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Sample records for brown widow spider

  1. Black widow spider and brown recluse spider bites in Texas from 1998 through 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B; Stanley, Sharilyn K

    2003-10-01

    Black widow spiders and brown recluse spiders are of medical importance to humans in the US. However, these spiders differ in their habits, habitat, and the clinical effects and treatment of their bite. This study used data from human exposure calls to poison centers in Texas to compare the epidemioloy of bites from these 2 spiders. During 1998-2002, 760 black widow spider bites and 1,369 brown recluse spider bites were reported. Black widow spider bite penetrance demonstrated no secular trend during this time period while the penetrance of brown recluse spider bites increased. A higher percentage of black widow spider bites occurred among males, while a higher proportion of brown recluse spider bites were reported for females. Black widow spider bites most frequently had mild outcomes while brown recluse spider bites most often had moderate outcomes. The majority of reported bites for both types of spider occurred at the patient's own residence, although the percentage was lower for black widow spiders. Seasonal trends were noted for both black widow and brown recluse spiders. The highest penetrance of black widow spider bites was observed in western Texas while the highest penetrance of brown recluse spider bites was observed in central Texas. This information is useful for identifying those populations at greatest risk for the respective spider bites.

  2. First report of brown widow spider sightings in Peninsular Malaysia and notes on its global distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslimin, Mustakiza; Wilson, John-James; Ghazali, Amir-Ridhwan M; Braima, Kamil A; Jeffery, John; Wan-Nor, Fitri; Alaa-Eldin, Mohamed E; Mohd-Zin, Siti-Waheeda; Wan-Yusoff, Wan S; Norma-Rashid, Yusoff; Lau, Yee L; Rohela, Mahmud; Abdul-Aziz, Noraishah M

    2015-01-01

    The brown widow spider (Latrodectus geometricus Koch, 1841) has colonised many parts of the world from its continent of origin, Africa. By at least 1841, the species had successfully established populations in South America and has more recently expanded its range to the southern states of North America. This highly adaptable spider has been far more successful in finding its niche around the world than its famous cousins, the black widow, Latrodectus mactans, found in the south-eastern states of North America, and the red-back, Latrodectus hasselti, found mostly in Australia, New Zealand and Japan. We performed an extensive web search of brown widow sightings and mapped the location of each sighting using ArcGIS. Specimens reputedly of the species L. geometricus were collected at three localities in Peninsular Malaysia. The spiders were identified and documented based on an examination of morphological characteristics and DNA barcoding. The spiders found in Peninsular Malaysia were confirmed to be Latrodectus geometricus based on their morphological characteristics and DNA barcodes. We recorded 354 sightings of the brown widow in 58 countries, including Peninsular Malaysia. Reports from the Americas and the Far East suggest a global-wide invasion of the brown widow spider. Herein we report the arrival of the brown widow spider in Peninsular Malaysia and provide notes on the identification of the species and its recently expanded range.

  3. Black and brown widow spider bites in South Africa: A series of 45 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cases of black widow (Latrodectus indistinctus) and brown widow (L. geometricus) spider bites referred to the Tygerberg Pharmacology and' Toxicology Consultation Centre from the summer of 1987/88 to the summer of 1991/92 were entered into this series. Of a total of 45 patients, 30 had been bitten by black and 15 by ...

  4. Exposure of Brown Recluse and Brown Widow Spiders (Araneae: Sicariidae, Theridiidae) to a Commercial Sulfuryl Fluoride Fumigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Richard S; Hoddle, Mark S; Choe, Dong-Hwan; Thoms, Ellen

    2014-10-01

    The body of pesticide research on spiders is sparse with most studies using topical or residual applications to assess efficacy. Data on the effects of fumigation on spider survivorship are scarce in the scientific literature. In this study, we exposed adult male and female brown recluse spiders, Loxosceles reclusa Gertsch & Mulaik, and female brown widow spiders, Latrodectus geometricus C. L. Koch, to a commercial fumigation event using sulfuryl fluoride directed at termite control. General consensus from the pest control industry is that fumigation is not always effective for control of spiders for a variety of reasons, including insufficient fumigant dosage, particularly, for contents of egg sacs that require a higher fumigant dosage for control. We demonstrated that a sulfuryl fluoride fumigation with an accumulated dosage of 162 oz-h per 1,000 ft(3) at 21°C over 25 h (≈1.7 × the drywood termite dosage) directed at termites was sufficient to kill adult brown recluse and brown widow spiders. The effectiveness of commercial fumigation practices to control spiders, and particularly their egg sacs, warrants further study. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.

  5. Establishment of the Brown Widow Spider (Araneae: Theridiidae) and Infestation of its Egg Sacs by a Parasitoid, Philolema latrodecti (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae), in French Polynesia and the Cook Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Jérôme; Vetter, Richard S

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents two newly established species for French Polynesia: the invasive brown widow spider, Latrodectus geometricus C. L. Koch, and its potential biocontrol agent, the parasitoid wasp, Philolema latrodecti (Fullaway). The brown widow spider was recorded from the island of Moorea in 2006 and, since that discovery, the occurrence of this species has expanded to two of the five archipelagos of French Polynesia including the main island of Tahiti and four of the Cook Islands. Although the tropical climate contributes to the establishment of L. geometricus, a biotic factor, P. latrodecti, may restrain population from demographic explosion. This eurytomid wasp is present in French Polynesia and is a parasitoid that has been used in biological control of the southern black widow Latrodectus mactans (F.) in Hawaii. This wasp could become a significant limiting factor for L. geometricus distribution on these islands, as it was found in 31% of the Tahitian brown widow spider egg sacs that were dissected. However, thus far, the wasp was only found on Tahiti in association with the brown widow spider. Although the brown widow is generally considered to be less toxic than its black widow relatives, it remains of medical concern in French Polynesia because reactions to its bites can, at times, be severe. The spider remains of public concern because it is a novel species; it has the word widow in its name and dark morphs are mistaken as black widows. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Hey! A Black Widow Spider Bit Me!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... System Taking Care of Your Teeth Bad Breath Hey! A Black Widow Spider Bit Me! KidsHealth > For Kids > Hey! A Black Widow Spider Bit Me! Print A ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Hey! A Tarantula Bit Me! Hey! A Flea Bit ...

  7. Brown recluse spider (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brown recluse is a venomous spider most commonly found in midwestern and southern states of the United States. It ... inch overall and has long skinny legs. The brown recluse is brown with a characteristic dark violin-shaped ...

  8. Brown recluse spider envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbee, R Brent; Kao, Louise W; Ibrahim, Danyal

    2006-03-01

    Brown recluse spider bite is a common diagnosis in almost every state in America. In fact, cases have been reported in areas where the spider has never been seen. A review of medical literature reveals that most current concepts regarding brown recluse spider envenomation are based on supposition. In this article, we attempt to review critically our present understanding of brown recluse bites with a focus on the published evidence.

  9. Brown Recluse Spider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6.4-19.1mm) • Color: Golden brown • A dark violin/fiddle shape (see top photo) is located ... Habitat The Brown Recluse Spider builds small retreat webs behind objects of any type. Symptoms • The severity ...

  10. Brown recluse spider bite on the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Kori; Misra, Subhasis

    2014-05-01

    Brown recluse spiders are one of two types of spiders in the United States that can cause significant tissue damage and, in rare cases, death. Brown recluse spider bites are most often benign and self-limiting, but in a few cases can cause severe necrotic skin lesions.

  11. [Neurotoxic manifestations of black widow spider envenomation in paediatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo-Cruz, N; Gómez-Rivera, N

    2016-05-01

    Envenomation by black widow spiders manifests clinically with signs of neurotoxicity in paediatric patients. Identify typical neurological signs and symptoms in paediatric patients of different ages, and describe treatment and outcomes in a paediatric hospital in northwest Mexico. We reviewed 70 clinical records of patients hospitalised due to black widow spider bite between 1978 and 2014. We divided the total into 2 groups: Group 1, infants and preschool children; and Group 2, school-age children and adolescents. The demographic variables were age, sex, birthplace, place where envenomation occurred, body part(s) affected, degree of envenomation according to signs and symptoms, treatment, clinical outcome, and statistical differences. Boys accounted for 61.4% of all cases, and infants younger than one year old made up 14.2%. Most patients (70%) were bitten by the spider at home; the anatomical areas most frequently affected were the legs, neck, thorax, and abdomen. The neurological signs and symptoms displayed by Group 1 were irritability, constant crying, sialorrhoea, nausea, tachycardia, arrhythmias, fatigue when walking, agitation, muscle spasms paraesthesia, tetany, seizures, and nystagmus. Signs in Group 2 included localized pain, headache, sialorrhoea, paraesthesia, profuse sweating, anxiety, muscle weakness, muscle spasms, and fine tremor. The predominant autonomic sign in Group 1 was sialorrhoea (P<.0001) and in Group 2, paraesthesia (P<.0001). Patients who received Fab antivenom treatment displayed better outcomes and shorter hospital stays than those who did not. No deaths were reported. The neurological signs and symptoms caused by black widow spider bite are predominantly autonomic, and identifying them permits early diagnosis and more effective treatment. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Brown recluse spider bites: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunnelee, Janice D

    2006-02-01

    The brown recluse spider is found more commonly in the Southeast and the Central Midwest. Its bite is not common because it is a shy spider that only bites if cornered. A severe bite may necrose a large area that requires skin grafting; systemic reactions rarely occur. This article discusses the brown recluse spider and presents a case study of a patient with two spider bites that did require extensive grafting.

  13. Spider Bites (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but are rare. Signs and Symptoms Of a brown recluse spider bite: red blister in the center with ... you think your child was bitten by a brown recluse or black widow spider Think Prevention! Make sure ...

  14. Hey! A Brown Recluse Spider Bit Me!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... System Taking Care of Your Teeth Bad Breath Hey! A Brown Recluse Spider Bit Me! KidsHealth > For Kids > Hey! A Brown Recluse Spider Bit Me! Print A ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Hey! A Fire Ant Stung Me! Hey! A Tarantula ...

  15. Epidemiology of the brown recluse spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Jacqueline

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide a comprehensive epidemiological and clinical description of the brown recluse spider bite. Review of evidenced-based scientific literature and practice guidelines. A specific descriptive case study is interwoven through the article to tie in the clinical presenting figure associated with this bite. The brown recluse lives in a circumscribed area of the United States (the south central Midwest) with a few less common recluse species living in the more sparsely populated southwest United States. In these areas, where spider populations may be dense, recluse spiders may be a cause of significant morbidity. Most spider bites are asymptomatic but what makes this bite so devastating is the toxin injected by the brown recluse spider, which can cause considerable systemic symptoms as well as necrotic skin ulcers (necrotic arachnidism). The article presents process for diagnosis and stresses the importance of identifying the spider if at all possible.

  16. Brown recluse spider bite to the eyelid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, R M; Neufeld, M V; Westfall, C T

    2000-08-01

    To present a photographically documented case of a known brown recluse spider bite to the eyelid. Interventional case report. The wound was photographed daily during an 11-day hospitalization and at 1 month and 6 months after the injury. Treatment included canthotomy and cantholysis; administration of dapsone, antibiotics, and steroids; and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Clinical presentation and course of a known brown recluse spider bite. Complete recovery with cicatrization at the site of the bite. We present a case of a brown recluse spider bite to the left lower eyelid with a discussion of management and outcome of this rarely reported injury.

  17. The distribution of brown recluse spiders in the southeastern quadrant of the United States in relation to loxoscelism diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Richard S

    2009-05-01

    The southern and eastern margins of the range of the brown recluse spider run through the southeastern quadrant of the United States. Populations vary from abundant in states such as Arkansas and west and central Kentucky and Tennessee to absent in the Atlantic seaboard states. The diagnosis of loxoscelism should be restricted to areas of the southeastern United States where brown recluse spiders are both common and widespread. Better knowledge of the local presence of recluse spiders in one's area, along with the list of differential diagnoses for dermonecrosis, will allow medical personnel in the south to better assess the probability of spider involvement in a necrotic skin lesion. In North America, there are two groups of spiders proven to be medically important: the widow spiders (genus Latrodectus) and the recluse spiders (genus Loxosceles). The widow spiders are a known entity, because their distinctive coloration makes them readily identifiable by nonarachnologists. Also, the physiological mechanism of the venom, the antivenom to counter it, and the symptoms are known, causing misdiagnosis to rarely occur. In contrast, recluse spiders are almost at the other end of the spectrum. They are readily misidentified or confused with harmless spiders, and the physiological mechanism of the venom is still being elucidated. Furthermore, no antivenom is commercially available, and the brown recluse's infamy causes many skin lesions of nonarachnid origin to be misdiagnosed as brown recluse spider bites.

  18. Identifying and misidentifying the brown recluse spider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, R

    1999-11-01

    The brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa, is often implicated as a cause of necrotic skin lesions.[1-3] Diagnoses are most commonly made by clinical appearance and infrequently is a spider seen, captured or identified at the time of the bite.[1, 2, 4-6] The brown recluse lives in a circumscribed area of the U.S. (the south central Midwest) with a few less common recluse species living in the more sparsely-populated southwest U.S.[7] In these areas, where spider populations may be dense, recluse spiders may be a cause of significant morbidity. However, outside the natural range of these recluse species, the conviction that they are the etiological agents behind necrotic lesions of unknown origin is widespread, and most often erroneous. In some states such as California, unsubstantiated reports concerning recluse spider bites have taken on the status of "urban legend" leading to overdiagnosis and, therefore, inappropriate treatment.

  19. Reports of envenomation by brown recluse spiders exceed verified specimens of Loxosceles spiders in South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frithsen, Ivar L; Vetter, Richard S; Stocks, Ian C

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether the number of brown recluse spider bites diagnosed by South Carolina physicians coincides with evidence of brown recluse spiders found in the state. Brown recluse spider bite diagnosis data were extracted from 1990 and 2004 surveys of South Carolina physicians. This was compared with the known historical evidence of brown recluse spiders collected in South Carolina and derived from various sources, including state agencies, arachnologists, and museum specimens. South Carolina physicians diagnosed 478 brown recluse spider bites in 1990 and 738 in 2004. Dating to 1953, 44 brown recluse spider specimens have been verified from 6 locations in South Carolina. The number of brown recluse bites reportedly diagnosed in South Carolina greatly outnumbers the verified brown recluse specimens that have been collected in the state. The pattern of bite diagnoses outnumbering verified brown recluse specimens has been reported in other areas outside of this spider's known endemic range.

  20. Reversible Myocarditis and Pericarditis after Black Widow Spider Bite or Kounis Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Yaman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical manifestation of black widow spider bite is variable and occasionally leads to death in rural areas. Cases of myocarditis and pericarditis after black widow spider bite are rare and the associated prognostic significance is unknown. Kounis syndrome has been defined as an acute coronary syndrome in the setting of allergic or hypersensitivity and anaphylactic or anaphylactoid insults that manifests as vasospastic angina or acute myocardial infarction or stent thrombosis. Allergic myocarditis is caused by myocardial inflammation triggered by infectious pathogens, toxic, ischemic, or mechanical injuries, such as drug-related inflammation and other immune reactions. A 15-year-old child was admitted to the emergency department with pulmonary edema after spider bite. ST segment depression on ECG, elevated cardiac enzymes and global left ventricular hypokinesia (with ejection fraction of 22%, and local pericardial effusion findings confirmed the diagnosis of myopericarditis. After heart failure and pulmonary edema oriented medical therapy, clinical status improved. Patient showed a progressive improvement and LV functions returned to normal on the sixth day. Myopericarditis complicating spider bite is rare and sometimes fatal. The mechanism is not clearly known. Alpha-latrotoxin of the black widow spider is mostly convicted in these cases. But allergy or hypersensitivity may play a role in myocardial damage.

  1. Histological findings after brown recluse spider envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, D M; Eggers, J S; Schmidt, W E; Storrow, A B; Doe, R H; McGlasson, D; Fischer, J R

    2000-06-01

    Histologic specimens from 41 rabbits were studied for changes resulting from the manual injection of brown recluse spider venom. Major findings included a mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, coagulative tissue necrosis, and vasculitis. All specimens demonstrated a well-delineated zone of eosinophilic staining recognizable as "mummified" coagulative necrosis of the epidermis and dermis. A dense band of neutrophils bordered the zone of necrosis. Immediately adjacent to the neutrophilic band, small vessel vasculitis was a universal finding. Degranulated eosinophils and neutrophils and macrophages filled with eosinophilic granules were common. Inflammatory foci were often centered on groups of lipocytes within the dermis. Large vessel vasculitis resembling that seen in polyarteritis nodosa was present deep to 7 of the 40 eschars. Large vessel vasculitis may contribute to the large zones of necrosis seen after some brown recluse spider bites. Eosinophils may play a role in tissue damage after envenomation.

  2. Reports of envenomation by brown recluse spiders (Araneae: Sicariidae) outnumber verifications of Loxosceles spiders in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Richard S; Edwards, G B; James, Louis F

    2004-07-01

    Bites attributed to the brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa Gertsch & Mulaik, are frequently reported by medical personnel throughout Florida, whereas the extensive arachnological evidence contradicts the alleged widespread occurrence of Loxosceles spiders in the state. We compared reports of brown recluse spider bites made by medical personnel from a 6-yr Florida poison control center database to the known verifications of Loxosceles spiders from 100 yr of Florida arachnological data. Medical personnel diagnosed 124 brown recluse spider bites from 31 of Florida's 67 counties in 6 yr. In contrast, only 11 finds of approximately 70 Loxosceles spiders have been made in 10 Florida counties in 100 yr. Florida does not have sufficient widespread populations of Loxosceles spiders to warrant consideration of brown recluse spider envenomation as a probable etiology of dermonecrosis. Florida health care would improve if medical personnel would consider the multitude of other etiologies that manifest in dermonecrosis.

  3. House spider genome uncovers evolutionary shifts in the diversity and expression of black widow venom proteins associated with extreme toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Kerry L; Haney, Robert A; Schwager, Evelyn E; Wierschin, Torsten; Stanke, Mario; Richards, Stephen; Garb, Jessica E

    2017-02-16

    Black widow spiders are infamous for their neurotoxic venom, which can cause extreme and long-lasting pain. This unusual venom is dominated by latrotoxins and latrodectins, two protein families virtually unknown outside of the black widow genus Latrodectus, that are difficult to study given the paucity of spider genomes. Using tissue-, sex- and stage-specific expression data, we analyzed the recently sequenced genome of the house spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum), a close relative of black widows, to investigate latrotoxin and latrodectin diversity, expression and evolution. We discovered at least 47 latrotoxin genes in the house spider genome, many of which are tandem-arrayed. Latrotoxins vary extensively in predicted structural domains and expression, implying their significant functional diversification. Phylogenetic analyses show latrotoxins have substantially duplicated after the Latrodectus/Parasteatoda split and that they are also related to proteins found in endosymbiotic bacteria. Latrodectin genes are less numerous than latrotoxins, but analyses show their recruitment for venom function from neuropeptide hormone genes following duplication, inversion and domain truncation. While latrodectins and other peptides are highly expressed in house spider and black widow venom glands, latrotoxins account for a far smaller percentage of house spider venom gland expression. The house spider genome sequence provides novel insights into the evolution of venom toxins once considered unique to black widows. Our results greatly expand the size of the latrotoxin gene family, reinforce its narrow phylogenetic distribution, and provide additional evidence for the lateral transfer of latrotoxins between spiders and bacterial endosymbionts. Moreover, we strengthen the evidence for the evolution of latrodectin venom genes from the ecdysozoan Ion Transport Peptide (ITP)/Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone (CHH) neuropeptide superfamily. The lower expression of latrotoxins in

  4. Lyme disease masquerading as brown recluse spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhoudt, Kevin C; Zaoutis, Theoklis; Zorc, Joseph J

    2002-05-01

    We report a case of Lyme disease with clinical features resembling those described from brown recluse spider bites. The most striking manifestation was a necrotic skin wound. Brown recluse spider bites may be overdiagnosed in some geographic regions. Tick bite and infection with Borrelia burgdorferi should be considered in the differential diagnosis of necrotic arachnidism in regions endemic for Lyme disease.

  5. Chromosome mapping of dragline silk genes in the genomes of widow spiders (Araneae, Theridiidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Zhao

    Full Text Available With its incredible strength and toughness, spider dragline silk is widely lauded for its impressive material properties. Dragline silk is composed of two structural proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2, which are encoded by members of the spidroin gene family. While previous studies have characterized the genes that encode the constituent proteins of spider silks, nothing is known about the physical location of these genes. We determined karyotypes and sex chromosome organization for the widow spiders, Latrodectus hesperus and L. geometricus (Araneae, Theridiidae. We then used fluorescence in situ hybridization to map the genomic locations of the genes for the silk proteins that compose the remarkable spider dragline. These genes included three loci for the MaSp1 protein and the single locus for the MaSp2 protein. In addition, we mapped a MaSp1 pseudogene. All the MaSp1 gene copies and pseudogene localized to a single chromosomal region while MaSp2 was located on a different chromosome of L. hesperus. Using probes derived from L. hesperus, we comparatively mapped all three MaSp1 loci to a single region of a L. geometricus chromosome. As with L. hesperus, MaSp2 was found on a separate L. geometricus chromosome, thus again unlinked to the MaSp1 loci. These results indicate orthology of the corresponding chromosomal regions in the two widow genomes. Moreover, the occurrence of multiple MaSp1 loci in a conserved gene cluster across species suggests that MaSp1 proliferated by tandem duplication in a common ancestor of L. geometricus and L. hesperus. Unequal crossover events during recombination could have given rise to the gene copies and could also maintain sequence similarity among gene copies over time. Further comparative mapping with taxa of increasing divergence from Latrodectus will pinpoint when the MaSp1 duplication events occurred and the phylogenetic distribution of silk gene linkage patterns.

  6. [Poisoning caused by Latrodectus Mactans (Black Widow) spider bite among children. Clinical features and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo-Cruz, Norberto; Hurtado-Valenzuela, Jaime Gabriel; Gómez-Rivera, Norberto

    2006-01-01

    Poisoning caused by "black widow" spider bite, is not commonly observed during childhood, it is not exempt from complications, and must be treated in time or the patient can die. In Mexico we do not have accurate data on the exact number of accidents due to this condition. Identify the signs and characteristic symptoms of children treated at the Children's Hospital from the state of Sonora with the aim of starting early treatment. We reviewed 43 clinical records of hospitalized patients admitted for "black widow " spider bite between 1978 - 2004. Demographic variables were: age, gender, place of origin, place where accident took place, treatment given prior to hospital admittance, degree of envenomation measured by signs and symptoms, treatment and clinical evolution. 69.7% of cases were male, we did not find differences in the number of patients between infant, pre-school, elementary school children and teenagers. During summer and afternoon hours we registered 44% and 37% cases respectively; 74% patients were poisoned by the spider at home; the anatomical areas most affected were: arms, hands and thorax. Signs and symptoms in infants were: irritability, constanty cry, sialorrea, agitation erythema on wounded areas and seizures. Among elementary school children and teenagers signs included pain in wounded area, abdominal and thoracic, muscle spasms, fine tremor and residual signs. Patients who received fabotherapic treatment had better evolution and less time of hospitalization. No deaths were reported. The different signs and symptoms between infants, preschool, elementary school children and teenagers allowed us to clearly identify evenommation and differentiate it form confounding diseases. In our study, specific fabotherapy constituted the best treatment choice.

  7. Necrotizing fasciitis developing from a brown recluse spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeski, J

    2001-02-01

    A 20-year retrospective case series was analyzed to identify the brown recluse spider bite as a cause of necrotizing fasciitis. Data from 31 consecutive patients with necrotizing fasciitis were analyzed. Of the 31 patients with necrotizing fasciitis a brown recluse spider bite was found to be the initial cause in two patients. Both patients with spider bites delayed in obtaining medical treatment, and secondary infection of the necrotic tissue occurred. One patient was diagnosed by frozen section tissue biopsy, and the second patient was diagnosed by clinical examination. All patients in this series had immediate aggressive operative debridement. Both patients survived with functional limbs. There were no deaths in this large series. Necrotizing fasciitis can be caused by a secondarily infected brown recluse spider bite. Successful treatment of necrotizing fasciitis from any cause is associated with early diagnosis, immediate surgical debridement, and supplemental enteral or parenteral nutrition.

  8. Black and brown widow spider bites in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A feeling of tighmess in the chest, which is interpreted by some victims as difficulty in breathing, is often described. An erection is occasionally experienced, especially in children. The patient appears anxious and sweats profusely (Fig. 8); the clothes and bedding are often soaked with sweat. The regional lymph nodes are.

  9. Systematics, Bioecology, and Medical Importance of Widow Spiders (Lathrodectus spp. in Khorasan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Rafijenad

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Following the hospitalization of 195 individuals due to the spider bite in 1995 and three cases of recorded death in the year of 1993 which were referred to Emam Reza Hospital in Mashad, the present study was undertaken on bionomics and medical importance of Lathrodectus spp in Khorasan Province, during 1995-2005. A total cases of 195 bites were studied composing of 70.8 % males and 29.2% females. The most prevalence cases were observed in mid age (20-55 years old and par¬ticularly among farmers (36.4%. A total number of 216 adult widow spiders and 258 egg sacs were collected from their habitats in different localities of 15 counties in the province. The following species have been recognized: Lathrodectus tredecimgottatus (62%, L. dahli (32%, L. geometricus (5% and L. pallidus (1%. Here is the first report on the occurrence of males of L. pallidus as well as both sexes of L. trdecimgottatus and L. geometricus in the country. The sex ratio among collected specimens was 88% and 12% female and male, respectively. Summer provides the most suitable and favorable climatic condition for the activities of these spiders. However 65% of spiders were collected in this season. Among different cit¬ies, Mashad had (60% the most reported cases in the study area. Foot was more injured than other parts. 96.5% of pa¬tients exhib¬ited localized pain from which only 2% had no pain in the bitten part and 87% had a generalized pain in whole body.

  10. Systematics, Bioecology, and Medical Importance of Widow Spiders (Lathrodectus spp. in Khorasan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Rafijenad

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Following the hospitalization of 195 individuals due to the spider bite in 1995 and three cases of recorded death in the year of 1993 which were referred to Emam Reza Hospital in Mashad, the present study was undertaken on bionomics and medical importance of Lathrodectus spp in Khorasan Province, during 1995-2005. A total cases of 195 bites were studied composing of 70.8 % males and 29.2% females. The most prevalence cases were observed in mid age (20-55 years old and par¬ticularly among farmers (36.4%. A total number of 216 adult widow spiders and 258 egg sacs were collected from their habitats in different localities of 15 counties in the province. The following species have been recognized: Lathrodectus tredecimgottatus (62%, L. dahli (32%, L. geometricus (5% and L. pallidus (1%. Here is the first report on the occurrence of males of L. pallidus as well as both sexes of L. trdecimgottatus and L. geometricus in the country. The sex ratio among collected specimens was 88% and 12% female and male, respectively. Summer provides the most suitable and favorable climatic condition for the activities of these spiders. However 65% of spiders were collected in this season. Among different cit¬ies, Mashad had (60% the most reported cases in the study area. Foot was more injured than other parts. 96.5% of pa¬tients exhib¬ited localized pain from which only 2% had no pain in the bitten part and 87% had a generalized pain in whole body.

  11. Neurotoxic activity and ultrastructural changes in muscles caused by the brown widow spider Latrodectus geometricus venom Actividad neurotóxica y cambios ultraestructurales en musculos causados por el veneno de la araña viuda marrón Latrodectus geometricus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias Reyes-Lugo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Brown widow spider (Latrodectus geometricus venom (BrWSV produces few local lesions and intense systemic reactions such as cramps, harsh muscle pains, nausea, vomiting and hypertension. Approximately 16 protein bands under reducing conditions and ~ 14 bands under non-reducing conditions on a 12.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were observed. Neurotoxic clinical manifestations were confirmed in vivo, while proteolytic activity was demonstrated on gelatine film. Severe ultrastructural damages in mice skeletal muscles were observed at 3, 6, 12 and 24 h postinjection with at total of 45 µg of venom protein. Infiltration of eosinophils and ruptures of the cellular membranes were observed in the muscles along with swelling of the nuclear cover and interruption of the collagen periodicity. Altered mitochondrias and autophage vacuoles, nuclear indentation and mitochondria without cristae, slight increment of intermyofibrillar and subsarcolemic spaces and myelinic figures formation were also observed. In the capillary, endothelial membrane unfolding into the lumen was noticed; along with myelinic figures compatible with a toxic myopathy. Swollen sarcotubular systems with lysis of membrane, intense mitochondria autophagia and areas without pinocytic vesicles were observed. Swollen mitochondria surrounded by necrotic areas, myofibrillar disorganization and big vacuolas of the sarcotubular system, degenerated mitochondrium with formation of myelinic figure was seen. Glycogenosomes with small particulate, muscle type glycogen was noticed. Autophagic vacuole (autophagolysosomes and necrotic areas were also noticed. These damages may be due to interactive effects of the multifactorial action of venom components. However, Latrodectus geometricus venom molecules may also be utilized as neuro therapeutic tools, as they affect neuronal activities with high affinity and selectivity. To our knowledge, the present study is the first

  12. Scavenging by spiders (Araneae) and its relationship to pest management of the brown recluse spider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Richard S

    2011-06-01

    Experiments reported in Sandidge (2003; Nature 426: 30) indicated that the brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa Gertsch & Mulaik, preferred to scavenge dead prey over live prey and that the spiders were not detrimentally affected when fed insecticide-killed crickets. Extrapolations made in subsequent media coverage disseminating the results of this research made counter-intuitive statements that pesticide treatment in houses would increase brown recluse populations in homes. This information was presented as if the scavenging behavior was specialized in the brown recluse; however, it was more likely that this behavior has not been well studied in other species. To provide a comparison, the current laboratory study examined the likelihood of non-Loxosceles spiders to scavenge dead prey. Of 100 non-Loxosceles spiders that were tested (from 11 families, 24 genera, and at least 29 species from a variety of spider hunting guilds), 99 scavenged dead crickets when offered in petri dishes. Some of the spiders were webspinners in which real-world scavenging of dead prey is virtually impossible, yet they scavenge when given the opportunity. Therefore, scavenging is a flexible opportunistic predatory behavior that is spread across a variety of taxa and is not a unique behavior in brown recluses. These findings are discussed in relation to pest management practices.

  13. An approach to spider bites. Erroneous attribution of dermonecrotic lesions to brown recluse or hobo spider bites in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Robert G; Vetter, Richard S

    2004-08-01

    To dispel prevalent myths surrounding diagnosis of dermonecrotic and associated conditions supposedly resulting from bites of brown recluse, hobo, or other spiders in Canada. Worldwide, spider bites are regularly misdiagnosed as the etiologic agents in human dermonecrosis mainly as a result of inaccurate, erroneous, or hyperbolic popular and professional literature based on inference, circumstantial evidence, inferior clinical trials, and misunderstanding of the facts regarding spider-bite envenomation. A working diagnosis of "spider bite" or publishing a case history should be considered only when a spider is caught in the act of biting or otherwise reliably associated with a lesion. Accurate identification of the spider could be critical for correct diagnosis and subsequent treatment. Brown recluse spiders are not found in Canada. Hobo spiders have not been reliably implicated in dermonecrosis. Worldwide, spider-bite envenomation is an unlikely cause of dermonecrosis. Canadian physicians should give priority consideration to other, more likely, causes.

  14. Copulation with immature females increases male fitness in cannibalistic widow spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biaggio, M Daniela; Sandomirsky, Iara; Lubin, Yael; Harari, Ally R; Andrade, Maydianne C B

    2016-09-01

    Copulatory cannibalism of male 'widow' spiders (genus Latrodectus) is a model example of the extreme effects of sexual selection, particularly in L. hasselti and L. geometricus where males typically facilitate cannibalism by females and mate only once. We show that these males can increase their reproductive success by copulating with final-instar, immature females after piercing the female's exoskeleton to access her newly developed sperm storage organs. Females retain sperm through their final moult and have similar fecundity to adult-mated females. This is an adaptive male tactic because immature mating increases insemination success relative to adult mating (which predicts higher paternity) and moreover, rarely ends in cannibalism, so males can mate again. Although successful only during a brief period before the female's final moult, males may employ this tactic when they associate with final-instar females in nature. Consistent with this, one-third of L. hasselti females collected as immatures in nature were already mated. Immature mating alters sexual selection on these otherwise monogynous males, and may explain male traits allowing facultative polygyny in Latrodectus Since male cohabitation with immature females is common among invertebrates, immature mating may be a widespread, previously unrecognized mating tactic, particularly when unmated females are of high reproductive value. © 2016 The Author(s).

  15. Brown recluse spider envenomation: dermatologic application of hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutrone, William D; Green, Kimberly M; Norris, Tom; Weinberg, Jeffrey M; Clarke, Dick

    2005-01-01

    Envenomation from the brown recluse (Loxosceles recluse) spider commonly proceed on one of three clinical pathways. The majority of bites (90%) result in nothing more than a local reaction. They are essentially self-limiting, require little if any attention, and resolve spontaneously. A great majority of the remaining bites will produce necrotic ulcerations of various sizes and dimensions, with systemic sequela ranging from fever to hemolysis and kidney failure. Finally, and in the most rare cases, the patient will succumb a fatal systemic reaction. Current therapeutic options for these wounds remain controversial and include the following: local care, corticosteroids, dapsone, and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy. This article will review the application of HBO therapy for patients who are envenomated by brown recluse spiders. Information for this manuscript was derived from multiple MEDLINE searches as well as searches of the National Baromedical Service's hyperbaric specialty literature collection.

  16. Trap Design for the Brown Recluse Spider, Loxosceles reclusa

    OpenAIRE

    Parks, Jennifer; Stoecker, William V.; Paige, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    While there are limited options for chemical-free Arachnid pest control, glue-traps are one suitable alternative to pesticides. The effectiveness of several three-dimensional glue-trap shapes for trapping the brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa Gertsch and Mulaik (Araneae: Sicariidae), was investigated using four novel glue-trap shape designs, which were compared to an existing design currently on the market. These four novel and one standard shape designs were tested using pairwise comp...

  17. Brown recluse spider bite to the upper lip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Ryan K; Conner, Kelly B; Tan, Poliana C; Hopkins, Robert H

    2012-03-01

    Brown recluse spiders are predominantly found in south central United States. Their bites usually cause mild self-limiting reactions, although localized tissue necrosis and rare systemic, potentially fatal, envenomations are known to occur. Herein, we report an atypical presentation of a brown recluse bite in a 20 year old female who was admitted to the intensive care unit due to angioedema and cellulitis. We photographically document the bite site for twenty-four hours following envenomation. She received glucocorticoids, antihistamines, antibiotics and dapsone while hospitalized and was subsequently discharged with complete resolution of symptoms without the development of tissue necrosis or scarring.

  18. Management of brown recluse spider bites in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, James W; Thompson, David M

    2004-01-01

    Treatment of brown recluse spider bites remains controversial; there are multiple options but little evidence of their effectiveness. Over a 5-year period, family physicians enrolled consecutive patients with suspected brown recluse spider bites. Usual care was provided based on physician preferences. Topical nitroglycerine patches and vitamin C tablets were provided at no cost for those who wished to use them. Baseline data were collected, and patients were followed-up weekly until healing occurred. Outcome measures included time to healing and occurrence of scarring. Regression methods were used to evaluate the impact of the 4 main treatment approaches (corticosteroids, dapsone, topical nitroglycerine, and high-dose vitamin C) after controlling for bite severity and other predictors. Two hundred and sixty-two patients were enrolled; outcomes were available for 189. The median healing time was 17 days. Only 21% had permanent scarring. One hundred seventy-four received a single treatment modality. Among this group, 12 different modalities were used. After controlling for other variables, predictors of more rapid healing included lower severity level, less erythema, and less necrosis at time of presentation, younger age, no diabetes, and earlier medical attention. Systemic corticosteroids and dapsone were associated with slower healing. Predictors of scarring were higher severity, presence of necrosis, and diabetes. Dapsone was associated with an increased probability of scarring. We found no evidence that commonly used treatment approaches reduced healing time or the likelihood of scarring in suspected brown recluse spider bites.

  19. Trap design for the brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Jennifer; Stoecker, William V; Paige, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    While there are limited options for chemical-free Arachnid pest control, glue-traps are one suitable alternative to pesticides. The effectiveness of several three-dimensional glue-trap shapes for trapping the brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa Gertsch and Mulaik (Araneae: Sicariidae), was investigated using four novel glue-trap shape designs, which were compared to an existing design currently on the market. These four novel and one standard shape designs were tested using pairwise comparisons. The most preferred trap design was a flat glue-trap with no covering. Although this type of trap was most efficient for capturing L. reclusa, it can pose risks in homes with children and pets for obvious reasons. Among the traps with coverings, the vertical strut trap was most preferred by the spiders, and should perhaps be the trap of choice for homeowners with children and pets.

  20. Immunological Studies of Brown Recluse Spider Venom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgert, Klaus D.; Ross, Milton A.; Campbell, Benedict J.; Barrett, James T.

    1974-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of Loxosceles reclusa venom demonstrated that only one of seven or eight major (plus three or four minor) protein components caused necrosis in guinea pig skin. Sephadex gel filtration separated the venom into three major peaks, the second peak of which contained the dermonecrotic activity. Hyperimmunization of rabbits with increasing doses of venom from L. reclusa produced potent precipitating antisera, and the rabbits became resistant to lesion development. Ouchterlony-type immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoretic studies revealed six to seven distinct precipitation lines, one of which stained intensely for esterase activity. Immunohistochemical techniques failed to detect any protease, lipase, catalase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, or amylase activity in the venom. The spreading activity of recluse spider venom in guinea pig skin was inhibited as much as 71% by antivenom. Venom preincubated with antivenom was unable to incite lesions in guinea pig skin. Passive immunization of guinea pigs 18 h before an injection of venom conferred venom resistance upon the animals. Local injections of antivenom immediately after intradermal injections of venom markedly reduced the dermal lesion. Heparin reduced the local and systemic effects of venom when preincubated with whole venom or when administered systemically before an intradermal injection of venom. Treatment of whole venom with the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate did not inhibit its necrotic activity. Transfer studies from a 24-h lesion indicated that the necrotic activity was localized and remained active in tissue for at least 24 h but not for 5 days. No lesions developed when high concentrations of venom were intradermally injected into the skin of sacrificed guinea pigs, indicating that an interaction of body constituents and venom is essential for the development of a lesion. Images PMID:4140161

  1. Isolation and Preliminary Characterization of Proteinaceous Toxins with Insecticidal and Antibacterial Activities from Black Widow Spider (L. tredecimguttatus Eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Lei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The eggs of black widow spider (L. tredecimguttatus have been demonstrated to be rich in toxic proteinaceous components. The study on such active components is of theoretical and practical importance. In the present work, using a combination of multiple biochemical and biological strategies, we isolated and characterized the proteinaceous components from the aqueous extract of the black widow spider eggs. After gel filtration of the egg extract, the resulting main protein and peptide peaks were further fractionated by ion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Two proteinaceous components, named latroeggtoxin-III and latroeggtoxin-IV, respectively, were purified to homogeneity. Latroeggtoxin-III was demonstrated to have a molecular weight of about 36 kDa. Activity analysis indicated that latroeggtoxin-III exhibited neurotoxicity against cockroaches but had no obvious effect on mice, suggesting that it is an insect-specific toxin. Latroeggtoxin-IV, with a molecular weight of 3.6 kDa, was shown to be a broad-spectrum antibacterial peptide, showing inhibitory activity against all five species of bacteria tested, with the highest activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Finally, the implications of the proteinaceous toxins in egg protection and their potential applications were analyzed and discussed.

  2. Brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) envenomation leading to acute hemolytic anemia in six adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    McDade, Jenny; Aygun, Banu; Ware, Russell E.

    2010-01-01

    Loxosceles reclusa (brown recluse spider) bites often cause local envenomation reactions, however acute hemolysis from systemic loxoscelism is rare. To highlight this important diagnostic consideration for unexplained hemolysis in areas endemic for brown recluse spiders, we report six adolescents with acute hemolytic anemia from presumed L. reclusa bites.

  3. Brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) envenomation leading to acute hemolytic anemia in six adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDade, Jenny; Aygun, Banu; Ware, Russell E

    2010-01-01

    Loxosceles reclusa (brown recluse spider) bites often cause local envenomation reactions; however, acute hemolysis from systemic loxoscelism is rare. To highlight this important diagnostic consideration for unexplained hemolysis in areas endemic for brown recluse spiders, we report on 6 adolescents with acute hemolytic anemia from presumed L reclusa bites.

  4. Evaluation of fixative solutions for ultrastructural analysis of brown spider Loxosceles intermedia (araneae: sicariidae) tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Costa-Ayub,C. L. S.; Faraco,C. D.; Freire,C. A.

    2006-01-01

    In view of the widely varying compositions of fixative solutions used for studying spiders, five different fixative formulas were tested for fixing male brown-spider (Loxosceles intermedia) gonad tissues. The brown spider represents a public health problem in Curitiba (Paraná State, Brazil). Morphological study of its gonads may aid in understanding the reproductive strategies of this species, and possibly in developing a reproduction control program. The fixatives tested contained glutaralde...

  5. Tracking a Medically Important Spider: Climate Change, Ecological Niche Modeling, and the Brown Recluse (Loxosceles reclusa)

    OpenAIRE

    Erin E Saupe; Monica Papes; Selden, Paul A; Richard S. Vetter

    2011-01-01

    Most spiders use venom to paralyze their prey and are commonly feared for their potential to cause injury to humans. In North America, one species in particular, Loxosceles reclusa (brown recluse spider, Sicariidae), causes the majority of necrotic wounds induced by the Araneae. However, its distributional limitations are poorly understood and, as a result, medical professionals routinely misdiagnose brown recluse bites outside endemic areas, confusing putative spider bites for other serious ...

  6. Brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) envenomation in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Lonny B; Vetter, Richard S

    2009-08-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of relevant literature regarding the brown recluse spider (BRS) and to define those criteria that must be satisfied before making a diagnosis of brown recluse envenomation. The complex venom of the BRS contains sphingomyelinase D, which is capable of producing all the clinical signs in the human and some animal models. There is no current commercially available test. In humans there are many proposed guidelines to achieve a definitive diagnosis; however, there are no established guidelines for veterinary patients. Currently, no consensus exists for treatment of BRS envenomation other than supportive care, which includes rest, thorough cleaning of the site, ice, compression, and elevation. Prognosis varies based on severity of clinical signs and response to supportive care. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2009.

  7. Brown recluse spider bites: a complex problem wound. A brief review and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Judy R; Hagood, Clyde O; Prather, Irvine D

    2005-03-01

    Brown recluse spiders (Loxosceles reclusa) are responsible for virtually all documented cases of spider bites leading to significant necrosis. The actual spider bite often goes unnoticed for as long as 4 to 6 hours, which makes diagnosis and, therefore, appropriate treatment, difficult. The spider bite generally results in either a necrotic wound or systemic symptoms that can lead to hemolysis. The patient described in this article experienced both complications. Dapsone and hyperbaric oxygen therapy brought the adverse response to the bite under control. The patient was hospitalized for 7 days during treatment for hemolysis and an extensive, necrotic wound. Efforts are underway to develop an assay to provide a definitive diagnosis for the brown recluse spider bite, but none is yet commercially available. Antivenom is scarce; capture of the offending spider appears to be most helpful in the diagnosis and proper treatment of spider bites.

  8. Osteomyelitis of the Mandibular Symphysis Caused by Brown Recluse Spider Bite

    OpenAIRE

    Naidu, Deepak K.; Ghurani, Rami; Salas, R. Emerick; Mannari, Rudolph J.; Robson, Martin C.; Payne, Wyatt G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Brown recluse spider bites cause significant trauma via their tissue toxic venom. Diagnosis of these injuries and envenomation is difficult and many times presumptive. Treatment is varied and dependent upon presentation and course of injury. Materials and Methods: We present a case of a previously unreported incidence of osteomyelitis of the mandible as a result of a brown recluse spider bite. A review of the literature and discussion of diagnosis and treatment of brown recluse sp...

  9. Osteomyelitis of the mandibular symphysis caused by brown recluse spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Deepak K; Ghurani, Rami; Salas, R Emerick; Mannari, Rudolph J; Robson, Martin C; Payne, Wyatt G

    2008-08-28

    Brown recluse spider bites cause significant trauma via their tissue toxic venom. Diagnosis of these injuries and envenomation is difficult and many times presumptive. Treatment is varied and dependent upon presentation and course of injury. We present a case of a previously unreported incidence of osteomyelitis of the mandible as a result of a brown recluse spider bite. A review of the literature and discussion of diagnosis and treatment of brown recluse spider bites are presented. Osteomyelitis of the mandible causing a chronic wound was the presenting finding of a patient with a history of spider bite and exposure to brown recluse spiders. Operative debridement and wound closure resulted in successful treatment. Brown recluse spider envenomation varies in its presentation and treatment is based on the presenting clinical picture. Treatment regimens for brown recluse spider bite envenomation should include the basics of wound care. Systemic antibiotics, topical antimicrobials, dapsone, and surgical debridement are valuable adjuncts of treatment, as indicated, based on the clinical course.

  10. Vibration transmission through sheet webs of hobo spiders (Eratigena agrestis) and tangle webs of western black widow spiders (Latrodectus hesperus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibert, Samantha; Scott, Catherine; Gries, Gerhard

    2016-11-01

    Web-building spiders construct their own vibratory signaling environments. Web architecture should affect signal design, and vice versa, such that vibratory signals are transmitted with a minimum of attenuation and degradation. However, the web is the medium through which a spider senses both vibratory signals from courting males and cues produced by captured prey. Moreover, webs function not only in vibration transmission, but also in defense from predators and the elements. These multiple functions may impose conflicting selection pressures on web design. We investigated vibration transmission efficiency and accuracy through two web types with contrasting architectures: sheet webs of Eratigena agrestis (Agelenidae) and tangle webs of Latrodectus hesperus (Theridiidae). We measured vibration transmission efficiencies by playing frequency sweeps through webs with a piezoelectric vibrator and a loudspeaker, recording the resulting web vibrations at several locations on each web using a laser Doppler vibrometer. Transmission efficiencies through both web types were highly variable, with within-web variation greater than among-web variation. There was little difference in transmission efficiencies of longitudinal and transverse vibrations. The inconsistent transmission of specific frequencies through webs suggests that parameters other than frequency are most important in allowing these spiders to distinguish between vibrations of prey and courting males.

  11. Incompatibility associated with the bite of a brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, J T; Beck, M L; Hardman, P K; Stout, L C

    1983-01-01

    Red cell samples from a patient who was suffering from massive hemolysis due to a brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) bite were found to be reactive by indirect antiglobulin test with most ABO-compatible serum samples. Spider venom, enzymes related to those in spider venom, and antisera to plasma proteins and Rh antigens were used to investigate the unusual reactivity of the patient's cells. IgG was detected on the patient's cells by indirect antiglobulin tests. Cells treated with brown recluse spider venom or phosphatidylcholine phosphatidohydrolase reacted similarly. These findings suggest that sphingomyelinase D, which has been identified in brown recluse spider venom, may be related to the unusual reactivity of the patient's cells. Unexpected reactions were observed when venom-treated cells were tested with Rh antibodies: O negative cells absorbed and eluted anti-D from Rh immune globulin; E negative cells were reactive with a commercial anti-E reagent.

  12. Complications and outcomes of brown recluse spider bites in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Jonathan J; James, Laura P

    2011-03-01

    Brown recluse spider bites may cause severe local and systemic morbidity, but data regarding morbidity in children are limited. This study reviewed inpatient medical records (n = 26; 10 years) with a discharge diagnosis of "spider bite" from a tertiary pediatric hospital. The majority (85%) of children had an inflammatory response accompanying necrosis, usually with signs of secondary cellulitis (77%). Hemolytic anemia (50%), rhabdomyolysis (27%), and acute renal failure (12%) were the most prevalent systemic effects. Hemolytic anemia was bimodal in distribution relative to the time-of-onset of the bite (early, 2.2 ± 0.4; late, 6.9 ± 1.5 days postbite, respectively; P = .004). Although no fatalities occurred in the population, 65% of children had major morbidity, including wound complications requiring surgical care and acute orbital compartment syndrome. The findings emphasize the importance of anticipatory patient/family education for outpatients and careful monitoring for systemic morbidity in inpatients. Timely and appropriate supportive care should yield favorable outcomes in most cases.

  13. Spider Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a ruptured appendix. Sweating. Excessive sweating can occur. Brown recluse spider bite The pain associated with a brown ... Sheds Garages Unused pots and gardening equipment Woodpiles Brown recluse habitat Brown recluse spiders are found most commonly ...

  14. Arachnids submitted as suspected brown recluse spiders (Araneae: Sicariidae): Loxosceles spiders are virtually restricted to their known distributions but are perceived to exist throughout the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Richard S

    2005-07-01

    An Internet offer was made to identify any spider in the United States perceived to be a brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa Gertsch & Mulaik (Sicariidae). In total, 1,773 arachnids from 49 states represented three orders (Araneae, Solifugae, and Opiliones) and the identifiable spiders (Araneae) consisted of 38 families, 88 genera, and 158 recognizable species. Participants from states at least half within the known brown recluse distribution submitted Loxosceles spiders 32- 89% of the time, except Louisiana and Mississippi with no submissions. From 25 of 29 states completely or almost completely outside of the range of Loxosceles spiders, no recluse spiders were submitted. Only two discoveries of brown recluses and two of the worldwide tramp species Loxosceles rufescens (Dufour) were submitted from nonendemic Loxosceles areas. States on distribution margins of brown recluse or other native Loxosceles spiders were intermediate in their Loxosceles submissions. This study showed that 1) the general public perceives brown recluses to occur over wide-ranging areas of the United States; and 2) brown recluses are frequently submitted from endemic states and almost never from nonendemic states, and therefore are virtually limited to their known distributions. This study corroborates opinions that diagnosis of brown recluse spider bites is best restricted to areas historically supporting proven, widespread populations of Loxosceles spiders.

  15. Nonhealing Wounds Caused by Brown Spider Bites: Application of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadanny, Amir; Fishlev, Gregory; Bechor, Yair; Meir, Oshra; Efrati, Shai

    2016-12-01

    Bites by Loxosceles spiders (also known as recluse spiders or brown spiders) can cause necrotic ulcerations of various sizes and dimensions. The current standard of care for brown spider bites includes analgesics, ice, compression, elevation, antihistamines, and surgical debridement. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in the treatment of brown spider bites has been administered in the early stage of ulceration, or 2 to 6 days after the bite. Unfortunately, the diagnosis of spider bite-related ulcers is often delayed and weeks or months may elapse before HBOT is considered. To evaluate the effect of HBOT on nonhealing wounds caused by brown spider bites in the late, chronic, nonhealing stage. Analysis of 3 patients with brown spider-bite healing wounds treated at The Sagol Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Research in Israel. Patients presented 2 to 3 months after failure of other therapies including topical dressings, antibiotics, and corticosteroids. All patients were treated with daily 2 ATA (atmospheres absolute) with 100% oxygen HBOT sessions. All 3 patients were previously healthy without any chronic disease. Their ages were 30, 42, and 73 years. They were treated once daily for 13, 17, and 31 sessions, respectively. The wounds of all 3 patients healed, and there was no need for additional surgical intervention. There were no significant adverse events in any of the patients. Microvascular injury related to brown spider bites may culminate in ischemic nonhealing wounds even in a relatively young, healthy population. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy should be considered as a valuable therapeutic tool even months after the bite.

  16. The ability of spiderlings of the widow spider Latrodectus hesperus (Araneae: Theridiidae) to pass through different size mesh screen: implications for exclusion from air intake ducts and greenhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Richard S; Flanders, Christopher P; Rust, Michael K

    2009-06-01

    Experiments tested the ability of newly emerged spiderlings of a black widow spider, Latrodectus hesperus Chamberlin & Ivie (Araneae: Theridiidae), to crawl through brass screen of various mesh size. The purpose was to determine whether immatures of these medically important spiders could be excluded from buildings. In horizontal orientation, black widow spiderlings were able to easily pass through mesh with openings of 0.83 mm and were prevented from passing in four of five tests with mesh of 0.59-mm openings. Spiderlings also readily pass through 0.83-mm mesh in vertical orientation. Our laboratory studies indicate that the mesh size sufficient for exclusion is too small for practical use in most cases, although there are some specialized situations where such small mesh might be useful. The results are discussed in regard to actual conditions found in typical commercial building situations.

  17. Reports of presumptive brown recluse spider bites reinforce improbable diagnosis in regions of North America where the spider is not endemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Richard S; Bush, Sean P

    2002-08-15

    Envenomations by the brown recluse spider have been reported throughout North America, despite the fact that the spider's range is limited to the South and central Midwest of the United States. Several of these medical reports have originated from regions of nonendemicity where the spider has never or rarely been documented and brown recluse spider populations are unknown. In most of these reports, no spider is positively identified in association with the dermonecrotic wound, and diagnosis has been based on clinical examination findings. Considering the extreme rarity of brown recluse spiders in areas of nonendemicity, the diagnosis of a presumptive bite is a misdiagnosis that reinforces the assumption that brown recluse spiders are common local etiologic agents of necrosis. There are many medical conditions of diverse origin that have been misdiagnosed as brown recluse spider bites, some of which can be fatal or debilitating. Physicians' awareness of these conditions will increase diagnostic accuracy in areas of North America where bites from brown recluse spiders are improbable.

  18. Distribution of the brown recluse spider (Araneae: Sicariidae) in Illinois and Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Kenneth L; Vetter, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    The medical importance of the brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa Gertsch and Mulaik, is well known, but there is a need for more accurate information about the distribution of the spider in North America. We gathered information via an Internet offer to identify spiders in Illinois and Iowa that were thought to be brown recluses. We also mined brown recluse locality information from other agencies that kept such records. In Iowa, the brown recluse is unknown from its northern counties and rare in southern counties. In Illinois, brown recluse spiders are common in the southern portion of the state and dwindle to almost nonexistence in a transition to the northern counties. Although there were a few finds in the Chicago, IL area and its suburbs, these are surmised to be human-transported specimens and not part of naturally occurring populations. Considering the great human population density and paucity of brown recluses in the Chicago area, medical personnel therein should obtain patient geographic information and be conservative when diagnosing loxoscelism in comparison with southern Illinois, where the spiders are plentiful and bites are more likely.

  19. Diagnoses of brown recluse spider bites (loxoscelism) greatly outnumber actual verifications of the spider in four western American states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Richard S; Cushing, Paula E; Crawford, Rodney L; Royce, Lynn A

    2003-09-15

    We attempt to demonstrate that physicians overdiagnose loxoscelism (colloquially known as 'brown recluse spider bites') by comparing the numbers of such diagnoses to the historically known numbers of Loxosceles spiders from the same areas in four western American states. The medical community from non-endemic Loxosceles areas often makes loxoscelism diagnoses solely on the basis of dermonecrotic lesions where Loxosceles spiders are rare or non-existent. If these diagnoses were correct then Loxosceles populations should be evident, specimens should readily be collected over the years and there should be a reasonable correlation between diagnoses and spider specimens. In 41 months of data collection, we were informed of 216 loxoscelism diagnoses from California, Oregon, Washington and Colorado. In contrast, from these four states, we can only find historical evidence of 35 brown recluse or Mediterranean recluse spiders. There is no consistency between localities of known Loxosceles populations and loxoscelism diagnoses. There are many conditions of diverse etiology that manifest in dermonecrosis. In the western United States, physician familiarity with these conditions will lead to more accurate diagnoses and subsequent proper remedy.

  20. Envenomation from the brown recluse spider: review of mechanism and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merigian, K S; Blaho, K

    1996-10-01

    The brown recluse spider in commonly found throughout the midsouth region of the United States. Bites from the brown recluse occur when the spider is trapped in clothing or its nest is otherwise disturbed. The bite may be undetected by the patient until hours or days later when a characteristic lesion develops. Mild reactions to envenomation are usually limited to a lesion only. In some cases, a severe reaction results which can be life-threatening. Although there have been case reports of various pharmacological agents used for the treatment of brown recluse bites, none have been shown to be consistently effective. Therapy for brown recluse bites remains centered around aggressive wound care. Early surgical excision has not been shown to be of benefit and in most cases delays healing. This review focuses on the physiological mechanisms of the brown recluse venom and current treatment options.

