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Sample records for brown-nosed coatis nasua

  1. Morphological study of the respiratory system of the brown-nosed coati (Nasua nasua

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    João Flavio Panattoni Martins

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to describe, macroscopically and with light microscopy, the respiratory organs of the brown-nosed coati (Nasua nasua. Five animals were euthanized, fixed in 10% formaldehyde solution and stored for dissection. The respiratory tracts of the coati were examined, measured and photographed. For the light microscopy study, fragments were collected from the respiratory organs, processed using standard techniques for histology and stained with HE and toluidine blue. The nose of the coati is pointed and turned upward. Internally it has ethmoidal, dorsal nasal and ventral nasal conchae that are separated by the dorsal and ventral nasal meatuses. The larynx has four cartilaginous structures: arytenoid, cricoid, epiglottis and thyroid. The trachea contains 34 tracheal rings and tracheal ligaments that are covered with ciliated pseudostratified epithelial tissue. The lungs are divided into lobes by interlobular fissures. The right lung is divided into four lobes and is larger than the left lung, whereas the left lung has only two lobes. Microscopically, the primary, secondary and tertiary bronchi have epithelial tissue that is similar to the trachea. We conclude that the respiratory tract of the brown-nosed coati resembles the respiratory tracts described for domestic carnivores.

  2. Habitat use and home range of brown-nosed coati, Nasua nasua (Carnivora: Procyonidae) in the Brazilian Cerrado biome.

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    Trovati, Roberto Guilherme; Brito, Bernardo Alves de; Duarte, José Maurício Barbanti

    2010-09-01

    The brown-nosed coati (Nasua nasua) is a carnivorous species found in all the Brazilian biomes, some of which are endangered areas. The aim of this work was to determine the habitat use and selection, home range and core area of N. nasua in the Cerrado biome, central region of Tocantins, Brazil. The study was carried out in an area of approximately 20 000ha from May 2000 to July 2002. A total of seven box traps were placed in the area for 13 months, three of 11 captured animals were followed and monitored by radio-tracking during 13 months. The monitoring was conducted once a day, three times a week using a car and walking through the study area (radio-tracking and visual contact). The results demonstrate that these three males used more frequently the gallery forest formation, followed by cerrado and wetlands. The use of gallery forest by these animals indicated an habitat selection (Proportion test, z=12.98, pcerrado percentage of habitat use. Besides, results also showed a gallery forest selection by adult (Proportion test z=13.62, pCerrado, that may support conservation efforts.

  3. Construction of arboreal nests by brown-nosed coatis, Nasua nasua (Carnivora: Procyonidae in the Brazilian Pantanal

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    Natalie Olifiers

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The construction of arboreal nests is rare among mammals in the order Carnivora. However, coatis (Procyonidae: Nasua Storr, 1780 build arboreal nests that are used for resting or birthing. Here we describe Nasua nasua (Linnaeus, 1766 nests located during a telemetry study of coatis in the Brazilian Pantanal. Coati nests were all "bird-like", that is, open nests having a semispherical shape. Nests were constructed of twigs, branches, and lianas sometimes interlaced with leaves. Nest volume was 30-50 cm³ and average nest height was approximately 9.5 m. Nests were found in open "cerrado" vegetation, along forest edges, or in interior "cordilheiras" forest. The reasons why coatis build such nests are unclear, but may relate to inter or intraspecific competition for nesting sites, litter size, thermoregulation, and predation avoidance.

  4. Semen collection and evaluation of captive coatis (Nasua nasua

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    R.C.R. Paz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Semen samples (n=105 were collected through eletroejaculation from six adult male coatis (Nasua nasua between January 2007 and December 2008 at Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso Zoo, Cuiabá, Brazil. Mean values were: volume (mL; concentration (sperm/mL; total motility (%; progressive sperm motility (scale, 0-5; live spermatozoa (%; acrossome integrity (%; primary defects (%; and secondary defects (%. There was high correlation between total motility and live sperm; total motility and progressive sperm motility; total motility and acrossome integrity; live sperm and progressive motility; live sperm and acrossome integrity and volume and concentration. The method for semen collection was considered safe and efficient. It can be used for the evaluation of breeding potential of coati in captivity and for the establishment of new assisted reproductive technology (ART for threatened neotropical carnivores species.

  5. ISOLATION AND GENOTYPING OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS FROM FREE-LIVING SOUTH AMERICAN COATI (NASUA NASUA).

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    Silva, Rodrigo O S; Almeida, Lara R; Oliveira Junior, Carlos A; Lima, Paula C S; Soares, Danielle F M; Pereira, Pedro L L; Silva, Israel J; Lobato, Francisco C F

    2016-03-01

    The importance of Clostridium perfringens for most wild animal species remains unclear. This study aimed to isolate and genotype C. perfringens in stool samples from free-living South American coati (Nasua nasua) in Brazil. Forty-six free-living N. nasua were trapped and stool samples were collected. Two different protocols for C. perfringens isolation were tested: direct plating onto selective agar and pre-enrichment in broth followed by plating in selective agar. Clostridium perfringens type A was isolated from 15 (32.6%) animals by direct plating and 36 (78.3%) animals by broth PE, and the rate of isolation was significantly different between these two methods (P < 0.01). Twelve of the 36 (33.3%) isolated strains by the PE protocol were positive for the β-2 toxin-encoding gene (cpb2) whereas the enterotoxin-encoding gene (cpe) and necrotic enteritis like-B toxin gene (netb) were not found. These results suggest that C. perfringens is commonly part of the microbiota of free-living coatis. Additionally, the use of a PE protocol appears to be essential for studies on C. perfringens in this species.

  6. Prey-rolling behavior of coatis ( Nasua spp.) is elicited by benzoquinones from millipedes

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    Weldon, Paul J.; Cranmore, Catherine F.; Chatfield, Jenifer A.

    2006-01-01

    Coatis ( Nasua spp.), gregarious, omnivorous carnivores that range in forests from the southwestern USA to south America, dispatch millipedes by rolling them on the ground using rapid, alternating movements of their forepaws. Prey rolling of millipedes is thought to stimulate the depletion of their defensive secretions and to wipe off secretions before millipedes are consumed. We report that prey-rolling behavior in Nasua spp. is elicited by 1,4-benzoquinone; 2-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone; and 2-methoxy-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone, the chief components of the defensive secretions of julidan, spirobolidan, and spirostreptidan millipedes. Chemicals elaborated for defense sometimes evolutionarily “backfire,” providing cues to predators on the presence or identity of prey. The elicitation of prey-rolling behavior in Nasua spp. by benzoquinones illustrates this effect for millipedes (and possibly other arthropods) that defensively discharge these compounds.

  7. Morphology of the muscles of the shoulder, arms and forearms of the coati (Nasua nasua

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    Amilton Cesar dos Santos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The coati is an animal that belongs to the Phylum Chordata, the Class Mammalia, the Order Carnivora and the Procyonidae family. The striking feature of the family Procyonidae is the presence of five digits on the paws. These animals are classified as plantigrades and can do hand movements in different directions. It has habits of climbing trees to procreate, fleeing from danger, and sleeping at night. It feeds on fruits, small vertebrates, insects, nectar, eggs and vegetables. For this work were used three euthanized animals, from the Scientific Breeding Center (CECRIMPAS – UNIFEOB authorized by IBAMA (Process nº 02027.003731/04-76, fixed in formaldehyde solution 10%. This work describes the morphology of the muscles of the forelimb of the coati, through dissection and photographic documentation. In the studied species, we found anatomical adaptations of thoracic limb muscles which had a mass volume much greater than in other species (puma, alpaca, dog, cat, lhama and Cebus apella monkeys, and this fact was found to be directly related to their abilities in climbing and handicraft.

  8. Occurrence of parasitism by Dioctophyma renale in ring-tailed coatis (Nasua nasua of the Tiete Ecological Park, São Paulo, Brazil Ocorrência de parasitismo por Dioctophyma renale em quati (Nasua nasua do Parque Ecológico Tietê, São Paulo

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    Liliane Milanelo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Dioctophymosis is a worldwide renal parasitosis caused by the Dioctophyma renale nematode, which results in progressive destruction of renal tissue. Aquatics annelids are considered the main intermediate hosts and the literature refers as permanent hosts of dogs, wild mammals and even humans. During procedures for population control of coatis (Nasua nasua in the Ecological Park of Tietê (PET, was noticed the presence of parasitosis by D. renale. From 68 animals, males and females, young and adults, submitted to exploratory laparotomy, 51 were positive for the presence of worms, 9 were found only in the right kidney. In 10 cases, in addition to right kidney parasitism, worms were also observed in the abdominal cavity. In 24 cases D. renale was found only in the abdominal cavity and in 8 animals the right kidney was reduced to a small rigid structure. The study showed that the preferred site for parasitism of the worm, considered erratic, was the abdominal cavity in 66.66% of the cases.A dioctofimose é uma parasitose renal causada pelo nematóide Dioctophyma renale conhecida por gerar a destruição progressiva do parênquima renal. Anelídeos de água doce são considerados os principais hospedeiros intermediários e a literatura refere como hospedeiros definitivos cães domésticos, mamíferos selvagens e até seres humanos. Durante procedimentos de controle populacional de quatis (Nasua nasua no Parque Ecológico do Tietê (PET, evidenciou-se a presença do parasitismo por D. renale. Sessenta e oito animais foram submetidos à laparotomia, machos e fêmeas, jovens e adultos, dos quais 51 foram positivos para presença do parasita. Em 9 animais o parasita esteve presente apenas no rim direito; em 10 animais D. renale parasitava o rim direito e a cavidade abdominal simultaneamente. Em outros 24 quatis o parasita foi encontrado apenas na cavidade abdominal e em 8 animais o rim direito foi reduzido apenas a uma pequena estrutura rígida. O estudo

  9. Use of Anecdotal Occurrence Data in Species Distribution Models: An Example Based on the White-Nosed Coati (Nasua narica in the American Southwest

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    James N. Stuart

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Species distributions are usually inferred from occurrence records. However, these records are prone to errors in spatial precision and reliability. Although influence of spatial errors has been fairly well studied, there is little information on impacts of poor reliability. Reliability of an occurrence record can be influenced by characteristics of the species, conditions during the observation, and observer’s knowledge. Some studies have advocated use of anecdotal data, while others have advocated more stringent evidentiary standards such as only accepting records verified by physical evidence, at least for rare or elusive species. Our goal was to evaluate the influence of occurrence records with different reliability on species distribution models (SDMs of a unique mammal, the white-nosed coati (Nasua narica in the American Southwest. We compared SDMs developed using maximum entropy analysis of combined bioclimatic and biophysical variables and based on seven subsets of occurrence records that varied in reliability and spatial precision. We found that the predicted distribution of the coati based on datasets that included anecdotal occurrence records were similar to those based on datasets that only included physical evidence. Coati distribution in the American Southwest was predicted to occur in southwestern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona and was defined primarily by evenness of climate and Madrean woodland and chaparral land-cover types. Coati distribution patterns in this region suggest a good model for understanding the biogeographic structure of range margins. We concluded that occurrence datasets that include anecdotal records can be used to infer species distributions, providing such data are used only for easily-identifiable species and based on robust modeling methods such as maximum entropy. Use of a reliability rating system is critical for using anecdotal data.

  10. Radiographic evaluation of the cardiac silluet using the VHS method (Vertebral Heart Size in young and adults coatis (Nasua nasua, Linneaus 1766 living in captivity

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    Andresa Cássia Martini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiographic examination of the toracic cavity is an usefull noninvasive method for assessment, monitoring the progress of heart disease, suggesting prognosis and guiding the treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cardiac silhouette of young and adults coatis and evaluate its relationship to the number of thoracic vertebrae (VHS, the method proposed by Buchanam and Buchele (1995 for small animals. We evaluated a group of 20 coatis, divided by age: I (GI and 8 animals aged between 4 and 5 months and group II (GII with 12 animals over 12 months old. Based in chest radiographs and VD laterolateral right projections for determining the major axis (L and short axis (Y being the sum of L and S is the value obtained by ESR, the relative depth/width (D / L chest were obtained and the results determined the type of conformation of the thorax, which results greater than 1.25 cm denote chest type deep, 0.75 to 1.25 cm chest intermediate and inferior results will 0.75cm wide chest. It was observed that the heart is alocated between the fourth and seventh pair of ribs, VHS average coatis healthy adults was 9.36 ± 0.75 and 8.06 ± 0 youth, 595 units thoracic vertebrae and the predominant conformation found was of intermediate type when compared to dogs. The mean values in this study serve as a basis for interpretation of the VHS type, however, a larger number may be required animals to determine the physiological limits of the cardiac silhouette in coati.

  11. Co-Infection and Wild Animal Health: Effects of Trypanosomatids and Gastrointestinal Parasites on Coatis of the Brazilian Pantanal.

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    Natalie Olifiers

    Full Text Available Wild animals are infected by diverse parasites, but how they influence host health is poorly understood. We examined the relationship of trypanosomatids and gastrointestinal parasites with health of wild brown-nosed coatis (Nasua nasua from the Brazilian Pantanal. We used coati body condition and hematological parameters as response variables in linear models that were compared using an information theoretic approach. Predictors were high/low parasitemias by Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi, and indices representing the abundance of distinct groups of gastrointestinal parasites. We also analyzed how host health changed with host sex and reproductive seasonality. Hemoparasites was best related to coati body condition and hematological indices, whereas abundance of gastrointestinal parasites was relatively less associated with coati health. Additionally, some associations were best predicted by models that incorporated reproductive seasonality and host sex. Overall, we observed a lower health condition during the breeding season, when coatis are under reproductive stress and may be less able to handle infection. In addition, females seem to handle infection better than males. Body condition was lower in coatis with high parasitemias of T. evansi, especially during the reproductive season. Total red blood cell counts, packed cell volume, platelets and eosinophils were also lower in animals with high T. evansi parasitemias. Total white blood cell counts and mature neutrophils were lower in animals with high parasitemias for both Trypanosoma species, with neutrophils decreasing mainly during the reproductive season. Overall, decreases in hematological parameters of females with T. evansi high parasitemias were less evident. For T. cruzi, monocytes decreased in individuals with high parasitemias. High abundances of microfilariae in the bloodstream, and cestode eggs and coccidian oocysts in feces were also associated with coati blood parameters. This

  12. Co-Infection and Wild Animal Health: Effects of Trypanosomatids and Gastrointestinal Parasites on Coatis of the Brazilian Pantanal

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    Olifiers, Natalie; Jansen, Ana Maria; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Bianchi, Rita de Cassia; D’Andrea, Paulo Sergio; Mourão, Guilherme de Miranda; Gompper, Matthew Edzart

    2015-01-01

    Wild animals are infected by diverse parasites, but how they influence host health is poorly understood. We examined the relationship of trypanosomatids and gastrointestinal parasites with health of wild brown-nosed coatis (Nasua nasua) from the Brazilian Pantanal. We used coati body condition and hematological parameters as response variables in linear models that were compared using an information theoretic approach. Predictors were high/low parasitemias by Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi, and indices representing the abundance of distinct groups of gastrointestinal parasites. We also analyzed how host health changed with host sex and reproductive seasonality. Hemoparasites was best related to coati body condition and hematological indices, whereas abundance of gastrointestinal parasites was relatively less associated with coati health. Additionally, some associations were best predicted by models that incorporated reproductive seasonality and host sex. Overall, we observed a lower health condition during the breeding season, when coatis are under reproductive stress and may be less able to handle infection. In addition, females seem to handle infection better than males. Body condition was lower in coatis with high parasitemias of T. evansi, especially during the reproductive season. Total red blood cell counts, packed cell volume, platelets and eosinophils were also lower in animals with high T. evansi parasitemias. Total white blood cell counts and mature neutrophils were lower in animals with high parasitemias for both Trypanosoma species, with neutrophils decreasing mainly during the reproductive season. Overall, decreases in hematological parameters of females with T. evansi high parasitemias were less evident. For T. cruzi, monocytes decreased in individuals with high parasitemias. High abundances of microfilariae in the bloodstream, and cestode eggs and coccidian oocysts in feces were also associated with coati blood parameters. This study shows the

  13. Co-Infection and Wild Animal Health: Effects of Trypanosomatids and Gastrointestinal Parasites on Coatis of the Brazilian Pantanal.

