubes depending on their initial spacing. Thus, initial tube spacings of 7 and 8 A resulted in a drying of the interface whereas spacing of > 9 A remain wet during the course of the simulation. Finally, we present a novel particle-particle-particle-mesh algorithm for long range potentials which allows for general (curvilinear) meshes and "black-box" fast solvers by adopting an influence matrix technique.

  9. A dynamic traffic simulator for roads affected by natural hasards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voumard, J.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Derron, M.-H.

    2012-04-01

    This work focuses on the issue of natural hazards threatening roads. Nowadays, risk estimations of rock falls or landslides affecting whole sections of road are generally quite accurate and under relatively good control. Mitigation measures provide intervention means to reduce the hazards along roads. However, as classical models of risk calculation on communication routes do not take into account the dynamic traffic parameters, little is known on the way of reducing the risk at road level. It is not known precisely what really happens on the road when an event occurs and how vehicles interact. A dynamic traffic simulator in development provides information on factors having an impact on the risk level related to the road. Variables such as visibility, curvature radius of turns or vehicle type were included in the model. Varying these variables within dynamic traffic simulations can suggest solutions to minimize the risks for road users. These simulations can provide answers to various questions, such as: does speed have a significant impact on the risk incurred by drivers? Is it possible to significantly reduce the risk with appropriate speeds? The simulation is performed with the MATLAB © software. The model is yet to be calibrated and validated through in situ tests.

  10. NETIMIS: Dynamic Simulation of Health Economics Outcomes Using Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Owen A; Hall, Peter S; Hulme, Claire

    2016-02-01

    Many healthcare organizations are now making good use of electronic health record (EHR) systems to record clinical information about their patients and the details of their healthcare. Electronic data in EHRs is generated by people engaged in complex processes within complex environments, and their human input, albeit shaped by computer systems, is compromised by many human factors. These data are potentially valuable to health economists and outcomes researchers but are sufficiently large and complex enough to be considered part of the new frontier of 'big data'. This paper describes emerging methods that draw together data mining, process modelling, activity-based costing and dynamic simulation models. Our research infrastructure includes safe links to Leeds hospital's EHRs with 3 million secondary and tertiary care patients. We created a multidisciplinary team of health economists, clinical specialists, and data and computer scientists, and developed a dynamic simulation tool called NETIMIS (Network Tools for Intervention Modelling with Intelligent Simulation; http://www.netimis.com ) suitable for visualization of both human-designed and data-mined processes which can then be used for 'what-if' analysis by stakeholders interested in costing, designing and evaluating healthcare interventions. We present two examples of model development to illustrate how dynamic simulation can be informed by big data from an EHR. We found the tool provided a focal point for multidisciplinary team work to help them iteratively and collaboratively 'deep dive' into big data.

  11. Simulating soil phosphorus dynamics for a phosphorus loss quantification tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadas, Peter A; Joern, Brad C; Moore, Philip A

    2012-01-01

    Pollution of fresh waters by agricultural phosphorus (P) is a water quality concern. Because soils can contribute significantly to P loss in runoff, it is important to assess how management affects soil P status over time, which is often done with models. Our objective was to describe and validate soil P dynamics in the Annual P Loss Estimator (APLE) model. APLE is a user-friendly spreadsheet model that simulates P loss in runoff and soil P dynamics over 10 yr for a given set of runoff, erosion, and management conditions. For soil P dynamics, APLE simulates two layers in the topsoil, each with three inorganic P pools and one organic P pool. It simulates P additions to soil from manure and fertilizer, distribution among pools, mixing between layers due to tillage and bioturbation, leaching between and out of layers, crop P removal, and loss by surface runoff and erosion. We used soil P data from 25 published studies to validate APLE's soil P processes. Our results show that APLE reliably simulated soil P dynamics for a wide range of soil properties, soil depths, P application sources and rates, durations, soil P contents, and management practices. We validated APLE specifically for situations where soil P was increasing from excessive P inputs, where soil P was decreasing due to greater outputs than inputs, and where soil P stratification occurred in no-till and pasture soils. Successful simulations demonstrate APLE's potential to be applied to major management scenarios related to soil P loss in runoff and erosion. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  12. Simulation of liquid dynamics in a cryogenic mobile vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lisowski

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Technical gases becomes liquid in extremely low temperature ranging minus 200 °C and very high pressure what makes that transportationdevices have to perform very strict requirement. Presented paper shows selected aspect of simulation of liquefied gas sloshing in aspect of requirements that mobile vessels have to fulfill. Mobile vessel which is the object of simulation is a two shell tank with vacuum and layer insulation between shells adapted to 20 ft container. It is assigned for see, railway and road transport and have to follow all of requirements for such transportation systems. Requirements for such tank are enclosed in standard ISO 1496-3 which deals with freight containers and standard EN13530-2 that describes vacuum, cryogenic vessels. The standards EN13530-2 defines that vessels which are to be filled equal or less than 80% should be fitted with surge plates to provide vessel stability and limit dynamic loads. Additionally surge plates area has tobe at least 70% of cross section of the vessel and volume between surge plates shall be not higher than 7.5 m3. Structure of the vessel as well as the surge plate should resist of longitudinal acceleration of 2g. Additionally surge plates shall resists stresses caused by pressure distributed across the area of surge plate and the pressure shall be calculated as mass of liquid between plates and acceleration 2g. In this paper is presented way of simulation of dynamic behavior of liquefied Argon on vessel structure. A numerical methods likeComputational Fluid Dynamics (CFD and Finite Element Analysis (FEA were used for this purpose. Combination of both tools allowedto get pick value of dynamic pressure that arising during acceleration of 2g, which was assumed is 0.2 s and investigate resistance of vessel and container structure. Presented approach is called Fluid – Structure Interaction simulation. In CFD simulation was used Ansys CFX code, while for FEA calculations Pro/Mechanica package.

  13. Cross-scale MD simulations of dynamic strength of tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulatov, Vasily

    2017-06-01

    Dislocations are ubiquitous in metals where their motion presents the dominant and often the only mode of plastic response to straining. Over the last 25 years computational prediction of plastic response in metals has relied on Discrete Dislocation Dynamics (DDD) as the most fundamental method to account for collective dynamics of moving dislocations. Here we present first direct atomistic MD simulations of dislocation-mediated plasticity that are sufficiently large and long to compute plasticity response of single crystal tantalum while tracing the underlying dynamics of dislocations in all atomistic details. Where feasible, direct MD simulations sidestep DDD altogether thus reducing uncertainties of strength predictions to those of the interatomic potential. In the specific context of shock-induced material dynamics, the same MD models predict when, under what conditions and how dislocations interact and compete with other fundamental mechanisms of dynamic response, e.g. twinning, phase-transformations, fracture. In collaboration with: Luis Zepeda-Ruiz, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Alexander Stukowski, Technische Universitat Darmstadt; Tomas Oppelstrup, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Lineage grammars: describing, simulating and analyzing population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, Adam; Cardelli, Luca; Shapiro, Ehud

    2014-07-21

    Precise description of the dynamics of biological processes would enable the mathematical analysis and computational simulation of complex biological phenomena. Languages such as Chemical Reaction Networks and Process Algebras cater for the detailed description of interactions among individuals and for the simulation and analysis of ensuing behaviors of populations. However, often knowledge of such interactions is lacking or not available. Yet complete oblivion to the environment would make the description of any biological process vacuous. Here we present a language for describing population dynamics that abstracts away detailed interaction among individuals, yet captures in broad terms the effect of the changing environment, based on environment-dependent Stochastic Tree Grammars (eSTG). It is comprised of a set of stochastic tree grammar transition rules, which are context-free and as such abstract away specific interactions among individuals. Transition rule probabilities and rates, however, can depend on global parameters such as population size, generation count, and elapsed time. We show that eSTGs conveniently describe population dynamics at multiple levels including cellular dynamics, tissue development and niches of organisms. Notably, we show the utilization of eSTG for cases in which the dynamics is regulated by environmental factors, which affect the fate and rate of decisions of the different species. eSTGs are lineage grammars, in the sense that execution of an eSTG program generates the corresponding lineage trees, which can be used to analyze the evolutionary and developmental history of the biological system under investigation. These lineage trees contain a representation of the entire events history of the system, including the dynamics that led to the existing as well as to the extinct individuals. We conclude that our suggested formalism can be used to easily specify, simulate and analyze complex biological systems, and supports modular

  15. Dislocation dynamics simulations of plasticity at small scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Caizhi [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    As metallic structures and devices are being created on a dimension comparable to the length scales of the underlying dislocation microstructures, the mechanical properties of them change drastically. Since such small structures are increasingly common in modern technologies, there is an emergent need to understand the critical roles of elasticity, plasticity, and fracture in small structures. Dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations, in which the dislocations are the simulated entities, offer a way to extend length scales beyond those of atomistic simulations and the results from DD simulations can be directly compared with the micromechanical tests. The primary objective of this research is to use 3-D DD simulations to study the plastic deformation of nano- and micro-scale materials and understand the correlation between dislocation motion, interactions and the mechanical response. Specifically, to identify what critical events (i.e., dislocation multiplication, cross-slip, storage, nucleation, junction and dipole formation, pinning etc.) determine the deformation response and how these change from bulk behavior as the system decreases in size and correlate and improve our current knowledge of bulk plasticity with the knowledge gained from the direct observations of small-scale plasticity. Our simulation results on single crystal micropillars and polycrystalline thin films can march the experiment results well and capture the essential features in small-scale plasticity. Furthermore, several simple and accurate models have been developed following our simulation results and can reasonably predict the plastic behavior of small scale materials.

  16. Flight Dynamic Simulation with Nonlinear Aeroelastic Interaction using the ROM-ROM Procedure Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology, Inc. proposes to develop an integrated flight dynamics simulation capability with nonlinear aeroelastic interactions by combining a flight dynamics...

  17. A Coupling Tool for Parallel Molecular Dynamics-Continuum Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Philipp

    2012-06-01

    We present a tool for coupling Molecular Dynamics and continuum solvers. It is written in C++ and is meant to support the developers of hybrid molecular - continuum simulations in terms of both realisation of the respective coupling algorithm as well as parallel execution of the hybrid simulation. We describe the implementational concept of the tool and its parallel extensions. We particularly focus on the parallel execution of particle insertions into dense molecular systems and propose a respective parallel algorithm. Our implementations are validated for serial and parallel setups in two and three dimensions. © 2012 IEEE.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations: from structure function relationships to drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Pramod C; Miners, John O

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an emerging in silico technique with potential applications in diverse areas of pharmacology. Over the past three decades MD has evolved as an area of importance for understanding the atomic basis of complex phenomena such as molecular recognition, protein folding, and the transport of ions and small molecules across membranes. The application of MD simulations in isolation and in conjunction with experimental approaches have provided an increased understanding of protein structure-function relationships and demonstrated promise in drug discovery.

  19. First Principles Modelling of Shape Memory Alloys Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kastner, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Materials sciences relate the macroscopic properties of materials to their microscopic structure and postulate the need for holistic multiscale research. The investigation of shape memory alloys is a prime example in this regard. This particular class of materials exhibits strong coupling of temperature, strain and stress, determined by solid state phase transformations of their metallic lattices. The present book presents a collection of simulation studies of this behaviour. Employing conceptually simple but comprehensive models, the fundamental material properties of shape memory alloys are qualitatively explained from first principles. Using contemporary methods of molecular dynamics simulation experiments, it is shown how microscale dynamics may produce characteristic macroscopic material properties. The work is rooted in the materials sciences of shape memory alloys and  covers  thermodynamical, micro-mechanical  and crystallographical aspects. It addresses scientists in these research fields and thei...

  20. Homogeneous Nucleation of Methane Hydrate in Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarupria, Sapna; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2012-10-18

    We report atomistically detailed molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous nucleation of methane hydrate in bulk aqueous phase in the absence of any interface. Subcritical clusters of water and methane molecules are formed in the initial segment of the simulations, which then aggregate to give the critical hydrate nucleus. This occurs over time scales of several hundred nanoseconds, indicating that the formation and aggregation of subcritical clusters can contribute significantly to the overall rate of hydrate nucleation. The clusters have elements of sI hydrate structure, such as 5(12) and 5(12)6(2) cages as well as other uncommon 5(12)6(3) and 5(12)6(4) cages, but do not possess long-range order. Clusters are dynamic in nature and undergo continuous structural rearrangements.

  1. A review of the analytical simulation of aircraft crash dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Carden, Huey D.; Boitnott, Richard L.; Hayduk, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    A large number of full scale tests of general aviation aircraft, helicopters, and one unique air-to-ground controlled impact of a transport aircraft were performed. Additionally, research was also conducted on seat dynamic performance, load-limiting seats, load limiting subfloor designs, and emergency-locator-transmitters (ELTs). Computer programs were developed to provide designers with methods for predicting accelerations, velocities, and displacements of collapsing structure and for estimating the human response to crash loads. The results of full scale aircraft and component tests were used to verify and guide the development of analytical simulation tools and to demonstrate impact load attenuating concepts. Analytical simulation of metal and composite aircraft crash dynamics are addressed. Finite element models are examined to determine their degree of corroboration by experimental data and to reveal deficiencies requiring further development.

  2. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase γ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Euro, Liliya; Haapanen, Outi; Róg, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    of replisomal interactions, and functional effects of patient mutations that do not affect direct catalysis have remained elusive. Here we report the first atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations of the human Pol γ replicative complex. Our simulation data show that DNA binding triggers remarkable......DNA polymerase γ (Pol γ) is a key component of the mitochondrial DNA replisome and an important cause of neurological diseases. Despite the availability of its crystal structures, the molecular mechanism of DNA replication, the switch between polymerase and exonuclease activities, the site...... changes in the enzyme structure, including (1) completion of the DNA-binding channel via a dynamic subdomain, which in the apo form blocks the catalytic site, (2) stabilization of the structure through the distal accessory β-subunit, and (3) formation of a putative transient replisome-binding platform...

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation damage cascades in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchan, J. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Robinson, M. [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Christie, H. J.; Roach, D. L.; Ross, D. K. [Physics and Materials Research Centre, School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Salford, Greater Manchester M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Marks, N. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

    2015-06-28

    Radiation damage cascades in diamond are studied by molecular dynamics simulations employing the Environment Dependent Interaction Potential for carbon. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies up to 2.5 keV are considered and a uniformly distributed set of 25 initial PKA directions provide robust statistics. The simulations reveal the atomistic origins of radiation-resistance in diamond and provide a comprehensive computational analysis of cascade evolution and dynamics. As for the case of graphite, the atomic trajectories are found to have a fractal-like character, thermal spikes are absent and only isolated point defects are generated. Quantitative analysis shows that the instantaneous maximum kinetic energy decays exponentially with time, and that the timescale of the ballistic phase has a power-law dependence on PKA energy. Defect recombination is efficient and independent of PKA energy, with only 50% of displacements resulting in defects, superior to graphite where the same quantity is nearly 75%.

  4. Dynamic simulation of flash drums using rigorous physical property calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. Gonçalves

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of flash drums is simulated using a formulation adequate for phase modeling with equations of state (EOS. The energy and mass balances are written as differential equations for the internal energy and the number of moles of each species. The algebraic equations of the model, solved at each time step, are those of a flash with specified internal energy, volume and mole numbers (UVN flash. A new aspect of our dynamic simulations is the use of direct iterations in phase volumes (instead of pressure for solving the algebraic equations. It was also found that an iterative procedure previously suggested in the literature for UVN flashes becomes unreliable close to phase boundaries and a new alternative is proposed. Another unusual aspect of this work is that the model expressions, including the physical properties and their analytical derivatives, were quickly implemented using computer algebra.

  5. Dynamic information architecture system (DIAS) : multiple model simulation management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simunich, K. L.; Sydelko, P.; Dolph, J.; Christiansen, J.

    2002-05-13

    Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) is a flexible, extensible, object-based framework for developing and maintaining complex multidisciplinary simulations of a wide variety of application contexts. The modeling domain of a specific DIAS-based simulation is determined by (1) software Entity (domain-specific) objects that represent the real-world entities that comprise the problem space (atmosphere, watershed, human), and (2) simulation models and other data processing applications that express the dynamic behaviors of the domain entities. In DIAS, models communicate only with Entity objects, never with each other. Each Entity object has a number of Parameter and Aspect (of behavior) objects associated with it. The Parameter objects contain the state properties of the Entity object. The Aspect objects represent the behaviors of the Entity object and how it interacts with other objects. DIAS extends the ''Object'' paradigm by abstraction of the object's dynamic behaviors, separating the ''WHAT'' from the ''HOW.'' DIAS object class definitions contain an abstract description of the various aspects of the object's behavior (the WHAT), but no implementation details (the HOW). Separate DIAS models/applications carry the implementation of object behaviors (the HOW). Any model deemed appropriate, including existing legacy-type models written in other languages, can drive entity object behavior. The DIAS design promotes plug-and-play of alternative models, with minimal recoding of existing applications. The DIAS Context Builder object builds a constructs or scenario for the simulation, based on developer specification and user inputs. Because DIAS is a discrete event simulation system, there is a Simulation Manager object with which all events are processed. Any class that registers to receive events must implement an event handler (method) to process the event during execution. Event handlers

  6. Polarized and depolarized light-scattering studies on Brownian diffusional and critical fluid systems: theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, C.M.

    1976-01-01

    An effort to expand light-scattering autocorrelation techniques to Brownian diffusional and critical fluid systems in which multiple scattering effects are important, and to understand the observed similarity of the Rayleigh linewidth of light scattered from these two seemingly different systems is discussed. A formalism was developed to find the light field multiply scattered from a suspension of Brownian diffusing particles. For the field doubly scattered from a system of noninteracting Brownian particles, the intensity and correlation time were much less dependent on the scattering angle than for the singly scattered component. The polarized and depolarized correlation times of light scattered from Brownian particle systems were measured. The double-scattering formalism was extended to light scattered from critical fluid systems. In the region k xi greater than 5 the doubly and singly scattered correlation times were nearly equal. The dynamic droplet model of critical phenomena was developed which gives the proper, experimentally verified, forms for the intensity and linewidth of light scattered from a critical fluid. To test the dynamic droplet model and the mode theories Rayleigh linewidth predictions, light-scattering measurements were performed on the critical fluid system methanol and cyclohexane. The data agreed with both the dynamic droplet and decoupled mode theory predictions. The depolarized scattered spectra from a critical fluid were measured, and qualitative agreement with the double-scattering theory was found. 57 figures, 5 tables.