  1. Heat Tolerance of the Brown Recluse Spider (Araneae: Sicariidae): Potential for Pest Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Kenneth L; Zagar, Lindsey M

    2016-02-01

    The brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa Gertsch & Mulaik, is a well-known venomous spider common in the south-central United States where infestations can reach thousands of individuals in a single structure. Bites from this spider pose a risk of dermonecrotic lesions (loxoscelism) or, rarely, more serious systemic effects. The heat tolerance of this spider is understudied but may offer an alternative pest control solution to pesticides or fumigation, both of which have their disadvantages. We subjected brown recluse spiders to increasing temperatures to establish the upper lethal temperature (LT). Using probit analysis to generate probability of mortality at increasing temperatures, we then exposed adult spiders to the observed LT50 to simulate whole-room heat treatment. Laboratory results predict exposure to 48°C for 130 min will achieve 100% mortality of adult spiders. Field tests need to be conducted to determine the efficacy of heat treatment in a variety of real-world situations. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Bilateral optic neuropathy following bite from brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantopoulos, Dimosthenis; Hendershot, Andrew J; Cebulla, Colleen M; Hirsh, David K

    2016-01-01

    A 63-year-old female with history of a resected frontal lobe meningioma presented with bilaterally decreased vision after a bite from a brown recluse spider. The exam was significant for a left relative afferent pupillary defect, bilateral optic nerve pallor, decreased foveal sensitivity in the left eye and new bilateral visual field defects, despite stability of her meningioma. The findings remained stable at 1-year follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of optic neuropathy secondary to a brown recluse spider bite. Visual field tests performed prior to the bite allowed us to compare and localize changes related to the bite.

  3. Distribution of the brown recluse spider (Araneae: Sicariidae) in Georgia with comparison to poison center reports of envenomations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Richard S; Hinkle, Nancy C; Ames, Lisa M

    2009-01-01

    Georgia is on the southeastern margin of the native range of the brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa Gertsch and Mulaik. The brown recluse is not a common Georgia spider and has limited distribution in the state. Using recent submissions, previously published records, and examination of museum specimens, we document the spider's presence in 31 (19.5%) of Georgia's 159 counties, with almost all being found in the northern portion. The spider was collected almost exclusively north of the Fall Line (a transition zone separating the Piedmont and the Coastal Plain geological provinces). Only two locations in the southern Coastal Plain province produced L. reclusa specimens; these southern finds are considered spiders that were transported outside their range. There were six finds of the non-native world tramp species, L. rufescens (Dufour), three south of the Fall Line. In conspicuous contrast, over a 5-yr period, a Georgia poison center database recorded 963 reports of brown recluse spider bites from 103 counties. These figures greatly outnumber the historic verifications of brown recluses in the state for both specimen quantity and county occurrence, indicating improbable spider involvement and the overdiagnosis of bites. In the southern half of the state, medical diagnoses of brown recluse spider bites have virtually zero probability of being correct. Bite diagnoses should be made with caution in north Georgia given the spider's spotty distribution with low frequency of occurrence.

  4. Brown recluse spider's nanometer scale ribbons of stiff extensible silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schniepp, Hannes C; Koebley, Sean R; Vollrath, Fritz

    2013-12-23

    The silk of the recluse spider features a ribbon-like morphology unlike any other spider silk or synthetically spun polymer fiber. These protein ribbons represent free-standing polymer films with a thickness of about 50 nm. Stress-strain characterization of individual fibers via atomic force microscopy reveals that these ribbons, only a few molecular layers of protein thin, rival the mechanical performance of the best silks. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Tracking a Medically Important Spider: Climate Change, Ecological Niche Modeling, and the Brown Recluse (Loxosceles reclusa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saupe, Erin E.; Papes, Monica; Selden, Paul A.; Vetter, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Most spiders use venom to paralyze their prey and are commonly feared for their potential to cause injury to humans. In North America, one species in particular, Loxosceles reclusa (brown recluse spider, Sicariidae), causes the majority of necrotic wounds induced by the Araneae. However, its distributional limitations are poorly understood and, as a result, medical professionals routinely misdiagnose brown recluse bites outside endemic areas, confusing putative spider bites for other serious conditions. To address the issue of brown recluse distribution, we employ ecological niche modeling to investigate the present and future distributional potential of this species. We delineate range boundaries and demonstrate that under future climate change scenarios, the spider's distribution may expand northward, invading previously unaffected regions of the USA. At present, the spider's range is centered in the USA, from Kansas east to Kentucky and from southern Iowa south to Louisiana. Newly influenced areas may include parts of Nebraska, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, South Dakota, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. These results illustrate a potential negative consequence of climate change on humans and will aid medical professionals in proper bite identification/treatment, potentially reducing bite misdiagnoses. PMID:21464985

  6. Tracking a medically important spider: climate change, ecological niche modeling, and the brown recluse (Loxosceles reclusa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin E Saupe

    Full Text Available Most spiders use venom to paralyze their prey and are commonly feared for their potential to cause injury to humans. In North America, one species in particular, Loxosceles reclusa (brown recluse spider, Sicariidae, causes the majority of necrotic wounds induced by the Araneae. However, its distributional limitations are poorly understood and, as a result, medical professionals routinely misdiagnose brown recluse bites outside endemic areas, confusing putative spider bites for other serious conditions. To address the issue of brown recluse distribution, we employ ecological niche modeling to investigate the present and future distributional potential of this species. We delineate range boundaries and demonstrate that under future climate change scenarios, the spider's distribution may expand northward, invading previously unaffected regions of the USA. At present, the spider's range is centered in the USA, from Kansas east to Kentucky and from southern Iowa south to Louisiana. Newly influenced areas may include parts of Nebraska, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, South Dakota, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. These results illustrate a potential negative consequence of climate change on humans and will aid medical professionals in proper bite identification/treatment, potentially reducing bite misdiagnoses.

  7. Tracking a medically important spider: climate change, ecological niche modeling, and the brown recluse (Loxosceles reclusa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saupe, Erin E; Papes, Monica; Selden, Paul A; Vetter, Richard S

    2011-03-25

    Most spiders use venom to paralyze their prey and are commonly feared for their potential to cause injury to humans. In North America, one species in particular, Loxosceles reclusa (brown recluse spider, Sicariidae), causes the majority of necrotic wounds induced by the Araneae. However, its distributional limitations are poorly understood and, as a result, medical professionals routinely misdiagnose brown recluse bites outside endemic areas, confusing putative spider bites for other serious conditions. To address the issue of brown recluse distribution, we employ ecological niche modeling to investigate the present and future distributional potential of this species. We delineate range boundaries and demonstrate that under future climate change scenarios, the spider's distribution may expand northward, invading previously unaffected regions of the USA. At present, the spider's range is centered in the USA, from Kansas east to Kentucky and from southern Iowa south to Louisiana. Newly influenced areas may include parts of Nebraska, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, South Dakota, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. These results illustrate a potential negative consequence of climate change on humans and will aid medical professionals in proper bite identification/treatment, potentially reducing bite misdiagnoses.

  8. A randomized controlled trial of trypsin to treat brown recluse spider bites in Guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaniss, Wyman W; Bush, Sean; O'Rourke, Dorcas P; Fletcher, Paul F; Brewer, Kori L; Lertpiriyapong, Kvin; Punja, Mohan; Miller, Susan N; Meggs, William J

    2014-09-01

    Brown recluse spider bites result in necrotic skin lesions for which there is no known antidote. Since venom toxins are proteins, a proteolytic enzyme like trypsin might be effective in reducing toxicity. The aim of this study was to conduct a randomized controlled trial of trypsin to treat brown recluse spider bites in guinea pigs. Subjects were 18 female guinea pigs. Anesthesia for injections was inhaled isoflurane. Analgesia was 0.05 mg/kg of buprenorphine twice a day as needed. Intervention was intradermal injection of 30 μg of brown recluse venom (Spider Pharm, Yarnell, AZ). Immediately after envenomation, subjects were randomized to two groups of nine: trypsin 10 μg in 1 mL normal saline and 1 mL of normal saline. The primary outcome was lesion area over a 10-day time period. Statistical analysis was performed with repeated measures ANOVA. Mean lesion area was smaller but not statistically different in the placebo group. Maximum lesion size occurred at day 4 in both groups, when lesion area was 76.1 ± 108.2 mm(2) in the placebo group and 149.7 ± 127.3 mm(2) in the treatment group. P value was 0.15 for placebo vs. treatment. This study did not establish a role for trypsin as a treatment for brown recluse spider bites in a guinea pig model.

  9. Black widow spider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in barns, sheds, stone walls, fences, woodpiles, porch furniture, and other outdoor structures. Symptoms The first symptom ... rare. Young children, the very ill, and the elderly may not survive a bite. To prevent a ...

  10. Surgical treatment of a brown recluse spider bite: a case study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delasotta, Lawrence A; Orozco, Fabio; Ong, Alvin; Sheikh, Emran

    2014-01-01

    Spider bite envenomation can cause local, constitutional, and/or systemic symptoms. The present case study reports on 5 years of follow-up for a "probable" brown recluse spider bite of the foot and ankle that was refractory to conservative treatment and was subsequently treated with surgery. The present case study reports the atypical occurrence of long-term peripheral neuropathy after necrotic arachnidism induced by "probable" brown recluse (Loxosceles recluse) envenomation, in a 46-year-old male. The state of published data suggests to minimize inflammation and tissue necrosis, prevent bacterial superinfection, and control pain levels. For patients with long-term peripheral neuropathy refractory to conservative therapy, surgical intervention may further improve their symptoms. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Brown recluse spider bites. A comparison of early surgical excision versus dapsone and delayed surgical excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, R S; Altenbern, D P; Lynch, J B; King, L E

    1985-01-01

    In a prospective study, 31 patients with brown recluse spider bites were treated by either immediate surgical excision or with the leukocyte inhibitor, dapsone, followed by delayed surgical excision. Patients were matched for age, gender, and lesion size and were excluded if the typical history and physical findings were not present. In patients treated with immediate surgical excision (N = 14), delayed wound healing (N = 5) and objectional scarring (N = 7) were common complications. However, pretreatment treatment with dapsone reduced the incidence of wound complications (N = 1) and objectional scarring (N = 1) (p less than 0.05), while reducing the need for surgical excision (N = 1). There were no severe drug reactions due to dapsone, although one patient had persistent G.I. upset. Pretreatment with dapsone not only reduced surgical complications but also improved the outcome of patients bitten by the brown recluse spider. PMID:4051613

  12. Brown recluse spiders: a review to help guide physicians in nonendemic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendell, R Preston

    2003-05-01

    The brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) exists in significant populations mainly in the midwestern United States. Although bites can cause significant harm, envenomation is infrequent, and cases are usually clinically insignificant. Proper knowledge of the spider's habitat and lifestyle as well as the signs and symptoms of loxoscelism are needed to assess clinical cases adequately. Loxoscelism can masquerade as many serious pathologies, and vice versa, so it is important for the clinician to explore all possibilities in the differential diagnosis thoroughly. Treatments are controversial, and no conclusive test for envenomation is currently available. This review provides information to help physicians, especially in nonendemic areas, include or exclude brown recluse bite in the clinical diagnosis and provide proper care.

  13. Cutaneous and systemic effects of varying doses of brown recluse spider venom in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlasson, David L; Harroff, Hugh H; Sutton, Jackie; Dick, Edward; Elston, Dirk M

    2007-01-01

    To ascertain whether a dose response exists between the dose of brown recluse spider venom (BRSV) and the cutaneous and coagulation effects in a rabbit model. Cutaneous necrosis is a serious complication of brown recluse spider envenomation (spider bite with venom). Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a dreaded complication of brown recluse envenomation in humans. New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits have proved to be a model for the study of therapeutic regimens to prevent skin necrosis after spider bites. We studied the venom's effects on the skin and the coagulation mechanism in this rabbit model to determine if a clear dose-response relationship could be established. Establishment of a dose-response relationship is an important first step in determining if the NZW rabbit is a suitable model to study both cutaneous and systemic effects of the venom. Thirty-six NZW rabbits were divided into three groups. One group received a saline injection, and the other two groups received a 4.0 microg or a 10.0 microg dose of purified BRSV intradermally into the skin on the dorsum of the back. Blood was collected at baseline, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Tissue specimens were obtained after seven days during the animal necropsy and gross and microscopic pathology examination was conducted to assess tissue damage. Measurements included complete blood count (CBC); platelets; PT; activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT); fibrinogen (clottable, immunological); coagulation factors II, V, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, XII; anti-thrombin (AT); alpha-2 antiplasmin (AP); Protein C (PC); mixing studies; lupus anticoagulant screening; plasminogen; thrombin-antithrombin; fibrin degradation products (FDP); d-dimer; and thrombin time. Gross pathology results were consistent with previous studies that used higher doses of BRSV. The WBC and platelet counts decreased at 24 hours in the two groups receiving the BRSV (p brown recluse envenomation. Further studies to identify this factor could shed

  14. Secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) from a presumed brown recluse spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandoy, Christopher; Grimley, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Systemic loxoscelism is a rare complication after Loxosceles reclusa (brown recluse spider) envenomation. Loxosceles venom contains pro-inflammatory proteins, which have been shown to be elevated in patients with hemophagocytic lymph histiocytosis. We present a case of a 10-year-old male that developed presumed systemic loxoscelism, secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis with hepatic dysfunction and renal failure. He was treated with dexamethasone and made a full recovery.

  15. Brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) venom phospholipase D (PLD) generates lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sangderk; Lynch, Kevin R.

    2005-01-01

    Envenomation by the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) may cause local dermonecrosis and, rarely, coagulopathies, kidney failure and death. A venom phospholipase, SMaseD (sphingomyelinase D), is responsible for the pathological manifestations of envenomation. Recently, the recombinant SMaseD from Loxosceles laeta was demonstrated to hydrolyse LPC (lysophosphatidylcholine) to produce LPA (lysophosphatidic acid) and choline. Therefore activation of LPA signalling pathways may be involved...

  16. A rare cause of severe periorbital edema and dermonecrotic ulcer of the eyelid in a child: brown recluse spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşkesen, Mustafa; Akdeniz, Sedat; Taş, Taşkin; Keklikçi, Uğur; Taş, Mehmet Ali

    2011-01-01

    Spider bites are a worldwide problem. Brown recluse spider bites can lead to severe local or systemic clinical effects, such as edema, necrotic ulcer, rashes, fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, malaise, arthralgia, myalgia, hemolysis, leukocytosis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, renal failure, and death. Eyelid bites from brown recluse spiders are rare. We report a child with severe facial edema and a dermonecrotic ulcer on the eyelid. Upon laboratory examination, leukocytosis with a significant left shift was detected. The patient was treated with antibiotics, systemic corticosteroid and conservative therapy that included saline compresses and ocular lubrication. No surgical excision was required. Vision was not impaired. A dermonecrotic ulcer is a severe complication of brown recluse spider bites. Since the diagnosis is difficult, clinical and epidemiological findings and a detailed history are important for an accurate diagnosis.

  17. Neuropeptide discovery in the Araneae (Arthropoda, Chelicerata, Arachnida): elucidation of true spider peptidomes using that of the Western black widow as a reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Andrew E; Chi, Megan

    2015-03-01

    The public deposition of large transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA) datasets for the Araneae (true spiders) provides a resource for determining the structures of the native neuropeptides present in members of this chelicerate order. Here, the Araneae TSA data were mined for putative peptide-encoding transcripts using the recently deduced neuropeptide precursors from the Western black widow Latrodectus hesperus as query templates. Neuropeptide-encoding transcripts from five spiders, Latrodectus tredecimguttatus, Stegodyphus mimosarum, Stegodyphus lineatus, Stegodyphus tentoriicola and Acanthoscurria geniculata, were identified, including ones encoding members of the allatostatin A, allatostatin B, allatostatin C, allatotropin, CAPA/periviscerokinin/pyrokinin, crustacean cardioactive peptide, crustacean hyperglycemic hormone/ion transport peptide, diuretic hormone 31, diuretic hormone 44, eclosion hormone, FMRFamide-like peptide (FLP), GSEFLamide, insulin-like peptide, orcokinin, proctolin, short neuropeptide F, SIFamide, sulfakinin and tachykinin-related peptide (TRP) families. A total of 156 distinct peptides were predicted from the precursor proteins deduced from the S. mimosarum transcripts, with 65, 26, 21 and 12 peptides predicted from those deduced from the A. geniculata, L. tredecimguttatus, S. lineatus and S. tentoriicola sequences, respectively. Among the peptides identified were variant isoforms of FLP, orcokinin and TRP, peptides whose structures are similar to ones previously identified from L. hesperus. The prediction of these atypical peptides from multiple spiders suggests that they may be broadly conserved within the Araneae rather than being species-specific variants. Taken collectively, the data described here greatly expand the number of known Araneae neuropeptides, providing a foundation for future functional studies of peptidergic signaling in this important Chelicerate order. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Necrotic skin lesion in a dog attributed to Loxosceles (brown spider bite: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LHA Machado

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Envenomations caused by Loxosceles (brown spider have been reported throughout the world. Clinical signs associated to bites of these spiders involve dermonecrotic lesions and intense local inflammatory response, besides systemic manifestations such as intravascular hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation and acute renal failure. The present study aimed to report and to describe dermonecrotic lesions probably caused by a Loxosceles envenomation in a four year-old poodle female dog, treated at the Dermatology Service of the Veterinary Hospital of the Veterinary Medicine and Animal Husbandry School, São Paulo State University, Botucatu, Brazil. Initially, the animal presented two skin lesions with blackish aspect that evolved into ulcerative crusts. The owner reported the presence of a brown spider near the place where the animal spent most of the time. Histological examination of lesions revealed necrosis of the epidermis extending to adnexa and panniculi, which is compatible with Loxosceles bite reaction. The animal was treated with systemic antibiotic and local curatives. Lesions healed by second intention in two months.

  19. Brown recluse spider bites to the head: three cases and a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Joseph; Bassichis, Benjamin; Itani, Kamel

    2004-07-01

    Consequences of envenomation from the bite of a brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) range from mild itching to death. The bite of this spider causes the most severe form of arthropod-induced tissue necrosis. These bites pose several challenges to the clinician in that diagnosis can be difficult, systemic manifestations can occur, and healing can be resistant to conventional measures. Bites to the head and neck-particularly the face-are uncommon, and they have not been widely reported in the otolaryngology literature. As experts in facial soft tissue, otolaryngologists and facial plastic surgeons should be able to recognize and treat these lesions. Because no laboratory test is available to identify the cause of symptoms in these cases, the diagnosis is made clinically. Early intervention can make a significant difference in cosmetic outcome, so a high index of suspicion is warranted. Local wound care includes rest, ice, compression, and elevation of the affected part of the body. Drug therapy with dapsone may limit the severity of the bite and prevent complications. Because some bites cause systemic loxoscelism, clinicians should be familiar with its manifestations. When necrosis occurs despite adequate medical treatment, reconstructive procedures should be delayed until healing is complete. We report 3 cases of brown recluse spider bites to the head. These cases illustrate the broad spectrum of the disease course, and they highlight the therapeutic challenges that these lesions pose.

  20. Brown spider (Loxosceles genus) venom toxins: Evaluation of biological conservation by immune cross-reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Daniela Regina; Souza, Fernanda Nunes; Meissner, Gabriel Otto; Morgon, Adriano Marcelo; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Ferrer, Valéria Pereira; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Matsubara, Fernando Hitomi; Boia-Ferreira, Mariana; Sade, Youssef Bacila; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Gremski, Waldemiro; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea

    2015-12-15

    Loxosceles spiders are responsible for serious human envenomations worldwide. The collection of symptoms found in victims after accidents is called loxoscelism and is characterized by two clinical conditions: cutaneous loxoscelism and systemic loxocelism. The only specific treatment is serum therapy, in which an antiserum produced with Loxosceles venom is administered to the victims after spider accidents. Our aim was to improve our knowledge, regarding the immunological relationship among toxins from the most epidemiologic important species in Brazil (Loxosceles intermedia, Loxosceles gaucho and Loxosceles laeta). Immunoassays using spider venoms and L. intermedia recombinant toxins were performed and their cross-reactivity assessed. The biological conservation of the main Loxosceles toxins (Phospholipases-D, Astacin-like metalloproteases, Hyaluronidase, ICK-insecticide peptide and TCTP-histamine releasing factor) were investigated. An in silico analysis of the putative epitopes was performed and is discussed on the basis of the experimental results. Our data is an immunological investigation in light of biological conservation throughout the Loxosceles genus. The results bring out new insights on brown spider venom toxins for study, diagnosis and treatment of loxoscelism and putative biotechnological applications concerning immune conserved features in the toxins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An infestation of 2,055 brown recluse spiders (Araneae: Sicariidae) and no envenomations in a Kansas home: implications for bite diagnoses in nonendemic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Richard S; Barger, Diane K

    2002-11-01

    During a 6-mo period, 2,055 brown recluse spiders, Loxosceles reclusa Gertsch and Mulaik, were collected in a 19th-century-built, currently occupied home in Lenexa, KS. We conservatively estimate that at least 400 of these spiders were large enough to cause envenomation. Additional collections from more typically infested homes in Missouri and Oklahoma in 2001 yielded 45 and 30 brown recluse spiders, respectively. Despite these infestations, no envenomations of the inhabitants of these three homes occurred. Considering the levels of infestations with no bites in the homes presented here, nonendemic areas in the United States, which typically lack recluse spider populations and have had zero to few verified specimens of the spider, do not have sufficient numbers of brown recluse spiders to make envenomation a likely scenario. Despite this, physicians from nonendemic recluse areas often diagnose brown recluse bites which, therefore, are unlikely to be correct.

  2. Seasonality of brown recluse spiders, Loxosceles reclusa, submitted by the general public: implications for physicians regarding loxoscelism diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Richard S

    2011-12-01

    Many medically important animals exhibit fluctuating seasonal abundance such that risk from envenomation or disease is not constant throughout the year. As indicated by homeowner submissions, brown recluse spiders, Loxosceles reclusa, show seasonal peaks of activity during summer and paucity in winter. This information should be incorporated as part of the diagnostic algorithm for physicians when considering the probability of loxoscelism in endemic Loxosceles areas especially if a skin lesion occurs when spiders are scarce. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Gene Duplication, Positive Selection, and Shifts in Gene Expression on the Evolution of the Venom Gland Transcriptome in Widow Spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Robert A.; Clarke, Thomas H.; Gadgil, Rujuta; Fitzpatrick, Ryan; Hayashi, Cheryl Y.; Ayoub, Nadia A.; Garb, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication and positive selection can be important determinants of the evolution of venom, a protein-rich secretion used in prey capture and defense. In a typical model of venom evolution, gene duplicates switch to venom gland expression and change function under the action of positive selection, which together with further duplication produces large gene families encoding diverse toxins. Although these processes have been demonstrated for individual toxin families, high-throughput multitissue sequencing of closely related venomous species can provide insights into evolutionary dynamics at the scale of the entire venom gland transcriptome. By assembling and analyzing multitissue transcriptomes from the Western black widow spider and two closely related species with distinct venom toxicity phenotypes, we do not find that gene duplication and duplicate retention is greater in gene families with venom gland biased expression in comparison with broadly expressed families. Positive selection has acted on some venom toxin families, but does not appear to be in excess for families with venom gland biased expression. Moreover, we find 309 distinct gene families that have single transcripts with venom gland biased expression, suggesting that the switching of genes to venom gland expression in numerous unrelated gene families has been a dominant mode of evolution. We also find ample variation in protein sequences of venom gland–specific transcripts, lineage-specific family sizes, and ortholog expression among species. This variation might contribute to the variable venom toxicity of these species. PMID:26733576

  4. Tropical House Gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia predation on brown spiders (Loxosceles intermedia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.N. Ramires

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Brown spiders (Loxosceles spp. are venomous arachnids, successfully adapted to urban habitats in Brazil. Loxoscelism became a serious public health problem in Paraná State, especially at the capital Curitiba, where the most abundant species is Loxosceles intermedia. Hemidactylus mabouia (Gekkonidae lizards are synanthropic predators of arthropods. In this paper, we describe the predatory behavior of the Tropical House Gecko H. mabouia on L. intermedia under laboratory conditions. Twelve geckos were observed, and all of them fed on brown spiders (n=123 observations. The attack consisted of a fast run followed by one bite on the spider’s abdomen or legs. The geckos did not attack L. intermedia anterior body parts, probably due to the fangs present in this region. Two Hemidactylus individuals were killed by L. intermedia bites: during a predatory encounter, and by an induced bite on a restrained lizard. The observations summarized in this paper show that H. mabouia could be used in the biological control of Loxosceles populations in human dwellings. However, additional field studies are necessary to quantify the impact of H. mabouia predation on urban populations of L. intermedia and other species of the same genus.

  5. [Brown recluse bite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehemya, Moshe

    2008-01-01

    Spider bites are not uncommon in our warm climate. The most prevalent species of venomous spiders in Israel are the brown recluse and the black widow. Although the black widow is more notorious than the recluse, for every bite by a black widow there are hundreds of recluse bites reported. Despite the numerous bites, there is little awareness amongst physicians with regard to the clinical signs of recluse bites, and very often the wrong diagnosis is made, resulting in complex and unnecessary treatments. The basis of this error stems from the numerous clinical diagnoses which closely imitate a recluse bite, the relative scarceness of documented recluse bites and the fact that in most cases the spider is not witnessed by the victim. The following article describes three cases of children admitted to our department, presenting with high fever, a necrotic lesion and an extensive maculopapular rash. The children were eventually diagnosed with brown recluse bites. Furthermore, the article summarizes the literature regarding the clinical signs of recluse bites, possible complications and treatment options. The objective of this review is to increase awareness towards recluse bites, thereby preventing misdiagnoses and unnecessary treatments.

  6. Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia secondary to brown recluse spider bite: a review of the literature and discussion of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, David R; Youse, Jeremy S

    2004-12-01

    The bite of the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) typically results in local, dermonecrotic skin lesions. Rarely, these bites may precipitate systemic disturbances of varying severity collectively known as systemic loxoscelism. The more severe systemic alterations attributed to the venom of this arachnid include hemolytic anemia, multiorgan failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, or even death. Coombs-positive hemolysis associated with brown recluse spider bites has rarely been documented in the literature. We report 2 cases of systemic loxoscelism in young women associated with severe Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia and systemic symptoms requiring hospitalization. Both patients were treated with aggressive wound care, hematologic monitoring with blood transfusion, and intravenous fluid replacement. Recovery was excellent in both cases. We review the literature and discuss the controversies surrounding the treatment of more severe brown recluse bite reactions.

  7. A new assay for the detection of Loxosceles species (brown recluse) spider venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Hernan F; Krywko, Diann M; Stoecker, William V

    2002-05-01

    Dermal lesions from unrelated arthropod species and medical causes appear similar to Loxosceles species (brown recluse spider) bites. This may result in delayed diagnosis and treatment. We developed a sensitive Loxosceles species venom enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and characterized the specificity of the assay by evaluating antigenic cross-reactivity from a variety of North American arthropod venoms. North American arthropod (14 spiders, 2 scorpions, and 1 bee) venoms were studied. Three venom amounts (diluted in 100 microL of ELISA buffer) were assayed: 16,000 ng, 2,000 ng, and 40 ng. The latter quantity was selected because this is the observed maximum amount of venom we detect when inoculating dermis with amounts likely to be deposited by a spider bite. The larger venom amounts are overwhelming quantities designed to test the limits of the assay for arthropod venom cross-reactivity. Similar amounts of Loxosceles species venom and bovine albumin served as positive and negative controls, respectively. At the lowest amount of venom tested (40 ng), the ELISA detected only the Loxosceles species positive control. When 2,000 ng was assayed, only Scytodes fusca and Kukulcania hibernalis arachnid venoms (in addition to Loxosceles species) cross-reacted to the assay. Finally, at 16,000 ng, the ELISA assay modestly detected Diguetia canities, Heteropoda venatoria, Tegenaria agrestis, Plectreurys tristes, Dolomedes tenebrosus, and Hadrurus arizonensis arachnid venoms. Cross-reactivity was observed in 8 of 17 North American arthropod venoms when large venom amounts were assayed with a Loxosceles species ELISA. By using a relevant quantity of venom, 40 ng, the assay was specific for Loxosceles species venom. The venom specificity of the ELISA may allow clinical application in Loxosceles species endemic regions of North America.

  8. Extreme Pain From Brown Recluse Spider Bites Model for Cytokine-Driven Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Katie S.; Schilli, Karen; Meier, Katlyn; Rader, Ryan K.; Dyer, Jonathan A.; Mold, James W.; Green, Jonathan A.; Stoecker, William V.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Bites from the brown recluse spider (BRS) can cause extreme pain. We propose cytokine release as a cause of the discomfort and a central mechanism through glial cell upregulation to explain measured pain levels and time course. Observations Twenty-three BRS bites were scored at a probable or documented level clinically, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to confirm the presence of BRS venom. The mean (SD) pain level in these cases 24 hours after the spider bite was severe: 6.74 (2.75) on a scale of 0 to 10. Narcotics may be needed to provide relief in some cases. The difference in pain level by anatomic region was not significant. Escalation observed in 22 of 23 cases, increasing from low/none to extreme within 24 hours, is consistent with a cytokine pain pattern, in which pain increases concomitantly with a temporal increase of inflammatory cytokines. Conclusions and Relevance These findings in BRS bites support the hypothesis of cytokine release in inflammatory pain. A larger series is needed to confirm the findings reported here. The extreme pain from many BRS bites motivates us to find better prevention and treatment techniques. PMID:25076008

  9. Therapeutic Plasma Exchange for Refractory Hemolysis After Brown Recluse Spider (Loxosceles reclusa) Envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Manjusha; Tilzer, Lowell; Hoehn, K Sarah; Thornton, Stephen L

    2015-09-01

    The brown recluse spider (BRS) (Loxosceles reclusa) envenomation can lead to multiple complications, including hemolysis. We present a case of refractory hemolysis after a BRS bite treated with therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE). A 17-year-old female presented with fever, fatigue, and dyspnea. She was diagnosed with sepsis and received intravenous (IV) fluids, inotropic support, and antibiotics. On hospital day 1 she was noted to have skin lesion consistent with a BRS bite and developed hemolysis. Systemic loxoscelism with hemolysis was then suspected and methylprednisolone IV was initiated. She was discharged with a stable HGB on hospital day 3 on oral prednisolone. She was re-admitted 24 h later, with signs of worsening hemolysis. Methylprednisolone was restarted and she was transfused 4 units of packed red blood cells. TPE was initiated due to the refractory hemolysis. Shortly after the TPE session, her clinical and laboratory status improved. She required no further transfusions and was discharged on a steroid taper. TPE is an extra-corporeal method to remove substances from the blood by separating plasma from cellular blood components and replacing it with physiologic fluids. TPE has been used for snake envenomation but there are no reports detailing its use for BRS envenomations. Improvement was associated with TPE initiation and may have been due to removal of complement components activated by the spider venom. This report suggests that TPE could be a possible treatment modality for systemic loxoscelism with refractory hemolysis due to BRS envenomation. Further investigation is warranted.

  10. Extreme pain from brown recluse spider bites: model for cytokine-driven pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Katie S; Schilli, Karen; Meier, Katlyn; Rader, Ryan K; Dyer, Jonathan A; Mold, James W; Green, Jonathan A; Stoecker, William V

    2014-11-01

    Bites from the brown recluse spider (BRS) can cause extreme pain. We propose cytokine release as a cause of the discomfort and a central mechanism through glial cell upregulation to explain measured pain levels and time course. Twenty-three BRS bites were scored at a probable or documented level clinically, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to confirm the presence of BRS venom. The mean (SD) pain level in these cases 24 hours after the spider bite was severe: 6.74 (2.75) on a scale of 0 to 10. Narcotics may be needed to provide relief in some cases. The difference in pain level by anatomic region was not significant. Escalation observed in 22 of 23 cases, increasing from low/none to extreme within 24 hours, is consistent with a cytokine pain pattern, in which pain increases concomitantly with a temporal increase of inflammatory cytokines. These findings in BRS bites support the hypothesis of cytokine release in inflammatory pain. A larger series is needed to confirm the findings reported here. The extreme pain from many BRS bites motivates us to find better prevention and treatment techniques.

  11. Identification and neutralization of biological activities associated with venom from the brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futrell, J M; Morgan, P N

    1977-11-01

    Venom from the brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa, reacted with human erythrocytes to form venom-sensitized erythrocytes. These cells were agglutinated specifically by high dilutions of adsorbed rabbit antivenin or were lysed by normal blood group compatible human sera. The specific rabbit antivenin prevented venom from attaching to erythrocytes, from interacting with serum complement, and from producing dermonecrotic lesions in rabbits. Results of experiments involving heat inactivation and adsorption to erythrocytes provide circumstantial evidence to suggest that the three biological activities of venom could be associated with a single component or few components with similar properties. The component interacting with serum complement is immunologically distinct from a factor in cobra venom which possesses similar biological activities.

  12. 1990 South Carolina Physician Survey of tick, spider and fire ant morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuman, S H; Caldwell, S T

    1991-08-01

    A population of 2,366 primary care physicians in South Carolina was surveyed by mail to estimate the number of cases of insect morbidity treated in 1990. A response rate of 42.3 percent was obtained. Cases reported totaled 414 for Rocky Mountain spotted fever, 334 for Lyme disease, 143 black widow and 478 brown recluse spider bites and 4,975 fire ant stings. These are counts of cases from a mail survey, not from a research-based study. Five deaths were also reported; two for Rocky Mountain spotted fever, two due to black widow spider bites and one fire ant anaphylaxis.

  13. Sphingomyelinase D activity of brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) venom as studied by 31P-NMR: effects on the time-course of sphingomyelin hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, M L; Hinton, J F; Geren, C R

    1998-03-01

    The time-course for the hydrolysis of the D linkage of chicken egg yolk sphingomyelin in a Triton X-100 mixed micelle and of lysophosphotidylcholine micelles, as catalyzed by brown recluse spider venom and brown recluse spider toxin, was followed by phosphorous-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The overall rate of hydrolysis of sphingomyelin in mixed micelles was found to be an order of magnitude faster than the hydrolysis of lysophosphotidylcholine. Incorporation of lysophosphotidylcholine into mixed micelles with Triton X-100 inhibited the lipase activity of brown recluse spider venom and brown recluse spider venom toxin. The effects of increased rates of overall reaction were observed with increased temperature and also with decreased ionic strength. The presence of divalent calcium ions was found to be necessary for hydrolytic activity, but only in catalytic amounts (less than 1 mM).

  14. NMR-spectroscopic screening of spider venom reveals sulfated nucleosides as major components for the brown recluse and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Frank C; Taggi, Andrew E; Gronquist, Matthew; Malik, Rabia U; Grant, Jacqualine B; Eisner, Thomas; Meinwald, Jerrold

    2008-09-23

    Extensive chemical analyses of spider venoms from many species have revealed complex mixtures of biologically active compounds, of which several have provided important leads for drug development. We have recently shown that NMR spectroscopy can be used advantageously for a direct structural characterization of the small-molecule content of such complex mixtures. Here, we report the application of this strategy to a larger-scale analysis of a collection of spider venoms representing >70 species, which, in combination with mass spectrometric analyses, allowed the identification of a wide range of known, and several previously undescribed, small molecules. These include polyamines, common neurotransmitters, and amino acid derivatives as well as two additional members of a recently discovered family of natural products, the sulfated nucleosides. In the case of the well studied brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa, sulfated guanosine derivatives were found to comprise the major small-molecule components of the venom.

  15. Spider Bites: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stiffness Severe abdominal pain or cramping Excessive sweating Brown recluse spider The brown recluse spider has a violin-shaped marking on its ... and southern states. Signs and symptoms of a brown recluse spider bite vary but may include: At first, ...

  16. Brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) venom phospholipase D (PLD) generates lysophosphatidic acid (LPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangderk; Lynch, Kevin R

    2005-10-15

    Envenomation by the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) may cause local dermonecrosis and, rarely, coagulopathies, kidney failure and death. A venom phospholipase, SMaseD (sphingomyelinase D), is responsible for the pathological manifestations of envenomation. Recently, the recombinant SMaseD from Loxosceles laeta was demonstrated to hydrolyse LPC (lysophosphatidylcholine) to produce LPA (lysophosphatidic acid) and choline. Therefore activation of LPA signalling pathways may be involved in some manifestations of Loxosceles envenomation. To begin investigating this idea, we cloned a full-length cDNA encoding L. reclusa SMaseD. The 305 amino acid sequence of the L. reclusa enzyme is 87, 85 and 60% identical with those of L. arizonica, L. intermedia and L. laeta respectively. The recombinant enzyme expressed in bacteria had broad substrate specificity. The lysophospholipids LPC, LPI (18:1-1-oleyol lysophosphatidylinositol), LPS, LPG (18:1-1-oleoyl-lysophosphatidylglycerol), LBPA (18:1-1-oleoyl-lysobisphosphatidic acid) (all with various acyl chains), lyso-platelet-activating factor (C16:0), cyclic phosphatidic acid and sphingomyelin were hydrolysed, whereas sphingosylphosphorylcholine, PC (phosphatidylcholine; C22:6, C20:4 and C6:0), oxidized PCs and PAF (platelet-activating factor; C16:0) were not hydrolysed. The PAF analogue, edelfosine, inhibited enzyme activity. Recombinant enzyme plus LPC (C18:1) induced the migration of A2058 melanoma cells, and this activity was blocked by the LPA receptor antagonist, VPC32183. The recombinant spider enzyme was haemolytic, but this activity was absent from catalytically inactive H37N (His37-->Asn) and H73N mutants. Our results demonstrate that Loxosceles phospholipase D hydrolyses a wider range of lysophospholipids than previously supposed, and thus the term 'SMaseD' is too limited in describing this enzyme.

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen effects on brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) envenomation in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, G M; Snider, T G; Tedford, B L; Cohn, G H

    1991-01-01

    Human loxoscelism was modeled in albino rabbits by injection of brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) venom, and the effects of daily or twice-daily hyperbaric oxygen treatment on wound healing were investigated. Lesions similar to those seen in humans were produced in rabbits by intradermal injection of 200 microliters of a venom extract (0.21 microgram protein per microliter), including edema and erythema, ischemia and cyanosis in the first 12 hr, extensive purpura by 24 hr, and crateriform ulcer formation by day four, with induration and eschar formation. Hyperbaric oxygen treatments, consisting of two atmospheres absolute (2 ATA) for 60 min, were applied daily (n = 8) or twice daily (n = 8), while control animals (n = 8) received no treatment. Treatments were initiated 72 hr after venom injection (day 3) to duplicate typical clinical treatment delays, and were administered for seven consecutive days. No significant effects of hyperbaric oxygen treatment on lesion healing were seen as measured by lesion area. However, histologic evaluation of wound tissue collected at euthanasia on day 24 showed clear differences between rabbits receiving twice-daily treatments and those receiving daily or no treatment. The former showed complete re-epithelization or slight ulceration, while the latter usually had necrotic cavities extending into the dermis, with myonecrosis and inflammatory cell accumulation. Thus, no superficial differences were seen between groups, but twice-daily treatments resulted in enhanced recovery at the histologic level.

  18. Arachnids misidentified as brown recluse spiders by medical personnel and other authorities in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Richard S

    2009-09-15

    Misidentification of harmless or nearly benign arachnids as Loxosceles spiders by medical personnel and other authorities proliferates misinformation in regard to alleged loxoscelism and leads to decreased health care. This is especially true in areas of North America where Loxosceles spiders are rare or non-existent. A diverse assemblage of such misidentified arachnids is presented here. It is hoped that authorities will honestly assess their arachnological limitations and, instead, seek qualified arachnologists for spider identifications.

  19. The clinical characteristics of brown recluse spider bites treated by family physicians: an OKPRN Study. Oklahoma Physicians Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacy, J; Mold, J W

    1999-07-01

    The brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) has been recognized as a cause of necrotizing bites since at least 1957, but most of the literature consists of laboratory studies using animals, human sera, or case reports of more dramatic examples of bite reactions. Our goal was to develop a more comprehensive clinical description of the brown recluse spider bites treated by family physicians. Two preprinted, postage-paid cards were given to physician members of the Oklahoma Physicians Research Network. One card was used for recording examination and treatment data, and the other was for tracking the progress of the bite until it was completely healed. For comparison, similar information was collected from the local poison control center. From April 1996 to August 1998, the physicians recorded 149 bites. Most of the victims were women aged 18 to 65 years, and most sought treatment within 3 days. Pain was common but not universal. Most bites were located on the extremities. Erythema was always present, but necrosis was present in only 40% of the bites. Some systemic signs or symptoms were common. The most frequent forms of treatment were systemic antibiotics (66% of cases) and conservative wound management (56%). Only 1 hospitalization occurred; 43% of the bites healed within 2 weeks; and only 13% resulted in scarring. The brown recluse spider bite is a relatively common problem treated by family physicians in Oklahoma. Most bites are not serious. More research at the practice level is needed to develop diagnostic criteria and to explore the effectiveness of various treatment options.

  20. Evaluation of the efficacy of vacuum cleaners for the integrated control of brown spider Loxosceles intermedia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Ramires

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Some venomous spiders of the genus Loxosceles can reach high population densities inside and around houses. In Brazil, most spider accidents are related to Loxosceles intermedia. Control of loxoscelism should utilize integrated pest management tools, such as vacuum cleaners, to eliminate egg sacs, webs and spiders. The present study tested the efficacy of one type of vacuum cleaner (for professional and domestic use in the control of L. intermedia populations. Cockroaches (Pycnoscelus surinamensis were used in some tests for comparison. Vacuuming using standard accessories or a paper tube resulted in the death of all female (n=60, male (n=60, young (n=60 and just-hatched (n=60 L. intermedia, and all egg sacs (n=5 were destroyed. The removal of the plastic plate present at the bottom of the vacuuming tube inside the machine allowed some spiders to survive the vacuuming process. When kept inside a vacuum bag full of dust and debris, adult females (n=10 survived for 10 days; however, significant mortality was observed among male (n=10 and young individuals (n=10. Addition of cornstarch to the vacuum bag did not affect the spiders (n=20. Vacuum cleaners, such as the one used in the present investigation, are promising tools for integrated management of L. intermedia and other spiders in domestic environments.

  1. Analysis of therapeutic benefits of antivenin at different time intervals after experimental envenomation in rabbits by venom of the brown spider (Loxosceles intermedia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Isolete; Minozzo, João Carlos; da Silva, Paulo Henrique; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2009-05-01

    Bites by the brown spider (Loxosceles spp.) are an important health problem in South America, where three species predominate (Loxosceles laeta, Loxosceles gaucho, Loxosceles intermedia). Brown spider bites (loxoscelism) induce a block of cutaneous necrosis and, less commonly, may cause fatal systemic poisoning. A variety of controversial protocols are used to treat loxoscelism, while treatment with antivenin is the only venom specific treatment. Here we studied the action of the venom as well as the response to the antivenin for Loxosceles through an experimental study that simulates bites of L. intermedia (bites of this species are the most common in Brazil). Beneficial effects are known for antivenin applied quickly (within 4 h) after envenomation. Here we wished to examine the temporal development of the brown spider bite as well as the temporal patterns of the action of the antivenin to determine the time limits for beneficial use of the antivenin after envenomation. This information is important since most patients only appear for treatment several hours after being bitten. New Zealand rabbits were experimentally exposed to the venom from brown spiders by the injection of venom from L. intermedia (2x minimum necrotic dose), followed at regular time intervals by antivenin. The use of the loxoscelic antivenin--CPPI (4 mL per animal)--minimized the effects of envenomation when applied for up to 12 h after the injection of the venom, as evaluated by cutaneous (erythrema, edema, ecchymosis and necrosis) and systemic (blood cell and platelet counts, hematimetrics and fibrinogen dosage) criteria. Also, antivenin reduced the size of the necrotic area when applied up to 48 h after envenomation. Thus, therapy with loxoscelic antivenin, CPPI, may provide beneficial results by interfering with envenomation well after the bite occurred and therefore may become an important tool for medical treatment of brown spider bites.

  2. Brown recluse spider venom: proteomic analysis and proposal of a putative mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Lucilene D; Dias, Nathalia B; Roberto, José; Pinto, A S; Palma, Mario S

    2009-01-01

    Loxosceles intermedia spider venom was subjected to proteomic analysis through a MudPIT shot-gun approach to identify the protein composition. Were identified 39 proteins which seem to responsible by the lesion of different types of tissues, to some physiopathological actions and by the prevention of structural damage to the toxin structures.

  3. Brown Recluse Spider Bite Mediated Hemolysis: Clinical Features, a Possible Role for Complement Inhibitor Therapy, and Reduced RBC Surface Glycophorin A as a Potential Biomarker of Venom Exposure: e76558

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eric A Gehrie; Hui Nian; Pampee P Young

    2013-01-01

      Background The venom of Loxosceles reclusa (Brown Recluse spider) can cause a severe, life-threatening hemolysis in humans for which no therapy is currently available in the USA beyond supportive measures...

  4. Brown Recluse spider bite mediated hemolysis: clinical features, a possible role for complement inhibitor therapy, and reduced RBC surface glycophorin A as a potential biomarker of venom exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Gehrie

    Full Text Available The venom of Loxosceles reclusa (Brown Recluse spider can cause a severe, life-threatening hemolysis in humans for which no therapy is currently available in the USA beyond supportive measures. Because this hemolysis is uncommon, relatively little is known about its clinical manifestation, diagnosis, or management. Here, we aimed to clarify the clinical details of envenomation, to determine the efficacy of the complement inhibitor eculizumab to prevent the hemolysis in vitro, and to investigate markers of exposure to Brown Recluse venom.We performed a 10-year chart review of cases of Brown Recluse spider bite-mediated hemolysis at our institution. We also designed an in vitro assay to test the efficacy of eculizumab to inhibit hemolysis of venom exposed red blood cells. Finally, we compared levels of CD55, CD59 and glycophorin A on venom exposed versus venom-naïve cells.Most victims of severe Brown Recluse spider mediated hemolysis at our institution are children and follow an unpredictable clinical course. Brown Recluse spider bite mediated hemolysis is reduced by 79.2% (SD=18.8% by eculizumab in vitro. Erythrocyte glycophorin A, but not CD55 or CD59, is reduced after red blood cells are incubated with venom in vitro.Taken together, our laboratory data and clinical observations indicate that L. reclusa venom exposure results in non-specific antibody and complement fixation on red blood cells, resulting in complement mediated hemolysis that is curtailed by the complement inhibitor eculizumab in vitro. Glycophorin A measurement by flow cytometry may help to identify victims of L. reclusa envenomation.

  5. Brown Recluse spider bite mediated hemolysis: clinical features, a possible role for complement inhibitor therapy, and reduced RBC surface glycophorin A as a potential biomarker of venom exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrie, Eric A; Nian, Hui; Young, Pampee P

    2013-01-01

    The venom of Loxosceles reclusa (Brown Recluse spider) can cause a severe, life-threatening hemolysis in humans for which no therapy is currently available in the USA beyond supportive measures. Because this hemolysis is uncommon, relatively little is known about its clinical manifestation, diagnosis, or management. Here, we aimed to clarify the clinical details of envenomation, to determine the efficacy of the complement inhibitor eculizumab to prevent the hemolysis in vitro, and to investigate markers of exposure to Brown Recluse venom. We performed a 10-year chart review of cases of Brown Recluse spider bite-mediated hemolysis at our institution. We also designed an in vitro assay to test the efficacy of eculizumab to inhibit hemolysis of venom exposed red blood cells. Finally, we compared levels of CD55, CD59 and glycophorin A on venom exposed versus venom-naïve cells. Most victims of severe Brown Recluse spider mediated hemolysis at our institution are children and follow an unpredictable clinical course. Brown Recluse spider bite mediated hemolysis is reduced by 79.2% (SD=18.8%) by eculizumab in vitro. Erythrocyte glycophorin A, but not CD55 or CD59, is reduced after red blood cells are incubated with venom in vitro. Taken together, our laboratory data and clinical observations indicate that L. reclusa venom exposure results in non-specific antibody and complement fixation on red blood cells, resulting in complement mediated hemolysis that is curtailed by the complement inhibitor eculizumab in vitro. Glycophorin A measurement by flow cytometry may help to identify victims of L. reclusa envenomation.

  6. Coagulopathy after spider bites in a six-year-old boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansari SH.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spider bites are common in most parts of the world. In some areas, where snake or scorpion bites are common, spider bites may not be considered a significant problem by the general public and those who have been bitten by spiders may not go to a hospital. However, significant problems are observed in the victims of certain species of spiders including: widow spider (of the genus Latrodectus, including the black widow and brown spiders (of the genus Loxosceles, such as the brown recluse. Case: We report a six-year-old boy, admitted to the hospital two weeks after suffering a spider bite. The patient presented with a severe nose bleed, ecchymosis and purpura, as well as anemia, indicating a clotting disorder. Laboratory results revealed abnormal values for prothrombin time (PT >50 sec, partial thromboplastin time (PTT >120 min and fibrinogen = 0 mg/dl, whereas factor VIII was normal according to a mixing study, with a normal platelet count of 350,000/µl. The patient was managed with fresh frozen plasma every 12 h, and was discharged one week after hospital admission. At present, the patient is well with more normal laboratory results one month after treatment: PT=13.4 sec, PTT= 34 sec, fibrinogen=105 mg/dl.         Conclusions: Although spider bites are uncommon in Iran, severe systemic reactions may occur in the pediatric population requiring admission to the pediatric intensive care unit. These systemic reactions may include hemolytic anemia coagulopathy and renal failure.

  7. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen on sphingomyelinase D activity of brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) venom as studied by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, M L; Hinton, J F; Geren, C R

    1997-03-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) has been reported by some to be therapeutic for necrotic lesions induced by the venom of the brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa. Others have reported no efficacy for this treatment. In this study, the effect of high pressure oxygen on an enzymatic activity of the toxin of this venom is reported. The time course for the hydrolysis of the phosphocholine ester bond of chicken egg yolk sphingomyelin, as catalyzed by brown recluse spider venom (BRSV) and venom treated with extended HBO (12 hr at 10 atmospheres), was followed by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The venom and HBO-pretreated venom demonstrated sphingomyelinase D activity. Phospholipase C activity was not detected. The sphingomyelinase D activity of BRSV in three separate experiments was not altered by HBO. The HBO-pretreated venom, in all cases, did not exhibit an altered time course in the overall hydrolysis of the D linkage of sphingomyelin.

  8. Brown Recluse Spider Bite Mediated Hemolysis: Clinical Features, a Possible Role for Complement Inhibitor Therapy, and Reduced RBC Surface Glycophorin A as a Potential Biomarker of Venom Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Gehrie, Eric A.; Hui Nian; Young, Pampee P

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The venom of Loxosceles reclusa (Brown Recluse spider) can cause a severe, life-threatening hemolysis in humans for which no therapy is currently available in the USA beyond supportive measures. Because this hemolysis is uncommon, relatively little is known about its clinical manifestation, diagnosis, or management. Here, we aimed to clarify the clinical details of envenomation, to determine the efficacy of the complement inhibitor eculizumab to prevent the hemolysis in vitro, and...

  9. Loxosceles niedeguidonae (Araneae, Sicariidae a new species of brown spider from Brazilian semi-arid region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute Gonçclves-de-Andrade

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A new species of recluse spider, Loxosceles niedeguidonae sp. n., is described from the Parque Nacional Serra da Capivara, State of Piauí, Brazil. This is the first endemic species described from Brazilian semi-arid environment. The species is included in gaucho group of Gertsch (1967 due to its spermathecal shape and is considered close to L. chapadensis Bertani, Fukushima & Nagahama, 2010 by the unusual long male palpal tibia, a character not common for species of this group. An updated key for Loxosceles species of gaucho group is presented.

  10. Loxosceles niedeguidonae (Araneae, Sicariidae) a new species of brown spider from Brazilian semi-arid region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute Maria; Bertani, Rogério; Nagahama, Roberto Hiroaki; Barbosa, Maria Fatima Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A new species of recluse spider, Loxosceles niedeguidonae sp. n., is described from the Parque Nacional Serra da Capivara, State of Piauí, Brazil. This is the first endemic species described from Brazilian semi-arid environment. The species is included in gaucho group of Gertsch (1967) due to its spermathecal shape and is considered close to Loxosceles chapadensis Bertani, Fukushima & Nagahama, 2010 by the unusual long male palpal tibia, a character not common for species of this group. An updated key for Loxosceles species of gaucho group is presented. PMID:22451789

  11. Epidemiological and clinical manifestations of patients hospitalized with brown recluse spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachenko, P; Ziv, M; Rozenman, D

    2006-10-01

    Necrotic arachnidism represents a common health problem and standard treatments are usually safe and effective. The aim of this study was to review documented Loxosceles species spider envenomations and identify the natural history of affected patients. A retrospective single-centre study included 52 patients with necrotic arachnidism hospitalized in the dermatology department between 1997 and 2004. We examined the relationship between the epidemiological, clinical and laboratory parameters and degree of lesion severity, length of hospitalization and time to complete healing. The bites occurred predominantly in rural areas, 67% between April and August. Only 35% of the patients sought medical care within 24 h post bite. Most bites were of the extremities (67%). Time to complete healing ranged from 14 days to more than 8 weeks (mean, 4.8 weeks). A marked relationship was found between age, comorbidities, lesion severity and time to complete healing (P < 0.01). Duration of hospitalization was significantly longer in patients with severe thigh lesions (P < 0.02). Loxosceles species spider bites frequently induce necrotic, slowly healing ulcers on the fatty areas of the body. Early, appropriate systemic therapy may provide clinical benefit.

  12. Toxicity of two North American Loxosceles (brown recluse spiders) venoms and their neutralization by antivenoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roodt, Adolfo Rafael; Estevez-Ramírez, Judith; Litwin, Silvana; Magaña, Penélope; Olvera, Alejandro; Alagón, Alejandro

    2007-09-01

    The toxic, biochemical, and immunological characteristics of L. boneti and L. reclusa venoms and its neutralization by anti-L. boneti and anti-L. reclusa antivenoms were studied. The electrophoretic profile showed very similar patterns and the toxic activities were very close. Immunological studies showed cross-reactivity among L. boneti and L. reclusa venoms, with L. boneti and L. reclusa experimental antivenoms, and anti-L. gaucho and anti-L. laeta antivenoms. The venom of L. laeta showed low immunological reactivity with the North American Loxosceles antivenoms. Experimental anti-North American Loxosceles antivenoms protected mice of the systemic toxicity and were able to prevent necrosis in rabbit skin after the injection of the venom. Both antivenoms displayed cross neutralization. The results showed that both Loxosceles venoms have very close toxic, biochemical, and immunological characteristics, and that either monospecific antivenoms or an antivenom raised with L. boneti and L. reclusa venoms as immunogens could be useful for treating bites by North American Loxosceles spiders.

  13. A controlled trial of topical nitroglycerin in a New Zealand white rabbit model of brown recluse spider envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, B P; Bradfield, J F; Carroll, R G; Brewer, K; Meggs, W J

    2001-02-01

    Topical nitroglycerin has been reported to prevent skin necrosis from brown recluse spider bites, but this has never been scientifically tested. This study attempts to assess the effects of topical nitroglycerin on experimental Loxosceles reclusa envenomations. We performed a randomized, blinded, controlled study in an animal care facility. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were experimentally envenomated by means of subcutaneous injection with 20 microg of brown recluse spider venom. Rabbits were randomized to 1 of 2 experimental groups. The treatment group received 1 in of 2% topical nitroglycerin ointment every 6 hours for 3 days applied directly to the envenomation site. The control group received the vehicle without nitroglycerin. Gross examination of the lesions and measurements of the areas of the lesions were made daily. Creatine phosphokinase (CPK), blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, hemoglobin, and hematocrit levels were measured on days 0, 5, and 10. Lesions were excised after 10 days and examined by a blinded pathologist, who measured the area of necrosis and quantified inflammation and edema using a standard wound-healing score. For all values, mean values plus SD were determined. All comparisons made over multiple time points were assessed for significance by using a repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Fisher least significant difference and Scheffé post hoc comparisons. A P value of.05 or less was used to determine significance. The Student's t test was used to compare the means of single measures. Significance was determined by using 95% confidence intervals. Comparisons of total area of necrosis were made with the nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test because of the heavy positive skew of the data. Skin necrosis developed in all animals. Mean values of the lesion area were not significantly different over time between the 2 groups of animals. At day 10, the median area of necrosis was 22.3 cm2 for the treatment group and 15.4 cm2 for

  14. A case of Spider bite localized to the eyelid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Karadag, Ayse Serap; Karadag, Remzi; Cecen, Ilhan; Calka, Omer

    2013-03-01

    Loxosceles Spiders have a worldwide distribution and are considered one of the most medically important groups of Spiders. The venom from Spiders of the genus Loxosceles, the most famous being Loxosceles reclusa (brown recluse Spider), can promote severe local and systemic damages. This report describes a girl presenting with a Spider bite over her right upper eyelid.