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    Olifiers, Natalie; Jansen, Ana Maria; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Bianchi, Rita de Cassia; D'Andrea, Paulo Sergio; Mourão, Guilherme de Miranda; Gompper, Matthew Edzart

    2015-01-01

    Wild animals are infected by diverse parasites, but how they influence host health is poorly understood. We examined the relationship of trypanosomatids and gastrointestinal parasites with health of wild brown-nosed coatis (Nasua nasua) from the Brazilian Pantanal. We used coati body condition and hematological parameters as response variables in linear models that were compared using an information theoretic approach. Predictors were high/low parasitemias by Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi, and indices representing the abundance of distinct groups of gastrointestinal parasites. We also analyzed how host health changed with host sex and reproductive seasonality. Hemoparasites was best related to coati body condition and hematological indices, whereas abundance of gastrointestinal parasites was relatively less associated with coati health. Additionally, some associations were best predicted by models that incorporated reproductive seasonality and host sex. Overall, we observed a lower health condition during the breeding season, when coatis are under reproductive stress and may be less able to handle infection. In addition, females seem to handle infection better than males. Body condition was lower in coatis with high parasitemias of T. evansi, especially during the reproductive season. Total red blood cell counts, packed cell volume, platelets and eosinophils were also lower in animals with high T. evansi parasitemias. Total white blood cell counts and mature neutrophils were lower in animals with high parasitemias for both Trypanosoma species, with neutrophils decreasing mainly during the reproductive season. Overall, decreases in hematological parameters of females with T. evansi high parasitemias were less evident. For T. cruzi, monocytes decreased in individuals with high parasitemias. High abundances of microfilariae in the bloodstream, and cestode eggs and coccidian oocysts in feces were also associated with coati blood parameters. This study shows the

  14. Adult male coatis play with a band of juveniles.

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    Logan, C J; Longino, J T

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the play behaviour in one group of coatis (Nasua narica) at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. We incidentally found adult males playing with juvenile coatis, and conducted post-hoc analyses to investigate this interaction. Coati groups consist of adult females and juveniles of both sexes until male juveniles reach two years of age and leave the band to become solitary. Adult males only tolerate juveniles for a brief period during breeding season when the males court females to mate. Outside of the breeding season, adult males are known to prey on juveniles. In this study, when adult males were present with the band, play occurred more than was expected by chance, and adult males engaged in many of these play bouts. Because the mechanisms driving infanticidal behaviour are not well understood, and adult male coatis show a range of behaviours from infanticide to highly affiliative interactions with juveniles, using coatis as a model system may elucidate mechanisms underlying infanticide.

  15. Kinship shapes affiliative social networks but not aggression in ring-tailed coatis.

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    Ben T Hirsch

    Full Text Available Animal groups typically contain individuals with varying degrees of genetic relatedness, and this variation in kinship has a major influence on patterns of aggression and affiliative behaviors. This link between kinship and social behavior underlies socioecological models which have been developed to explain how and why different types of animal societies evolve. We tested if kinship and age-sex class homophily in two groups of ring-tailed coatis (Nasua nasua predicted the network structure of three different social behaviors: 1 association, 2 grooming, and 3 aggression. Each group was studied during two consecutive years, resulting in four group-years available for analysis (total of 65 individuals. Association patterns were heavily influenced by agonistic interactions which typically occurred during feeding competition. Grooming networks were shaped by mother-offspring bonds, female-female social relationships, and a strong social attraction to adult males. Mother-offspring pairs were more likely to associate and groom each other, but relatedness had no effect on patterns of aggressive behavior. Additionally, kinship had little to no effect on coalitionary support during agonistic interactions. Adult females commonly came to the aid of juveniles during fights with other group members, but females often supported juveniles who were not their offspring (57% of coalitionary interactions. These patterns did not conform to predictions from socioecological models.

  16. Morfologia da glândula mamária do quati (Nasua nasua

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    Juliana B. Casals

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nasua nasua é um animal onívoro, encontrado em todo Brasil. A reprodução da espécie ocorre somente uma vez ao ano, na primavera. As fêmeas são matriarcas e amamentam suas crias até os 5 meses de idade, vivem com seus filhotes em bandos de até 30 indivíduos. Para descrição morfológica da glândula mamaria do Nasua nasua foram utilizados seis animais provenientes do Criatório Cientifico (Cecrimpas, Unifeob. Autorizado pelo Ibama (Proc.02027.002322/98-99. Para análise macroscópica um animal foi injetado com látex neoprene, sendo a artéria femoral injetada com látex de cor vermelha e a veia jugular de cor azul. Os demais animais foram fixados em solução aquosa a 10% de formaldeído. Para análise microscópica, fragmentos glandulares foram coletados e submetidos ao processo rotineiro, embebido em parafina e corados com Hematoxilina e Eosina, Picrossírius e Azul de Toluidina. Macroscopicamente foram evidenciados três pares de glândulas mamárias, sendo dois pares posicionados na região abdominal e um par na região inguinal. Microscopicamente, notou-se epitélio de revestimento externo das papilas mamárias, epitélio pavimentoso estratificado queratinizado, o qual seguia por toda glândula de forma irregular. Na entrada do óstio, o epitélio da epiderme era modificado ocorrendo uma transição de epitélio pavimentoso estratificado para um epitélio cúbico no ducto papilar. O parênquima glandular era caracteristicamente túbulo alveolar com células secretoras, evidenciado principalmente no animal lactente. Os resultados macroscópicos e microscópicos assemelham-se aos já descritos nas cadelas (Canis familiaris e os do Procyon cancrivorus pertencente à mesma família do quati, Família Procyonidae.

  17. Niche Partitioning among Mesocarnivores in a Brazilian Wetland

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    Olifiers, Natalie; Gompper, Matthew E.; Mourão, Guilherme

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the home range size, habitat selection, as well as the spatial and activity overlap, of four mid-sized carnivore species in the Central Pantanal, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. From December 2005 to September 2008, seven crab-eating foxes Cerdocyon thous, seven brown-nosed coatis Nasua nasua, and six ocelots Leopardus pardalis were radio-collared and monitored. Camera trap data on these species were also collected for the crab-eating raccoon Procyon cancrivorus. We hypothesized that there would be large niche differentiation in preferred habitat-type or active period between generalist species with similar diet, and higher similarity in habitat-type or activity time between the generalist species (crab-eating foxes and coatis) and the more specialized ocelot. Individual home ranges were estimated using the utilization distribution index (UD– 95% fixed Kernel). With data obtained from radio-collared individuals, we evaluated habitat selection using compositional analysis. Median home range size of ocelots was 8 km2. The proportion of habitats within the home ranges of ocelots did not differ from the overall habitat proportion in the study area, but ocelots preferentially used forest within their home range. The median home range size of crab-eating foxes was 1.4 km2. Foxes showed second-order habitat selection and selected savanna over shrub-savanna vegetation. The median home range size for coati was 1.5 km2. Coati home ranges were located randomly in the study area. However, within their home range, coatis occurred more frequently in savanna than in other vegetation types. Among the four species, the overlap in activity period was the highest (87%) between ocelots and raccoons, with the least overlap occurring between the ocelot and coati (25%). We suggest that temporal segregation of carnivores was more important than spatial segregation, notably between the generalist coati, crab-eating fox and crab-eating raccoon. PMID:27685854

  18. The procyonid social club: comparison of brain volumes in the coatimundi (Nasua nasua, N. narica), kinkajou (Potos flavus), and raccoon (Procyon lotor).

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    Arsznov, Bradley M; Sakai, Sharleen T

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated whether increased relative brain size, including regional brain volumes, is related to differing behavioral specializations exhibited by three member species of the family Procyonidae. Procyonid species exhibit continuums of behaviors related to social and physical environmental complexities: the mostly solitary, semiarboreal and highly dexterous raccoons (Procyon lotor); the exclusively arboreal kinkajous (Potos flavus), which live either alone or in small polyandrous family groups, and the social, terrestrial coatimundi (Nasua nasua, N. narica). Computed tomographic (CT) scans of 45 adult skulls including 17 coatimundis (9 male, 8 female), 14 raccoons (7 male, 7 female), and 14 kinkajous (7 male, 7 female) were used to create three-dimensional virtual endocasts. Endocranial volume was positively correlated with two separate measures of body size: skull basal length (r = 0.78, p < 0.01) and basicranial axis length (r = 0.45, p = 0.002). However, relative brain size (total endocranial volume as a function of body size) varied by species depending on which body size measurement (skull basal length or basicranial axis length) was used. Comparisons of relative regional brain volumes revealed that the anterior cerebrum volume consisting mainly of frontal cortex and surface area was significantly larger in the social coatimundi compared to kinkajous and raccoons. The dexterous raccoon had the largest relative posterior cerebrum volume, which includes the somatosensory cortex, in comparison to the other procyonid species studied. The exclusively arboreal kinkajou had the largest relative cerebellum and brain stem volume in comparison to the semi arboreal raccoon and the terrestrial coatimundi. Finally, intraspecific comparisons failed to reveal any sex differences, except in the social coatimundi. Female coatimundis possessed a larger relative frontal cortical volume than males. Social life histories differ in male and female coatimundis

  19. Cone photopigments in nocturnal and diurnal procyonids.

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    Jacobs, G H; Deegan, J F

    1992-10-01

    Procyonids are small, New World carnivores distributed among some 6 genera. Electroretinogram (ERG) flicker photometry was used to measure the spectra of the cone photopigments for members of two nocturnal species, the raccoon (Procyon lotor) and the kinkajou (Potos flavus), and a diurnal species, the coati (Nasua nasua). Each of the 3 has a class of cone photopigment with maximum sensitivity in the middle to long wavelengths. The spectral positioning of this cone is different for the three. Whereas the raccoon and kinkajou are monochromatic, the diurnal coati is a dichromat having an additional class of cone photopigment with peak sensitivity close to 433 nm.

  20. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma evansi infection in capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) from a nonendemic area in Brazil.

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    Da Silva, Aleksandro Schafer; Krawczak, Felipe da Silva; Soares, João Fabio; Klauck, Vanderlei; Pazinato, Rafael; Marcili, Arlei; Labruna, Marcelo Bahia

    2016-03-01

    In South America, capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) as well as coatis (Nasua nasua) are the reservoir hosts of Trypanosoma evansi. Capybaras from a T. evansi nonendemic area in the State of São Paulo, southeastern Brazil, were culled because of an ongoing outbreak of Brazilian spotted fever; serum samples from these capybaras were tested for antibodies to T. evansi. Of the 172 sera tested, 17 (9.9%) were seropositive by card agglutination test, with antibody titers of 1:8-1:128; 14 (8.1%) of these 17 seropositive sera were also seropositive by indirect fluorescent antibody test, with antibody titers of 1:16-1:256. Both serologic techniques proved to be efficient, with similar results for detection of antibodies to T. evansi in capybaras from a nonendemic area in Brazil.

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in neotropical wild carnivores (Mammalia: Carnivora: at the top of the T. cruzi transmission chain.

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    Fabiana Lopes Rocha

    Full Text Available Little is known on the role played by Neotropical wild carnivores in the Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycles. We investigated T. cruzi infection in wild carnivores from three sites in Brazil through parasitological and serological tests. The seven carnivore species examined were infected by T. cruzi, but high parasitemias detectable by hemoculture were found only in two Procyonidae species. Genotyping by Mini-exon gene, PCR-RFLP (1f8/Akw21I and kDNA genomic targets revealed that the raccoon (Procyon cancrivorus harbored TcI and the coatis (Nasua nasua harbored TcI, TcII, TcIII-IV and Trypanosoma rangeli, in single and mixed infections, besides four T. cruzi isolates that displayed odd band patterns in the Mini-exon assay. These findings corroborate the coati can be a bioaccumulator of T. cruzi Discrete Typing Units (DTU and may act as a transmission hub, a connection point joining sylvatic transmission cycles within terrestrial and arboreal mammals and vectors. Also, the odd band patterns observed in coatis' isolates reinforce that T. cruzi diversity might be much higher than currently acknowledged. Additionally, we assembled our data with T. cruzi infection on Neotropical carnivores' literature records to provide a comprehensive analysis of the infection patterns among distinct carnivore species, especially considering their ecological traits and phylogeny. Altogether, fifteen Neotropical carnivore species were found naturally infected by T. cruzi. Species diet was associated with T. cruzi infection rates, supporting the hypothesis that predator-prey links are important mechanisms for T. cruzi maintenance and dispersion in the wild. Distinct T. cruzi infection patterns across carnivore species and study sites were notable. Musteloidea species consistently exhibit high parasitemias in different studies which indicate their high infectivity potential. Mesocarnivores that feed on both invertebrates and mammals, including the coati, a host that

  2. Possible Differences in the Effects of Trypanosoma cruzi on Blood Cells and Serum Protein of Two Wildlife Reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Hernández, Fernando; López-Díaz, Osvaldo; Bello-Bedoy, Rafael; Villalobos, Guiehdani; Muñoz-García, Claudia I; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Córdoba-Aguilar, Alex; Gutiérrez-Cabrera, Ana E; Suzán, Gerardo; Villanueva-García, Claudia; Gama-Campillo, Lilia M; Díaz-Negrete, Mariela T; Rendón-Franco, Emilio

    2016-11-01

    A key step in the dynamics of vector-borne diseases is the role of seasonality. Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan that causes Chagas disease. Some wild mammals are considered natural hosts, yet not all mammals show the same response to infection. We explored the effect of T. cruzi on blood parameters in two mammal carnivores, coati (Nasua narica) and raccoon (Procyon lotor), that were naturally infected in summer and winter seasons. The study was carried out in the Zoological Park "Parque Museo de la Venta," in Southeastern Mexico. Blood samples were collected in summer and winter from 2010 to 2013. Parasite infection was assessed by PCR from whole blood, and a complete hemogram was determined by traditional manual methods. We found that both species had the same T. cruzi I lineage. For coatis, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and monocytes were dependent of season, while eosinophils and plasma proteins were significantly different, but with no season effect. For raccoon, erythrocytes, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and monocytes were dependent of season. These results and a previous study that indicated interspecific differences in parasitemia in both species suggest that raccoon is a better reservoir than coati. Such a different interspecific response implies that animals do not contribute equally to maintain T. cruzi parasites in the ecosystem. Such inequality differs according to season.