  7. Structure and Dynamics of Glycosphingolipids in Lipid Bilayers: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak Y. Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycolipids are important constituents of biological membranes, and understanding their structure and dynamics in lipid bilayers provides insights into their physiological and pathological roles. Experimental techniques have provided details into their behavior at model and biological membranes; however, computer simulations are needed to gain atomic level insights. This paper summarizes the insights obtained from MD simulations into the conformational and orientational dynamics of glycosphingolipids and their exposure, hydration, and hydrogen-bonding interactions in membrane environment. The organization of glycosphingolipids in raft-like membranes and their modulation of lipid membrane structure are also reviewed.

  8. Characterization of turbulence stability through the identification of multifractional Brownian motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. C.

    2013-02-01

    Multifractional Brownian motions have become popular as flexible models in describing real-life signals of high-frequency features in geoscience, microeconomics, and turbulence, to name a few. The time-changing Hurst exponent, which describes regularity levels depending on time measurements, and variance, which relates to an energy level, are two parameters that characterize multifractional Brownian motions. This research suggests a combined method of estimating the time-changing Hurst exponent and variance using the local variation of sampled paths of signals. The method consists of two phases: initially estimating global variance and then accurately estimating the time-changing Hurst exponent. A simulation study shows its performance in estimation of the parameters. The proposed method is applied to characterization of atmospheric stability in which descriptive statistics from the estimated time-changing Hurst exponent and variance classify stable atmosphere flows from unstable ones.

  9. Characterization of turbulence stability through the identification of multifractional Brownian motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Lee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Multifractional Brownian motions have become popular as flexible models in describing real-life signals of high-frequency features in geoscience, microeconomics, and turbulence, to name a few. The time-changing Hurst exponent, which describes regularity levels depending on time measurements, and variance, which relates to an energy level, are two parameters that characterize multifractional Brownian motions. This research suggests a combined method of estimating the time-changing Hurst exponent and variance using the local variation of sampled paths of signals. The method consists of two phases: initially estimating global variance and then accurately estimating the time-changing Hurst exponent. A simulation study shows its performance in estimation of the parameters. The proposed method is applied to characterization of atmospheric stability in which descriptive statistics from the estimated time-changing Hurst exponent and variance classify stable atmosphere flows from unstable ones.

  10. Simulation of dynamic systems with Matlab and Simulink

    CERN Document Server

    Klee, Harold

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical ModelingDerivation of a Mathematical ModelDifference EquationsFirst Look at Discrete-Time SystemsCase Study: Population Dynamics (Single Species)Continuous-Time SystemsFirst-Order SystemsSecond-Order SystemsSimulation DiagramsHigher-Order SystemsState VariablesNonlinear SystemsCase Study: Submarine Depth Control SystemElementary Numerical IntegrationDiscrete-Time System Approximation of a Continuous-

  11. Particle Simulation of Plasma Blob Dynamics: Preliminary Results

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroki, HASEGAWA; Seiji, ISHIGURO

    2012-01-01

    A three dimensional electrostatic plasma particle code has been developed to investigate blob dynamics. Some results of preliminary simulations are in agreement with previous studies based on a two-dimensional reduced fluid model. When periodic boundary condition is applied in the ambient magnetic field direction, it was observed that a blob evolves to a mushroom-shaped structure. Furthermore, the relation between the observed blob propagation speed and the initial blob size is consistent wit...

  12. Molecular Dynamics Computer Simulations of Multidrug RND Efflux Pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Ruggerone, Paolo; Vargiu, Attilio V.; Collu, Francesca; Fischer, Nadine; Kandt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Over-expression of multidrug efflux pumps of the Resistance Nodulation Division (RND) protein super family counts among the main causes for microbial resistance against pharmaceuticals. Understanding the molecular basis of this process is one of the major challenges of modern biomedical research, involving a broad range of experimental and computational techniques. Here we review the current state of RND transporter investigation employing molecular dynamics simulations providing conformation...

  13. Modelling and simulation of phase equilibrium in dynamic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dahl

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available The article reports an investigation on how to efficiently describe phase equilibrium in dynamic systems, and how to solve the resulting equations numerically. An overview of possible solution strategies is given. Different thermodynamic models are briefly reviewed, and important algorithms like PT flash are described. A flash tank with a mixture of propane and propylene is simulated to illustrate some different solution strategies.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanocolloidal amorphous silica particles: Part I

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, S.; Kirk, S. R.; Persson, M.; Carlen, J.; Abbas, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Explicit molecular dynamics simulations were applied to a pair of amorphous silica nanoparticles in aqueous solution, of diameter 4.4 nm with four different background electrolyte concentrations, to extract the mean force acting between the pair of silica nanoparticles. Dependences of the interparticle forces with separation and the background electrolyte concentration were demonstrated. The nature of the interaction of the counter-ions with charged silica surface sites (deprotonated silanols...

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanocolloidal amorphous silica particles: Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, S.; Kirk, S. R.; Persson, M.; Carlen, J.; Abbas, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Explicit molecular dynamics simulations were applied to a pair of amorphous silica nanoparticles of diameter 3.2 nm immersed in a background electrolyte. Mean forces acting between the pair of silica nanoparticles were extracted at four different background electrolyte concentrations. Dependence of the inter-particle potential of mean force on the separation and the silicon to sodium ratio, as well as on the background electrolyte concentration, are demonstrated. The pH was indirectly account...

  16. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline nickel: structure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swygenhoven, H. van [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Caro, A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche

    1997-09-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations of low temperature elastic and plastic deformation of Ni nanophase samples (3-7 nm) are performed. The samples are polycrystals nucleated from different seeds, with random locations and orientations. Bulk and Young`s modulus, onset of plastic deformation and mechanism responsible for the plastic behaviour are studied and compared with the behaviour of coarse grained samples. (author) 1 fig., 3 refs.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of Borophene

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Yue; Li, Chun; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Wei, Ning; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Yongjie Jessica

    2017-01-01

    The present work carries out molecular dynamics simulations to compute the thermal conductivity of the borophene nanoribbon and the borophene nanotube using the Muller-Plathe approach. We investigate the thermal conductivity of the armchair and zigzag borophenes, and show the strong anisotropic thermal conductivity property of borophene. We compare the results of the borophene nanoribbon and the borophene nanotube, and find the thermal conductivity of the borophene is structure dependent.

  19. Improved Pyrolysis Micro reactor Design via Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-23

    NUMBER (Include area code) 23 May 2017 Briefing Charts 25 April 2017 - 23 May 2017 Improved Pyrolysis Micro-reactor Design via Computational Fluid...PYROLYSIS MICRO-REACTOR DESIGN VIA COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS Ghanshyam L. Vaghjiani* DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release...History of Micro-Reactor (Chen-Source) T ≤ 1800 K S.D. Chambreau et al./International Journal of Mass Spectrometry 2000, 199, 17–27 DISTRIBUTION A

  20. Game-based dynamic simulations supporting technical education and training

    OpenAIRE

    Tore Bjølseth; Ole K. Solbjørg; Bjarne A. Foss; Tor Ivar Eikaas

    2006-01-01

    Educational games may improve learning by taking advantage of the new knowledge and skills of today’s students obtained from extensive use of interactive games. This paper describes how interactive dynamic simulators of advanced technical systems and phenomena can be shaped and adapted as games and competitions supporting technical education and training. Some selected examples at different educational levels are shown, from vocational training to university level courses. The potential ...

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Solutions at Constant Chemical Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Perego, C; Salvalaglio, M; Parrinello, M.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, which range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, which influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a Gran...

  2. Simulations of burn dynamics in tokamak fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsinen, M.J.; Salomaa, R.R.E.

    1997-10-01

    The global dynamics of tokamak reactors is investigated with the time-dependent, volume-averaged (0D) particle and power balance code FRESCO (Fusion REactor Simulation COde). The main emphasis is on studies of reactivity transients during tokamak start-up and shut down, as well as after sudden changes in plasma and tokamak parameters. In particular, the plasma responses to changes in the confinement, fuelling rates and impurity concentrations are considered. 76 refs.

  3. Fractional Brownian motion and multifractional Brownian motion of Riemann-Liouville type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. C.

    2001-02-01

    The relationship between standard fractional Brownian motion (FBM) and FBM based on the Riemann-Liouville fractional integral (or RL-FBM) is clarified. The absence of stationary property in the increment process of RL-FBM is compensated by a weaker property of local stationarity, and the stationary property for the increments of the large-time asymptotic RL-FBM. Generalization of RL-FBM to the RL-multifractional Brownian motion (RL-MBM) can be carried out by replacing the constant Hölder exponent by a time-dependent function. RL-MBM is shown to satisfy a weaker scaling property known as the local asymptotic self-similarity. This local scaling property can be translated into the small-scale behaviour of the associated scalogram by using the wavelet transform.

  4. Performance analysis of dynamic erbium-doped fiber amplifier simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sharbani; Priye, Vishnu; Kumar, Santosh

    2013-04-01

    A real time multichannel dynamic erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) Simulink model with flat gain and gain clamping facility has been developed on a MATLAB platform. We model the EDFA simulator with one-dimensional nonlinear differential equation that describes the time dependent population density. For the model to show gain flattening multiplexed channels at different wavelengths, the MATLAB function block is used. Next, to simulate the noise performance of EDFA. New forward amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise blocks are designed that add noise dynamically at signal wavelength. The model has been implemented in the study of performance characteristics of an EDFA in both C- and L-band signal amplification by simulation. Based on the designed ASE generator, noise figure for different signal wavelengths are calculated. For 980 nm pump power, the noise figure almost reaches the practical limit of 3 dB whereas for 1480 nm pump power, a variation of about 1.5 dB and 0.8 dB is observed from the practical limit for the C- and L-bands, respectively. The present model can be implemented successfully as a test bed in the study of EDFA gain dynamics over the entire third optical communication bandwidth (1525 to 1690 nm) in signal amplification.

  5. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations: synergies between theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernelli, Ivano

    2015-03-17

    Recent developments in nonadiabatic dynamics enabled ab inito simulations of complex ultrafast processes in the condensed phase. These advances have opened new avenues in the study of many photophysical and photochemical reactions triggered by the absorption of electromagnetic radiation. In particular, theoretical investigations can be combined with the most sophisticated femtosecond experimental techniques to guide the interpretation of measured time-resolved observables. At the same time, the availability of experimental data at high (spatial and time) resolution offers a unique opportunity for the benchmarking and the improvement of those theoretical models used to describe complex molecular systems in their natural environment. The established synergy between theory and experiments can produce a better understanding of new ultrafast physical and chemical processes at atomistic scale resolution. Furthermore, reliable ab inito molecular dynamics simulations can already be successfully employed as predictive tools to guide new experiments as well as the design of novel and better performing materials. In this paper, I will give a concise account on the state of the art of molecular dynamics simulations of complex molecular systems in their excited states. The principal aim of this approach is the description of a given system of interest under the most realistic ambient conditions including all environmental effects that influence experiments, for instance, the interaction with the solvent and with external time-dependent electric fields, temperature, and pressure. To this end, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is among the most efficient and accurate methods for the representation of the electronic dynamics, while trajectory surface hopping gives a valuable representation of the nuclear quantum dynamics in the excited states (including nonadiabatic effects). Concerning the environment and its effects on the dynamics, the quantum mechanics

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in water/sugar solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerbret, A. [Department of Food Science, Cornell University, 101 Stocking Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Affouard, F. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 8024, Universite Lille I, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)], E-mail: frederic.affouard@univ-lille1.fr; Bordat, P. [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique et de Physico-Chimie Moleculaire, UMR 5624, Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, 64000 Pau (France); Hedoux, A.; Guinet, Y.; Descamps, M. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 8024, Universite Lille I, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2008-04-18

    Structural and dynamical properties of the solvent at the protein/solvent interface have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in trehalose, maltose and sucrose solutions. Results are discussed in the framework of the bioprotection phenomena. The analysis of the relative concentration of water oxygen atoms around lysozyme suggests that lysozyme is preferentially hydrated. When comparing the three sugars, trehalose is seen more excluded than maltose and sucrose. The preferential exclusion of sugars from the protein surface induces some differences in the behavior of trehalose and maltose, particularly at 50 and 60 wt% concentrations, that are not observed experimentally in binary sugar/mixtures. The dynamical slowing down of the solvent is suggested to mainly arise from the homogeneity of the water/sugar matrices controlled by the percolation of the sugar hydrogen bonds networks. Furthermore, lysozyme strongly increases relaxation times of solvent molecules at the protein/solvent interface.

  7. Agent-based computer simulations of language choice dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzibeganovic, Tarik; Stauffer, Dietrich; Schulze, Christian

    2009-06-01

    We use agent-based Monte Carlo simulations to address the problem of language choice dynamics in a tripartite community that is linguistically homogeneous but politically divided. We observe the process of nonlocal pattern formation that causes populations to self-organize into stable antagonistic groups as a result of the local dynamics of attraction and influence between individual computational agents. Our findings uncover some of the unique properties of opinion formation in social groups when the process is affected by asymmetric noise distribution, unstable intergroup boundaries, and different migratory behaviors. Although we focus on one particular study, the proposed stochastic dynamic models can be easily generalized and applied to investigate the evolution of other complex and nonlinear features of human collective behavior.

  8. Two-Speed Gearbox Dynamic Simulation Predictions and Test Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, David G.; DeSmidt, Hans; Smith, Edward C.; Bauman, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic simulations and experimental validation tests were performed on a two-stage, two-speed gearbox as part of the drive system research activities of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Rotary Wing Project. The gearbox was driven by two electromagnetic motors and had two electromagnetic, multi-disk clutches to control output speed. A dynamic model of the system was created which included a direct current electric motor with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) speed control, a two-speed gearbox with dual electromagnetically actuated clutches, and an eddy current dynamometer. A six degree-of-freedom model of the gearbox accounted for the system torsional dynamics and included gear, clutch, shaft, and load inertias as well as shaft flexibilities and a dry clutch stick-slip friction model. Experimental validation tests were performed on the gearbox in the NASA Glenn gear noise test facility. Gearbox output speed and torque as well as drive motor speed and current were compared to those from the analytical predictions. The experiments correlate very well with the predictions, thus validating the dynamic simulation methodologies.

  9. Detailed Multidimensional Simulations of the Structure and Dynamics of Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, G.; Kailasanath, K.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical simulations in which the various physical and chemical processes can be independently controlled can significantly advance our understanding of the structure, stability, dynamics and extinction of flames. Therefore, our approach has been to use detailed time-dependent, multidimensional, multispecies numerical models to perform carefully designed computational experiments of flames on Earth and in microgravity environments. Some of these computational experiments are complementary to physical experiments performed under the Microgravity Program while others provide a fundamental understanding that cannot be obtained from physical experiments alone. In this report, we provide a brief summary of our recent research highlighting the contributions since the previous microgravity combustion workshop. There are a number of mechanisms that can cause flame instabilities and result in the formation of dynamic multidimensional structures. In the past, we have used numerical simulations to show that it is the thermo-diffusive instability rather than an instability due to preferential diffusion that is the dominant mechanism for the formation of cellular flames in lean hydrogen-air mixtures. Other studies have explored the role of gravity on flame dynamics and extinguishment, multi-step kinetics and radiative losses on flame instabilities in rich hydrogen-air flames, and heat losses on burner-stabilized flames in microgravity. The recent emphasis of our work has been on exploring flame-vortex interactions and further investigating the structure and dynamics of lean hydrogen-air flames in microgravity. These topics are briefly discussed after a brief discussion of our computational approach for solving these problems.

  10. A Dynamical Training and Design Simulator for Active Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Dumont

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the design of an active multi-link micro-catheter actuated by Shape Memory Alloy (SMA micro actuators. This may be a response to one medical major demand on such devices, which will be useful for surgical explorations and interventions. In this paper, we focus on a training and design simulator dedicated to such catheters. This simulator is based on an original simulation platform (OpenMASK. The catheter is a robotic system, which is evaluated by a dynamical simulation addressing a navigation task in its environment. The design of the prototype and its mechanical model are presented. We develop an interaction model for contact. This model uses a real medical database for which distance cartography is proposed. Then we focus on an autonomous control model based on a multi-agent approach and including the behaviour description of the SMA actuators. Results of mechanical simulations including interaction with the ducts are presented. Furthermore, the interest of such a simulator is presented by applying virtual prototyping techniques for the design optimization. This optimization process is achieved by using genetic algorithms at different stages with respect to the specified task.

  11. A Dynamical Training and Design Simulator for Active Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Dumont

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the design of an active multi-link micro-catheter actuated by Shape Memory Alloy (SMA micro actuators. This may be a response to one medical major demand on such devices, which will be useful for surgical explorations and interventions. In this paper, we focus on a training and design simulator dedicated to such catheters. This simulator is based on an original simulation platform (OpenMASK. The catheter is a robotic system, which is evaluated by a dynamical simulation addressing a navigation task in its environment. The design of the prototype and its mechanical model are presented. We develop an interaction model for contact. This model uses a real medical database for which distance cartography is proposed. Then we focus on an autonomous control model based on a multi-agent approach and including the behaviour description of the SMA actuators. Results of mechanical simulations including interaction with the ducts are presented. Furthermore, the interest of such a simulator is presented by applying virtual prototyping techniques for the design optimization. This optimization process is achieved by using genetic algorithms at different stages with respect to the specified task.