  15. Brown recluse spider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fever Nausea Reddish or purplish color in a circle around bite Sweating Large sore (ulcer) in the ... or in their preferred hiding places, such as dark, sheltered areas under logs or underbrush, or other ...

  16. Insect bites and stings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... insects, bees, and spiders; Black widow spider bite; Brown recluse bite; Flea bite; Honey bee or hornet sting; ... spider bites, such as the black widow or brown recluse, can cause serious illness or death. Most spider ...

  17. Physiotherapeutic attendance after repairing surgeries of lesions by brown spider: a case report - doi:10.5020/18061230.2007.p133

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Marques Frezza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The loxoscelism is the most serious form of arachnidism in Brazil. The genus Loxosceles comprises more than 100 species of spiders in African and American continents. In Brazil, they are known as brown spiders. Nevertheless the great incidence of occurrence, few are the reports about repairing procedures, specially related to Physiotherapy after surgeries due to dermonecrosis. The aim of this case report was to register the Physiotherapeutic attendance of a female patient, 29 years old, victim of loxoscelism and who underwent debridement and skin transplantation for repairing right forearm lesions while she was interned at a hospital. Afterwards, data were confronted with the literature about loxoscelism, burns and Physiotherapy after skin transplantation. It is concluded that the patients with lesions caused by loxoscelism, who need repairing surgeries, may benefit a lot from Physiotherapeutic attendance while still at hospital. Although, factors such as: the lesion’s location, the cicatrization period, the number and complexity of surgeries, may be decisive for this indication.

  18. Serum amyloid P component: its role in platelet activation stimulated by sphingomyelinase D purified from the venom of the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, C A; Rees, R S

    1990-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component or serum amyloid protein is a ubiquitous, highly conserved glycoprotein whose function is unknown. Although the related pentraxin, C-reactive protein, is an acute phase reactant in man, there is no direct evidence that human serum amyloid protein is involved in an inflammatory response. Here we show that serum amyloid protein is required by sphingomyelinase D, the principal necrotic agent of the venom of Loxosceles reclusa, for the in vitro-activation of human platelets. Furthermore, this platelet activation is dependent upon the presence of only serum amyloid protein; no other plasma components are necessary. Secretion of [3H]-serotonin and aggregation of platelets are nearly maximal following incubation of the platelets with purified sphingomyelinase D (0.3 micrograms/ml) and 5 micrograms/ml pure serum amyloid protein in the presence of calcium. Since the platelets are no longer activated when this 10% physiologic amount of serum amyloid protein is omitted, serum amyloid protein is likely to have a role in the necrosis caused by brown recluse spider venom.

  19. Transgenic Bt rice lines producing Cry1Ac, Cry2Aa or Cry1Ca have no detrimental effects on Brown Planthopper and Pond Wolf Spider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Lin; Mannakkara, Amani; Qiu, Lin; Wang, Xiaoping; Hua, Hongxia; Lei, Chaoliang; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis; Ma, Weihua

    2017-05-16

    Transgenic rice expressing cry genes from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt rice) is highly resistant to lepidopteran pests. The brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens) is the main non-target sap-sucking insect pest of Bt transgenic rice. The pond wolf spider (PWS, Pardosa pseudoannulata) is one of the most dominant predators of BPH in rice fields. Consequently, the safety evaluation of Bt rice on BPH and PWS should be conducted before commercialization. In the current study, two experiments were performed to assess the potential ecological effects of Bt rice on BPH and PWS: (1) a tritrophic experiment to evaluate the transmission of Cry1Ac, Cry2Aa and Cry1Ca protein in the food chain; and (2) binding assays of Cry1Ac, Cry2Aa and Cry1Ca to midgut brush border membrane proteins from BPH and PWS. Trace amounts of the three Cry proteins were detected in BPH feeding on Bt rice cultivars, but only Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa proteins could be transferred to PWS through feeding on BPH. In vitro binding of biotinylated Cry proteins and competition assays in midgut protein vesicles showed weak binding, and ligand blot analysis confirmed the binding specificity. Thus, we inferred that the tested Bt rice varieties have negligible effects on BPH and PWS.

  20. Seasonality of brown recluse populations is reflected by numbers of brown recluse envenomations

    OpenAIRE

    Rader, RK; Stoecker, WV; Malters, JM; Marr, MT; Dyer, JA

    2012-01-01

    A significant seasonal correlation was recently shown for brown recluse spider activity. Vetter (2011) observed brown recluse spiders were submitted by the general public predominantly during April–October. For patients with suspected brown recluse spider bites (BRSB), we have observed the same seasonality. Among 45 cases with features consistent of a BRSB, 43 (95.6%) occurred during April–October. Both the Vetter study and our study serve to demonstrate seasonal activity for brown recluse sp...

  1. Analysis of the toxic potential of venom from Loxosceles adelaida, a Brazilian brown spider from karstic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretel, Fernando; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M; Magnoli, Fabio Carlos; da Silva, Maria Esther R; Ferreira, Jorge M C; van den Berg, Carmen W; Tambourgi, Denise V

    2005-03-15

    Loxosceles adelaida spiders (Araneae, Sicariidae) are found near and inside the caves in the Parque Estadual Turistico do Alto Ribeira (PETAR), Sao Paulo, Brazil, which are visited by thousands of tourists every year. Several Loxosceles species are a public health problem in many regions of the world, by causing severe dermonecrosis and/or complement dependent haemolysis upon envenomation. The aim of this study was to characterize the biochemical and biological properties of L. adelaida venom and evaluate the toxic potential of envenomation by this non-synanthropic Loxosceles species. The biological activities of the L. adelaida venom was compared to that of Loxosceles gaucho, a synanthropic species of medical importance in Brazil. L. adelaida venom showed a similar potential to induce haemolysis, dermonecrosis and lethality as L. gaucho venom. L. adelaida crude venom was purified, yielding a 31 kDa component endowed with haemolytic and dermonecrotic activities. In conclusion, we show here that the troglophile Loxosceles species, L. adelaida, commonly found in the complex of caves from PETAR, is potentially able to cause envenomation with the same gravity of those produced by synanthropic species.

  2. Comparison of colchicine, dapsone, triamcinolone, and diphenhydramine therapy for the treatment of brown recluse spider envenomation: a double-blind, controlled study in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Dirk M; Miller, Scott D; Young, Russell J; Eggers, Jeff; McGlasson, David; Schmidt, William H; Bush, Anneke

    2005-05-01

    To compare the efficacy of dapsone, diphenhydramine, colchicine, and intralesional triamcinolone in the treatment of brown spider bites. We used a purified venom that reproducibly produces a large eschar. To mimic real-life circumstances, all agents were administered following a 2-hour delay after envenomation. The animals were evaluated for the presence of coagulopathy to determine if the incidence of systemic findings correlated with the type of treatment. In a research laboratory, 60 New Zealand white rabbits each received an intradermal injection of 20 microg of purified Loxosceles reclusa venom. The rabbits were divided into 5 groups of 12; a control group and 4 groups treated with a drug (either colchicine, triamcinolone, diphenhydramine, or dapsone). Measured end points included maximum eschar size as well as histologic grading of depth, inflammation, and thrombosis. Treatment with colchicine, triamcinolone, diphenhydramine, or dapsone. Maximum eschar size as well as histologic grading of depth, inflammation, and thrombosis. There was no significant difference with respect to eschar size (1-way analysis of variance, P = .003). There was no significant difference between any treatment with respect to presence or absence of ulcer, necrosis, large vessel vasculitis, or small vessel vasculitis. The only outcome of significance was that triamcinolone offered protection from thrombosis (chi2 likelihood ratio, P = .04). We also noted evidence of coagulopathy in all of the envenomated animals. The rabbits had grossly elevated activated partial thromboplastin time results, which were corrected with 1:1 mixing with normal rabbit plasma, suggesting an acquired factor deficiency. We did not detect an individual factor deficiency or a lupus anticoagulant. In a rabbit model, none of the agents tested (dapsone, diphenhydramine, colchicine, and intralesional triamcinolone) had an effect on eschar size. Triamcinolone appeared to offer some protection against histologic

  3. Seasonality of brown recluse populations is reflected by numbers of brown recluse envenomations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, R K; Stoecker, W V; Malters, J M; Marr, M T; Dyer, J A

    2012-07-01

    A significant seasonal correlation was recently shown for brown recluse spider activity. Vetter (2011) observed brown recluse spiders were submitted by the general public predominantly during April-October. For patients with suspected brown recluse spider bites (BRSB), we have observed the same seasonality. Among 45 cases with features consistent of a BRSB, 43 (95.6%) occurred during April-October. Both the Vetter study and our study serve to demonstrate seasonal activity for brown recluse spiders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Isotachophoretic and immunological analysis of venoms from sea snakes (Laticauda semifasciata) and brown recluse spiders (Loxosceles reclusa) of different morphology, locality, sex, and developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, C G; Tu, A T; Geren, C R

    1984-01-01

    Sea snake venom: The venom compositions of sea snakes, Laticauda semifasciata, with different scale patterns were analyzed by isotachophoresis. The comparison showed quantitative rather than qualitative differences. Similarly, L. semifasciata venoms of Philippine and Japanese origins differed only in the quantity of certain proteins. Spider venom: 3. Loxosceles reclusa venom apparatus extract is rich in neutral and acidic proteins but contains relatively small quantities of basic proteins. Differences in venom apparatus extract composition between nymph and adult (male or female) were detected by isotachophoresis. The extracts of male and female venom apparatus were very similar. Extracts of venom apparatus of spiders collected in locations separated by 100 miles were the same.

  5. Spider Web DNA: A New Spin on Noninvasive Genetics of Predator and Prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Charles C. Y.; Yen, Ivy J.; Bowman, Dean; Turner, Cameron R.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive genetic sampling enables biomonitoring without the need to directly observe or disturb target organisms. This paper describes a novel and promising source of noninvasive spider and insect DNA from spider webs. Using black widow spiders (Latrodectus spp.) fed with house crickets (Acheta domesticus), we successfully extracted, amplified, and sequenced mitochondrial DNA from spider web samples that identified both spider and prey to species. Detectability of spider DNA did not differ between assays with amplicon sizes from 135 to 497 base pairs. Spider and prey DNA remained detectable at least 88 days after living organisms were no longer present on the web. Spider web DNA as a proof-of-concept may open doors to other practical applications in conservation research, pest management, biogeography studies, and biodiversity assessments. PMID:26606730

  6. Spider Web DNA: A New Spin on Noninvasive Genetics of Predator and Prey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C Y Xu

    Full Text Available Noninvasive genetic sampling enables biomonitoring without the need to directly observe or disturb target organisms. This paper describes a novel and promising source of noninvasive spider and insect DNA from spider webs. Using black widow spiders (Latrodectus spp. fed with house crickets (Acheta domesticus, we successfully extracted, amplified, and sequenced mitochondrial DNA from spider web samples that identified both spider and prey to species. Detectability of spider DNA did not differ between assays with amplicon sizes from 135 to 497 base pairs. Spider and prey DNA remained detectable at least 88 days after living organisms were no longer present on the web. Spider web DNA as a proof-of-concept may open doors to other practical applications in conservation research, pest management, biogeography studies, and biodiversity assessments.

  7. 20 CFR 228.50 - Tier II annuity component widow(er), child, or parent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tier II annuity component widow(er), child... RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT COMPUTATION OF SURVIVOR ANNUITIES The Tier II Annuity Component § 228.50 Tier II annuity component widow(er), child, or parent. (a) General. The tier II annuity component is an additional...

  8. Uso de terapia VAC® para tratamiento de heridas por mordedura de araña reclusa café Vacuum-Assisted Closure therapy® for treatment of brown recluse spider bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Menéndez Arzac

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Las mordeduras producidas por la araña reclusa café pueden causar una ulcera necrótica de crecimiento progresivo, tradicionalmente tratada en forma expectante, con antinflamatorios y con cirugía reconstructiva tardía. En este trabajo presentamos 2 casos clínicos tratados de forma exitosa por medio del dispositivo para el cierre asistido por presión negativa (VAC®. Creemos que este dispositivo es un elemento importante para el manejo de esta patología, ya que la terapia por presión negativa ayuda a limitar la necrosis cutánea y a disminuir el tamaño de la ulcera y por lo tanto, acelera el proceso de recuperación del paciente.The brown recluse spider bite can cause an enlarging necrotic skin wound, traditionally treated with expectant management, anti-inflammatory drugs and late reconstructive surgery. In this paper we report 2 cases where we used Vacuum-Assisted Closure therapy (VAC® for the successful management of these wounds. We believe that VAC® therapy is very effective in reducing wound size and skin necrosis, and also in accelerating patient recovery time.

  9. The necrotic venom of the brown recluse spider induces dysregulated endothelial cell-dependent neutrophil activation. Differential induction of GM-CSF, IL-8, and E-selectin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, K D; Modur, V; Zimmerman, G A; Prescott, S M; McIntyre, T M

    1994-01-01

    Brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) venom induces severe dermonecrotic lesions. The mechanism for this is unknown but presents an interesting paradox: necrosis is completely dependent on the victim's neutrophils, yet neutrophils are not activated by the venom. We show Loxosceles venom is a potent, but disjointed, endothelial cell agonist. It weakly induced E-selectin expression, but not intercellular adhesion molecule-1 or IL-6 expression, yet significantly stimulated release of IL-8 and large amounts of GM-CSF by 4 h. In contrast, TNF strongly induced all of these, except for GM-CSF. PMN bound to E-selectin on venom-activated endothelial cells, apparently via counterreceptors different from those that bind E-selectin on TNF alpha-activated monolayers. Notably, PMN bound venom-activated monolayers only at intercellular junctions, did not polarize, and completely failed to migrate beneath the monolayer. Despite this, bound PMN demonstrated increased intracellular Ca2+ levels and secreted primary and secondary granule markers. The latter event was suppressed by sulfones used to treat envenomation. We have defined a new endothelial cell agonist, Loxosceles venom, that differentially stimulates the inflammatory response of endothelial cells. This, in turn, leads to a dysregulated PMN response where adhesion and degranulation are completely dissociated from shape change and transmigration. Images PMID:7518841

  10. SPIDER SILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PORAV Viorica

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The strengthness and toughness of spider fiber and its multifunctional nature is only surpassed in some cases by synthetic high performance fibers. In the world of natural fibers, spider silk has been long time recognized as a wonder fiber for its unique combination of high strength and rupture elongation. Scientists in civil military engineering reveal that the power of biological material (spider silk lies in the geometric configuration of structural protein, and the small cluster of week hydrogen bonds that works together to resist force and dissipate energy. Each spider and each type of silk has a set of mechanical properties optimized for their biological function. Most silks, in particular deagline silk, have exceptional mechanical properties. They exhibit a unique combination of high tensile strength and extensibility (ductility. This enables a silk fiber to absorb a lot of energy before breaking (toughness, the area under a stress- strain curve. A frequent mistake made in the mainstream media is to confuse strength and toughness when comparing silk to other materials. As shown below in detail, weight for weight, silk is stronger than steel, but not as strong as Kevlar. Silk is,however, tougher than both.This paper inform about overview on the today trend in the world of spider silk.

  11. Bug Bites and Stings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of teens become ill after being bitten by brown recluse or black widow spiders. Although not everyone will ... been bitten by one of these spiders. The brown recluse is brown (big surprise) with a small shape ...

  12. Biology of spiders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Foelix, Rainer F

    2011-01-01

    "One of the only books to treat the whole spider, from its behavior and physiology to its neurobiology and reproductive characteristics, Biology of Spiders is considered a classic in spider literature...

  13. 20 CFR 404.336 - How do I become entitled to widow's or widower's benefits as a surviving divorced spouse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How do I become entitled to widow's or widower's benefits as a surviving divorced spouse? 404.336 Section 404.336 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... § 404.336 How do I become entitled to widow's or widower's benefits as a surviving divorced spouse? We...

  14. 8 CFR 204.2 - Petitions for relatives, widows and widowers, and abused spouses and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... is submitted by the purported father of a child or son or daughter born out of wedlock, the father... date will be accorded only to a son or daughter previously eligible as a derivative beneficiary under a... benefits do not extend to an unmarried or married son or daughter of an alien widow or widower. (c) Self...

  15. Of spiders and zebras: publication of inadequately documented loxoscelism case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Richard S; Swanson, David L

    2007-06-01

    The dermatology and general medical literature is filled with articles that report skin disease caused by the brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa. A large number of these articles contain inadequate documentation of Loxosceles bites; many come from areas that have no Loxosceles spiders. Authors submitting papers alleging loxoscelism should adhere to standards of evidence when writing case reports.

  16. Posttraumatic Growth in Widowed and Non-widowed Older Adults: Religiosity and Sense of Coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, J; Camilli, C; Noriega, C

    2015-10-01

    Older people may experience psychological growth following a life major event. The objective of this study is to analyze the degree of posttraumatic growth (PTG) developed by widowed and non-widowed older adults (n = 103) as well as the impact of possible predicting variables such as sociodemographic characteristics, experienced or witnessed life major events, religiosity and sense of coherence. The findings suggest that, in spite of widowhood, elder people develop PTG in the same way that non-widowed elder people. Therefore, the support of a religious community, age, life major events experienced and the subjective meaning given to them correlated with PTG.

  17. British Widows of the South African War and the Origins of War Widows' Pensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedi, Eliza

    2017-09-23

    The South African War of 1899-1902 cost the lives of 22,000 British and colonial soldiers and created almost 5,000 British war widows. It was in this context that the first state pensions for the widows of rank and file soldiers were introduced in 1901. Triggered by unexpectedly high casualty rates and widespread dissatisfaction with charitable provision, the introduction of state pensions also reflected changing public attitudes towards soldiers and their dependants in the context of an imperial war. Dismissed in the historiography as insignificant because of its low rates and restrictive eligibility clauses, the 1901 scheme in fact delivered pensions to the majority of war widows and made the Edwardian state their most important source of financial support. This article, after discussing the social and political context in which widows' pensions were developed, analyses the economics of the scheme and how key eligibility rules were formulated, before investigating significant changes in the scheme to 1920, the point at which Boer War widows were finally granted full maintenance. Strongly influenced by the practices of Victorian armed forces charities and by contemporary ideologies of gender and class, the South African War pension regulations created precedents which would continue to shape pensions for military widows to the end of the twentieth century. © The Author [2017]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. 20 CFR 404.346 - Your relationship as wife, husband, widow, or widower based upon a deemed valid marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... widower based upon a deemed valid marriage. 404.346 Section 404.346 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... relationship as wife, husband, widow, or widower based upon a deemed valid marriage. (a) General. If your... explained in § 404.345, you may be eligible for benefits based upon a deemed valid marriage. You will be...

  19. Severe systemic reaction to Loxosceles reclusa spider bites in a pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbahlawan, Lama M; Stidham, Gregory L; Bugnitz, Mark C; Storgion, Stephanie A; Quasney, Michael W

    2005-03-01

    To report 6 children who had severe systemic reaction after spider bites requiring pediatric intensive care unit admission and to describe their clinical presentation, hospital course, and outcome. A retrospective analysis was done to identify patients presenting with brown recluse spider bites. Charts of children admitted to the intensive care unit were reviewed. Six previously healthy African-American children, aged 3 to 15 years, with brown recluse spider bites were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit. All had fever, jaundice, and evidence of hemolytic anemia. Four of 6 children had hypotension. One child developed mental status changes, acute renal failure secondary to rhabdomyolysis, and hyperkalemia and required emergent hemodialysis. All children fully recovered. Although most cases of brown recluse spider bites are benign requiring no intervention, severe systemic reactions may occur in the pediatric population resulting in admission to the pediatric intensive care unit. These systemic reactions may include hemolytic anemia, hypotension, and renal failure.

  20. Involuntary freedom in elderly widows- Narrative insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Carriço

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the existing age gap between the average life expectancy of males and females, the widowhood process in old age is mainly experienced by women. In light of this, this study aims to understand the state of widowhood from a female perspective, analysing its impact at the level of lifestyle choices, in addition to identifying the changes that took place in the lives of elderly women and to what extent widowhood influences the choice of daily life as well as leisure activities. This is an exploratory-descriptive study that resorts to a qualitative methodology, using a study group comprising 30 elderly widowed women, aged 65 or above. Data were collected during semi-structured individual interviews and its content was analysed with the WebQda Software (Web Qualitative Data Analysis. Results show that becoming a widow gave the elderly a greater sense of independence and freedom. Simultaneously, it also showed that in the early years of widowhood, widows experience more feelings of grief and nostalgia for their loved ones (feeling of missing someone immensely.  

  1. Blueprint for a high-performance biomaterial: full-length spider dragline silk genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia A Ayoub

    Full Text Available Spider dragline (major ampullate silk outperforms virtually all other natural and manmade materials in terms of tensile strength and toughness. For this reason, the mass-production of artificial spider silks through transgenic technologies has been a major goal of biomimetics research. Although all known arthropod silk proteins are extremely large (>200 kiloDaltons, recombinant spider silks have been designed from short and incomplete cDNAs, the only available sequences. Here we describe the first full-length spider silk gene sequences and their flanking regions. These genes encode the MaSp1 and MaSp2 proteins that compose the black widow's high-performance dragline silk. Each gene includes a single enormous exon (>9000 base pairs that translates into a highly repetitive polypeptide. Patterns of variation among sequence repeats at the amino acid and nucleotide levels indicate that the interaction of selection, intergenic recombination, and intragenic recombination governs the evolution of these highly unusual, modular proteins. Phylogenetic footprinting revealed putative regulatory elements in non-coding flanking sequences. Conservation of both upstream and downstream flanking sequences was especially striking between the two paralogous black widow major ampullate silk genes. Because these genes are co-expressed within the same silk gland, there may have been selection for similarity in regulatory regions. Our new data provide complete templates for synthesis of recombinant silk proteins that significantly improve the degree to which artificial silks mimic natural spider dragline fibers.

  2. Spider's microstructure for sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Li, Hongxiang; Yang, Xianjin; Liu, Yongchang; Hu, Wenping

    2006-01-01

    The spider is well known for sensing the movements of air and preys. Bionics of the spider based on this principle is being paid great attention by many researchers. Here, this paper presents some detailed organs of the spider to make an attempt to clarify the sensing mechanism of the spider from the point view of physical structure by scanning electron microscopy. And behavior characteristics concerning sensing action are observed by optical microscopy. Compared with structures, some novel features of sense movements in micro- and nano-scale size and corresponding possible models are presented. At the same time, simple structure analysis is made to explain and prove this hypothesis.

  3. Predation by cosmopolitan spiders upon the medically significant pest species Loxosceles reclusa (Araneae: Sicariidae): limited possibilities for biological control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandidge, Jamél

    2004-04-01

    Interspecific predation of three cosmopolitan house spiders, Achearanea tepidariorum (Kock 1841) (Theridiidae), Steotoda triangulosa (Walckenaer 1802) (Theridiidae), and Pholcus phalangioides (Doleschall 1859) (Pholcidae), and the medically significant brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa (Sicariidae) were examined to evaluate transitive predatory relationships and to explore the potential use of cosmopolitan spiders as effective biological control agents on L. reclusa. Fifty houses from northeastern Kansas were visually inspected from May to December 2002 for cosmopolitan spiders and L. reclusa. In 25 houses, insect monitoring traps were used to sample spider diversity and abundance. The remaining 25 houses were monitored to examine intraguild predation and spider behavior. If cosmopolitan spiders have the ability to regulate or decrease L. reclusa populations, houses with large cosmopolitan spider populations are expected to have significantly fewer L. reclusa than houses without cosmopolitan spiders. Predation and/or evidence of predation by all three cosmopolitan spiders on L. reclusa was detected in 68% of houses. Spearman's rank correlation analysis showed overall positive relationships between population densities of cosmopolitan spiders and L. reclusa. When evaluated independently, the presence of both A. tepidariorum and S. triangulosa showed negative, yet nonsignificant, relationships with L. reclusa densities, whereas P. phalangioides showed a positive nonsignificant relationship. Although statistical tests showed a decrease in L. reclusa population densities with increased population densities of two cosmopolitan species, alluding to a potential beneficial interaction for biological control, observations of spider behavior, web positioning (niche partitioning), and predation showed little possibility of biological control capabilities.

  4. Brown Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extraction) have also been linked to acquired Brown syndrome. Inflammation of the tendon-trochlea complex (from adult and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and sinusitis) can be ... syndrome hereditary? Hereditary cases of Brown syndrome are rare. ...

  5. The Support Systems of Aging Widows: Educational Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiamberg, Lawrence

    The status and problems of aged widows have, to some extent, been camoflaged by the more general concern about older adults. A pilot project was undertaken to identify the existing support networks for aging urban and rural widows and the details of the operation of those systems in order to relate the findings to social and educational policy.…

  6. Financial Planners: Educating Widows in Personal Financial Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Widows constitute a growing segment of the U.S. population; however, very little has been done to educate them on the basics of personal financial planning. The creation and implementation of financial planning education programs for widows can help them become more financially literate and free them from anxiety and fear. Interviews with eight…

  7. Family Survivors of Suicide and Accidental Death: Consequences for Widows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiel, Dale E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined the impact of completed suicide on the surviving family, comparing widows (N=13) whose husbands had died through suicide to widows (N=13) whose husbands had died in accidents. Found suicide survivors showed no more family dysfunction, life stress, or psychiatric symptomatology than accident survivors. (Author/ABL)

  8. Similarity of Perceptions of Bereavement Experiences between Widows and Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Shoshanna E. Williams; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Compared 92 widows and 400 professionals (clergy, counselors, physicians, funeral directors) regarding perceptions of conjugal bereavement. Professionals saw bereavement as having more negative impact and requiring use of coping skills to greater extent than did widows. Help-seeking behaviors, age at bereavement, and length of bereavement…

  9. Mental health outcomes of widowed and married mothers after war

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morina, N.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed prevalence rates of mental disorders in 206 mothers who had experienced the Kosovo war 10 years previously: 100 lone mothers widowed by the war, 71 non-bereaved married mothers, and 35 married mothers bereaved since the war (loss of family other than husband). A total of 96% of widowed

  10. O Nyarwath The Luo Care for Widows _Lako_ and Contemporary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O Nyarwath

    things, being anachronistic, a violation of the widow's right to freedom of choice to marry or not, treating a widow as property to be .... Lako is inextricably linked to the very meaning of marriage in the Luo culture, hence the aptness of. Kirwen's observation: ...... August 6. Ondiek, T.O. 1994. “Wife Inheritance has Advantages”.

  11. The magnitude of widow ritual cleansings among Kara tribe in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Widow ritual cleansing has been documented in many countries in Africa. The ritual refers to the traditional practice of sexual intercourse with the widow of a deceased male, to prepare her for acceptance to the community and or remarriage. Several reasons have been found to account for the existence of this kind of ritual, ...

  12. Bat predation by spiders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Nyffeler

    Full Text Available In this paper more than 50 incidences of bats being captured by spiders are reviewed. Bat-catching spiders have been reported from virtually every continent with the exception of Antarctica (≈ 90% of the incidences occurring in the warmer areas of the globe between latitude 30° N and 30° S. Most reports refer to the Neotropics (42% of observed incidences, Asia (28.8%, and Australia-Papua New Guinea (13.5%. Bat-catching spiders belong to the mygalomorph family Theraphosidae and the araneomorph families Nephilidae, Araneidae, and Sparassidae. In addition to this, an attack attempt by a large araneomorph hunting spider of the family Pisauridae on an immature bat was witnessed. Eighty-eight percent of the reported incidences of bat catches were attributable to web-building spiders and 12% to hunting spiders. Large tropical orb-weavers of the genera Nephila and Eriophora in particular have been observed catching bats in their huge, strong orb-webs (of up to 1.5 m diameter. The majority of identifiable captured bats were small aerial insectivorous bats, belonging to the families Vespertilionidae (64% and Emballonuridae (22% and usually being among the most common bat species in their respective geographic area. While in some instances bats entangled in spider webs may have died of exhaustion, starvation, dehydration, and/or hyperthermia (i.e., non-predation death, there were numerous other instances where spiders were seen actively attacking, killing, and eating the captured bats (i.e., predation. This evidence suggests that spider predation on flying vertebrates is more widespread than previously assumed.

  13. Bat Predation by Spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyffeler, Martin; Knörnschild, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    In this paper more than 50 incidences of bats being captured by spiders are reviewed. Bat-catching spiders have been reported from virtually every continent with the exception of Antarctica (∼90% of the incidences occurring in the warmer areas of the globe between latitude 30° N and 30° S). Most reports refer to the Neotropics (42% of observed incidences), Asia (28.8%), and Australia-Papua New Guinea (13.5%). Bat-catching spiders belong to the mygalomorph family Theraphosidae and the araneomorph families Nephilidae, Araneidae, and Sparassidae. In addition to this, an attack attempt by a large araneomorph hunting spider of the family Pisauridae on an immature bat was witnessed. Eighty-eight percent of the reported incidences of bat catches were attributable to web-building spiders and 12% to hunting spiders. Large tropical orb-weavers of the genera Nephila and Eriophora in particular have been observed catching bats in their huge, strong orb-webs (of up to 1.5 m diameter). The majority of identifiable captured bats were small aerial insectivorous bats, belonging to the families Vespertilionidae (64%) and Emballonuridae (22%) and usually being among the most common bat species in their respective geographic area. While in some instances bats entangled in spider webs may have died of exhaustion, starvation, dehydration, and/or hyperthermia (i.e., non-predation death), there were numerous other instances where spiders were seen actively attacking, killing, and eating the captured bats (i.e., predation). This evidence suggests that spider predation on flying vertebrates is more widespread than previously assumed. PMID:23516436

  14. Black widow pulsars: the price of promiscuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, A. R.; Davies, M. B.; Beer, M. E.

    2003-10-01

    The incidence of evaporating `black widow' pulsars (BWPs) among all millisecond pulsars is far higher in globular clusters than in the field. This implies a special formation mechanism for them in clusters. Cluster millisecond pulsars in wide binaries with white dwarf companions exchange them for turnoff-mass stars. These new companions eventually overflow their Roche lobes because of encounters and tides. The millisecond pulsars eject the overflowing gas from the binary, giving mass loss on the binary evolution time-scale. The systems are only observable as BWPs at epochs where this evolution is slow, making the mass loss transparent and the lifetime long. This explains why observed BWPs have low-mass companions. We suggest that at least some field BWPs were ejected from globular clusters or entered the field population when the cluster itself was disrupted.

  15. 20 CFR 404.1577 - Disability defined for widows, widowers, and surviving divorced spouses for monthly benefits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... physical or mental impairment(s). We do not consider your age, education, and work experience. We also do... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disability defined for widows, widowers, and surviving divorced spouses for monthly benefits payable for months prior to January 1991. 404.1577 Section...

  16. Necrotic arachnidism and intractable pain from recluse spider bites treated with lumbar sympathetic block: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiaobin; AuBuchon, Jacob; Zeltwanger, Shawn; Kirby, John P

    2011-06-01

    Brown recluse (Loxosceles reclusa) spider bites mainly occur in the southern and Midwestern United States. The clinical manifestation of brown recluse spider bites varies from skin irritation, a small area of tissue damage to neuropathic pain, necrotic arachnidism and severe systemic reactions such as acute renal failure and even death. Treatment is controversial and nonspecific. We describe a case of extensive right lower extremity tissue necrosis and intractable neuropathic pain treated with lumbar sympathetic block in a patient with a documented brown recluse spider bite. Both his pain and tissue necrosis improved significantly with lumbar sympathetic block with local anesthetic. After a series of lumbar sympathetic blocks, his symptoms resolved and lower extremity wound healed rapidly. We discuss the benefit of sympathetic blockade not only for neuropathic pain but also possibly as a treatment for necrotic arachnidism from a brown recluse spider bite.

  17. Widowers' accounts of maternal mortality among women of low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... status in different locations of the country including Lagos, Ibadan, Kaduna, Zaria, ... with widowers employing In-depth Interviews and Key Informant Interviews. ... Both ethnographic summaries and content analysis were employed in data ...

  18. The MTA UXO Survey and Target Recovery on Lake Erie at the Former Erie Army Depot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    species include the black widow and the brown or violin spiders. The black widow is a coal-black bulbous spider about ¾-inch in length, with a bright...brown or violin spider is brownish to tan in color, rather flat, about 5/8-inch long with a dark brown “ violin ” shape on the top. Of the brown spider...there are three varieties found in the United States, which present a problem to site personnel. These are the brown recluse, the desert violin

  19. Health care utilization, somatic and mental health distress, and well-being among widowed and non-widowed female survivors of war

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morina, N.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to assess levels of somatic and mental health distress, well-being, AS WELL AS utilization of primary and specialist health care services among war-related widowed and non-widowed female civilian survivors of war. Methods 100 war-related widowed lone mothers and

  20. PATHWAYS TO SPIDER PHOBIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MERCKELBACH, H; ARNTZ, A; ARRINDELL, WA; DEJONG, PJ

    Using a revised version of the Phobic Origin Questionnaire (POQ; Ost, L. G. & Hugdahl, K. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 19,439-477; 1981), the present study examined whether conditioning experiences, modeling experiences, and/or informational learning experiences were more often reported by spider

  1. Catalogue of Texas spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, David Allen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This catalogue lists 1,084 species of spiders (three identified to genus only) in 311 genera from 53 families currently recorded from Texas and is based on the “Bibliography of Texas Spiders” published by Bea Vogel in 1970. The online list of species can be found at http://pecanspiders.tamu.edu/spidersoftexas.htm. Many taxonomic revisions have since been published, particularly in the families Araneidae, Gnaphosidae and Leptonetidae. Many genera in other families have been revised. The Anyphaenidae, Ctenidae, Hahniidae, Nesticidae, Sicariidae and Tetragnathidae were also revised. Several families have been added and others split up. Several genera of Corinnidae were transferred to Phrurolithidae and Trachelidae. Two genera from Miturgidae were transferred to Eutichuridae. Zoridae was synonymized under Miturgidae. A single species formerly in Amaurobiidae is now in the Family Amphinectidae. Some trapdoor spiders in the family Ctenizidae have been transferred to Euctenizidae. Gertsch and Mulaik started a list of Texas spiders in 1940. In a letter from Willis J. Gertsch dated October 20, 1982, he stated “Years ago a first listing of the Texas fauna was published by me based largely on Stanley Mulaik material, but it had to be abandoned because of other tasks.” This paper is a compendium of the spiders of Texas with distribution, habitat, collecting method and other data available from revisions and collections. This includes many records and unpublished data (including data from three unpublished studies). One of these studies included 16,000 adult spiders belonging to 177 species in 29 families. All specimens in that study were measured and results are in the appendix. Hidalgo County has 340 species recorded with Brazos County at 323 and Travis County at 314 species. These reflect the amount of collecting in the area. PMID:27103878

  2. Spider phylogenomics: untangling the Spider Tree of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Nicole L. Garrison; Rodriguez, Juanita; Agnarsson, Ingi; Coddington, Jonathan A.; Griswold, Charles E.; Hamilton, Christopher A.; Hedin, Marshal; Kocot, Kevin M.; Ledford, Joel M.; Bond, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Spiders (Order Araneae) are massively abundant generalist arthropod predators that are found in nearly every ecosystem on the planet and have persisted for over 380 million years. Spiders have long served as evolutionary models for studying complex mating and web spinning behaviors, key innovation and adaptive radiation hypotheses, and have been inspiration for important theories like sexual selection by female choice. Unfortunately, past major attempts to reconstruct spider phylogeny typical...

  3. Diet-dependent fecundity of the spiders Atypena formosana and Pardosa pseudoannulata, predators in irrigated rice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigsgaard, Lene; Toft, Søren; Villareal, Sylvia

    2001-01-01

    The fecundity of the spiders Atypena formosana and Pardosa pseudoannulata was assessed on diets of brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens (BPH), green leafhopper Nephotettix virescens (GLH), Collembola (Entomobryidae), Drosophila melanogaster and three prey mixtures; BPH-GLH, BPH-GLH-Collembola and...

  4. Spider-Ant Associations: An Updated Review of Myrmecomorphy, Myrmecophily, and Myrmecophagy in Spiders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula E. Cushing

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a summary of the extensive theoretical and empirical work that has been carried out in recent years testing the adaptational significance of various spider-ant associations. Hundreds of species of spiders have evolved close relationships with ants and can be classified as myrmecomorphs, myrmecophiles, or myrmecophages. Myrmecomorphs are Batesian mimics. Their close morphological and behavioral resemblance to ants confers strong survival advantages against visually hunting predators. Some species of spiders have become integrated into the ant society as myrmecophiles or symbionts. These spider myrmecophiles gain protection against their own predators, live in an environment with a stable climate, and are typically surrounded by abundant food resources. The adaptations by which this integration is made possible are poorly known, although it is hypothesized that most spider myrmecophiles are chemical mimics and some are even phoretic on their hosts. The third type of spider-ant association discussed is myrmecophagy—or predatory specialization on ants. A table of known spider myrmecophages is provided as is information on their biology and hunting strategies. Myrmecophagy provides these predators with an essentially unlimited food supply and may even confer other protections to the spiders.

  5. Mental health outcomes of widowed and married mothers after war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morina, Nexhmedin; Emmelkamp, Paul M G

    2012-02-01

    We assessed prevalence rates of mental disorders in 206 mothers who had experienced the Kosovo war 10 years previously: 100 lone mothers widowed by the war, 71 non-bereaved married mothers, and 35 married mothers bereaved since the war (loss of family other than husband). A total of 96% of widowed lone mothers reported a major depressive episode, an anxiety disorder or a substance use disorder as compared with 54.9% and 60% in the married groups. Furthermore, 45% of widowed lone mothers reported current suicide risk as compared with 16.9% and 22.9% in the married samples. War-related widowhood combined with lone motherhood constitutes a significant factor for elevated psychopathology.

  6. Decay of Magnetic Field in Black Widow Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, C. M.; Benvenuto, O. G.; De Vito, M. A.; Horvath, J. E.

    2014-10-01

    A small fraction of the binary relativistic systems display the "black widow" effect: the companion is being ablated by the (recycled) pulsar wind. In these binary systems the evolution of the companion star (of the solar-type) reaches the point of filling its Roche lobe, thus initiating the process of mass accretion onto the pulsar. Accretion is generally believed to result in magnetic field decay, while isolated neutron star fields decay very slowly, if at all. We shall show that the very long evolution of the "black widow" system, starting from a solar-type star and lasting > 5 Gyr to reach the observed position in the plane, allows us to conclude that the magnetic field does not decay below the bottom value , extending the previous conclusions drawn from younger systems. In addition, the masses of the "black widow" pulsars are naturally predicted to be > 2 Mo due to the accretion history, in full agreement with recent measurements.

  7. Cultural Trauma and Welfare for War Widows in India

    OpenAIRE

    Atwal, Jyoti

    2017-01-01

    This article explores “connected” and “extended” cultural traumas in order to identify certain issues which dominated pensions of the war widows throughout twentieth century India. Nearly two million Indian men were recruited into the British army during the two World Wars. Despite the fact that notions of race and physical fitness of the Indian men in the war dominated this colonial relationship, about 22,000 Indian widows were receiving a pension by the end of the Second World War. At one l...

  8. Inactivation of complement by Loxosceles reclusa spider venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebel, H M; Finke, J H; Elgert, K D; Cambell, B J; Barrett, J T

    1979-07-01

    Zymosan depletion of serum complement in guinea pigs rendered them highly resistant to lesion by Loxosceles reclusa spider venom. Guinea pigs deficient in C4 of the complement system are as sensitive to the venom as normal guinea pigs. The injection of 35 micrograms of whole recluse venom intradermally into guinea pigs lowered their complement level by 35.7%. Brown recluse spider venom in concentrations as slight as 0.02 micrograms protein/ml can totally inactivate one CH50 of guinea pig complement in vitro. Bee, scorpion, and other spider venoms had no influence on the hemolytic titer of complement. Fractionation of recluse spider venom by Sephadex G-200 filtration separated the complement-inactivating property of the venom into three major regions which could be distinguished on the basis of heat stability as well as size. None was neutralized by antivenom. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of venom resolved the complement inactivators into five fractions. Complement inactivated by whole venom or the Sephadex fractions could be restored to hemolytic activity by supplements of fresh serum but not by heat-inactivated serum, pure C3, pure C5, or C3 and C5 in combination.

  9. Extended spider cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japyassú, Hilton F; Laland, Kevin N

    2017-05-01

    There is a tension between the conception of cognition as a central nervous system (CNS) process and a view of cognition as extending towards the body or the contiguous environment. The centralised conception requires large or complex nervous systems to cope with complex environments. Conversely, the extended conception involves the outsourcing of information processing to the body or environment, thus making fewer demands on the processing power of the CNS. The evolution of extended cognition should be particularly favoured among small, generalist predators such as spiders, and here, we review the literature to evaluate the fit of empirical data with these contrasting models of cognition. Spiders do not seem to be cognitively limited, displaying a large diversity of learning processes, from habituation to contextual learning, including a sense of numerosity. To tease apart the central from the extended cognition, we apply the mutual manipulability criterion, testing the existence of reciprocal causal links between the putative elements of the system. We conclude that the web threads and configurations are integral parts of the cognitive systems. The extension of cognition to the web helps to explain some puzzling features of spider behaviour and seems to promote evolvability within the group, enhancing innovation through cognitive connectivity to variable habitat features. Graded changes in relative brain size could also be explained by outsourcing information processing to environmental features. More generally, niche-constructed structures emerge as prime candidates for extending animal cognition, generating the selective pressures that help to shape the evolving cognitive system.

  10. Species status and conservation issues of New Zealand's endemic Latrodectus spider species (Araneae: Theridiidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vink, Cor J; Sirvid, Phillip J; Malumbres-Olarte, Jagoba

    2008-01-01

    cross-bred in the laboratory and produced fertile eggsacs. Colour variation is clinal over latitude and correlates significantly with mean annual temperature. We conclude that L. atritus is a junior synonym of L. katipo. An example of introgression from the Australian species L. hasseltii Thorell, 1870......) and morphological methods and with cross-breeding experiments. Latrodectus katipo and L. atritus were not found to be reciprocally monophyletic for any of the gene regions or morphological traits. Other than colour, which is variable, there were no morphological characters that separated the two species, which......New Zealand has two endemic widow spiders, Latrodectus katipo Powell, 1871 and L. atritus Urquhart, 1890. Both species face many conservation threats and are actively managed. The species status of the Latrodectus spiders of New Zealand was assessed using molecular (COI, ITS1, ITS2...

  11. Patriarchy, Marriage and the Rights of Widows in Nigeria | Ezejiofor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Employing the methods of analysis and description, this paper identifies patriarchy and marriage as the conceptual framework on which a proper of understanding widows' experiences in Nigeria is based. It argues that the institution of patriarchy and marriage, as aspects of the Nigerian traditional society, indeed, suffice as ...

  12. Society, culture and widow maltreatment in Nigeria: An Examination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Society, culture and widow maltreatment in Nigeria: An Examination of Rose Mary Asen's the woman in black. MD Jonathan, E Inedu. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  13. The Construction of a Day by Elderly Widowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Robert L.

    1986-01-01

    The way in which some elderly widowers living alone experientially organize time can be viewed as on a continuum structured around the notion of a "day" as a central organizing focus. Related to this is the role of a "daily highlight" in organizing daily activities. Certain factors may help structure this experiential continuum. (Author/ABB)

  14. Health care utilization, somatic and mental health distress, and well-being among widowed and non-widowed female survivors of war

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to assess levels of somatic and mental health distress, well-being, AS WELL AS utilization of primary and specialist health care services among war-related widowed and non-widowed female civilian survivors of war. Methods 100 war-related widowed lone mothers and 106 non-widowed mothers who had experienced the Kosovo war ten years previously participated in the study. Measures of somatic, depressive, post-traumatic stress, anxiety, and grief complaints, subjective well-being, and utilization of health care services during the previous three months were used. Results Compared to non-widowed mothers, widowed lone mothers reported significantly higher levels of somatic, depressive, post-traumatic stress, and anxiety complaints. Further, they reported significantly lower levels of subjective well-being as composed of positive and negative affect and satisfaction with life. More than half of both widowed and non-widowed mothers reported utilization of health care services during the last three months, without significant differences between the groups. However, only three percent of widowed lone mothers and four percent of non-bereaved mothers reported utilization of mental health services during the last three months, despite high levels of mental health distress especially among widowed lone mothers. Among widowed lone mothers, severity of prolonged grief symptoms significantly predicted number of contacts of specialist health care use over and above sociodemographic variables, number of war-related events, and other psychopathology. Conclusion War-related widowed lone mothers suffer from elevated somatic and mental distress even a decade after the war. The tiny proportion of widowed lone mothers in use of mental health services can be seen as a reflection of lack of previous and current mental health services to meet mental health needs of this population. PMID:22578096

  15. Health care utilization, somatic and mental health distress, and well-being among widowed and non-widowed female survivors of war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morina, Nexhmedin; Emmelkamp, Paul M G

    2012-05-11

    The aim of the study was to assess levels of somatic and mental health distress, well-being, AS WELL AS utilization of primary and specialist health care services among war-related widowed and non-widowed female civilian survivors of war. 100 war-related widowed lone mothers and 106 non-widowed mothers who had experienced the Kosovo war ten years previously participated in the study. Measures of somatic, depressive, post-traumatic stress, anxiety, and grief complaints, subjective well-being, and utilization of health care services during the previous three months were used. Compared to non-widowed mothers, widowed lone mothers reported significantly higher levels of somatic, depressive, post-traumatic stress, and anxiety complaints. Further, they reported significantly lower levels of subjective well-being as composed of positive and negative affect and satisfaction with life. More than half of both widowed and non-widowed mothers reported utilization of health care services during the last three months, without significant differences between the groups. However, only three percent of widowed lone mothers and four percent of non-bereaved mothers reported utilization of mental health services during the last three months, despite high levels of mental health distress especially among widowed lone mothers. Among widowed lone mothers, severity of prolonged grief symptoms significantly predicted number of contacts of specialist health care use over and above sociodemographic variables, number of war-related events, and other psychopathology. War-related widowed lone mothers suffer from elevated somatic and mental distress even a decade after the war. The tiny proportion of widowed lone mothers in use of mental health services can be seen as a reflection of lack of previous and current mental health services to meet mental health needs of this population.

  16. Health care utilization, somatic and mental health distress, and well-being among widowed and non-widowed female survivors of war

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morina Nexhmedin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to assess levels of somatic and mental health distress, well-being, AS WELL AS utilization of primary and specialist health care services among war-related widowed and non-widowed female civilian survivors of war. Methods 100 war-related widowed lone mothers and 106 non-widowed mothers who had experienced the Kosovo war ten years previously participated in the study. Measures of somatic, depressive, post-traumatic stress, anxiety, and grief complaints, subjective well-being, and utilization of health care services during the previous three months were used. Results Compared to non-widowed mothers, widowed lone mothers reported significantly higher levels of somatic, depressive, post-traumatic stress, and anxiety complaints. Further, they reported significantly lower levels of subjective well-being as composed of positive and negative affect and satisfaction with life. More than half of both widowed and non-widowed mothers reported utilization of health care services during the last three months, without significant differences between the groups. However, only three percent of widowed lone mothers and four percent of non-bereaved mothers reported utilization of mental health services during the last three months, despite high levels of mental health distress especially among widowed lone mothers. Among widowed lone mothers, severity of prolonged grief symptoms significantly predicted number of contacts of specialist health care use over and above sociodemographic variables, number of war-related events, and other psychopathology. Conclusion War-related widowed lone mothers suffer from elevated somatic and mental distress even a decade after the war. The tiny proportion of widowed lone mothers in use of mental health services can be seen as a reflection of lack of previous and current mental health services to meet mental health needs of this population.

  17. Unmaking Brown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockette, Tim

    2010-01-01

    America's schools are more segregated now than they were in the late 1960s. More than 50 years after "Brown v. Board of Education," educators need to radically rethink the meaning of "school choice." For decades at Wake County, buses would pick up public school students in largely minority communities along the Raleigh…

  18. Animal coloration: sexy spider scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lisa A; McGraw, Kevin J

    2007-08-07

    Many male jumping spiders display vibrant colors that are used in visual communication. A recent microscopic study on a jumping spider from Singapore shows that three-layered 'scale sandwiches' of chitin and air are responsible for producing their brilliant iridescent body coloration.

  19. Neutralization of Latrodectus mactans and L. hesperus venom by redback spider (L. hasseltii) antivenom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, F F; Hill, R E; Bogdan, G M; Dart, R C

    2001-01-01

    To test the effectiveness of L. hasseltii (redback spider) antivenom in neutralizing the lethal effects of L. hesperus and L. mactans (North American black widow) venoms. LD50 values for the L. hesperus and L. mactans venom preparations were determined. A prospective, randomized, double-blind antivenom efficacy experiment was then performed for each venom using a mouse envenomation model. The following treatments were premixed and incubated at 25 degrees C for 1 hour prior to intraperitoneal injection: 1) saline control + protein control, 2) saline control + L. hasseltii antivenom, 3) L. hesperus or L. mactans venom + protein control, and 4) L. hesperus or L. mactans venom + L. hasseltii antivenom. The study endpoints were time elapsed until death and survival at 24 hours. The mouse LD50 values for L. hesperus and L. mactans venoms were 0.64 mg/kg and 0.26 mg/kg, respectively. In the efficacy trial, all mice in group 3 (L. hesperus or L. mactans venom and protein control) died. In both experiments, all mice in group 4 (L. hesperus or L. mactans venom + antivenom) survived (p venom obtained by electrical stimulation of live adult spiders. Redback spider antivenom is effective in neutralizing the lethal effects of L. hesperus and L. mactans venoms in a mouse envenomation model. While this study is limited by the optimized premixing of antigen with antibody, it generates the hypothesis that redback antivenom would be effective in the treatment of latrodectism in humans caused by the two clinically relevant species of North American widow spiders.

  20. X-Ray Observations of Black Widow Pulsars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gentile, P.A.; Roberts, M.S.E.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Camilo, F.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Kerr, M.; Ransom, S.M.; Ray, P.S.; Stairs, I.H.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the first X-ray observations of five short orbital period (PB < 1 day), γ-ray emitting, binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Four of these—PSRs J0023+0923, J1124-3653, J1810+1744, and J2256-1024—are "black-widow" pulsars, with degenerate companions of mass Lt0.1 M ☉, three of which exhibit

  1. Involuntary freedom in elderly widows – narrative looks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carriço Sílvia

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The widowhood process in the elderly is mainly experienced by women, due to the age differential between feminine and masculine average life expectancy. In this context, this study aims to understand the state of widowhood in a feminine point of view, analyzing its impact in lifestyle choices, identifying the changes occurred in the lives of elderly women and, in which way the widowhood influences the choice of different everyday and leisure activities. Using a qualitative methodology, it has been organized as an exploratory-descriptive study, in which was used a study group composed by 30 elderly widowed women, aged 65 or above. Data was collected through semi-structured individual interviews, then analyzed in terms of content with the support of WebQ da Software (Web Qualitative Data Analysis. Results show that the fact of having become widowed gave the elderly a greater independence and sense of liberty. Simultaneously, it also showed that in the early years of widowhood, widows show more feelings of grief and nostalgia for their loved one (feeling of missing someone immensely.  

  2. Temporal Patterns in the Abundance and Species Composition of Spiders on Host Plants of the Invasive Moth Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Brian N; Mills, Nicholas J; Daane, Kent M

    2017-06-01

    Generalist predators such as spiders may help mitigate the spread and impact of exotic herbivores. The lack of prey specificity and long generation times of spiders may allow them to persist when pests are scarce, and to limit the growth of pest populations before they reach damaging levels. We examined whether resident spiders are likely to play a role in maintaining populations of the invasive light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), below outbreak levels in California. We surveyed the spider community on two E. postvittana host plants, the ornamental Australian tea tree, Leptospermum laevigatum, and the weed French broom, Genista monspessulana, to characterize spider and larval E. postvittana abundance and spider species composition throughout the year. Spider densities and species composition showed slight seasonal changes. Spiders were present during periods of high and low E. postvittana abundance. Anyphaenid hunting spiders, Anyphaena aperta Banks in Australian tea tree and Anyphaena pacifica Banks in French broom, dominated spider species composition at four of five sampled sites, and underwent only slight seasonal variation in abundance. Adult A. aperta were rare at all times of the year, suggesting that high mortality among juvenile A. aperta limits the potential of this species as a predator of E. postvittana. Nevertheless, the continued presence of spiders throughout the year indicates that the resident spider community is likely to play a key role in reducing E. postvittana populations in California. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  3. Immunotoxicology of brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, J L; Marmer, D J; Steele, R W

    1986-01-01

    A purified toxic protein from Loxosceles reclusa venom was assayed for its in vitro effects on the human immunological and blood clotting systems. The toxin caused inhibition of neutrophil chemotaxis, depletion of serum hemolytic complement, prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time and depletion of clotting factors XII, XI, IX and VIII by an average of 44% in human plasma. The prothrombin time of human plasma was also prolonged by 1.5-2.0 sec. No effect of the purified toxin was observed on microbicidal ability of neutrophils, the release of enzymes from neutrophils or the adherence of neutrophils to glass beads.

  4. Revisiting the Continuing Bonds Theory: The Cultural Uniqueness of the Bei Dao Phenomenon in Taiwanese Widows/Widowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wan-Lin; Hou, Yi-Chen; Lin, Yaw-Sheng

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, we used the phenomenological approach to rediscover the ontological meaning of relationships with the deceased in Taiwanese widows/widowers. We first revised the original Western definitions of grief, bereavement, and mourning to fit Taiwanese culture. We used the word bei dao to indicate the mixed nature of grief and mourning in the Taiwanese bereavement process. Then we reanalyzed data from a previous study, which was conducted in 2006. In the previous qualitative research, each subject was interviewed 3 to 4 times in the mourning state over an 18-month interval that began at the point of the spouse's death. Results showed that two main themes emerged in the present analysis: (a) a blurred boundary of life and death and (b) a transformation of ethical bonds. The present study reveals the culturally unique aspects of the Taiwanese bei dao process. Limitations of the present study and future directions are discussed and reflected.

  5. Cell culture's spider silk road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkel, Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    A number of synthetic and natural materials have been tried in cell culture and tissue engineering applications in recent years. Now Jeffrey Perkel takes a look at one new culture component that might surprise you-spider silk.

  6. Funnel-web spider bite

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002844.htm Funnel-web spider bite To use the sharing features on ... Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map ...

  7. 42 CFR 435.138 - Disabled widows and widowers aged 60 through 64 who would be eligible for SSI except for early...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... would be eligible for SSI except for early receipt of social security benefits. 435.138 Section 435.138... SSI except for early receipt of social security benefits. (a) If the agency provides Medicaid to aged... disabled widows and widowers who— (1) Are at least age 60; (2) Are not entitled to hospital insurance...

  8. 20 CFR 220.38 - When a widow(er)'s disability determination is governed by the regulations of the Social Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... is governed by the regulations of the Social Security Administration. 220.38 Section 220.38 Employees... Disability Determinations Governed by the Regulations of the Social Security Administration § 220.38 When a widow(er)'s disability determination is governed by the regulations of the Social Security...