  3. Image-based red blood cell counter for multiple species of wild and domestic animals

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    C.R.M. Mauricio

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT RBC count plays an important role in animal diagnosis. Despite the many technologies available in different automated hematology analyzers, when it comes to the blood of wild animals it is still difficult to find an easy and affordable solution for multiple species. This study aims to evaluate the proposed automatic red blood cell counter. Blood samples (1 ocelot - Leopardus pardalis, 1 monkey - Cebus apella, 1 coati - Nasua nasua, 62 dogs - Canis familiaris, and 5 horses - Equus caballus were analyzed using three methods: 1-manual count, 2-automatic count by image, and 3-semi-automatic count by image; blood from dogs and horses were also analyzed by a fourth method: 4-automatic count by impedance. The counts in methods 2 and 3 were produced by the proposed red blood cell counter. Results were compared using Pearson's correlation and plots with different methods as the criterion standard. RBC counts in methods 1, 2, and 3 correlated very well with those in the method 4 (r ≥ 0.94. RBC counts produced by method 2 were highly correlated with method 3 (r = 0.998. The results indicate that the proposed method can be used as an automatic or semi-automatic counting method in clinics that are currently using the manual method for RBC assessment.

  4. Mamíferos não-voadores do campus "Luiz de Queiroz", Universidade de São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brasil Non-volant mammals of campus "Luiz de Queiroz", University of São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil

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    Carla Gheler-Costa

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The remaining portion of the Atlantic Forest within the State of Sao Paulo is highly fragmented and most of the remainders are wrapped up in an essentially agricultural mosaic. This study aims at the local surveying of non-volant mammals, including their distribution and relative abundance within the human-altered environments of campus "Luiz de Queiroz", University of Sao Paulo, Piracicaba, São Paulo State, Brazil, an urbanized area bordered by two highways and the Piracicaba River. The landscape of the study area is characterized by a mosaic of small forest fragments surrounded by pastures, agriculture, and planted forests. Small mammals were captured from February to October, 2001, with an effort of 7056 day-traps, sampling the most representative environments of the campus: planted Eucalyptus (L'Héritier and Pinus (Shaw forests, native forest fragment, meadow, rubber tree (Hevea sp. plantation, agriculture and pasture area. Occurrence of medium and large frame mammals was recorded daily (morning and afternoon from November of 2000 to October of 2001 along a trail set up to merge the studied environments. Sixteen species of non-volant mammals were recorded, ten of medium or big body-size, and six of small body-size. Capybara (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris (Linnaeus, 1766 and coati (Nasua nasua (Linnaeus, 1766 were the most abundant species.

  5. Serological Evidence of Infection by Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum (Synonym: Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi) in Free-Ranging Wild Mammals in a Nonendemic Region of the State of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiz, Laís Moraes; Fornazari, Felipe; Menozzi, Benedito Donizete; Oliveira, Gabriela Capriogli; Coiro, Carla Janeiro; Teixeira, Carlos Roberto; da Silva, Valdinei Moraes Campanucci; Donalisio, Maria Rita; Langoni, Helio

    2015-11-01

    Concerns about the interface between wildlife, domestic animals, and humans in the transmission of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) have been growing due to natural or anthropogenic environmental changes. In this context, investigations of the infection in wild mammals are important to assess their exposure to the vector and the parasite. A study of anti-Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum antibodies was carried out using the direct agglutination test (DAT) on 528 free-ranging wild mammals of 38 species from the region of Botucatu, state of São Paulo, Brazil, a municipality that has no records of the vector or of human or canine autochthony. Antibodies were detected, with a cutoff of 1:320, in 9/528 (1.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6-2.8%) mammals of the species Callithrix jacchus, Lepus europaeus, Sphiggurus villosus, Nasua nasua, Eira barbara, and Galictis cuja, with high titers (≥1280) for the last three. These three are little-studied species, and previous records of the detection of anti-Leishmania spp. antibodies in Brazil exist only for coatis (N. nasua), whereas worldwide, infection by L. (L.) infantum has been confirmed only in hares (Le. europaeus). On the other hand, opossums and canids, the species most commonly reported to be naturally infected by L. (L.) infantum, were not seropositive. Fifty-eight (58/528; 10.9%) mammals were found to have antibody titers ranging from 20 to 160 and were not included among the seropositive animals due to the adopted cutoff. However, the possibility of infection in these animals should not be discarded, because there is no standard cutoff point for the different wild species. Our findings indicate the need for investigations into the exact role of the seropositive species in the epidemiology of VL and for effective epidemiological surveillance to prevent its expansion, because even in regions where there are no records of canine or human autochthonous cases, there may be parasite circulation among wild mammals.

  6. Avaliação da predação de Podocnemis expansa e Podocnemis unifilis (Testudines, Podocnemididae no rio Javaés, Tocantins Evaluation of predation in Podocnemis expansa and Podocnemis unifilis (Testudines, Podocnemididae in the Javaés River, Tocantins

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    Giovanni Salera Junior

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Podocnemis expansa e P. unifilis são animais de vida longa, com uma demorada maturação sexual, o que influencia uma baixa taxa de substituição de indivíduos. Suas populações são caracterizadas por uma pequena mortalidade dos animais adultos, mas alta taxa de mortalidade de filhotes e embriões. Sendo a predação natural de ninhos e filhotes um dos fatores mais importantes do baixo sucesso de eclosão dessas espécies. No rio Javaés, os ovos e recém-eclodidos podem ser predados por uma grande diversidade de animais: dentre as aves, urubus (Coragyps atratus e Cathartes aura, carcará (Polyborus plancus, jaburu (Jabiru mycteria; lagartos (Tupinambis teguixin e mamíferos de pequeno porte, coati (Nasua nasua e cachorro-do-mato (Cerdocyon thous. Do total anual de desovas de P. unifilis em média 65,98% são predadas, sendo 41,68% de forma total e 24,30% parcialmente. Enquanto que apenas 5,31% das ninhadas de P. expansa são sempre parcialmente predadas. Dentre os predadores aquáticos existem diversos peixes, principalmente piranhas (Serrasalmus nattereri e jacarés (Melanosuchus niger e Caimam crocodilus. Os predadores das fêmeas de P. unifilis são: jacaré-açu (Melanosuchus niger, onça-pintada (Panthera onca e onça-parda (Puma concolor. Enquanto que as fêmeas de P. expansa em postura, somente são predadas por P. onca. As fêmeas de P. unifilis em postura são predadas num total médio de 3,93% anualmente, enquanto que para P. expansa a média anual é 5,66% das fêmeas.Podocnemis expansa and P. unifilis long lived with late sexual maturation, which influences a low replacement rate of individuals. Their populations are characterized by low adults mortality, but high mortality of embryos and hatchlings. The natural nest predation is an important factor for hatchling success. In Javaés River, the eggs and hatchlings can be predated by a large number of animals such as birds, vultures (Coragyps atratus and Cathartes aura, carcar

  7. Pesquisa de anticorpos contra Leptospira spp. em animais silvestres e em estado feral da região de Nhecolândia, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brasil: utilização da técnica de imuno-histoquímica para detecção do agente Investigation of antibodies to Leptospira spp. in wild and feral animals from the region of Nhecolândia, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil: use of the immunohistochemistry technique for the agent detection

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    Raul José Silva Girio

    2004-02-01

    microscopic agglutination test. Of these samples, 67 were of feral bovine (Bos taurus indicus, 39 of feral pigs (Sus scrofa, 39 of buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis, nine of coatis (Nasua nasua, 41 of pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus, 10 of brocket deer (Mazama americana and 110 of feral sheep (Ovis aries. In 12 dead animals (six feral pigs, four pampas deer and two feral sheep, isolation attempts and Leptospira identification through the immunohistochemistry were accomplished. Sixty-four (20.3% of the samples reacted to at least one serovar of pathogenic Leptospira; 41.0% of the buffaloes, 40.3% of the feral bovine, 17.9% of the feral pigs, 9% of the feral sheep, and 9.7% of the pampas deer serum samples were reactors. All the serum samples of brocket deer and of coatis were not reactors. The most frequent serovars for the studied animal species were: pomona for buffaloes and feral sheep; icterohaemorrhagiae for feral sheep, pampas deer and feral pigs; and copenhageni for pampas deer and feral pigs. The attempts of Leptospira isolation resulted negative, and the immunohistochemistry analysis revealed Leptospira in the liver of one feral pig. Microscopic examination of the kidney revealed vascular congestion, hemorrhage and infiltration of mononuclear inflammatory cells in the interstice.

  8. Arbovírus Ilheus em aves silvestres (Sporophila caerulescens e Molothrus bonariensis Ilheus arbovirus in wild birds (Sporophila caerulescens and Molothrus bonariensis

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    Luiz Eloy Pereira

    2001-04-01

    identified by serological tests, such as hemagglutination, hemagglutination inhibition, complement fixation and neutralization. Besides virus isolation, serum samples were also tested for the presence of hemagglutination inhibition antibodies. RESULTS: Two strains of Ilheus virus were isolated from the bird species Sporophila caerulescens and Molothrus bonariensis. Specific antibodies to Ilheus virus were detected in serum samples of some birds (Columbina talpacoti, Geopelia cuneata, Sicalis flaveola and Molothrus bonariensis, marmosets (Callithrix jacchus and Callithrix penicillata and coati (Nasua nasua. CONCLUSIONS: Virus isolation and detection of specific antibodies in serum samples of local, migratory and captive birds, captive marmosets and wild coati corroborate the circulation of Ilheus virus in the Parque Ecológico do Tietê. The migrating behavior of some species of wild birds, like Sporophila caerulescens, enables the virus spread to other regions. Taking into consideration its human pathogenicity and the presence of the virus in this area, local authorities should be aware of the risk of infecting the local community.

  9. The multiple and complex and changeable scenarios of the Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycle in the sylvatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Ana Maria; Xavier, Samanta C C; Roque, André Luiz R

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we report and discuss the results generated from over 20 years of studies of the Trypanosoma cruzi sylvatic transmission cycle. Our results have uncovered new aspects and reviewed old concepts on issues including reservoirs, true generalist species, association of mammalian species with distinct discrete typing units - DTUs, distribution of T. cruzi genotypes in the wild, mixed infections, and T. cruzi transmission ecology. Using parasitological and serological tests, we examined T. cruzi infection in 7,285 mammalian specimens from nine mammalian orders dispersed all over the Brazilian biomes. The obtained T. cruzi isolates were characterized by mini-exon gene sequence polymorphism and PCR RFLP to identify DTUs. Infection by T. cruzi was detected by serological methods in 20% of the examined animals and isolated from 41% of those infected, corresponding to 8% of all the examined mammals. Each mammal taxon responded uniquely to T. cruzi infection. Didelphis spp. are able to maintain high and long-lasting parasitemias (positive hemocultures) caused by TcI but maintain and rapidly control parasitemias caused by TcII to almost undetectable levels. In contrast, the tamarin species Leontopithecus rosalia and L. chrysomelas maintain long-lasting and high parasitemias caused by TcII similarly to Philander sp. The coati Nasua nasua maintains high parasitemias by both parental T. cruzi DTUs TcI or TcII and by TcII/TcIV (formerly Z3) at detectable levels. Wild and domestic canidae seem to display only a short period of reservoir competence. T. cruzi infection was demonstrated in the wild canid species Cerdocyon thous and Chrysocyon brachyurus, and positive hemoculture was obtained in one hyper carnivore species (Leopardus pardalis), demonstrating that T. cruzi transmission is deeply immersed in the trophic net. T. cruzi DTU distribution in nature did not exhibit any association with a particular biome or habitat. TcI predominates throughout (58% of the T. cruzi

  10. Occurrence of oral diseases in neotropical wild carnivores kept in captivity at the zoo from Federal University of Mato Grosso – Cuiabá

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    Paula Márcia Marques de Campos Andrade

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Control of oral lesions contributes directly to the health, survival and welfare of captive animals. In order to investigate the occurrence of oral diseases in neotropical wild carnivores kept at the zoo at the Federal University of Mato Grosso – Cuiabá, we evaluated 31 oral cavities from three families of carnivores (Felidae, Canidae and Procyonidae between July 2012 and June 2013. Twelve coatis (Nasua nasua, three raccoons (Procyon cancrivorus, two maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus, six crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous, one hoary fox (Pseudalopex vetulus, three ocelots (Leopardus pardalis, one cougar (Puma concolor and three wild cats (Puma yagouaroundi, Leopardus wiedii and Leopardus colocolo were reviewed. The most frequent lesions were dental absences 21/31 (67.7%, dental fractures 20/31 (64.5% and tooth wear 19/31 (61.3%, which were suggestive of trauma caused from stress. Of lesser importance, we also observed occurrence of dental calculus grade I in 18/31 (58%, caries 1/31 (3.2%, foreign bodies 2/31 (6.4%, orofacial fistulas 1/31 (3.2%, hyperplasia in the oral mucosa 1/31 (3.2%, dental dimming 3/31 (9.7% and chafing of the soft tissue 5/31 (16.1%. Therefore, it was concluded that environmental enrichment strategies and oral routine evaluation must be implemented to ensure the welfare of these animals, reducing local and systemic adverse effects of oral lesions. The diet has been successful in preventing periodontal disease, suggesting that this diet for the captive animals in the institution should be maintained.