  12. Vision-Augmented Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nanoindentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajab Al-Sayegh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a user-friendly vision-augmented technique to carry out atomic simulation using hand gestures. The system is novel in its concept as it enables the user to directly manipulate the atomic structures on the screen, in 3D space using hand gestures, allowing the exploration and visualisation of molecular interactions at different relative conformations. The hand gestures are used to pick and place atoms on the screen allowing thereby the ease of carrying out molecular dynamics simulation in a more efficient way. The end result is that users with limited expertise in developing molecular structures can now do so easily and intuitively by the use of body gestures to interact with the simulator to study the system in question. The proposed system was tested by simulating the crystal anisotropy of crystalline silicon during nanoindentation. A long-range (Screened bond order Tersoff potential energy function was used during the simulation which revealed the value of hardness and elastic modulus being similar to what has been found previously from the experiments. We anticipate that our proposed system will open up new horizons to the current methods on how an MD simulation is designed and executed.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of pervaporation in zeolite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, W.; Murad, S.

    The pervaporation separation of liquid mixtures of water/ethanol and water/methanol using three zeolite (Silicalite, NaA and Chabazite) membranes has been examined using the method of molecular dynamics. The main goal of this study was to identify intermolecular interactions between water, methanol, ethanol and the membrane surface that play a critical role in the separations. This would then allow better membranes to be designed more efficiently and systematically than the trial-and-error procedures often being used. Our simulations correctly exhibited all the qualitative experimental observations for these systems, including the hydrophobic or hydrophilic behaviour of zeolite membranes. The simulations showed that, for Silicalite zeolite, the separation is strongly influenced by the selective adsorption of ethanol. The separation factor, as a consequence, increases almost exponentially as the ethanol composition decreases. For ethanol dehydration in NaA and Chabazite, pore size was found to play a very important role in the separation; very high separation factors were therefore possible. Simulations were also used to investigate the effect of pore structure, feed compositions and operating conditions on the pervaporation efficiency. Finally, our simulations also demonstrated that molecular simulations could serve as a useful screening tool to determine the suitability of a membrane for potential pervaporation separation applications. Simulations can cost only a small fraction of an experiment, and can therefore be used to design experiments most likely to be successful.

  14. Hybrid molecular dynamics simulation for plasma induced damage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukuma, Masaaki

    2016-09-01

    In order to enable further device size reduction (also known as Moore's law) and improved power performance, the semiconductor industry is introducing new materials and device structures into the semiconductor fabrication process. Materials now include III-V compounds, germanium, cobalt, ruthenium, hafnium, and others. The device structure in both memory and logic has been evolving from planar to three dimensional (3D). One such device is the FinFET, where the transistor gate is a vertical fin made either of silicon, silicon-germanium or germanium. These changes have brought renewed interests in the structural damages caused by energetic ion bombardment of the fin sidewalls which are exposed to the ion flux from the plasma during the fin-strip off step. Better control of the physical damage of the 3D devices requires a better understanding of the damage formation mechanisms on such new materials and structures. In this study, the damage formation processes by ion bombardment have been simulated for Si and Ge substrate by Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) hybrid simulations and compared to the results from the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In our QM/MM simulations, the highly reactive region in which the structural damage is created is simulated with the Density Functional based Tight Binding (DFTB) method and the region remote from the primary region is simulated using classical MD with the Stillinger-Weber and Moliere potentials. The learn on the fly method is also used to reduce the computational load. Hence our QM/MM simulation is much faster than the full QC-MD simulations and the original QM/MM simulations. The amorphous layers profile simulated with QM/MM have obvious differences in their thickness for silicon and germanium substrate. The profile of damaged structure in the germanium substrate is characterized by a deeper tail then in silicon. These traits are also observed in the results from the mass selected ion beam

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of nucleic acids: successes, limitations, and promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, T E; Young, M A

    In the last five years we have witnessed a significant increase in the number publications describing accurate and reliable all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of nucleic acids. This increase has been facilitated by the development of fast and efficient methods for treating the long-range electrostatic interactions, the availability of faster parallel computers, and the development of well-validated empirical molecular mechanical force fields. With these technologies, it has been demonstrated that simulation is not only capable of consistently reproducing experimental observations of sequence specific fine structure of DNA, but also can give detailed insight into prevalent problems in nucleic acid structure, ion association and specific hydration of nucleic acids, polyadenine tract bending, and the subtle environmental dependence of the A-DNA-B-DNA duplex equilibrium. Despite the advances, there are still issues with the methods that need to be resolved through rigorous controlled testing. In general, these relate to deficiencies of the underlying molecular mechanical potentials or applied methods (such as the imposition of true periodicity in Ewald simulations and the need for energy conservation), and significant limits in effective conformational sampling. In this perspective, we provide an overview of our experiences, provide some cautionary notes, and provide recommendations for further study in molecular dynamics simulation of nucleic acids. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biopolymers (Nucleic Acid Sci) 56: 232-256, 2001

  16. Stochastic Simulation of Biomolecular Networks in Dynamic Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voliotis, Margaritis; Thomas, Philipp; Grima, Ramon; Bowsher, Clive G

    2016-06-01

    Simulation of biomolecular networks is now indispensable for studying biological systems, from small reaction networks to large ensembles of cells. Here we present a novel approach for stochastic simulation of networks embedded in the dynamic environment of the cell and its surroundings. We thus sample trajectories of the stochastic process described by the chemical master equation with time-varying propensities. A comparative analysis shows that existing approaches can either fail dramatically, or else can impose impractical computational burdens due to numerical integration of reaction propensities, especially when cell ensembles are studied. Here we introduce the Extrande method which, given a simulated time course of dynamic network inputs, provides a conditionally exact and several orders-of-magnitude faster simulation solution. The new approach makes it feasible to demonstrate-using decision-making by a large population of quorum sensing bacteria-that robustness to fluctuations from upstream signaling places strong constraints on the design of networks determining cell fate. Our approach has the potential to significantly advance both understanding of molecular systems biology and design of synthetic circuits.

  17. Stochastic Simulation of Biomolecular Networks in Dynamic Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaritis Voliotis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of biomolecular networks is now indispensable for studying biological systems, from small reaction networks to large ensembles of cells. Here we present a novel approach for stochastic simulation of networks embedded in the dynamic environment of the cell and its surroundings. We thus sample trajectories of the stochastic process described by the chemical master equation with time-varying propensities. A comparative analysis shows that existing approaches can either fail dramatically, or else can impose impractical computational burdens due to numerical integration of reaction propensities, especially when cell ensembles are studied. Here we introduce the Extrande method which, given a simulated time course of dynamic network inputs, provides a conditionally exact and several orders-of-magnitude faster simulation solution. The new approach makes it feasible to demonstrate-using decision-making by a large population of quorum sensing bacteria-that robustness to fluctuations from upstream signaling places strong constraints on the design of networks determining cell fate. Our approach has the potential to significantly advance both understanding of molecular systems biology and design of synthetic circuits.

  18. Cost and Precision of Brownian Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Barato, Andre C

    2016-01-01

    Brownian clocks are biomolecular networks that can count time. A paradigmatic example are proteins that go through a cycle thus regulating some oscillatory behaviour in a living system. Typically, such a cycle requires free energy often provided by ATP hydrolysis. We investigate the relation between the precision of such a clock and its thermodynamic costs. For clocks driven by a constant thermodynamic force, a given precision requires a minimal cost that diverges as the uncertainty of the clock vanishes. In marked contrast, we show that a clock driven by a periodic variation of an external protocol can achieve arbitrary precision at arbitrarily low cost. This result constitutes a fundamental difference between processes driven by a fixed thermodynamic force and those driven periodically. As a main technical tool, we map a periodically driven system with a deterministic protocol to one subject to an external protocol that changes in stochastic time intervals, which simplifies calculations significantly. In th...

  19. Simulation of Tailrace Hydrodynamics Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2001-05-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools to investigate hydrodynamic flow fields surrounding the tailrace zone below large hydraulic structures. Previous and ongoing studies using CFD tools to simulate gradually varied flow with multiple constituents and forebay/intake hydrodynamics have shown that CFD tools can provide valuable information for hydraulic and biological evaluation of fish passage near hydraulic structures. These studies however are incapable of simulating the rapidly varying flow fields that involving breakup of the free-surface, such as those through and below high flow outfalls and spillways. Although the use of CFD tools for these types of flow are still an active area of research, initial applications discussed in this report show that these tools are capable of simulating the primary features of these highly transient flow fields.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Building Energy Performance Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Tryggvason, T.

    1998-01-01

    An interconnection between a building energy performance simulation program and a Computational Fluid Dynamics program (CFD) for room air distribution will be introduced for improvement of the predictions of both the energy consumption and the indoor environment. The building energy performance...... simulation program requires a detailed description of the energy flow in the air movement which can be obtained by a CFD program. The paper describes an energy consumption calculation in a large building, where the building energy simulation program is modified by CFD predictions of the flow between three...... zones connected by open areas with pressure and buoyancy driven air flow. The two programs are interconnected in an iterative procedure. The paper shows also an evaluation of the air quality in the main area of the buildings based on CFD predictions. It is shown that an interconnection between a CFD...

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of gold cluster growth during sputter deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, J. W., E-mail: abraham@theo-physik.uni-kiel.de; Bonitz, M., E-mail: bonitz@theo-physik.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Leibnizstraße 15, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Strunskus, T.; Faupel, F. [Institut für Materialwissenschaft, Lehrstuhl für Materialverbunde, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kaiserstraße 2, D-24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-05-14

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation scheme that we apply to study the time evolution of the self-organized growth process of metal cluster assemblies formed by sputter-deposited gold atoms on a planar surface. The simulation model incorporates the characteristics of the plasma-assisted deposition process and allows for an investigation over a wide range of deposition parameters. It is used to obtain data for the cluster properties which can directly be compared with recently published experimental data for gold on polystyrene [M. Schwartzkopf et al., ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 7, 13547 (2015)]. While good agreement is found between the two, the simulations additionally provide valuable time-dependent real-space data of the surface morphology, some of whose details are hidden in the reciprocal-space scattering images that were used for the experimental analysis.

  2. Dispersion analysis techniques within the space vehicle dynamics simulation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, L. S.; Kuhn, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    The Space Vehicle Dynamics Simulation (SVDS) program was evaluated as a dispersion analysis tool. The Linear Error Analysis (LEA) post processor was examined in detail and simulation techniques relative to conducting a dispersion analysis using the SVDS were considered. The LEA processor is a tool for correlating trajectory dispersion data developed by simulating 3 sigma uncertainties as single error source cases. The processor combines trajectory and performance deviations by a root-sum-square (RSS process) and develops a covariance matrix for the deviations. Results are used in dispersion analyses for the baseline reference and orbiter flight test missions. As a part of this study, LEA results were verified as follows: (A) Hand calculating the RSS data and the elements of the covariance matrix for comparison with the LEA processor computed data. (B) Comparing results with previous error analyses. The LEA comparisons and verification are made at main engine cutoff (MECO).

  3. A hybrid algorithm for parallel molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiardi, Chris M.; Meyer, R.

    2017-10-01

    This article describes algorithms for the hybrid parallelization and SIMD vectorization of molecular dynamics simulations with short-range forces. The parallelization method combines domain decomposition with a thread-based parallelization approach. The goal of the work is to enable efficient simulations of very large (tens of millions of atoms) and inhomogeneous systems on many-core processors with hundreds or thousands of cores and SIMD units with large vector sizes. In order to test the efficiency of the method, simulations of a variety of configurations with up to 74 million atoms have been performed. Results are shown that were obtained on multi-core systems with Sandy Bridge and Haswell processors as well as systems with Xeon Phi many-core processors.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations on the ionic current through charged nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, J. M.; Zou, X. Q.; Xie, Y. B.; Wang, Y. G.

    2009-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed to investigate the ionic current through charged nanopores, and the results were compared with the calculation of Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations based on the continuum theory. Results show that the current obtained by MD simulation is lower than the current calculated by PNP equations, and the discrepancy depends on the surface charge density of the nanopores. Also, MD simulation shows that the contribution of the electro-osmotic flow effect on ionic current could be 10% higher than the results obtained by solving PNP equations. Since the PNP equations do not take the effect of the pore wall into consideration, we suggest that adjusting the diffusion coefficient in the PNP equations can obtain more accurate results when calculating the ionic current through charged nanopores.

  5. Bose polaron as an instance of quantum Brownian motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniello Lampo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the dynamics of a quantum impurity immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate as an open quantum system in the framework of the quantum Brownian motion model. We derive a generalized Langevin equation for the position of the impurity. The Langevin equation is an integrodifferential equation that contains a memory kernel and is driven by a colored noise. These result from considering the environment as given by the degrees of freedom of the quantum gas, and thus depend on its parameters, e.g. interaction strength between the bosons, temperature, etc. We study the role of the memory on the dynamics of the impurity. When the impurity is untrapped, we find that it exhibits a super-diffusive behavior at long times. We find that back-flow in energy between the environment and the impurity occurs during evolution. When the particle is trapped, we calculate the variance of the position and momentum to determine how they compare with the Heisenberg limit. One important result of this paper is that we find position squeezing for the trapped impurity at long times. We determine the regime of validity of our model and the parameters in which these effects can be observed in realistic experiments.

  6. Relation between cooperative molecular motors and active Brownian particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touya, Clément; Schwalger, Tilo; Lindner, Benjamin

    2011-05-01

    Active Brownian particles (ABPs), obeying a nonlinear Langevin equation with speed-dependent drift and noise amplitude, are well-known models used to describe self-propelled motion in biology. In this paper we study a model describing the stochastic dynamics of a group of coupled molecular motors (CMMs). Using two independent numerical methods, one based on the stationary velocity distribution of the motors and the other one on the local increments (also known as the Kramers-Moyal coefficients) of the velocity, we establish a connection between the CMM and the ABP models. The parameters extracted for the ABP via the two methods show good agreement for both symmetric and asymmetric cases and are independent of N, the number of motors, provided that N is not too small. This indicates that one can indeed describe the CMM problem with a simpler ABP model. However, the power spectrum of velocity fluctuations in the CMM model reveals a peak at a finite frequency, a peak which is absent in the velocity spectrum of the ABP model. This implies richer dynamic features of the CMM model which cannot be captured by an ABP model.

  7. cellGPU: Massively parallel simulations of dynamic vertex models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Daniel M.

    2017-10-01

    Vertex models represent confluent tissue by polygonal or polyhedral tilings of space, with the individual cells interacting via force laws that depend on both the geometry of the cells and the topology of the tessellation. This dependence on the connectivity of the cellular network introduces several complications to performing molecular-dynamics-like simulations of vertex models, and in particular makes parallelizing the simulations difficult. cellGPU addresses this difficulty and lays the foundation for massively parallelized, GPU-based simulations of these models. This article discusses its implementation for a pair of two-dimensional models, and compares the typical performance that can be expected between running cellGPU entirely on the CPU versus its performance when running on a range of commercial and server-grade graphics cards. By implementing the calculation of topological changes and forces on cells in a highly parallelizable fashion, cellGPU enables researchers to simulate time- and length-scales previously inaccessible via existing single-threaded CPU implementations. Program Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/6j2cj29t3r.1 Licensing provisions: MIT Programming language: CUDA/C++ Nature of problem: Simulations of off-lattice "vertex models" of cells, in which the interaction forces depend on both the geometry and the topology of the cellular aggregate. Solution method: Highly parallelized GPU-accelerated dynamical simulations in which the force calculations and the topological features can be handled on either the CPU or GPU. Additional comments: The code is hosted at https://gitlab.com/dmsussman/cellGPU, with documentation additionally maintained at http://dmsussman.gitlab.io/cellGPUdocumentation

  8. Equilibration of experimentally determined protein structures for molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Emily B; Vanvliet, Krystyn J

    2006-12-01

    Preceding molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecular interactions, the molecule of interest is often equilibrated with respect to an initial configuration. This so-called equilibration stage is required because the input structure is typically not within the equilibrium phase space of the simulation conditions, particularly in systems as complex as proteins, which can lead to artifactual trajectories of protein dynamics. The time at which nonequilibrium effects from the initial configuration are minimized-what we will call the equilibration time-marks the beginning of equilibrium phase-space exploration. Note that the identification of this time does not imply exploration of the entire equilibrium phase space. We have found that current equilibration methodologies contain ambiguities that lead to uncertainty in determining the end of the equilibration stage of the trajectory. This results in equilibration times that are either too long, resulting in wasted computational resources, or too short, resulting in the simulation of molecular trajectories that do not accurately represent the physical system. We outline and demonstrate a protocol for identifying the equilibration time that is based on the physical model of Normal Mode Analysis. We attain the computational efficiency required of large-protein simulations via a stretched exponential approximation that enables an analytically tractable and physically meaningful form of the root-mean-square deviation of atoms comprising the protein. We find that the fitting parameters (which correspond to physical properties of the protein) fluctuate initially but then stabilize for increased simulation time, independently of the simulation duration or sampling frequency. We define the end of the equilibration stage--and thus the equilibration time--as the point in the simulation when these parameters attain constant values. Compared to existing methods, our approach provides the objective identification of the time at

  9. Dynamic Simulation in the Processing Industries: Case Studies from Mobil Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.W. Womack

    1985-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of Mobil's recent use of dynamic simulation. It provides examples of applications to capital projects, to operator training, and to existing facilities. Techniques and methodology of dynamic simulation are considered. Desirable future developments for dynamic simulation software are discussed.

  10. Ice formation on kaolinite: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosso, Gabriele C.; Tribello, Gareth A.; Zen, Andrea; Pedevilla, Philipp; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-12-01

    The formation of ice affects many aspects of our everyday life as well as important technologies such as cryotherapy and cryopreservation. Foreign substances almost always aid water freezing through heterogeneous ice nucleation, but the molecular details of this process remain largely unknown. In fact, insight into the microscopic mechanism of ice formation on different substrates is difficult to obtain even if state-of-the-art experimental techniques are used. At the same time, atomistic simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation frequently face extraordinary challenges due to the complexity of the water-substrate interaction and the long time scales that characterize nucleation events. Here, we have investigated several aspects of molecular dynamics simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation considering as a prototypical ice nucleating material the clay mineral kaolinite, which is of relevance in atmospheric science. We show via seeded molecular dynamics simulations that ice nucleation on the hydroxylated (001) face of kaolinite proceeds exclusively via the formation of the hexagonal ice polytype. The critical nucleus size is two times smaller than that obtained for homogeneous nucleation at the same supercooling. Previous findings suggested that the flexibility of the kaolinite surface can alter the time scale for ice nucleation within molecular dynamics simulations. However, we here demonstrate that equally flexible (or non flexible) kaolinite surfaces can lead to very different outcomes in terms of ice formation, according to whether or not the surface relaxation of the clay is taken into account. We show that very small structural changes upon relaxation dramatically alter the ability of kaolinite to provide a template for the formation of a hexagonal overlayer of water molecules at the water-kaolinite interface, and that this relaxation therefore determines the nucleation ability of this mineral.