  9. Application of 3 kinds of practical electromagnetic spiders in electromagnetic spider web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic spider web the launch circuit has introduced a lot, but in the center position of the utility of the spider generally have 3 kinds of circuits respectively, the use of single-chip microcomputer circuit of the low energy consumption spider by multi-channel transmission, single circuit receiver circuit. Direct use of the 3 channels of the spider and the use of PLC circuit spider, depending on the actual situation were placed.

  10. Suspected brown recluse envenomation: a case report and review of different treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Rebecca J; Campoli, Jennifer; Johar, Sandeep K; Schumacher, Katherine A; Allison, E Jackson

    2011-08-01

    The Loxosceles reclusa, commonly known as the brown recluse spider, is responsible for virtually all cases of spider bites leading to a significant necrosis. We report the case of a 72-year-old man who presented to the Emergency Department complaining of back pain, weakness, and diarrhea. The patient stated that he sustained a bug bite 1 week before presenting to the hospital. His wound was necrotizing in nature and after an exhaustive work-up, the most likely etiology was found to be envenomation by a brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa. This is an endemic cause of a necrotizing wound bite in areas of the Midwestern and Southern United States, but it is rarely reported in the Northeast. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. On the taxonomy of the Neotropical spider genera Dossenus and Dyrines (Araneae: Lycosoidea: Trechaleidae from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estevam L. C. da Silva

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The male of Dossenus guapore Silva, Lise & Carico, 2007 is described and illustrated for the first time, based on material from Bonito, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. The spider genus Dossenus Simon, 1898 is distributed from Panama to southern Brazil and can be distinguished by the other known genera of Trechaleidae by the median dark brown band on the carapace that extends to the abdomen and by the spoon-like shape of the median apophysis of the male palpus. A new species of Dyrines Simon, 1903, D. brescoviti sp. nov., is described and illustrated based on material collected in Sergipe and Paraná, Brazil. The representatives of this spider genus are relatively small and can be distinguished from the other genera by the longitudinal dark brown bands on the legs. New records of Dyrines striatipes (Simon, 1898 are presented.

  12. Wound assessment of the Loxosceles reclusa spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clowers, T D

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the data that are most important for nurses to recognize in the assessment of a Loxosceles reclusa (brown recluse) spider bite. Given such assessment elements, it may be possible to decrease the severity of complications and complexity of care by providing the most appropriate therapy. This study involved a retrospective review of 39 identified patient charts. Aspects that were examined included demographics, wound assessments, and outcome data. Patients who came to the study facility within 48 hours of the bite and whose diagnosis was a probable or possible brown spider bite met inclusion criteria. Data analysis revealed that the majority of patients sustained bites on the extremities and that those bites produced the most commonly noted symptoms. This is the first study in which specific local and systemic symptoms have been quantified and related to the wound area. Because of varied treatment and limited follow-up, determining the relationship between wound assessment and outcome was problematic. Ongoing studies, in contrast to retrospective review, are needed to reduce the limitations of this study, such as the loss of patients to follow-up. Areas for further research include the replication of this study and detailed analysis of treatment variables in relation to wound outcome.

  13. Spider phylogenomics: untangling the Spider Tree of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Nicole L; Rodriguez, Juanita; Agnarsson, Ingi; Coddington, Jonathan A; Griswold, Charles E; Hamilton, Christopher A; Hedin, Marshal; Kocot, Kevin M; Ledford, Joel M; Bond, Jason E

    2016-01-01

    Spiders (Order Araneae) are massively abundant generalist arthropod predators that are found in nearly every ecosystem on the planet and have persisted for over 380 million years. Spiders have long served as evolutionary models for studying complex mating and web spinning behaviors, key innovation and adaptive radiation hypotheses, and have been inspiration for important theories like sexual selection by female choice. Unfortunately, past major attempts to reconstruct spider phylogeny typically employing the "usual suspect" genes have been unable to produce a well-supported phylogenetic framework for the entire order. To further resolve spider evolutionary relationships we have assembled a transcriptome-based data set comprising 70 ingroup spider taxa. Using maximum likelihood and shortcut coalescence-based approaches, we analyze eight data sets, the largest of which contains 3,398 gene regions and 696,652 amino acid sites forming the largest phylogenomic analysis of spider relationships produced to date. Contrary to long held beliefs that the orb web is the crowning achievement of spider evolution, ancestral state reconstructions of web type support a phylogenetically ancient origin of the orb web, and diversification analyses show that the mostly ground-dwelling, web-less RTA clade diversified faster than orb weavers. Consistent with molecular dating estimates we report herein, this may reflect a major increase in biomass of non-flying insects during the Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution 125-90 million years ago favoring diversification of spiders that feed on cursorial rather than flying prey. Our results also have major implications for our understanding of spider systematics. Phylogenomic analyses corroborate several well-accepted high level groupings: Opisthothele, Mygalomorphae, Atypoidina, Avicularoidea, Theraphosoidina, Araneomorphae, Entelegynae, Araneoidea, the RTA clade, Dionycha and the Lycosoidea. Alternatively, our results challenge the monophyly of

  14. Spider phylogenomics: untangling the Spider Tree of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L. Garrison

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Spiders (Order Araneae are massively abundant generalist arthropod predators that are found in nearly every ecosystem on the planet and have persisted for over 380 million years. Spiders have long served as evolutionary models for studying complex mating and web spinning behaviors, key innovation and adaptive radiation hypotheses, and have been inspiration for important theories like sexual selection by female choice. Unfortunately, past major attempts to reconstruct spider phylogeny typically employing the “usual suspect” genes have been unable to produce a well-supported phylogenetic framework for the entire order. To further resolve spider evolutionary relationships we have assembled a transcriptome-based data set comprising 70 ingroup spider taxa. Using maximum likelihood and shortcut coalescence-based approaches, we analyze eight data sets, the largest of which contains 3,398 gene regions and 696,652 amino acid sites forming the largest phylogenomic analysis of spider relationships produced to date. Contrary to long held beliefs that the orb web is the crowning achievement of spider evolution, ancestral state reconstructions of web type support a phylogenetically ancient origin of the orb web, and diversification analyses show that the mostly ground-dwelling, web-less RTA clade diversified faster than orb weavers. Consistent with molecular dating estimates we report herein, this may reflect a major increase in biomass of non-flying insects during the Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution 125–90 million years ago favoring diversification of spiders that feed on cursorial rather than flying prey. Our results also have major implications for our understanding of spider systematics. Phylogenomic analyses corroborate several well-accepted high level groupings: Opisthothele, Mygalomorphae, Atypoidina, Avicularoidea, Theraphosoidina, Araneomorphae, Entelegynae, Araneoidea, the RTA clade, Dionycha and the Lycosoidea. Alternatively, our results

  15. Economic resilience of Genocide widows of AVEGA in Eastern Province of Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Militery Ngamata, Olivier; Mbonyinkebe, Deo; Lebailly, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    AVEGA is a non-profit making organization of Rwanda genocide widows which was established in 1995. It renders and performs its activities all over Rwanda. It is comprised of 20,312 widows and 71,478 of their dependants, mainly orphans (AVEGA, Annual report, 2012).The association helps widows and their dependents escape the poverty, anguish and misery that filled their lives following the genocide of 1994. It works with others partners to improve the social economic conditions of members. This...

  16. Survey for potentially necrotizing spider venoms, with special emphasis on Cheiracanthium mildei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foradori, Matthew J; Smith, Samuel C; Smith, Elizabeth; Wells, Roger E

    2005-05-01

    It has proven difficult to identify those spiders which cause necrotic lesions. In an effort to design a simple, inexpensive screening method for identifying spiders with necrotizing venoms, we have examined the venom gland homogenates of a variety of spider species for their ability to cause red blood cell lysis. Those venoms which were positive were further examined for the presence of sphingomyelinase D, and their ability to evoke necrotic lesions in the skin of rabbits. Sphingomyelinase D is known to be the causative agent of necrosis and red blood cell lysis in the venom of the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa), and our assumption was that this would be the same agent in other spider venoms as well. This did not prove to be the case. Of 45 species examined, only the venom of L. reclusa and Cheiracanthium mildei lysed sheep red blood cells. Unlike L. reclusa venom, however, C. mildei venom did not possess sphingomyelinase D nor did it cause necrotic lesions in the skin of rabbits. We present evidence suggesting that a phospholipase A2 is the hemolytic agent in C. mildei venom.

  17. Bereavement-Related Regret Trajectories Among Widowed Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Although regrets and unfinished business with a deceased spouse are frequently discussed as crucial determinants of one’s postloss adjustment, there have been few empirical investigations of bereavement-related regrets. This present study aimed to investigate the longitudinal course of these regrets and their correlates among widowed older adults. Methods. Drawing upon information from 201 widowed older adults in the Changing Lives of Older Couples study, this present study used latent class growth analysis to identify unique longitudinal trajectories of regret from 6 to 48 months postloss and examine differences between these trajectories with regard to grief and depressive symptomatology. Results. Three distinct bereavement-related regret trajectories were identified, characterized by Stable Low Regret, Stable High Regret, and Worsening High Regret. Results revealed that those in the Worsening High Regret group, whose bereavement-related regrets were exacerbated during the study, had the poorest grief outcomes. No differences were observed between these groups with regard to depressive symptoms, indicating that regret may be a unique marker of difficulties in the grieving process. Discussion. These findings highlight the importance of periodically reassessing bereavement-related regrets (and perhaps other aspects of the continued relationship with the deceased) over time and support the rationale behind interventions designed to facilitate resolution of these issues. PMID:23766434

  18. The Forensic Widow: Reflections on Living with and Assisting a Forensic Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Gina

    A number of unique challenges face the spouse of a forensic educator, including the possibility of becoming a forensic widow/widower. The job of a forensics coach is all-encompassing and requires endless hours of dedication, drive, and driving. Trying to keep up on all of the required duties is very time consuming and leaves little time for…

  19. The plights of widows and widowhood in Nigeria: Reflections on 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study finds out that the plights of the widows in Nigeria range from poverty and economic deprivation to marginalisation and inhuman treatment in the husband's family, in the church as well as in the society. The paper concluded that the widows themselves have major roles to play in addition to the efforts of the church ...

  20. The diet of the black widow spider Latrodectus mirabilis (Theridiidae) in two cereal crops of central Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Pompozzi; Nelson Ferretti; Leonela Schwerdt; Sofía Copperi; Adriana A. Ferrero; Miguel Simó

    2013-01-01

    La araña Latrodectus mirabilis (Holmberg, 1876) se encuentra comúnmente en cultivos de cereales del centro de Argentina. Se estudió la composición de la dieta a campo y la tasa de captura sobre hormigas cortadoras negras a laboratorio. Este estudio documenta el primer registro de la dieta de L. mirabilis en cultivos de trigo y avena del centro de Argentina. Se identificaron 1004 ítem presa colectados de las telas de L. mirabilis en las últimas etapas fenológicas de ambos cultivos. La composic...

  1. Stigma of tiger attack: Study of tiger-widows from Sundarban Delta, India*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Arabinda N.; Brahma, Arabinda; Mondal, Ranajit; Biswas, Mrinal K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Human-tiger conflict (HTC) is a serious public health issue in Sundarban Reserve Forest, India. HTC is a continued concern for significant mortality and morbidity of both human and tiger population. This study examined 49 widows, whose husbands were killed by tigers, in order to explore the cultural stigma related with tiger-killing and consequent discrimination and social rejection. Different psychosocial aspects of community stigma associated with tiger-killings is discussed in the context of local culture. Methods: A mix of both quantitative and qualitative methods was used in this ethnographic study in two mouzas of Sundarban adjacent to Reserve Forest, involving (1) Village Survey for Tiger-widows, (2) In-depth interview of the widows, (3) Focus Group discussions, (4) Participatory mapping and (5) Stigma assessment by using a 28 item stigma scale especially devised for this research. For comparison of stigma-burden snake-bite widows and normal widows were taken from the same community. Results: Tiger-widows showed significantly higher stigma scores on all the clusters (fear, negative feelings, disclosure, discrimination, community attitudes, and spiritual dimension) than from both normal and snake-bite widows. They also showed higher total stigma score (65.9 ± 9.8) than normal widows (35.8 ± 8.0) and snake-bite widows (40.1 ± 7.1) and this difference was highly significant (P tiger-killing. This can be seen in how the tiger-widows’ quality of life has been negatively impacted with a multitude of post-trauma psychological scars, deprivation, abuse and exploitation. Conclusions: The study proposes that administrative strategy for sustainable alternative income generation and conservation policy with integrated participatory forest management may save both human and tiger. A community ecocultural mental health programme addressing to eradicate the cultural stigma related with tiger attack, with environmental awareness may help to reduce the social

  2. Debt, shame, and survival: becoming and living as widows in rural Kerala, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The health and well-being of widows in India is an important but neglected issue of public health and women’s rights. We investigate the lives of Indian women as they become widows, focussing on the causes of their husband’s mortality and the ensuing consequences of these causes on their own lives and identify the opportunities and challenges that widows face in living healthy and fulfilling lives. Methods Data were collected in a Gram Panchayat (lowest level territorial decentralised unit) in the south Indian state of Kerala. Interviews were undertaken with key informants in order to gain an understanding of local constructions of ‘widowhood’ and the welfare and social opportunities for widows. Then we conducted semi-structured interviews with widows in the community on issues related to health and vulnerability, enabling us to hear perspectives from widows. Data were analysed for thematic content and emerging patterns. We synthesized our findings with theoretical understandings of vulnerability and Amartya Sen’s entitlements theory to develop a conceptual framework. Results Two salient findings of the study are: first, becoming a widow can be viewed as a type of ‘shock’ that operates similarly to other ‘economic shocks’ or ‘health shocks’ in poor countries except that the burden falls disproportionately on women. Second, widowhood is not a static phenomenon, but rather can be viewed as a multi-phased process with different public health implications at each stage. Conclusion More research on widows in India and other countries will help to both elucidate the challenges faced by widows and encourage potential solutions. The framework developed in this paper could be used to guide future research on widows. PMID:23126457

  3. Rumination and avoidance as predictors of prolonged grief, depression, and posttraumatic stress in female widowed survivors of war

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morina, N.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined independent contributions of rumination and experiential avoidance in predicting symptoms of psychological distress among female widowed survivors of war. A decade after the war in Kosovo, 100 widowed survivors of war completed measures of rumination, experiential avoidance,

  4. The Legs That Rock the Cradle: Spider Mothers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Spiders are excellent models to study behavioural diversityand evolutionary adaptations in the animal world. This articleexplores the strategies used by spiders to maximise thesurvival of their offspring.

  5. Clinicopathological course of acute kidney injury following brown recluse (Loxoscles reclusa) envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Siddiq; Torosyan, Rafael; Ginsberg, Charles; Liapis, Helen; Morrison, Aubrey R

    2013-12-01

    We report a case of severe systemic loxoscelism in a previously healthy young man. This was associated with a Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia, striking leukomid reaction, renal failure, respiratory failure and cardiovascular collapse. This is the first documented case of a renal biopsy in a patient with renal failure after envenomation by the brown recluse spider. Associated systemic toxicity usually resolves but requires prompt recognition and supportive care in an intensive care setting. We also discuss the potential mechanism by which the venom of this small spider can lead to multiorgan failure and possibly death.

  6. Clinicopathological course of acute kidney injury following brown recluse (Loxoscles reclusa) envenomation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Siddiq; Torosyan, Rafael; Ginsberg, Charles; Liapis, Helen; Morrison, Aubrey R.

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of severe systemic loxoscelism in a previously healthy young man. This was associated with a Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia, striking leukomid reaction, renal failure, respiratory failure and cardiovascular collapse. This is the first documented case of a renal biopsy in a patient with renal failure after envenomation by the brown recluse spider. Associated systemic toxicity usually resolves but requires prompt recognition and supportive care in an intensive care setting. We also discuss the potential mechanism by which the venom of this small spider can lead to multiorgan failure and possibly death. PMID:26120457

  7. [Human brown adipose tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Kirsi A; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2015-01-01

    Adult humans have heat-producing and energy-consuming brown adipose tissue in the clavicular region of the neck. There are two types of brown adipose cells, the so-called classic and beige adipose cells. Brown adipose cells produce heat by means of uncoupler protein 1 (UCP1) from fatty acids and sugar. By applying positron emission tomography (PET) measuring the utilization of sugar, the metabolism of brown fat has been shown to multiply in the cold, presumably influencing energy consumption. Active brown fat is most likely present in young adults, persons of normal weight and women, least likely in obese persons.

  8. Biomechanical characterization of spider webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rakesh; Kumar, Amit; Patel, Anurag; Vijay, Sahil; Saurabh, Shashank; Kumar, Navin

    2017-03-01

    In light of recent focus on the behaviour of the natural structures for revolutionary technological growth, spider web seems to have seized considerable attention of product designer due to its amazing behaviour. In present work, mechanism behind the structural integrity of the spider web along with the materialistic analysis of its constituent silk threads has been extensively investigated. The nanoindentation tool both in static and dynamic mode has been utilized for complete analysis of the mechanical behaviour of the spiral and radial threads separately. Both the average elastic modulus and hardness of the radial silk thread is higher than the spiral silk thread which reveals the radial silk thread is the major structural component of the web. The sustainability of spider webs under storm, windy conditions and during the impact of pray has been investigated under dynamic conditions. The radial silk thread exhibits elastic like response and the spiral silk thread exhibits viscous like response in a wide frequency range (1-200Hz). The damping characteristic of the radial and spiral silk threads, an important parameter to investigate the energy dissipation properties of the materials has also been investigated in windy conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Multi-wavelength studies of Redback and Black Widow pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, Roberto; Salvetti, David; Pallanca, Cristina; Marelli, Martino; De Luca, Andrea; Belfiore, Andrea Mario

    2016-07-01

    The unexpected Fermi discovery of more than 70 gamma-ray milli-second pulsars (MSPs) outside globular clusters, spurred the scientific interest on these objects, and opened new horizons in MSP astronomy and on the study of the evolution of neutron stars in compact binary systems, including the ablation process of the companion star in the so-called Black Widow (BW) and Redback (RB) systems. It is thought that an important fraction of the tens of unidentified pulsar-like Fermi sources at high latitude are MSPs, yet unidentified, owing to their extremely elusive radio emission. As shown in a few recent cases, optical observations have been instrumental to spot binary MSP candidates through the discovery of periodic modulations in the flux of their putative companions. In this contribution, we report on the recent follow-ups of several candidate binary MSPs carried out with optical and X-ray facilities, e.g. GROND and XMM-Newton, Swift. This program already lead to identification of the Fermi source 3FGL 2036.6-5618 as candidate RB system, through the detection of periodic (orbital) modulation of its X/optical flux (Salvetti et al. 2015).

  10. Overlooked and underserved: Widowed fathers with dependent-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yopp, Justin M; Park, Eliza M; Edwards, Teresa; Deal, Allison; Rosenstein, Donald L

    2015-10-01

    Widowed fathers and their children are at heightened risk for poor coping and maladaptive psychosocial outcomes. This exploratory study is the first to explicitly examine the psychological characteristics of this population of fathers. Some 259 fathers (mean age = 46.81; 90% Caucasian) with dependent-age children and whose wives had died from cancer within the previous five years completed a web-based survey that consisted of demographic questions, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), the Texas Inventory of Grief-Revised (TRIG-R), the Psychological Adaptation Scale (PAS), the Kansas Parental Satisfaction Scale (KPSS), and items assessing perceived parental efficacy. Fathers were found to have elevated depressive (CES-D mean = 22.6) and grief (TRIG-R mean = 70.3) symptomatology, low adaptation (PAS mean = 3.2), and high levels of stress related to their parenting role. They reported being satisfied with their parenting (KPSS mean = 15.8) and having met their own parental expectations. Multivariate analyses revealed an association between father's age and depression (p = cost, with particularly high stress related to being a sole parent. These findings may help guide interventions for this neglected population and underscore the importance of developing targeted therapies and research protocols to address their needs.

  11. (Araneae: Palpimanidae) on jumping spiders (Araneae: Salticidae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is the first detailed report on the natural prey and the prey-capture tactics of a Palpimanus sp. from Entebbe (Uganda). Although this species fed occasionally on insects, its dominant prey in the field was other spiders, especially jumping spiders (Salticidae) and their eggs. Encounters between Palpimanus sp. and ...

  12. Tangled in a sparse spider web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Dimitar Stefanov; Lopardo, Lara; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the tempo and the mode of spider orb web evolution and diversification, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis using six genetic markers along with a comprehensive taxon sample. The present analyses are the first to recover the monophyly of orb-weaving spiders based solely on DNA ...

  13. The ecological consequences of temperament in spiders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan N. PRUITT, Susan E. RIECHERT

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ecological and evolutionary studies on spiders have been featured prominently throughout the contemporary behavio­ral syndromes movement. Here we review the behavioral syndromes literature devoted to spiders, and identify some ways in which behavioral syndromes can impact the function of spiders in ecological communities. We further highlight three general themes within the behavioral syndromes literature for which spiders have served as front running model systems: (1 how trait correlations beget performance trade-offs, (2 the influence that behavioral trait variants have on interspecific interactions and (3 mechanisms that aid in maintaining behavioral variation within- and among-populations. Research on behavioral syndromes continues to grow at an impressive rate, and we feel the success of behavioral syndromes studies in spiders bodes well for their continued prominence [Current Zoology 58 (4: 589–596, 2012].

  14. Morbidity patterns and health care seeking behavior among older widows in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Agrawal

    Full Text Available In the process of health transition, India is facing rapid pace of demographic aging. Rapid increase in older adult population posed serious concerns regarding health and health care utilization for them. However, very limited research documented resultant implications of demographic aging for health and health care use in the nexus of marital status and gender. With this perspective, the present study examined patterns in morbidity prevalence and health seeking behaviour among older widows in India. Multivariate logistic regression models were estimated to examine the effects of socio-demographic conditions on morbidity prevalence among older widows and their health care seeking behavior. Data from the latest 60(th round of National Sample Survey (NSS, 2004 was used. Overall, morbidity prevalence was 13% greater among older widows compared to older widowers. Adjusted prevalence of communicable and non-communicable diseases was found 74 and 192 per 1000 older widows respectively. At the same time, likelihood of seeking health care services for reported morbidities was substantially lower among older widows. The findings of this study are important to support policy makers and health care providers in identifying individuals 'at risk' and could be integrated into the current programs of social, economic and health security for the older persons.

  15. Daily emotional and physical reactivity to stressors among widowed and married older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Elizabeth A; Cichy, Kelly E; Small, Brent J; Almeida, David M

    2014-01-01

    Widowhood may result in declines in health and potentially stressful changes to daily routines. However, little research has examined how daily stressors contribute to physical and emotional well-being in widowhood. The objectives of the current study were to examine daily stressor exposure and reactivity in widowed versus married older adults. Participants included all 100 widowed and 342 married adults aged 65 and older from the National Study of Daily Experiences, a daily diary study from the second wave of the Midlife in the United States. Daily stressors were measured using the Daily Inventory of Stressful Events; multilevel modeling assessed daily reactivity to stressors using daily negative affect (emotional reactivity) and daily physical symptoms (physical reactivity) as outcomes. Married participants reported more stressors in general, and specifically more interpersonal stressors (e.g., arguments). Both married and widowed participants were reactive to daily stressors. Married participants were physically and emotionally reactive to interpersonal stressors. Widowed participants were more physically reactive to home-related stressors. Attention to the types of daily stressors that widowed older adults experience in daily life and the potential physical effects of daily stressors during widowhood may help to alleviate some of the physical distress that widowed older adults may experience.

  16. Daily Emotional and Physical Reactivity to Stressors Among Widowed and Married Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Widowhood may result in declines in health and potentially stressful changes to daily routines. However, little research has examined how daily stressors contribute to physical and emotional well-being in widowhood. The objectives of the current study were to examine daily stressor exposure and reactivity in widowed versus married older adults. Method. Participants included all 100 widowed and 342 married adults aged 65 and older from the National Study of Daily Experiences, a daily diary study from the second wave of the Midlife in the United States. Daily stressors were measured using the Daily Inventory of Stressful Events; multilevel modeling assessed daily reactivity to stressors using daily negative affect (emotional reactivity) and daily physical symptoms (physical reactivity) as outcomes. Results. Married participants reported more stressors in general, and specifically more interpersonal stressors (e.g., arguments). Both married and widowed participants were reactive to daily stressors. Married participants were physically and emotionally reactive to interpersonal stressors. Widowed participants were more physically reactive to home-related stressors. Discussion. Attention to the types of daily stressors that widowed older adults experience in daily life and the potential physical effects of daily stressors during widowhood may help to alleviate some of the physical distress that widowed older adults may experience. PMID:23685921

  17. Widows' land security in the era of HIV/AIDS: panel survey evidence from Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapoto, Antony; Jayne, T S; Mason, Nicole M

    2011-01-01

    In areas of Africa hard hit by HIV/AIDS, there are growing concerns that many women lose access to land after the death of their husbands. However, there remains a dearth of quantitative evidence on the proportion of widows who lose access to their deceased husband's land, whether they lose all or part of that land, and whether there are factors specific to the widow, her family, or the broader community that influence her ability to maintain rights to land. This study examines these issues using average treatment effects models with propensity score matching applied to a nationally representative panel data of 5,342 rural households surveyed in 2001 and 2004. Results are highly variable, with roughly a third of households incurring the death of a male household head controlling less than 50% of the land they had prior to their husband's death, while over a quarter actually controlled as much or even more land than while their husbands were alive. Widows who were in relatively wealthy households prior to their husband's death lose proportionately more land than widows in households that were relatively poor. Older widows and widows related to the local headman enjoy greater land security. Women in matrilineal inheritance areas were no less likely to lose land than women in patrilineal areas.

  18. Differential accumulation of heavy metals by web spiders and ground spiders in an old-field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, K.J.; Brewer, S.R.; Taylor, D.H. (Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States). Dept. of Zoology)

    1994-03-01

    Accumulation of the heavy metals Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn by web spiders (orb weavers: Araneidae) and ground spiders was examined in an old-field that had been subjected to 11 years of nutrient enrichment. The study area consistent of six 0.1-ha plots treated from 1978 to 1988 with municipal sewage sludge containing heavy-metal contaminants, urea-phosphate fertilizer, or left as untreated controls. In 1991 and 1992, heavy-metal concentrations in the soil, ground spiders, and web spiders were measured with a flame AA spectrophotometer. Spiders accumulated Cd, Cu, and Zn to concentrations greater than those present in the soil but did not accumulate Pb. Ground spiders contained significantly higher levels of Cd and Cu than web spiders, whereas web spiders contained slightly greater levels of Pb than ground spiders. No trend between spider guilds was apparent for Zn accumulation. To understand the impact of the application of metal-contaminated municipal sludge on ecosystem, the toxicological effects on the biology and behavior of major biotic components in terrestrial food webs must be known.

  19. Spider phobics more easily see a spider in morphed schematic pictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partchev Ivailo

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals with social phobia are more likely to misinterpret ambiguous social situations as more threatening, i.e. they show an interpretive bias. This study investigated whether such a bias also exists in specific phobia. Methods Individuals with spider phobia or social phobia, spider aficionados and non-phobic controls saw morphed stimuli that gradually transformed from a schematic picture of a flower into a schematic picture of a spider by shifting the outlines of the petals until they turned into spider legs. Participants' task was to decide whether each stimulus was more similar to a spider, a flower or to neither object while EEG was recorded. Results An interpretive bias was found in spider phobia on a behavioral level: with the first opening of the petals of the flower anchor, spider phobics rated the stimuli as more unpleasant and arousing than the control groups and showed an elevated latent trait to classify a stimulus as a spider and a response-time advantage for spider-like stimuli. No cortical correlates on the level of ERPs of this interpretive bias could be identified. However, consistent with previous studies, social and spider phobic persons exhibited generally enhanced visual P1 amplitudes indicative of hypervigilance in phobia. Conclusion Results suggest an interpretive bias and generalization of phobia-specific responses in specific phobia. Similar effects have been observed in other anxiety disorders, such as social phobia and posttraumatic stress disorder.

  20. Brown Fat Cell Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Author: C.R. Kahn ### 1.) ISOLATION AND PRIMARY CULTURE OF BROWN FAT PREADIPOCYTES ### Rationale: To prepare primary brown preadipocytes for immortalization: useful for metabolic studies from knockout mice. This consists of the following five protocols. References: Fasshauer, M., J. Klein, K M. Kriauciunas, K. Ueki, M.Benito, and C.R. Kahn. 2001. Essential role of insulin substrate 1 in differentiation of brown adipocytes. *Mol Cell Biol* 21: 319-329. Fasshauer, M....

  1. Plasmodesmata of brown algae

    OpenAIRE

    Terauchi, Makoto; Nagasato, Chikako; Motomura, Taizo

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are intercellular connections in plants which play roles in various developmental processes. They are also found in brown algae, a group of eukaryotes possessing complex multicellularity, as well as green plants. Recently, we conducted an ultrastructural study of PD in several species of brown algae. PD in brown algae are commonly straight plasma membrane-lined channels with a diameter of 10?20?nm and they lack desmotubule in contrast to green plants. Moreover, branched PD ...

  2. Learned predation risk management by spider mites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eHackl

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Predation is a prime selective force shaping prey behavior. Investment in anti-predator behavior is traded-off against time and energy for other fitness-enhancing activities such as foraging or reproduction. To optimize this benefit/cost trade-off, prey should be able to innately and/or by experience modulate their behavior to the level of predation risk. Here, we assessed learned predation risk management in the herbivorous two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae. We exposed spider mites coming from benign (naïve or high immediate predation risk (experienced environments to latent and/or no risk and assessed their site choice, activity and oviposition. Benign environments were characterized by the absence of any predator cues, high immediate risk environments by killed spider mites, physical presence of the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis and associated chemosensory traces left on the surface, and latent risk environments by only predator traces. In the no-choice experiment both naïve and experienced spider mites laid their first egg later on leaves with than without predator traces. Irrespective of predator traces presence/absence, experienced mites laid their first egg earlier than naïve ones did. Naïve spider mites were more active, indicating higher restlessness, and laid fewer eggs on leaves with predator traces, whereas experienced mites were less active and laid similar numbers of eggs on leaves with and without predator traces. In the choice experiment both naïve and experienced spider mites preferentially resided and oviposited on leaves without predator traces but experienced mites were less active than naïve ones. Overall, our study suggests that spider mites experienced with high predation risk behave bolder under latent risk than naïve spider mites. Since predator traces alone do not indicate immediate risk, we argue that the attenuated anti-predator response of experienced spider mites represents adaptive learned

  3. X-ray observations of black widow pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, P. A.; McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Roberts, M. S. E. [Eureka Scientific Inc., 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Hessels, J. W. T. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Kerr, M. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ray, P. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2014-03-10

    We describe the first X-ray observations of five short orbital period (P{sub B} < 1 day), γ-ray emitting, binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Four of these—PSRs J0023+0923, J1124–3653, J1810+1744, and J2256–1024—are 'black-widow' pulsars, with degenerate companions of mass <<0.1 M {sub ☉}, three of which exhibit radio eclipses. The fifth source, PSR J2215+5135, is an eclipsing 'redback' with a near Roche-lobe filling ∼0.2 solar mass non-degenerate companion. Data were taken using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and covered a full binary orbit for each pulsar. Two pulsars, PSRs J2215+5135 and J2256–1024, show significant orbital variability while PSR J1124–3653 shows marginal orbital variability. The lightcurves for these three pulsars have X-ray flux minima coinciding with the phases of the radio eclipses. This phenomenon is consistent with an intrabinary shock emission interpretation for the X-rays. The other two pulsars, PSRs J0023+0923 and J1810+1744, are fainter and do not demonstrate variability at a level we can detect in these data. All five spectra are fit with three separate models: a power-law model, a blackbody model, and a combined model with both power-law and blackbody components. The preferred spectral fits yield power-law indices that range from 1.3 to 3.2 and blackbody temperatures in the hundreds of eV. The spectrum for PSR J2215+5135 shows a significant hard X-ray component, with a large number of counts above 2 keV, which is additional evidence for the presence of intrabinary shock emission. This is similar to what has been detected in the low-mass X-ray binary to MSP transition object PSR J1023+0038.

  4. Father Brown, Selected sories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chesterton, G.K.

    2005-01-01

    Father Brown, a small, round Catholic priest with a remarkable understanding of the criminal mind, is one of literature's most unusual and endearing detectives, able to solve the strangest crimes in a most fascinating manner. This collection draws from all five Father Brown books, and within their

  5. Location of brown recluse venom attachment sites on human erythrocytes by the firritin-labeled antibody technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futrell, J. M.; Morgan, P. N.; Su, S. P.; Roth, S. I.

    1979-01-01

    Brown recluse spider (loxosceles reclusa) venom has been demonstrated by a ferritin-labeled antibody technique to attach to human erythrocyte cell membranes. The number of individual attachment sites per cell is proportional to the concentration of the venom used to sensitize the erythrocytes. Structural changes in the red cell membrane are associated with the venom attachment. These sites may be related to the red cell hemolysis which sometimes occurs in the human as a result of the spider bite. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:377995

  6. Brown adipocyte function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Sally

    . The first part of this thesis explores this by identifying and investigating two novel kinase regulators of brown adipocyte function. Study 1 demonstrates that spleen tyrosine kinase is a hitherto undescribed regulator of brown adipocyte differentiation and activation. Study 2 identifies glycogen synthase...... kinase 3 as a negative regulator of the canonical p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade. Thus both studies add novel regulatory layers to the growing understanding of brown adipocyte signal transduction. Activated BAT also exerts great influence on whole body glucose homeostasis......, of great interest for diabetes treatment. The second part of this thesis explores this by investigating glycolytic flux in activated brown adipocytes. Study 3 identifies hypoxia-inducible factor 1α as an important regulator of glycolytic gene expression in brown adipocytes. Study 4 establishes...

  7. Levirate marriage amongst the Hebrews and widow's inheritance amongst the Yoruba: A comparative investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samson O. Olanisebe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In ancient Israel, even though widowhood was not something people were praying for, when it came, the people involved were protected by the legal and customary structures already in place. One of those structures in the Old Testament is the institution of the levirate marriage where the right and the possession due to a widow without a son for her late husband could be protected and appropriated. A similar custom was also found amongst the pre-colonial Yoruba people through the widow�s inheritance which guarantees the welfare of the widow after the demise of her husband. However, these structures have been dismantled by Christianity, thereby exposing the majority of present-day widows to untold hardship. This article, therefore, through historical, descriptive and comparative methods, examines the customs of the levirate marriage and widow�s inheritance in the two cultures, ascertains how effective they were in addressing the welfare and protection of the rights and privileges of widows and recommends how the church can better see to the welfare of the widows in the society.

  8. Almost a spider: a 305-million-year-old fossil arachnid and spider origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Russell J.; Dunlop, Jason A.; Selden, Paul A.; Spencer, Alan R. T.; Atwood, Robert C.; Vo, Nghia T.; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Spiders are an important animal group, with a long history. Details of their origins remain limited, with little knowledge of their stem group, and no insights into the sequence of character acquisition during spider evolution. We describe a new fossil arachnid, Idmonarachne brasieri gen. et sp. nov. from the Late Carboniferous (Stephanian, ca 305–299 Ma) of Montceau-les-Mines, France. It is three-dimensionally preserved within a siderite concretion, allowing both laboratory- and synchrotron-based phase-contrast computed tomography reconstruction. The latter is a first for siderite-hosted fossils and has allowed us to investigate fine anatomical details. Although distinctly spider-like in habitus, this remarkable fossil lacks a key diagnostic character of Araneae: spinnerets on the underside of the opisthosoma. It also lacks a flagelliform telson found in the recently recognized, spider-related, Devonian–Permian Uraraneida. Cladistic analysis resolves our new fossil as sister group to the spiders: the spider stem-group comprises the uraraneids and I. brasieri. While we are unable to demonstrate the presence of spigots in this fossil, the recovered phylogeny suggests the earliest character to evolve on the spider stem-group is the secretion of silk. This would have been followed by the loss of a flagelliform telson, and then the ability to spin silk using spinnerets. This last innovation defines the true spiders, significantly post-dates the origins of silk, and may be a key to the group's success. The Montceau-les-Mines locality has previously yielded a mesothele spider (with spinnerets). Evidently, Late Palaeozoic spiders lived alongside Palaeozoic arachnid grades which approached the spider condition, but did not express the full suite of crown-group autapomorphies. PMID:27030415

  9. Almost a spider: a 305-million-year-old fossil arachnid and spider origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Russell J; Dunlop, Jason A; Selden, Paul A; Spencer, Alan R T; Atwood, Robert C; Vo, Nghia T; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2016-03-30

    Spiders are an important animal group, with a long history. Details of their origins remain limited, with little knowledge of their stem group, and no insights into the sequence of character acquisition during spider evolution. We describe a new fossil arachnid, Idmonarachne brasierigen. et sp. nov. from the Late Carboniferous (Stephanian,ca 305-299 Ma) of Montceau-les-Mines, France. It is three-dimensionally preserved within a siderite concretion, allowing both laboratory- and synchrotron-based phase-contrast computed tomography reconstruction. The latter is a first for siderite-hosted fossils and has allowed us to investigate fine anatomical details. Although distinctly spider-like in habitus, this remarkable fossil lacks a key diagnostic character of Araneae: spinnerets on the underside of the opisthosoma. It also lacks a flagelliform telson found in the recently recognized, spider-related, Devonian-Permian Uraraneida. Cladistic analysis resolves our new fossil as sister group to the spiders: the spider stem-group comprises the uraraneids and I. brasieri While we are unable to demonstrate the presence of spigots in this fossil, the recovered phylogeny suggests the earliest character to evolve on the spider stem-group is the secretion of silk. This would have been followed by the loss of a flagelliform telson, and then the ability to spin silk using spinnerets. This last innovation defines the true spiders, significantly post-dates the origins of silk, and may be a key to the group's success. The Montceau-les-Mines locality has previously yielded a mesothele spider (with spinnerets). Evidently, Late Palaeozoic spiders lived alongside Palaeozoic arachnid grades which approached the spider condition, but did not express the full suite of crown-group autapomorphies. © 2016 The Authors.

  10. Modelling Crop Biocontrol by Wanderer Spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturino, Ezio; Ghersi, Andrea

    2008-09-01

    We study mathematically the effects some spiders populations have on insects living in and near agroecosystems, where woods and vineyards alternate in the landscape as in the Alta Langa, Piemonte, NW Italy.

  11. Spider's web inspires fibres for industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacey, James

    2010-03-01

    Spiders may not be everybody's idea of natural beauty, but nobody can deny the artistry in the webs that they spin, especially when decorated with water baubles in the morning dew. Inspired by this spectacle, a group of researchers in China has mimicked the structural properties of the spider's web to create a fibre for industry that can manipulate water with the same skill and efficiency, writes James Dacey.

  12. Summary statistics for fossil spider species taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Penney

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Spiders (Araneae are one of the most species-rich orders on Earth today, and also have one of the longest geological records of any terrestrial animal groups, as demonstrated by their extensive fossil record. There are currently around 1150 described fossil spider species, representing 2.6% of all described spiders (i.e. extinct and extant. Data for numbers of fossil and living spider taxa described annually (and various other metrics for the fossil taxa were compiled from current taxonomic catalogues. Data for extant taxa showed a steady linear increase of approximately 500 new species per year over the last decade, reflecting a rather constant research activity in this area by a large number of scientists, which can be expected to continue. The results for fossil species were very different, with peaks of new species descriptions followed by long troughs, indicating minimal new published research activity for most years. This pattern is indicative of short bursts of research by a limited number of authors. Given the frequent discovery of new fossil deposits containing spiders, a wealth of new material coming to light from previously worked deposits, and the application of new imaging techniques in palaeoarachnology that allow us to extract additional data from historical specimens, e.g. X-ray computed tomography, it is important not only to ensure a sustained research activity on fossil spiders (and other arachnids through training and enthusing the next generation of palaeoarachnologists, but preferably to promote increased research and expertise in this field.

  13. Social structure vs. self rehabilitation: IDF widows forming an intimate relationship in the sociopolitical discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smadar Ben-Asher

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The public discourse pertaining to IDF (Israel Defense Forces widows, especially those cohabiting with a partner out of wedlock, is presented by means of a study that analyzes competing representations in the sociopolitical discourse in Israeli society. The social representations give expression to collectivistrepublican perceptions that accord centrality to the widows’ national role of preserving the country’s collective memory in exchange for monetary compensation, and individualist-liberal representations that accord centrality to the individual and do not dictate her conduct in accordance with the role designated for her by the state. The present study analyzed the Internet talkback discourse that appeared in response to a media report presenting the demands of IDF widows for the state’s continuedacknowledgement of its obligation toward them, even after they form a new intimate relationship. The study’s findings corroborate the existence of hegemonic representations that reflect a republicannationalist discourse advocating that the widows should serve the national values of commemoration in order to gain state recognition, alongside emancipated representations of a liberal discourse that accords centrality to the widow as an individual and views her rehabilitation as a private and personal matter. The study also found polemical representations that confront the two perceptions, which can no longer coexist. The study found that respondents belonging to the liberal-individualist group will beinclined to support recognition and state support for the widows irrespective of their personal status, whereas respondents belonging to the republican-collectivist group will be inclined to precondition state recognition and support for the widows on their personal status.

  14. Refugia preferences by the spiders Loxosceles reclusa and Loxosceles laeta (Araneae: Sicariidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Richard S; Rust, Michael K

    2008-01-01

    A variety of refugia were offered to different instars of brown recluse spiders, Loxosceles reclusa Gertsch and Mulaik, and a South American recluse spider, L. laeta (Nicolet), to determine whether they preferred certain types of refugia spaces. Variables included (1) crevice widths ranging from 3.2 to 21 mm, (2) horizontal and vertical orientations, and (3) new refugia or refugia that had silk deposited by a previous conspecific resident. An additional 30-d assay with similar-sized refugia studied each species' propensity for site fidelity or movement among refugia. L. reclusa preferred crevice widths > or = 9 mm with no correlation of body size to crevice width, whereas L. laeta preferred crevice sizes > or = 6.4 mm with a marginally significant correlation between crevice width and body size. Both species preferred (1) vertical instead of horizontal-oriented refugia and (2) refugia with conspecific silk compared with previously uninhabited refugia. There was no significant difference between the species in their propensity to move among refugia in the 30-d trial; however, both species had individuals that were always found in the same refugium for the entire assay and individuals changing refugia every 2-3 d. The propensity to switch refugia was not affected by the degree of starvation for the period tested as was initially hypothesized. The possible implications of this research toward developing novel control measures for Loxosceles spiders are discussed.

  15. Cognitive bias in spider-phobic children: Comparison of a pictorial and a linguistic spider Stroop.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kindt, M.; Brosschot, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    Examined the relation between spider fear in children and cognitive processing bias toward threatening information. It was investigated whether spider fear in children is related to a cognitive bias for threatening pictures and words. Pictorial and linguistic Stroop stimuli were administered to 28

  16. [Psychological processes and readaptation to life in society of elderly widowers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroya, Kazuko; Tajima, Tukasa

    2013-09-01

    This study used a literature review to examine the psychological processes and readaptation to life in society of elderly widowers. The psychological restoration process after a bereavement is different among individuals, and there are various types of coping patterns. However the relationship between the psychological process after a bereavement and the psychological isolation caused by environmental factors of having social roles in the community or not, have not yet been clarified. Further research is needed on these points to support elderly widowers in their readaptation to life in society.

  17. 46 SPIDER WEBS AS INDICATORS OF COBALT AND LEAD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SPIDER WEBS AS INDICATORS OF COBALT AND LEAD POLLUTION IN KANO. MUNICIPALITY. Ibrahim R.Yalwa. Department ... Keywords: spider, indicator, cobalt, lead, pollution, Kano. INTRODUCTION. Cobalt is required for ..... Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. (ATSDR), (1992). Toxicological Profile.

  18. Plasmodesmata of brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Makoto; Nagasato, Chikako; Motomura, Taizo

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are intercellular connections in plants which play roles in various developmental processes. They are also found in brown algae, a group of eukaryotes possessing complex multicellularity, as well as green plants. Recently, we conducted an ultrastructural study of PD in several species of brown algae. PD in brown algae are commonly straight plasma membrane-lined channels with a diameter of 10-20 nm and they lack desmotubule in contrast to green plants. Moreover, branched PD could not be observed in brown algae. In the brown alga, Dictyota dichotoma, PD are produced during cytokinesis through the formation of their precursor structures (pre-plasmodesmata, PPD). Clustering of PD in a structure termed "pit field" was recognized in several species having a complex multicellular thallus structure but not in those having uniseriate filamentous or multiseriate one. The pit fields might control cell-to-cell communication and contribute to the establishment of the complex multicellular thallus. In this review, we discuss fundamental morphological aspects of brown algal PD and present questions that remain open.

  19. What Helps Middle-Aged Widows with Their Psychological and Social Adaptation Several Years after Their Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Lea; Florian, Victor

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the factors contributing to middle-aged widows' adaptation to their husbands' death due to physical illness, 1 to 5 years after the initial loss. Ninety-three widows and 93 married women, who served as controls, filled out questionnaires assessing their experience of stress and strain, their Sense of Coherence level, the social…

  20. African traditional widowhood rites and their benefits and/or detrimental effects on widows in a context of African Christianity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsobane Manala

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Africans teach ubuntu principles of communality, mutual respect, caring and so forth, but they do not walk the talk with regard to the treatment of widows. In the footsteps of Jesus of Nazareth, Christian communities preach unconditional love, especially for the poor, marginalised and vulnerable. Implementation is, however, grossly lacking in respect of the treatment of widows. There is thus an apparent deliberate uncaring, disrespectful, discriminatory, impolite and unjust treatment of widows in African communities in spite of the ubuntu values and Christian teaching that emphasise love and caring, especially towards the grieving and thus vulnerable widows. Widows seem to be neglected and even oppressed in our time. The aim of this research is to critically examine African traditional widowhood rites and practices with special reference to the comfort or pain to which they subject African widows. The research further aims to examine the behaviour of some African Christians belonging to three congregations of one mainline church to determine whether their treatment of widows resonates with Jesus’ teaching regarding the requisite care of widows. The issue of widowhood in Africa, in terms of the apparent plight of these bereaved and grieving women, needs to be urgently addressed for change in the 21st century. A critical literature study of relevant sources and a newspaper article will be used for this research. My personal experiences and continuing observation as an insider will also inform the research in useful ways.

  1. SPIDER OR NO SPIDER? NEURAL CORRELATES OF SUSTAINED AND PHASIC FEAR IN SPIDER PHOBIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münsterkötter, Anna Luisa; Notzon, Swantje; Redlich, Ronny; Grotegerd, Dominik; Dohm, Katharina; Arolt, Volker; Kugel, Harald; Zwanzger, Peter; Dannlowski, Udo

    2015-09-01

    Processes of phasic fear responses to threatening stimuli are thought to be distinct from sustained, anticipatory anxiety toward an unpredicted, potential threat. There is evidence for dissociable neural correlates of phasic fear and sustained anxiety. Whereas increased amygdala activity has been associated with phasic fear, sustained anxiety has been linked with activation of the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and the insula. So far, only a few studies have focused on the dissociation of neural processes related to both phasic and sustained fear in specific phobia. We suggested that first, conditions of phasic and sustained fear would involve different neural networks and, second, that overall neural activity would be enhanced in a sample of phobic compared to nonphobic participants. Pictures of spiders and neutral stimuli under conditions of either predicted (phasic) or unpredicted (sustained) fear were presented to 28 subjects with spider phobia and 28 nonphobic control subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning. Phobic patients revealed significantly higher amygdala activation than controls under conditions of phasic fear. Sustained fear processing was significantly related to activation in the insula and ACC, and phobic patients showed a stronger activation than controls of the BNST and the right ACC under conditions of sustained fear. Functional connectivity analysis revealed enhanced connectivity of the BNST and the amygdala in phobic subjects. Our findings support the idea of distinct neural correlates of phasic and sustained fear processes. Increased neural activity and functional connectivity in these networks might be crucial for the development and maintenance of anxiety disorders. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Mass predicts web asymmetry in Nephila spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntner, Matjaž; Gregorič, Matjaž; Li, Daiqin

    2010-12-01

    The architecture of vertical aerial orb webs may be affected by spider size and gravity or by the available web space, in addition to phylogenetic and/or developmental factors. Vertical orb web asymmetry measured by hub displacement has been shown to increase in bigger and heavier spiders; however, previous studies have mostly focused on adult and subadult spiders or on several size classes with measured size parameters but no mass. Both estimations are suboptimal because (1) adult orb web spiders may not invest heavily in optimal web construction, whereas juveniles do; (2) size class/developmental stage is difficult to estimate in the field and is thus subjective, and (3) mass scales differently to size and is therefore more important in predicting aerial foraging success due to gravity. We studied vertical web asymmetry in a giant orb web spider, Nephila pilipes, across a wide range of size classes/developmental stages and tested the hypothesis that vertical web asymmetry (measured as hub displacement) is affected by gravity. On a sample of 100 webs, we found that hubs were more displaced in heavier and larger juveniles and that spider mass explained vertical web asymmetry better than other measures of spider size (carapace and leg lengths, developmental stage). Quantifying web shape via the ladder index suggested that, unlike in other nephilid taxa, growing Nephila orbs do not become vertically elongated. We conclude that the ontogenetic pattern of progressive vertical web asymmetry in Nephila can be explained by optimal foraging due to gravity, to which the opposing selective force may be high web-building costs in the lower orb. Recent literature finds little support for alternative explanations of ontogenetic orb web allometry such as the size limitation hypothesis and the biogenetic law.

  3. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis (AGEP Triggered by a Spider Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Makris

    2009-01-01

    Discussion: A spider bite may represent a possible causative factor of AGEP. A spider's venom contains sphingomyelinase that stimulates the release of IL8 and GM-CSF, which are involved in AGEP pathogenesis. Whether or not the con-current use of antibiotics has an effect in AGEP appearance when combined with a spider's venom, cannot be excluded.

  4. A case of spider phobia in a congenitally blind person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musial, Frauke; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Sülzenbrück, Sandra; Miltner, Wolfgang H R

    2007-09-30

    Vision is the key sensory system in humans, leading to the implicit assumption that the acquisition of spider phobia is predominantly mediated through the visual pathway. We report on a congenitally blind person with spider phobia, showing that the acquisition of spider phobia does not necessarily depend on visual cues.

  5. 139 Patriarchy, Marriage and the Rights of Widows in Nigeria Austin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ike Odimegwu

    one of her husband's brothers. (Division for the. Advancement of Women 9) Thus, widows are exposed to untold hardships including homelessness, insecurity, hunger, poverty, illness and rejection. In many cases, they will have to withdraw their children (non adults) from school because they do not have enough means of ...

  6. Effectiveness of "Primary Bereavement Care" for Widows: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Involving Family Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Jesus A.; Landa, Victor; Grandes, Gonzalo; Pombo, Haizea; Mauriz, Amaia

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-one family physicians, from 19 primary care teams in Biscay (Spain), were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. The 15 intervention family physicians, after training in primary bereavement care, saw 43 widows for 7 sessions, from the 4th to 13th month after their loss. The 16 control family physicians, without primary…

  7. When culture clashes with individual human rights: A practical theological reflection on the dignity of widows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gift T. Baloyi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the nature of human beings (men and women as an egalitarian one even beyond cultural expectations. It argues against some cultural practices on women, especially widows, which claim supremacy and bind the widows to its ritual processes among the Tsonga people. It stresses the importance of human individual that overtakes everything from God�s creation, including cultural rituals which are created by human beings. It claims that the existence of culture depends solely on the existence or presence of human beings and their communities. Therefore, culture cannot use humans to shape itself and to transform the community. It is humans themselves who use culture to identify themselves and ultimately change their communities. Although the paper is theological in its approach, it argues for individual human rights to be respected and weighed above all cultural practices. It further concludes that such cultural practices are not static and that they can be removed from the rest of culture.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: This article, from a practical theological view, challenges the African cultural rituals that claim authority over women�s rights and dignity. The interdisciplinary nature of this article indicates the sanctity of human individuals especially widows and thereby calls for paradigm shift to deconstruct certain oppressive teachings and practices against widows among African women. This article concludes thus, cultural deconstruction is possible.

  8. Resilience Among Nepali Widows After the Death of a Spouse: "That Was My Past and Now I Have to See My Present".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Zoé M; Kim, Jane; Tol, Wietse A; Shrestha, Abina; Kafle, Hari Maya; Luitel, Nagendra P; Thapa, Lily; Surkan, Pamela J

    2018-02-01

    Responses to the death of a spouse vary; although some are at increased risk of poorer physical and mental health outcomes, others have more resilient responses. In light of the limited scope of research on widows' experiences in Nepal, a setting where widows are often marginalized, we explore themes of resilience in Nepali widows' lives. Drawing from a larger qualitative study of grief and widowhood, a thematic narrative analysis was performed on narratives from four widows that reflected resilient outcomes. Individual assets and social resources contributed to these widows' resilient outcomes. Forgetting, acceptance, and moving forward were complemented by confidence and strength. Social support and social participation were key to widows' resilient outcomes. These four narratives reflect the sociocultural context that shape widows' resilient outcomes in Nepal. Future studies on the emergent themes from this exploratory study will help identify how best to encourage resilient outcomes among widows.

  9. How, Now, Brown Dwarfs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecher, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    The vocabulary of astronomy is riddled with colorful names for stars, from red giants to blue stragglers. Objects with masses between roughly .01 and .1 solar masses are called "brown dwarfs". Do they - could they - ever actually appear brown? Color is not a one-dimensional physical parameter like wavelength. It is a complex, psychophysical phenomenon involving not only three degrees of freedom - hue (often incorrectly equated with "color"), saturation and brightness - but also observational context. The perceptual nature of color has been known since Newton wrote in his "Opticks” in 1704: "For the Rays to speak properly are not coloured. In them there is nothing else than a certain Power and disposition to stir up a Sensation of this or that Colour.” To most observers, the 2000 or so naked eye stars observable from the northern hemisphere all appear white, with the half dozen exceptions which look reddish/orange like Betelgeuse, Arcturus and Antares. But what color would Betelgeuse (effective temperature 3600 K) appear at a distance of, say, 100 times the Earth-Sun separation? Not red. In fact, it has a temperature about 40% higher than that of an ordinary incandescent light bulb. It would appear white (or yellowish)! Can a very cool radiating (emissive) object ever appear brown? What is brown anyway? It is not a primary or even secondary color. In this presentation, we will explore the nature and meaning of "brown” by the use of several physical and computer demonstrations developed as part of "Project LITE- Light Inquiry Through Experiments", an educational materials development project. These demonstrations show that an isolated thermally radiating object will never appear brown. Hence the term "Brown Dwarf” is as nonsensical as the phrase "How, Now, Brown Cow?". Project LITE is supported by the NSF through DUE Grant # 0715975.

  10. Remembering the Object You Fear: Brain Potentials during Recognition of Spiders in Spider-Fearful Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowski, Jaroslaw M.; Weymar, Mathias; Hamm, Alfons O.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we investigated long-term memory for unpleasant, neutral and spider pictures in 15 spider-fearful and 15 non-fearful control individuals using behavioral and electrophysiological measures. During the initial (incidental) encoding, pictures were passively viewed in three separate blocks and were subsequently rated for valence and arousal. A recognition memory task was performed one week later in which old and new unpleasant, neutral and spider pictures were presented. Replicating previous results, we found enhanced memory performance and higher confidence ratings for unpleasant when compared to neutral materials in both animal fearful individuals and controls. When compared to controls high animal fearful individuals also showed a tendency towards better memory accuracy and significantly higher confidence during recognition of spider pictures, suggesting that memory of objects prompting specific fear is also facilitated in fearful individuals. In line, spider-fearful but not control participants responded with larger ERP positivity for correctly recognized old when compared to correctly rejected new spider pictures, thus showing the same effects in the neural signature of emotional memory for feared objects that were already discovered for other emotional materials. The increased fear memory for phobic materials observed in the present study in spider-fearful individuals might result in an enhanced fear response and reinforce negative beliefs aggravating anxiety symptomatology and hindering recovery. PMID:25296032

  11. Remembering the object you fear: brain potentials during recognition of spiders in spider-fearful individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowski, Jaroslaw M; Weymar, Mathias; Hamm, Alfons O

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we investigated long-term memory for unpleasant, neutral and spider pictures in 15 spider-fearful and 15 non-fearful control individuals using behavioral and electrophysiological measures. During the initial (incidental) encoding, pictures were passively viewed in three separate blocks and were subsequently rated for valence and arousal. A recognition memory task was performed one week later in which old and new unpleasant, neutral and spider pictures were presented. Replicating previous results, we found enhanced memory performance and higher confidence ratings for unpleasant when compared to neutral materials in both animal fearful individuals and controls. When compared to controls high animal fearful individuals also showed a tendency towards better memory accuracy and significantly higher confidence during recognition of spider pictures, suggesting that memory of objects prompting specific fear is also facilitated in fearful individuals. In line, spider-fearful but not control participants responded with larger ERP positivity for correctly recognized old when compared to correctly rejected new spider pictures, thus showing the same effects in the neural signature of emotional memory for feared objects that were already discovered for other emotional materials. The increased fear memory for phobic materials observed in the present study in spider-fearful individuals might result in an enhanced fear response and reinforce negative beliefs aggravating anxiety symptomatology and hindering recovery.