  11. Ticks (Acari: Ixodida) on wild carnivores in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labruna, Marcelo B; Jorge, Rodrigo S P; Sana, Dênis A; Jácomo, Anah Tereza A; Kashivakura, Cyntia K; Furtado, Mariana M; Ferro, Claudia; Perez, Samuel A; Silveira, Leandro; Santos, Tarcísio S; Marques, Samuel R; Morato, Ronaldo G; Nava, Alessandra; Adania, Cristina H; Teixeira, Rodrigo H F; Gomes, Albério A B; Conforti, Valéria A; Azevedo, Fernando C C; Prada, Cristiana S; Silva, Jean C R; Batista, Adriana F; Marvulo, Maria Fernanda V; Morato, Rose L G; Alho, Cleber J R; Pinter, Adriano; Ferreira, Patrícia M; Ferreira, Fernado; Barros-Battesti, Darci M

    2005-01-01

    The present study reports field data of ticks infesting wild carnivores captured from July 1998 to September 2004 in Brazil. Additional data were obtained from one tick collection and from previous published data of ticks on carnivores in Brazil. During field work, a total of 3437 ticks were collected from 89 Cerdocyon thous (crab-eating fox), 58 Chrysocyon brachyurus (maned wolf), 30 Puma concolor (puma), 26 Panthera onca (jaguar), 12 Procyon cancrivorus (crab-eating raccoon), 4 Speothos venaticus (bush dog), 6 Pseudalopex vetulus (hoary fox), 6 Nasua nasua (coati), 6 Leopardus pardalis (ocelot), 2 Leopardus tigrinus (oncilla), 1 Leopardus wiedii (margay), 1 Herpailurus yagouaroundi (jaguarundi), 1 Oncifelis colocolo (pampas cat), 1 Eira barbara (tayara), 1 Galictis vittata (grison), 1 Lontra longicaudis (neotropical otter), and 1 Potus flavus (kinkajou). Data obtained from the Acari Collection IBSP included a total of 381 tick specimens collected on 13 C. thous, 8 C. brachyurus, 3 P. concolor, 10 P. onca, 3 P. cancrivorus, 4 N. nasua, 1 L. pardalis, 1 L. wiedii, 4 H. yagouaroundi, 1 Galictis cuja (lesser grison), and 1 L. longicaudis. The only tick-infested carnivore species previously reported in Brazil, for which we do not present any field data are Pseudalopex gymnocercus (pampas fox), Conepatus chinga (Molina's hog-nosed skunk), and Conepatus semistriatus (striped hog-nosed skunk). We report the first tick records in Brazil on two Felidae species (O. colocolo, H. yagouaroundi), two Canidae species (P. vetulus, S. venaticus), one Procyonidae species (P. flavus) and one Mustelidae (E. barbara). Tick infestation remains unreported for 5 of the 26 Carnivora species native in Brazil: Oncifelis geoffroyi (Geoffroy's cat), Atelocynus microtis (short-eared dog), Pteronura brasiliensis (giant otter), Mustela africana (Amazon weasel), and Bassaricyon gabbii (olingo). Our field data comprise 16 tick species represented by the genera Amblyomma (12 species), Ixodes (1

  12. Phylogeny of the Procyonidae (Mammalia: Carnivora): molecules, morphology and the Great American Interchange.

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    Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Gompper, Matthew E; Eizirik, Eduardo; Ho, Cheuk-Chung; Linden, Leif; Maldonado, Jesus E; Wayne, Robert K

    2007-06-01

    The Procyonidae (Mammalia: Carnivora) have played a central role in resolving the controversial systematics of the giant and red pandas, but phylogenetic relationships of species within the family itself have received much less attention. Cladistic analyses of morphological characters conducted during the last two decades have resulted in topologies that group ecologically and morphologically similar taxa together. Specifically, the highly arboreal and frugivorous kinkajou (Potos flavus) and olingos (Bassaricyon) define one clade, whereas the more terrestrial and omnivorous coatis (Nasua), raccoons (Procyon), and ringtails (Bassariscus) define another clade, with the similar-sized Nasua and Procyon joined as sister taxa in this latter group. These relationships, however, have not been tested with molecular sequence data. We examined procyonid phylogenetics based on combined data from nine nuclear and two mitochondrial gene segments totaling 6534bp. We were able to fully resolve relationships within the family with strongly supported and congruent results from maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, minimum evolution, and Bayesian analyses. We identified three distinct lineages within the family: a (Nasua, Bassaricyon) clade, a (Bassariscus, Procyon) clade, and a Potos lineage, the last of which is sister to the other two clades. These findings, which are in strong disagreement with prior fossil and morphology-based assessments of procyonid relationships, reemphasize the morphological and ecological flexibility of these taxa. In particular, morphological similarities between unrelated genera possibly reflect convergence associated with similar lifestyles and diets rather than ancestry. Furthermore, incongruence between the molecular supermatrix and a morphological character matrix comprised mostly of dental characters [Baskin, J.A., 2004. Bassariscus and Probassariscus (Mammalia, Carnivora, Procyonidae) from the early Barstovian (Middle Miocene). J. Vert. Paleo. 24

  13. ENDEMIC ORTHOPOXVIRUS CIRCULATING IN PROCYONIDS IN MEXICO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Romero, Nadia F; Aréchiga-Ceballos, Nidia; Emerson, Ginny L; Martínez-Martínez, Flor O; Doty, Jeffrey B; Nakazawa, Yoshinori J; Rendón-Franco, Emilio; Muñoz-García, Claudia I; Villanueva-García, Claudia; Ramírez-Cid, Citlali; Gama-Campillo, Lilia M; Gual-Sill, Fernando; Aguilar-Setién, Álvaro; Carroll, Darin S

    2016-07-01

    Limited serosurveillance studies suggested that orthopoxviruses (OPXV) are widespread in the US (e.g., Raccoonpox virus, Skunkpox virus, Volepox virus) and Brazil (Vaccinia virus); however, their animal reservoir(s) remain unconfirmed. Mexican mammal diversity includes several species related to those in which evidence for OPXV infections has been found (Oryzomys, Peromyscus, Microtus, and Procyonidae). The presence of these groups of mammals in Mexico and the evidence of their possible involvement in the maintenance of OPXV in nature suggest the same or similar OPXV are circulating in Mexico. We tested 201 sera from 129 procyonids via modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot (WB) to estimate OPXV antibody prevalence in these animals. We detected a prevalence of 16.67% in Nasua narica (white-nosed coati), 35% in Procyon lotor (raccoon), and 30.4% in Bassariscus astutus (ring-tailed cat) when tested by either ELISA or WB. Western blot results presented protein bands consistent with the size of some OPXV immunodominant bands (14, 18, 32, 36, and 62 kDa). These results support the hypothesis that OPXV circulate in at least three genera of Procyonidae in Central and Southeast Mexico.

  14. Raccoon roundworms in pet kinkajous--three states, 1999 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    Baylisascaris procyonis (BP) is the common roundworm of raccoons (Procyon lotor). Adult BP live in the small intestine of this host, where they produce eggs that are passed in the feces. BP eggs ingested by nondefinitive host species hatch in the intestine, producing larvae that can migrate widely, causing visceral, ocular, or neural larva migrans. Cases of neural larva migrans in humans caused by BP likely acquired from raccoons have resulted in severe encephalitis with permanent deficits and in death. Although raccoons are the most common definitive host of BP in North America, some other carnivores, including domestic dogs, can serve as definitive hosts, making them a potential source of human disease. Less well-documented is infection in procyonids other than raccoons (e.g., kinkajous [Potos flavus], coatis [Nasua spp.], olingos [Bassaricyon spp.], and ringtails [Bassariscus astutus]) and the potential for transmission from these species to humans. This report describes cases of BP infection in pet kinkajous that placed humans at risk for infection. Avoiding contact with feces from potentially infected animals and routine deworming of pets, including dogs and exotic species that might host this parasite, will prevent infection with BP.

  15. Atropelamentos de vertebrados na Floresta Nacional de Carajás, Pará, Brasil Roadkills of vertebrates in Carajas National Forest, Para, Brazil

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    Fabiano Gumier-Costa

    2009-01-01

    frequency of vertebrates from April/2003 to Octobre/2006 along the first 25 km of the highway. We registered 155 roadkills. The number of roadkills diminished along the years (P=0,01, and with distance from the beginning of the highway (P=0,0002. Snakes (Ophidia and opossum Didelphis marsupialis presented higher roadkill numbers (7,5/year, followed by birds (Aves, crab-eating fox Cerdocyon thous, coati Nasua nasua, rodents (Rodentia, and non identified (4,9/year; opossum Marmosops sp., brazilian rabbit Sylvilagus brasiliensis, black howler monkey Alouatta sp., tayra Eira barbara, tortoise Geochelone sp., lizards (Lacertilia e capuchin monkey Cebus apella (1/year. There was no significant relation between monthly roadkill numbers and monthly precipitation.

  16. Conocimiento, uso y valor cultural de seis presas del jaguar (Panthera onca y su relación con éste, en San Nicolás de los Montes, San Luis Potosí, Mexico Knowledge, use and cultural value of six prey of jaguar (Panthera onca and their relationship with this species in San Nicolás de los Montes, San Luis Potosí, Mexico

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    Dulce M. Ávila-Nájera

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Durante 2007 se obtuvo información del conocimiento y la percepción que los pobladores del ejido tienen sobre el jaguar, sus presas y los factores que afectan la distribución y su conservación. Mediante el índice de importancia cultural (IIC se determinó el conocimiento que los ejidatarios tienen de las presas, y el uso y valor que les otorgan. Las presas que reconocieron importantes fueron venado cola blanca (Odocoileus virginianus, temazate (Mazama temama, pecarí (Tayassu pecari, tejón (Nasua narica, armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus y tepezcuintle (Cuniculus paca; 72% de los encuestados también identificaron especies domésticas como presas del jaguar. Según su percepción, las más abundantes son pecarí, tejón y armadillo. El valor de uso más importante es el alimenticio, puesto que 82% de los encuestados ha consumido alguna especie silvestre. El valor más alto del IIC fue para el venado (27.17. En el ejido se considera perjudicial el jaguar por alimentarse del ganado. Los pobladores y los jaguares utilizan las mismas especies para obtener beneficio. El presente estudio constituye una base para el desarrollo de trabajos tendientes a manejar y conservar los recursos naturales que existen en el ejido considerando las necesidades de la población humana, de su fauna silvestre y la relación entre éstas.During 2007, we obtained information about the knowledge, perception of rural people regarding jaguar, its preys and the factors that affect its distribution and conservation. Additionally, we determined with the Index of Cultural Importance the knowledge, use and value that rural people assign to preys of the jaguar. They recognized as important prey species of the jaguar to white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus, brocket (Mazama temama, pecari (Tayassu peccari, coati (Nasua narica, armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus and paca (Cuniculus paca. Most of the villagers (72% identified also domestic species as preys of the jaguar

  17. Inquérito sorológico para toxoplasmose e leptospirose em mamíferos selvagens neotropicais do Zoológico de Aracaju, Sergipe Serological survey of toxoplasmosis and leptospirosis in neotropical wild mammals from Aracaju Zoo, Sergipe, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joubert S. Pimentel

    2009-12-01

    ção aos quatro mamíferos soropositivos para Leptospira spp., três (75% foram procedentes da natureza e um (25% nasceu no zoológico. Este foi o primeiro inquérito sorológico de anticorpos anti-Leptospira spp. em primatas e carnívoros neotropicais em um zoológico do Nordeste do Brasil e descreveu pela primeira vez a ocorrência de anticorpos anti-T. gondii e anti-Leptospira spp. com sorovar mais provável Copenhageni no primata ameaçado de extinção macaco-prego-de-peito-amarelo (C. xanthosternus em Aracaju, SE.Modern zoological gardens are institutions to wildlife maintenance, aiming its conservation, the performance of scientific research and leisure, recreation and environ-mental education activities. The variety of wild species living in conditions different from the one found in its natural habitats represents a propitious environment for diseases spread, specially the zoonotic ones. Due to data shortage and wild mammals' epidemio-logical relevance both for toxoplasmosis as for leptospirosis, this study aimed to determine the serological survey of toxoplasmosis and leptospirosis in Neotropical wild mammals, from Zoo of Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil. Blood samples were collected from 32 wild mammals, adults and from both sexes: 14 wild bearded capuchins (Cebus libidinosus, four golden-bellied capuchins (Cebus xanthosternus, three pumas (Puma concolor, one jaguar (Pantheraonca, one crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous, six crab-eating raccoons (Procyon cancrivorus, two South American coatis (Nasua nasua, and one tayra (Eira barbara. Sera were tested to Toxoplasma gondii antibodies by the modified agglutination test (MAT e"1:25, and by the microscopic seroaglutination test (cut-off e"1:100 using 24 serovar of pathogenic leptospiras and two serovar of saprophyte leptospiras. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 17 of 32 (53.1% wild mammals, and antibodies to Leptospira spp. were found in 4 of 32 (12.5% wild mammals. In relation to gender, 9 of 15 (60% males, and 8 of 17

  18. Raccoons of North and Middle America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Edward A.; Jackson, Hartley H.T.

    1950-01-01

    The raccoons, genus Procyon, colloquially known as “coons,” belong to the carnivorous family Procyonidae, which also includes the American genera Nasua, Nasuella, Bassaricyon, and Potos, and the Old World genera Ailurus and Ailuropoda of the subfamily Ailurinae.

  19. Pesquisa de anticorpos contra Leptospira spp. em animais silvestres e em estado feral da região de Nhecolândia, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brasil: utilização da técnica de imuno-histoquímica para detecção do agente

    OpenAIRE

    Girio,Raul José Silva; Pereira,Fernando Lúcio Garcia; Marchiori Filho,Moacir; Mathias,Luís Antônio; Herreira,Rita de Cássia Pereira; Alessi, Antônio Carlos; Girio,Thaís Marino Silva

    2004-01-01

    Foram examinadas 315 amostras de soros sangüíneos de diversas espécies de animais que vivem em estado feral ou silvestre na região de Nhecolândia, Corumbá, MS, por meio da prova de soroaglutinação microscópica para leptospirose. Dessas amostras, 67 foram de bois baguás (Bos taurus indicus), 39 de porcos-monteiros (Sus scrofa), 39 de búfalos (Bubalus bubalis), nove de quatis (Nasua nasua), 41 de veados-campeiros (Ozotoceros bezoarticus), 10 de veados-mateiros (Mazama americana) e 110 amostras ...

  20. Pesquisa de anticorpos contra Leptospira spp. em animais silvestres e em estado feral da região de Nhecolândia, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brasil: utilização da técnica de imuno-histoquímica para detecção do agente Investigation of antibodies to Leptospira spp. in wild and feral animals from the region of Nhecolândia, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil: use of the immunohistochemistry technique for the agent detection

    OpenAIRE

    Raul José Silva Girio; Fernando Lúcio Garcia Pereira; Moacir Marchiori Filho; Luís Antônio Mathias; Rita de Cássia Pereira Herreira; Antônio Carlos Alessi; Thaís Marino Silva Girio

    2004-01-01

    Foram examinadas 315 amostras de soros sangüíneos de diversas espécies de animais que vivem em estado feral ou silvestre na região de Nhecolândia, Corumbá, MS, por meio da prova de soroaglutinação microscópica para leptospirose. Dessas amostras, 67 foram de bois baguás (Bos taurus indicus), 39 de porcos-monteiros (Sus scrofa), 39 de búfalos (Bubalus bubalis), nove de quatis (Nasua nasua), 41 de veados-campeiros (Ozotoceros bezoarticus), 10 de veados-mateiros (Mazama americana) e 110 amostras ...