  11. Simulation of in vivo dynamics during robot assisted joint movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrowitsch, Evgenij; Lorenz, Andrea; Wülker, Nikolaus; Walter, Christian

    2014-12-16

    Robots are very useful tools in orthopedic research. They can provide force/torque controlled specimen motion with high repeatability and precision. A method to analyze dissipative energy outcome in an entire joint was developed in our group. In a previous study, a sheep knee was flexed while axial load remained constant during the measurement of dissipated energy. We intend to apply this method for the investigation of osteoarthritis. Additionally, the method should be improved by simulation of in vivo knee dynamics. Thus, a new biomechanical testing tool will be developed for analyzing in vitro joint properties after different treatments. Discretization of passive knee flexion was used to construct a complex flexion movement by a robot and simulate altering axial load similar to in vivo sheep knee dynamics described in a previous experimental study. The robot applied an in vivo like axial force profile with high reproducibility during the corresponding knee flexion (total standard deviation of 0.025 body weight (BW)). A total residual error between the in vivo and simulated axial force was 0.16 BW. Posterior-anterior and medio-lateral forces were detected by the robot as a backlash of joint structures. Their curve forms were similar to curve forms of corresponding in vivo measured forces, but in contrast to the axial force, they showed higher total standard deviation of 0.118 and 0.203 BW and higher total residual error of 0.79 and 0.21 BW for posterior-anterior and medio-lateral forces respectively. We developed and evaluated an algorithm for the robotic simulation of complex in vivo joint dynamics using a joint specimen. This should be a new biomechanical testing tool for analyzing joint properties after different treatments.

  12. Machine learning molecular dynamics for the simulation of infrared spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastegger, Michael; Behler, Jörg; Marquetand, Philipp

    2017-10-01

    Machine learning has emerged as an invaluable tool in many research areas. In the present work, we harness this power to predict highly accurate molecular infrared spectra with unprecedented computational efficiency. To account for vibrational anharmonic and dynamical effects - typically neglected by conventional quantum chemistry approaches - we base our machine learning strategy on ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. While these simulations are usually extremely time consuming even for small molecules, we overcome these limitations by leveraging the power of a variety of machine learning techniques, not only accelerating simulations by several orders of magnitude, but also greatly extending the size of systems that can be treated. To this end, we develop a molecular dipole moment model based on environment dependent neural network charges and combine it with the neural network potential approach of Behler and Parrinello. Contrary to the prevalent big data philosophy, we are able to obtain very accurate machine learning models for the prediction of infrared spectra based on only a few hundreds of electronic structure reference points. This is made possible through the use of molecular forces during neural network potential training and the introduction of a fully automated sampling scheme. We demonstrate the power of our machine learning approach by applying it to model the infrared spectra of a methanol molecule, n -alkanes containing up to 200 atoms and the protonated alanine tripeptide, which at the same time represents the first application of machine learning techniques to simulate the dynamics of a peptide. In all of these case studies we find an excellent agreement between the infrared spectra predicted via machine learning models and the respective theoretical and experimental spectra.

  13. Parachute-Payload System Flight Dynamics and Trajectory Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Guglieri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The work traces a general procedure for the design of a flight simulation tool still representative of the major flight physics of a parachute-payload system along decelerated trajectories. An example of limited complexity simulation models for a payload decelerated by one or more parachutes is given, including details and implementation features usually omitted as the focus of the research in this field is typically on the investigation of mission design issues, rather than addressing general implementation guidelines for the development of a reconfigurable simulation tool. The dynamics of the system are modeled through a simple multibody model that represents the expected behavior of an entry vehicle during the terminal deceleration phase. The simulators are designed according to a comprehensive vision that enforces the simplification of the coupling mechanism between the payload and the parachute, with an adequate level of physical insight still available. The results presented for a realistic case study define the sensitivity of the simulation outputs to the functional complexity of the mathematical model. Far from being an absolute address for the software designer, this paper tries to contribute to the area of interest with some technical considerations and clarifications.

  14. Towards realistic molecular dynamics simulations of grain boundary mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, J., E-mail: zhou@imm.rwth-aachen.de [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule (RWTH), Aachen (Germany); Mohles, V. [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule (RWTH), Aachen (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    In order to investigate grain boundary migration by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations a new approach involving a crystal orientation-dependent driving force has been developed by imposing an appropriate driving force on grain boundary atoms and enlarging the effective range of driving force. The new approach has been validated by the work of the driving force associated with the motion of grain boundaries. With the new approach the relation between boundary migration velocity and driving force is found to be nonlinear, as was expected from rate theory for large driving forces applied in MD simulations. By evaluating grain boundary mobility nonlinearly for a set of symmetrical <1 1 1> tilt boundaries in aluminum at high temperature, high-angle grain boundaries were shown to move much faster than low-angle grain boundaries. This agrees well with experimental findings for recrystallization and grain growth. In comparison with the available data the simulated mobility of a 38.21{sup o{Sigma}}7 boundary was found to be significantly lower than other MD simulation results and comparable with the experimental values. Furthermore, the average volume involved during atomic jumps for boundary migration is determined in MD simulations for the first time. The large magnitude of the volume indicates that grain boundary migration is accomplished by the correlated motion of atom groups.

  15. Dissociation dynamics of ethylene molecules on a Ni cluster using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, K.; Shibuta, Y.; Ohmura, S.; Arifin, R.; Shimojo, F.

    2016-04-01

    The atomistic mechanism of dissociative adsorption of ethylene molecules on a Ni cluster is investigated by ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations. The activation free energy to dehydrogenate an ethylene molecule on the Ni cluster and the corresponding reaction rate is estimated. A remarkable finding is that the adsorption energy of ethylene molecules on the Ni cluster is considerably larger than the activation free energy, which explains why the actual reaction rate is faster than the value estimated based on only the activation free energy. It is also found from the dynamic simulations that hydrogen molecules and an ethane molecule are formed from the dissociated hydrogen atoms, whereas some exist as single atoms on the surface or in the interior of the Ni cluster. On the other hand, the dissociation of the C-C bonds of ethylene molecules is not observed. On the basis of these simulation results, the nature of the initial stage of carbon nanotube growth is discussed.

  16. Aggregation in colloidal suspensions: evaluation of the role of hydrodynamic interactions by means of numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomilov, A; Videcoq, A; Cerbelaud, M; Piechowiak, M A; Chartier, T; Ala-Nissila, T; Bochicchio, D; Ferrando, R

    2013-11-21

    Numerical simulations constitute a precious tool for understanding the role of key parameters influencing the colloidal arrangement in suspensions, which is crucial for many applications. The present paper investigates numerically the role of hydrodynamic interactions on the aggregation processes in colloidal suspensions. Three simulation techniques are used: Brownian dynamics without hydrodynamic interactions, Brownian dynamics including some of the hydrodynamic interactions, using the Yamakawa-Rotne-Prager tensor, and stochastic rotation dynamics coupled with molecular dynamics. A system of monodisperse colloids strongly interacting through a generalized Lennard-Jones potential is studied for a colloid volume fraction ranging from 2.5 to 20%. Interestingly, effects of the hydrodynamic interactions are shown in the details of the aggregation processes. It is observed that the hydrodynamic interactions slow down the aggregation kinetics in the initial nucleation stage, while they speed up the next cluster coalescence stage. It is shown that the latter is due to an enhanced cluster diffusion in the simulations including hydrodynamic interactions. The higher the colloid volume fraction, the more pronounced the effects on the aggregation kinetics. It is also observed that hydrodynamic interactions slow down the reorganization kinetics. It turns out that the Brownian dynamics technique using the Yamakawa-Rotne-Prager tensor tends to overestimate the effects on cluster diffusion and cluster reorganization, even if it can be a method of choice for very dilute suspensions.

  17. Analyzing, Modeling, and Simulation for Human Dynamics in Social Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the human behavior in the top-one social network system in China (Sina Microblog system. By analyzing real-life data at a large scale, we find that the message releasing interval (intermessage time obeys power law distribution both at individual level and at group level. Statistical analysis also reveals that human behavior in social network is mainly driven by four basic elements: social pressure, social identity, social participation, and social relation between individuals. Empirical results present the four elements' impact on the human behavior and the relation between these elements. To further understand the mechanism of such dynamic phenomena, a hybrid human dynamic model which combines “interest” of individual and “interaction” among people is introduced, incorporating the four elements simultaneously. To provide a solid evaluation, we simulate both two-agent and multiagent interactions with real-life social network topology. We achieve the consistent results between empirical studies and the simulations. The model can provide a good understanding of human dynamics in social network.

  18. Pattern Recognition for a Flight Dynamics Monte Carlo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Carolina; Hurtado, John E.

    2011-01-01

    The design, analysis, and verification and validation of a spacecraft relies heavily on Monte Carlo simulations. Modern computational techniques are able to generate large amounts of Monte Carlo data but flight dynamics engineers lack the time and resources to analyze it all. The growing amounts of data combined with the diminished available time of engineers motivates the need to automate the analysis process. Pattern recognition algorithms are an innovative way of analyzing flight dynamics data efficiently. They can search large data sets for specific patterns and highlight critical variables so analysts can focus their analysis efforts. This work combines a few tractable pattern recognition algorithms with basic flight dynamics concepts to build a practical analysis tool for Monte Carlo simulations. Current results show that this tool can quickly and automatically identify individual design parameters, and most importantly, specific combinations of parameters that should be avoided in order to prevent specific system failures. The current version uses a kernel density estimation algorithm and a sequential feature selection algorithm combined with a k-nearest neighbor classifier to find and rank important design parameters. This provides an increased level of confidence in the analysis and saves a significant amount of time.

  19. Computer simulation of methanol exchange dynamics around cations and anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Santanu; Dang, Liem X.

    2016-03-03

    In this paper, we present the first computer simulation of methanol exchange dynamics between the first and second solvation shells around different cations and anions. After water, methanol is the most frequently used solvent for ions. Methanol has different structural and dynamical properties than water, so its ion solvation process is different. To this end, we performed molecular dynamics simulations using polarizable potential models to describe methanol-methanol and ion-methanol interactions. In particular, we computed methanol exchange rates by employing the transition state theory, the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, the reactive flux approach, and the Grote-Hynes theory. We observed that methanol exchange occurs at a nanosecond time scale for Na+ and at a picosecond time scale for other ions. We also observed a trend in which, for like charges, the exchange rate is slower for smaller ions because they are more strongly bound to methanol. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of solutions at constant chemical potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, C; Salvalaglio, M; Parrinello, M

    2015-04-14

    Molecular dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, which range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, which influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a grand-canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work, we propose the Constant Chemical Potential Molecular Dynamics (CμMD) method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the CμMD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystallization in aqueous solution. As a result, we have been able to study crystal growth dynamics under constant supersaturation conditions and to extract growth rates and free-energy barriers.

  1. Huge-scale molecular dynamics simulation of multibubble nuclei

    KAUST Repository

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    We have developed molecular dynamics codes for a short-range interaction potential that adopt both the flat-MPI and MPI/OpenMP hybrid parallelizations on the basis of a full domain decomposition strategy. Benchmark simulations involving up to 38.4 billion Lennard-Jones particles were performed on Fujitsu PRIMEHPC FX10, consisting of 4800 SPARC64 IXfx 1.848 GHz processors, at the Information Technology Center of the University of Tokyo, and a performance of 193 teraflops was achieved, which corresponds to a 17.0% execution efficiency. Cavitation processes were also simulated on PRIMEHPC FX10 and SGI Altix ICE 8400EX at the Institute of Solid State Physics of the University of Tokyo, which involved 1.45 billion and 22.9 million particles, respectively. Ostwald-like ripening was observed after the multibubble nuclei. Our results demonstrate that direct simulations of multiscale phenomena involving phase transitions from the atomic scale are possible and that the molecular dynamics method is a promising method that can be applied to petascale computers. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamics Simulation of Human Gait Model With Predictive Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinming; Wu, Shaoli; Voglewede, Philip A

    2017-12-13

    In this article, it is proposed the central nervous system controls human gait using a predictive control approach in conjunction with classical feedback control instead of exclusive classical feedback control theory that controls based on past error. To validate this proposition, a dynamic model of human gait is developed using a novel predictive approach to investigate the principles of the central nervous system (CNS). The model developed includes two parts: a plant model that represents the dynamics of human gait and a controller that represents the CNS. The plant model is a seven-segment, six-joint model that has nine degrees of freedom. The plant model is validated using data collected from able-bodied human subjects. The proposed controller utilizes Model Predictive Control (MPC). MPC uses an internal model to predict the output in advance, compare the predicted output to the reference and optimize the control input so that the predicted error is minimal. To decrease the complexity of the model, two joints are controlled using a PD controller. The developed predictive human gait model is validated by simulating able-bodied human gait. The simulation results show that the developed model is able to simulate the kinematic output close to experimental data.

  3. Simulating the dynamics of lipid droplets in adipocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, Federico; Rizzatti, Vanni; Zamboni, Mauro; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Lipid droplets are cellular organelles that regulate the storage and hydrolysis of neutral lipids. The dynamic of lipid droplets (LDs), during the differentiation process from fibroblast-like cells into adipocyte, is strictly related to the lipid storage in cells. The number and size of the LDs depends on the lipidic or lipolytic stimulations to which the cells are exposed. Here, we propose a computational approach to study the processes regulating the LDs' number and growth/reduction in size using Monte Carlo simulations. The number and size of LDs are measured before and after experimental treatment in 3T3-L1 cell cultures. The algorithms simulating the evolution from basal to differentiate (lipidic or lipolytic) conditions are here detailed step by step. The algorithms can mimic thousand interacting events between LDs or squeezing/enlargement events of a single LD in a very brief computational time, from seconds up to few minutes. The main processes regulating the interactions between LDs are here presented, and for each of them, all the needed information to re-write the computational routine are provided. More specifically, the results obtained, analyzing the fusion process between LDs, are here presented. Here, we would like to supply the basis to explore the dynamics of lipid storage in cells with a computational approach and to encourage the applications of numerical simulation to cell studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Energy conservation in molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxvaerd, Søren; Heilmann, Ole J; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2012-06-14

    Classical Newtonian dynamics is analytic and the energy of an isolated system is conserved. The energy of such a system, obtained by the discrete "Verlet" algorithm commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations, fluctuates but is conserved in the mean. This is explained by the existence of a "shadow Hamiltonian" H [S. Toxvaerd, Phys. Rev. E 50, 2271 (1994)], i.e., a Hamiltonian close to the original H with the property that the discrete positions of the Verlet algorithm for H lie on the analytic trajectories of H. The shadow Hamiltonian can be obtained from H by an asymptotic expansion in the time step length. Here we use the first non-trivial term in this expansion to obtain an improved estimate of the discrete values of the energy. The investigation is performed for a representative system with Lennard-Jones pair interactions. The simulations show that inclusion of this term reduces the standard deviation of the energy fluctuations by a factor of 100 for typical values of the time step length. Simulations further show that the energy is conserved for at least one hundred million time steps provided the potential and its first four derivatives are continuous at the cutoff. Finally, we show analytically as well as numerically that energy conservation is not sensitive to round-off errors.

  5. Parareal in Time for Dynamic Simulations of Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurrala, Gurunath [ORNL; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D [ORNL; Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there have been significant developments in parallel algorithms and high performance parallel computing platforms. Parareal in time algorithm has become popular for long transient simulations (e.g., molecular dynamics, fusion, reacting flows). Parareal is a parallel algorithm which divides the time interval into sub-intervals and solves them concurrently. This paper investigates the applicability of the parareal algorithm to power system dynamic simulations. Preliminary results on the application of parareal for multi-machine power systems are reported in this paper. Two widely used test systems, WECC 3-generator 9-bus system, New England 10-generator 39- bus system, is used to explore the effectiveness of the parareal. Severe 3 phase bus faults are simulated using both the classical and detailed models of multi-machine power systems. Actual Speedup of 5-7 times is observed assuming ideal parallelization. It has been observed that the speedup factors of the order of 20 can be achieved by using fast coarse approximations of power system models. Dependency of parareal convergence on fault duration and location has been observed.

  6. Trypsinogen activation as observed in accelerated molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boechi, Leonardo; Pierce, Levi; Komives, Elizabeth A; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Serine proteases are involved in many fundamental physiological processes, and control of their activity mainly results from the fact that they are synthetized in an inactive form that becomes active upon cleavage. Three decades ago Martin Karplus's group performed the first molecular dynamics simulations of trypsin, the most studied member of the serine protease family, to address the transition from the zymogen to its active form. Based on the computational power available at the time, only high frequency fluctuations, but not the transition steps, could be observed. By performing accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations, an interesting approach that increases the configurational sampling of atomistic simulations, we were able to observe the N-terminal tail insertion, a crucial step of the transition mechanism. Our results also support the hypothesis that the hydrophobic effect is the main force guiding the insertion step, although substantial enthalpic contributions are important in the activation mechanism. As the N-terminal tail insertion is a conserved step in the activation of serine proteases, these results afford new perspective on the underlying thermodynamics of the transition from the zymogen to the active enzyme. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  7. Fractional Brownian motion, the Matérn process, and stochastic modeling of turbulent dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Jonathan M.; Sykulski, Adam M.; Early, Jeffrey J.; Olhede, Sofia C.