  12. Remembering the object you fear: brain potentials during recognition of spiders in spider-fearful individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslaw M Michalowski

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated long-term memory for unpleasant, neutral and spider pictures in 15 spider-fearful and 15 non-fearful control individuals using behavioral and electrophysiological measures. During the initial (incidental encoding, pictures were passively viewed in three separate blocks and were subsequently rated for valence and arousal. A recognition memory task was performed one week later in which old and new unpleasant, neutral and spider pictures were presented. Replicating previous results, we found enhanced memory performance and higher confidence ratings for unpleasant when compared to neutral materials in both animal fearful individuals and controls. When compared to controls high animal fearful individuals also showed a tendency towards better memory accuracy and significantly higher confidence during recognition of spider pictures, suggesting that memory of objects prompting specific fear is also facilitated in fearful individuals. In line, spider-fearful but not control participants responded with larger ERP positivity for correctly recognized old when compared to correctly rejected new spider pictures, thus showing the same effects in the neural signature of emotional memory for feared objects that were already discovered for other emotional materials. The increased fear memory for phobic materials observed in the present study in spider-fearful individuals might result in an enhanced fear response and reinforce negative beliefs aggravating anxiety symptomatology and hindering recovery.

  13. Fish predation by semi-aquatic spiders: a global pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Nyffeler

    Full Text Available More than 80 incidences of fish predation by semi-aquatic spiders--observed at the fringes of shallow freshwater streams, rivers, lakes, ponds, swamps, and fens--are reviewed. We provide evidence that fish predation by semi-aquatic spiders is geographically widespread, occurring on all continents except Antarctica. Fish predation by spiders appears to be more common in warmer areas between 40° S and 40° N. The fish captured by spiders, usually ranging from 2-6 cm in length, are among the most common fish taxa occurring in their respective geographic area (e.g., mosquitofish [Gambusia spp.] in the southeastern USA, fish of the order Characiformes in the Neotropics, killifish [Aphyosemion spp.] in Central and West Africa, as well as Australian native fish of the genera Galaxias, Melanotaenia, and Pseudomugil. Naturally occurring fish predation has been witnessed in more than a dozen spider species from the superfamily Lycosoidea (families Pisauridae, Trechaleidae, and Lycosidae, in two species of the superfamily Ctenoidea (family Ctenidae, and in one species of the superfamily Corinnoidea (family Liocranidae. The majority of reports on fish predation by spiders referred to pisaurid spiders of the genera Dolomedes and Nilus (>75% of observed incidences. There is laboratory evidence that spiders from several more families (e.g., the water spider Argyroneta aquatica [Cybaeidae], the intertidal spider Desis marina [Desidae], and the 'swimming' huntsman spider Heteropoda natans [Sparassidae] predate fish as well. Our finding of such a large diversity of spider families being engaged in fish predation is novel. Semi-aquatic spiders captured fish whose body length exceeded the spiders' body length (the captured fish being, on average, 2.2 times as long as the spiders. Evidence suggests that fish prey might be an occasional prey item of substantial nutritional importance.

  14. Spider Invasion Across the Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yue Hui

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The nature of the exotic stellar corpses which reincarnate by consuming their companion is reviewed. Apart from sucking life from their partners, they are actually eating the doomed companions away by their deadly and powerful particle/radiation beams. Such situation resembles that a female “black widow” spider that eats its mate after mating. These celestial zombies are called - Millisecond pulsars (MSPs. In this review article, I will focus on the effort of Fermi Asian Network (FAN in exploring these intricating objects over the last five years. Two special classes of MSPs are particularly striking. Since Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has started surveying the gamma−ray sky, the population of “black widows” has been boosted. Another dramatic class is so-called “redbacks” (Australian cousin of “black widows” which has just emerged in the last few years. These MSPs provide us with a long-sought missing link in understanding the transition between accretion-powered and rotation-powered systems. The strategy of hunting MSPs through mulitwavelength observations of the unidentified Fermi objects is also reviewed.

  15. Spider web-inspired acoustic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniaci, Marco; Krushynska, Anastasiia; Movchan, Alexander B.; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-08-01

    Spider silk is a remarkable example of bio-material with superior mechanical characteristics. Its multilevel structural organization of dragline and viscid silk leads to unusual and tunable properties, extensively studied from a quasi-static point of view. In this study, inspired by the Nephila spider orb web architecture, we propose a design for mechanical metamaterials based on its periodic repetition. We demonstrate that spider-web metamaterial structure plays an important role in the dynamic response and wave attenuation mechanisms. The capability of the resulting structure to inhibit elastic wave propagation in sub-wavelength frequency ranges is assessed, and parametric studies are performed to derive optimal configurations and constituent mechanical properties. The results show promise for the design of innovative lightweight structures for tunable vibration damping and impact protection, or the protection of large scale infrastructure such as suspended bridges.

  16. The evolution of sociality in spiders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubin, Yael; Bilde, T.

    2007-01-01

    -Biased Colony Sex Ratios: Primary and Operational Sex Ratios E. Mating System: Inbreeding and Its Population-Genetic Consequences F. "Boom and Bust" Colony Dynamics IV. Phylogenetic Relationships Among Social Spider Species A. Common Features of Social Evolution B. Case Studies 1. Stegodyphus (Eresidae) 2....... Anelosimus (Theridiidae) C. Sociality in Spiders: An Evolutionary Dead End? V. Evolution and Maintenance of Sociality in Spiders: Relevant Models A. Kin Selection 1. Kin Recognition 2. Inbreeding and Kin Selection B. Multilevel Selection (Group Selection) C. Ecological Benefits D. Ecological Constraints E....... Game Theory Models F. By-Product Mutualism VI. Transitions in the Evolution of Sociality: Processes and Patterns A. From Premating to Postmating Dispersal B. From Outbreeding to Inbreeding C. From Maternal Care to Cooperative Breeding VII. Summary: From Subsocial to Inbred Social, an Overview...

  17. Aquatic subsidies transport anthropogenic nitrogen to riparian spiders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akamatsu, Fumikazu, E-mail: f-akamt55@pwri.go.jp [Department of Environmental Sciences, Shinshu University, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Toda, Hideshige [Department of Environmental Sciences, Shinshu University, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Stable nitrogen isotopic composition ({delta}{sup 15}N) of aquatic biota increases with anthropogenic N inputs such as sewage and livestock waste downstream. Increase in {delta}{sup 15}N of riparian spiders downstream may reflect the anthropogenic pollution exposure through predation on aquatic insects. A two-source mixing model based on stable carbon isotopic composition showed the greatest dependence on aquatic insects (84%) by horizontal web-building spiders, followed by intermediate (48%) and low (31%) dependence by cursorial and vertical web-building spiders, respectively. The spider body size was negatively correlated with the dietary proportion of aquatic insects and spider {delta}{sup 15}N. The aquatic subsidies transported anthropogenic N to smaller riparian spiders downstream. This transport of anthropogenic N was regulated by spider's guild designation and body size. - Highlights: > {delta}{sup 15}N of aquatic insects increases downstream with anthropogenic nitrogen inputs. > {delta}{sup 15}N of riparian spiders increases with a high dietary proportion of aquatic insects and smaller spider body size. > The aquatic subsidies transport anthropogenic nitrogen to smaller riparian spiders downstream. - Smaller spiders assimilate anthropogenic nitrogen through the predation on aquatic subsides.

  18. Ecopsychosocial Aspects of Human-Tiger Conflict: An Ethnographic Study of Tiger Widows of Sundarban Delta, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Arabinda N; Mondal, Ranajit; Brahma, Arabinda; Biswas, Mrinal K

    2016-01-01

    Human-tiger conflict (HTC) is a serious public health issue in Sundarban Reserve Forest, India. HTC is a continued concern for the significant mortality and morbidity of both human and tiger population. This is the first comprehensive report on Sundarban tiger-human conflicts and its impact on widows whose husbands were killed by tigers. The study attempts to explore the situation analysis of HTC and the aftermath of the incident including bereavement and coping, the cultural stigma related to being killed by a tiger and the consequent discrimination, deprivation, and social rejection, and the impact on the mental health of the tiger-widows. This is a three-phase ethnographic research with a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods. In the first phase, a door-to-door village survey (3,084 households) was carried out in two villages of Sundarban, which are adjacent to the Reserve Forest, in which the incidents of human-animal conflicts and the 65 tiger-widows identified were documented. In the second phase, the 65 tiger-widows were studied to explore the ecodemography of tiger attacks and tiger-widows alongside the stigma issue by using a stigma questionnaire (n = 49). The stigma burden was compared with normal widows (n = 21) and snake-bite widows (n = 18). In the third phase, the psychosocial and cultural dimensions related to tiger attacks were studied by using in-depth interviews (IDI) of the tiger-widows, focus-group discussions (FGD), and participatory mapping in the community. Clinical examinations of the mental health of the widows were also carried out in this phase. The mean age of the 65 widows was 43.49 ± 9.58 years. Of this, 12.3% of the widows had remarried and only 4.6% of the widows were literate. In all, 67.2% of all tiger attacks occurred as a result of illegal forest entry. The main livelihood of the former husbands of the widows were 43.8% wood cutting, 28.1% fishing, 10.9% crab catching, 9.4% tiger prawn seed (juvenile prawn), and 4.7% honey

  19. Checklist of spider fauna of FR Peshawar, FATA, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Perveen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The spiders are known as poisonous arthropods, but they also act as the predator or biological pests control agent. Their 23 species belonging to 15 genera and 09 families were reported during 2009-2010 from FR Peshawar, FATA, Pakistan. The reported families Clubionidae, Scytodidae and Sprassidae covered each 4%, Araneidae, Gnaphosidae, Pholicidae and Salticidae each 9%, Thomisidae 13% and Lycosidae 43% biodiversity of spiders of FATA. However, the largest spider collected was huntsman, Isopoda tuhodnigra (Barrion with total body length 15.80+-0.83 mm. Moreover, the smallest spider was wolf spider, Pardosa birmanica (Simon with total body length 4.20+-1.30 mm. Further, the crab spiders, Thomisus pugilis (Stoliczka, T. spectabilis (Doleschall and Diaea evanida (Thorell were the most colorful species belonging to family Thomisidae. A detail study is required for further exploration of spider fauna of FATA.

  20. Programming spiders, bots, and aggregators in Java

    CERN Document Server

    Heaton, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    The content and services available on the web continue to be accessed mostly through direct human control. But this is changing. Increasingly, users rely on automated agents that save them time and effort by programmatically retrieving content, performing complex interactions, and aggregating data from diverse sources. Programming Spiders, Bots, and Aggregators in Java teaches you how to build and deploy a wide variety of these agents-from single-purpose bots to exploratory spiders to aggregators that present a unified view of information from multiple user accounts. You will quickly build on

  1. Fish Predation by Semi-Aquatic Spiders: A Global Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyffeler, Martin; Pusey, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    More than 80 incidences of fish predation by semi-aquatic spiders – observed at the fringes of shallow freshwater streams, rivers, lakes, ponds, swamps, and fens – are reviewed. We provide evidence that fish predation by semi-aquatic spiders is geographically widespread, occurring on all continents except Antarctica. Fish predation by spiders appears to be more common in warmer areas between 40° S and 40° N. The fish captured by spiders, usually ranging from 2–6 cm in length, are among the most common fish taxa occurring in their respective geographic area (e.g., mosquitofish [Gambusia spp.] in the southeastern USA, fish of the order Characiformes in the Neotropics, killifish [Aphyosemion spp.] in Central and West Africa, as well as Australian native fish of the genera Galaxias, Melanotaenia, and Pseudomugil). Naturally occurring fish predation has been witnessed in more than a dozen spider species from the superfamily Lycosoidea (families Pisauridae, Trechaleidae, and Lycosidae), in two species of the superfamily Ctenoidea (family Ctenidae), and in one species of the superfamily Corinnoidea (family Liocranidae). The majority of reports on fish predation by spiders referred to pisaurid spiders of the genera Dolomedes and Nilus (>75% of observed incidences). There is laboratory evidence that spiders from several more families (e.g., the water spider Argyroneta aquatica [Cybaeidae], the intertidal spider Desis marina [Desidae], and the ‘swimming’ huntsman spider Heteropoda natans [Sparassidae]) predate fish as well. Our finding of such a large diversity of spider families being engaged in fish predation is novel. Semi-aquatic spiders captured fish whose body length exceeded the spiders’ body length (the captured fish being, on average, 2.2 times as long as the spiders). Evidence suggests that fish prey might be an occasional prey item of substantial nutritional importance. PMID:24940885

  2. Tune Your Brown Clustering, Please

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derczynski, Leon; Chester, Sean; Bøgh, Kenneth Sejdenfaden

    2015-01-01

    Brown clustering, an unsupervised hierarchical clustering technique based on ngram mutual information, has proven useful in many NLP applications. However, most uses of Brown clustering employ the same default configuration; the appropriateness of this configuration has gone predominantly...

  3. Identifying obstacles to participation in a questionnaire survey on widowers' grief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helgason Asgeir R

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine if Icelandic widowers might foresee obstacles to responding to a questionnaire on bereavement. Also, we sought to compare the proportion of men reporting obstacles in a telephone interview to the actual response rate in the questionnaire survey. Methods The study was part of a nation-wide survey of widowers who lost their wives in 1999, 2000, and 2001. This included all widowers born in Iceland 1924-1969 (aged 30-75 years who were alive, and residing in Iceland at the time of the study. A telephone poll was conducted prior to sending out a questionnaire to determine if the widowers would be interested in responding, or if they could see obstacles, which could affect their willingness to respond to a subsequent questionnaire survey. The telephone poll was repeated five years later with a random sample of the original study base to determine if views initially expressed towards the questionnaire survey, had changed over time. Results Of the 357 eligible widowers, 11 had died prior to the first telephone interview, yielding a study population of 346 widowers. Of those, 296 (86% were reachable and all of these (100% were willing to participate in the telephone survey. Of them, 55% identified obstacles to participation in the questionnaire survey. Men under 60 years were less likely to identify obstacles. Years from loss (second through fourth years were not associated with reporting obstacles to participation. The response rate in the epidemiological questionnaire survey following the telephone interview was 62% (216/346. Of those who did identify obstacles 23%, did not did not identify any particular obstacle, but 33% stated that "they felt bad" or that it would be "a painful experience" or that they felt "uncomfortable" talking about their grief. About 18% stated their grief was "a private matter"; 6% stated that they did not want to be "stuck with their grief"; 9% said that it was "too

  4. Natural Inhibitors of Maillard Browning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    incorporated into pre-selected candidate ration components for evaluation via storage, sensory and chemical analysis. The concentration of inhibitor was...inhibiting Maillard browning, also known as non-enzymatic browning, a complex reaction which can lead to darkening of color, off- odors , off-flavors...nutritional intake, and decrease waste due to non-consumption of sensory degraded ration components. 1.1 Maillard Browning Maillard browning, also

  5. 21 year timing of the black-widow pulsar J2051-0827

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaifullah, G.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Freire, P. C. C.; Tauris, T. M.; Wex, N.; Osłowski, S.; Stappers, B. W.; Bassa, C. G.; Caballero, R. N.; Champion, D. J.; Cognard, I.; Desvignes, G.; Graikou, E.; Guillemot, L.; Janssen, G. H.; Jessner, A.; Jordan, C.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Lazaridis, K.; Lazarus, P.; Lyne, A. G.; McKee, J. W.; Perrodin, D.; Possenti, A.; Tiburzi, C.

    2016-10-01

    Timing results for the black-widow pulsar J2051-0827 are presented, using a 21 year data set from four European Pulsar Timing Array telescopes and the Parkes radio telescope. This data set, which is the longest published to date for a black-widow system, allows for an improved analysis that addresses previously unknown biases. While secular variations, as identified in previous analyses, are recovered, short-term variations are detected for the first time. Concurrently, a significant decrease of ˜ 2.5 × 10- 3 cm- 3 pc in the dispersion measure associated with PSR J2051-0827 is measured for the first time and improvements are also made to estimates of the proper motion. Finally, PSR J2051-0827 is shown to have entered a relatively stable state suggesting the possibility of its eventual inclusion in pulsar timing arrays.

  6. Old Age, Widows, and Rural Solitude in the Eighteenth Century Central-Southern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco GARCÍA GONZÁLEZ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Current research about old age during the Ancient Regime in Spain is insufficient. And the same is the case with women, despite the large number of studies about gender and family history in the past decades. Taking, as a starting point, the analysis of widow women which became heads of households, this paper aims to know which specific characteristics had those households during their old age, composition, size, typology and the tendency to solitude; which activities and livelihood they had, paying attention to those differences as an expression of inequality; and which mechanisms and social reproduction strategies they followed to deal with the effects of aging. This paper is geografically focused in a wide rural area of central-southern Spain and aims to review the assumption that single and widow women in preindustrial age had subordinted lives. 

  7. A dynamic analysis of the effect of social security reform on Spanish widow pensioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peinado Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the dynamic effects of the reform of the Spanish social security pension system on the pensions received by one of the most vulnerable groups of the population, namely, widows. We undertake a duration analysis to account for the effects of reform over time. We study the effects on the widows’ overall financial welfare in terms of the evolution of their risk of poverty. We show that the combined effects of the measures to be implemented will have a positive impact; that is to say, the risk of poverty diminishes with respect to the current financial situation of the widows. However, the risk of poverty increases as the pensioners get older.

  8. Phantom spiders: notes on dubious spider species from Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breitling, Rainer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A surprisingly large number of European spider species have never been reliably rediscovered since their first description many decades ago. Most of these are probably synonymous with other species or unidentifiable, due to insufficient descriptions or missing type material. Here we discuss about 50 of these cases, declare some names as nomina dubia and establish the following new or re-confirmed synonymies: Agelena mengeella Strand, 1942 = Allagelena gracilens (C. L. Koch, 1841 syn. conf.; Anyphaena accentuata obscura (Sundevall, 1831 = Anyphaena accentuata (Walckenaer, 1802 syn. conf.; Anyphaena accentuata obscura Lebert, 1877 = Anyphaena accentuata (Walckenaer, 1802 syn. nov.; Araneus diadematus stellatus C. L. Koch, 1836 = Araneus diadematus Clerck, 1757 syn. nov.; Araneus diadematus islandicus (Strand, 1906 = Araneus diadematus Clerck, 1757 syn. nov.; Araneus quadratus minimus Simon, 1929 = Araneus quadratus Clerck, 1757 syn. nov.; Araneus quadratus subviridis (Franganillo, 1913 = Araneus quadratus Clerck, 1757 syn. nov.; Centromerus unctus (L. Koch, 1870 = Leptorhoptrum robustum (Westring, 1851 syn. nov.; Clubiona caliginosa Simon, 1932 = Clubiona germanica Thorell, 1871 syn. nov.; Coelotes atropos anomalus Hull, 1955 = Coelotes atropos (Walckenaer, 1830 syn. nov.; Coelotes atropos silvestris Hull, 1955 = Coelotes atropos (Walckenaer, 1830 syn. nov.; Coelotes obesus Simon, 1875 = Pireneitega pyrenaea (Simon, 1870 syn. conf.; Coelotes simoni Strand, 1907 = Coelotes solitarius (L. Koch, 1868 syn. nov.; Diplocephalus semiglobosus (Westring, 1861 nomen oblitum = Entelecara congenera (O. P.-Cambridge, 1879 syn. nov.; Drassodes voigti (Bösenberg, 1899 = Scotophaeus blackwalli (Thorell, 1871 syn. conf.; Erigone decens Thorell, 1871 = Hylyphantes graminicola (Sundevall, 1830 syn. nov.; Liocranoeca striata gracilior (Kulczynski, 1898 = Liocranoeca striata (Kulczynski, 1882 syn. conf.; Phlegra rogenhoferi (Simon, 1868 = Phlegra cinereofasciata

  9. Spider Silk Spun and Integrated into Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-20

    biomimetic analogues. Biological functionality, after all, relies on wet engineering. OUTLOOK.: There are many other natural hybrid nano-composites. In...explains the large interspecific variability of spider dragline silks observed by us and other groups. Moreover, MAA silks from three representative

  10. The aerodynamic signature of running spiders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Casas

    Full Text Available Many predators display two foraging modes, an ambush strategy and a cruising mode. These foraging strategies have been classically studied in energetic, biomechanical and ecological terms, without considering the role of signals produced by predators and perceived by prey. Wolf spiders are a typical example; they hunt in leaf litter either using an ambush strategy or by moving at high speed, taking over unwary prey. Air flow upstream of running spiders is a source of information for escaping prey, such as crickets and cockroaches. However, air displacement by running arthropods has not been previously examined. Here we show, using digital particle image velocimetry, that running spiders are highly conspicuous aerodynamically, due to substantial air displacement detectable up to several centimetres in front of them. This study explains the bimodal distribution of spider's foraging modes in terms of sensory ecology and is consistent with the escape distances and speeds of cricket prey. These findings may be relevant to the large and diverse array of arthropod prey-predator interactions in leaf litter.

  11. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives.

  12. ‘He wasn’t in that chair’: what loneliness means to widowed older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Mary Bennet

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We have little robust empirical evidence that articulates what being lonely means to older people and even less knowledge about what loneliness means to older widows and widowers; this article addresses that deficit. We undertook a re-analysis of 125 interviews with older people (aged 55-98 that explored their experiences of widowhood. In this article, we focus on those interviews in which participants described themselves as experiencing loneliness by the spontaneous use of terms such as ‘‘lonely’’, ‘‘loneliness’’ or ‘‘lonesome’’. Almost half of the participants (42% described themselves in that way without any prompting from the interviewer. In terms of understanding and describing the meaning of loneliness, 50% explained loneliness in terms of absence of either their spouse, a physical presence in the house or people. One-third (34% discussed loneliness in relation to time and place: night, weekends and home, and 4% described the emotional impact of loneliness. Fifteen per cent just said they were lonely without elaboration, assuming a common understanding of what loneliness means. Our findings suggest that widowed people’s understanding and experience of loneliness resonates with the concept of ‘‘emotional’’ loneliness, resulting from the loss of significant social and emotional attachment. This has important implications for the types of interventions that may be appropriate for remediating loneliness in this group.

  13. Life-as-Lived Today: Perpetual (Undesired Liminality of the Half-widows of Kashmir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul DSouza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available According to Victor Turner, all liminality must eventually dissolve, for it is a state of great intensity that cannot exist very long without some sort of structure to sta-bilize it. This paper takes his lead and attempts to describe the liminal status of those women, the whereabouts of whose husbands are not known (they are locally re-ferred to as 'half-widows' in the conflict zone of Kashmir, India. The article ex-amines the concept of liminality based on life as lived today by these half-widows and shows how the effects of liminality operate in their day to day life, making them extremely vulnerable victims. In this, it is an attempt to expand upon the concept of liminality, originally linked almost exclusively to rites of passage. Furthermore, this paper reflects on the idea of permanent liminality that has been elaborated by soci-ologist Arpad Szakolczai. The narratives of the half-widows of Kashmir provide an example of how they are trapped in a form of 1permanent liminality1 far beyond what was initially defined as a 'temporal state'.

  14. Status of the CNESM diagnostic for SPIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraro, A., E-mail: muraro@ifp.cnr.it [IFP-CNR, Via Cozzi 53, Milano (Italy); Croci, G. [IFP-CNR, Via Cozzi 53, Milano (Italy); Sez. INFN Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano (Italy); Albani, G. [University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano (Italy); Cazzaniga, C. [Sez. INFN Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano (Italy); Claps, G. [INFN-LNF, Via Enrico Fermi 40, Frascati (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN-LNL, Viale dell’Università 2, Legnaro (Italy); Grosso, G. [IFP-CNR, Via Cozzi 53, Milano (Italy); Palma, M. Dalla; Fincato, M. [RFX Consortium, Corso Stati uniti 4, Padova (Italy); Murtas, F. [INFN-LNF, Via Enrico Fermi 40, Frascati (Italy); Pasqualotto, R. [RFX Consortium, Corso Stati uniti 4, Padova (Italy); Cippo, E. Perelli [IFP-CNR, Via Cozzi 53, Milano (Italy); Rebai, M. [University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano (Italy); Sez. INFN Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano (Italy); Tollin, M. [RFX Consortium, Corso Stati uniti 4, Padova (Italy); Tardocchi, M. [IFP-CNR, Via Cozzi 53, Milano (Italy); Gorini, G. [University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano (Italy); Sez. INFN Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We have finished the design of the detector box of the CNESM diagnostic for SPIDER. • We have constructed the GEM detector of the CNESM detector for SPIDER. • We have tested the detector under fast neutron irradiation. - Abstract: The ITER neutral beam test facility under construction in Padova will host two experimental devices: SPIDER, a 100 kV negative H/D RF source, and MITICA, a full scale, 1 MeV deuterium beam injector. A detection system called close-contact neutron emission surface mapping (CNESM) is under development with the aim to resolve the horizontal beam intensity profile in MITICA and one of the eight beamlet groups in SPIDER, with a spatial resolution of 1.5 and 2.5 cm respectively. This is achieved by the evaluation of the map of the neutron emission due to interaction of the deuterium beam with the deuterons implanted in the beam dump surface. CNESM uses nGEM detectors, i.e. GEM detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron–proton converter foil. The diagnostic will be placed right behind the SPIDER and MITICA beam dump, i.e. in an UHV environment, but the nGEM detectors need to operate at atmospheric pressure: in order to maintain the detector at atmospheric pressure, a vacuum sealed box, that will be mounted inside the vacuum, has been designed. The box design was driven by the need to minimize the neutron attenuation and the distance between the beam dump surface and the detector active area. This paper presents the status of the CNESM diagnostic describing the design of the detector, the design of the sealed box and reporting the results obtained with the first full-size prototype under fast neutron irradiation.

  15. Fucoidans from brown seaweeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ale, Marcel Tutor; Meyer, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    structural details of fucoidans. Mild extraction techniques coupled with the use of new tools such as enzymes can provide the much needed knowledge about structural characteristics of different fucoidan molecules and thus pave the way for a better understanding of the structural chemistry and bioactivities......-proliferative effects on cancer cells. Recent work has revealed distinct structural features of fucoidans obtained from different brown seaweed sources. Fucoidans are classically obtained from brown seaweeds by multi-step, hot acid extraction, but the structural and compositional traits, and possibly the bioactivity......, of the fucoidan polysaccharides are significantly influenced by the extraction parameters. This review discusses the structural features of fucoidans, the significance of different extraction technologies, and reviews enzymatic degradation of fucoidans and the use of fucoidan-modifying enzymes for elucidating...

  16. A novel neurotoxin from venom of the spider, Brachypelma albopilosum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhua Zhong

    Full Text Available Spiders have evolved highly selective toxins for insects. There are many insecticidal neurotoxins in spider venoms. Although a large amount of work has been done to focus on neurotoxicity of spider components, little information, which is related with effects of spider toxins on tumor cell proliferation and cytotoxicity, is available for Brachypelma albopilosum venom. In this work, a novel spider neurotoxin (brachyin was identified and characterized from venoms of the spider, Brachypelma albopilosum. Brachyin is composed of 41 amino acid residues with the sequence of CLGENVPCDKDRPNCCSRYECLEPTGYGWWYASYYCYKKRS. There are six cysteines in this sequence, which form three disulfided bridges. The serine residue at the C-terminus is amidated. Brachyin showed strong lethal effects on American cockroaches (Periplaneta americana and Tenebrio molitor (common mealbeetle. This neurotoxin also showed significant analgesic effects in mice models including abdominal writhing induced by acetic acid and formalin-induced paw licking tests. It was interesting that brachyin exerted marked inhibition on tumor cell proliferation.

  17. The canopy spiders (Araneae of the floodplain forest in Leipzig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The canopy spiders of the floodplain forest in Leipzig have become a focus of ecological studies in recent years. In 2006 we sampled 30 tree canopies in the ‘Burgaue’ nature reserve with pyrethrum knock-down fogging, recording 502 adult spiders belonging to 48 species and 11 families. Based on these data and the results of a previous fogging study, the studied spider community was dominated by forest and forest-edge species with a preference for the shrub and canopy strata as well as by spiders of the web spider feeding guild. The community structure was typical for arboreal spider communities from northern temperate forests but very different from communities in the tropics. Species richness and evenness were similar to the old growth near-primary Białowieża Forest in Poland. The checklist of 96 canopy spider species of the floodplain forest of Leipzig includes 54 additions to the spider fauna of Leipzig and vicinity by recent canopy studies and eight first canopy records for Leipzig from our field work. The theridiid Dipoena torva (Thorell, 1875 was recorded for the first time in Saxony. The floodplain forest of Leipzig sustains a large and species-rich arboreal spider community and is thus a valuable habitat for a large proportion of endangered species (12%.

  18. A novel property of spider silk: chemical defence against ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shichang; Koh, Teck Hui; Seah, Wee Khee; Lai, Yee Hing; Elgar, Mark A.; Li, Daiqin

    2012-01-01

    Spider webs are made of silk, the properties of which ensure remarkable efficiency at capturing prey. However, remaining on, or near, the web exposes the resident spiders to many potential predators, such as ants. Surprisingly, ants are rarely reported foraging on the webs of orb-weaving spiders, despite the formidable capacity of ants to subdue prey and repel enemies, the diversity and abundance of orb-web spiders, and the nutritional value of the web and resident spider. We explain this paradox by reporting a novel property of the silk produced by the orb-web spider Nephila antipodiana (Walckenaer). These spiders deposit on the silk a pyrrolidine alkaloid (2-pyrrolidinone) that provides protection from ant invasion. Furthermore, the ontogenetic change in the production of 2-pyrrolidinone suggests that this compound represents an adaptive response to the threat of natural enemies, rather than a simple by-product of silk synthesis: while 2-pyrrolidinone occurs on the silk threads produced by adult and large juvenile spiders, it is absent on threads produced by small juvenile spiders, whose threads are sufficiently thin to be inaccessible to ants. PMID:22113027

  19. Spider mites of Japan: their biology and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takafuji, A; Ozawa, A; Nemoto, H; Gotoh, T

    2000-01-01

    Spider mite biology and control in Japan were reviewed. Seventy-eight spider mite species of 16 genera (Family Tetranychidae) have been recorded in Japan. Several of the species recently described were separated from a species complex comprising strains with different ecological performance such as host range. These separations were first supported by crossing experiments and then confirmed by molecular genetic studies. Spider mite control in Japan is still dependent on heavy acaricide spraying in order to attain products of extremely high quality. The commercial use of natural enemies in spider mite management has just started.

  20. Araneae Sloveniae: a national spider species checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostanjšek, Rok; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The research of the spider fauna of Slovenia dates back to the very beginning of binomial nomenclature, and has gone through more and less prolific phases with authors concentrating on taxonomy, faunistics, ecology and zoogeographic reviews. Although the body of published works is remarkable for a small nation, the faunistic data has remained too scattered for a thorough understanding of regional biotic diversity, for comparative and ecological research, and for informed conservation purposes. A national checklist is long overdue. Here, a critical review of all published records in any language is provided. The species list currently comprises 738 species, is published online at http://www.bioportal.si/katalog/araneae.php under the title Araneae Sloveniae, and will be updated in due course. This tool will fill the void in cataloguing regional spider faunas and will facilitate further araneological research in central and southern Europe. PMID:25632258

  1. Araneae Sloveniae: a national spider species checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Kostanjšek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The research of the spider fauna of Slovenia dates back to the very beginning of binomial nomenclature, and has gone through more and less prolific phases with authors concentrating on taxonomy, faunistics, ecology and zoogeographic reviews. Although the body of published works is remarkable for a small nation, the faunistic data has remained too scattered for a thorough understanding of regional biotic diversity, for comparative and ecological research, and for informed conservation purposes. A national checklist is long overdue. Here, a critical review of all published records in any language is provided. The species list currently comprises 738 species, is published online at http://www.bioportal.si/katalog/araneae.php under the title Araneae Sloveniae, and will be updated in due course. This tool will fill the void in cataloguing regional spider faunas and will facilitate further araneological research in central and southern Europe.

  2. The Jean Gutierrez spider mite collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Migeon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The family Tetranychidae (spider mites currently comprises 1,275 species and represents one of the most important agricultural pest families among the Acari with approximately one hundred pest species, ten of which considered major pests. The dataset presented in this document includes all the identified spider mites composing the Jean Gutierrez Collection hosted at the CBGP (Montferrier-sur-Lez, France, gathered from 1963 to 1999 during his career at the Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD. It consists of 5,262 specimens corresponding to 1,564 occurrences (combination species/host plant/date/location of 175 species. Most specimens were collected in Madagascar and other islands of the Western Indian Ocean, New Caledonia and other islands of the South Pacific and Papuasia. The dataset constitutes today the most important one available on Tetranychidae worldwide.

  3. Inbreeding avoidance in spiders: evidence for rescue effect in fecundity of female spiders with outbreeding opportunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, T.; Maklakov, A.A.; Schilling, Nadia

    2007-01-01

    for unrelated sperm via pre- and/or post-copulatory mechanisms could restore female fitness when inbreeding depression increases. Using inbred isofemale lines we provided female spiders with one or two male spiders of different relatedness in five combinations: one male sib; one male nonsib; two male sibs; two......Selection by inbreeding depression should favour mating biases that reduce the risk of fertilization by related mates. However, equivocal evidence for inbreeding avoidance questions the strength of inbreeding depression as a selective force in the evolution of mating biases. Lack of inbreeding...... avoidance can be because of low risk of inbreeding, variation in tolerance to inbreeding or high costs of outbreeding. We examined the relationship between inbreeding depression and inbreeding avoidance adaptations under two levels of inbreeding in the spider Oedothorax apicatus, asking whether preference...

  4. Rates of trauma spectrum disorders and risks of posttraumatic stress disorder in a sample of orphaned and widowed genocide survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Schaal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available During the Rwandan genocide of 1994, nearly one million people were killed within a period of 3 months.The objectives of this study were to investigate the levels of trauma exposure and the rates of mental health disorders and to describe risk factors of posttraumatic stress reactions in Rwandan widows and orphans who had been exposed to the genocide.Trained local psychologists interviewed orphans (n=206 and widows (n=194. We used the PSS-I to assess posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, the Hopkins Symptom Checklist to assess depression and anxiety symptoms, and the M.I.N.I. to assess risk of suicidality.Subjects reported having been exposed to a high number of different types of traumatic events with a mean of 11 for both groups. Widows displayed more severe mental health problems than orphans: 41% of the widows (compared to 29% of the orphans met symptom criteria for PTSD and a substantial proportion of widows suffered from clinically significant depression (48% versus 34% and anxiety symptoms (59% versus 42% even 13 years after the genocide. Over one-third of respondents of both groups were classified as suicidal (38% versus 39%. Regression analysis indicated that PTSD severity was predicted mainly by cumulative exposure to traumatic stressors and by poor physical health status. In contrast, the importance given to religious/spiritual beliefs and economic variables did not correlate with symptoms of PTSD.While a significant portion of widows and orphans continues to display severe posttraumatic stress reactions, widows seem to constitute a particularly vulnerable survivor group. Our results point to the chronicity of mental health problems in this population and show that PTSD may endure over time if not addressed by clinical intervention. Possible implications of poor mental health and the need for psychological intervention are discussed.

  5. Rates of trauma spectrum disorders and risks of posttraumatic stress disorder in a sample of orphaned and widowed genocide survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Susanne; Dusingizemungu, Jean-Pierre; Jacob, Nadja; Elbert, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    During the Rwandan genocide of 1994, nearly one million people were killed within a period of 3 months. The objectives of this study were to investigate the levels of trauma exposure and the rates of mental health disorders and to describe risk factors of posttraumatic stress reactions in Rwandan widows and orphans who had been exposed to the genocide. Trained local psychologists interviewed orphans (n=206) and widows (n=194). We used the PSS-I to assess posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the Hopkins Symptom Checklist to assess depression and anxiety symptoms, and the M.I.N.I. to assess risk of suicidality. Subjects reported having been exposed to a high number of different types of traumatic events with a mean of 11 for both groups. Widows displayed more severe mental health problems than orphans: 41% of the widows (compared to 29% of the orphans) met symptom criteria for PTSD and a substantial proportion of widows suffered from clinically significant depression (48% versus 34%) and anxiety symptoms (59% versus 42%) even 13 years after the genocide. Over one-third of respondents of both groups were classified as suicidal (38% versus 39%). Regression analysis indicated that PTSD severity was predicted mainly by cumulative exposure to traumatic stressors and by poor physical health status. In contrast, the importance given to religious/spiritual beliefs and economic variables did not correlate with symptoms of PTSD. While a significant portion of widows and orphans continues to display severe posttraumatic stress reactions, widows seem to constitute a particularly vulnerable survivor group. Our results point to the chronicity of mental health problems in this population and show that PTSD may endure over time if not addressed by clinical intervention. Possible implications of poor mental health and the need for psychological intervention are discussed.

  6. Designing Spider Silk Proteins for Materials Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-28

    acid (X) in the [GPGGX]2 elastic motif and temperature have an impact on the amount of β-sheet structures present in the proteins. More specifically...increasing temperatures seem to be positively correlated with β-sheet formation for both proteins and this state is irreversible or reversible when...Cheryl Y. Hayashi Expansion and Intragenic Homogenization of Spider Silk Genes since the Triassic : Evidence from Mygalomorphae (Tarantulas and Their

  7. Disentangling the phylogenetic and ecological components of spider phenotypic variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Gonçalves-Souza

    Full Text Available An understanding of how the degree of phylogenetic relatedness influences the ecological similarity among species is crucial to inferring the mechanisms governing the assembly of communities. We evaluated the relative importance of spider phylogenetic relationships and ecological niche (plant morphological variables to the variation in spider body size and shape by comparing spiders at different scales: (i between bromeliads and dicot plants (i.e., habitat scale and (ii among bromeliads with distinct architectural features (i.e., microhabitat scale. We partitioned the interspecific variation in body size and shape into phylogenetic (that express trait values as expected by phylogenetic relationships among species and ecological components (that express trait values independent of phylogenetic relationships. At the habitat scale, bromeliad spiders were larger and flatter than spiders associated with the surrounding dicots. At this scale, plant morphology sorted out close related spiders. Our results showed that spider flatness is phylogenetically clustered at the habitat scale, whereas it is phylogenetically overdispersed at the microhabitat scale, although phylogenic signal is present in both scales. Taken together, these results suggest that whereas at the habitat scale selective colonization affect spider body size and shape, at fine scales both selective colonization and adaptive evolution determine spider body shape. By partitioning the phylogenetic and ecological components of phenotypic variation, we were able to disentangle the evolutionary history of distinct spider traits and show that plant architecture plays a role in the evolution of spider body size and shape. We also discussed the relevance in considering multiple scales when studying phylogenetic community structure.

  8. Host selection by a kleptobiotic spider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénaut, Yann; Delme, Juliette; Legal, Luc; Williams, Trevor

    2005-02-01

    Why do kleptobiotic spiders of the genus Argyrodes seem to be associated with spiders of the genus Nephila worldwide? Observations following introduction of experimental insect prey of different sizes and weights on to host webs revealed that: (1) small prey are more effectively retained on the web of Nephila clavipes than on the web of another common host, Leucauge venusta. (2) N. clavipes did not consume small prey that accumulated on the web whereas larger, heavier prey were enveloped and stored. (3) We observed clear partitioning of prey items between N. clavipes and Argyrodes spp.; diet selection by Argyrodes did not overlap with that of N. clavipes but closely overlapped with that of L. venusta. (4) L. venusta responds very quickly to prey impact whereas N. clavipes is slower, offering a temporal window of opportunity for Argyrodes foraging. (5) The ability of L. venusta to detect and respond to small items also means that it acts aggressively to Argyrodes spp., whereas N. clavipes does not. Consequently, food-acquisition behaviours of Argyrodes were clearly less risky with N. clavipes compared with L. venusta. We conclude that when a kleptobiotic organism has a choice of various host species, it will opt for the least risky host that presents the highest rate of availability of food items. The fact that Nephila species present such characteristics explains the worldwide association with Argyrodes kleptobiotic spiders.

  9. Nanofibre production in spiders without electric charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel, Anna-Christin; Baumgartner, Werner

    2017-06-15

    Technical nanofibre production is linked to high voltage, because nanofibres are typically produced by electrospinning. In contrast, spiders have evolved a way to produce nanofibres without high voltage. These spiders are called cribellate spiders and produce nanofibres within their capture thread production. It is suggested that their nanofibres become frictionally charged when brushed over a continuous area on the calamistrum, a comb-like structure at the metatarsus of the fourth leg. Although there are indications that electrostatic charges are involved in the formation of the thread structure, final proof is missing. We proposed three requirements to validate this hypothesis: (1) the removal of any charge during or after thread production has an influence on the structure of the thread; (2) the characteristic structure of the thread can be regenerated by charging; and (3) the thread is attracted to or repelled from differently charged objects. None of these three requirements were proven true. Furthermore, mathematical calculations reveal that even at low charges, the calculated structural assembly of the thread does not match the observed reality. Electrostatic forces are therefore not involved in the production of cribellate capture threads. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Interspecific Infanticide and Infant-Directed Aggression by Spider Monkeys (Ateles hybridus) in a Fragmented Forest in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbach, Rebecca; Pardo-Martinez, Alejandra; Montes-Rojas, Andres; Di Fiore, Anthony; Link, Andres

    2012-01-01

    Interspecific aggression amongst nonhuman primates is rarely observed and has been mostly related to scenarios of resource competition. Interspecific infanticide is even rarer, and both the ultimate and proximate socio-ecological factors explaining this behavior are still unclear. We report two cases of interspecific infanticide and five cases of interspecific infant-directed aggression occurring in a well-habituated primate community living in a fragmented landscape in Colombia. All cases were initiated by male brown spider monkeys (Ateles hybridus) and were directed toward infants of either red howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus: n = 6 cases) or white-fronted capuchins (Cebus albifrons: n = 1 case). One individual, a subadult spider monkey male, was involved in all but one case of interspecific infanticide or aggression. Other adult spider monkeys participated in interspecific aggression that did not escalate into potentially lethal encounters. We suggest that competition for food resources and space in a primate community living in high population densities and restricted to a forest fragment of ca. 65 ha might partly be driving the observed patterns of interspecific aggression. On the other hand, the fact that all but one case of interspecific infanticide and aggression involved the only subadult male spider monkey suggests this behavior might either be pathological or constitute a particular case of redirected aggression. Even if the underlying principles behind interspecific aggression and infanticide are poorly understood, they represent an important factor influencing the demographic trends of the primate community at this study site. Am. J. Primatol. 74:990–997, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22767357

  11. [Local dermonecrotic loxoscelism in children bitten by the spider Loxosceles reclusa (the "violin" spider)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante-Galindo, P; Montoya-Cabrera, M A; Terroba-Larios, V M; Nava-Juárez, A R; Escalante-Flores, I

    1999-01-01

    This is an observational retrospective study. Our goal is to describe the local dermonecrotic reaction occurring after a spider bite in eleven pediatric patients. In seven (63.7%), the spider was identified as Loxosceles reclusa, and in four, bites were presumptive. The main symptoms and signs were pain, erythema, swelling, blisters, and vasculitis in five patients. There was a significant relationship between the time of onset before the treatment and the severity of the lesions (63.4 hours in the severe cases vs 14.4 hours in the mild cases, p loxoscelism occurred in this patient.

  12. Structure–Activity Relationship Study of Spider Polyamine Toxins as Inhibitors of Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Xiaofeng; Poulsen, Mette H; Hussein, Rama A

    2014-01-01

    The spider polyamine toxins Joro spider toxin-3 (JSTX-3) and Nephila polyamine toxins-1 and -8 (NPTX-1 and NPTX-8) are isolated from the venom of the orb-weaver spider Nephila clavata (Joro spider). They share a high degree of structural resemblance, their aromatic head groups being the only...

  13. Fear of spiders: The effect of real threat on the interference caused by symbolic threat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Becker, E.S.; Rinck, M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the presence of a real spider on attentional biases for symbolic spider stimuli was examined in 42 low-fearful and 26 high-spider-fearful participants. They completed a word colour-naming task as well as a picture orientation-judgement task, both with versus without a spider present in

  14. Alleviation of oxidative stress induced by spider mite invasion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spider mite invasion induces oxidative stress on bean plants and increased soluble sugars, phenole, proline and peroxidase activity, but decreased catalase activity and ascorbic acid and carotenoid concentration. Application of elicitors significantly enhanced spider mite tolerance by decreasing hydrogen peroxide, ...

  15. Spider diversity in relation to habitat heterogeneity and an altitudinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using pitfall traps, wandering spiders (Arachnida: Araneae) were sampled in a nested design from three different localities in the mountainous arid ecosystem of South Sinai at low, middle, and high altitudes. Habitat type and altitude were clearly different among the three localities. Spider diversity per trap varied spatially ...

  16. Task-irrelevant spider associations affect categorization performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woud, M.L.; Ellwart, T.; Langner, O.; Rinck, M.; Becker, E.S.

    2011-01-01

    In two studies, the Single Target Implicit Association Test (STIAT) was used to investigate automatic associations toward spiders. In both experiments, we measured the strength of associations between pictures of spiders and either threat-related words or pleasant words. Unlike previous studies, we

  17. Brain systems underlying encounter expectancy bias in spider phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aue, Tatjana; Hoeppli, Marie-Eve; Piguet, Camille; Hofstetter, Christoph; Rieger, Sebastian W; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2015-06-01

    Spider-phobic individuals are characterized by exaggerated expectancies to be faced with spiders (so-called encounter expectancy bias). Whereas phobic responses have been linked to brain systems mediating fear, little is known about how the recruitment of these systems relates to exaggerated expectancies of threat. We used fMRI to examine spider-phobic and control participants while they imagined visiting different locations in a forest after having received background information about the likelihood of encountering different animals (spiders, snakes, and birds) at these locations. Critically, imagined encounter expectancies modulated brain responses differently in phobics as compared with controls. Phobics displayed stronger negative modulation of activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex, precuneus, and visual cortex by encounter expectancies for spiders, relative to snakes or birds (within-participants analysis); these effects were not seen in controls. Between-participants correlation analyses within the phobic group further corroborated the hypothesis that these phobia-specific modulations may underlie irrationality in encounter expectancies (deviations of encounter expectancies from objective background information) in spider phobia; the greater the negative modulation a phobic participant displayed in the lateral prefrontal cortex, precuneus, and visual cortex, the stronger was her bias in encounter expectancies for spiders. Interestingly, irrationality in expectancies reflected in frontal areas relied on right rather than left hemispheric deactivations. Our data accord with the idea that expectancy biases in spider phobia may reflect deficiencies in cognitive control and contextual integration that are mediated by right frontal and parietal areas.

  18. Who is afraid of a black Spider(-Man?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ora C. McWilliams

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An Internet post asking about Spider-Man's race in a film turned into an Internet campaign about an actor that led fans to interact with each other as well as with the actor, which in turn led to the attention of media producers, which resulted in a change in Spider-Man's race in a print comic book.

  19. Spider bite in southern Africa: diagnosis and management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She is a staff member of the Tygerberg Poison Information Centre and the Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Laboratory,. Division of Pharmacology ..... The spider antivenom is a refined equine anti-spider serum globulin, supplied in 5 ml ampoules. .... Other reported therapies include hyperbaric oxygen, antihistamines (including ...

  20. Spiders of Kerala Agricultural University Campus, Thrissur, Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Adarsh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 86 species of spiders belonging to 56 genera of 20 families have been recorded from the Kerala Agricultural University (KAU campus, Thrissur, Kerala, southern India.  This represents 5.1% of the total spiders’ species and 33.33% of the total families of spiders recorded in India.  The dominant spider family at KAU campus is Araneidae with 18 species of nine genera. Salticidae is represented by 14 species of 13 genera.  Out of 252 endemic spiders of India, 16 have been reported from KAU campus.  Guild structure analysis shows spiders belonging to seven types of feeding guilds present in KAU campus.  Orb-web builders are the dominant feeding guild accounting for 34%, followed by stalkers (22%, ground runners (20%, ambushers (8%, scattered line weavers (8%, foliage runners (7% and sheet-web builders (1%. 

  1. Nutrient regulation in a predator, the wolf spider Pardosa prativaga

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim; Mayntz, David; Toft, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient balancing is well known in herbivores and omnivores, but has only recently been demonstrated in predators. To test how a predator might regulate nutrients when the prey varies in nutrient composition, we restricted juvenile Pardosa prativaga wolf spiders to diets of one of six fruit fly......, Drosophila melanogaster, prey types varying in lipid:protein composition during their second instar. We collected all fly remnants to estimate food and nutrient intake over each meal. The spiders adjusted their capture rate and nutrient extraction in response to prey mass and nutrient composition...... irrespective of energy intake. Intake was initially regulated to a constant lipid plus protein mass, but later spiders fed on prey with high proportions of protein increased consumption relative to spiders fed on other prey types. This pattern indicates that the spiders were prepared to overconsume vast...

  2. Biotechnological Trends in Spider and Scorpion Antivenom Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Solà, Mireia; Jappe, Emma Christine

    2016-01-01

    Spiders and scorpions are notorious for their fearful dispositions and their ability to inject venom into prey and predators, causing symptoms such as necrosis, paralysis, and excruciating pain. Information on venom composition and the toxins present in these species is growing due to an interest...... in using bioactive toxins from spiders and scorpions for drug discovery purposes and for solving crystal structures of membrane-embedded receptors. Additionally, the identification and isolation of a myriad of spider and scorpion toxins has allowed research within next generation antivenoms to progress...... at an increasingly faster pace. In this review, the current knowledge of spider and scorpion venoms is presented, followed by a discussion of all published biotechnological efforts within development of spider and scorpion antitoxins based on small molecules, antibodies and fragments thereof, and next generation...

  3. Vision in the nocturnal wandering spider Leucorchestris arenicola (Araneae: Sparassidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Thomas; Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Henschel, Joh R

    2008-01-01

    At night the Namib Desert spider Leucorchestris arenicola performs long-distance homing across its sand dune habitat. By disabling all or pairs of the spiders' eight eyes we found that homing ability was severely reduced when vision was fully abolished. Vision, therefore, seems to play a key role...... in the nocturnal navigational performances of L. arenicola. After excluding two or three pairs of eyes, the spiders were found to be able to navigate successfully using only their lateral eyes or only their anterior median eyes. Measurement of the eyes' visual fields showed that the secondary eyes combined have...... resolution of the eyes is insufficient for detecting any visual information on structures in the landscape, and bright stars would be the only objects visible to the spiders. However, by summation in space and time, the spiders can rescue enough vision to detect coarse landscape structures. We show that L...

  4. SPIDER: CMB Polarimetry from the Edge of Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualtieri, R.; et al.

    2017-11-28

    SPIDER is a balloon-borne instrument designed to map the polarization of the millimeter-wave sky at large angular scales. SPIDER targets the B-mode signature of primordial gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), with a focus on mapping a large sky area with high fidelity at multiple frequencies. SPIDER's first longduration balloon (LDB) flight in January 2015 deployed a total of 2400 antenna-coupled Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) at 90 GHz and 150 GHz. In this work we review the design and in-flight performance of the SPIDER instrument, with a particular focus on the measured performance of the detectors and instrument in a space-like loading and radiation environment. SPIDER's second flight in December 2018 will incorporate payload upgrades and new receivers to map the sky at 285 GHz, providing valuable information for cleaning polarized dust emission from CMB maps.

  5. The psychosocial effects of "La Violencia" on widows of El Quiche, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, J

    1993-06-01

    In Guatemala, government-sponsored terrorism directed at Mayan villagers resulted in at least 122,000 deaths and 18,000 "disappearances" during the period 1975-85. Even today, "low intensity warfare" in the form of random acts of terrorism continue. Thus, in the past 20 years, 120,000 women have been widowed, 11,000 in the province of El Quiche alone. This violence extended to threats of death directed toward women who joined a human rights organization, to the rape of women by their husbands' murderers and the further murder or kidnapping of their relatives. Groups of women were split between widows and married women, and women had to recreate their roles in society. The resulting reformation of family life led to an irretrievably altered relationship with the past. Survivors had to cope with pervasive fear, with a new understanding of their vulnerability, and with an inability to fulfill their obligations towards the dead who were buried in clandestine graves. The women who coped the best were those who learned to comprehend the violence in political terms through participation in human rights and women's groups and those who lived in villages where the dead were exhumed and properly buried. The psychological pain suffered by the women often manifested itself in physical ways and added to the suffering they realized from overwork and poor nutrition.

  6. Widows' and orphans' property disputes: the impact of AIDS in Rakai District, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roys, C

    1995-11-01

    The 1991 census identified 44,000 orphans in the Rakai District of Uganda. The Child Social Care Project (CSCP) in the district helps ensure that orphaned children under 18 years who have lost one or both parents to AIDS receive the property rights to which they are entitled. The property rights of widows are also championed by the CSCP. The project has enjoyed considerable success in settling individual disputes. The CSCP has also had some success in enabling communities to deal appropriately with the conflicts without recourse to experts. The author notes that while it is important to promote the empowerment of women, the phrase is so overused that it is in danger of becoming meaningless. That said, a vital aspect of empowerment is economic independence. The CSCP helps women claim the right to own property, land, and housing, as well as to care for their children in the attempt to give them some degree of economic control over their destiny and that of their children. The paper discusses widows' and orphans' property disputes in sections on wills, customary law, and statutory law. The CSCP is described followed by a case study and consideration of gender and legal reform.

  7. Ecopsychosocial Aspects of Human–Tiger Conflict: An Ethnographic Study of Tiger Widows of Sundarban Delta, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Arabinda N.; Mondal, Ranajit; Brahma, Arabinda; Biswas, Mrinal K.

    2016-01-01

    AIMS Human–tiger conflict (HTC) is a serious public health issue in Sundarban Reserve Forest, India. HTC is a continued concern for the significant mortality and morbidity of both human and tiger population. This is the first comprehensive report on Sundarban tiger–human conflicts and its impact on widows whose husbands were killed by tigers. The study attempts to explore the situation analysis of HTC and the aftermath of the incident including bereavement and coping, the cultural stigma related to being killed by a tiger and the consequent discrimination, deprivation, and social rejection, and the impact on the mental health of the tiger-widows. METHODS This is a three-phase ethnographic research with a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods. In the first phase, a door-to-door village survey (3,084 households) was carried out in two villages of Sundarban, which are adjacent to the Reserve Forest, in which the incidents of human–animal conflicts and the 65 tiger-widows identified were documented. In the second phase, the 65 tiger-widows were studied to explore the ecodemography of tiger attacks and tiger-widows alongside the stigma issue by using a stigma questionnaire (n = 49). The stigma burden was compared with normal widows (n = 21) and snake-bite widows (n = 18). In the third phase, the psychosocial and cultural dimensions related to tiger attacks were studied by using in-depth interviews (IDI) of the tiger-widows, focus-group discussions (FGD), and participatory mapping in the community. Clinical examinations of the mental health of the widows were also carried out in this phase. RESULTS The mean age of the 65 widows was 43.49 ± 9.58 years. Of this, 12.3% of the widows had remarried and only 4.6% of the widows were literate. In all, 67.2% of all tiger attacks occurred as a result of illegal forest entry. The main livelihood of the former husbands of the widows were 43.8% wood cutting, 28.1% fishing, 10.9% crab catching, 9.4% tiger prawn seed

  8. Specific predictive power of automatic spider-related affective associations for controllable and uncontrollable fear responses toward spiders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Huijding (Jorg); P.J. de Jong (Peter)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThis study examined the predictive power of automatically activated spider-related affective associations for automatic and controllable fear responses. The Extrinsic Affective Simon Task (EAST; De Houwer, 2003) was used to indirectly assess automatic spider fear-related associations.