  1. Initial deposition of calcium phosphate ceramic on polyethylene and polydimethylsiloxane by rf magnetron sputtering deposition: the interface chemistry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feddes, B.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Vredenberg, A.M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings are well known for their bioactive nature. CaP coated polymeric materials can be used as implant material. For this, a strong adhesion between the coating and substrate is necessary. Because the chemical structure of the interface plays an important role in the coati

  2. Wild carnivores (Mammalia) as hosts for ticks (Ixodida) in Panama

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bermudez, S.E.; Esser, H.J.; Miranda, R.; Moreno, R.S.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports ticks collected from wild carnivores from different habitat types in Panama. We examined 94 individual wild carnivores and we found 87 parasitized by ticks: seven coyotes, six crab-eating foxes, 54 coatis, four raccoons, five ocelots, two pumas, two gray foxes, two skunks, and one

  3. Study of the Structural and Mechanical Properties of Nanocrystalline TiAlSiN Gradient Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cholakova, T.; Chitanov, V.; Chaliampalias, D.; Kolaklieva, L.; Kakanakov, R.; Bahchedjiev, Ch.; Petkov, N.; Pashinski, Ch.; Vourlias, G.; Vouroutzis, N.; Polychroniadis, E.; Wang, Y.; Meletis, E. I.

    2014-01-01

    A study of the structural and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline TiAlSiN gradient coatings deposited by cathodic arc deposition techniques at 500 degrees C and post-annealed at 525 degrees C is presented. Analysis of the coatings, chemical composition and microstructure revealed that the coati

  4. Pyrolysis of carbonaceous particles and properties of Carbonaceous-g-Poly (acrylic acid-co-acrylamide) superabsorbent polymer for agricultural applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ghazali S.; Jamari S; Noordin N.; Tan K.M.

    2016-01-01

    Utilisation of fertilizer and water are very important in determining the production of agriculture nowadays. The excessive use of fertilizer in plantation somehow could leads to environmental pollution. The present study reported a synthesis of controlled release water retention (CRWR) fertilizer coating with superabsorbent polymer (SAPs). Superabsorbent polymer (SAPs) are polymers that have ability to absorb and retain large amounts of water relative to their own mass. The presence of coati...

  5. Hyper abundant mesopredators and bird extinction in an Atlantic forest island

    OpenAIRE

    Mauro Galetti; Ricardo S. Bovendorp; Fadini, Rodrigo F.; Carlos O. A. Gussoni; Marcos Rodrigues; Ariane D. Alvarez; Guimarães Jr., Paulo R.; Kaiser Alves

    2009-01-01

    Islands can serve as model systems for understanding how biological invasions affect native species. Here we examine the negative effects of mesopredator mammals on bird richness at Anchieta Island, an 826 ha offshore island in the coast of Brazil. Anchieta Island has the highest density of mammals of the entire Atlantic forest, especially nest predators such as marmosets and coatis, introduced more than 20 years ago. This indiscriminate introduction of mammals may have affected directly the ...

  6. In Vitro and Sensory Evaluation of Capsaicin-Loaded Nanoformulations

    OpenAIRE

    Mathias Kaiser; Benedikt Kirsch; Hannah Hauser; Désirée Schneider; Ingrid Seuß-Baum; Francisco M Goycoolea

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin has known health beneficial and therapeutic properties. It is also able to enhance the permeability of drugs across epithelial tissues. Unfortunately, due to its pungency the oral administration of capsaicin is limited. To this end, we assessed the effect of nanoencapsulation of capsaicin, under the hypothesis that this would reduce its pungency. Core-shell nanocapsules with an oily core and stabilized with phospholipids were used. This system was used with or without chitosan coati...

  7. In Vitro and Sensory Evaluation of Capsaicin-Loaded Nanoformulations

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, M.; Kirsch, B.; Hauser, H; Schneider, D; Seuß-Baum, I. (Ingrid); Goycoolea, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin has known health beneficial and therapeutic properties. It is also able to enhance the permeability of drugs across epithelial tissues. Unfortunately, due to its pungency the oral administration of capsaicin is limited. To this end, we assessed the effect of nanoencapsulation of capsaicin, under the hypothesis that this would reduce its pungency. Core-shell nanocapsules with an oily core and stabilized with phospholipids were used. This system was used with or without chitosan coati...

  8. Host range characteristics of the primate coccidian, Isospora arctopitheci Rodhain 1933 (Protozoa: Eimeriidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, L D

    1977-02-01

    Studies were conducted on 35 primates, 12 carnivores, and 2 marsupials to determine their susceptibility to the primate coccidian, Isospora arctopitheci. Patent oocyst infections resulted in 12 of the 14 species of animals investigated. These included 6 genera of New World primates native to Panama: Saguinus geoffroyi, Aotus trivirgatus, Ateles fusciceps, Cebus capucinus, Alouatta villosa, and Saimiri sciureus. In addition 4 families of carnivores (2 domestic and 2 sylvatic) and 1 species of marsupial became infected following experimental exposure. These animals are represented respectively by the following 6 genera and species: Canis familiaris; Felis catus; Nasua nasua, and Potos flavus; Eiria barbara; and Didelphis marsupialis. Four Old World rhesus monkeys, Macaca mulatta, and 1 carnivore, Bassaricyon gabbii, did not become oocyst positive. This unusually large host range makes this isosporan unique among the coccidia that have been investigated to date.

  9. Ultra-High Efficiency / Low Hydrogen Embrittlement Nanostructured Zn-Based Electrodeposits as Environmentally Benign Cd-Replacement Coatings for High Strength Steel Fasteners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    the hydro eater than th gen in the 20 e with regar d capacity ar diffusion pa rtant paramet by the Solub t in “ hydrog ize embrittlem f high stre als...1 µm), and i bi-electrod d, 3) single c s calculated ition, the app ter than that 2. The incr provides 1) a n of hydroge be defined 0, which equ...the coati was varied b h the hydrog is the specie ere would be (i.e. release cture. The cturing and rs are the ce ains specifica trate, it is ant

  10. PRODUCCIÓN Y USO DE OBJETOS ORNAMENTALES ELABORADOS SOBRE DIENTES DE CARNÍVOROS EN CONTEXTOS ARQUEOLÓGICOS DEL HUMEDAL DEL PARANÁ INFERIOR / Manufacture and use of ornaments made on carnivore teeth from archaeological sites of Low Paraná Wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Alberto Acosta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se analizan una serie de piezas dentarias de carnívoros discutiendo su utilización como objetos ornamentales por las poblaciones humanas que ocuparon el sector meridional del humedal del Paraná inferior durante el Holoceno tardío. La identificación taxonómica de los distintos elementos dentarios se efectuó mediante estudios morfométricos, siendo de particular interés señalar el reconocimiento de especies que son poco frecuentes o que hasta ahora no estaban presentes en el registro arqueológico regional como Canis familiaris y Nasua nasua. A través del análisis microscópico, logramos identificar distintos rastros o huellas de transformación y utilización de los dientes, incluso en aquellos ejemplares que a ojo desnudo no presentaban modificaciones antrópicas. En función de los resultados obtenidos se discute la obtención y uso de estos objetos como objetos ornamentales y se realizan distintas consideraciones en cuanto a su potencial valor simbólico, señalando ciertas limitaciones interpretativas que existen sobre este tópico, así como las vías analíticas y conceptos desarrollados por otros autores para abordar problemáticas similares a las aquí estudiadas. AbstractThis paper analyses Carnivore dental items, discussing their use as ornaments by human societies that inhabited the southern sector of Low Paraná wetland during the Late Holocene. Taxonomic identification of dental items was made trough morphometric analysis. It is very interesting to show the presence of taxa not available in the area as Canis familiaris and Nasua nasua. Through microscopic analysis, we identified use and manufacture process, also in those items which do not show anthropic modification at the naked eye. On the basis of these results, we discuss the bone raw material acquisition and their use as ornaments, arguing their symbolic value but pointing the analytical restrictions on this subject, as well as the methodological and

  11. Hyper abundant mesopredators and bird extinction in an Atlantic forest island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Galetti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Islands can serve as model systems for understanding how biological invasions affect native species. Here we examine the negative effects of mesopredator mammals on bird richness at Anchieta Island, an 826 ha offshore island in the coast of Brazil. Anchieta Island has the highest density of mammals of the entire Atlantic forest, especially nest predators such as marmosets and coatis, introduced more than 20 years ago. This indiscriminate introduction of mammals may have affected directly the bird community, nowadays represented by 100 species comprised mainly by water-crossing birds, being 73 forest-dwelling species. A small component of these remnant bird species nests in tree holes and on the forest floor, null model analysis suggest that birds within these two nest types are under-represented on Anchieta Island. All guilds were affected negatively, but "opportunist insectivorous/omnivorous". Experiments using artificial nests showed a predation of 73% of nests on the floor while only 26% on the mainland. Camera traps recorded predation by coatis, agoutis, and opossums. The restoration of the bird community on this island is highly constrained by the high density of hyper abundant nest predators.

  12. Permanent Genetic Resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources Database 1 May 2009-31 July 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almany, Glenn R; DE Arruda, Maurício P; Arthofer, Wolfgang; Atallah, Z K; Beissinger, Steven R; Berumen, Michael L; Bogdanowicz, S M; Brown, S D; Bruford, Michael W; Burdine, C; Busch, Jeremiah W; Campbell, Nathan R; Carey, D; Carstens, Bryan C; Chu, K H; Cubeta, Marc A; Cuda, J P; Cui, Zhaoxia; Datnoff, L E; Dávila, J A; Davis, Emily S; Davis, R M; Diekmann, Onno E; Eizirik, Eduardo; Fargallo, J A; Fernandes, Fabiano; Fukuda, Hideo; Gale, L R; Gallagher, Elizabeth; Gao, Yongqiang; Girard, Philippe; Godhe, Anna; Gonçalves, Evonnildo C; Gouveia, Licinia; Grajczyk, Amber M; Grose, M J; Gu, Zhifeng; Halldén, Christer; Härnström, Karolina; Hemmingsen, Amanda H; Holmes, Gerald; Huang, C H; Huang, Chuan-Chin; Hudman, S P; Jones, Geoffrey P; Kanetis, Loukas; Karunasagar, Iddya; Karunasagar, Indrani; Keyghobadi, Nusha; Klosterman, S J; Klug, Page E; Koch, J; Koopman, Margaret M; Köppler, Kirsten; Koshimizu, Eriko; Krumböck, Susanne; Kubisiak, T; Landis, J B; Lasta, Mario L; Lee, Chow-Yang; Li, Qianqian; Li, Shou-Hsien; Lin, Rong-Chien; Liu, M; Liu, Na; Liu, W C; Liu, Yuan; Loiseau, A; Luan, Weisha; Maruthachalam, K K; McCormick, Helen M; Mellick, Rohan; Monnahan, P J; Morielle-Versute, Eliana; Murray, Tomás E; Narum, Shawn R; Neufeld, Katie; De Nova, P J G; Ojiambo, Peter S; Okamoto, Nobuaki; Othman, Ahmad Sofiman; Overholt, W A; Pardini, Renata; Paterson, Ian G; Patty, Olivia A; Paxton, Robert J; Planes, Serge; Porter, Carolyn; Pratchett, Morgan S; Püttker, Thomas; Rasic, Gordana; Rasool, Bilal; Rey, O; Riegler, Markus; Riehl, C; Roberts, John M K; Roberts, P D; Rochel, Elisabeth; Roe, Kevin J; Rossetto, Maurizio; Ruzzante, Daniel E; Sakamoto, Takashi; Saravanan, V; Sarturi, Cladinara Roberts; Schmidt, Anke; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Schuler, Hannes; Serb, Jeanne M; Serrão, Ester T A; Shi, Yaohua; Silva, Artur; Sin, Y W; Sommer, Simone; Stauffer, Christian; Strüssmann, Carlos Augusto; Subbarao, K V; Syms, Craig; Tan, Feng; Tejedor, Eugenio Daniel; Thorrold, Simon R; Trigiano, Robert N; Trucco, María I; Tsuchiya-Jerep, Mirian Tieko Nunes; Vergara, P; Van De Vliet, Mirjam S; Wadl, Phillip A; Wang, Aimin; Wang, Hongxia; Wang, R X; Wang, Xinwang; Wang, Yan; Weeks, Andrew R; Wei, Fuwen; Werner, William J; Wiley, E O; Williams, D A; Wilkins, Richard J; Wisely, Samantha M; With, Kimberly A; Wu, Danhua; Yao, Cheng-Te; Yau, Cynthia; Yeap, Beng-Keok; Zhai, Bao-Ping; Zhan, Xiangjiang; Zhang, Guo-Yan; Zhang, S Y; Zhao, Ru; Zhu, Lifeng

    2009-11-01

    This article documents the addition of 512 microsatellite marker loci and nine pairs of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) sequencing primers to the Molecular Ecology Resources Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Alcippe morrisonia morrisonia, Bashania fangiana, Bashania fargesii, Chaetodon vagabundus, Colletes floralis, Coluber constrictor flaviventris, Coptotermes gestroi, Crotophaga major, Cyprinella lutrensis, Danaus plexippus, Fagus grandifolia, Falco tinnunculus, Fletcherimyia fletcheri, Hydrilla verticillata, Laterallus jamaicensis coturniculus, Leavenworthia alabamica, Marmosops incanus, Miichthys miiuy, Nasua nasua, Noturus exilis, Odontesthes bonariensis, Quadrula fragosa, Pinctada maxima, Pseudaletia separata, Pseudoperonospora cubensis, Podocarpus elatus, Portunus trituberculatus, Rhagoletis cerasi, Rhinella schneideri, Sarracenia alata, Skeletonema marinoi, Sminthurus viridis, Syngnathus abaster, Uroteuthis (Photololigo) chinensis, Verticillium dahliae, Wasmannia auropunctata, and Zygochlamys patagonica. These loci were cross-tested on the following species: Chaetodon baronessa, Falco columbarius, Falco eleonorae, Falco naumanni, Falco peregrinus, Falco subbuteo, Didelphis aurita, Gracilinanus microtarsus, Marmosops paulensis, Monodelphis Americana, Odontesthes hatcheri, Podocarpus grayi, Podocarpus lawrencei, Podocarpus smithii, Portunus pelagicus, Syngnathus acus, Syngnathus typhle,Uroteuthis (Photololigo) edulis, Uroteuthis (Photololigo) duvauceli and Verticillium albo-atrum. This article also documents the addition of nine sequencing primer pairs and sixteen allele specific primers or probes for Oncorhynchus mykiss and Oncorhynchus tshawytscha; these primers and assays were cross-tested in both species.