    2017-08-01

    Stochastic processes exhibiting power-law slopes in the frequency domain are frequently well modeled by fractional Brownian motion (fBm), with the spectral slope at high frequencies being associated with the degree of small-scale roughness or fractal dimension. However, a broad class of real-world signals have a high-frequency slope, like fBm, but a plateau in the vicinity of zero frequency. This low-frequency plateau, it is shown, implies that the temporal integral of the process exhibits diffusive behavior, dispersing from its initial location at a constant rate. Such processes are not well modeled by fBm, which has a singularity at zero frequency corresponding to an unbounded rate of dispersion. A more appropriate stochastic model is a much lesser-known random process called the Matérn process, which is shown herein to be a damped version of fractional Brownian motion. This article first provides a thorough introduction to fractional Brownian motion, then examines the details of the Matérn process and its relationship to fBm. An algorithm for the simulation of the Matérn process in O(NlogN) operations is given. Unlike fBm, the Matérn process is found to provide an excellent match to modeling velocities from particle trajectories in an application to two-dimensional fluid turbulence.

  8. Directed transport of Brownian particles in a changing temperature field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillo, A [DMFCI, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Catania. Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Jinha, A [HPL-Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Federico, S [HPL-Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Ait-Haddou, R [HPL-Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Herzog, W [HPL-Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Giaquinta, G [DMFCI, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Catania. Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy)

    2008-01-11

    We study the interaction of Brownian particles with a changing temperature field in the presence of a one-dimensional periodic adiabatic potential. We show the existence of directed transport through the determination of the overall current of Brownian particles crossing the boundary of the system. With respect to the case of Brownian particles in a thermal bath, we determine a current which exhibits a contribution explicitly related to the presence of a thermal gradient. Beyond the self-consistent calculation of the temperature and probability density distribution of Brownian particles, we evaluate the energy consumption for directed transport to take place. Our description is based on Streater's model, and solutions are obtained by perturbing the system from its initial thermodynamic equilibrium state.

  9. Random times and enlargements of filtrations in a Brownian setting

    CERN Document Server

    Mansuy, Roger

    2006-01-01

    In November 2004, M. Yor and R. Mansuy jointly gave six lectures at Columbia University, New York. These notes follow the contents of that course, covering expansion of filtration formulae; BDG inequalities up to any random time; martingales that vanish on the zero set of Brownian motion; the Azéma-Emery martingales and chaos representation; the filtration of truncated Brownian motion; attempts to characterize the Brownian filtration. The book accordingly sets out to acquaint its readers with the theory and main examples of enlargements of filtrations, of either the initial or the progressive kind. It is accessible to researchers and graduate students working in stochastic calculus and excursion theory, and more broadly to mathematicians acquainted with the basics of Brownian motion.

  10. Reflected Backward Stochastic Differential Equations Driven by Countable Brownian Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengju Duan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a new class of reflected backward stochastic differential equations driven by countable Brownian motions. The existence and uniqueness of the RBSDEs are obtained via Snell envelope and fixed point theorem.

  11. Large-eddy simulations with a dynamic explicit vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrer, G.; Maurer, K.; Chatziefstratiou, E.; Medvigy, D.

    2014-12-01

    We coupled the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS)-based Forest Large-Eddy Simulation (RAFLES) and a modified version of the Ecosystem Demography model version 2 (ED2) to form a dynamic, high resolution, physiologically driven large eddy simulation. RAFLES represents both drag and volume restriction by the canopy over an explicit 3-D domain. We conducted a sensitivity analysis of uplift and circulation patterns at the front and back of a rectangular barrier to the representation of the canopy volume. We then used this model to perform a virtual experiment using combinations of realistic heterogeneous canopies and virtual homogenous canopies combined with heterogeneous and homogenous patterns of soil moisture to test the effects of the spatial scaling of soil moisture on the fluxes of momentum, heat, and water in heterogeneous environments at the tree-crown scale. Further simulations were performed to test the combined effects of canopy structure, soil moisture heterogeneity, and soil water availability. We found flux dynamics of momentum, heat, and water to be significantly influenced by canopy structure, soil moisture heterogeneity, and soil water availability. During non-plant-limiting soil-water conditions, we found canopy structure to be the primary driver of tree-crown scale fluxes of momentum, heat, and water, specifically through modification of the ejection sweep dynamics. However, as soil water conditions became limiting for latent heat flux from plants, tree-crown scale fluxes of momentum and heat became influenced by the spatial pattern of soil moisture, whereas soil moisture became a significant driver of tree-crown scale fluxes of water along with canopy structure.

  12. Estimation of the global regularity of a multifractional Brownian motion

    OpenAIRE

    Lebovits, Joachim; Podolskij, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new estimator of the global regularity index of a multifractional Brownian motion. Our estimation method is based upon a ratio statistic, which compares the realized global quadratic variation of a multifractional Brownian motion at two different frequencies. We show that a logarithmic transformation of this statistic converges in probability to the minimum of the Hurst functional parameter, which is, under weak assumptions, identical to the global regularity index of th...

  13. Dynamic Simulation and Optimization of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul I. Barton; Mujid S. Kaximi; Georgios Bollas; Patricio Ramirez Munoz

    2009-07-31

    This project is part of a research effort to design a hydrogen plant and its interface with a nuclear reactor. This project developed a dynamic modeling, simulation and optimization environment for nuclear hydrogen production systems. A hybrid discrete/continuous model captures both the continuous dynamics of the nuclear plant, the hydrogen plant, and their interface, along with discrete events such as major upsets. This hybrid model makes us of accurate thermodynamic sub-models for the description of phase and reaction equilibria in the thermochemical reactor. Use of the detailed thermodynamic models will allow researchers to examine the process in detail and have confidence in the accurary of the property package they use.

  14. Accurate direct Eulerian simulation of dynamic elastic-plastic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamm, James R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Walter, John W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The simulation of dynamic, large strain deformation is an important, difficult, and unsolved computational challenge. Existing Eulerian schemes for dynamic material response are plagued by unresolved issues. We present a new scheme for the first-order system of elasto-plasticity equations in the Eulerian frame. This system has an intrinsic constraint on the inverse deformation gradient. Standard Godunov schemes do not satisfy this constraint. The method of Flux Distributions (FD) was devised to discretely enforce such constraints for numerical schemes with cell-centered variables. We describe a Flux Distribution approach that enforces the inverse deformation gradient constraint. As this approach is new and novel, we do not yet have numerical results to validate our claims. This paper is the first installment of our program to develop this new method.

  15. ALADYN - a spatially explicit, allelic model for simulating adaptive dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffers, Katja H; Travis, Justin Mj

    2014-12-01

    ALADYN is a freely available cross-platform C++ modeling framework for stochastic simulation of joint allelic and demographic dynamics of spatially-structured populations. Juvenile survival is linked to the degree of match between an individual's phenotype and the local phenotypic optimum. There is considerable flexibility provided for the demography of the considered species and the genetic architecture of the traits under selection. ALADYN facilitates the investigation of adaptive processes to spatially and/or temporally changing conditions and the resulting niche and range dynamics. To our knowledge ALADYN is so far the only model that allows a continuous resolution of individuals' locations in a spatially explicit landscape together with the associated patterns of selection.

  16. Beam dynamics simulation of a double pass proton linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kilean; Qiang, Ji

    2017-04-01

    A recirculating superconducting linear accelerator with the advantage of both straight and circular accelerator has been demonstrated with relativistic electron beams. The acceleration concept of a recirculating proton beam was recently proposed [J. Qiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 795, 77 (2015, 10.1016/j.nima.2015.05.056)] and is currently under study. In order to further support the concept, the beam dynamics study on a recirculating proton linear accelerator has to be carried out. In this paper, we study the feasibility of a two-pass recirculating proton linear accelerator through the direct numerical beam dynamics design optimization and the start-to-end simulation. This study shows that the two-pass simultaneous focusing without particle losses is attainable including fully 3D space-charge effects through the entire accelerator system.

  17. Beam dynamics simulation of a double pass proton linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilean Hwang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A recirculating superconducting linear accelerator with the advantage of both straight and circular accelerator has been demonstrated with relativistic electron beams. The acceleration concept of a recirculating proton beam was recently proposed [J. Qiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 795, 77 (2015NIMAER0168-900210.1016/j.nima.2015.05.056] and is currently under study. In order to further support the concept, the beam dynamics study on a recirculating proton linear accelerator has to be carried out. In this paper, we study the feasibility of a two-pass recirculating proton linear accelerator through the direct numerical beam dynamics design optimization and the start-to-end simulation. This study shows that the two-pass simultaneous focusing without particle losses is attainable including fully 3D space-charge effects through the entire accelerator system.

  18. Phase portrait methods for verifying fluid dynamic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, H.B.

    1989-01-01

    As computing resources become more powerful and accessible, engineers more frequently face the difficult and challenging engineering problem of accurately simulating nonlinear dynamic phenomena. Although mathematical models are usually available, in the form of initial value problems for differential equations, the behavior of the solutions of nonlinear models is often poorly understood. A notable example is fluid dynamics: while the Navier-Stokes equations are believed to correctly describe turbulent flow, no exact mathematical solution of these equations in the turbulent regime is known. Differential equations can of course be solved numerically, but how are we to assess numerical solutions of complex phenomena without some understanding of the mathematical problem and its solutions to guide us

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Resolving Scaling Laws of Polyethylene Melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuaki Z. Takahashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations were performed to estimate the actual physical nature of a united-atom model of polyethylene (PE. Several scaling laws for representative polymer properties are compared to theoretical predictions. Internal structure results indicate a clear departure from theoretical predictions that assume ideal chain statics. Chain motion deviates from predictions that assume ideal motion of short chains. With regard to linear viscoelasticity, the presence or absence of entanglements strongly affects the duration of the theoretical behavior. Overall, the results indicate that Gaussian statics and dynamics are not necessarily established for real atomistic models of PE. Moreover, the actual physical nature should be carefully considered when using atomistic models for applications that expect typical polymer behaviors.

  20. Kinetic distance and kinetic maps from molecular dynamics simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Noe, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing macromolecular kinetics from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations requires a distance metric that can distinguish slowly-interconverting states. Here we build upon diffusion map theory and define a kinetic distance for irreducible Markov processes that quantifies how slowly molecular conformations interconvert. The kinetic distance can be computed given a model that approximates the eigenvalues and eigenvectors (reaction coordinates) of the MD Markov operator. Here we employ the time-lagged independent component analysis (TICA). The TICA components can be scaled to provide a kinetic map in which the Euclidean distance corresponds to the kinetic distance. As a result, the question of how many TICA dimensions should be kept in a dimensionality reduction approach becomes obsolete, and one parameter less needs to be specified in the kinetic model construction. We demonstrate the approach using TICA and Markov state model (MSM) analyses for illustrative models, protein conformation dynamics in bovine...

  1. Simulation study of granular compaction dynamics under vertical tapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenović, D; Vrhovac, S B; Jaksić, Z M; Budinski-Petković, Lj; Belić, A

    2006-12-01

    We study, by numerical simulation, the compaction dynamics of frictional hard disks in two dimensions, subjected to vertical shaking. Shaking is modeled by a series of vertical expansion of the disk packing, followed by dynamical recompression of the assembly under the action of gravity. The second phase of the shake cycle is based on an efficient event-driven molecular-dynamics algorithm. We analyze the compaction dynamics for various values of friction coefficient and coefficient of normal restitution. We find that the time evolution of the density is described by rho(t)=rho{infinity}-DeltarhoE{alpha}[-(ttau){alpha}], where E{alpha} denotes the Mittag-Leffler function of order 0

  2. Interfacial colloidal rod dynamics: Coefficients, simulations, and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuguang; Bevan, Michael A.

    2017-08-01

    Colloidal rod diffusion near a wall is modeled and simulated based on a constrained Stokesian dynamic model of chains-of-spheres. By modeling colloidal rods as chains-of-spheres, complete diffusion tensors are computed for colloidal rods in bulk media and near interfaces, including hydrodynamic interactions, translation-rotation coupling, and all diffusion modes in the particle and lab frames. Simulated trajectories based on the chain-of-spheres diffusion tensor are quantified in terms of typical experimental quantities such as mean squared positional and angular displacements as well as autocorrelation functions. Theoretical expressions are reported to predict measured average diffusivities as well as the crossover from short-time anisotropic translational diffusion along the rod's major axis to isotropic diffusion. Diffusion modes are quantified in terms of closed form empirical fits to model results to aid their use in interpretation and prediction of experiments involving colloidal rod diffusion in interfacial and confined systems.

  3. Dynamic friction modelling in heat exchanger tube simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, X.; Rogers, R.J. [Univ. of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-12-01

    A force-balance friction model has been developed to describe dynamic friction phenomena in multi-degree of freedom vibration systems and validated for a two degree-of-freedom (2dof) lumped mass vibration system. It has been implemented into VIBIC, a finite element code for the vibration of beams with intermittent contact, to improve the prediction of tube wear rate in the simulation of shell-and-tube heat exchangers. The friction model has been tailored for VIBIC for various kinds of supports: circular, semi-circular scallop-bar, and arbitrary flat-bar supports. Simulations for single fuel pin vibration have been compared with experimental data on wear work rate for different test conditions, gaps and preloads.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of membrane in room temperature ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theng, Soong Guan; Jumbri, Khairulazhar bin; Wirzal, Mohd Dzul Hakim

    2017-10-01

    The polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane has been a popular material in membrane separation process. In this work, molecular dynamic simulation was done on the PVDF membrane with 100 wt% IL and 50 wt% IL in GROningen MAchine for Chemical Simulations (GROMACS). The results was evaluated based on potential energy, root mean square deviation (RMSD) and radial distribution function (RDF). The stability and interaction of PVDF were evaluated. Results reveal that PVDF has a stronger interaction to [C2bim]+ cation compared to water and bromine anion. Both potential energy and RMSD were lower when the weight percentage of IL is higher. This indicates that the IL is able to stabilize the PVDF structure. RMSD reveals that [C2bim]+ cation is dominant at short distance (less than 1 nm), indicating that strong interaction of cation to PVDF. This understanding of the behavior of PVDF-IL could be used as a reference for future development of stronger membrane.

  5. Finite-element lattice Boltzmann simulations of contact line dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matin, Rastin; Krzysztof Misztal, Marek; Hernández-García, Anier; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2018-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method has become one of the standard techniques for simulating a wide range of fluid flows. However, the intrinsic coupling of momentum and space discretization restricts the traditional lattice Boltzmann method to regular lattices. Alternative off-lattice Boltzmann schemes exist for both single- and multiphase flows that decouple the velocity discretization from the underlying spatial grid. The current study extends the applicability of these off-lattice methods by introducing a finite element formulation that enables simulating contact line dynamics for partially wetting fluids. This work exemplifies the implementation of the scheme and furthermore presents benchmark experiments that show the scheme reduces spurious currents at the liquid-vapor interface by at least two orders of magnitude compared to a nodal implementation and allows for predicting the equilibrium states accurately in the range of moderate contact angles.

  6. Coding considerations for standalone molecular dynamics simulations of atomistic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaya, R. O.; Terblans, J. J.

    2017-10-01

    The laws of Newtonian mechanics allow ab-initio molecular dynamics to model and simulate particle trajectories in material science by defining a differentiable potential function. This paper discusses some considerations for the coding of ab-initio programs for simulation on a standalone computer and illustrates the approach by C language codes in the context of embedded metallic atoms in the face-centred cubic structure. The algorithms use velocity-time integration to determine particle parameter evolution for up to several thousands of particles in a thermodynamical ensemble. Such functions are reusable and can be placed in a redistributable header library file. While there are both commercial and free packages available, their heuristic nature prevents dissection. In addition, developing own codes has the obvious advantage of teaching techniques applicable to new problems.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of a single stranded (ss) DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Thakur, Siddarth; Burin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop an understanding of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to assist the development of new DNA-based biosensors. A ssDNA model containing twelve bases was constructed from the 130-145 codon sequence of the p53 gene. Various thermodynamic macroscopic observables such as temperature, energy distributions, as well as root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the nucleic acid backbone of the ssDNA were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The AMBER program was used for building the structural model of the ssDNA, and atomistic MD simulations in three different ensembles were carried out using the NAMD program. The microcanonical (NVE), conical (NVT) and isobaric-isothermal (NPT) ensembles were employed to compare the equilibrium characteristics of ssDNA in aqueous solutions. Our results indicate that the conformational stability of the ssDNA is dependent on the thermodynamic conditions.

  8. A Modal Model to Simulate Typical Structural Dynamic Nonlinearity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacini, Benjamin Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mayes, Randall L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roettgen, Daniel R [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Some initial investigations have been published which simulate nonlinear response with almost traditional modal models: instead of connecting the modal mass to ground through the traditional spring and damper, a nonlinear Iwan element was added. This assumes that the mode shapes do not change with amplitude and there are no interactions between modal degrees of freedom. This work expands on these previous studies. An impact experiment is performed on a structure which exhibits typical structural dynamic nonlinear response, i.e. weak frequency dependence and strong damping dependence on the amplitude of vibration. Use of low level modal test results in combination with high level impacts are processed using various combinations of modal filtering, the Hilbert Transform and band-pass filtering to develop response data that are then fit with various nonlinear elements to create a nonlinear pseudo-modal model. Simulations of forced response are compared with high level experimental data for various nonlinear element assumptions.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Clathrate Hydrates on Specialised Hardware Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian R. Trott

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Classical equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD simulations have been performed to investigate the computational performance of the Simple Point Charge (SPC and TIP4P water models applied to simulation of methane hydrates, and also of liquid water, on a variety of specialised hardware platforms, in addition to estimation of various equilibrium properties of clathrate hydrates. The FPGA-based accelerator MD-GRAPE 3 was used to accelerate substantially the computation of non-bonded forces, while GPU-based platforms were also used in conjunction with CUDA-enabled versions of the LAMMPS MD software packages to reduce computational time dramatically. The dependence of molecular system size and scaling with number of processors was also investigated. Considering performance relative to power consumption, it is seen that GPU-based computing is quite attractive.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of deformation twin in rocksalt vanadium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Tao [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Peng, Xianghe, E-mail: xhpeng@cqu.edu.cn [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhao, Yinbo [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Li, Tengfei [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Li, Qibin [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wang, Zhongchang, E-mail: zcwang@wpi-aimr.tohoku.ac.jp [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    We perform molecular dynamics simulation of nano-indentation with a cylindrical indenter to investigate the formation mechanism of deformation twin in vanadium nitride (VN) with a rocksalt structure. We find that the deformation twins occur during the loading stage, and subsequently conduct a systematic analysis of nucleation, propagation and thickening of a deformation twin. We find that the nucleation of a partial dislocation and its propagation to form a stacking fault are premise of deformation twin formation. The sequential nucleation and propagation of partial dislocation on adjacent parallel {111} planes are found to cause the thickening of the deformation twin. Moreover, the deformation twins can exist in VN at room temperature. - Highlights: • MD simulations of indentation are performed to study the deformation twin in VN. • The deformation twins can occur in VN during the loading stage. • The nucleation, propagation and thickening of a deformation twin are analyzed. • The deformation twins can exist in VN at room temperature.