  9. Morphological evolution of spiders predicted by pendulum mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Moya-Laraño

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animals have been hypothesized to benefit from pendulum mechanics during suspensory locomotion, in which the potential energy of gravity is converted into kinetic energy according to the energy-conservation principle. However, no convincing evidence has been found so far. Demonstrating that morphological evolution follows pendulum mechanics is important from a biomechanical point of view because during suspensory locomotion some morphological traits could be decoupled from gravity, thus allowing independent adaptive morphological evolution of these two traits when compared to animals that move standing on their legs; i.e., as inverted pendulums. If the evolution of body shape matches simple pendulum mechanics, animals that move suspending their bodies should evolve relatively longer legs which must confer high moving capabilities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested this hypothesis in spiders, a group of diverse terrestrial generalist predators in which suspensory locomotion has been lost and gained a few times independently during their evolutionary history. In spiders that hang upside-down from their webs, their legs have evolved disproportionately longer relative to their body sizes when compared to spiders that move standing on their legs. In addition, we show how disproportionately longer legs allow spiders to run faster during suspensory locomotion and how these same spiders run at a slower speed on the ground (i.e., as inverted pendulums. Finally, when suspensory spiders are induced to run on the ground, there is a clear trend in which larger suspensory spiders tend to run much more slowly than similar-size spiders that normally move as inverted pendulums (i.e., wandering spiders. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Several lines of evidence support the hypothesis that spiders have evolved according to the predictions of pendulum mechanics. These findings have potentially important ecological and evolutionary implications since

  10. Wayanad widows: A study of sustainable rural economic development using renewable energy technology for micro enterprise in Kerala, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhees, Maire Claire

    This thesis examines the situation of the farmer widows of Wayanad, Kerala through exploration of the underlying agricultural and economic issues leading to farmers' suicides, the current state of the environment in the Wayanad District of Kerala, India, and an economic model of micro-entrepreneurship to address economic and social issues of the surviving widows. Quantitative and qualitative research methods were performed through the assessment and document analysis of archive, newspaper, and published reports to gain a macro perspective. The Environmental Vulnerability Index was used as a tool to evaluate and organize findings of the current environmental conditions in the region. This thesis supports the sustainability concept of considering the economic, ecological, and social impacts when identifying economic development pathways. The goal was to explore the appropriateness of small household solar systems as vehicle in the micro-enterprise model to be a sustainable alternative economic pathway to agriculture for the farmer widows of Wayanad.

  11. Checklist of the spiders (Araneae) of Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonstein, Sergei; Marusik, Yuri M

    2013-01-01

    This checklist records 631 spider species and subspecies belonging to 49 families in Israel. Species distributions are given in both generalised (by main geographic areas of the country) and detailed (by localities) form. Twenty-seven records are considered as doubtful and another ten are based on misidentifications. A historical survey is provided. Each record is presented in its original combination. The list is dominated by members of the families Gnaphosidae and Salticidae (20.0% and 17.1% of total species, respectively). The level of regional endemism exceeds 37.0%.

  12. Natural Compounds as Spider Repellents: Fact or Myth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andreas; Ayasse, Manfred; Andrade, Maydianne C B

    2018-02-09

    Although some spiders are globally invasive, found at high densities, and may be considered pests (particularly those that are toxic to humans), there are few pest management methods based on experimental data. 'Common wisdom' and advertisements on internet websites assert that a number of natural substances repel spiders. We tested whether the three substances cited most frequently (lemon oil, peppermint oil, and chestnut-fruits) effectively repelled female spiders or whether these were myths. We presented each of the putative repellents versus a control in a two-choice assay and tested responses of females of three invasive spider species in two different families: theridiids, Latrodectus geometricus C. L. Koch (Araneae: Theridiidae) and Steatoda grossa C. L. Koch (Araneae: Theridiidae) and the araneid, Araneus diadematus Clerck . Chestnuts (Araneae: Araneidae) and mint oil strongly repelled L. geometricus and A. diadematus. S. grossa was less sensitive to these chemicals but had a slight tendency to avoid chestnuts. However, lemon oil, the substance most likely to be cited as a repellent (over 1,000,000 hits on Google), had no effect on any of these spiders. We conclude that volatiles released by mint oil and chestnuts may be effective in deterring spider settlement in two different families of spiders, but lemon oil as a repellent is a myth. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) triggered by a spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Michael; Spanoudaki, Nektaria; Giannoula, Fani; Chliva, Caterina; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios

    2009-06-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a rare and severe cutaneous reaction usually triggered by drugs. Other causative factors such as viral infections are rarely involved. In this study, we report a case of AGEP caused by a spider bite. A 56-year-old woman was referred to the allergy unit after a spider bite at the left popliteal fossa, while gardening, 5 days earlier. The offending spider was captured and identified by an entomologist as belonging to the Loxosceles rufescens species. No acute reaction was observed; however, after 24 hours, due to the occurrence of typical dermonecrotic skin lesions associated with erythema and edema, Cefuroxime and Clindamycin were administered intramuscularly after medical advice was given. Almost 72 hours after the spider bite, an erythematous and partly edematous eruption appeared locally in the gluteus area bilaterally, which progressively expanded to the trunk, arms and femors. Within 24 hours dozens of small, pinhead sized, non-follicular pustules were present, mainly in the folds. The patient complained of a burning sensation of the skin in addition to pruritus; and simultaneously had a fever of 38-39 degrees C as the eruption expanded. A spider bite may represent a possible causative factor of AGEP. A spider's venom contains sphingomyelinase that stimulates the release of IL8 and GM-CSF, which are involved in AGEP pathogenesis. Whether or not the con-current use of antibiotics has an effect in AGEP appearance when combined with a spider's venom, cannot be excluded.

  14. Structural and optical studies on selected web spinning spider silks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyani, R.; Divya, A.; Mathavan, T.; Asath, R. Mohamed; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Muthuchelian, K.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the structural and optical properties in the cribellate silk of the sheet web spider Stegodyphus sarasinorum Karsch (Eresidae) and the combined dragline, viscid silk of the orb-web spiders Argiope pulchella Thorell (Araneidae) and Nephila pilipes Fabricius (Nephilidae). X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR), Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques were used to study these three spider silk species. X-ray diffraction data are consistent with the amorphous polymer network which is arising from the interaction of larger side chain amino acid contributions due to the poly-glycine rich sequences known to be present in the proteins of cribellate silk. The same amorphous polymer networks have been determined from the combined dragline and viscid silk of orb-web spiders. From FTIR spectra the results demonstrate that, cribellate silk of Stegodyphus sarasinorum, combined dragline viscid silk of Argiope pulchella and Nephila pilipes spider silks are showing protein peaks in the amide I, II and III regions. Further they proved that the functional groups present in the protein moieties are attributed to α-helical and side chain amino acid contributions. The optical properties of the obtained spider silks such as extinction coefficients, refractive index, real and imaginary dielectric constants and optical conductance were studied extensively from UV-Vis analysis. The important fluorescent amino acid tyrosine is present in the protein folding was investigated by using fluorescence spectroscopy. This research would explore the protein moieties present in the spider silks which were found to be associated with α-helix and side chain amino acid contributions than with β-sheet secondary structure and also the optical relationship between the three different spider silks are investigated. Successful spectroscopic knowledge of the internal protein structure and optical properties of the spider silks could

  15. First report of clinical presentation of a bite by a running spider, Philodromus sp. (Araneae: Philodromidae), with recommendations for spider bite management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Maureen; Dippenaar, Ansie; Frean, John; Hunt, Richard H

    2017-06-30

    This article describes the clinical progression of symptoms over a period of 5 days of a bite inflicted by a Philodromus sp. spider. Commonly known as 'running spiders', these are not considered to be harmful to humans. This report, however, is the first description of an actual bite by a member of this group of spiders showing cytotoxic envenomation. Management of the bites should be as recommended for other cytotoxic spider bites.

  16. Sex-specific kleptoparasitic foraging in ant-eating spiders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martisová, Martina; Bilde, T.; Pekar, Stano

    2009-01-01

    . To investigate this hypothesis, we studied the effect of sex and life history stage on the frequency of kleptoparasitism in ant-eating spiders of the genus Zodarion in the field. These spiders use a special capture technique involving a quick attack on an ant that is left unguarded by spiders for several minutes...... behaviour from hunting to kleptoparasitism in males, males preferred to feed on dead (freshly killed) prey while females preferred live prey. Furthermore, males experienced a decline in prey capture rate compared with females and juveniles. Kleptoparasitism in males was accompanied by inspection of female...

  17. Inhibition of the spider heartbeat by gravity and vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, A.

    1984-01-01

    The rate and vigor of the spider heartbeat is controlled by an external pacemaker. A mechanical feature of the spider cardio-vascular system is the production of high serum pressure in the prosoma and the legs. This appears to be the source for leg extension. The lyriform organ on the patella of the leg is sensitive to vibratory and kinesthetic stimuli. This sensitivity depends upon the degree of leg extension. Thus the activity of the heart and the response characteristics of the sense receptor are related. The effect of a supra-threshold vibratory or gravitational stimulus is to produce an inhibition and a tachycardia of the spider heartbeat.

  18. Spider silk reinforced by graphene or carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Emiliano; Bosia, Federico; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Bruna, Matteo; Taioli, Simone; Garberoglio, Giovanni; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Pugno, Nicola Maria

    2017-09-01

    Spider silk has promising mechanical properties, since it conjugates high strength (~1.5 GPa) and toughness (~150 J g-1). Here, we report the production of silk incorporating graphene and carbon nanotubes by spider spinning, after feeding spiders with the corresponding aqueous dispersions. We observe an increment of the mechanical properties with respect to pristine silk, up to a fracture strength ~5.4 GPa and a toughness modulus ~1570 J g-1. This approach could be extended to other biological systems and lead to a new class of artificially modified biological, or ‘bionic’, materials.

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF THE OPTICAL COUNTERPART OF FERMI BLACK WIDOW MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J1544+4937

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Sumin; Phinney, E. Sterl; Prince, Thomas A.; Bellm, Eric; Cao, Yi; Perley, Daniel A. [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kaplan, David L. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Breton, Rene P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Bildsten, Lars [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Kong, Albert K. H.; Yen, T.-C. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Sesar, Branimir [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Wolf, William M. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    We report the optical identification of the companion to the Fermi black widow millisecond pulsar PSR J1544+4937. We find a highly variable source on Keck Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer images at the nominal pulsar position, with 2 mag variations over orbital period in the B, g, R, and I bands. The nearly achromatic light curves are difficult to explain with a simply irradiated hemisphere model, and suggest that the optical emission is dominated by a nearly isothermal hot patch on the surface of the companion facing the pulsar. We roughly constrain the distance to PSR J1544+4937 to be between 2 and 5 kpc. A more reliable distance measurement is needed in order to constrain the composition of the companion.

  20. The Language of Revolution and the Power of Storytelling in The Pregnant Widow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Alghamdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Martin Amis uses the language of revolution to describe the newly altered social circumstances at the height of the sexual revolution in his semi-autobiographical novel The Pregnant Widow. The concept of a ‘language of revolution’ as well as second- and third-wave feminist scholarship is applied to a textual analysis of the novel. Amis’s brand of satire creates a sense of displacement and challenges existing perceptions about gender, culture and sexuality, exposing them as constructed and changeable norms. Moreover, it becomes clear that the author is skeptical about the benefits of the sexual revolution for either gender, and that he views its liberating aspects as unfulfilled, particularly for women. Given that Amis names one of his characters Scheherazade, evoking the legendary heroine of The Arabian Nights, the importance of storytelling in the novel is also examined and found to be a potentially redeeming force.

  1. Prolonged grief disorder and depression in widows due to the Rwandan genocide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Susanne; Elbert, Thomas; Neuner, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Should pathological grief be viewed as a nosological category, separate from other forms of mental diseases? Diagnostic criteria for "Prolonged Grief Disorder" (PGD) have recently been specified by Prigerson and her coworkers. We interviewed a total of 40 widows who had lost their husbands during the Rwandan genocide in 1994. We assessed Major Depression using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.) and prolonged grief reactions with the PG-13. In order to examine the distinctiveness of the two syndromes we performed a multitrait correlational matrix analysis using modified versions of Generalized Proximity Functions (GPFs). 12.5% (n = 5) of the sample fulfilled the criteria for a diagnosis of PGD; 40% (n = 16) met criteria for Major Depressive Episode. The two syndromes were strongly associated. No discriminant validity was found between the two constructs suggesting that PGD may rather be an appearance of depression than a separate nosological entity.

  2. Hemolymph biochemistry reference ranges for wild-caught Goliath birdeater spiders (Theraphosa blondi) and Chilean rose spiders (Grammostola rosea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, Trevor T; Mitchell, Mark A; Guichard, Clare M; Singh, Rimme S

    2007-06-01

    Theraphosid spiders have become increasingly popular for private and public uses in the United States. However, little is known about their physiology from a medical standpoint. This study represents the first attempt to establish reference hemolymph values for two common species of theraphosids, the goliath birdeater spider (Theraphosa blondi) and the Chilean rose spider (Grammostola rosea). Eleven T. blondi and twelve G. rosea, all wild-caught subadults, were obtained after importation and hemolymph was collected for biochemical analysis. After 8 wk of captivity, hemolymph was again collected from the spiders and analyzed. The biochemical analytes measured in the study included aspartate transferase, creatine kinase, glucose, total protein, albumin, uric acid, blood urea nitrogen, phosphorous, calcium, potassium, and sodium. The osmolality of the hemolymph was estimated for each spider using two different formulae. There were significant differences in body weight, sodium, potassium, and osmolality between the sampling times for both species. There were also significant differences in creatine kinase, calcium, total protein, and blood urea nitrogen between sampling periods for T. blondi. The results of this study suggest that serial hemolymph samples may be used to assess the hydration status of theraphosid spiders. In addition, the differences in hemolymph analytes between spiders suggest that there may be differences between species that should be addressed in future studies.

  3. Nuclear DNA variation in spider monkeys (Ateles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A C; Dubach, J M

    2001-04-01

    Phylogenetic relationships based on DNA sequence variation for the aldolase A intron V nuclear genomic region were evaluated and compared to phylogenies based on mitochondrial DNA sequence variation among spider monkeys (Ateles). Samples of Ateles ranging from Central America throughout the Amazon Basin were sequenced to determine phylogenetic relationships among geographically widely distributed populations. Analysis of nuclear DNA sequences using parsimony, maximum-likelihood, and genetic distance analyses produced similar phylogenies. Four previously proposed monophyletic species of spider monkeys were: (1) Ateles paniscus, composed of haplotypes from the northeastern Amazon Basin; (2) A. belzebuth, found in the western and southern Amazon Basin; (3) A. hybridus, located primarily along the Magdalena River valley of Colombia; and (4) A. geoffroyi, including all haplotypes found in the Choco region of South America and throughout Central America. The nuclear phylograms were analyzed based on associated bootstrap support and confidence probabilities. Support from the nuclear DNA genome was less robust than support from the mitochondrial DNA data, most likely due to a level of sequence variation, which was 90% less than that of the mitochondrial DNA genome. Nuclear DNA congruencies with mitochondrial DNA-based phylogenies, as supported by the incongruence length difference and winning sites tests, provide further support for the suggested revisions in Ateles taxonomy that are contradictory to long-held taxonomies based on pelage variation. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  4. Progress on development of SPIDER diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualotto, R.; Agostini, M.; Barbisan, M.; Bernardi, M.; Brombin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Croci, G.; Palma, M. Dalla; Delogu, R. S.; Gorini, G.; Lotto, L.; Muraro, A.; Peruzzo, S.; Pimazzoni, A.; Pomaro, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Zaniol, B.; Zaupa, M.

    2017-08-01

    SPIDER experiment, the full size prototype of the beam source for the ITER heating neutral beam injector, has to demonstrate extraction and acceleration to 100 kV of a large negative ion hydrogen or deuterium beam with co-extracted electron fraction e-/D- cost effective implementations. Thermocouples used to measure the power load distribution in the source and over the beam dump front surface will be efficiently fixed with proven technique and acquired through commercial and custom electronics. Spectroscopy needs to use well collimated lines of sight and will employ novel design spectrometers with higher efficiency and resolution and filtered detectors with custom built amplifiers. The electrostatic probes will be operated through electronics specifically developed to cope with the challenging environment of the RF source. The instrumented calorimeter STRIKE will use new CFC tiles, still under development. Two linear cameras, one built in house, have been tested as suitable for optical beam tomography. Some diagnostic components are off the shelf, others are custom developed: some of these are being prototyped or are under test before final production and installation, which will be completed before start of SPIDER operation.

  5. Rates and risks for prolonged grief disorder in a sample of orphaned and widowed genocide survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Susanne; Jacob, Nadja; Dusingizemungu, Jean-Pierre; Elbert, Thomas

    2010-07-06

    The concept of Prolonged Grief Disorder (PGD) has been defined in recent years by Prigerson and co-workers, who have developed and empirically tested consensus and diagnostic criteria for PGD. Using these most recent criteria defining PGD, the aim of this study was to determine rates of and risks for PGD in survivors of the 1994 Rwandan genocide who had lost a parent and/or the husband before, during or after the 1994 events. The PG-13 was administered to 206 orphans or half orphans and to 194 widows. A regression analysis was carried out to examine risk factors of PGD. 8.0% (n = 32) of the sample met criteria for PGD with an average of 12 years post-loss. All but one person had faced multiple losses and the majority indicated that their grief-related loss was due to violent death (70%). Grief was predicted mainly by time since the loss, by the violent nature of the loss, the severity of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the importance given to religious/spiritual beliefs. By contrast, gender, age at the time of bereavement, bereavement status (widow versus orphan), the number of different types of losses reported and participation in the funeral ceremony did not impact the severity of prolonged grief reactions. A significant portion of the interviewed sample continues to experience grief over interpersonal losses and unresolved grief may endure over time if not addressed by clinical intervention. Severity of grief reactions may be associated with a set of distinct risk factors. Subjects who lose someone through violent death seem to be at special risk as they have to deal with the loss experience as such and the traumatic aspects of the loss. Symptoms of PTSD may hinder the completion of the mourning process. Religious beliefs may facilitate the mourning process and help to find meaning in the loss. These aspects need to be considered in the treatment of PGD.

  6. Spiders (Araneae) Found in Bananas and Other International Cargo Submitted to North American Arachnologists for Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Richard S; Crawford, Rodney L; Buckle, Donald J

    2014-11-01

    Spiders found in international cargo brought into North America are sometimes submitted to arachnologists for identification. Often, these spiders are presumed to be of medical importance because of size or a submitter's familiarity with a toxic spider genus from the continent of origin. Starting in 2006, requests were made for spiders found in international cargo brought into North America, in addition to the specimens from similar cargo shipments already in our museum collections. This was an ad hoc study that allowed us to focus on spiders of concern to the discoverer. We identified 135 spiders found in international cargo. A key for the most common species is provided. The most frequently submitted spiders were the pantropical huntsman spider, Heteropoda venatoria (L.) (Sparassidae), and the redfaced banana spider, Cupiennius chiapanensis Medina Soriano (Ctenidae). Spiders of medical importance were rare. The most common cargo from which spiders were submitted was bananas with most specimens coming from Central America, Ecuador, or Colombia. Lack of experience with nonnative fauna caused several experienced American arachnologists to misidentify harmless ctenid spiders (C. chiapanensis, spotlegged banana spider, Cupiennius getazi Simon) as highly toxic Phoneutria spiders. These misidentifications could have led to costly, unwarranted prophylactic eradication measures, unnecessary employee health education, heightened employee anxiety and spoilage when perishable goods are left unloaded due to safety concerns. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.

  7. Depression and anxiety among war-widows of Nepal: a post-civil war cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnet, Syaron; Kandel, Pragya; Lamichhane, Prabhat

    2018-02-01

    Thousands of Nepalese women were widowed as a consequence of a decade (1996-2006) long civil war in Nepal. These women are at grave risk of mental health problems due to both traumatic experiences and violation of natural order of widowhood. The present study explores the depression and anxiety among war-widows. In 2012, a cross-sectional study was designed to interview 358 war-widows using validitated Beck Depression Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory in four districts of Nepal - Bardiya, Surkhet, Sindhupalchowk and Kavrepalanchowk with history of high conflict intensity. The prevalence of depression and anxiety was 53% and 63% respectively. Financial stress was significantly associated with depression (2.67, 95% CI: 1.40-5.07) and anxiety (2.37, 95% CI: 1.19-4.72). High autonomy of women as compared to low autonomy, high social support as compared to low social support and literacy as opposed to illiteracy was associated with less likelihood of depression and anxiety. Our results suggest high magnitude of depression and anxiety among war-widows in Nepal. Future policy efforts should be directed at providing mental health services to identify mental health issues among conflict affected individuals with focus on education, employment and activities to promote social support and autonomy at community.

  8. 'People insult her as a sexy woman': sexuality, stigma and vulnerability among widowed and divorced women in Oromiya, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton-Levinson, Anna; Winskell, Kate; Abdela, Berissa; Rubardt, Marcie; Stephenson, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Widowed and divorced women, sometimes referred to as 'female heads of household', are one of the most impoverished and marginalised groups in the world. Widowed and divorced women are often overlooked in the literature or are seen primarily as economically or socially marginalised beings; their sexuality is rarely addressed. In an effort to understand the experiences and challenges faced by such women, we conducted and analysed four focus-group discussions, seven in-depth interviews and four interactive activities with 32 widowed and divorced women and with 25 other community members in Oromiya, Ethiopia. Findings indicate that women experienced high levels of community stigma in relation to their sexuality. Participants' fear of community stigma, and the actions they took to avert it, further served to marginalise them within their community and had negative impact on their economic, social and health support systems and, ultimately, on their overall well-being. Future interventions need to acknowledge sexual stigma as a driving force in the many challenges these women face. Further programmatic work is needed to reduce stigma related to widowed and divorced women's sexuality and to decrease their vulnerability to rape.

  9. Probing the origin of Pulsar wind with a Black widow pulsar 2FGL J2339.6-0532

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsu, Yoichi; Shibata, Shinpei; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kataoka, Jun; Saito, Yoshihiko

    Multi-wavelength observations of a black widow binary system 2FGL2339.6-0532 are presented. Black widow pulsars are believed to be in the intermediate stage between LMXB and isolated millisecond pulsars(MSPs). In a typical black widow system, the recycled MSP is evaporating up its companion star by the powerful pulsar wind. Fermi gamma-ray source 2FGL2339.6-0532 is recently categorized as an black widow pulsar. It possesses a K-star companion orbiting at a period of 4.63 h that corresponds to an orbit radius of about 10(11) cm for a standard NS mass. Our optical observations utilizing OISTER show clear sinusoidal light curves at various wavelength covering Ks B band. Phase resolved SED precisely constrained the size of the companion star and temperature. X-ray spectra taken with Suzaku revealed steady soft X-ray excess below 1 keV energy range that may be originated in blackbody emission from the neutron surface. While In hard X-ray energy band the X-ray light curve shows double peak modulation synchronized with the orbital motion indicating that the hard X-ray may be from the surface of the companion star. To explain the hard X-ray behavior we examined a simple geometry and estimated the physical state of the pulsar wind at immediate vicinity of the light cylinder of the pulsar.

  10. Evolution of stenophagy in spiders (Araneae): evidence based on the comparative analysis of spider diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekár, Stano; Coddington, Jonathan A; Blackledge, Todd A

    2012-03-01

    Stenophagy (narrow diet breadth) represents an extreme of trophic specialization in carnivores, but little is known about the forces driving its evolution. We used spiders, the most diversified group of terrestrial predators, to investigate whether stenophagy (1) promoted diversification; (2) was phylogenetically conserved and evolutionarily derived state; and (3) was determined either by geographical distribution and foraging guild. We used published data on the prey of almost 600 species. Six categories of stenophagy were found: myrmecophagy, araneophagy, lepidopterophagy, termitophagy, dipterophagy, and crustaceophagy. We found that the species diversity of euryphagous genera and families was similar to stenophagous genera and families. At the family level, stenophagy evolved repeatedly and independently. Within families, the basal condition was oligophagy or euryphagy. Most types of stenophagy were clearly derived: myrmecophagy in Zodariidae; lepidopterophagy in Araneidae; dipterophagy in Theridiidae. In contrast, araneophagy was confined to basal and intermediate lineages, suggesting its ancestral condition. The diet breadth of species from the tropics and subtropics was less diverse than species from the temperate zone. Diet breadth was lower in cursorial spiders compared to web-building species. Thus, the evolution of stenophagy in spiders appears to be complex and governed by phylogeny as well as by ecological determinants. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. Peculiar torsion dynamical response of spider dragline silk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dabiao; Yu, Longteng; He, Yuming; Peng, Kai; Liu, Jie; Guan, Juan; Dunstan, D. J.

    2017-07-01

    The torsional properties of spider dragline silks from Nephila edulis and Nephila pilipes spiders are investigated by using a torsion pendulum technique. A permanent torsional deformation is observed after even small torsional strain. This behaviour is quite different from that of the other materials tested here, i.e., carbon fiber, thin metallic wires, Kevlar fiber, and human hair. The spider dragline thus displays a strong energy dissipation upon the initial excitation (around 75% for small strains and more for a larger strain), which correspondingly reduces the amplitude of subsequent oscillations around the new equilibrium position. The variation of torsional stiffness in relaxation dynamics of spider draglines for different excitations is also determined. The experimental result is interpreted in the light of the hierarchical structure of dragline silk.

  12. Optical surface profiling of orb-web spider capture silks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, D M; Joyce, A M; Staib, G R [Department of Physics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Herberstein, M E, E-mail: deb.kane@mq.edu.a [Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2010-09-15

    Much spider silk research to date has focused on its mechanical properties. However, the webs of many orb-web spiders have evolved for over 136 million years to evade visual detection by insect prey. It is therefore a photonic device in addition to being a mechanical device. Herein we use optical surface profiling of capture silks from the webs of adult female St Andrews cross spiders (Argiope keyserlingi) to successfully measure the geometry of adhesive silk droplets and to show a bowing in the aqueous layer on the spider capture silk between adhesive droplets. Optical surface profiling shows geometric features of the capture silk that have not been previously measured and contributes to understanding the links between the physical form and biological function. The research also demonstrates non-standard use of an optical surface profiler to measure the maximum width of a transparent micro-sized droplet (microlens).

  13. Evolutionary crossroads in developmental biology: the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbrant, Maarten; Damen, Wim G M; McGregor, Alistair P

    2012-08-01

    Spiders belong to the chelicerates, which is an arthropod group that branches basally from myriapods, crustaceans and insects. Spiders are thus useful models with which to investigate whether aspects of development are ancestral or derived with respect to the arthropod common ancestor. Moreover, they serve as an important reference point for comparison with the development of other metazoans. Therefore, studies of spider development have made a major contribution to advancing our understanding of the evolution of development. Much of this knowledge has come from studies of the common house spider, Parasteatoda tepidariorum. Here, we describe how the growing number of experimental tools and resources available to study Parasteatoda development have provided novel insights into the evolution of developmental regulation and have furthered our understanding of metazoan body plan evolution.

  14. Spiders of the Great Dismal Swamp: Lake Drummond 1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report outlines the results of a study of spiders that was conducted along the shores of Lake Drummond, in the Great Dismal Swamp. The purpose of the study was...

  15. A revision of the spider genus Zaitunia (Araneae, Filistatidae)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sergei Zonstein; Yuri M. Marusik

    2016-01-01

    The spider genus Zaitunia Lehtinen, 1967 (Araneae, Filistatidae) is revised. It was found to include 24 species distributed in the Eastern Mediterranean, Middle East and Central Asia: ♀ Z. afghana (Roewer, 1962) (Afghanistan), ♀ Z...

  16. Chemical recognition of fruit ripeness in spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo, Omer; Orts Garri, Rosa; Hernandez Salazar, Laura Teresa; Schulz, Stefan; Heymann, Eckhard W; Ayasse, Manfred; Laska, Matthias

    2015-10-06

    Primates are now known to possess well-developed olfactory sensitivity and discrimination capacities that can play a substantial role in many aspects of their interaction with conspecifics and the environment. Several studies have demonstrated that olfactory cues may be useful in fruit selection. Here, using a conditioning paradigm, we show that captive spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) display high olfactory discrimination performance between synthetic odor mixtures mimicking ripe and unripe fruits of two wild, primate-consumed, Neotropical plant species. Further, we show that spider monkeys are able to discriminate the odor of ripe fruits from odors that simulate unripe fruits that become increasingly similar to that of ripe ones. These results suggest that the ability of spider monkeys to identify ripe fruits may not depend on the presence of any individual compound that mark fruit ripeness. Further, the results demonstrate that spider monkeys are able to identify ripe fruits even when the odor signal is accompanied by a substantial degree of noise.

  17. Beyond PICO: the SPIDER tool for qualitative evidence synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Alison; Smith, Debbie; Booth, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    Standardized systematic search strategies facilitate rigor in research. Current search tools focus on retrieval of quantitative research. In this article we address issues relating to using existing search strategy tools, most typically the PICO (Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome) formulation for defining key elements of a review question, when searching for qualitative and mixed methods research studies. An alternative search strategy tool for qualitative/mixed methods research is outlined: SPIDER (Sample, Phenomenon of Interest, Design, Evaluation, Research type). We used both the SPIDER and PICO search strategy tools with a qualitative research question. We have used the SPIDER tool to advance thinking beyond PICO in its suitable application to qualitative and mixed methods research. However, we have highlighted once more the need for improved indexing of qualitative articles in databases. To constitute a viable alternative to PICO, SPIDER needs to be refined and tested on a wider range of topics.

  18. SPIDERS (ARANEI) OF VOLGOGRAD SITY AND ITS ENVIRONS

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Ponomarev; A. S. Khnykin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Aim. Fauna of spiders of Volgograd Region is researched uncompletely. Only 149 species of 19 families were listed in previous references. Complete listing of spiders of this large region was the aim of our investigation.Location. Volgograd Region, Russia.Methods. Material was collected in Volgograd City with environs and Volga-Don area in 2009–2013. Areas with minimum of anthropogenic influence within the city, artificial ecosystem of park type, plots of native vegetation along the ...

  19. Benefits of cooperation with genetic kin in a subsocial spider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, J.M.; Bilde, T.

    2008-01-01

    used a cross-fostering design to control for genetic relatedness and group membership. Our study animal was the periodic social spider Stegodyphus lineatus, a transitional species that belongs to a genus containing both permanent social and periodic social species. In S. lineatus, the young cooperate....... Hence, in communally feeding spiders, nepotism favors group retention and reduces the conflict between selfish interests and the interests of the group....

  20. Mechanics and Morphology of Silk Drawn from Anesthetized Spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, B.; Vollrath, F.

    CO2 and N2 anesthetized Nephila spiders produced dragline silk with mechanical properties that differed from control silk as a function of time under anesthesia. Silk from CO2 spiders had a significantly lower breaking strain and breaking energy, significantly higher initial modulus, and marginally lower breaking stress. At the onset of anesthesia the silk diameter became highly variable. During deep anesthesia silk either became thinner or retained cross-section but fibrillated.

  1. Biotechnological Trends in Spider and Scorpion Antivenom Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Solà, Mireia; Jappe, Emma Christine

    2016-01-01

    at an increasingly faster pace. In this review, the current knowledge of spider and scorpion venoms is presented, followed by a discussion of all published biotechnological efforts within development of spider and scorpion antitoxins based on small molecules, antibodies and fragments thereof, and next generation...... immunization strategies. The increasing number of discovery and development efforts within this field may point towards an upcoming transition from serum-based antivenoms towards therapeutic solutions based on modern biotechnology....

  2. Spider silk as a blueprint for greener materials : a review

    OpenAIRE

    Lefèvre, Thierry; Auger, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    Spider silk exhibits remarkable properties, especially its well-known tensile performances. They rely on a complex nanostructured hierarchical organisation that studies progressively elucidate. Spider silk encompasses a vast range of fibres that exhibit diverse and captivating physical and biological characteristics. The full understanding of the relation between structure and properties may lead in the future to the design of a variety of high-performance, tailored materials and ...

  3. Spider sedation induced by defensive chemicals of milliped prey*

    OpenAIRE

    Carrel, James E.; Eisner, Thomas

    1984-01-01

    Wolf spiders (Lycosa spp.) show delayed induced sedation (total immobilization) of prolonged duration (in the order of days) after attacks upon millipeds (Glomeris marginata). The sedation is specifically attributable to glomerin and homoglomerin, two previously characterized quinazolinones present in the defensive secretion of Glomeris. Median sedative doses for the quinazolinones are in the range of 1-7 μg per spider, a fraction of the total (60-90 μg) present in the secretion of medium to ...

  4. Small Molecules from Spiders Used as Chemical Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Christian Adam; Kristensen, Anders S.; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Spiders are important species in ecological systems and as major predators of insects they are endowed with a plethora of low‐molecular‐weight natural products having intriguing biological activities. The isolation and biological characterization of these entities are well established, however, o...... the area of pheromones and allomones from spiders. Herein, we recapitulate these recent results, put them into perspective with previous findings, and provide an outlook for future studies of these chemotypes....

  5. Relatedness facilitates cooperation in the subsocial spider, Stegodyphus tentoriicola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilde Trine

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cooperative hunting and foraging in spiders is rare and prone to cheating such that the actions of selfish individuals negatively affect the whole group. The resulting social dilemma may be mitigated by kin selection since related individuals lose indirect fitness benefits by acting selfishly. Indeed, cooperation with genetic kin reduces the disadvantages of within-group competition in the subsocial spider Stegodyphus lineatus, supporting the hypothesis that high relatedness is an important pre-adaptation in the transition to sociality in spiders. In this study we examined the consequences of group size and relatedness on cooperative feeding in the subsocial spider S. tentoriicola, a species suggested to be at the transition to permanent sociality. Results We formed groups of 3 and 6 spiders that were either siblings or non-siblings. We found that increasing group size negatively affected feeding efficiency but that these negative effects were reduced in sib-groups. Sib groups were more likely to feed cooperatively and all group members grew more homogenously than groups of unrelated spiders. The measured differences did not translate into differential growth or mortality during the experimental period of 8 weeks. Conclusion The combination of our results with those from previous studies indicates that the conflict between individual interests and group interests may be reduced by nepotism and that the latter promote the maintenance of the social community.

  6. Nutrient Deprivation Induces Property Variations in Spider Gluey Silk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamires, Sean J.; Sahni, Vasav; Dhinojwala, Ali; Blackledge, Todd A.; Tso, I-Min

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms facilitating property variability in biological adhesives may promote biomimetic innovations. Spider gluey silks such as the spiral threads in orb webs and the gumfoot threads in cobwebs, both of which comprise of an axial thread coated by glue, are biological adhesives that have variable physical and chemical properties. Studies show that the physical and chemical properties of orb web gluey threads change when spiders are deprived of food. It is, however, unknown whether gumfoot threads undergo similar property variations when under nutritional stress. Here we tested whether protein deprivation induces similar variations in spiral and gumfoot thread morphology and stickiness. We manipulated protein intake for the orb web spider Nephila clavipes and the cobweb spider Latrodectus hesperus and measured the diameter, glue droplet volume, number of droplets per mm, axial thread width, thread stickiness and adhesive energy of their gluey silks. We found that the gluey silks of both species were stickier when the spiders were deprived of protein than when the spiders were fed protein. In N. clavipes a concomitant increase in glue droplet volume was found. Load-extension curves showed that protein deprivation induced glue property variations independent of the axial thread extensions in both species. We predicted that changes in salt composition of the glues were primarily responsible for the changes in stickiness of the silks, although changes in axial thread properties might also contribute. We, additionally, showed that N. clavipes' glue changes color under protein deprivation, probably as a consequence of changes to its biochemical composition. PMID:24523902

  7. Impact of prescribed burning on a heathland inhabiting spider community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krause, Rolf Harald

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Heathlands can provide refuge for many stenotopic and endangered arthropods, if habitat management practices are applied. A management measure that is rarely being used today, but which has the potential to support diversity of arthropod communities, is prescribed burning. In this study we investigated the effects of prescribed burning on spider assemblages on a burned site with Calluna vulgaris in the nature reserve Lueneburg Heath, northwest Germany. We used pitfall trapping with a sampling design of 39 traps over a period of one year and 17 sampling intervals on a burned and a control site. We compared overall species richness, activity abundance patterns and community composition of the two sites, with a particular focus on stenotopic and endangered species. We collected 5116 adult spiders and 99 species altogether in a relatively small sampling area. This number of species represents nearly one third of the regional species pool of heathland spider species. Twelve species occurred exclusively on the burned site in contrast to 28 species exclusively found on the unburned site. Although we found more than twice as many spider individuals and higher mean species richness on the control site than on the burned site, the species richness of red-listed spiders was higher on the burned site. Especially the fact that we found 24 endangered species on the burned site and only 20 on the control site indicates that the applied measure of prescribed burning can foster certain endangered spider species and contribute to preserving the overall biodiversity of heathland ecosystems.

  8. SPIDERS (ARANEI OF VOLGOGRAD SITY AND ITS ENVIRONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ponomarev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Aim. Fauna of spiders of Volgograd Region is researched uncompletely. Only 149 species of 19 families were listed in previous references. Complete listing of spiders of this large region was the aim of our investigation.Location. Volgograd Region, Russia.Methods. Material was collected in Volgograd City with environs and Volga-Don area in 2009–2013. Areas with minimum of anthropogenic influence within the city, artificial ecosystem of park type, plots of native vegetation along the Varvarovskoe water reservoir and natural steppe on banks of Don River were investigated. The main method of spiders’ collection were pitfall traps, which exposed from April to October.Results and main conclusions. As a result 235 species of spiders from 26 families (including 195 species from 23 families within the city were found. One hundred fifty five species are new for Volgograd Region. Spiders of families Atypidae, Corinnidae, Dysderidae, Eresidae, Liocranidae, Sparassidae, Zodariidae were not found in Volgograd Region earier. Trichoncus villius Tanasevitch et Piterkina, 2007 is the first record for Russia. Totally 304 species of spiders are known from Volgograd Region after our study including literature data. New data about fauna of spiders with summarized check-list are very significant for future faunistic and biogeographic investigations. Study of river islands with minimum anthropogenic influence inside Volgograd City allow to develop measures for biodiversity conservation.

  9. Adaptive aggregation by spider mites under predation risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Lena; Schausberger, Peter

    2017-09-06

    Grouping together is a commonly observed anti-predator strategy. Possible anti-predator benefits of aggregation include the encounter/avoidance effect for visually hunting predators and the dilution effect, together dubbed attack abatement. Possible costs opposing the dilution effect are easier detection of aggregated than scattered individuals. The benefits of attack abatement, and opposing costs after group detection, are poorly understood for chemosensory predator-prey interactions. We tackled this issue by assessing the aggregation behavior of spider mites Tetranychus urticae under predation risk emanating from predatory mites Phytoseiulus persimilis. We examined whether adult spider mite females aggregate more tightly when perceiving predator cues (traces left and eggs), representing graded risk levels, and whether grouping enhances survival in physical predator presence. The spider mites aggregated more tightly and were more active in presence than absence of predator cues. Grouped spider mites were less likely and later detected and attacked than scattered spider mites. Moreover, encounter and attack of one group member did not increase the risk of other members to be attacked, as compared to scattered spider mites. To the best of our knowledge, our study is the first rigorous documentation of the adaptive benefit of tightened prey aggregation towards a purely chemosensorily hunting predator.

  10. Spider-mite problems and control in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C C

    2000-01-01

    Problems with spider mites first appeared in Taiwan in 1958, eight years after the importation of synthetic pesticides, and the mites evolved into major pests on many crops during the 1980s. Of the 74 spider mite species recorded from Taiwan 10 are major pests, with Tetranychus kanzawai most important, followed by T. urticae, Panonychus citri, T. cinnabarinus, T. truncatus and Oligonychus litchii. Most crops suffer from more than one species. Spider mites reproduce year-round in Taiwan. Diapause occurs only in high-elevation areas. Precipitation is the most important abiotic factor restricting spider-mite populations. Control is usually accomplished by applying chemicals. Fifty acaricides are currently registered for the control of spider mites. Acaricide resistance is a serious problem, with regional variation in resistance levels. Several phytoseiid mites and a chrysopid predator have been studied for control of spider mites with good effect. Efforts to market these predators should be intensified so that biological control can be a real choice for farmers.

  11. Biodiversity baseline of the French Guiana spider fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedel, Vincent; Rheims, Christina; Murienne, Jérôme; Brescovit, Antonio Domingos

    2013-01-01

    The need for an updated list of spiders found in French Guiana rose recently due to many upcoming studies planned. In this paper, we list spiders from French Guiana from existing literature (with corrected nomenclature when necessary) and from 2142 spiders sampled in 12 sites for this baseline study. Three hundred and sixty four validated species names of spider were found in the literature and previous authors' works. Additional sampling, conducted for this study added another 89 identified species and 62 other species with only a genus name for now. The total species of spiders sampled in French Guiana is currently 515. Many other Morphospecies were found but not described as species yet. An accumulation curve was drawn with seven of the sampling sites and shows no plateau yet. Therefore, the number of species inhabiting French Guiana cannot yet be determined. As the very large number of singletons found in the collected materials suggests, the accumulation curve indicates nevertheless that more sampling is necessary to discover the many unknown spider species living in French Guiana, with a focus on specific periods (dry season and wet season) and on specific and poorly studied habitats such as canopy, inselberg and cambrouze (local bamboo monospecific forest).

  12. Isoflurane anesthesia of wild-caught goliath birdeater spiders (Theraphosa blondi) and Chilean rose spiders (Grammostola rosea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, Trevor T; Mitchell, Mark A; Guichard, Clare M; Singh, Rimme S

    2009-06-01

    Anesthesia is used in theraphosid spiders to facilitate medical procedures (e.g., physical examination, sample collection, surgery); however, most information on this subject is anecdotal. This study was conducted to systematically determine the anesthetic parameters of wild-caught, subadult goliath birdeater spiders (Theraphosa blondi) (n = 11) and Chilean rose spiders (Grammostola rosea) (n = 12). Each spider was placed in a 3-L gas anesthetic chamber and subjected to an induction of 5% isoflurane at a rate of 1 L/min oxygen. Anesthetic depth was monitored by evaluating the righting reflex every 5 min. Animals were recovered in 100% oxygen. Induction, recovery, and overall anesthetic times were determined. After an 8-wk washout period, the procedure was repeated. For both species, median induction time was 10 min. Median recovery time was 30 min for T. blondi and 12.5 min for G. rosea.

  13. Prey interception drives web invasion and spider size determines successful web takeover in nocturnal orb-web spiders

    OpenAIRE

    Wenjin Gan; Shengjie Liu; Xiaodong Yang; Daiqin Li; Chaoliang Lei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A striking feature of web-building spiders is the use of silk to make webs, mainly for prey capture. However, building a web is energetically expensive and increases the risk of predation. To reduce such costs and still have access to abundant prey, some web-building spiders have evolved web invasion behaviour. In general, no consistent patterns of web invasion have emerged and the factors determining web invasion remain largely unexplored. Here we report web invasion among conspecif...

  14. The phylogeny of fossil whip spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Russell J; Dunlop, Jason A; Knecht, Brian J; Hegna, Thomas A

    2017-04-21

    Arachnids are a highly successful group of land-dwelling arthropods. They are major contributors to modern terrestrial ecosystems, and have a deep evolutionary history. Whip spiders (Arachnida, Amblypygi), are one of the smaller arachnid orders with ca. 190 living species. Here we restudy one of the oldest fossil representatives of the group, Graeophonus anglicus Pocock, 1911 from the Late Carboniferous (Duckmantian, ca. 315 Ma) British Middle Coal Measures of the West Midlands, UK. Using X-ray microtomography, our principal aim was to resolve details of the limbs and mouthparts which would allow us to test whether this fossil belongs in the extant, relict family Paracharontidae; represented today by a single, blind species Paracharon caecus Hansen, 1921. Tomography reveals several novel and significant character states for G. anglicus; most notably in the chelicerae, pedipalps and walking legs. These allowed it to be scored into a phylogenetic analysis together with the recently described Paracharonopsis cambayensis Engel & Grimaldi, 2014 from the Eocene (ca. 52 Ma) Cambay amber, and Kronocharon prendinii Engel & Grimaldi, 2014 from Cretaceous (ca. 99 Ma) Burmese amber. We recovered relationships of the form ((Graeophonus (Paracharonopsis + Paracharon)) + (Charinus (Stygophrynus (Kronocharon (Charon (Musicodamon + Paraphrynus)))))). This tree largely reflects Peter Weygoldt's 1996 classification with its basic split into Paleoamblypygi and Euamblypygi lineages; we were able to score several of his characters for the first time in fossils. Our analysis draws into question the monophyly of the family Charontidae. Our data suggest that Graeophonus is a crown group amblypygid, and falls within a monophyletic Paleoamblypgi clade, but outside the family Paracharontidae (= Paracharonopsis + Paracharon). Our results also suggest a new placement for the Burmese amber genus Kronocharon, a node further down from its original position. Overall, we offer a

  15. Rates and risks for prolonged grief disorder in a sample of orphaned and widowed genocide survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Nadja

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The concept of Prolonged Grief Disorder (PGD has been defined in recent years by Prigerson and co-workers, who have developed and empirically tested consensus and diagnostic criteria for PGD. Using these most recent criteria defining PGD, the aim of this study was to determine rates of and risks for PGD in survivors of the 1994 Rwandan genocide who had lost a parent and/or the husband before, during or after the 1994 events. Methods The PG-13 was administered to 206 orphans or half orphans and to 194 widows. A regression analysis was carried out to examine risk factors of PGD. Results 8.0% (n = 32 of the sample met criteria for PGD with an average of 12 years post-loss. All but one person had faced multiple losses and the majority indicated that their grief-related loss was due to violent death (70%. Grief was predicted mainly by time since the loss, by the violent nature of the loss, the severity of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and the importance given to religious/spiritual beliefs. By contrast, gender, age at the time of bereavement, bereavement status (widow versus orphan, the number of different types of losses reported and participation in the funeral ceremony did not impact the severity of prolonged grief reactions. Conclusions A significant portion of the interviewed sample continues to experience grief over interpersonal losses and unresolved grief may endure over time if not addressed by clinical intervention. Severity of grief reactions may be associated with a set of distinct risk factors. Subjects who lose someone through violent death seem to be at special risk as they have to deal with the loss experience as such and the traumatic aspects of the loss. Symptoms of PTSD may hinder the completion of the mourning process. Religious beliefs may facilitate the mourning process and help to find meaning in the loss. These aspects need to be considered in the treatment of PGD.

  16. The impact of cultural evolution on the ego ideal, depression, psychosis, and suicide: a South India community study of the widow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Helen E

    2011-01-01

    Cultural factors have a significant impact on the manifestation of psychiatric illness and the development of the ego ideal. The evolution of the widow's cultural role in a South India village provides insight on the ego ideal through several generations. As treatment of widows changed so that their appearance became indistinguishable from other women, they no longer became objects of revulsion. A case study approach documents the interrelationship of changes in the cultural ego ideal on psychiatric illness among widows in a South India village over a period of more than four decades.

  17. Intersexual Trophic Niche Partitioning in an Ant-Eating Spider (Araneae: Zodariidae)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pekar, Stano; Martisova, Martina; Bilde, Trine

    2011-01-01

    .... Zodarion jozefienae spiders specialize on Messor barbarus ants that are polymorphic in body size and hence comprise potential trophic niches for the spider, making this system well-suited to study...

  18. Molecular cloning and expression of the C-terminus of spider ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    . Among the types of spider silks, draglines from Nephila clavipes and Araneus diadematus have been the most intensely studied. However, the entirety of a spider silk gene has not been cloned yet, and sequence data from. Molecular cloning ...

  19. How brown is brown fat that we can see?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2014-04-01

    There are many unanswered questions related to the heterogeneity of adipose tissue depots and the paucity of their function, development, and organization at the cellular level. Much effort has been directed at studying white adipose tissue (WAT), the driver of obesity and the associated metabolic disease. In recent years, the importance of brown adipose tissue (BAT) has also been appreciated. While BAT depots are prominent in many small mammal species, their detection in adult humans has been technically challenging and the identity of brown human adipocytes found within depots of WAT has remained controversial. We recently reported a peptide probe that binds to BAT vasculature and, when coupled with a near-infrared fluorophore, can be used to detect BAT in whole body imaging. This probe reliably discriminates between endothelium associated with brown or brown-like (beige/brite) adipocytes and endothelium of visceral WAT. Improved probes based on this approach could aid in assessing human adipose tissue body distribution and remodeling, which is a process underlying various pathologies. This commentary aims at discussing open questions that need to be addressed before full clinical advantage can be taken from adipose tissue imaging, as well as its metabolic activation strategies.

  20. DISCOVERY OF GAMMA-RAY ORBITAL MODULATION IN THE BLACK WIDOW PSR J1311–3430

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Yi; Wang, Zhongxiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2015-05-10

    We report our discovery of orbitally modulated γ-ray emission from the black widow system PSR J1311−3430. We analyze the Fermi Large Area Telescope data during the off-pulse phase interval of the pulsar and find the orbital modulation signal at a ∼3σ confidence level. Further spectral analysis shows no significant differences for the spectra obtained during the bright and faint orbital phase ranges. A simple sinusoid-like function can describe the modulation. Given these properties, we suggest that the intrabinary γ-ray emission arises from the region close to the companion and the modulation is caused by the occultation of the emitting region by the companion, similar to that is seen in the transitional millisecond pulsar binary (MSP) PSR J1023+0038. Considering the X-ray detection of intrabinary shock emission from eclipsing MSP binaries recently reported, this discovery further suggests the general existence of intrabinary γ-ray emission from them.

  1. Discovery of an Unidentified Fermi Object as a Black Widow-Like Millisecond Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, A. K. H.; Huang, R. H. H.; Cheng, K. S.; Takata, J.; Yatsu, Y.; Cheung, C. C.; Donato, D.; Lin, L. C. C.; Kataoka, J.; Takahashi, Y.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has revolutionized our knowledge of the gamma-ray pulsar population, leading to the discovery of almost 100 gamma-ray pulsars and dozens of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Although the outer-gap model predicts different sites of emission for the radio and gamma-ray pulsars, until now all of the known gamma-ray MSPs have been visible in the radio. Here we report the discovery of a radio-quiet" gamma-ray emitting MSP candidate by using Fermi, Chandra, Swift, and optical observations. The X-ray and gamma-ray properties of the source are consistent with known gamma-ray pulsars. We also found a 4.63-hr orbital period in optical and X-ray data. We suggest that the source is a black widow-like MSP with a approx. 0.1 Stellar Mass late-type companion star. Based on the profile of the optical and X-ray light-curves, the companion star is believed to be heated by the pulsar while the X-ray emissions originate from pulsar magnetosphere and/or from intra-binary shock. No radio detection of the source has been reported yet and although no gamma-ray/radio pulsation has been found, we estimated that the spin period of the MSP is approx. 3-5 ms based on the inferred gamma-ray luminosity.

  2. Grief and Healing in Young and Middle Age: A Widower's Journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Peter A

    2017-02-01

    The experience of grief is both uniquely personal and universal. Our personality, our relationship with the deceased, the manner in which the deceased died, our life stage, and many other contextual factors matter and impact grief, and yet there are many experiences, phases, stages of grief that are universal. Those who are grieving deeply or who are farther along in their healing are often trying to understand grief and its realities. It has been said that people die but relationships do not. As a widower twice, once at age 25 and then again nearly 30 years later, I agree with that sentiment, and it is the profound relationships with my wives Becky and Susan that propelled me to share my experiences and reflections on grief and healing. As a clinical psychologist and gerontologist I examined the grief and gerontology literature, learning new things that were useful and not as useful. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. "I am a widow with five children. I also have AIDS.".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, N

    1993-05-01

    Norman Martinez died in 1991. She died from AIDS in a town outside of Mexico City at age 32 years weighing 57 pounds and leaving behind 5 children. Mrs. Martinez died after she was widowed by her husbands who contracted HIV by giving blood professionally. While her husband learned 7 years before his death that he had HIV, he did not know what it was. The last child was born after Mrs. Martinez found that she, too, was HIV-seropositive, but the child was carried to term and also carries HIV since abortions are permitted in only select circumstances. The 16-year-old son works to provide for the family, while the 13-year-old daughter cares for the family and house at the expense of her education. Even though her family was poor, had barely enough to eat, and could not afford the AZT which she needs, Mrs. Martinez at least hoped that her children would not be stigmatized by the community. Mrs. Martinez goes on to state that the realization of her impending and untimely mortality made her stronger. She hopes that readers will learn from this depiction of her experience and educate the uninfected while being sensitive to the infected.

  4. Somatic panic-attack equivalents in a community sample of Rwandan widows who survived the 1994 genocide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagengimana, Athanase; Hinton, Devon; Bird, Bruce; Pollack, Mark; Pitman, Roger K

    2003-01-25

    The present study is the first to attempt to determine rates of panic attacks, especially 'somatically focused' panic attacks, panic disorder, symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and depression levels in a population of Rwandans traumatized by the 1994 genocide. The following measures were utilized: the Rwandan Panic-Disorder Survey (RPDS); the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ); and the PTSD Checklist (PCL). Forty of 100 Rwandan widows suffered somatically focused panic attacks during the previous 4 weeks. Thirty-five (87%) of those having panic attacks suffered panic disorder, making the rate of panic disorder for the entire sample 35%. Rwandan widows with panic attacks had greater psychopathology on all measures. Somatically focused panic-attack subtypes seem to constitute a key response to trauma in the Rwandan population. Future studies of traumatized non-Western populations should carefully assess not only somatoform disorder but also somatically focused panic attacks.

  5. First report of clinical presentation of a bite by a running spider ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article describes the clinical progression of symptoms over a period of 5 days of a bite inflicted by a Philodromus sp. spider. Commonly known as 'running spiders', these are not considered to be harmful to humans. This report, however, is the first description of an actual bite by a member of this group of spiders ...

  6. Beat sampling accuracy in estimating spruce spider mite (Acari: Tetranychidae) populations and injury on juniper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrewsbury, Paula M; Hardin, Mark R

    2004-08-01

    The use of a standardized beat sampling method for estimating spruce spider mite, Oligonychus ununguis (Jacobi) (Acari: Tetranychidae), densities on a widely used evergreen ornamental plant species, Juniperus chinensis variety 'Sargentii' A. Henry (Cupressaceae), was examined. There was a significant positive relationship between total spruce spider mite densities and spider mite densities from beat sampling on juniper. The slope and intercept of the relationship may be used by pest managers to predict total spider mite densities on plants from beat sample counts. Beat sampling dramatically underestimates the total number of spider mites on a foliage sample. The relationships between spruce spider mite feeding injury and spider mite density estimates from beat sampling juniper foliage and total spider mite counts on foliage were also examined. There was a significant positive relationship between spruce spider mite density as estimated from beat sampling and injury to the plants. There was a similar positive relationship between the total number of spruce spider mites and injury to the plants, suggesting that a pest manager could use beat sampling counts to estimate plant injury and related thresholds. These findings have important implications to decision-making for spruce spider mite control, especially as it relates to threshold levels and determining rates of predator releases. Further assessment of the effectiveness of beat and other sampling methods across multiple spider mite- host plant associations needs to be examined to enable pest managers to select sampling plans that are feasible and reliable.

  7. Live-trapping and handling brown bear

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper reports techniques developed to live trap and handle brown bears on the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge. The brown bears (Ursus middendorffi) on the...