  13. Late Pleistocene carnivores (Carnivora: Mammalia) from a cave sedimentary deposit in northern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Shirlley; Avilla, Leonardo S; Soibelzon, Leopoldo H; Bernardes, Camila

    2014-12-01

    The Brazilian Quaternary terrestrial Carnivora are represented by the following families: Canidae, Felidae, Ursidae, Procyonidae Mephitidae and Mustelidae. Their recent evolutionary history in South America is associated with the uplift of the Panamanian Isthmus, and which enabled the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI). Here we present new fossil records of Carnivora found in a cave in Aurora do Tocantins, Tocantins, northern Brazil. A stratigraphical controlled collection in the sedimentary deposit of the studied cave revealed a fossiliferous level where the following Carnivora taxa were present: Panthera onca, Leopardus sp., Galictis cuja, Procyon cancrivorus, Nasua nasua and Arctotherium wingei. Dating by Electron Spinning Resonance indicates that this assemblage was deposited during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), at least, 22.000 YBP. The weasel, G. cuja, is currently reported much further south than the record presented here. This may suggest that the environment around the cave was relatively drier during the LGM, with more open vegetation, and more moderate temperatures than the current Brazilian Cerrado.

  14. Late Pleistocene carnivores (Carnivora: Mammalia from a cave sedimentary deposit in northern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHIRLLEY RODRIGUES

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Quaternary terrestrial Carnivora are represented by the following families: Canidae, Felidae, Ursidae, Procyonidae Mephitidae and Mustelidae. Their recent evolutionary history in South America is associated with the uplift of the Panamanian Isthmus, and which enabled the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI. Here we present new fossil records of Carnivora found in a cave in Aurora do Tocantins, Tocantins, northern Brazil. A stratigraphical controlled collection in the sedimentary deposit of the studied cave revealed a fossiliferous level where the following Carnivora taxa were present: Panthera onca, Leopardus sp., Galictis cuja, Procyon cancrivorus, Nasua nasua and Arctotherium wingei. Dating by Electron Spinning Resonance indicates that this assemblage was deposited during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, at least, 22.000 YBP. The weasel, G. cuja, is currently reported much further south than the record presented here. This may suggest that the environment around the cave was relatively drier during the LGM, with more open vegetation, and more moderate temperatures than the current Brazilian Cerrado.

  15. Anti-Leptospira spp. antibodies in captive animals in Paraíba State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Brasil

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this survey was to verify the occurrence of anti-Leptospira spp. antibodies in captive animals in the Parque Zoobotânico Arruda Câmara, João Pessoa, Paraíba State, Northeastern Brazil. Blood samples were collected from 49 animals: 26 mammals of the species Sapajus libidinosus, Cebus flavius, Saimiri sciureu, Coendu sp., Pseudalopex vetulus, Leopardus pardalis, Leopardus tigrinus, Galactitis vitata, Eira barbara, Nasua nasua, Tayassu tajacu and Ratus norvegicus; 10 birds of the species Penelope jacucaca, Pavo cristatus, Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus, Ara chlorothpterus, Pionites leucogaster, Polyborus plancus, Geranoaetus melanoleucus and Urubitinga urubitinga; and 13 reptiles of the species Caiman latirostris, Paleosuchus trigonatus, Caiman crocodilus, Tupinabis merinae, Tupinambis teguixin, Boa constrictor, Corallus hortulanus, Python molurus, Bufocephala vanderhaegei, Geochelone denticulata and Geochelone carboraria. Sera were examined by the microscopic agglutination teste (MAT using 24 serovars as antigens and cut-off point of 1:100. One ocelot (Leopardo pardalis presented positive reaction for the Icterohaemorrhagiae serovar with titer of 100, however, it did not show any clinical sign of the infection. Sinantropic rodents are the main reservoirs of this serovar, which suggests the need of maintenance and continuous evaluation of rodent control programs.

  16. Late Pleistocene carnivores (Carnivora: Mammalia) from a cave sedimentary deposit in northern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Shirlley; Avilla, Leonardo S; Soibelzon, Leopoldo H; Bernardes, Camila

    2014-11-28

    The Brazilian Quaternary terrestrial Carnivora are represented by the following families: Canidae, Felidae, Ursidae, Procyonidae Mephitidae and Mustelidae. Their recent evolutionary history in South America is associated with the uplift of the Panamanian Isthmus, and which enabled the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI). Here we present new fossil records of Carnivora found in a cave in Aurora do Tocantins, Tocantins, northern Brazil. A stratigraphical controlled collection in the sedimentary deposit of the studied cave revealed a fossiliferous level where the following Carnivora taxa were present: Panthera onca, Leopardus sp., Galictis cuja, Procyon cancrivorus, Nasua nasua and Arctotherium wingei. Dating by Electron Spinning Resonance indicates that this assemblage was deposited during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), at least, 22.000 YBP. The weasel, G. cuja, is currently reported much further south than the record presented here. This may suggest that the environment around the cave was relatively drier during the LGM, with more open vegetation, and more moderate temperatures than the current Brazilian Cerrado.

  17. Detection of wild animals as carriers of Leptospira by PCR in the Pantanal biome, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Anahi S; Narduche, Lorena; Martins, Gabriel; Schabib Péres, Igor A H F; Zimmermann, Namor P; Juliano, Raquel S; Pellegrin, Aiesca O; Lilenbaum, Walter

    2016-11-01

    Leptospiral infection is widespread in wildlife. In this context, wild ecosystems in tropical countries hold a vast biodiversity, including several species that may act as potential reservoirs of leptospires. The Pantanal biome presents highly favorable environmental conditions for the occurrence of leptospirosis, such as high temperatures, constant flooding, and high biodiversity. The purpose of this study was to detect wild animals as carriers of Leptospira sp. using direct methods (PCR and culture) in the Pantanal biome, Brazil. A total of 35 animals were studied, namely Cerdocyon thous, Nasua nasua, Ozotoceros bezoarticus, and Sus scrofa species. Blood for serology (MAT) and urine for bacteriological culturing and PCR was sampled. The most prevalent serogroups were Javanica and Djasiman. Additionally, 40.6% of these animals presented PCR positive reactions. Seroreactivity associated with the high frequency of leptospiral carriers among the different studied species suggests a high level of exposure of the studied animals to pathogenic Leptospira strains. Our results are still limited and the actual role of the studied animals in the epidemiology of leptospirosis in the Pantanal region remains to be elucidated.

  18. [Mammals' camera-trapping in Sierra Nanchititla, Mexico: relative abundance and activity patterns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy-Vilchis, Octavio; Zarco-González, Martha M; Rodríguez-Soto, Clarita; Soria-Díaz, Leroy; Urios, Vicente

    2011-03-01

    Species conservation and their management depend on the availability of their population behavior and changes in time. This way, population studies include aspects such as species abundance and activity pattern, among others, with the advantage that nowadays new technologies can be applied, in addition to common methods. In this study, we used camera-traps to obtain the index of relative abundance and to establish activity pattern of medium and large mammals in Sierra Nanchititla, Mexico. The study was conducted from December 2003 to May 2006, with a total sampling effort of 4 305 trap-days. We obtained 897 photographs of 19 different species. Nasua narica, Sylvilagus floridanus and Urocyon cinereoargenteus were the most abundant, in agreement with the relative abundance index (RAI, number of independent records/100 trap-days), and according to previous studies with indirect methods in the area. The activity patterns of the species showed that 67% of them are nocturnal, except Odocoileus virginianus, Nasua narica and others. Some species showed differences with previously reported patterns, which are related with seasonality, resources availability, organism sex, principally. The applied method contributed with reliable data about relative abundance and activity patterns.

  19. Pneumocystis and Histoplasma infections in wild animals from the Amazon region of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainson, R; Shaw, J J

    1975-01-01

    Routine examination of tissues from wild forest rodents from Amapá, north Brazil, revealed Pneumocystis carinii in lung smears from a newly captured Oryzomys capito (Cricetidae). Acute, fatal infections with this parasite are also recorded in a number of captive "coatimundis", Nasua narica (Carnivora: Procyonidae) and a sloth, Bradypus tridactylus (Edentata). Pneumocystis was also encountered in lung smears from a newly captured and apparently healthy sloth, Choloepus didactylus. The presence of infection in newly captured animals leads us to believe that the fatal, fulminating pneumocystosis seen in the captive Nasua and Bradypus was due to exacerbation of pre-existant infections acquired in their natural forest environment. Pneumocystis carinii is a well known cause of fatal, interstitial plasma-cell pneumonia in human infants and sometimes the weakened adult: the keeping of exotic pets such as the coatimundi is, therefore, not without some hazard in this respect. Histoplasma, another well known pathogen for man, was isolated from 4 rodents, Proechimys guyanensis (Echimyidae), all from virgin forest along the newly opened Trans Amazon Highway, Pará State, and from a single sloth, Choloepus didactylus, from near Belém, Pará. All these animals showed no symptoms of infection: isolation of the parasite was made by the inoculation of laboratory hamsters with saline suspensions of triturated liver and spleen.

  20. The Processing and Mechanical Properties of High Temperature/High Performance Composites. Book 2. Constituent Properties and Macroscopic Performance: CMCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    kisrihuiton. oi cr~ikk Act :1 aler dur.- ’ tal result,,s arc conisi stent with a separated i nterfauce (EK. -, UIi 0) l\\r, 90l 1 s ,1i dmill:it j 1 D...known, the fiber bundle strength Mateial44 O igmi rddionl i𔃾- coatiing Maint A 1.98 0).44 10 None C ’Tissclig uatiy mpi % ncud% hedwibirn f thr...NSS0\\ and LF( KIU I ALt1, Ri 01 S) C RFIN1 IOR(’CD (() MPi )\\tT Is I ’,. , I IC-’ Rr•, .tileat !Ji’Urc 0.’:,CU 1 M thI.- llAiris I\\ in irc,:1wn 4 1

  1. Caracterização e relacionamento antigênico de três novos Bunyavirus no grupo Anopheles A (Bunyaviridae dos arbovirus Characterization and antigenic relationship of three new Bunyavirus in the Anopheles A serogroup (Bunyaviridae of arboviruses

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    Jorge Fernando Soares Travassos da Rosa

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available São descritos o isolamento e a caracterização de três novos arbovirus isolados na região da Usina Hidro-Elétrica de Tucuruí (UHE-TUC. Os três novos arbovirus pertencem ao grupo Anopheles A(ANA, gênero Bunyavirus (família Bunyaviridae. Os vírus Tucuruí (TUC, Caraipé (CPE e Arumateua (ART são relacionados entre si e com o vírus Trombetas (TBT, formando dentro do grupo ANA um complexo chamado Trombetas. Os arbovirus TUC, CPE e ART foram obtidos a partir de lotes de mosquitos Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus sp capturados em Tucuruí, nas proximidades da usina hidrelétrica de Tucuruí, Estado do Pará, nos meses de fevereiro, agosto e outubro de 1984, respectivamente. Até o final de 1990 os vírus TUC, CPE e ART foram isolados 12, 32 e 28 vezes respectivamente, sempre na região da UHE-TUC, exceção feita ao vírus TUC, do qual se obteve uma amostra procedente de Balbina, onde também foi construída uma hidroelétrica. Até o presente, esses vírus só foram isolados a partir de mosquitos do grupo An. (Nys. principalmente, a partir das espécies An. (Nys. nuneztovari e An. (Nys. triannulatus também consideradas vetores secundários da malária na Amazônia Brasileira. Testes sorológicos executados com soros humanos e de diversas espécies de animais silvestres foram negativos, com exceção de um soro de um carnívoro de espécie Nasua nasua que neutralizou a amostra TUC em títulos de 2.6 índice logaritmico de neutralização (ILN.The isolation and characterization of three new viruses obtained from the Tucuruí hydroelectric dam region is repeated. These three agents belong to the Anopheles A serogroup, genus Bunyavirus, Bunyaviridae. The Tucuruí (TUC, Caraipe (CPE and Arumateua (ART viruses have close relationships with each other and with Trombetas (TBT virus, an Anopheles A virus previously isolated in the Amazon Region of Brazil. These viruses form the "Trombetas complex". TUC, CPE and ART viruses were obtained from pools of

  2. Notas sôbre a evolução do virus vacínico em animais silvestres da fauna brasileira

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    Cicero Alves Moreira

    1956-06-01

    Full Text Available A note on the evolution of cow-pox virus in wild animals of Brazilian fauna. We have tried the sensibility of wild animals of Brazilian fauna to the cow-pox virus. The following specimens were submitted to experiences: Procyon cancrivorus, Hydrochoerus capybara, Cavea aperea, Coendu villosus, Didelphis aurita, Bradypus tridactylus, Euphractus sexcintus, Tamandua tetradactylus, Nasua narica, Dasyprocta aguti and Testudo tabulata. In all these animals, - excepting Bradypus tridactylus - we have obtained an infection with incubation (five days, aspect and duration similar to cow-pox of the laboratorial animals (calf and rabbit. In the Bradypus tridactylus howewer, the incubation was very long. Only after 30 days of inoculation we verified the infection with the formation of vesiculae and postulae.