  11. Simulation of dynamics of a permanent magnet linear actuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yatchev, Ivan; Ritchie, Ewen

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of two approaches for the simulation of the dynamic behaviour of a permanent magnet linear actuator is presented. These are full coupled model, where the electromagnetic field, electric circuit and mechanical motion problems are solved simultaneously, and decoupled model, where first...... a set of static magnetic filed analysis is carried out and then the electric circuit and mechanical motion equations are solved employing bi-cubic spline approximations of the field analysis results. The results show that the proposed decoupled model is of satisfactory accuracy and gives more...

  12. Interfacial interaction between polypropylene and nanotube: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Danhui; Yang, Houbo; Liu, Zhongkui; Liu, Anmin; Li, Yunfang

    2017-09-01

    The interfacial interaction between polypropylene (PE) and single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The result showed that the PE chain could stabilize the SWCNT and then extended along the direction of SWCNT. The mechanism of interfacial interaction between PE and SWCNT was also discussed. Furthermore, the interfacial interaction between more PE and SWCNT was also investigated and the position also deeply influenced the interaction. This will be beneficial to understanding the interfacial interaction between polymer and CNT in solution, and also guiding the fabrication of high performance polymer/CNT nanocomposites.

  13. Research and Simulation of the Electrical Vehicle Based Dynamical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko-Chun Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study developed a dynamic model of electric vehicle system by using the MATLAB/Simulink tool. The vehicle model comprises two system components: an electrical system and a suspension system. This study also designed various road conditions for simulating the motion of vehicle traveling along a road. The results show that the electrical and suspension system parameters can be adjusted immediately to enhance passenger comfort. The findings of this research have practical teaching applications. Students can modify the vehicle model parameters byes using the MATLAB graphical user interface, allowing them to observe the motion of vehicle under various road conditions.

  14. A simulation study in dynamic 'Utah'-models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toldam-Andersen, Torben Bo

    1992-01-01

    major variants: I) Models involving a procedure which makes it possible to include the dynamic relationship between chilling and heat requirement. II) Models involving a chain structure with each "link" representing a develop­mental phase through the dormancy period. Based on the teories proposed...... by Saure (1985), the temperature response of the system was adjusted in each phase in arder to simulate the change in the temperature response of the dormant tree. Tue proposed models were used to predict the beginning of flowering inAlnus and Betula, which are closely related species, but shows great...

  15. Optimization of hydrogen vehicle refueling via dynamic simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Mérida, W.; Rokni, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    A dynamic model has been developed to analyze and optimize the thermodynamics and design of hydrogen refueling stations. The model is based on Dymola software and incorporates discrete components. Two refueling station designs were simulated and compared. The modeling results indicate that pressure...... loss in the vehicle's storage system is one of the main factors determining the mass flow and peak cooling requirements of the refueling process. The design of the refueling station does not influence the refueling of the vehicle when the requirements of the technical information report J2601 from...... refueling is reduced by 5%, and the total amount of stored hydrogen at high pressure is reduced by 20%....

  16. Simulation of sub-barrier fusion process including dynamical deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, Kentaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-05-01

    Four reactions ({sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca, {sup 58}Ni+{sup 58}Ni, {sup 64}Ni+{sup 64}Ni and {sup 74}Ge+{sup 74}Ge) were simulated as examples of spherical nuclei, {sup 40}Ca and {sup 58}Ni and dynamical deformation, {sup 64}Ni and {sup 74}Ge. The experimental excited functions of sub-barrier fusion reaction were reproduced with high accuracy without free parameters. The sub-barrier fusion process had supposed to pass one-dimensional fusion process estimated by the principle of least action on the potential surface with a freedom of nuclear deformation. (S.Y.)

  17. Numerical simulation of the RISOe1-airfoil dynamic stall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F.; Soerensen, N. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    In this paper we are concerned with the numerical computation of the dynamic stall that occur in the viscous flowfield over an airfoil. These results are compared to experimental data that were obtained with the new designed RISOe1-airfoil, both for a motionless airfoil and for a pitching motion. Moreover, we present some numerical computations of the plunging and lead-lag motions. We also investigate the possibility of using the pitching motion to simulate the plunging and lead-lag situations. (au)

  18. Energy dynamics in a simulation of LAPD turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, B; Umansky, M V; Schaffner, D

    2012-01-01

    Energy dynamics calculations in a 3D fluid simulation of drift wave turbulence in the linear Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman et al.,Rev. Sci. Inst. 62, 2875 (1991)] illuminate processes that drive and dissipate the turbulence. These calculations reveal that a nonlinear instability dominates the injection of energy into the turbulence by overtaking the linear drift wave instability that resides in the system of equations. The nonlinear instability drives flute-like $k_\\parallel = 0$ density fluctuations through advection of the equilibrium density profile. Through nonlinear axial wavenumber transfer to $k_\\parallel \

  19. Description of waste pretreatment and interfacing systems dynamic simulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbrick, D.J.; Zimmerman, B.D.

    1995-05-01

    The Waste Pretreatment and Interfacing Systems Dynamic Simulation Model was created to investigate the required pretreatment facility processing rates for both high level and low level waste so that the vitrification of tank waste can be completed according to the milestones defined in the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). In order to achieve this objective, the processes upstream and downstream of the pretreatment facilities must also be included. The simulation model starts with retrieval of tank waste and ends with vitrification for both low level and high level wastes. This report describes the results of three simulation cases: one based on suggested average facility processing rates, one with facility rates determined so that approximately 6 new DSTs are required, and one with facility rates determined so that approximately no new DSTs are required. It appears, based on the simulation results, that reasonable facility processing rates can be selected so that no new DSTs are required by the TWRS program. However, this conclusion must be viewed with respect to the modeling assumptions, described in detail in the report. Also included in the report, in an appendix, are results of two sensitivity cases: one with glass plant water recycle steams recycled versus not recycled, and one employing the TPA SST retrieval schedule versus a more uniform SST retrieval schedule. Both recycling and retrieval schedule appear to have a significant impact on overall tank usage.

  20. Dynamical simulations of classical stochastic systems using matrix product states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T H; Clark, S R; Jaksch, D

    2010-09-01

    We adapt the time-evolving block decimation (TEBD) algorithm, originally devised to simulate the dynamics of one-dimensional quantum systems, to simulate the time evolution of nonequilibrium stochastic systems. We describe this method in detail; a system's probability distribution is represented by a matrix product state (MPS) of finite dimension and then its time evolution is efficiently simulated by repeatedly updating and approximately refactorizing this representation. We examine the use of MPS as an approximation method, looking at parallels between the interpretations of applying it to quantum state vectors and probability distributions. In the context of stochastic systems we consider two types of factorization for use in the TEBD algorithm: non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), which ensures that the approximate probability distribution is manifestly non-negative, and the singular value decomposition (SVD). Comparing these factorizations, we find the accuracy of the SVD to be substantially greater than current NMF algorithms. We then apply TEBD to simulate the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) for systems of up to hundreds of lattice sites in size. Using exact analytic results for the TASEP steady state, we find that TEBD reproduces this state such that the error in calculating expectation values can be made negligible even when severely compressing the description of the system by restricting the dimension of the MPS to be very small. Out of the steady state we show for specific observables that expectation values converge as the dimension of the MPS is increased to a moderate size.

  1. Biased Brownian motion in narrow channels with asymmetry and anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Kiwing; Peng, Zheng

    2016-11-01

    We study Brownian motion of a single millimeter size bead confined in a quasi-two-dimensional horizontal channel with built-in anisotropy and asymmetry. Channel asymmetry is implemented by ratchet walls while anisotropy is introduced using a channel base that is grooved along the channel axis so that a bead can acquire a horizontal impulse perpendicular to the longitudinal direction when it collides with the base. When energy is injected to the channel by vertical vibration, the combination of asymmetric walls and anisotropic base induces an effective force which drives the bead into biased diffusive motion along the channel axis with diffusivity and drift velocity increase with vibration strength. The magnitude of this driving force, which can be measured in experiments of tilted channel, is found to be consistent to those obtained from dynamic mobility and position probability distribution measurements. These results are explained by a simple collision model that suggests the random kinetic energies transfer between different translational degrees of freedom may be turned into useful work in the presence of asymmetry and anisotropy.

  2. Ultrafast Vibrational Dynamics of Water Disentangled by Reverse Nonequilibrium Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Nagata

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Water is a unique solvent with strong, yet highly dynamic, intermolecular interactions. Many insights into this distinctive liquid have been obtained using ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy of water’s O-H stretch vibration. However, it has been challenging to separate the different contributions to the dynamics of the O-H stretch vibration in H_{2}O. Here, we present a novel nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD algorithm that allows for a detailed picture of water vibrational dynamics by generating nonequilibrium vibrationally excited states at targeted vibrational frequencies. Our ab initio NEMD simulations reproduce the experimentally observed time scales of vibrational dynamics in H_{2}O. The approach presented in this work uniquely disentangles the effects on the vibrational dynamics of four contributions: the delocalization of the O-H stretch mode, structural dynamics of the hydrogen bonded network, intramolecular coupling within water molecules, and intermolecular coupling between water molecules (near-resonant energy transfer between O-H groups. Our results illustrate that intermolecular energy transfer and the delocalization of the O-H stretch mode are particularly important for the spectral diffusion in H_{2}O.

  3. On the first crossing distributions in fractional Brownian motion and the mass function of dark matter haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiotelis, Nicos; Del Popolo, Antonino

    2017-03-01

    We construct an integral equation for the first crossing distributions for fractional Brownian motion in the case of a constant barrier and we present an exact analytical solution. Additionally we present first crossing distributions derived by simulating paths from fractional Brownian motion. We compare the results of the analytical solutions with both those of simulations and those of some approximated solutions which have been used in the literature. Finally, we present multiplicity functions for dark matter structures resulting from our analytical approach and we compare with those resulting from N-body simulations. We show that the results of analytical solutions are in good agreement with those of path simulations but differ significantly from those derived from approximated solutions. Additionally, multiplicity functions derived from fractional Brownian motion are poor fits of the those which result from N-body simulations. We also present comparisons with other models which are exist in the literature and we discuss different ways of improving the agreement between analytical results and N-body simulations.

  4. Dynamics of Nanoscale Grain-Boundary Decohesion in Aluminum by Molecular-Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakov, V.; Saether, E.; Phillips, D. R.; Glaessegen, E. H.

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics and energetics of intergranular crack growth along a flat grain boundary in aluminum is studied by a molecular-dynamics simulation model for crack propagation under steady-state conditions. Using the ability of the molecular-dynamics simulation to identify atoms involved in different atomistic mechanisms, it was possible to identify the energy contribution of different processes taking place during crack growth. The energy contributions were divided as: elastic energy, defined as the potential energy of the atoms in fcc crystallographic state; and plastically stored energy, the energy of stacking faults and twin boundaries; grain-boundary and surface energy. In addition, monitoring the amount of heat exchange with the molecular-dynamics thermostat gives the energy dissipated as heat in the system. The energetic analysis indicates that the majority of energy in a fast growing crack is dissipated as heat. This dissipation increases linearly at low speed, and faster than linear at speeds approaching 1/3 the Rayleigh wave speed when the crack tip becomes dynamically unstable producing periodic dislocation bursts until the crack is blunted.

  5. From Brownian motion to power of fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Berche

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The year 2012 marks the 140th birth anniversary of Marian Smoluchowski (28.05.1872-5.09.1917, a man who "made ground-breaking contribution to the theory of Brownian motion, the theory of sedimentation, the statistical nature of the Second Law, the theory and practice of density fluctuations (critical opalescence. During his final years of scientific creativity his pioneering theory of coagulation and diffusion-limited reaction rate appeared. These outstanding achievements present true gems which dominate the description of soft matter physics and chemical physics as well as the related areas up till now!" This quotation was taken from the lecture by Peter Hanggi given at international conference Statistical Physics: Modern Trends and Applications that took place in Lviv, Ukraine on July 3-6, 2012 (see conference web-page for more details and was dedicated to the commemoration of Smoluchowski's work. This and forthcoming issues of the Condensed Matter Physics contain papers presented at this conference.

  6. Cost and Precision of Brownian Clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre C. Barato

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Brownian clocks are biomolecular networks that can count time. A paradigmatic example are proteins that go through a cycle, thus regulating some oscillatory behavior in a living system. Typically, such a cycle requires free energy often provided by ATP hydrolysis. We investigate the relation between the precision of such a clock and its thermodynamic costs. For clocks driven by a constant thermodynamic force, a given precision requires a minimal cost that diverges as the uncertainty of the clock vanishes. In marked contrast, we show that a clock driven by a periodic variation of an external protocol can achieve arbitrary precision at arbitrarily low cost. This result constitutes a fundamental difference between processes driven by a fixed thermodynamic force and those driven periodically. As a main technical tool, we map a periodically driven system with a deterministic protocol to one subject to an external protocol that changes in stochastic time intervals, which simplifies calculations significantly. In the nonequilibrium steady state of the resulting bipartite Markov process, the uncertainty of the clock can be deduced from the calculable dispersion of a corresponding current.

  7. Cost and Precision of Brownian Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-10-01

    Brownian clocks are biomolecular networks that can count time. A paradigmatic example are proteins that go through a cycle, thus regulating some oscillatory behavior in a living system. Typically, such a cycle requires free energy often provided by ATP hydrolysis. We investigate the relation between the precision of such a clock and its thermodynamic costs. For clocks driven by a constant thermodynamic force, a given precision requires a minimal cost that diverges as the uncertainty of the clock vanishes. In marked contrast, we show that a clock driven by a periodic variation of an external protocol can achieve arbitrary precision at arbitrarily low cost. This result constitutes a fundamental difference between processes driven by a fixed thermodynamic force and those driven periodically. As a main technical tool, we map a periodically driven system with a deterministic protocol to one subject to an external protocol that changes in stochastic time intervals, which simplifies calculations significantly. In the nonequilibrium steady state of the resulting bipartite Markov process, the uncertainty of the clock can be deduced from the calculable dispersion of a corresponding current.

  8. Shear thinning in non-Brownian suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatté, Guillaume; Comtet, Jean; Niguès, Antoine; Bocquet, Lydéric; Siria, Alessandro; Ducouret, Guylaine; Lequeux, François; Lenoir, Nicolas; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Colin, Annie

    2018-02-14

    We study the flow of suspensions of non-Brownian particles dispersed into a Newtonian solvent. Combining capillary rheometry and conventional rheometry, we evidence a succession of two shear thinning regimes separated by a shear thickening one. Through X-ray radiography measurements, we show that during each of those regimes, the flow remains homogeneous and does not involve particle migration. Using a quartz-tuning fork based atomic force microscope, we measure the repulsive force profile and the microscopic friction coefficient μ between two particles immersed into the solvent, as a function of normal load. Coupling measurements from those three techniques, we propose that (1) the first shear-thinning regime at low shear rates occurs for a lubricated rheology and can be interpreted as a decrease of the effective volume fraction under increasing particle pressures, due to short-ranged repulsive forces and (2) the second shear thinning regime after the shear-thickening transition occurs for a frictional rheology and can be interpreted as stemming from a decrease of the microscopic friction coefficient at large normal load.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Adhesion at Epoxy Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Clancy, Thomas C.; Hinkley, J. A.; Gates. T. S.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of moisture on adhesives used in aerospace applications can be modeled with chemically specific techniques such as molecular dynamics simulation. In the present study, the surface energy and work of adhesion are calculated for epoxy surfaces and interfaces, respectively, by using molecular dynamics simulation. Modifications are made to current theory to calculate the work of adhesion at the epoxy-epoxy interface with and without water. Quantitative agreement with experimental values is obtained for the surface energy and work of adhesion at the interface without water. The work of adhesion agrees qualitatively with the experimental values for the interface with water: the magnitude is reduced 15% with respect to the value for the interface without water. A variation of 26% in the magnitude is observed depending on the water configuration at a concentration of 1.6 wt%. The methods and modifications to the method that are employed to obtain these values are expected to be applicable for other epoxy adhesives to determine the effects of moisture uptake on their work of adhesion.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. One gear was powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the buckytube to rotate, and a second gear was allowed.to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its buckytube on a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations were simulated. Cases in vacuum and with an inert atmosphere were examined. In an extension to molecular dynamics technology, some simulations used a thermostat on the atmosphere while the hydrocarbon gear's temperature was allowed to fluctuate. This models cooling the gears with an atmosphere. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50-100 gigahertz in a vacuum or inert atmosphere at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering temperature and/or rotation rate. Videos and atomic trajectory files in xyz format are presented.

  11. Finite-size effects on the lattice dynamics in spin crossover nanomaterials. II. Molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasek, Mirko; Nicolazzi, William; Terki, Férial; Molnár, Gábor; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2017-07-01

    In the first part of this work, an experimental study of the lattice dynamics of spin crossover nanoparticles was performed using the nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS). A size dependence of low energy phonon modes appears under 10 nm, but its origin is not well understood. In this paper, we investigate the phonon confinement effects in the framework of molecular dynamics simulations by modeling three-dimensional nanoparticles considering a cubic lattice with an octahedral pattern. The vibrational density of states is computed and compared to the experiment. The simulations allow one to highlight both the role of the phonon quantification and the role of the size and shape distributions of particles on the extracted parameters leading to a better understanding of the experimental results.