  8. Brown Adipose Tissue: Function and Physiological Significance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    CANNON, BARBARA; NEDERGAARD, JAN

    2004-01-01

    .... Brown Adipose Tissue: Function and Physiological Significance. Physiol Rev 84: 277–359, 2004; 10.1152/physrev.00015.2003.—The function of brown adipose tissue is to transfer energy from food into heat...

  9. Hydrothermal-mechanical dewatering of brown coal

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Jian

    2017-01-01

    There are enormous reserves of brown coal in the world. In Australia, brown coal is used to generate most of electricity in the states of Victoria and South Australia. Brown coal is characterised by very high moisture content (around 60 wt% on a wet basis). Therefore, boilers used in the power station are very large and have low thermal efficiency, leading to high cost and large emissions of green house gas. High moisture content also makes brown coal uneconomical for transport...

  10. Survival advantage of marriage in uterine cancer patients contrasts poor outcome for widows: a Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, William J; Stany, Michael P; Phippen, Neil T; Bunch, Kristen P; Oliver, Kate E; Tian, Chunqiao; Maxwell, G Larry; Darcy, Kathleen M; Hamilton, Chad A

    2015-02-01

    Marriage confers a survival advantage for many cancers but has yet to be evaluated in uterine cancer patients. We sought to determine whether uterine cancer survival varied by self-reported relationship status. Data were downloaded from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program for women diagnosed with uterine cancer (between 1991 and 2010 in nine geographic regions). Patients with complete clinical data for analysis were categorized as married, single, widowed or other (divorced or separated). Differences in distributions were evaluated using Chi-square, exact and/or Mantel-Haenszel test. Uterine cancer survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Of 47,420 eligible patients, 56% were married, 15% were single and 19% were widows. Married vs. non-married women had a higher likelihood of having low risk (grade 1/2 endometrioid) endometrial cancer and local disease (pmarriage. This report identifies widows as a new high-risk subpopulation with significantly inferior outcomes potentially benefiting from personalized care and social support. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Reversed sex change by widowed males in polygynous and protogynous fishes: female removal experiments in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwamura, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Shohei; Kadota, Tatsuru

    2011-12-01

    Sex change, either protogyny (female to male) or protandry (male to female), is well known among fishes, but evidence of bidirectional sex change or reversed sex change in natural populations is still very limited. This is the first report on female removal experiments for polygnous and protogynous fish species to induce reversed sex change in the widowed males in the field. We removed all of the females and juveniles from the territories of dominant males in the cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus (Labridae) and the rusty angelfish Centropyge ferrugata (Pomacanthidae) on the coral reefs of Okinawa. In both species, if new females or juveniles did not immigrate into the territories of the widowed males, some of them emigrated to form male-male pairs. When a male-male pair formed, the smaller, subordinate partner began to perform female sexual behaviours ( n = 4 in L. dimidiatus; n = 2 in C. ferrugata) and, finally, released eggs ( n = 1, respectively). Thus, the reversed sex change occurred in the widowed males according to the change of their social status. These results suggest that such female removal experiments will contribute to the discovery of reversed sex change in the field also in other polygnous and protogynous species.

  12. Worry about not having a caregiver and depressive symptoms among widowed older adults in China: the role of family support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ling; Li, Yawen; Min, Joohong; Chi, Iris

    2017-08-01

    Using the stress-coping framework, this study examined whether worry about not having a caregiver in old age was associated with depressive symptoms among widowed Chinese older adults, including the moderating effects of self-perceived family support. Using a sample of 5331 widowed adults aged 60 years old or older from the 2006 National Sample Survey of the Aged Population in Urban/Rural China, we regressed measures of depressive symptoms on worry about not having a caregiver. We also tested moderation effects of family support. Individuals who were worried about not having a caregiver reported significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms. Feeling that their children are filial, having instrumental support from children, and having only daughters moderated the effects of worry about not having a caregiver on depressive symptoms. Our findings indicate the detrimental effects of worry about not having a caregiver on the psychological well-being of widowed older adults. This study also highlights some forms of family support that may help reduce such negative effects of widowhood.

  13. Fulfilling the Promise of Brown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Judith A.

    1995-01-01

    Summarizes the U.S. Department of Education's efforts to implement the mandate of "Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas" and the Civil Rights Act of 1964, examining traditional tools used in enforcing civil rights laws and reviewing new strategies to promote high quality education, equal educational opportunity, and diversity.…

  14. Endemic harvestmen and spiders of Austria (Arachnida: Opiliones, Araneae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komposch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive overview of plant, fungus and animal species of Austria revealed a total of 748 endemic and subendemic species, including, 11 harvestman and 46 spider species. Altogether two endemic harvestmen (Nemastoma bidentatum relictum, Nemastoma schuelleri and 8 endemic spiders (Abacoproeces molestus, Collinsia (caliginosa nemenziana, Mughiphantes severus, Mughiphantes styriacus, Pelecopsis alpica, Scotophaeus nanus, Troglohyphantes novicordis, Troglohyphantes tauriscus, beside 9 subendemic harvestman and 38 subendemic spider species have been recorded from Austria. Hot-spots of endemism in the Eastern Alps are the north-eastern (Ennstaler Alps and southern Calcareous Alps (Karawanken, Karnische Alps and the Central Alps (Hohe Tauern, Gurktaler Alps, Ötztaler and Stubaier Alps. Most of the endemic arachnid species occur from the nival down to the montane zone. Important habitats are rocky areas, caves and woodlands. High absolute numbers and percentages of endemics can be found within the harvestman families Cladonychiidae, Ischyropsalididae and Nemastomatidae and in the spider genera Lepthyphantes s. l. and Troglohyphantes. The conservation status of these highly endangered taxa – 85 % of the spider species and 100 % of the harvestman taxa are endangered in Austria – is poor.

  15. Biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings on recombinant spider silk fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Liang; Habibovic, Pamela; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens A [Department of Tissue Regeneration, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Hedhammar, My; Johansson, Jan [Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, the Biomedical Centre, Box 575, 751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Blom, Tobias; Leifer, Klaus [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, S-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-08-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramic coatings, applied on surfaces of metallic and polymeric biomaterials, can improve their performance in bone repair and regeneration. Spider silk is biocompatible, strong and elastic, and hence an attractive biomaterial for applications in connective tissue repair. Recently, artificial spider silk, with mechanical and structural characteristics similar to those of native spider silk, has been produced from recombinant minispidroins. In the present study, supersaturated simulated body fluid was used to deposit calcium phosphate coatings on recombinant spider silk fibres. The mineralization process was followed in time using scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) detector and Raman spectroscope. Focused ion beam technology was used to produce a cross section of a coated fibre, which was further analysed by EDX. Preliminary in vitro experiments using a culture of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on coated fibres were also performed. This study showed that recombinant spider silk fibres were successfully coated with a homogeneous and thick crystalline calcium phosphate layer. In the course of the mineralization process from modified simulated body fluid, sodium chloride crystals were first deposited on the silk surface, followed by the deposition of a calcium phosphate layer. The coated silk fibres supported the attachment and growth of hMSCs.

  16. Treatment effect on biases in size estimation in spider phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiban, Youssef; Fruth, Martina B; Pauli, Paul; Kinateder, Max; Reichenberger, Jonas; Mühlberger, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    The current study investigates biases in size estimations made by spider-phobic and healthy participants before and after treatment. Forty-one spider-phobic and 20 healthy participants received virtual reality (VR) exposure treatment and were then asked to rate the size of a real spider immediately before and, on average, 15days after the treatment. During the VR exposure treatment skin conductance response was assessed. Prior to the treatment, both groups tended to overestimate the size of the spider, but this size estimation bias was significantly larger in the phobic group than in the control group. The VR exposure treatment reduced this bias, which was reflected in a significantly smaller size rating post treatment. However, the size estimation bias was unrelated to the skin conductance response. Our results confirm the hypothesis that size estimation by spider-phobic patients is biased. This bias is not stable over time and can be decreased with adequate treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Phylogenomic analysis of spiders reveals nonmonophyly of orb weavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Rosa; Hormiga, Gustavo; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2014-08-04

    Spiders constitute one of the most successful clades of terrestrial predators. Their extraordinary diversity, paralleled only by some insects and mites, is often attributed to the use of silk, and, in one of the largest lineages, to stereotyped behaviors for building foraging webs of remarkable biomechanical properties. However, our understanding of higher-level spider relationships is poor and is largely based on morphology. Prior molecular efforts have focused on a handful of genes but have provided little resolution to key questions such as the origin of the orb weavers. We apply a next-generation sequencing approach to resolve spider phylogeny, examining the relationships among its major lineages. We further explore possible pitfalls in phylogenomic reconstruction, including missing data, unequal rates of evolution, and others. Analyses of multiple data sets all agree on the basic structure of the spider tree and all reject the long-accepted monophyly of Orbiculariae, by placing the cribellate orb weavers (Deinopoidea) with other groups and not with the ecribellate orb weavers (Araneoidea). These results imply independent origins for the two types of orb webs (cribellate and ecribellate) or a much more ancestral origin of the orb web with subsequent loss in the so-called RTA clade. Either alternative demands a major reevaluation of our current understanding of the spider evolutionary chronicle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prey interception drives web invasion and spider size determines successful web takeover in nocturnal orb-web spiders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjin Gan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A striking feature of web-building spiders is the use of silk to make webs, mainly for prey capture. However, building a web is energetically expensive and increases the risk of predation. To reduce such costs and still have access to abundant prey, some web-building spiders have evolved web invasion behaviour. In general, no consistent patterns of web invasion have emerged and the factors determining web invasion remain largely unexplored. Here we report web invasion among conspecifics in seven nocturnal species of orb-web spiders, and examined the factors determining the probability of webs that could be invaded and taken over by conspecifics. About 36% of webs were invaded by conspecifics, and 25% of invaded webs were taken over by the invaders. A web that was built higher and intercepted more prey was more likely to be invaded. Once a web was invaded, the smaller the size of the resident spider, the more likely its web would be taken over by the invader. This study suggests that web invasion, as a possible way of reducing costs, may be widespread in nocturnal orb-web spiders.

  19. Prey interception drives web invasion and spider size determines successful web takeover in nocturnal orb-web spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Wenjin; Liu, Shengjie; Yang, Xiaodong; Li, Daiqin; Lei, Chaoliang

    2015-09-24

    A striking feature of web-building spiders is the use of silk to make webs, mainly for prey capture. However, building a web is energetically expensive and increases the risk of predation. To reduce such costs and still have access to abundant prey, some web-building spiders have evolved web invasion behaviour. In general, no consistent patterns of web invasion have emerged and the factors determining web invasion remain largely unexplored. Here we report web invasion among conspecifics in seven nocturnal species of orb-web spiders, and examined the factors determining the probability of webs that could be invaded and taken over by conspecifics. About 36% of webs were invaded by conspecifics, and 25% of invaded webs were taken over by the invaders. A web that was built higher and intercepted more prey was more likely to be invaded. Once a web was invaded, the smaller the size of the resident spider, the more likely its web would be taken over by the invader. This study suggests that web invasion, as a possible way of reducing costs, may be widespread in nocturnal orb-web spiders. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Influence of spider silk on refugia preferences of the recluse spiders Loxosceles reclusa and Loxosceles laeta (Araneae: Sicariidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Richard S; Rust, Michael K

    2010-06-01

    In a previous experimental study, recluse spiders Loxosceles reclusa Gertsch and Mulaik and Loxosceles laeta (Nicolet) (Araneae: Sicariidae) preferred small cardboard refugia covered with conspecific silk compared with never-occupied refugia. Herein, we investigated some factors that might be responsible for this preference using similar cardboard refugia. When the two Loxosceles species were given choices between refugia previously occupied by their own and by the congeneric species, neither showed a species-specific preference; however, each chose refugia coated with conspecific silk rather than those previously inhabited by a distantly related cribellate spider, Metaltella simoni (Keyserling). When L. laeta spiders were offered refugia that were freshly removed from silk donors compared with heated, aged refugia from the same silk donor, older refugia were preferred. Solvent extracts of L. laeta silk were chosen approximately as often as control refugia when a range of solvents (methylene chloride:methanol, water, and hexane) were used. However, when acetone was used on similar silk, there was a statistical preference for the control, indicating that there might be a mildly repellent aspect to acetone-washed silk. Considering the inability to show attraction to chemical aspects of fresh silk, it seems that physical attributes may be more important for selection and that there might be repellency to silk of a recently vacated spider. These findings are discussed in regard to pest management strategies to control recluse spiders.

  1. How spiders practice aggressive and Batesian mimicry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena J. NELSON, Robert R. JACKSON

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available To understand communication, the interests of the sender and the receiver/s of signals should be considered separately. When our goal is to understand the adaptive significance of specific responses to specific signals by the receiver, questions about signal information are useful. However, when our goal is to understand the adaptive significance to the sender of generating a signal, it may be better to envisage the receiver’s response to signals as part of the sender’s extended phenotype. By making signals, a sender interfaces with the receiver’s model of the world and indirectly manipulates its behaviour. This is especially clear in cases of mimicry, where animals use deceptive signals that indirectly manipulate the behaviour of receivers. Many animals adopt Batesian mimicry to deceive their predators, or aggressive mimicry to deceive their prey. We review examples from the lite­rature on spiders to illustrate how these phenomena, traditionally thought of as distinct, can become entangled in a web of lies [Current Zoology 58 (4: 620–629, 2012].

  2. Thermal architecture for the SPIDER flight cryostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, J. E.; Ade, P. A. R.; Amiri, M.; Benton, S. J.; Bihary, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Bonetti, J. A.; Bryan, S. A.; Burger, B.; Chiang, H. C.; Contaldi, C. R.; Crill, B. P.; Doré, O.; Farhang, M.; Filippini, J.; Fissel, L. M.; Gandilo, N. N.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G.; Holmes, W.; Hristov, V. V.; Irwin, K. D.; Jones, W. C.; Kuo, C. L.; MacTavish, C. J.; Mason, P. V.; Montroy, T. E.; Morford, T. A.; Netterfield, C. B.; O'Dea, D. T.; Rahlin, A. S.; Reintsema, C. D.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Schenker, M. A.; Shariff, J. A.; Soler, J. D.; Trangsrud, A.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, R. S.; Turner, A. D.

    2010-07-01

    We describe the cryogenic system for SPIDER, a balloon-borne microwave polarimeter that will map 8% of the sky with degree-scale angular resolution. The system consists of a 1284 L liquid helium cryostat and a 16 L capillary-filled superfluid helium tank, which provide base operating temperatures of 4 K and 1.5 K, respectively. Closed-cycle 3He adsorption refrigerators supply sub-Kelvin cooling power to multiple focal planes, which are housed in monochromatic telescope inserts. The main helium tank is suspended inside the vacuum vessel with thermally insulating fiberglass flexures, and shielded from thermal radiation by a combination of two vapor cooled shields and multi-layer insulation. This system allows for an extremely low instrumental background and a hold time in excess of 25 days. The total mass of the cryogenic system, including cryogens, is approximately 1000 kg. This enables conventional long duration balloon flights. We will discuss the design, thermal analysis, and qualification of the cryogenic system.

  3. How to visualize the spider mite silk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clotuche, G; Le Goff, G; Mailleux, A-C; Deneubourg, J-L; Detrain, C; Hance, T

    2009-09-01

    Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae) is a phytophagous mite that forms colonies of several thousand individuals. Like spiders, every individual produces abundant silk strands and is able to construct a common web for the entire colony. Despite the importance of this silk for the biology of this worldwide species, only one previous study suggested how to visualize it. To analyze the web structuration, we developed a simple technique to dye T. urticae'silk on both inert and living substrates. Fluorescent brightener 28 (FB) (Sigma F3543) diluted in different solvents at different concentrations regarding the substrate was used to observe single strands of silk. On glass lenses, a 0.5% dimethyl sulfoxide solution was used and on bean leaves, a 0.1% aqueous solution. A difference of silk deposit was observed depending the substrate: rectilinear threads on glass lenses and more sinuous ones on bean leaves. This visualizing technique will help to carry out future studies about the web architecture and silk used by T. urticae. It might also be useful for the study of other silk-spinning arthropods.

  4. [Providing grief counseling to a major depressive elderly widower: a nurse's experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hsiu-Ching; Chow, Philip C

    2008-10-01

    The death of a spouse is both a major loss and a tremendous life stressor for the partner left behind. Such has been shown to be particularly hard on the elderly. This article describes a nurse's experience caring for an elderly patient suffering from major depression resulting from the death of his wife. While providing nursing care to the client, the author, employing holistic nursing assessment, identified a reciprocal influence between his depressive symptoms and grief reaction. In applying the Inventory of Complicated Grief to ascertain grief reaction intensity to help the client discern between major depressive symptoms and grief reaction, the author found that the client (1) could not accept the loss of his wife, (2) had difficulty adjusting to life after his wife's death, and (3) faced a tense and distant relationship with his son. Such resulted in suicidal ideation and planning and feelings of loneliness, helplessness, hopelessness and incapability, which triggered major depression and a complicated grief reaction. Therefore, the author applied grief counseling to help the client accept the loss of his spouse, communicate his grief, overcome the difficult adjustment to life after his spouse's death, bid farewell to his wife, and establish new relationships. Such counseling gradually helped the client accept the inevitability of death and his wife's passing. To help the client establish new relationships under existing circumstances of negligible external support systems, the author encouraged the client to establish a new relationship with himself and integrate the old-age stage of life cycle naturally into his daily routine. Based on this care experience, we recommend psychiatric nurses assess cautiously the loss experience and grief reaction in elderly widowers under their care in order to provide timely grief counseling intervention to help the client pass quickly through the grieving phase and free him or her from the haze of depression.

  5. Synthetic Adhesive Attachment Discs based on Spider Pyriform Silk Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Dharamdeep; Sahni, Vasav; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-03-01

    Among the variety of silks produced by spiders, pyriform silk is used in conjunction with the dragline silk to attach webs to different surfaces. Cob weaver spiders employ different architectural patterns to utilize the pyriform silk and form attachment joints with each pattern having a characteristic adhesive performance. The staple pin architecture is a one of the strongest attachment designs employed by spiders to attach their webs. Here we use a synthetic approach to create the a similar patterned architecture attachment discs on aluminum substrate using thermoplastic polyurethane. Measurable pull off forces are generated when the synthetic discs are peeled off a surface. This innovative adhesive strategy can be a source of design in various biomedical applications. Financial Support from National Science Foundation.

  6. Final design of thermal diagnostic system in SPIDER ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brombin, M., E-mail: matteo.brombin@igi.cnr.it; Dalla Palma, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pomaro, N. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    The prototype radio frequency source of the ITER heating neutral beams will be first tested in SPIDER test facility to optimize H{sup −} production, cesium dynamics, and overall plasma characteristics. Several diagnostics will allow to fully characterise the beam in terms of uniformity and divergence and the source, besides supporting a safe and controlled operation. In particular, thermal measurements will be used for beam monitoring and system protection. SPIDER will be instrumented with mineral insulated cable thermocouples, both on the grids, on other components of the beam source, and on the rear side of the beam dump water cooled elements. This paper deals with the final design and the technical specification of the thermal sensor diagnostic for SPIDER. In particular the layout of the diagnostic, together with the sensors distribution in the different components, the cables routing and the conditioning and acquisition cubicles are described.

  7. Web-building spiders attract prey by storing decaying matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman-Chiswell, Bojun T.; Kulinski, Melissa M.; Muscat, Robert L.; Nguyen, Kim A.; Norton, Briony A.; Symonds, Matthew R. E.; Westhorpe, Gina E.; Elgar, Mark A.

    The orb-weaving spider Nephila edulis incorporates into its web a band of decaying animal and plant matter. While earlier studies demonstrate that larger spiders utilise these debris bands as caches of food, the presence of plant matter suggests additional functions. When organic and plastic items were placed in the webs of N. edulis, some of the former but none of the latter were incorporated into the debris band. Using an Y-maze olfactometer, we show that sheep blowflies Lucilia cuprina are attracted to recently collected debris bands, but that this attraction does not persist over time. These data reveal an entirely novel foraging strategy, in which a sit-and-wait predator attracts insect prey by utilising the odours of decaying organic material. The spider's habit of replenishing the debris band may be necessary to maintain its efficacy for attracting prey.

  8. Adhesion modulation using glue droplet spreading in spider capture silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-05-01

    Orb web spiders use sticky capture spiral silk to retain prey in webs. Capture spiral silk is composed of an axial fibre of flagelliform silk covered with glue droplets that are arranged in a beads-on-a-string morphology that allows multiple droplets to simultaneously extend and resist pull off. Previous studies showed that the adhesion of capture silk is responsive to environmental humidity, increasing up to an optimum humidity that varied among different spider species. The maximum adhesion was hypothesized to occur when the viscoelasticity of the glue optimized contributions from glue spreading and bulk cohesion. In this study, we show how glue droplet shape during peeling contributes significantly to capture silk adhesion. Both overspreading and underspreading of glue droplets reduces adhesion through changes in crack propagation and failure regime. Understanding the mechanism of stimuli-responsive adhesion of spider capture silk will lead to new designs for smarter adhesives. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. New data on spider fauna from northern Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudić B.D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During two years of research on the epigeic fauna in agroecosystems of northern Serbia, which was conducted as a part of SEE-ERA NET PLUS project no. 51, 5488 spider specimens were collected at three fields with oilseed rape (Brassica napus var. oleifera, turnip rape (Brassica rapa x chinensis and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum as subsequent crop at Stari Žednik (Vojvodina. A total of 62 species from 15 families were identified. Pardosa agrestis and Xysticus kochi were the dominant species in the studied fields. Spider families with significant presence were Lycosidae, Linyphiidae, Thomisidae, Gnaphosidae, Theridiidae and Philodromidae. Seven species are new to the spider fauna of Serbia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173038

  10. Recombinant Spider Silks—Biopolymers with Potential for Future Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Scheibel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Nature has evolved a range of materials that compete with man-made materials in physical properties; one of these is spider silk. Silk is a fibrous material that exhibits extremely high strength and toughness with regard to its low density. In this review we discuss the molecular structure of spider silk and how this understanding has allowed the development of recombinant silk proteins that mimic the properties of natural spider silks. Additionally, we will explore the material morphologies and the applications of these proteins. Finally, we will look at attempts to combine the silk structure with chemical polymers and how the structure of silk has inspired the engineering of novel polymers.

  11. Final design of thermal diagnostic system in SPIDER ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombin, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pomaro, N.

    2016-11-01

    The prototype radio frequency source of the ITER heating neutral beams will be first tested in SPIDER test facility to optimize H- production, cesium dynamics, and overall plasma characteristics. Several diagnostics will allow to fully characterise the beam in terms of uniformity and divergence and the source, besides supporting a safe and controlled operation. In particular, thermal measurements will be used for beam monitoring and system protection. SPIDER will be instrumented with mineral insulated cable thermocouples, both on the grids, on other components of the beam source, and on the rear side of the beam dump water cooled elements. This paper deals with the final design and the technical specification of the thermal sensor diagnostic for SPIDER. In particular the layout of the diagnostic, together with the sensors distribution in the different components, the cables routing and the conditioning and acquisition cubicles are described.

  12. Spider fauna of semiarid eastern Colorado agroecosystems: diversity, abundance, and effects of crop intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzicnik, Lauren M; Peairs, Frank B; Cushing, Paula E; Draney, Michael L; Merrill, Scott C

    2013-02-01

    Spiders are critical predators in agroecosystems. Crop management practices can influence predator density and diversity, which, in turn, can influence pest management strategies. Crop intensification is a sustainable agricultural technique that can enhance crop production although optimizing soil moisture. To date, there is no information on how crop intensification affects natural enemy populations, particularly spiders. This study had two objectives: to characterize the abundance and diversity of spiders in eastern Colorado agroecosystems, and to test the hypothesis that spider diversity and density would be higher in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in crop-intensified rotations compared with wheat in conventional rotations. We collected spiders through pitfall, vacuum, and lookdown sampling from 2002 to 2007 to test these objectives. Over 11,000 spiders in 19 families from 119 species were captured from all sampling techniques. Interestingly, the hunting spider guild represented 89% of the spider fauna captured from all sites with the families Gnaphosidae and Lycosidae representing 75% of these spiders. Compared with European agroecosystems, these agroecosystems had greater diversity, which can be beneficial for the biological control of pests. Overall, spider densities were low in these semiarid cropping systems, and crop intensification effects on spider densities were not evident at this scale.

  13. Nutrient deprivation induces property variations in spider gluey silk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean J Blamires

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms facilitating property variability in biological adhesives may promote biomimetic innovations. Spider gluey silks such as the spiral threads in orb webs and the gumfoot threads in cobwebs, both of which comprise of an axial thread coated by glue, are biological adhesives that have variable physical and chemical properties. Studies show that the physical and chemical properties of orb web gluey threads change when spiders are deprived of food. It is, however, unknown whether gumfoot threads undergo similar property variations when under nutritional stress. Here we tested whether protein deprivation induces similar variations in spiral and gumfoot thread morphology and stickiness. We manipulated protein intake for the orb web spider Nephila clavipes and the cobweb spider Latrodectus hesperus and measured the diameter, glue droplet volume, number of droplets per mm, axial thread width, thread stickiness and adhesive energy of their gluey silks. We found that the gluey silks of both species were stickier when the spiders were deprived of protein than when the spiders were fed protein. In N. clavipes a concomitant increase in glue droplet volume was found. Load-extension curves showed that protein deprivation induced glue property variations independent of the axial thread extensions in both species. We predicted that changes in salt composition of the glues were primarily responsible for the changes in stickiness of the silks, although changes in axial thread properties might also contribute. We, additionally, showed that N. clavipes' glue changes color under protein deprivation, probably as a consequence of changes to its biochemical composition.

  14. Prey type, vibrations and handling interactively influence spider silk expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamires, S J; Chao, I-C; Tso, I-M

    2010-11-15

    The chemical and mechanical properties of spider major ampullate (MA) silks vary in response to different prey, mostly via differential expression of two genes - MaSp1 and MaSp2 - although the spinning process exerts additional influence over the mechanical properties of silk. The prey cues that initiate differential gene expression are unknown. Prey nutrients, vibratory stimuli and handling have been suggested to be influential. We performed experiments to decouple the vibratory stimuli and handling associated with high and low kinetic energy prey (crickets vs flies) from their prey nutrients to test the relative influence of each as inducers of silk protein expression in the orb web spider Nephila pilipes. We found that the MA silks from spiders feeding on live crickets had greater percentages of glutamine, serine, alanine and glycine than those from spiders feeding on live flies. Proline composition of the silks was unaffected by feeding treatment. Increases in alanine and glycine in the MA silks of the live-cricket-feeding spiders indicate a probable increase in MaSp1 gene expression. The amino acid compositions of N. pilipes feeding on crickets with fly stimuli and N. pilipes feeding on flies with cricket stimuli did not differ from each other or from pre-treatment responses, so these feeding treatments did not induce differential MaSp expression. Our results indicate that cricket vibratory stimuli and handling interact with nutrients to induce N. pilipes to adjust their gene expression to produce webs with mechanical properties appropriate for the retention of this prey. This shows that spiders can genetically alter their silk chemical compositions and, presumably, mechanical properties upon exposure to different prey types. The lack of any change in proline composition with feeding treatment in N. pilipes suggests that the MaSp model determined for Nephila clavipes is not universally applicable to all Nephila.

  15. A preliminary checklist of spiders (Araneae: Arachnida in Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary, Western Ghats, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Adarsh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary study was conducted to document spider diversity in Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary, Idukki District, Kerala State in southern India.  The study was conducted from October to November 2012.  A total of 101 species of spiders belonging to 65 genera from 29 families were identified from the sanctuary.  This accounted for 6.98% of Indian spider species, 17.81% of Indian spider genera and 48.33% of the spider families of India.  The dominant families were Lycosidae (11 species and Araneidae (10.  Two endemic genera of Indian spiders such as Annandaliella and Neoheterophrictus were found at Chinnar, each representing one species each, and belonging to the family Theraphosidae.  A guild structure analysis of the spiders revealed seven feeding guilds such as orb weavers, stalkers, ground runners, foliage runners, sheet web builders, space web builders and ambushers. 

  16. Spiders and harvestmen on tree trunks obtained by three sampling methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machač, Ondřej

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We studied spiders and harvestmen on tree trunks using three sampling methods. In 2013, spider and harvestman research was conducted on the trunks of selected species of deciduous trees (linden, oak, maple in the town of Přerov and a surrounding floodplain forest near the Bečva River in the Czech Republic. Three methods were used to collect arachnids (pitfall traps with a conservation fluid, sticky traps and cardboard pocket traps. Overall, 1862 spiders and 864 harvestmen were trapped, represented by 56 spider species belonging to 15 families and seven harvestman species belonging to one family. The most effective method for collecting spider specimens was a modified pitfall trap method, and in autumn (September to October a cardboard band method. The results suggest a high number of spiders overwintering on the tree bark. The highest species diversity of spiders was found in pitfall traps, evaluated as the most effective method for collecting harvestmen too.

  17. Secondary eyes mediate the response to looming objects in jumping spiders (Phidippus audax, Salticidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, Lauren; Long, Skye M; Jakob, Elizabeth M

    2012-12-23

    Some species have sensory systems divided into subsystems with morphologically different sense organs that acquire different types of information within the same modality. Jumping spiders (family Salticidae) have eight eyes. Four eyes are directed anteriorly to view objects in front of the spider: a pair of principal eyes track targets with their movable retinae, while the immobile anterior lateral (AL) eyes have a larger field of view and lower resolution. To test whether the principal eyes, the AL eyes, or both together mediate the response to looming stimuli, we presented spiders with a video of a solid black circle that rapidly expanded (loomed) or contracted (receded). Control spiders and spiders with their principal eyes masked were significantly more likely to back away from the looming stimulus than were spiders with their AL eyes masked. Almost no individuals backed away from the receding stimulus. Our results show that the AL eyes alone mediate the loom response to objects anterior to the spider.

  18. Contamination vs. harm-relevant outcome expectancies and covariation bias in spider phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Peter J; Peters, Madelon L

    2007-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that spiders are not feared because of harmful outcome expectancies but because of disgust and contamination-relevant outcome expectancies. This study investigated the relative strength of contamination- and harm-relevant UCS expectancies and covariation bias in spider phobia. High (n=25) and low (n=24) spider fearful individuals saw a series of slides comprising spiders, pitbulls, maggots, and rabbits. Slides were randomly paired with either a harm-relevant outcome (electrical shock), a contamination-related outcome (drinking of a distasting fluid), or nothing. Spider fearful individuals displayed a contamination-relevant UCS expectancy bias associated with spiders, whereas controls displayed a harm-relevant expectancy bias. There was no evidence for a (differential) postexperimental covariation bias; thus the biased expectancies were not robust against refutation. The present findings add to the evidence that contamination ideation is critically involved in spider phobia.

  19. Shear-induced rigidity in spider silk glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, Kristie J.; McKiernan, Keri; Akhenblit, Paul; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2012-09-01

    We measure the elastic stiffnesses of the concentrated viscous protein solution of the dehydrated Nephila clavipes major ampullate gland with Brillouin light scattering. The glandular material shows no rigidity but possesses a tensile stiffness similar to that of spider silk. We show, however, that with application of a simple static shear, the mechanical properties of the spider gland protein mixture can be altered irreversibly, lowering symmetry and enabling shear waves to be supported, thus, giving rise to rigidity and yielding elastic properties similar to those of the naturally spun (i.e., dynamically sheared) silk.

  20. Volatile compounds from leaves of the African spider plant (Gynandropsis gynandra) with bioactivity against spider mite (Tetranychus urticae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyalala, Samuel Odeyo; Petersen, Mikael Agerlin; Grout, Brian William Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Gynandropsis gynandra emits acetonitrile as a foliar volatile from intact plants and isolated leaves, and that this compound is an effective spider mite repellent. This study has used gas chromatography–mass spectrometry to investigate volatile compounds...... emitted from homogenised G. gynandra leaves to evaluate their tissue acetonitrile content and to look for other compounds that might be exploited for the management of spider mites. Acetonitrile was absent from the homogenised tissues of five lines of G. gynandra, studied over two seasons. Thirteen...... volatile compounds were emitted by G. gynandra at significantly higher levels than mite-susceptible pot roses, including isothiocyanates, aldehydes, esters, alcohols and terpenes. Six representative compounds were selected to assess bioactivity. Spider mite populations were completely inactive after a 2¿h...

  1. Taxonomic revision of the spider family Penestomidae (Araneae, Entelegynae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, J.A.; Griswold, C.E.; Haddad, C.R.

    2010-01-01

    Conflicting character evidence and a scarcity of male specimens has historically made placement of the spider subfamily Penestominae Simon problematic. The Penestominae was recently removed from the family Eresidae and promoted to family rank based on the results of a molecular phylogenetic study; a

  2. Mating duration and sperm precedence in the spider Linyphia triangularis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Ditte L.; Toft, Søren; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2011-01-01

    , especially the males, are able to influence the outcome of mating for their own benefit. We studied the linyphiid spider Linyphia triangularis in which mating follows a strict sequence during which the male inducts two droplets of sperm and transfers them to the female. We performed sperm competition...

  3. LAMBRACHAEUS RAM/FER ALCOCK, A RARE SPIDER CRAB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LAMBRACHAEUS RAM/FER ALCOCK, A RARE SPIDER CRAB FROM THE. EAST COAST OF SOUTHERN AFRICA (DECAPODA, BRACHYURA,. MAJIDAE). BRIAN KENS LEY. South African Museum. Cape Town. Accepted: May 1977. ABSTRACT. Lambrachaew rami/er Alcock, previously known only from a single record ...

  4. Spiders of the Vine Plants in Southern Moravia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Havlová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Araneofauna of vineyards is relatively known in Central Europe but we have a lack of knowledge about araneofauna which occur directly on the vine plants. Our investigation was focused on spiders which live on vine plants, especially on the vine plants trunks. We investigated spiders in six vineyards in southern Moravia (Šatov, Mikulov, Popice, Morkůvky, Nosislav and Blučina. Vineyards were under different soil management, traps were placed on different parts of particular locality (terraced and plain and all localities were under integrated pest management. We employed two types of cardboard traps for spider collecting during whole vegetation season. Altogether, we collected 21 spider species which belong to seven families. The most important species was Marpissa nivoyi (Lucas, 1836, which is mentioned in the Red List as vulnerable (VU and Sibianor tantulus (Simon, 1868 which had unknown distribution in the Czech Republic. The other very interesting result is that the most common species is myrmecomorph Synageles venator (Lucas, 1836, which is scarcely recorded in such huge numbers as we documented in our study.

  5. Spiders associated with papaya, Carica papaya L., in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The main objective of this work was to study the species composition and population dynamics of spiders associated with papaya plantings in three papaya production areas: Corozal, Isabela, and Lajas, Puerto Rico. Nineteen species representing seven families and 15 genera were identified. Members of ...

  6. Further notes on the spiders of New Guinea I (Argyopidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrysanthus, Fr.

    1971-01-01

    In this paper several collections of spiders are dealt with, originating from New Guinea, Bismarck Arch., Solomon Is., and from islands of the Great Barrier Reef and in the Coral Sea. Descriptions, figures and/or remarks are given of the following species: Argyope aemula (Walckenaer), A. aetherea

  7. Ballooning behavior in the golden orbweb spider Nephilapilipes (Araneae: Nephilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa M.J. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ballooning, a mode of aerial dispersal in spiders, is an innate behavior that requires appropriate physiological and meteorological conditions. Although only rarely reported in the golden orbweb spiders, family Nephilidae, the large geographic distributions of most nephilids—in particular of Nephila species—would imply that these spiders likely routinely disperse by ballooning in spite of giant female sizes. Here we study ballooning behavior in the golden orbweb spider Nephila pilipes (Fabricius, 1793. Specifically, we test for the propensity of spiderlings to deploy ballooning as a dispersal mechanism. We subjected a total of 59 first-instar spiderlings to a wind experiment at two wind speeds (2.17 ± 0.02 m s-1 and 3.17 ± 0.02 m s-1 under laboratory conditions. Under an average wind speed of 3.17 m s-1, none of the spiderlings exhibited pre-ballooning or ballooning behavior. However, at an average wind speed of 2.17 m s-1, 53 (89.8% spiderlings showed pre-ballooning behavior, and 17 (32.1% of the pre-ballooners ultimately ballooned. Our results concur with prior reports on spiderlings of other families that pre-ballooning behavior is a requirement for ballooning to occur. Furthermore, although we cannot rule out other dispersal mechanisms such as synanthropic spread, our findings suggest that the widespread N. pilipes uses ballooning to colonize remote oceanic islands.

  8. Food caching in orb-web spiders (Araneae: Araneoidea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion de Crespigny, Fleur E.; Herberstein, Marie E.; Elgar, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    Caching or storing surplus prey may reduce the risk of starvation during periods of food deprivation. While this behaviour occurs in a variety of birds and mammals, it is infrequent among invertebrates. However, golden orb-web spiders, Nephila edulis, incorporate a prey cache in their relatively permanent web, which they feed on during periods of food shortage. Heavier spiders significantly reduced weight loss if they were able to access a cache, but lost weight if the cache was removed. The presence or absence of stored prey had no effect on the weight loss of lighter spiders. Furthermore, N. edulis always attacked new prey, irrespective of the number of unprocessed prey in the web. In contrast, females of Argiope keyserlingi, who build a new web every day and do not cache prey, attacked fewer new prey items if some had already been caught. Thus, a necessary pre-adaptation to the evolution of prey caching in orb-web spiders may be a durable or permanent web, such as that constructed by Nephila.

  9. Female mating strategy during precopulatory mate guarding in spider mites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oku, K.

    2009-01-01

    In some taxa, females choose their mates indirectly by using male combat. In the Kanzawa spider mite, Tetranychus kanzawai, adult males guard prereproductive quiescent females. In a dual choice experiment, more males first approached females already guarded by a conspecific male than approached

  10. Spiders (Arachnida: Araneae) Of Milbridge, Washington County, Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel T. Jennings; Frank Jr. Graham

    2007-01-01

    An inventory or spiders associated with diverse habitats of Milbridge, a 6,290-ha area of the East Coastal BioPhysical Region, yielded 6,979 individuals of 19 families, 145 genera, and 302 species (4 unknown). Species richness per genus ranged from 1 to 13, with 88 genera represented by a single species. Total species composition favored web spinners over hunters;...

  11. Infrared and Raman Study of the Recluse Spider Silk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. L.; Wang, Qijue; Xing, Zhen; Schniepp, H. C.; Qazilbash, M. M.

    Spider silk exhibits remarkable mechanical properties, such as high tensile strength and toughness. We want to gain insight into the composition and structure of spider silk to discover the origin of these properties. We are especially interested in the organization of the crystalline beta sheets that are expected to contribute to the high strength of the silk from the recluse spider, Loxosceles laeta. The recluse spider produces a silk that has a unique geometry amongst arachnids. We measure the silk's optical properties, particularly the infrared-active and Raman-active vibrations. Broadband infrared transmission spectra were collected in the spectral range between 600 cm-1 and 4000 cm-1, with light polarized parallel and perpendicular to the long axis of the silk. Raman micro-spectroscopy was performed in the spectral range 500 cm-1 and 4000 cm- 1 with a 514 nm laser. The infrared and Raman vibrational modes are fit with Lorentzian and pseudo-Voigt functions. The vibrational modes are assigned to specific structures and electronic bonds in the silk. This work was supported by NASA/ Virginia Space Grant Consortium.

  12. Central European habitats inhabited by spiders with disjunctive distributions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Vlastimil

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 2 (2011), s. 367-380 ISSN 1505-2249 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : spiders * glacial relicts * boreomontane species Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.506, year: 2011

  13. Spider dystrophy as an ocular manifestation of myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louprasong, Amber C; Light, Dennis J; Diller, Rebecca S

    2010-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most common adult-onset muscular dystrophy. It is an autosomal dominant inherited neuromuscular disease that is characterized by myotonia, muscle weakness, and atrophy. It affects multiple systems including skeletal muscular, gastrointestinal, cardiac, respiratory, central nervous, endocrine, and ocular. Ocular manifestations of myotonic dystrophy include cataract, ocular muscle changes, hypotony, and retinal pigmentary changes in the periphery or in the macula (known as pigment pattern dystrophy). This report presents and discusses the case of a pigmented pattern dystrophy known as spider dystrophy as an ocular manifestation of myotonic dystrophy. A 44-year-old man with myotonic dystrophy presented to the eye clinic for routine examination. Ocular history included previous bilateral cataract surgery and mild bilateral ptosis for the last "few years." Dilated fundus examination was remarkable for bilateral macular pigmentary changes in an irregular "spider"-shaped pattern. The patient was asymptomatic without decrease in vision or Amsler grid defects. Optical coherence tomography was normal. A retinal consult concurred with the diagnosis of spider dystrophy. Photo documentation was obtained, and the patient is being monitored annually. Pigmented pattern dystrophies, including spider dystrophy, have been associated with myotonic dystrophy. They are set apart from other retinal dystrophies because they rarely affect visual acuity, and the majority of patients are asymptomatic. Progression may lead to reduced vision and in rare cases choroidal neovascularization. Annual dilated examinations, photo documentation, optical coherence tomography, and home Amsler grid monitoring are recommended for follow-up care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. ArachnoServer: a database of protein toxins from spiders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaas Quentin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venomous animals incapacitate their prey using complex venoms that can contain hundreds of unique protein toxins. The realisation that many of these toxins may have pharmaceutical and insecticidal potential due to their remarkable potency and selectivity against target receptors has led to an explosion in the number of new toxins being discovered and characterised. From an evolutionary perspective, spiders are the most successful venomous animals and they maintain by far the largest pool of toxic peptides. However, at present, there are no databases dedicated to spider toxins and hence it is difficult to realise their full potential as drugs, insecticides, and pharmacological probes. Description We have developed ArachnoServer, a manually curated database that provides detailed information about proteinaceous toxins from spiders. Key features of ArachnoServer include a new molecular target ontology designed especially for venom toxins, the most up-to-date taxonomic information available, and a powerful advanced search interface. Toxin information can be browsed through dynamic trees, and each toxin has a dedicated page summarising all available information about its sequence, structure, and biological activity. ArachnoServer currently manages 567 protein sequences, 334 nucleic acid sequences, and 51 protein structures. Conclusion ArachnoServer provides a single source of high-quality information about proteinaceous spider toxins that will be an invaluable resource for pharmacologists, neuroscientists, toxinologists, medicinal chemists, ion channel scientists, clinicians, and structural biologists. ArachnoServer is available online at http://www.arachnoserver.org.

  15. Incidense of spider mites in South Texas cotton fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence of spider mites was evaluated· in four locations of south Texas between Progreso (Hidalgo Co.) to Bishop (Nueces Co.). This is an area with a south to north transect of 125 miles from south Progreso to north Bishop (respectively).The other two intermediate sampled locations were Harlin...

  16. Spiders do not escape reproductive manipulations by Wolbachia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrickx Frederik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternally inherited bacteria that reside obligatorily or facultatively in arthropods can increase their prevalence in the population by altering their hosts' reproduction. Such reproductive manipulations have been reported from the major arthropod groups such as insects (in particular hymenopterans, butterflies, dipterans and beetles, crustaceans (isopods and mites. Despite the observation that endosymbiont bacteria are frequently encountered in spiders and that the sex ratio of particular spider species is strongly female biased, a direct relationship between bacterial infection and sex ratio variation has not yet been demonstrated for this arthropod order. Results Females of the dwarf spider Oedothorax gibbosus exhibit considerable variation in the sex ratio of their clutches and were infected with at least three different endosymbiont bacteria capable of altering host reproduction i.e. Wolbachia, Rickettsia and Cardinium. Breeding experiments show that sex ratio variation in this species is primarily maternally inherited and that removal of the bacteria by antibiotics restores an unbiased sex ratio. Moreover, clutches of females infected with Wolbachia were significantly female biased while uninfected females showed an even sex ratio. As female biased clutches were of significantly smaller size compared to non-distorted clutches, killing of male embryos appears to be the most likely manipulative effect. Conclusions This represents to our knowledge the first direct evidence that endosymbiont bacteria, and in particular Wolbachia, might induce sex ratio variation in spiders. These findings are pivotal to further understand the diversity of reproductive phenotypes observed in this arthropod order.

  17. Cardinium symbionts cause cytoplasmic incompatibility in spider mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, T; Noda, H; Ito, S

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular symbiotic bacteria belonging to the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides lineage have recently been described and are widely distributed in arthropod species. The newly discovered bacteria, named Cardinium sp, cause the expression of various reproductive alterations in their arthropod hosts, including cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), induction of parthenogenesis and feminization of genetic males. We detected 16S ribosomal DNA sequences similar to those of Cardinium from seven populations of five spider mite species, suggesting a broad distribution of infection of Cardinium in spider mites. To clarify the effect of Cardinium on the reproductive traits of the infected spider mites, infected mites were crossed with uninfected mites for each population. In one of the populations, Eotetranychus suginamensis, CI was induced when infected males were crossed with uninfected females. The other six populations of four species showed no reproductive abnormalities in the F(1) generation, but the possibility of CI effects in the F(2) generation remains to be tested. One species of spider mite, Tetranychus pueraricola, harbored both Cardinium and Wolbachia, but these symbionts seemed to have no effect on the reproduction of the host, even when the host was infected independently with each symbiont.

  18. Spiders do not escape reproductive manipulations by Wolbachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanthournout, Bram; Swaegers, Janne; Hendrickx, Frederik

    2011-01-14

    Maternally inherited bacteria that reside obligatorily or facultatively in arthropods can increase their prevalence in the population by altering their hosts' reproduction. Such reproductive manipulations have been reported from the major arthropod groups such as insects (in particular hymenopterans, butterflies, dipterans and beetles), crustaceans (isopods) and mites. Despite the observation that endosymbiont bacteria are frequently encountered in spiders and that the sex ratio of particular spider species is strongly female biased, a direct relationship between bacterial infection and sex ratio variation has not yet been demonstrated for this arthropod order. Females of the dwarf spider Oedothorax gibbosus exhibit considerable variation in the sex ratio of their clutches and were infected with at least three different endosymbiont bacteria capable of altering host reproduction i.e. Wolbachia, Rickettsia and Cardinium. Breeding experiments show that sex ratio variation in this species is primarily maternally inherited and that removal of the bacteria by antibiotics restores an unbiased sex ratio. Moreover, clutches of females infected with Wolbachia were significantly female biased while uninfected females showed an even sex ratio. As female biased clutches were of significantly smaller size compared to non-distorted clutches, killing of male embryos appears to be the most likely manipulative effect. This represents to our knowledge the first direct evidence that endosymbiont bacteria, and in particular Wolbachia, might induce sex ratio variation in spiders. These findings are pivotal to further understand the diversity of reproductive phenotypes observed in this arthropod order.

  19. The Spider Assemblage of Olive Groves Under Three Management Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Manuel; Pascual, Felipe; Campos, Mercedes; Pekár, Stano

    2015-06-01

    Olives, Olea europaea L., are one of the most important crops in Spain. They are currently produced under three management systems that involve different aspects of soil and pest management, productivity, and crop economy: organic, (integrated pest management-IPM), and conventional. Here, we studied how these systems affect the spiders, the natural enemies of olive grove pests, and performed a detailed analysis of their assemblage. The study was performed during one season in 18 olive groves in Andalusia, Spain, and included both ground-dwelling and canopy species. We found that the organic system supported a significantly higher level of abundance and diversity of canopy spiders than the IPM and conventional systems. Plowing had a negative effect on spider abundance and diversity. However, the presence of hedge vegetation had a positive effect on the spiders. The practices affected the guild structure differently, with some guilds supported by organic and others by IPM. It is suggested that sustainability (in terms of pest control) in olive grove agroecosystems may be obtained by maintaining hedge vegetation regardless of the management system. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The sejugal furrow in camel spiders and acariform mites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunlop, Jason A.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Camel spiders (Arachnida: Solifugae are one of the arachnid groups characterised by a prosomal dorsal shield composed of three distinct elements: the pro-, meso- and metapeltidium. These are associated respectively with prosomal appendages one to four, five, and six. What is less well known, although noted in the historical literature, is that the coxae of the 4th and 5th prosomal segments (i.e. walking legs 2 and 3 of camel spiders are also separated ventrally by a distinct membranous region, which is absent between the coxae of the other legs. We suggest that this essentially ventral division of the prosoma specifically between coxae 2 and 3 is homologous with the so-called sejugal furrow (the sejugal interval sensu van der Hammen. This division constitutes a fundamental part of the body plan in acariform mites (Arachnida: Acariformes. If homologous, this sejugal furrow could represent a further potential synapomorphy for (Solifugae + Acariformes; a relationship with increasing morphological and molecular support. Alternatively, outgroup comparison with sea spiders (Pycnogonida and certain early Palaeozoic fossils could imply that the sejugal furrow defines an older tagma, derived from a more basal grade of organisation. In this scenario the (still divided prosoma of acariform mites and camel spiders would be plesiomorphic. This interpretation challenges the textbook arachnid character of a peltidium (or ‘carapace’ covering an undivided prosoma.

  1. Field performance of spider plant ( Cleome gynandra l) under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Midlands province of Zimbabwe, to determine the effect of planting date and fertilizer types in enhancing the productivity of spider plant, an indigenous leafy vegetable. The experimental design was a split- plot arranged in a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with three blocks. The planting date was the main plot ...

  2. Characteristics of the first recorded spider (Arthropoda: Arachnida fauna from Sheringal, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Khan Perveen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The spiders (order: Aranae are an important environmental indicator and play a significant role as predators in biological control of the most of the key insect pests. The present study was conducted to establish the characteristics of the first recorded spider fauna from Sheringal, Dir Upper (DU, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP, Pakistan during June 2013-July 2014. Their 10 species belong to 7 families, and 10 genera (nt=123: total; ni=77: identified; nui=46: unidentified were recorded in the 6 quadrates, i.e., Daramdala, Doki, Guryaal, Samang, Shahoor and Sia-Sheringal of Sheringal. The largest family was Lycosidae (wolf spiders with respect to size and numbers of specimens collected (n=20, which contained Arctosa littorali Simon, 1897; Hippasa partita Takidar, 1970; Pardosa distincta Backwall, 1867, while the smallest family was Gnphosidae (ground spiders (n=3 with Gnaphosa eucalyptus Ghafoor and Beg, 2002; while other families Sparassidae (huntsman spiders (n=19 Halconia insignis Thorell, 1836, and Isopeda tuhogniga Barrion and Litsinger, 1995, Opilionidae (harvestmen spiders (n=12 Hadrobunus grandis Sundevall, 1833; Pholcidae (cellar spider (n=10 have Crossopriza lyoni Blackwall, 1867; Hersiliidae (two-tailed spiders (n=6 is having Harsilia savignyi Lucas, 1836; (n=5 with Araneus diadematus Clerck, 1757 were recorded. It was concluded that 50% of the spiders collected from the study area were venomous. A detail study is required for further exploration of spider fauna of Sheringal, KP, Pakistan with special reference to their taxonomical, physiological and ecological characteristics.

  3. Spider diversity in coffee agroecosystems: the influence of agricultural intensification and aggressive ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Linda; Perfecto, Ivette

    2013-04-01

    Spiders are a very diverse group of invertebrate predators found in agroecosystems and natural systems. However, spider distribution, abundance, and eventually their ecological function in ecosystems can be influenced by abiotic and biotic factors such as agricultural intensification and dominant ants. Here we explore the influence of both agricultural intensification and the dominant arboreal ant Azteca instabilis on the spider community in coffee agroecosystems in southern Mexico. To measure the influence of the arboreal ant Azteca instabilis (F. Smith) on the spider community inhabiting the coffee layer of coffee agroecosystems, spiders were collected from coffee plants that were and were not patrolled by the ant in sites differing in agricultural intensification. For 2008, generalized linear mixed models showed that spider diversity was affected positively by agricultural intensification but not by the ant. However, results suggested that some spider species were associated with A. instabilis. Therefore, in 2009 we concentrated our research on the effect of A. instabilis on spider diversity and composition. For 2009, generalized linear mixed models show that spider richness and abundance per plant were significantly higher in the presence of A. instabilis. In addition, analyses of visual counts of insects and sticky traps data show that more resources were present in plants patrolled by the ant. The positive effect of A. instabilis on spiders seems to be caused by at least two mechanisms: high abundance of insects and protection against predators.

  4. Predation on amphibians by spiders (Arachnida, Araneae in the Neotropical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Menin

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report observations about spider predation on anurans (adults and juveniles in Central Amazonia and a literature review of spiders preying on amphibians in the Neotropical zoogeographic realm. We conducted field observations in Reserva Florestal Adolpho Ducke, Manaus, AM, and observed eight predation events on Bufonidae, Dendrobatidae, Hylidae, and Leptodactylidae frogs. The predators belong to the spider families Ctenidae, Pisauridae and Theraphosidae. Besides the families of spiders found in this study, two others – Lycosidae and Sparissidae - were found in literature. Frogs from families Centrolenidae and Microhylidae, and a caecilian(Gymnophiona, Caeciliidae were found in literature also. There is a significant correlation between the length of the anuran (snout-vent length and the length of spiders (cephalotorax and abdomen length. The size of the spider is similar or slightly lesser than the anuran prey. In general, the spiders preyed on adult and juvenile frogsin the breeding season. Spiders are opportunistic predators and prey on small frogs. Theraphosidae prey upon sub adults of large anurans and caecilians. As spiders can reach high densities on the forest floor - especially species of the genera Ctenus and Ancylometes - this interaction may be ecologically important for breeding anurans.Our reports and literature data provide evidence that spiders commonly prey on amphibians in Neotropic, but the impact of predation on populations of amphibians is unknown.

  5. Evaluating Stem Cell Response to a Spider Silk Scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Katherine Lee

    Micropatterning on a surface using fibers, channels, and troughs, can act as an effective means of inducing cell attachment and alignment. These morphological and pattern changes as a response to physical cues can impact the potential that a cell has to differentiate into a different cell line. This thesis evaluated the response of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), and other cell types, to spider dragline silk fibers, a potential scaffold material for tissue regeneration, and further observed the effects of morphology, orientation, and composition of silk on the adherence of cells. Several cell lines were studied in this thesis, including adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs), osteoblasts (7F2s), and fibroblasts (3T3s), but DPSCs were the main cell type of interest. This is due to the fact that DPSCs are a proposed source of stem cells for nerve regeneration based on their close embryonic origin to neurons and the ease with which DPSCs can be obtained from a donor. The cells' morphologies and spread patterns were characterized after they were plated onto Nephila clavipes dragline fibers in media. The inclusion of 3T3s and 7F2s in this study allowed for both direct comparisons to prior published work and a qualitative comparison to the morphology of the DPSCs. After twelve days, the DPSCs exhibited greater relative alignment and adherence to the spider dragline fibers than the 3T3s and 7F2s when silk was wrapped in an aligned orientation rather than a random orientation. The impact of a common sterilization method (ultraviolet light) on the spider dragline fiber surface and subsequent cell response to this modified surface was also characterized. Exposure of the silk to ultraviolet light did not have a measureable effect on cell alignment, but it did eliminate bacterial growth and changed fiber surface roughness. Spiders' exposure to stressful environments did not have an effect on silk to impair cell alignment or adhesion, and synthetic recombinant protein silk

  6. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species Analipus.../code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. (c) In accordance with § 184.1(b)(2), the ingredient is...