  3. Utilização dos recursos naturais por comunidades humanas do Parque Ecoturístico do Guamá, Belém, Pará Utilization of natural resources by the human communities of the Guamá Ecotouristic Park, Belém, Pará

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    Ana Sílvia Sardinha Ribeiro

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho apresenta dados sobre o uso dos recursos naturais por populações humanas em pequenas comunidades (vilas localizadas no entorno (n = 6 e no interior (n = 1 do Parque Ecoturístico do Guamá (PEG, visando avaliar os impactos sobre a fauna e flora local, ante a implantação de um projeto de infra-estrutura rodoviária local. A metodologia consistiu da aplicação de dois modelos de questionários. Um direcionado a pessoas-chave, como: moradores mais antigos, presidentes de associações, agentes de saúde, etc, e o outro aplicado aleatoriamente aos adultos locais. Buscou-se atingir pelo menos 50% das famílias das pequenas localidades (11 famílias. Em todos os casos é realizado o extrativismo da fauna e flora, principalmente com o objetivo de subsistência. As espécies mais caçadas foram Agouti paca,Dasyprocta agouti,Nasua nasua, Euphractus sexcintus e Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris. A complementação da renda familiar através do comércio de caça sob encomenda é realizada em todas as comunidades estudadas. Frutíferas como Euterpe oleracea Mart., Musa spp e Theobroma cacao foram encontradas em 100% das comunidades (n=7. Plantas medicinais são rotineiramente cultivadas e empregadas. As espécies madeireiras exploradas são utilizadas com o objetivo de produção de carvão, construção de casas e de meios de transporte, predominando o Inga edulis, Virola surinamensis (Rol. Warb e Simaruba amara (Aubl.. O trabalho discute os resultados sob o aspecto da implantação do projeto viário, oferecendo recomendações para a minimização dos impactos do mesmo sobre a fauna, a flora e o modo tradicional de vida das comunidades.This work shows data about the use of natural resources by the human population located in (n=1 and around (n=6 the Guamá Ecotouristic Park (GEP, in order to evaluate the impact on the local fauna and flora in view of the project for constructing a road through the park. The methodology utilized in this community

  4. Mamíferos do município de Fênix, Paraná, Brasil: etnozoologia e conservação Mammals of the municipality of Fênix, Paraná, Brazil: ethnozoology and conservation

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    Fabiana Rocha-Mendes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Com base na abordagem etnozoológica foram resgatadas informações históricas e atuais sobre a mastofauna do município de Fênix, mesorregião centro-ocidental do estado do Paraná, sul do Brasil. Para tanto, no ano de 2004, foram realizadas entrevistas com 19 moradores locais por meio de uma conversa informal que tinham por objetivo o preenchimento de um questionário básico e a apresentação de fotografias da fauna potencial da região. Como resultado, foram registradas 39 espécies de mamíferos, sendo que destas, pelo menos seis são novos registros para a área. Informações obtidas em relação à caça indicam que esta atividade, muito comum no passado, ainda é presente, inclusive em unidades de conservação, como o Parque Estadual Vila Rica do Espírito Santo. As espécies que sofreram e sofrem maior pressão de caça são as mesmas citadas para outras partes do neotrópico. Atualmente, Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris (Linnaeus, 1766 (Hydrochaeridae é a espécie mais procurada, dada à facilidade de encontrá-la em diversas áreas naturais ou parcialmente antropizadas do município. No que se refere à predação causada por animais silvestres sobre animais domésticos, quase 80% dos entrevistados relataram ter sofrido perdas em suas criações, principalmente galinhas, resultantes de ataques de carnívoros de médio porte. Dados sobre alterações temporais na composição da mastofauna também foram obtidos junto aos entrevistados, como a extinção local de alguns mamíferos de grande porte (Panthera onca (Linnaeus, 1758 (Felidae, Tapirus terrestris (Linnaeus, 1758 (Tapiridae e Tayassu pecari (Link, 1795 (Tayassuidae e o aumento populacional de Cebus nigritus (Goldfuss, 1809 (Cebidae e de Nasua nasua (Linnaeus 1766 (Procyonidae, supostamente relacionado ao consumo de plantações como o milho.Based on an ethnozoological approach we obtained historical and present information on the mammalian fauna of the municipality of Fênix

  5. Composição e abundância relativa dos mamíferos de médio e grande porte no Parque Estadual do Turvo, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Composition and relative abundance of the medium-large ized mammals of Turvo State Park, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

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    Carlos B. Kasper

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Entre janeiro de 2005 e dezembro de 2006 foram realizados estudos sobre a composição e abundância relativa dos mamíferos de médio e grande porte do Parque Estadual do Turvo. Para tanto, foram utilizados registros de armadilhas fotográficas além de visualizações e dados sobre presença e ausência de pegadas ao longo de transectos pré-determinados. No total foram registradas 29 espécies de mamíferos de médio e grande porte, das quais Dasyprocta azarae Lichtenstein, 1823 e Sylvilagus brasiliensis (Linnaeus, 1758 foram as espécies com maior número de registros. No que se refere a Carnivora, Nasua nasua (Linnaeus, 1766 e Leopardus pardalis (Linnaeus, 1758 tiveram os maiores índices de registro, enquanto Leopardus tigrinus (Schreber, 1775, Leopardus wiedii (Schinz, 1782 e Galictis cuja (Molina 1782 os menores. Entre os ungulados apenas Pecari tajacu (Linnaeus, 1758 mostrou-se freqüente, sendo a quarta espécie em número de registros. Algumas espécies comuns em outros ambientes apresentaram baixos índices de registro no Parque Estadual do Turvo, tais como Dasypus novemcinctus Linnaeus, 1758 e Didelphis albiventris Lund, 1840. Finalmente, constata-se a provável extinção local de Tayassu pecari (Link, 1795, uma vez que não foram obtidos registros de sua presença ao longo do estudo. A conservação dos mamíferos de médio e grande porte do Parque está fortemente associada à preservação do "Corredor Verde de Misiones", que provavelmente representa uma área fonte para diversas espécies.Between January of 2005 and December of 2006, studies on the composition and relative abundance of medium and large sized mammals were carried out in Turvo State Park. Records came from camera-trapping, in addition to visualization and presence and absence data from track surveys along pre determined transects. At total, 29 species of medium-large sized mammals were listed. Of these, Dasyprocta azarae Lichtenstein, 1823 and Sylvilagus

  6. Mamíferos carnívoros e sua relação com a diversidade de hábitats no Parque Nacional dos Aparados da Serra, sul do Brasil Carnivore mammals and their relation with habitat diversity in Aparados da Serra National Park, southern Brazil

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    Maria de Fátima M. dos Santos

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A survey of carnivore mammals was accomplished in Aparados da Serra National Park from February 1998 to March 2000. The park has 10,250 ha and is considered a biodiversity core area of the Atlantic Forest Biosphere Reserve in the Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. The landscape is characterized by relatively well preserved relicts of Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol. Kuntze forest, grasslands and Atlantic Forest, which have contributed for the survival of endangered carnivore mammals. The National Park was divided in a grid of 16 km² cells using a 1:50,000 scale map. The animals were recorded using indirect methods, by identifying signs (scats, tracks and direct observation in 2.5 km long and 5 m wide transects, with 10 replicates in each grid cell. Interviews with local people were also used to confirm the animal presence. A total of 13 species was recorded: Procyon cancrivorus (Cuvier, 1798, Pseudalopex gymnocercus (G. Fischer, 1814, Leopardus pardalis (Linnaeus, 1758 and Cerdocyon thous (Linnaeus, 1766 were the most frequent species registered. Nasua nasua (Linnaeus 1766, Herpailurus yaguarondi (Lacépède, 1809, Chrysocyon brachyurus (Illiger, 1815, Eira barbara (Linnaeus, 1758, Leopardus sp., Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771, Galictis cuja (Molina, 1782, Conepatus chinga (Molina, 1892 and Lontra longicaudis (Olfers, 1818 showed lower frequencies. The Park presented areas with significant differences (Mantel Test, P< 0.05 in species richness and composition related to habitat classes. Areas with high habitat richness presented high species richness. The Araucaria forest was the habitat that presented the higher carnivore richness. The border areas of the Park are influenced by several environmental degradation factors that could be affecting the distribution of carnivores.

  7. Caracterização e relacionamento antigênico de três novos Bunyavirus no grupo Anopheles A (Bunyaviridae dos arbovirus

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    Jorge Fernando Soares Travassos da Rosa

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available São descritos o isolamento e a caracterização de três novos arbovirus isolados na região da Usina Hidro-Elétrica de Tucuruí (UHE-TUC. Os três novos arbovirus pertencem ao grupo Anopheles A(ANA, gênero Bunyavirus (família Bunyaviridae. Os vírus Tucuruí (TUC, Caraipé (CPE e Arumateua (ART são relacionados entre si e com o vírus Trombetas (TBT, formando dentro do grupo ANA um complexo chamado Trombetas. Os arbovirus TUC, CPE e ART foram obtidos a partir de lotes de mosquitos Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus sp capturados em Tucuruí, nas proximidades da usina hidrelétrica de Tucuruí, Estado do Pará, nos meses de fevereiro, agosto e outubro de 1984, respectivamente. Até o final de 1990 os vírus TUC, CPE e ART foram isolados 12, 32 e 28 vezes respectivamente, sempre na região da UHE-TUC, exceção feita ao vírus TUC, do qual se obteve uma amostra procedente de Balbina, onde também foi construída uma hidroelétrica. Até o presente, esses vírus só foram isolados a partir de mosquitos do grupo An. (Nys. principalmente, a partir das espécies An. (Nys. nuneztovari e An. (Nys. triannulatus também consideradas vetores secundários da malária na Amazônia Brasileira. Testes sorológicos executados com soros humanos e de diversas espécies de animais silvestres foram negativos, com exceção de um soro de um carnívoro de espécie Nasua nasua que neutralizou a amostra TUC em títulos de 2.6 índice logaritmico de neutralização (ILN.

  8. Caracterização e relacionamento antigênico de três novos Bunyavirus no grupo Anopheles A (Bunyaviridae dos arbovirus

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    Rosa Jorge Fernando Soares Travassos da

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available São descritos o isolamento e a caracterização de três novos arbovirus isolados na região da Usina Hidro-Elétrica de Tucuruí (UHE-TUC. Os três novos arbovirus pertencem ao grupo Anopheles A(ANA, gênero Bunyavirus (família Bunyaviridae. Os vírus Tucuruí (TUC, Caraipé (CPE e Arumateua (ART são relacionados entre si e com o vírus Trombetas (TBT, formando dentro do grupo ANA um complexo chamado Trombetas. Os arbovirus TUC, CPE e ART foram obtidos a partir de lotes de mosquitos Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus sp capturados em Tucuruí, nas proximidades da usina hidrelétrica de Tucuruí, Estado do Pará, nos meses de fevereiro, agosto e outubro de 1984, respectivamente. Até o final de 1990 os vírus TUC, CPE e ART foram isolados 12, 32 e 28 vezes respectivamente, sempre na região da UHE-TUC, exceção feita ao vírus TUC, do qual se obteve uma amostra procedente de Balbina, onde também foi construída uma hidroelétrica. Até o presente, esses vírus só foram isolados a partir de mosquitos do grupo An. (Nys. principalmente, a partir das espécies An. (Nys. nuneztovari e An. (Nys. triannulatus também consideradas vetores secundários da malária na Amazônia Brasileira. Testes sorológicos executados com soros humanos e de diversas espécies de animais silvestres foram negativos, com exceção de um soro de um carnívoro de espécie Nasua nasua que neutralizou a amostra TUC em títulos de 2.6 índice logaritmico de neutralização (ILN.

  9. Mamíferos da Fazenda Nhumirim, sub-região de Nhecolândia, Pantanal do Mato Grosso do Sul: I - levantamento preliminar de espécies

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    Cleber J.R. Alho

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available The pantanal is one of the world's richest freshwater wetlands. The pantanal is located in the flood plain of the headwaters of the Paraguai river, covering 140,000km². The habitats of the Pantanal are present in a complex mosaic. The major habitat types are: pockets of forests, called capão or cordilheira, seasonally flooded grasslands or campos, and permanent or temporary lagoons, called baías. The Pantanal harbors both rich and abundant mammal fauna. A survey was conducted at Fazenda Nhumirim, a research station run by the Centro de Pesquisa Agropecuária do Pantanal (CPAP in Corumbá, a research branch of EMBRAPA. The Fazenda covers an area of 4,310 ha in the sub-region of Nhecolândia, appoximately 150km east of Corumbá, Mato Grosso do Sul. The area receives an average annual rainfall of 1,022mm, and has a mean monthly temperature that varies between 29.1ºC (January and 22.0ºC (June. Four routes were followed between two times during ten days of each month. The survey routes were covered on horseback by between two and four observers. Each route was followed and equal number of times in the morning and in the afternoon, to eliminate bias related to the activity patterns of mammals. In order to evaluate relative abundance of nocturnal species, we also conducted a number of nocturnal censuses. These censuses were done by car; a high intensity searchlight was used to spot the animals. We also conducted a trap-mark-recapture survey of the small mammals at Fazenda Nhumirim. After the census period, we continued to collect observations on the occurrence of mammals at the Fazenda, noting wherever possible the kind of habitat in which the animals were observed. The survey identified a diversity of mammals at Fazenda Nhumirim: six orders, 14 families, 19 genera, and 20 species. Nasua nasua was the most frequently observed species during the diurnal census, accounting for 61.5 percent of all observations. Dusicyon (formely Cerdocyon thous was

  10. Arbovírus Ilheus em aves silvestres (Sporophila caerulescens e Molothrus bonariensis

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    Pereira Luiz Eloy

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar o isolamento do vírus Ilheus no Estado de São Paulo e avaliar o seu impacto para a saúde pública. MÉTODOS: O isolamento de vírus foi realizado em camundongos albinos Swiss, a partir de sangue de aves silvestres, capturadas com redes de espera tipo mist net, armadas no nível do solo, no Parque Ecológico do Tietê, São Paulo. A identificação das cepas isoladas foi feita pelos testes de inibição da hemaglutinação, fixação de complemento e neutralização em camundongos. Amostras de plasma de aves e de mamíferos silvestres foram submetidas à pesquisa sorológica para detecção de anticorpos inibidores de hemaglutinação. RESULTADOS: Foram isoladas duas cepas do vírus Ilheus em sangue de aves das espécies Sporophila caerulescens e Molothrus bonariensis e detectados anticorpos em aves das espécies Columbina talpacoti, Geopelia cuneata, Molothrus bonariensis e Sicalis flaveola, em sagüis das espécies Callithrix jacchus e Callithrix penicillata e no quati Nasua nasua. CONCLUSÕES: O isolamento do vírus Ilheus e a detecção de anticorpos específicos em aves residentes, migratórias e de cativeiro, em sagüis e quatis, comprovam a presença desse agente no Parque Ecológico do Tietê. O comportamento migratório de aves silvestres pode determinar a introdução do vírus em outras regiões. Considerando-se a patogenicidade para o homem e a confirmação da circulação desse agente viral em área urbana, freqüentada para atividade de lazer e de educação, o risco de ocorrência de infecção na população humana não pode ser descartado.