  12. ARCHITECTURAL LARGE CONSTRUCTED ENVIRONMENT. MODELING AND INTERACTION USING DYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fiamma

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available How to use for the architectural design, the simulation coming from a large size data model? The topic is related to the phase coming usually after the acquisition of the data, during the construction of the model and especially after, when designers must have an interaction with the simulation, in order to develop and verify their idea. In the case of study, the concept of interaction includes the concept of real time "flows". The work develops contents and results that can be part of the large debate about the current connection between "architecture" and "movement". The focus of the work, is to realize a collaborative and participative virtual environment on which different specialist actors, client and final users can share knowledge, targets and constraints to better gain the aimed result. The goal is to have used a dynamic micro simulation digital resource that allows all the actors to explore the model in powerful and realistic way and to have a new type of interaction in a complex architectural scenario. On the one hand, the work represents a base of knowledge that can be implemented more and more; on the other hand the work represents a dealt to understand the large constructed architecture simulation as a way of life, a way of being in time and space. The architectural design before, and the architectural fact after, both happen in a sort of "Spatial Analysis System". The way is open to offer to this "system", knowledge and theories, that can support architectural design work for every application and scale. We think that the presented work represents a dealt to understand the large constructed architecture simulation as a way of life, a way of being in time and space. Architecture like a spatial configuration, that can be reconfigurable too through designing.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of a synthetic ion channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Q; Jiang, Q; Moore, P B; Newns, D M; Klein, M L

    1998-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on a synthetic membrane-spanning ion channel, consisting of four alpha-helical peptides, each of which is composed of the amino acids leucine (L) and serine (S), with the sequence Ac-(LSLLLSL)3-CONH2. This four-helix bundle has been shown experimentally to act as a proton-conducting channel in a membrane environment. In the present simulation, the channel was initially assembled as a parallel bundle in the octane portion of a phase-separated water/octane system, which provided a membrane-mimetic environment. An explicit reversible multiple-time-step integrator was used to generate a dynamical trajectory, a few nanoseconds in duration for this composite system on a parallel computer, under ambient conditions. After more than 1 ns, the four helices were found to adopt an associated dimer state with twofold symmetry, which evolved into a coiled-coil tetrameric structure with a left-handed twist. In the coiled-coil state, the polar serine side chains interact to form a layered structure with the core of the bundle filled with H2O. The dipoles of these H2O molecules tended to align opposite the net dipole of the peptide bundle. The calculated dipole relaxation function of the pore H2O molecules exhibits two reorientation times. One is approximately 3.2 ps, and the other is approximately 100 times longer. The diffusion coefficient of the pore H2O is about one-third of the bulk H2O value. The total dipole moment and the inertia tensor of the peptide bundle have been calculated and reveal slow (300 ps) collective oscillatory motions. Our results, which are based on a simple united atom force-field model, suggest that the function of this synthetic ion channel is likely inextricably coupled to its dynamical behavior.

  14. Supercoiled DNA energetics and dynamics by computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlick, T; Olson, W K

    1992-02-20

    A new formulation is presented for investigating supercoiled DNA configurations by deterministic techniques. Thus far, the computational difficulties involved in applying deterministic methods to supercoiled DNA studies have generally limited computer simulations to stochastic approaches. While stochastic methods, such as simulated annealing and Metropolis-Monte Carlo sampling, are successful at generating a large number of configurations and estimating thermodynamic properties of topoisomer ensembles, deterministic methods offer an accurate characterization of the minima and a systematic following of their dynamics. To make this feasible, we model circular duplex DNA compactly by a B-spline ribbon-like model in terms of a small number of control vertices. We associate an elastic deformation energy composed of bending and twisting integrals and represent intrachain contact by a 6-12 Lennard Jones potential. The latter is parameterized to yield an energy minimum at the observed DNA-helix diameter inclusive of a hydration shell. A penalty term to ensure fixed contour length is also included. First and second partial derivatives of the energy function have been derived by using various mathematical simplifications. First derivatives are essential for Newton-type minimization as well as molecular dynamics, and partial second-derivative information can significantly accelerate minimization convergence through preconditioning. Here we apply a new large-scale truncated-Newton algorithm for minimization and a Langevin/implicit-Euler scheme for molecular dynamics. Our truncated-Newton method exploits the separability of potential energy functions into terms of differing complexity. It relies on a preconditioned conjugate gradient method that is efficient for large-scale problems to solve approximately for the search direction at every step. Our dynamics algorithm is numerically stable over large time steps. It also introduces a frequency-discriminating mechanism so that

  15. Animated molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated caesium-smectite interlayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sposito Garrison

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer animation of center of mass coordinates obtained from 800 ps molecular dynamics simulations of Cs-smectite hydrates (1/3 and 2/3 water monolayers provided information concerning the structure and dynamics of the interlayer region that could not be obtained through traditional simulation analysis methods. Cs+ formed inner sphere complexes with the mineral surface, and could be seen to jump from one attracting location near a layer charge site to the next, while water molecules were observed to migrate from the hydration shell of one ion to that of another. Neighboring ions maintained a partial hydration shell by sharing water molecules, such that a single water molecule hydrated two ions simultaneously for hundreds of picoseconds. Cs-montmorillonite hydrates featured the largest extent of this sharing interaction, because interlayer ions were able to inhabit positions near surface cavities as well as at their edges, close to oxygen triads. The greater positional freedom of Cs+ within the montmorillonite interlayer, a result of structural hydroxyl orientation and low tetrahedral charge, promoted the optimization of distances between cations and water molecules required for water sharing. Preference of Cs+ for locations near oxygen triads was observed within interlayer beidellite and hectorite. Water molecules also could be seen to interact directly with the mineral surface, entering its surface cavities to approach attracting charge sites and structural hydroxyls. With increasing water content, water molecules exhibited increased frequency and duration of both cavity habitation and water sharing interactions. Competition between Cs+ and water molecules for surface sites was evident. These important cooperative and competitive features of interlayer molecular behavior were uniquely revealed by animation of an otherwise highly complex simulation output.

  16. Observations of Crew Dynamics during Mars Analog Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Stacy L.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the crew dynamics during two simulations of Mars Missions. Using an analog of a Mars habitat in two locations, Flashline Mars Arctic Research Station (FMARS) which is located on Devon Island at 75 deg North in the Canadian Arctic, and the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) which is located in the south of Utah, the presentation examines the crew dynamics in relation to the leadership style of the commander of the mission. The difference in the interaction of the two crews were shown to be related to the leadership style and the age group in the crew. As much as possible the habitats and environment was to resemble a Mars outpost. The difference between the International Space Station and a Mars missions is reviewed. The leadership styles are reviewed and the contrast between the FMARS and the MDRS leadership styles were related to crew productivity, and the personal interactions between the crew members. It became evident that leadership styles and interpersonal skill had more affect on mission success and crew dynamics than other characteristics.

  17. Extensions to Dynamic System Simulation of Fissile Solution Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bernardin, John David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-24

    Previous reports have documented the results of applying dynamic system simulation (DSS) techniques to model a variety of fissile solution systems. The SUPO (Super Power) aqueous homogeneous reactor (AHR) was chosen as the benchmark for comparison of model results to experimental data for steadystate operation.1 Subsequently, DSS was applied to additional AHR to verify results obtained for SUPO and extend modeling to prompt critical excursions, ramp reactivity insertions of various magnitudes and rate, and boiling operations in SILENE and KEWB (Kinetic Experiment Water Boiler).2 Additional models for pressurized cores (HRE: Homogeneous Reactor Experiment), annular core geometries, and accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADAHR) were developed and results reported.3 The focus of each of these models is core dynamics; neutron kinetics, thermal hydraulics, radiolytic gas generation and transport are coupled to examine the time-based evolution of these systems from start-up through transition to steady-state. A common characteristic of these models is the assumption that (a) core cooling system inlet temperature and flow and (b) plenum gas inlet pressure and flow are held constant; no external (to core) component operations that may result in dynamic change to these parameters are considered. This report discusses extension of models to include explicit reference to cooling structures and radiolytic gas handling. The accelerator-driven subcritical generic system model described in References 3 and 4 is used as a basis for this extension.

  18. Hydrotropic Solubilization by Urea Derivatives: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Cui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrotropy is a phenomenon where the presence of a large quantity of one solute enhances the solubility of another solute. The mechanism of this phenomenon remains a topic of debate. This study employed molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the hydrotropic mechanism of a series of urea derivatives, that is, urea (UR, methylurea (MU, ethylurea (EU, and butylurea (BU. A poorly water-soluble compound, nifedipine (NF, was used as the model solute that was solubilized. Structural, dynamic, and energetic changes upon equilibration were analyzed to supply insights to the solubilization mechanism. The study demonstrated that NF and urea derivatives underwent significant nonstoichiometric molecular aggregation in the aqueous solution, a result consistent with the self-aggregation of urea derivatives under the same conditions. The analysis of hydrogen bonding and energy changes revealed that the aggregation was driven by the partial restoration of normal water structure. The energetic data also suggested that the promoted solubilization of NF is favored in the presence of urea derivatives. While the solutes aggregated to a varying degree, the systems were still in single-phase liquid state as attested by their active dynamics.

  19. Effective particle size from molecular dynamics simulations in fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jianwei; Welch, Paul M.; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Redondo, Antonio; Vorobieff, Peter; Kober, Edward M.

    2017-12-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations designed to investigate the effective size of colloidal particles suspended in a fluid in the vicinity of a rigid wall where all interactions are defined by smooth atomic potential functions. These simulations are used to assess how the behavior of this system at the atomistic length scale compares to continuum mechanics models. In order to determine the effective size of the particles, we calculate the solvent forces on spherical particles of different radii as a function of different positions near and overlapping with the atomistically defined wall and compare them to continuum models. This procedure also then determines the effective position of the wall. Our analysis is based solely on forces that the particles sense, ensuring self-consistency of the method. The simulations were carried out using both Weeks-Chandler-Andersen and modified Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials to identify the different contributions of simple repulsion and van der Waals attractive forces. Upon correction for behavior arising the discreteness of the atomic system, the underlying continuum physics analysis appeared to be correct down to much less than the particle radius. For both particle types, the effective radius was found to be ˜ 0.75σ , where σ defines the length scale of the force interaction (the LJ diameter). The effective "hydrodynamic" radii determined by this means are distinct from commonly assumed values of 0.5σ and 1.0σ , but agree with a value developed from the atomistic analysis of the viscosity of such systems.

  20. Atomic-scale Simulation of Solid-Liquid Interface Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Deyan; Asta, Mark; Hoyt, J. J.; Karma, Alain

    2003-03-01

    Quantitative modeling of the dendritic growth of a crystal from its melt can be achieved through a hierarchical multiscale simulation approach combining atomistic-simulations of solid-liquid interface properties with phase-field modeling of microstructure evolution. Under rapid-solidification conditions the solid-liquid interface kinetic coefficient, and its associated crystalline anisotropy, are key parameters controlling the growth velocity and morphological evolution of a dendritic crystal. The kinetic coefficient is defined as the proportionality constant between the growth rate of a solid-liquid interface and its undercooling. In this talk the kinetic coefficient and its anisotropy are studied by both non-equilibrium and equilibrium molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations. Two new MD-based methods for calculating kinetic coefficient are proposed, and results obtained from the different approaches are found to be consistent. The relative strengths of each method will be discussed. The anisotropy of kinetic coefficient is studied in detail for both FCC metal and BCC metal, and comparing with the previously proposed theoretical models.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Slip on Curved Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross D.A.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present Molecular Dynamics (MD simulations of liquid water confined within nanoscale geometries, including slit-like and cylindrical graphitic pores. These equilibrium results are used for calculating friction coefficients, which in turn can be used to calculate slip lengths. The slip length is a material property independent of the fluid flow rate. It is therefore a better quantity for study than the fluid velocity at the wall, also known as the slip velocity. Once the slip length has been found as a function of surface curvature, it can be used to parameterise Lattice Boltzmann (LB simulations. These larger scale simulations are able to tell us about how fluid transport is affected by slip in complex geometries; not just limited to single pores. Applications include flow and transport in nano-porous engine valve deposits and gas shales. The friction coefficient is found to be a function of curvature and is higher for fluid on convex surfaces and lower for concave surfaces. Both concave and convex surfaces approach the same value of the friction coefficient, which is constant above some critical radius of curvature, here found to be 7.4 ± 2.9 nm. The constant value of the friction coefficient is 10,000 ± 600 kg m−2 s−1, which is equivalent to a slip length of approximately 67 ± 4 nm.

  2. Hypervelocity impact properties of graphene armor via molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang W.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypervelocity impact properties of two different graphene armor systems are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. One system is the so-called spaced armor which consists of a number of graphene plates spaced certain distance apart. Its response under normal impact of a spherical projectile is studied, focusing on the effect of the number of graphene monolayers per plate (denoted by n on the penetration resistance of the armor. We find that under normal impact by a spherical projectile the penetration resistance increases with decreasing number of monolayers per plate (n, and the best penetration resistance is achieved in the system with one graphene layer for each plate. Note that the monolayers in all the simulated multilayer graphene plates were AB-stacked. The second system being studied is the laminated copper/graphene composites with the graphene layers inside copper, on impact or back surface, or on both the impact and back surfaces. The simulation results show that under normal impact by a spherical projectile the laminated copper/graphene composite has much higher penetration resistance than the monolithic copper plate. The best efficiency is achieved when the graphene layers are on both the impact and back surfaces.

  3. Linear interfacial polymerization: theory and simulations with dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezkin, Anatoly V; Kudryavtsev, Yaroslav V

    2014-11-21

    Step-growth alternating interfacial polymerization between two miscible or immiscible monomer melts is investigated theoretically and by dissipative particle dynamics simulations. In both cases the kinetics for an initially bilayer system passes from the reaction to diffusion control. The polymer composed of immiscible monomers precipitates at the interface forming a film of nearly uniform density. It is demonstrated that the reaction proceeds in a narrow zone, which expands much slower than the whole film, so that newly formed polymer is extruded from the reaction zone. This concept of "reactive extrusion" is used to analytically predict the degree of polymerization and distribution of all components (monomers, polymer, and end groups) within the film in close agreement with the simulations. Increasing the comonomer incompatibility leads to thinner and more uniform films with the higher average degree of polymerization. The final product is considerably more polydisperse than expected for the homogeneous step-growth polymerization. The results extend the previous theoretical reports on interfacial polymerization and provide new insights into the internal film structure and polymer characteristics, which are important for membrane preparation, microencapsulation, and 3D printing technologies. A systematic way of mapping the simulation data onto laboratory scales is discussed.

  4. Dynamic Simulation of a Multiple Beam Fourier Telescopy Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapp, J.; Cuellar, E.; Spivey, B.; Chen, L.; Leon, L.; Hughes, K.; Sandler, D.

    A detailed simulation has been developed to model a high resolution active imaging LEO satellite system currently being designed under the Satellite Active Imaging National Testbed (SAINT) program. This imaging system is based upon Fourier Telescopy, which uses multiple coherent laser beams that illuminate a target with a fringe pattern that sweeps across it due to a known frequency differences between the beams. In this way the target spatial frequency components are encoded in the temporal signal that is reflected from the coherently illuminated target. The software simulation program models both the dynamic reconfiguration of the continuous-wave transmitter laser beams and the atmospheric uplink / downlink turbulence effects. In addition, accurate modeling of the changing satellite target aspect over the imaging period is included in the simulation to properly model the received time-dependent reflected intensity received from the satellite target on the ground. A novel reconstructor has been developed that compensates for atmospheric phase fluctuations affecting the large number of beams transmitted simultaneously (10 - 20 beams). A new type of global phase closure has been developed, which allows image reconstruction from the time history of measured total reflected intensity from the target. The reconstruction algorithm also solves for hundreds of image Fourier components simultaneously, permitting rapid reconstruction of the image.

  5. Relaxation dynamics of lysozyme in solution under pressure: Combining molecular dynamics simulations and quasielastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calandrini, V. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Synchrotron Soleil, L' Orme de Merisiers, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hamon, V. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Hinsen, K. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Synchrotron Soleil, L' Orme de Merisiers, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Calligari, P. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, B.P. 156, 38042 Grenoble (France); Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bellissent-Funel, M.-C. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kneller, G.R. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Synchrotron Soleil, L' Orme de Merisiers, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)], E-mail: kneller@cnrs-orleans.fr

    2008-04-18

    This paper presents a study of the influence of non-denaturing hydrostatic pressure on the relaxation dynamics of lysozyme in solution, which combines molecular dynamics simulations and quasielastic neutron scattering experiments. We compare results obtained at ambient pressure and at 3 kbar. Experiments have been performed at pD 4.6 and at a protein concentration of 60 mg/ml. For both pressures we checked the monodispersity of the protein solution by small angle neutron scattering. To interpret the simulation results and the experimental data, we adopt the fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process as a model for the internal relaxation dynamics of the protein. On the experimental side, global protein motions are accounted for by the model of free translational diffusion, neglecting the much slower rotational diffusion. We find that the protein dynamics in the observed time window from about 1 to 100 ps is slowed down under pressure, while its fractal characteristics is preserved, and that the amplitudes of the motions are reduced by about 20%. The slowing down of the relaxation is reduced with increasing q-values, where more localized motions are seen.

  6. Structural and Dynamical Properties of Polyethylene/Graphene Nanocomposites through Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastassia N. Rissanou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Detailed atomistic (united atoms molecular dynamics simulations of several graphene based polymer (polyethylene, PE nanocomposite systems have been performed. Systems with graphene sheets of different sizes have been simulated at the same graphene concentration (~3%. In addition, a periodic graphene layer (“infinite sheet” has been studied. Results concerning structural and dynamical properties of PE chains are presented for the various systems and compared to data from a corresponding bulk system. The final properties of the material are the result of a complex effect of the graphene’s sheet size, mobility and fluctuations. A detailed investigation of density, structure and dynamics of the hybrid systems has been conducted. Particular emphasis has been given in spatial heterogeneities due to the PE/graphene interfaces, which were studied through a detailed analysis based on radial distances form the graphene’s center-of-mass. Chain segmental dynamics is found to be slower, compared to the bulk one, at the PE/graphene interface by a factor of 5 to 10. Furthermore, an analysis on the graphene sheets characteristics is presented in terms of conformational properties (i.e., wrinkling and mobility.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal disruptive self-assembly in dynamic peptide libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasselli, I R; Moreira, I P; Ulijn, R V; Tuttle, T

    2017-08-09

    There is significant interest in the use of unmodified self-assembling peptides as building blocks for functional, supramolecular biomaterials. Recently, dynamic peptide libraries (DPLs) have been proposed to select self-assembling materials from dynamically exchanging mixtures of dipeptide inputs in the presence of a nonspecific protease enzyme, where peptide sequences are selected and amplified based on their self-assembling tendencies. It was shown that the results of the DPL of mixed sequences (e.g. starting from a mixture of dileucine, L 2 , and diphenylalanine, F 2 ) did not give the same outcome as the separate L 2 and F 2 libraries (which give rise to the formation of F 6 and L 6 ), implying that interactions between these sequences could disrupt the self-assembly. In this study, coarse grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations are used to understand the DPL results for F 2 , L 2 and mixed libraries. CG-MD simulations demonstrate that interactions between precursors can cause the low formation yield of hexapeptides in the mixtures of dipeptides and show that this ability to disrupt is influenced by the concentration of the different species in the DPL. The disrupting self-assembly effect between the species in the DPL is an important effect to take into account in dynamic combinatorial chemistry as it affects the possible discovery of new materials. This work shows that combined computational and experimental screening can be used complementarily and in combination providing a powerful means to discover new supramolecular peptide nanostructures.

  8. Dynamics and energetics of permeation through aquaporins. What do we learn from molecular dynamics simulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hub, Jochen S; Grubmüller, Helmut; de Groot, Bert L

    2009-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of integral membrane proteins, which facilitate the rapid and yet highly selective flux of water and other small solutes across biological membranes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations contributed substantially to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie this remarkable efficiency and selectivity of aquaporin channels. This chapter reviews the current state of MD simulations of aquaporins and related aquaglyceroporins as well as the insights these simulations have provided. The mechanism of water permeation through AQPs and methods to determine channel permeabilities from simulations are described. Protons are strictly excluded from AQPs by a large electrostatic barrier and not by an interruption of the Grotthuss mechanism inside the pore. Both the protein's electric field and desolvation effects contribute to this barrier. Permeation of apolar gas molecules such as CO(2) through AQPs is accompanied by a large energetic barrier and thus can only be expected in membranes with a low intrinsic gas permeability. Additionally, the insights from simulations into the mechanism of glycerol permeation through the glycerol facilitator GlpF from E. coli are summarized. Finally, MD simulations are discussed that revealed that the aro-matic/arginine constriction region is generally the filter for uncharged solutes, and that AQP selectivity is controlled by a hydrophobic effect and steric restraints.

  9. Advances in chemical physics dynamical processes in condensed matter

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Myron W

    2009-01-01

    Transport Properties and Soliton Models for Polyacetylene (M. Andretta, et al.). Development and Application of the Theory of Brownian Motion (W. Coffey). The Fading of Memory During the Regression of Structural Fluctuations (L. Dissado, et al.). Cooperative Molecular Behavior and Field Effects on Liquids: Experimental Considerations (G. Evans). A Review and Computer Simulation of the Molecular Dynamics of a Series of Specific Molecular Liquids (M. Evans and G. Evans). Recent Advances in Molecular-Dynamics Computer Simulation (D. Fincham and D. Heyes). Nonadiabatic Scattering Probl

  10. Studies of climate dynamics with innovative global-model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoming

    Climate simulations with different degrees of idealization are essential for the development of our understanding of the climate system. Studies in this dissertation employ carefully designed global-model simulations for the goal of gaining theoretical and conceptual insights into some problems of climate dynamics. Firstly, global warming-induced changes in extreme precipitation are investigated using a global climate model with idealized geography. The precipitation changes over an idealized north-south mid-latitude mountain barrier at the western margin of an otherwise flat continent are studied. The intensity of the 40 most intense events on the western slopes increases by about ~4°C of surface warming. In contrast, the intensity of the top 40 events on the eastern mountain slopes increases at about ~6°C. This higher sensitivity is due to enhanced ascent during the eastern-slope events, which can be explained in terms of linear mountain-wave theory relating to global warming-induced changes in the upper-tropospheric static stability and the tropopause level. Dominated by different dynamical factors, changes in the intensity of extreme precipitation events over plains and oceans might differ from changes over mountains. So the response of extreme precipitation over mountains and flat areas are further compared using larger data sets of simulated extreme events over the two types of surfaces. It is found that the sensitivity of extreme precipitation to increases in global mean surface temperature is 3% per °C lower over mountains than over the oceans or the plains. The difference in sensitivity among these regions is not due to thermodynamic effects, but rather to differences between the gravity-wave dynamics governing vertical velocities over the mountains and the cyclone dynamics governing vertical motions over the oceans and plains. The strengthening of latent heating in the storms over oceans and plains leads to stronger ascent in the warming climate

  11. An Interactive Simulator for Imposing Virtual Musculoskeletal Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Christopher

    2017-05-10

    Disease processes are often marked by both neural and muscular changes that alter movement control and execution, but these adaptations are difficult to tease apart because they occur simultaneously. This is addressed by swapping an individual's limb dynamics with a neurally-controlled facsimile using an interactive musculoskeletal simulator (IMS) that allows controlled modifications of musculoskeletal dynamics. This paper details the design and operation of the IMS, quantifies and describes human adaptation to the IMS, and determines whether the IMS allows users to move naturally, a prerequisite for manipulation experiments. Healthy volunteers (n = 4) practiced a swift goal-directed task (back-and-forth elbow flexion/extension) for 90 trials with the IMS off (normal dynamics) and 240 trials with the IMS on, i.e. the actions of a user's personalized electromyography-driven musculoskeletal model are robotically imposed back on to the user. After practicing with the IMS on, subjects could complete the task with end-point errors of 1.56°, close to the speed-matched IMS-off error of 0.57°. Muscle activity, joint torque, and arm kinematics for IMS-on and -off conditions were well matched for three subjects (root-meansquared error [RMSE] = 0.16 Nm), but the error was higher for one subject with a small stature (RMSE = 0.25 Nm). A well-matched musculoskeletal model allowed IMS users to perform a goal-directed task nearly as well as when the IMS was not active. This advancement permits real-time manipulations of musculoskeletal dynamics, which could increase our understanding of muscular and neural co-adaptations to injury, disease, disuse, and aging.

  12. The Art of Molecular Dynamics Simulation (by D. C. Rapaport)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molner, Stephen P.

    1999-02-01

    Cambridge University Press: New York, 1996. 400 pp. ISBN 0 521 44561 2. $74.95. This book describes the extremely powerful techniques of molecular dynamics simulation. The techniques involve solving the classical many-body problems in contexts relevant to the study of matter at the atomic level. The method allows the prediction of static and dynamics properties of substances directly from the underlying interactions between molecules. This is, of course, a very broad subject and the author has adopted a dual approach in that the text is partly tutorial and also contains a large number of computer programs for practical use. Rapaport has adopted the attitude of trying the simplest method first. Atoms are modeled as point particles interacting through point potentials. Molecules are represented by atoms with orientation dependent forces, or as extended structures each containing several interaction sites. The molecules may be rigid, flexible, or somewhere in between, and if there are internal degrees of freedom there will be internal forces as well. The intent of the book is not to discuss the design of molecular models, but rather to make use of existing models, and from a pedagogical viewpoint the simpler the model the better. The aim of the book is to demonstrate the general methodology of molecular dynamics simulation by example, not to review the large body of literature covering the many different kinds of models developed for specific applications. The text is partly tutorial, but also contains a large number of computer programs for practical use. This volume will serve as an introduction to the subject for beginners and as a reference manual for the more experienced practitioner. The material covers a wide range of practical methods and real applications and is organized as a series of case studies. The typical case study includes a summary of the theoretical background used for the formulation of the computational approach. That is described by either a

  13. Direct dynamics simulation of FES-assisted locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, Karin G.; van den Bogert, Anton J.; Hulliger, Manuel

    1996-05-01

    Using functional electrical stimulation (FES), muscles of spinal-cord injured patients can be activated by externally generated electrical currents in order to restore function. As for gait, the question arises when during the gait cycle and two what extent individual muscles should be stimulated. Computer simulation provides the designer with a tool to evaluate the performance of different muscle stimulation patterns without the need to test patients at every stage of system development. The goals of this paper are: first, to identify, using computer simulation, multi-channel stimulation patterns that are capable of reproducing normal gait kinematics for a full gait cycle, without relying on sensory feedback (open-loop control); second, to briefly assess the stability of the gait obtained. A two-dimensional musculo-skeletal model was developed, based on mathematical representations of muscle properties (including force-length and force velocity characteristics and muscle activation dynamics). A visco-elastic model, including non-linear heel-pad properties, was used to describe the foot-ground interaction. A seven segment skeletal model was actuated by 8 major muscle groups in each leg. Rectangular muscle stimulation patterns were defined by 3 parameters: onset, termination and level of stimulation. Thus, the minimization of the differences between simulated and measured normal gait kinematics was a 24 (3 by 8) parameter optimization problem. Although a good agrement was found between simulated and measured kinematics (rms difference equals 6.5 degrees), stable cyclic locomotion was not achieved. At this point it is concluded that muscle properties do not provide sufficient stability to permit cyclic locomotion with sixteen channels of muscle stimulation, and that incorporation of sensory feedback control will be necessary to achieve this goal.

  14. A particle based simulation model for glacier dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Åström

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A particle-based computer simulation model was developed for investigating the dynamics of glaciers. In the model, large ice bodies are made of discrete elastic particles which are bound together by massless elastic beams. These beams can break, which induces brittle behaviour. At loads below fracture, beams may also break and reform with small probabilities to incorporate slowly deforming viscous behaviour in the model. This model has the advantage that it can simulate important physical processes such as ice calving and fracturing in a more realistic way than traditional continuum models. For benchmarking purposes the deformation of an ice block on a slip-free surface was compared to that of a similar block simulated with a Finite Element full-Stokes continuum model. Two simulations were performed: (1 calving of an ice block partially supported in water, similar to a grounded marine glacier terminus, and (2 fracturing of an ice block on an inclined plane of varying basal friction, which could represent transition to fast flow or surging. Despite several approximations, including restriction to two-dimensions and simplified water-ice interaction, the model was able to reproduce the size distributions of the debris observed in calving, which may be approximated by universal scaling laws. On a moderate slope, a large ice block was stable and quiescent as long as there was enough of friction against the substrate. For a critical length of frictional contact, global sliding began, and the model block disintegrated in a manner suggestive of a surging glacier. In this case the fragment size distribution produced was typical of a grinding process.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of a two-dimensional system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Huseini

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available   The study of a two-dimensional (2-D system started nearly half a century ago when Peierls and Landau showed the lack of long range translational order in a two-dimensional solid. In 1968, Mermin proved that despite the absence of long range translational order. Two-dimensional solids can still exhibit a different kind of long range bond orientation. During the last decade, fascinating theories were put forward to explain the role of topological defects in the melting of two-dimensional solids, starting with Kosterlitz and Thouless. Recent surge of interest in melting is also due to the theoretical ideas of Halperin, Nelson and Young. They have suggested that the transition may be fundamentally different from that observed in ordinary three-dimensional systems. Computer simulations suggest that the transition is of the usual first-order type observed in a three-dimensional system. A large body of experimental and simulation research into the two-dimensional melting followed the announcement of the KTHNY theory. In spite of all this effort, the question as to the nature of two dimensional melting remains unresolved. Recent experimental work supporting the existence of continuous melting transitions in some two-dimentsional systems indicates the need for further theoretical and computational work to lead to an understanding of the experimental results.   In this paper we intend to summarze and clarify the current situation with regard to research in the two-dimensional melting with an emphasis on computer simulations. The paper begins with an overview of the current status of relevant theoretical, experimental and simulation research, then a two-dimensional simulation of an ionic salt system is studied in detail. This simulation has been done by using the molecular dynamics method. The most important parameters that have been determined are ,The trnsition temperature, the total energy of the system, the mean square displacement and the bond

  16. Dynamic, Thermodynamic and Vorticity Budget Analysis of a Simulated Tornado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yue

    Data from a very high resolution (30m grid spacing) simulation of a long-lived EF5 tornado embedded in a supercell was used to examine the dynamic and thermodynamic quantities associated with the evolution of the simulated tornado. A Eulerian vertical vorticity budget analysis was performed in a volume bounding the lowest grid layer inside the tornado at various stages to better understand the possible vorticity sources for the low-level tornado, particularly the role of small-scale vortices present primarily along the forward-flank downdraft boundary. The dynamic and thermodynamic fields exhibit similar features to past studies such as slightly positive pressure perturbations along the rear-flank downdraft boundary, small-scale downdrafts with positive potential temperature perturbation to the southwest of the tornado, two-celled structure of the tornado, etc. The rear-flank downdraft in this simulation differs from the classic conceptual model because the vertical velocity was found to be either close to zero or slightly positive in a distinctive region wrapping partially around the major updraft, where previous studies often found a prominent rear-flank downdraft. The vertical vorticity budget analysis shows that the stretching term and the vertical flux term largely oppose each other with nearly the same magnitude throughout the analysis period. The tilting term is almost zero (though slightly positive) throughout the genesis stage, and makes a small and positive contribution in the mature and late mature phases of the tornado. The horizontal flux term makes the greatest contribution in the vertical vorticity source for the tornado during the genesis stage and a significant contribution during the maintenance period. This suggests that the small-scale vortices present along the forward-flank downdraft boundary flowing towards and merging with the tornado are the major vertical vorticity source for the development of the tornado. This, and the lack of a cohesive

  17. Thermal equilibrium of a Brownian particle in a fluctuating fluid: a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Nie, Deming

    2017-07-01

    In this work the fluctuating lattice Boltzmann method was adopted to simulate the motion of a Brownian particle in a fluid in two dimensions. The temperatures characterizing the translation motion and rotational motion of the particle were calculated to evaluate the thermal equilibrium between the particle and the fluid. Furthermore, the effects of the fluid temperature and viscosity on the fluid pressure fluctuation were investigated. The linear relationships were observed in a log-log coordinate. Besides, the slopes of the linear relation were obtained, which keeps constant for all cases studied.

  18. GaAs-Based Nanowire Devices with Multiple Asymmetric Gates for Electrical Brownian Ratchets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Nakano, Yuki; Kasai, Seiya

    2013-06-01

    GaAs-based nanowire devices having multiple asymmetric gates for electrical Brownian ratchets were fabricated and characterized. From three-dimensional potential simulation results and current-voltage characteristics, we confirmed the formation of the asymmetric potential in our device design. Direct current was generated at room temperature by repeatedly switching the potential in a multiple-asymmetric-gate device on and off. Such current was not observed in either a single-asymmetric-gate device or a multiple-symmetric-gate device. The current direction and input frequency dependences of the net current indicated that the observed current was generated by the flashing-ratchet mechanism.

  19. Parametrization of Backbone Flexibility in a Coarse-Grained Force Field for Proteins (COFFDROP) Derived from All-Atom Explicit-Solvent Molecular Dynamics Simulations of All Possible Two-Residue Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frembgen-Kesner, Tamara; Andrews, Casey T; Li, Shuxiang; Ngo, Nguyet Anh; Shubert, Scott A; Jain, Aakash; Olayiwola, Oluwatoni J; Weishaar, Mitch R; Elcock, Adrian H

    2015-05-12

    Recently, we reported the parametrization of a set of coarse-grained (CG) nonbonded potential functions, derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acid pairs and designed for use in (implicit-solvent) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins; this force field was named COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representations Of Proteins). Here, we describe the extension of COFFDROP to include bonded backbone terms derived from fitting to results of explicit-solvent MD simulations of all possible two-residue peptides containing the 20 standard amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms. The iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method was used to optimize new CG potential functions for backbone-related terms by attempting to reproduce angle, dihedral, and distance probability distributions generated by the MD simulations. In a simple test of the transferability of the extended force field, the angle, dihedral, and distance probability distributions obtained from BD simulations of 56 three-residue peptides were compared to results from corresponding explicit-solvent MD simulations. In a more challenging test of the COFFDROP force field, it was used to simulate eight intrinsically disordered proteins and was shown to quite accurately reproduce the experimental hydrodynamic radii (Rhydro), provided that the favorable nonbonded interactions of the force field were uniformly scaled downward in magnitude. Overall, the results indicate that the COFFDROP force field is likely to find use in modeling the conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins and multidomain proteins connected by flexible linkers.

  20. Phase space master equations for quantum Brownian motion in a periodic potential: comparison of various kinetic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleary, Liam; Coffey, William T; Dowling, William J [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Kalmykov, Yuri P [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique, Universite de Perpignan Via Domitia, 52, Avenue de Paul Alduy, 66860 Perpignan Cedex (France); Titov, Serguey V, E-mail: kalmykov@univ-perp.fr [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Vvedenskii Square 1, Fryazino, 141190 (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-25

    The dynamics of quantum Brownian particles in a cosine periodic potential are studied using the phase space formalism associated with the Wigner representation of quantum mechanics. Various kinetic phase space master equation models describing quantum Brownian motion in a potential are compared by evaluating the dynamic structure factor and escape rate from the differential recurrence relations generated by the models. The numerical solution is accomplished via matrix continued fractions in the manner customarily used for the classical Fokker-Planck equation. The results of numerical calculations of the escape rate from a well of the cosine potential are compared with those given analytically by the quantum-mechanical reaction rate theory solution of the Kramers turnover problem for a periodic potential, given by Georgievskii and Pollak (1994 Phys. Rev. E 49 5098), enabling one to appraise each model. (paper)