  11. Diversidad de mamíferos terrestres de talla grande y media de una selva subcaducifolia del noreste de Oaxaca, México Diversity of large and medium sized land mammals of a subcaducifolious tropical forest of north eastern of Oaxaca, Mexico

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    Gabriela Pérez-Irineo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available El estado de Oaxaca en el sureste de México alberga una biodiversidad extraordinaria. Sin embargo, las actividades humanas han propiciado alteraciones considerables, incluida la disminución de diferentes ambientes naturales, especialmente de los bosques tropicales; por ello es importante documentar la diversidad de estos ambientes, así como su respuesta a las transformaciones antropocéntricas. Este trabajo tiene como objetivo estimar la diversidad de mamíferos terrestres en una selva mediana en el noreste del estado de Oaxaca, México. Se recorrieron 3 senderos para la búsqueda de rastros, captura de organismos, avistamientos y fototrampeo de septiembre de 2007 a agosto de 2008. Se registraron 15 especies de 6 órdenes, 11 familias y 14 géneros, entre ellas 7 nuevas para la región. Las especies más abundantes fueron Nasua narica, Pecari tajacu, Dasyprocta mexicana, Cuniculus paca y Leopardus pardalis. A pesar de presentar un índice de diversidad bajo con respecto a otros estudios comparables, la presencia de especies consideradas en riesgo por la legislación mexicana, como L. pardalis, L. wiedii, Eira barbara y Tamandua mexicana hacen a la zona valiosa para la conservación de la diversidad en la región.The state of Oaxaca, in southeast Mexico is home to an extraordinary biodiversity. But human activities have led to significant changes, including reduction of different natural habitats, especially tropical forests, so it is important to document the diversity of these environments, and their response to the anthropocentric changes. Therefore, this study aimed to estimate the diversity of terrestrial mammals in a tropical forest in northeastern of the state of Oaxaca, Mexico. Three transects were walked to search for tracks, catches of organisms, sightings, and phototrapping from September 2007 to August 2008. There were recorded 15 species of 6 orders, 11 families, and 14 genera, 7 of this not previously known in the region. The

  12. PRAXIS: low thermal emission high efficiency OH suppressed fibre spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Content, Robert; Ellis, Simon; Gers, Luke; Haynes, Roger; Horton, Anthony; Lawrence, Jon; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Lindley, Emma; Min, Seong-Sik; Shortridge, Keith; Staszac, Nick; Xavier, Pascal; Zhelen, Ross

    2014-01-01

    PRAXIS is a second generation instrument that follows on from GNOSIS, which was the first instrument using fibre Bragg gratings for OH background suppression. The Bragg gratings reflect the NIR OH lines while being transparent to light between the lines. This gives a much higher signal-noise ratio at low resolution but also at higher resolutions by removing the scattered wings of the OH lines. The specifications call for high throughput and very low thermal and detector noise so that PRAXIS will remain sky noise limited. The optical train is made of fore-optics, an IFU, a fibre bundle, the Bragg grating unit, a second fibre bundle and a spectrograph. GNOSIS used the pre-existing IRIS2 spectrograph while PRAXIS will use a new spectrograph specifically designed for the fibre Bragg grating OH suppression and optimised for 1470 nm to 1700 nm (it can also be used in the 1090 nm to 1260 nm band by changing the grating and refocussing). This results in a significantly higher transmission due to high efficiency coati...

  13. Conservation on international boundaries: the impact of security barriers on selected terrestrial mammals in four protected areas in Arizona, USA.

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    Jamie W McCallum

    Full Text Available Several thousand terrestrial protected areas (PAs lie on international boundaries. Because international boundaries can be focal points for trade, illegal activity and development, such PAs can be vulnerable to a range of anthropogenic threats. There is an increasing trend towards the erection of international boundary infrastructure (including fences, barriers and ditches in many parts of the world, which may reduce the risk of these anthropogenic threats to some PAs. However this may restrict home range and access to resources for some native species. We sought to understand the impacts of these two different types of threat by using camera traps to measure the activity level of humans, native and invasive mammals in four US PAs on the Mexican international boundary. Comparisons were made between treatment areas with barriers and those without. Results showed that puma and coati were more likely to appear in treatment areas without barriers, whereas humans were not observed more frequently in one treatment area over another. The suggestion is that the intermittent fencing present in this part of the world does affect some native species, but does not necessarily restrict the movement of humans (including illegal migrants, who may negatively impact native species.

  14. Antigenic typing of brazilian rabies virus samples isolated from animals and humans, 1989-2000

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    FAVORETTO Silvana Regina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal and human rabies samples isolated between 1989 and 2000 were typified by means of a monoclonal antibody panel against the viral nucleoprotein. The panel had been previously established to study the molecular epidemiology of rabies virus in the Americas. Samples were isolated in the Diagnostic Laboratory of the Pasteur Institute and in other rabies diagnostic centers in Brazil. In addition to the fixed virus samples CVS-31/96-IP, preserved in mouse brain, and PV-BHK/97, preserved in cell culture, a total of 330 rabies virus samples were isolated from dogs, cats, cattle, horses, bats, sheep, goat, swine, foxes, marmosets, coati and humans. Six antigenic variants that were compatible with the pre-established monoclonal antibodies panel were defined: numbers 2 (dog, 3 (Desmodus rotundus, 4 (Tadarida brasiliensis, 5 (vampire bat from Venezuela, 6 (Lasiurus cinereus and Lab (reacted to all used antibodies. Six unknown profiles, not compatible with the panel, were also found. Samples isolated from insectivore bats showed the greatest variability and the most commonly isolated variant was variant-3 (Desmodus rotundus. These findings may be related to the existence of multiple independent transmission cycles, involving different bat species.

  15. Know Your Monkey: Identifying Primate Conservation Challenges in an Indigenous Kichwa Community Using an Ethnoprimatological Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Ciara A; Alarcon-Valenzuela, Javiera; Patiño, Javier; Preziosi, Richard F; Sellers, William I

    2016-01-01

    Increasing pressure on tropical forests is continually highlighting the need to find new solutions that mitigate the impact of human populations on biodiversity. However, developing solutions that can tackle the drivers of anthropogenic pressure, or at least take them into account, hinges upon building a good understanding of the culture and perceptions of local people. This study aims to provide an overview of the ethnoprimatology of an indigenous Kichwa community in the Ecuadorian Amazon that maintains a traditional lifestyle but also has good access to markets. We examine whether primates are seen as a distinctive group and their relative importance as sources of bushmeat and as household pets. Pile-sorting exercises revealed that although locals generally group members of the order Primates together, tree-dwelling non-primates including sloths, coatis, kinkajous and tamanduas are also frequently classified as 'monkeys'. The perceived importance of primates to the forest and the community lay more in their potential as bushmeat, and only 1 respondent identified an ecological role for the group in terms of seed dispersal. Gaining a better understanding of local perceptions will allow for better-informed conservation decisions that are more aware of potential impacts and are more likely to gain community support.

  16. Ascaridoid nematodes of South American mammals, with a definition of a new genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprent, J F

    1982-09-01

    Ascaridoid nematodes occurring in South American mammals are divided into categories based on their possible origin. The affinities are discussed of five species so far known only from the Neotropical Region. Toxocara alienata (Rudolphi 1819) is reported from Nasua rufa socialis, Procyon cancrivorus, and Tayassus torquatus. The specimens from T. torquatus are described and found most closely to resemble Toxocara mackerrasae from south-east Asian and Austrialian rodents. Anisakis insignis from Inia geoffrensis is transferred back to Peritrachelius Diesing, 1851, on account of the structure of the lips and spicules. P. insignis is shown to exhibit remarkable convergence of lip structure with Lagochilascaris turgida from Didelphis marsupialis. Galeiceps longispiculum (Freitas & Lent, 1941) from Pteronura brasiliensis is confirmed as a species distinct from G. cucullus (Linstow, 1899) and G. spinicollis (Baylis, 1923), but G. simiae (Mosgovoy, 1951) is considered to be a synonym of G. spinicollis. An error in the host record of G. spinicollis is corrected from Cercopithecus leucampyx kandti to Lutra maculicollis kivuana. Ascaris dasypodina Baylis, 1922 from armadillos, including Cabassous unicinctus and Tolypeutes matacos, is redescribed and placed in a new genus Bairdascaris. The question is raised as to whether some species in Lagochilascaris, Galeiceps, and Toxocara may have crossed directly by sea from Africa to South America, rather than entering via North America.

  17. Transtornos alimentares ou um impasse dietético?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Figueiredo Carneiro

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Este texto se interroga se é apropriada a nomenclatura direcionadaaos sintomas classificados como “transtornos alimentares”, a partirda posição do sujeito anoréxico. E propõe, a partir de uma lógicada posição do sujeito frente ao objeto, a experimentação de um impassedietético que estremece sua crença no objeto de amor totalizantee que reaviva uma inscrição ocorrida em uma idade precocee determinante para o advento do amor. Apresenta ainda a tese deque o amor sempre se reinscreverá em função de uma dimensãoprecoce e no tempo em que o sujeito se encontra com uma falha nasua construção subjetiva, indicando que uma relação sexual inexisteprecisamente no duplo espaço de falência de sexo e de amor.

  18. Ticks collected from humans, domestic animals, and wildlife in Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vivas, R I; Apanaskevich, D A; Ojeda-Chi, M M; Trinidad-Martínez, I; Reyes-Novelo, E; Esteve-Gassent, M D; Pérez de León, A A

    2016-01-15

    Domestic animals and wildlife play important roles as reservoirs of zoonotic pathogens that are transmitted to humans by ticks. Besides their role as vectors of several classes of microorganisms of veterinary and public health relevance, ticks also burden human and animal populations through their obligate blood-feeding habit. It is estimated that in Mexico there are around 100 tick species belonging to the Ixodidae and Argasidae families. Information is lacking on tick species that affect humans, domestic animals, and wildlife through their life cycle. This study was conducted to bridge that knowledge gap by inventorying tick species that infest humans, domestic animals and wildlife in the State of Yucatan, Mexico. Amblyomma ticks were observed as euryxenous vertebrate parasites because they were found parasitizing 17 animal species and human. Amblyomma mixtum was the most eryxenous species found in 11 different animal species and humans. Both A. mixtum and A. parvum were found parasitizing humans. Ixodes near affinis was the second most abundant species parasitizing six animal species (dogs, cats, horses, white-nosed coati, white-tail deer and black vulture) and was found widely across the State of Yucatan. Ixodid tick populations may increase in the State of Yucatan with time due to animal production intensification, an increasing wildlife population near rural communities because of natural habitat reduction and fragmentation. The diversity of ticks across host taxa documented here highlights the relevance of ecological information to understand tick-host dynamics. This knowledge is critical to inform public health and veterinary programs for the sustainable control of ticks and tick-borne diseases.

  19. El orden Carnivora (Mammalia en el Perú: Estado del conocimiento y prioridades de investigación para su conservación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Daniel Cossíos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available La alta diversidad de especies de carnívoros del Perú puede generar problemas al momento de decidir los taxa y temas sobre los que deben dirigirse los esfuerzos de investigación. En este trabajo se evalúa el esfuerzo de investigación en base al número de publicaciones realizadas para cada familia y especie de carnívoro en el Perú. Asimismo, se señalan los vacíos de información relevantes para la conservación de cada especie y se presenta la primera evaluación de las prioridades de investigación sobre este grupo animal en el Perú. Se registró 145 publicaciones sobre carnívoros peruanos realizadas desde el año 1943. El número de publicaciones presentó grandes diferencias entre taxa, entre temas estudiados y entre las ecorregiones en las que se realizaron las investigaciones. Según la escala de prioridades propuesta, la especie que debe ser estudiada con mayor prioridad es el coatí andino Nasua olivacea y la de menor prioridad es el ocelote Leopardus pardalis. Los resultados de nuestro trabajo resaltan la urgencia de realizar investigaciones sobre ciertas especies de carnívoros de las que existen pocos datos publicados, tanto a nivel local como global, y que se distribuyen en pocas ecorregiones del Perú. Tanto la escala de prioridades de investigación como la lista de vacíos de información serán de utilidad para guiar esfuerzos logísticos y financieros de investigadores particulares, instituciones privadas y gubernamentales.

  20. [Diversity, relative abundance and activity patterns of medium and large mammals in a tropical deciduous forest in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Oaxaca, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Marcial, Malinalli; Briones-Salas, Miguel

    2014-12-01

    The use of camera traps and mammal track search are complementary methods to monitoring species of which is not well documented their natural history, as in the case of medium and large mammals. To ensure its conservation and good management, it is necessary to generate information about the structure of the community and their populations. The objective of the present study was to estimate the diversity, relative abundance and activity patterns of medium and large mammals in a tropical deciduous forest located in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Oaxaca, Mexico. Samplings were conducted in three month intervals, from September 2011 to May 2013. We used photographic-sampling and track search, two complementary sampling methods. For photographic-sampling, 12 camera traps were placed covering an area of 60 km2, while for the tracks search a monthly tour of four line-transect surveys of three kilometers length each was undertaken. We obtained a total of 344 pictures with 5292 trap-days total sampling effort; in addition, 187 track records in a total of 144 km. With both methods we registered 21 species of mammals, in 13 families and seven orders, and five species resulted in new records to the area. The diversity index of Shannon-Wiener obtained with the method of tracks was H' = 2.41, while the most abundant species were Urocyon cinereoargen- teus (IAR = 0.23) and Pecari tajacu (IAR = 0.20). By the method of trap the most abundant species were P. tajacu (IAR = 2.62) and Nasua narica (IAR = 1.28). In terms of patterns of activity P. tajacu, N. narica and Odocoileus virginianus were primarily diurnal species; Canis latrans and Leopardus pardalis did not show preference for any schedule in particular, and Didelphis virginiana and Dasypus novemcinctus preferred to have nocturnal activity. This information can be of help to the creation of programs of management and conservation of mam- mals of medium and large in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Oaxaca, México.

  1. 浙南沿岸张网渔获物优势种类组成及季节分布%Dominant species catch composition and seasonal distribution of swing net along southern coast of Zhejiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪小括; 张石天; 艾为明

    2012-01-01

    According to the survey data of net catch in sampling along the southern coast of Zhejiang from July 2010 to June 2011, research and analysis on dominant species catch composition and seasonal distribution of swing net were conducted. The results show that, 97 kinds of swimming organisms were identified in the annual sample survey. Dominant species were Acetes Chinensis, Acetes Japanese, Bombay duck, Leptochela gracilis Stimpson, Coiliaspp, Charybdis bimaculata, Coilia nasua, and genera of Anchoviella commersonii, Gobiidae, genera of edible mantis shrimp, genera of Solenocera Melantho, Parapenaeopsis, Alpheus were in the 12 groups. Acetes were encountered throughout the year, there are two busy seasons, one is from March to May, the other is in July and August, the monthly gross Acetes weight proportion of the sample were 41.5%, 33.1%, 36.4%, 43.1% and 77.2%. Bombay duck appeared mainly in September to October, accounting of the weight of the sample in each month were 25.5% and 39.7%, average weight were 1.2 g and 1.1 g. Coiliaspp occurred mainly in June to September, accounting for 3.2%, 3.6%, 1.4% and 2.6% of the weight of the sample each month, average weight were 1.1 g, 2.2 g, 1.8 g and 3.9 g. Edible mantis shrimp appeared mainly in the busy season from September to October, accounting for 10.5% and 9.2% of the weight of the sample in each month, average weight were 3.5 g and 4.8 g.%根据2010年7月至2011年6月对浙南沿岸张网渔获物采样调查资料,研究分析张网渔获物优势种类组成及季节分布。结果表明,在全年取样调查中,共鉴定游泳生物97种。优势种类为中国毛虾、日本毛虾、龙头鱼、细螯虾、带鱼,双斑虫寻、刀鲚以及小公鱼属、虎鱼科、口虾蛄属、管鞭虾属、仿对虾属、鼓虾属等12个类群。毛虾全年均有出现,在一年中出现旺季有两个,一个是3月至5月,再一个是7月至8月,各月样品中毛虾重量占比分别为41.5%、33.1%、36.4%、43