  7. Loss of the tumour suppressor gene AIP mediates the browning of human brown fat tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Linda; Hansen, Nils; Saba, Karim H; Nilsson, Jenny; Fioretos, Thoas; Rissler, Pehr; Nord, Karolin H

    2017-10-01

    Human brown fat tumours (hibernomas) show concomitant loss of the tumour suppressor genes MEN1 and AIP. We hypothesized that the brown fat phenotype is attributable to these mutations. Accordingly, in this study, we demonstrate that silencing of AIP in human brown preadipocytic and white fat cell lines results in the induction of the brown fat marker UCP1. In human adipocytic tumours, loss of MEN1 was found both in white (one of 51 lipomas) and in brown fat tumours. In contrast, concurrent loss of AIP was always accompanied by a brown fat morphology. We conclude that this white-to-brown phenotype switch in brown fat tumours is mediated by the loss of AIP. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Global Patterns of Guild Composition and Functional Diversity of Spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Pedro; Pekár, Stano; Jocqué, Rudy; Coddington, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this work are: (1) to define spider guilds for all extant families worldwide; (2) test if guilds defined at family level are good surrogates of species guilds; (3) compare the taxonomic and guild composition of spider assemblages from different parts of the world; (4) compare the taxonomic and functional diversity of spider assemblages and; (5) relate functional diversity with habitat structure. Data on foraging strategy, prey range, vertical stratification and circadian activity was collected for 108 families. Spider guilds were defined by hierarchical clustering. We searched for inconsistencies between family guild placement and the known guild of each species. Richness and abundance per guild before and after correcting guild placement were compared, as were the proportions of each guild and family between all possible pairs of sites. Functional diversity per site was calculated based on hierarchical clustering. Eight guilds were discriminated: (1) sensing, (2) sheet, (3) space, and (4) orb web weavers; (5) specialists; (6) ambush, (7) ground, and (8) other hunters. Sixteen percent of the species richness corresponding to 11% of all captured individuals was incorrectly attributed to a guild by family surrogacy; however, the correlation of uncorrected vs. corrected guilds was invariably high. The correlation of guild richness or abundances was generally higher than the correlation of family richness or abundances. Functional diversity was not always higher in the tropics than in temperate regions. Families may potentially serve as ecological surrogates for species. Different families may present similar roles in the ecosystems, with replacement of some taxa by other within the same guild. Spiders in tropical regions seem to have higher redundancy of functional roles and/or finer resource partitioning than in temperate regions. Although species and family diversity were higher in the tropics, functional diversity seems to be also influenced by

  9. Synthetic Spider Silk Production on a Laboratory Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Yang; Gnesa, Eric; Pacheco, Ryan; Kohler, Kristin; Jeffery, Felicia; Vierra, Craig

    2012-01-01

    As society progresses and resources become scarcer, it is becoming increasingly important to cultivate new technologies that engineer next generation biomaterials with high performance properties. The development of these new structural materials must be rapid, cost-efficient and involve processing methodologies and products that are environmentally friendly and sustainable. Spiders spin a multitude of different fiber types with diverse mechanical properties, offering a rich source of next generation engineering materials for biomimicry that rival the best manmade and natural materials. Since the collection of large quantities of natural spider silk is impractical, synthetic silk production has the ability to provide scientists with access to an unlimited supply of threads. Therefore, if the spinning process can be streamlined and perfected, artificial spider fibers have the potential use for a broad range of applications ranging from body armor, surgical sutures, ropes and cables, tires, strings for musical instruments, and composites for aviation and aerospace technology. In order to advance the synthetic silk production process and to yield fibers that display low variance in their material properties from spin to spin, we developed a wet-spinning protocol that integrates expression of recombinant spider silk proteins in bacteria, purification and concentration of the proteins, followed by fiber extrusion and a mechanical post-spin treatment. This is the first visual representation that reveals a step-by-step process to spin and analyze artificial silk fibers on a laboratory scale. It also provides details to minimize the introduction of variability among fibers spun from the same spinning dope. Collectively, these methods will propel the process of artificial silk production, leading to higher quality fibers that surpass natural spider silks. PMID:22847722

  10. Synthetic spider silk production on a laboratory scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Yang; Gnesa, Eric; Pacheco, Ryan; Kohler, Kristin; Jeffery, Felicia; Vierra, Craig

    2012-07-18

    As society progresses and resources become scarcer, it is becoming increasingly important to cultivate new technologies that engineer next generation biomaterials with high performance properties. The development of these new structural materials must be rapid, cost-efficient and involve processing methodologies and products that are environmentally friendly and sustainable. Spiders spin a multitude of different fiber types with diverse mechanical properties, offering a rich source of next generation engineering materials for biomimicry that rival the best manmade and natural materials. Since the collection of large quantities of natural spider silk is impractical, synthetic silk production has the ability to provide scientists with access to an unlimited supply of threads. Therefore, if the spinning process can be streamlined and perfected, artificial spider fibers have the potential use for a broad range of applications ranging from body armor, surgical sutures, ropes and cables, tires, strings for musical instruments, and composites for aviation and aerospace technology. In order to advance the synthetic silk production process and to yield fibers that display low variance in their material properties from spin to spin, we developed a wet-spinning protocol that integrates expression of recombinant spider silk proteins in bacteria, purification and concentration of the proteins, followed by fiber extrusion and a mechanical post-spin treatment. This is the first visual representation that reveals a step-by-step process to spin and analyze artificial silk fibers on a laboratory scale. It also provides details to minimize the introduction of variability among fibers spun from the same spinning dope. Collectively, these methods will propel the process of artificial silk production, leading to higher quality fibers that surpass natural spider silks.

  11. Surprising Legacies of Brown v. Board

    OpenAIRE

    Minow, Martha Louise

    2014-01-01

    Perhaps the most powerful legacy of Brown v. Board is this: opponents in varied political battles fifty years later each claim ties to the decision and its meaning. So although the analogy between Brown and same-sex marriage has divided Black clergy, each side vies to inherit the civil rights heritage. President George W. Bush invoked Brown in opposing race-conscious college admission practices. The success of Brown in reshaping the moral landscape has been so profound that I fear we do not f...

  12. Enzymatic Browning: a practical class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Pedrosa Silva Clerici

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a practical class about the enzymes polyphenol oxidases, which have been shown to be responsible for the enzymatic browning of fruits and vegetables. Vegetables samples were submitted to enzymatic inactivation process with chemical reagents, as well as by bleaching methods of applying heat by conventional oven and microwave oven. Process efficiency was assessed qualitatively by both observing the guaiacol peroxidase activity and after the storage period under refrigeration or freezing. The practical results obtained in this class allow exploring multidisciplinary knowledge in food science, with practical applications in everyday life.

  13. Brown Fat and Browning for the Treatment of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Hun Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Brown fat is a specialized fat depot that can increase energy expenditure and produce heat. After the recent discovery of the presence of active brown fat in human adults and novel transcription factors controlling brown adipocyte differentiation, the field of the study of brown fat has gained great interest and is rapidly growing. Brown fat expansion and/or activation results in increased energy expenditure and a negative energy balance in mice and limits weight gain. Brown fat is also able to utilize blood glucose and lipid and results in improved glucose metabolism and blood lipid independent of weight loss. Prolonged cold exposure and beta adrenergic agonists can induce browning of white adipose tissue. The inducible brown adipocyte, beige adipocyte evolving by thermogenic activation of white adipose tissue have different origin and molecular signature from classical brown adipocytes but share the characteristics of high mitochondria content, UCP1 expression and thermogenic capacity when activated. Increasing browning may also be an efficient way to increase whole brown fat activity. Recent human studies have shown possibilities that findings in mice can be reproduced in human, making brown fat a good candidate organ to treat obesity and its related disorders.

  14. Rapid visuomotor processing of phobic images in spider- and snake-fearful participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberkamp, Anke; Schmidt, Filipp; Schmidt, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates enhanced visuomotor processing of phobic compared to fear-relevant and neutral stimuli. We used a response priming design to measure rapid, automatic motor activation by natural images (spiders, snakes, mushrooms, and flowers) in spider-fearful, snake-fearful, and control participants. We found strong priming effects in all tasks and conditions; however, results showed marked differences between groups. Most importantly, in the group of spider-fearful individuals, spider pictures had a strong and specific influence on even the fastest motor responses: Phobic primes entailed the largest priming effects, and phobic targets accelerated responses, both effects indicating speeded response activation by phobic images. In snake-fearful participants, this processing enhancement for phobic material was less pronounced and extended to both snake and spider images. We conclude that spider phobia leads to enhanced processing capacity for phobic images. We argue that this is enabled by long-term perceptual learning processes. © 2013.

  15. Evolutionary morphology of the hemolymph vascular system of basal araneomorph spiders (Araneae: Araneomorphae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckstorf, Katarina; Michalik, Peter; Ramírez, Martín; Wirkner, Christian S

    2015-11-01

    The superfamily Austrochiloidea (Austrochilidae and Gradungulidae) take a pivotal position in araneomorph spider phylogeny. In this discussion crevice weaver spiders (Filistatidae) are of equal interest. Especially data from these phylogenetically uncertain yet basal off branching groups can enlighten our understanding on the evolution of organ systems. In the course of a survey on the evolutionary morphology of the circulatory system in spiders we therefore investigated the hemolymph vascular system in two austrochiloid and one filistatid species. Additionally some data on a hypochilid and a gradungulid species are included. Using up-to-date morphological methods, the vascular systems in these spiders are visualized three dimensionally. Ground pattern features of the circulatory systems in austrochiloid spiders are presented and the data discussed along recent lines of phylogenetic hypotheses. Special topics highlighted are the intraspecific variability of the origins of some prosomal arteries and the evolutionary correlation of respiratory and circulatory systems in spiders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Brown dwarf disks with ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricci, L.; Isella, A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Testi, L.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Natta, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Scholz, A., E-mail: lricci@astro.caltech.edu [School of Cosmic Physics, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-08-10

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array continuum and spectral line data at 0.89 mm and 3.2 mm for three disks surrounding young brown dwarfs and very low mass stars in the Taurus star forming region. Dust thermal emission is detected and spatially resolved for all the three disks, while CO(J = 3-2) emission is seen in two disks. We analyze the continuum visibilities and constrain the disks' physical structure in dust. The results of our analysis show that the disks are relatively large; the smallest one has an outer radius of about 70 AU. The inferred disk radii, radial profiles of the dust surface density, and disk to central object mass ratios lie within the ranges found for disks around more massive young stars. We derive from our observations the wavelength dependence of the millimeter dust opacity. In all the three disks, data are consistent with the presence of grains with at least millimeter sizes, as also found for disks around young stars, and confirm that the early stages of the solid growth toward planetesimals occur also around very low-mass objects. We discuss the implications of our findings on models of solids evolution in protoplanetary disks, the main mechanisms proposed for the formation of brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars, as well as the potential of finding rocky and giant planets around very low-mass objects.

  17. The brain and brown fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Cristina; Gonzalez, Francisco; Fernø, Johan; Diéguez, Carlos; Rahmouni, Kamal; Nogueiras, Rubén; López, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a specialized organ responsible for thermogenesis, a process required for maintaining body temperature. BAT is regulated by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), which activates lipolysis and mitochondrial uncoupling in brown adipocytes. For many years, BAT was considered to be important only in small mammals and newborn humans, but recent data have shown that BAT is also functional in adult humans. On the basis of this evidence, extensive research has been focused on BAT function, where new molecules, such as irisin and bone morphogenetic proteins, particularly BMP7 and BMP8B, as well as novel central factors and new regulatory mechanisms, such as orexins and the canonical ventomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) AMP- activated protein kinase (AMPK)-SNS-BAT axis, have been discovered and emerged as potential drug targets to combat obesity. In this review we provide an overview of the complex central regulation of BAT and how different neuronal cell populations co-ordinately work to maintain energy homeostasis.

  18. Ontogenesis, gender, and molting influence the venom yield in the spider Coremiocnemis tropix (Araneae, Theraphosidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Herzig, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The demand for spider venom increases along with the growing popularity of venoms-based research. A deeper understanding of factors that influence the venom yield in spiders would therefore be of interest to both commercial venom suppliers and research facilities. The present study addresses the influence of several factors on the venom yield by systematically analyzing the data obtained from 1773 electrical milkings of the Australian theraphosid spider Coremiocnemis tropix. Gender and ontoge...

  19. Loss of legs: is it or not a handicap for an orb-weaving spider?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquet, Alain; Anotaux, Mylène; Leborgne, Raymond

    2011-07-01

    Leg loss is a common phenomenon in spiders, and according to the species 5% to 40% of the adults can present at least one missing leg. There is no possibility of regeneration after adult moult and the animal must manage with its missing appendages until its death. With the loss of one or more legs, female orb-weaving spiders can be penalized twice: firstly, because the legs are necessary for web construction and secondly, the legs are essential for the control of the prey after its interception by the web. During development, spiders may be also penalized because regeneration has energetic costs that take away resources for survival, growth and reproduction. All these consequences should influence negatively the development of the spider and thus its fitness. We investigated the impact of leg loss in the orb-weaving spider, Zygiella x-notata by studying its frequency in a natural population and web building and prey capture behaviours in laboratory. In field populations, 9.5% to 13%, of the adult females presented the loss of one or more legs; the majority of individuals had lost only one leg (in 48% of cases, a first one). Leg loss seems to affect all the adult spiders, as there is no difference of mass between intact spiders and those with missing leg. Data obtained with laboratory-reared spiders, showed that the loss of legs due to the moult is rare (less than 1%). Considering changes in web design, spiders with missing legs decreased their silk investment, increased the distance between spiral turns but did not change the capture surface of the web. Under our laboratory experimental conditions, spiders with one or two lost legs did not present any difference in prey capture efficiency. In laboratory conditions, spiders with lost leg(s) did not show any difference in egg sac production or in longevity (adult lifespan) compared to intact spiders.

  20. High school students? attitudes towards spiders: A cross-cultural comparison

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Spiders are traditionally considered to be among the least popular of animals. Current evidence suggests that a negative attitude towards spiders could be influenced by both cultural and evolutionary pressures. Some researchers suggest that science education activities could positively influence students? perceptions of spiders. Their evidence is, however, ambivalent. Using a five-point score Likert-type questionnaire in which the items were developed in a similar way to f...

  1. Design and construction of a carbon fiber gondola for the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Soler, J. D.; Ade, P. A. R.; Amiri, M.; Benton, S. J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Bryan, S. A.; Chiang, C.; Contaldi, C. C.; Crill, B. P.; Doré, O. P.; Farhang, M.; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Fissel, L.M; Fraisse, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the light-weight carbon fiber and aluminum gondola designed for the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope. SPIDER is designed to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation with unprecedented sensitivity and control of systematics in search of the imprint of inflation: a period of exponential expansion in the early Universe. The requirements of this balloon-borne instrument put tight constrains on the mass budget of the payload. The SPIDER gondola is designed t...

  2. Spider Silk: From Protein-Rich Gland Fluids to Diverse Biopolymer Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-06

    Ala-rich regions in Nephila clavipes dragline (Biomacromolecules 2015, 16, 852). In addition, we successfully developed an in vitro solid-state NMR...producing process in vivo. We successfully imaged the major ampullate silk producing glands of a Nephila clavipes (Golden Orb Weaver) spider and...our 2D 2H-13C HETCOR MAS NMR experiments to investigate the Ala-rich regions of spider dragline silk from Nephila clavipes spiders. 2D 2H-13C

  3. Chemical attraction of kleptoparasitic flies to heteropteran insects caught by orb-weaving spiders.

    OpenAIRE

    Eisner, T; Eisner, M; Deyrup, M

    1991-01-01

    Insects of the heteropteran families Pentatomidae (stink bugs) and Coreidae (squash bugs), when being eaten by the orb-weaving spider Nephila clavipes, attract flies of the family Milichiidae. The flies aggregate on the bugs and, as kleptoparasites, share in the spider's meal. Stink bugs and squash bugs typically eject defensive sprays when attacked; they do so when caught by Nephila, but the spray only minimally affects the spider. Evidence is presented indicating that it is the spray of the...

  4. Intraguild interactions between spiders and ants and top-down control in a grassland food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Dirk; Platner, Christian

    2007-01-01

    In most terrestrial ecosystems ants (Formicidae) as eusocial insects and spiders (Araneida) as solitary trappers and hunters are key predators. To study the role of predation by these generalist predators in a dry grassland, we manipulated densities of ants and spiders (natural and low density) in a two-factorial field experiment using fenced plots. The experiment revealed strong intraguild interactions between ants and spiders. Higher densities of ants negatively affected the abundance and biomass of web-building spiders. The density of Linyphiidae was threefold higher in plots without ant colonies. The abundance of Formica cunicularia workers was significantly higher in spider-removal plots. Also, population size of springtails (Collembola) was negatively affected by the presence of wandering spiders. Ants reduced the density of Lepidoptera larvae. In contrast, the abundance of coccids (Ortheziidae) was positively correlated with densities of ants. To gain a better understanding of the position of spiders, ants and other dominant invertebrate groups in the studied food web and important trophic links, we used a stable isotope analysis ((15)N and (13)C). Adult wandering spiders were more enriched in (15)N relative to (14)N than juveniles, indicating a shift to predatory prey groups. Juvenile wandering and web-building spiders showed delta(15)N ratios just one trophic level above those of Collembola, and they had similar delta(13)C values, indicating that Collembola are an important prey group for ground living spiders. The effects of spiders demonstrated in the field experiment support this result. We conclude that the food resource of spiders in our study system is largely based on the detrital food web and that their effects on herbivores are weak. The effects of ants are not clear-cut and include predation as well as mutualism with herbivores. Within this diverse predator guild, intraguild interactions are important structuring forces.

  5. Spider Mites Web: : a database dedicated to the knowledge of an acarine pest family, the Tetranychidae

    OpenAIRE

    Migeon, Alain; Dorkeld, Franck

    2008-01-01

    Building databases to collect information regarding pest families is particularly useful for an overall knowledge of their biology. Spider Mites Web is dedicated to the Tetranychidae, a family including about 1,250 species, of which 100 are considered as pests. Spider Mites Web is an online database, free, regularly updated, and continuously improved. Built to provide information on all described spider mites worldwide, the database was originally developed from work initiated by J. Gutierrez...

  6. Polarimetry from the stratosphere with SPIDER and BLASTPol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Jamil Aly

    This thesis presents the hardware development and flight performance of two balloon-borne experiments. The SPIDER experiment is a millimetre-wavelength polarimeter designed to measure B-mode polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background at degree scales. This pattern is the imprint of the primordial gravitational waves predicted to have been produced by inflation. The BLASTPol experiment is a submillimetre-wavelength polarimeter designed to measure the linearly-polarized emission from aligned dust grains in Galactic molecular clouds, inferring the directions of the magnetic fields there. One goal of this measurement is to understand the role of magnetic fields in the earliest stages of star formation. SPIDER had a Long-Duration Balloon flight around Antarctica in January 2015. BLASTPol had two such flights, in December 2010 and 2012. Analysis of SPIDER data is underway. Results of BLASTPol 2012 data analysis are presented herein. The design and performance of the SPIDER pointing control system is presented. A new pivot motor control mode was developed, in which the servo drive controlled motor velocity, not current. This mode enabled sinusoidal azimuth scans at a peak speed of 5 deg/s, with a peak acceleration of 0.5 deg·s-2, in flight. The pointing stability in flight was 1'' to 2'' RMS. A new elevation drive system was designed and built for SPIDER. The SPIDER observing strategy is presented. It enabled observation of a 10% patch of sky, avoiding the sun and Galactic plane, with uniform coverage in declination, and good cross-linking. A model of the BLASTPol 2012 PSF was developed, allowing centroiding, flat-fielding, and map deconvolution. The latter was attempted in Fourier space, and using the Lucy-Richardson method. A net linear polarization of the dust emission in the Carina Nebula was measured by BLASTPol. The mean fractional polarization is 6.75% +/- 0.015%, 6.84% v 0.016% and 7.06% v 0.019%, at 250, 350, and 500 microm respectively. A falling

  7. Jumping spiders (Salticidae) enhance the seed production of a plant with extrafloral nectaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhren, Scott; Handel, Steven N

    1999-05-01

    Many plants secrete nectar from extrafloral nectaries (EFNs), specialized structures that usually attract ants which can act as plant defenders. We examined the nectar-mediated interactions between Chamaecrista nictitans (Caesalpineaceae) and jumping spiders (Araneae, Salticidae) for 2 years in old fields in New Jersey, USA. Previous research suggests that spiders are entirely carnivorous, yet jumping spiders (Eris sp. and Metaphidippus sp.) on C. nictitans collected nectar in addition to feeding on herbivores, ants, bees, and other spiders. In a controlled-environment experiment, when given a choice between C. nictitans with or without active EFNs, foraging spiders spent 86% of their time on plants with nectar. C. nictitans with resident jumping spiders did set significantly more seed than plants with no spiders, indicating a beneficial effect from these predators. However, the presence of jumping spiders did not decrease numbers of Sennius cruentatus (Bruchidae), a specialist seed predator of C. nictitans. Jumping spiders may provide additional, unexpected defense to plants possessing EFNs. Plants with EFNs may therefore have beneficial interactions with other arthropod predators in addition to nectar-collecting ants.

  8. Information processing biases in spider phobia: application of the Stroop and "White Noise" Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Sawchuk, Craig N; Lee, Thomas C; Lohr, Jeffrey M; Tolin, David F

    2008-06-01

    The present study examines attentional and implicit memory biases in spider phobic and nonphobic participants. The results showed that spider phobics demonstrated increased interference for neutral, negative, and spider-relevant words on a computerized Stroop task. However, no group differences emerged when adjusting for differences in color-naming speed. Prior exposure to a dead spider did result in higher overall Stroop interference in spider phobics and this appeared to be mostly pronounced for spider-relevant words. Implicit memory bias for threat was examined with a noise judgment task. Participants first heard neutral and spider-relevant sentences and implicit memory for these sentences was evaluated by having participants rate the volume of noise accompanying the presentation of old sentences intermixed with new sentences. An implicit memory bias is indicated if participants rate noise accompanying old sentences as less loud than noise accompanying new sentences. No evidence was found for an implicit memory bias in spider phobics. These findings are discussed in relation to the role of information processing biases in spider phobia.

  9. Body burdens of metals in spiders from the Lidice coal dump near Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, G.; Babczynska, A.; Majkus, Z. [Silesian University, Katowice (Poland)

    2005-09-01

    Spiders' feeding behaviour and external digestion expose them to man-made pollutants, especially those easily transferred along the food chain. The problem for this study was whether the levels of heavy metals in selected species of spiders from the Lidice coal dump reflect adaptation to environmental pollutants. We used flameless and flame AAS to measure the whole-body concentrations of Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, Fe, Ni and Mg in male and female spiders differing in their hunting strategies, type of web construction, prey, and taxonomic position (Araneidae, Agelenidae, Linyphiidae, Theridiidae, Tetragnathidae, Lycosidae, Salticidae, Pisauridae, Clubionidae, Philodromidae). The levels of metals found in the spiders were species-dependent, indicating differences related to the hunting strategy and type of prey. Accumulation of Pb, Cu and Zn was always higher in ground spiders than in web-constructing species. Sheet-web spiders Linyphia triangularis and wandering spiders Clubiona lutescens had the lowest Cd, Mg and Cu content of all the studied species. Web-building spiders of the Tetragnathidae family showed the highest Cd, Cu and Pb content, even in species with feeding behaviour similar to spiders of other families. There were no interspecific differences in accumulation only for Fe and Mg. The concentrations of Cd, Ni and Pb were lower in females than in males, irrespective of their taxonomic position and the intensity of their hunting activity. This may suggest that females have better metal-excretion ability than males.

  10. Trap and soil monolith sampled edaphic spiders (arachnida: araneae) in Araucaria angustifolia forest

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baretta, Dilmar; Brescovit, Antonio Domingos; Knysak, Irene; Cardoso, Elke Jurandy Bran Nogueira

    2007-01-01

    Forests with Araucaria angustifolia (Bert.) O. Kuntze trees are endangered in Brazil, and information on the diversity of soil spider families associated to these environments is practically inexistent...

  11. Direction of stimulus movement alters fear-linked individual differences in attentional vigilance to spider stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basanovic, Julian; Dean, Laurence; Riskind, John H; MacLeod, Colin

    2017-12-01

    Researchers have proposed that high spider-fearful individuals are characterised by heightened attentional vigilance to spider stimuli, as compared to low spider-fearful individuals. However, these findings have arisen from methodologies that have uniformly employed only static stimuli. Such findings do not inform upon the patterns of fear-linked attentional selectivity that occur in the face of moving feared stimuli. Hence, the present study developed a novel methodology designed to examine the influence of stimulus movement on attentional vigilance to spider and non-spider stimuli. Eighty participants who varied in level of spider-fear completed an attentional-probe task that presented stimuli under two conditions. One condition presented stimuli that displayed an approaching movement, while the other condition presented stimuli that displayed a receding movement. Fear-linked heightened attentional vigilance was observed exclusively under the latter condition. These findings suggest that fear-linked attentional vigilance to spider stimuli does not represent a uniform characteristic of heightened spider-fear, but rather is influenced by stimulus context. The means by which these findings inform understanding of attentional mechanisms that characterise heightened spider-fear, and avenues for future research, are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional Group of Spiders in Cultivated Landscape Dominated by Paddy Fields in West Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I WAYAN SUANA

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of spiders in all colonized environments is limited by biotic and abiotic factors requiring adaptations with respect to, for example microhabitat choice and hunting behavior. These two factors were frequently used to group spiders into functional groups. In this study our objectives were to (i group of genera of spiders into functional group based on their microhabitat specificity, hunting behavior, and daily activity; and (ii compare the number and composition of functional group of spider at each habitat type and period of paddy growth. The study was conducted at a landscape dominated by paddy fields in Cianjur Watershed for a period of 9 months. Four different habitat types (paddy, vegetable, non-crop, and mixed garden, were sampled using five trapping techniques (pitfall traps, farmcop suction, sweep netting, yellow-pan traps, and sticky traps. The Unweighted Pair-Group Average and the Euclidean Distances were used to generate dendrogram of functional group of spider. We found 14 functional groups of spider at genus level. The number of functional group of spider at four habitat types was differing, but the composition was similar, because all habitats were closed to each other. Habitat structure diversity and disturbance level influenced the number of functional group of spider. Different architecture of vegetation and availability of differ prey during paddy growth, causing the composition of functional group of spider in each period of paddy growth was changed, although its number was unchanged.

  13. Processing of recombinant spider silk proteins into tailor-made materials for biomaterials applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacht, Kristin; Scheibel, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Spider silk has extraordinary mechanical properties, is biocompatible and biodegradable, and therefore an ideal material for biomedical applications. However, a drawback for any application is the inhomogeneity of spider silk, as seen for other natural materials, as well as the low availability due to the cannibalism of most spiders. Recently, developed recombinant spider silk proteins ensure constant material properties, as well as scalable production, and further the processing into morphologies other than fibres. Biotechnology enables genetic modification, broadening the range of applications, such as implant coatings, scaffolds for tissue engineering, wound dressing devices as well as drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Spiders do not evoke greater early posterior negativity in the event-related potential as snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongshen; Kubo, Kenta; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2014-09-10

    It has been long believed that both snakes and spiders are archetypal fear stimuli for humans. Furthermore, snakes have been assumed as stronger threat cues for nonhuman primates. However, it is still unclear whether spiders hold a special status in human perception. The current study explored to what extent spider pictures draw early visual attention [as assessed with early posterior negativity (EPN)] when compared with insects similar to spiders. To measure the EPN, participants watched a random rapid serial presentation of pictures, which consisted of two conditions: spider condition (spider, wasp, bumblebee, beetle) and snake condition (snake, bird). EPN amplitudes revealed no significant difference between spider, wasp, bumblebee, and beetle pictures, whereas EPN amplitudes were significantly larger for snake pictures relative to bird pictures. In addition, EPN amplitudes were significantly larger for snake pictures relative to spider pictures. These results suggest that the early visual attentional capture of animate objects is stronger for snakes, whereas spiders do not appear to hold special early attentional value.

  15. Microlensing Binaries with Candidate Brown Dwarf Companions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, I.-G; Han, C.; Gould, A.

    2012-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation histories. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing ...

  16. Remembering "Brown": Silence, Loss, Rage, and Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, James A.

    2004-01-01

    The author was in the seventh grade at the Newsome Training School in Aubrey, Arkansas when the Supreme Court handed down "Brown v. Board of Education" on May 17, 1954. His most powerful memory of the "Brown" decision is that he has no memory of it being rendered or mentioned by his parents, teachers, or preachers. In his rural…

  17. Isolation of glycoproteins from brown algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel process for the isolation of unique anti-oxidative glycoproteins from the pH precipitated fractions of enzymatic extracts of brown algae. Two brown seaweeds viz, Fucus serratus and Fucus vesiculosus were hydrolysed by using 3 enzymes viz, Alcalase, Viscozyme...

  18. Brown vs. Board of Education Booklet

    OpenAIRE

    IDEA, UCLA

    2004-01-01

    This booklet was designed for K-12 classrooms and community groups examining the legacy of Brown v Board for California. The booklet chronicles the national battle for equal schooling up to and since the Brown decision. It also highlights the history of school segregation in California and the ongoing struggle for equal schooling.

  19. "Brown" and Black-White Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armor, David J.

    2006-01-01

    "Brown v. Board of Education" only presumed to eliminate the "de jure" apartheid that existed in 1954. It was never intended to resolve the "de facto" gap in minority achievement that still faces education policymakers today. Sociologist David J. Armor goes beyond "Brown" to identify a set of definite risk…

  20. Some Aspects of Enzymatic Browning in Apples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liffen, C. L.; Cleeve, H. N.

    1975-01-01

    Describes material modified from the Nuffield advanced chemistry course to make it meaningful and relevant to pupils in the middle school. Discusses a series of simple experiments on apple browning and summarizes the browning process and its control. (Author/GS)

  1. Traumatic Brown-Séquard-plus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, M O; Flynn, P A; Pang, K A; Hawkins, S A

    2001-09-01

    In the 1840s Brown-Séquard described the motor and sensory effects of sectioning half of the spinal cord. Penetrating injuries can cause Brown-Séquard or, more frequently, Brown-Séquard-plus syndromes. To report the case of a 25-year-old man who developed left-sided Brown-Séquard syndrome at the C8 level and left-sided Horner syndrome plus urinary retention and bilateral extensor responses following a stab wound in the right side of the neck. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a low cervical lesion and somatosensory evoked potentials confirmed the clinical finding of left-side dorsal column disturbance. At follow-up, the patient's mobility and bladder function had returned to normal. This patient recovered well after a penetrating neck injury that disturbed function in more than half the lower cervical spinal cord (Brown-Séquard-plus syndrome).

  2. A new jumping spider species of the genus Maeota (Araneae: Salticidae: Euophryini, with new faunistic data of the tribe from Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Galvis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A new species of jumping spider of the genus Maeota (Salticidae, M. galeanoae sp. nov., is described and illustrated from the Caribbean state of Magdalena, Colombia. Additionally, the genus Anasaitis is recorded for the first time from Colombia, with the species A. canalis, from the department of Chocó. Moreover, new records are presented for Maeota serrapophysis from the departments of Magdalena, Quindío and Valle del Cauca, Colombia, with individuals from the southern region presenting a slightly different pattern of coloration in which the prosoma, abdomen and legs have a reticulated brown and gray pattern. New faunistic data from Colombia are also presented for the species M. betancuri and Ilargus galianoae. Finally, a distribution map is presented, including new and previously published records for the taxa treated here.

  3. Australian Assassins, Part I: A review of the Assassin Spiders (Araneae, Archaeidae) of mid-eastern Australia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rix, Michael G; Harvey, Mark S

    2011-01-01

    The Assassin Spiders of the family Archaeidae are an ancient and iconic lineage of basal araneomorph spiders, characterised by a specialised araneophagic ecology and unique, 'pelican-like' cephalic morphology...

  4. Composition of the silk lipids of the spider Nephila clavipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, S

    2001-06-01

    A detailed analysis of the lipids of spider silk is given for the first time. Extracts of the silk from the golden orb weaver, Nephila clavipes, were studied by gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and chemical derivatizations. The major group of the lipids consisted of methyl-branched 1-methoxyalkanes (methyl ethers) with up to four methyl groups in the chain (chain length between C28 and C34), which are unique to spiders. The position of the methyl branches was determined by conversion into cyanides, which allowed easy location of methyl branches. The second-largest group included alkanes with a wide structural variety; 2-methyl-branched, even-numbered hydrocarbons predominated. A general numerical method for the estimation of retention indices of alkanes and their derivatives is presented. Further components of the web included alkanols and alkanediols, fatty acids, and glyceryl ethers. Some comments on the biosynthesis of these compounds are also given.

  5. Mechanical Properties of Spider Dragline Silk: Humidity, Hysteresis, and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehoff, T.; Glišović, A.; Schollmeyer, H.; Zippelius, A.; Salditt, T.

    2007-01-01

    Spider silk is well-known for its outstanding mechanical properties. However, there is a significant variation of these properties in literature and studies analyzing large numbers of silk samples to explain these variations are still lacking. To fill this gap, the following work examines the mechanical properties of major ampullate silk based on a large ensemble of threads from Nephila clavipes and Nephila senegalensis. In addition, the effect of relative humidity (RH) on the mechanical properties was quantified. The large effect of RH on the mechanical properties makes it plausible that the variation in the literature values can to a large extent be attributed to changes in RH. Spider silk's most remarkable property—its high tenacity—remains unchanged. In addition, this work also includes hysteresis as well as relaxation measurements. It is found that the relaxation process is well described by a stretched exponential decay. PMID:17766337

  6. A Spider That Lays Its Eggs in Rows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Edwards

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The small (2.5-3.0 mm, colorful metine spider, Homalometa nigritarsis Simon 1897, Family Tetragnathidae, has previously been reported from northern Mexico, Panama and the southern islands of the Lesser Antilles (Levi 1986. In the rain forest of northeastern Puerto Rico it is most frequently found with webbing on the larger outer concave surfaces of pendulous leaves. H. nigritarsis typically makes a circular, relatively flat retreat within which the female deposits two parallel rows of naked eggs. The rows are produced at intervals; as one row hatches another replaces it shortly thereafter. Evidence of up to four generations of rows has been observed. Above the retreat, and closely aligned with it, the spider builds a nearly invisible, delicate orb web, typically from edge to edge of the leaf (Fig. 1a and b. While retaining the traditional orb-web, H. nigritarsis has adopted a unique habitat and set of life history features.

  7. Optics of the ultraviolet reflecting scales of a jumping spider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Michael F; Horwood, Julia; Lim, Matthew L.M; Li, Daiqin

    2007-01-01

    The jumping spider Cosmophasis umbratica from Singapore is strongly sexually dimorphic. The males, but not the females, reflect ultraviolet as well as green–orange light. The scales responsible for this are composed of a chitin–air–chitin sandwich in which the chitin layers are three-quarters of a wavelength thick and the air gap a quarter wavelength (where λ=600 nm, the peak wavelength of the principal reflection maximum). It is shown that this configuration produces a second reflectance peak at approximately 385 nm, accounting for the observed reflection in the ultraviolet. Other scales have a similar thickness of chitin but lack the air gap and thus produce a dull purple reflection. This novel mechanism provides the spiders with two colour signals, both of which are important in mating displays. PMID:17456453

  8. Hamiltonian Dynamics of Spider-Type Multirotor Rigid Bodies Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshin, Anton V.

    2010-03-01

    This paper sets out to develop a spider-type multiple-rotor system which can be used for attitude control of spacecraft. The multirotor system contains a large number of rotor-equipped rays, so it was called a ``Spider-type System,'' also it can be called ``Rotary Hedgehog.'' These systems allow using spinups and captures of conjugate rotors to perform compound attitude motion of spacecraft. The paper describes a new method of spacecraft attitude reorientation and new mathematical model of motion in Hamilton form. Hamiltonian dynamics of the system is investigated with the help of Andoyer-Deprit canonical variables. These variables allow obtaining exact solution for hetero- and homoclinic orbits in phase space of the system motion, which are very important for qualitative analysis.

  9. A collection of spiders (Araneae in Albanian coastal areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrenozi, Blerina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study unites data from several excursions in typical Mediterranean lowland ecosystems in Albania during the years 2006 to 2009. Spiders from several different habitat types along the coast were analysed in six districts: Saranda, Fieri, Kavaja, Durrësi, Tirana and Lezha. In total 299 adult specimens were collected. They belong to 82 species, 60 genera and 22 families. Six species are new to the Albanian fauna: Aculepeira armida (Audouin, 1826, Zygiella x-notata (Clerck, 1757, Histopona torpida (C. L. Koch, 1837, Malthonica campestris (C. L. Koch, 1834, Pellenes tripunctatus (Walckenaer, 1802 and Pseudeuophrys erratica (Walckenaer, 1826. With respect to zoogeography, the spider fauna is mainly characterized by the presence of many Palaearctic species.

  10.  “Spiders and Webs in American Literature”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Dussol

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available From Jonathan Edwards to Jorie Graham, spiders are strikingly present in American literature. The purpose of this article is first to show how that theme may have become something of a national tradition as very different writers, all of them careful observers of aranae, answered one another through the years. It is very likely that the attention paid to spiders by American authors was increased by those Native American myths in which spiders are a central figure. More than occasionally, on the female side of the American counter-culture, especially among its feminist and lesbian exponents, simple activists and creative writers have harnessed the symbolic power invested in the spider by Native Americans.There may be deeper reasons accounting for American authors’ fascination with spiders. The country’s phobia of disunion is one; a nation of settlers’ acute consciousness of the precariousness of its occupation of the territory is another. In demonstrating outstanding skills for adjustment to unknown places, spiders epitomize a form of identity permanence. The predominantly positive character of spider symbols in American literature will occasionally be inverted. Following the national logic of checks and balances, any web covering the whole of the United States will tend to come under suspicion.This study ends with an inventory of cultural productions linked with spiders and webs and whose Americanness is yet to be clearly determined.De Jonathan Edwards à Jorie Graham, l’araignée apparaît dans un nombre frappant de textes littéraires américains. On a d’abord voulu tenter de montrer comment a pu se construire cette tradition thématique et faire la preuve que différents écrivains, réunis par un souci de l’observation, se sont répondus à travers elle. L’attention prêtée à l’araignée s’est certainement trouvée renforcée par les récits mythologiques des peuples premiers américains qui font de l’araignée une

  11. Systematics, phylogeny, and evolution of orb-weaving spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormiga, Gustavo; Griswold, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    The orb-weaving spiders (Orbiculariae) comprise more than 25% of the approximately 44,000 known living spider species and produce a remarkable variety of webs. The wheel-shaped orb web is primitive to this clade, but most Orbiculariae make webs hardly recognizable as orbs. Orb-weavers date at least to the Jurassic. With no evidence for convergence of the orb web, the monophyly of the two typical orb web taxa, the cribellate Deinopoidea and ecribellate Araneoidea, remains problematic, supported only weakly by molecular studies. The sister group of the Orbiculariae also remains elusive. Despite more than 15 years of phylogenetic scrutiny, a fully resolved cladogram of the Orbiculariae families is not yet possible. More comprehensive taxon sampling, comparative morphology, and new molecular markers are required for a better understanding of orb-weaver evolution.

  12. Web-mediated interspecific competition among spider mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, K; Furuichi, H; Yano, S; Osakabe, M

    2006-06-01

    Some spider mites, such as Tetranychus spp. and Amphitetranychus spp., create complicated webs (CWs), whereas others, such as Panonychus spp., produce little webs (LWs). We verified whether interspecific competition occurred between CW and LW mites via habitat arrangement under laboratory conditions. The complicated webs produced by CW mites clearly inhibited juvenile development in LW mites, whereas there was no effect of LW mites on CW mites. In oviposition site choice tests, both CW and LW females preferred the lower surface of leaves to the upper surface. The preference of LW mites for the lower leaf surface, even in the presence of CW mite webs, suggests that the costs of amensalism are outweighed by the possible benefits, such as avoiding rain. These findings show that the shift in mite species composition from LW to CW mites can occur as a consequence of the interspecific association between spider mites via their webs, without pesticide applications or the presence of natural enemies.

  13. Environmental Engineering Approaches toward Sustainable Management of Spider Mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takeshi

    2012-10-26

    Integrated pest management (IPM), which combines physical, biological, and chemical control measures to complementary effect, is one of the most important approaches to environmentally friendly sustainable agriculture. To expand IPM, we need to develop new pest control measures, reinforce existing measures, and investigate interactions between measures. Continued progress in the development of environmental control technologies and consequent price drops have facilitated their integration into plant production and pest control. Here I describe environmental control technologies for the IPM of spider mites through: (1) the disturbance of photoperiod-dependent diapause by artificial light, which may lead to death in seasonal environments; (2) the use of ultraviolet radiation to kill or repel mites; and (3) the use of water vapor control for the long-term cold storage of commercially available natural enemies. Such environmental control technologies have great potential for the efficient control of spider mites through direct physical effects and indirect effects via natural enemies.

  14. Environmental Engineering Approaches toward Sustainable Management of Spider Mites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Suzuki

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Integrated pest management (IPM, which combines physical, biological, and chemical control measures to complementary effect, is one of the most important approaches to environmentally friendly sustainable agriculture. To expand IPM, we need to develop new pest control measures, reinforce existing measures, and investigate interactions between measures. Continued progress in the development of environmental control technologies and consequent price drops have facilitated their integration into plant production and pest control. Here I describe environmental control technologies for the IPM of spider mites through: (1 the disturbance of photoperiod-dependent diapause by artificial light, which may lead to death in seasonal environments; (2 the use of ultraviolet radiation to kill or repel mites; and (3 the use of water vapor control for the long-term cold storage of commercially available natural enemies. Such environmental control technologies have great potential for the efficient control of spider mites through direct physical effects and indirect effects via natural enemies.

  15. Brown Swiss cattle cytogenetic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Maria Ladeira Pires

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available At 1985, a Brown Swiss herd from the Institute of Animal Science and Pastures, APTA/ SAA was cytogenetically analyzed and 1/29 Robertsonian translocation was observed. Such anomaly is related to fertility reduction. Quimeric abnormality such as 60,XX/60,XY in freemartin females. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence of cromossomic abnormalities in Brown Swiss animals, descending form herd karyotyped earlier. After 25 years, 127 animals (97 females and 30 males from this herd were karyotyped by metaphases obtained from blood lymphocyte cultures. The typical diploid number 2n=60, 58 acrocentric and two X submetacentric chromosomes were confirmed in 94 females and in 27 males the sexual complement X and Y, both submetacentric, although from different sizes. Four females from gemelar parturition whit males were karyotyped. Three of them presented quimerism 60,XX/60,XY (one with 25.8% of female cells (XX and 74.2% male cells (XY; one another with 10% of cells XX e 90% of XY and the third with 50% of each type showing genital masculinization, diagnosed as freemartism and discarded from herd. Two hundred and five cells were analyzed from another female twins and only 60,XX cells were found, diagnosed as normal. His sister also were normal (60,XY. The another three males were also analyzed from gemelar heterosexual parturition, with karyotype 60,XX/60,XY. Cytogenetic analysis are a safe methodology for freemartin abnormalities identification in female bovine twins with male bovine, giving the opportunity of selecting fertile animals, avoiding loses in the management of sterile animals. Robertsonian’s translocation was not observed in any of the animals analyzed.

  16. Animal behaviour: task differentiation by personality in spider groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinsted, Lena; Bacon, Jonathan P

    2014-08-18

    In social animals, group efficiency is often assumed to increase with task differentiation, but this requires that individuals are better than generalists at the task they specialize in. A new study finds that individual Anelosimus studiosus spiders do predominantly perform the task they excel at, in line with their individual personality type, when they are placed in groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. On the diversity of some spiders (Aranea: Arachnida from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćurčić Božidar P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 76 species from 16 families: Dysderidae (6, Theridiidae (3 Nesticidae (1, Linyphiidae (35, Tetragnathidae (1, Araneidae (1 Lycosidae (5, Agelenidae (3, Cybaeidae (1, Dictynidae (1, Amaurobiidae (5, Liocranidae (2, Clubionidae (3, Gnaphosidae (3, Thomisidae (3 and Salticidae (3 were established from 42 localities in Serbia. Ten species and three genera are new for the Serbian spider fauna. The most diverse is the family Linyphiidae, otherwise represented by 35 species.

  18. On the colours of spider orb-webs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhr, Wilfried; Schlichting, H Joachim, E-mail: wilfried.suhr@uni-muenster.de, E-mail: schlichting@uni-muenster.de [Institut fuer Didaktik der Physik, University of Muenster, 48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    A sticky capture thread from the spiral element of spider orb-webs is formed of almost regularly spaced droplets that surround a supporting axial fibre. From the perspective of physical optics it represents a periodic linear array of scattering elements that acts as a diffraction grating. This is a novel aspect, which is of vital importance for the understanding of the overall scattering pattern. To demonstrate its significance, we present our experimental findings and compare them with results of a simplified model.

  19. Early environmental conditions shape personality types in a jumping spider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannis eLiedtke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Individuals of many species across the animal kingdom are found to be less plastic than expected, even in behavioral traits. The existence of consistent behavioral differences between individuals, termed personality differences, is puzzling, since plastic behavior is considered ideal to enable animals to adaptively respond to changes in environmental conditions. In order to elucidate which mechanisms are important for the evolution of personality differences, it is crucial to understand which aspects of the environment are important for the development of personality differences. Here, we tested whether physical or social aspects of the environment during development influence individual differentiation (mean level of behavior using the jumping spider Marpissa muscosa. Furthermore, we assessed whether those behaviors were repeatable, i.e. whether personalities existed. We applied a split-brood design and raised spider siblings in three different environments: a deprived environment with no enrichment, a socially and a physically enriched environment. We focused on exploratory behavior and repeatedly assessed individual behavior in a novel environment and a novel object test. Results show that the environment during development influenced spiders’ exploratory tendencies: spiders raised in enriched environments tended to be more exploratory. Most investigated behaviors were repeatable (i.e. personalities existed across all individuals tested, whereas only few behaviors were also repeatable across individuals that had experienced the same environmental condition. Taken together, our results indicate that external stimuli can influence the development of one aspect of personality, the inter-individual variation (mean level of behavior, in a jumping spider. We also found family by environment interactions on behavioral traits potentially suggesting genetic variation in developmental plasticity.

  20. Spiders in mountain habitats of the Giant Mountains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Vlastimil; Vaněk, J.; Šmilauer, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 4 (2012), s. 341-347 ISSN 1067-4136 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Giant Mountain s (Krkonoše, Karkonosze) * spiders * anemo-orographic systems Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.236, year: 2012 http://www.springerlink.com/content/0k5g721q1155r146/fulltext.pdf

  1. Individual personalities shape task differentiation in a social spider

    OpenAIRE

    Grinsted, Lena; Pruitt, Jonathan N.; Settepani, Virginia; Bilde, Trine

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering the mechanisms involved in shaping social structure is key to a deeper understanding of the evolutionary processes leading to sociality. Individual specialization within groups can increase colony efficiency and consequently productivity. Here, we test the hypothesis that within-group variation in individual personalities (i.e. boldness and aggression) can shape task differentiation. The social spider Stegodyphus sarasinorum (Eresidae) showed task differentiation (significant uneq...

  2. A troglomorphic spider from Java (Araneae, Ctenidae, Amauropelma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeremy; Rahmadi, Cahyo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A new troglomorphic spider from caves in Central Java, Indonesia, is described and placed in the ctenid genus Amauropelma Raven, Stumkat & Gray, until now containing only species from Queensland, Australia. Only juveniles and mature females of the new species are known. We give our reasons for placing the new species in Amauropelma, discuss conflicting characters, and make predictions about the morphology of the as yet undiscovered male that will test our taxonomic hypothesis. The description includes DNA barcode sequence data. PMID:22303127

  3. A Reconsideration of the Classification of the Spider Infraorder Mygalomorphae (Arachnida: Araneae) Based on Three Nuclear Genes and Morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Bond, Jason E.; Hendrixson, Brent E.; Hamilton, Chris A.; Marshal Hedin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The infraorder Mygalomorphae (i.e., trapdoor spiders, tarantulas, funnel web spiders, etc.) is one of three main lineages of spiders. Comprising 15 families, 325 genera, and over 2,600 species, the group is a diverse assemblage that has retained a number of features considered primitive for spiders. Despite an evolutionary history dating back to the lower Triassic, the group has received comparatively little attention with respect to its phylogeny and higher classification. The fe...

  4. A New Limit on CMB Circular Polarization from SPIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, J.M.; et al.

    2017-04-01

    We present a new upper limit on CMB circular polarization from the 2015 flight of SPIDER, a balloon-borne telescope designed to search for $B$-mode linear polarization from cosmic inflation. Although the level of circular polarization in the CMB is predicted to be very small, experimental limits provide a valuable test of the underlying models. By exploiting the non-zero circular-to-linear polarization coupling of the HWP polarization modulators, data from SPIDER's 2015 Antarctic flight provides a constraint on Stokes $V$ at 95 and 150 GHz from $33<\\ell<307$. No other limits exist over this full range of angular scales, and SPIDER improves upon the previous limit by several orders of magnitude, providing 95% C.L. constraints on $\\ell (\\ell+1)C_{\\ell}^{VV}/(2\\pi)$ ranging from 141 $\\mu K ^2$ to 203 $\\mu K ^2$ at 150 GHz for a thermal CMB spectrum. As linear CMB polarization experiments become increasingly sensitive, the techniques described in this paper can be applied to obtain stronger constraints on circular polarization.

  5. Evidence for antimicrobial activity associated with common house spider silk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Simon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spider silk is one of the most versatile materials in nature with great strength and flexibility. Native and synthetically produced silk has been used in a wide range of applications including the construction of artificial tendons and as substrates for human cell growth. In the literature there are anecdotal reports that suggest that native spider silk may also have antimicrobial properties. Findings In this study we compared the growth of a Gram positive and a Gram negative bacterium in the presence and absence of silk produced by the common house spider Tegenaria domestica. We demonstrate that native web silk of Tegenaria domestica can inhibit the growth of the Gram positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis. No significant inhibition of growth was detected against the Gram negative bacterium, Escherichia coli. The antimicrobial effect against B. subtilis appears to be short lived thus the active agent potentially acts in a bacteriostatic rather than bactericidal manner. Treatment of the silk with Proteinase K appears to reduce the ability to inhibit bacterial growth. This is consistent with the active agent including a protein element that is denatured or cleaved by treatment. Tegenaria silk does not appear to inhibit the growth of mammalian cells in vitro thus there is the potential for therapeutic applications.

  6. Epigeic spiders of the pastures of northern Wielkopolska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woźny, Marek

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The fauna of epigeic spiders (Araneae occurring on three different types of pastures in northern Wielkopolska was analysed. Studies were conducted from May 1992 to October 1993. The 18,995 specimens collected were classified as belonging to 137 species and 17 families. The family Linyphiidae proved the richest in species while Lycosidae was the most abundantly in terms of number of specimens. Zoocenological analysis of spider communities showed their differentiation testifying to differences in the sites studied. The dominants were: 1 Osowo Stare (Site 1: Pardosa palustris, 2 Sycyn Dolny (Site 2: Xerolycosa miniata, P. palustris, Xysticus kochi, 3 Braczewo (Site 3: Erigone dentipalpis, P. palustris. Seasonal changes of dominance of the species at each site were established. A comparison of changes of the species’ dominances in the years 1992 and 1993 disclosed similar values of the individual dominance coefficient at the sites in Osowo Stare and Braczewo. This result indicates the occurrence of the process of stabilization of these biocenoses and a tendency to equilibrium in the environment. The least stable proved to be the site at Sycyn Dolny. Analysis of the seasonal dynamics of epigeic spider communities was also made by determining the mean number of species at each site in the two years of study. The highest number of species was noted in spring. It is interesting to note the appearance of species which are rare or very rare in Poland such as: Lepthyphantes insignis, Ostearius melanopygius, Enoplognatha mordax and Enoplognatha oelandica.

  7. Individual personalities shape task differentiation in a social spider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinsted, Lena; Pruitt, Jonathan N; Settepani, Virginia; Bilde, Trine

    2013-09-22

    Deciphering the mechanisms involved in shaping social structure is key to a deeper understanding of the evolutionary processes leading to sociality. Individual specialization within groups can increase colony efficiency and consequently productivity. Here, we test the hypothesis that within-group variation in individual personalities (i.e. boldness and aggression) can shape task differentiation. The social spider Stegodyphus sarasinorum (Eresidae) showed task differentiation (significant unequal participation) in simulated prey capture events across 10-day behavioural assays in the field, independent of developmental stage (level of maturation), eliminating age polyethism. Participation in prey capture was positively associated with level of boldness but not with aggression. Body size positively correlated with being the first spider to emerge from the colony as a response to prey capture but not with being the first to attack, and dispersal distance from experimental colonies correlated with attacking but not with emerging. This suggests that different behavioural responses to prey capture result from a complex set of individual characteristics. Boldness and aggression correlated positively, but neither was associated with body size, developmental stage or dispersal distance. Hence, we show that personalities shape task differentiation in a social spider independent of age and maturation. Our results suggest that personality measures obtained in solitary, standardized laboratory settings can be reliable predictors of behaviour in a social context in the field. Given the wealth of organisms that show consistent individual behavioural differences, animal personality could play a role in social organization in a diversity of animals.

  8. Jewelled spiders manipulate colour-lure geometry to deceive prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Thomas E

    2017-03-01

    Selection is expected to favour the evolution of efficacy in visual communication. This extends to deceptive systems, and predicts functional links between the structure of visual signals and their behavioural presentation. Work to date has primarily focused on colour, however, thereby understating the multicomponent nature of visual signals. Here I examined the relationship between signal structure, presentation behaviour, and efficacy in the context of colour-based prey luring. I used the polymorphic orb-web spider Gasteracantha fornicata, whose yellow- or white-and-black striped dorsal colours have been broadly implicated in prey attraction. In a manipulative assay, I found that spiders actively control the orientation of their conspicuous banded signals in the web, with a distinct preference for near-diagonal bearings. Further field-based study identified a predictive relationship between pattern orientation and prey interception rates, with a local maximum at the spiders' preferred orientation. There were no morph-specific effects on capture success, either singularly or via an interaction with pattern orientation. These results reveal a dynamic element in a traditionally 'static' signalling context, and imply differential functions for chromatic and geometric signal components across visual contexts. More broadly, they underscore how multicomponent signal designs and display behaviours may coevolve to enhance efficacy in visual deception. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. Optimal foraging, not biogenetic law, predicts spider orb web allometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorič, Matjaž; Kiesbüy, Heine C.; Quiñones Lebrón, Shakira G.; Rozman, Alenka; Agnarsson, Ingi; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2013-03-01

    The biogenetic law posits that the ontogeny of an organism recapitulates the pattern of evolutionary changes. Morphological evidence has offered some support for, but also considerable evidence against, the hypothesis. However, biogenetic law in behavior remains underexplored. As physical manifestation of behavior, spider webs offer an interesting model for the study of ontogenetic behavioral changes. In orb-weaving spiders, web symmetry often gets distorted through ontogeny, and these changes have been interpreted to reflect the biogenetic law. Here, we test the biogenetic law hypothesis against the alternative, the optimal foraging hypothesis, by studying the allometry in Leucauge venusta orb webs. These webs range in inclination from vertical through tilted to horizontal; biogenetic law predicts that allometry relates to ontogenetic stage, whereas optimal foraging predicts that allometry relates to gravity. Specifically, pronounced asymmetry should only be seen in vertical webs under optimal foraging theory. We show that, through ontogeny, vertical webs in L. venusta become more asymmetrical in contrast to tilted and horizontal webs. Biogenetic law thus cannot explain L. venusta web allometry, but our results instead support optimization of foraging area in response to spider size.

  10. Review of the Australian wolf spider genus Venator (Araneae, Lycosidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Framenau, Volker W

    2015-09-11

    Species of the Australian wolf spider genus Venator are reviewed including the type species, V. spenceri Hogg, 1900, from south-eastern Australia and V. immansuetus (Simon, 1909) comb. nov., a common species in south-west Western Australia. Venator marginatus Hogg, 1900 is only known from two female specimens and the genital morphology of this species does not conform to the diagnosis of genus as presented here. Therefore V. marginatus is considered incerta sedis. Venator includes medium-sized (9.0-22 mm body length) wolf spiders of overall brownish colouration, and with a black patch covering the anterior three quarters of the venter. They differ from all other wolf spiders in particular by genitalic characters, namely an elevated atrium of the female epigyne that forms a raised edged against the inverted T-shaped median septum. This edge often corresponds to a retrolateral incision on the tegular apophysis of the male pedipalp. The genus is mainly a representative of the Bassian fauna of the Australian continent where it occurs predominantly in dry sclerophyll forests.

  11. Diapause incidence in the two-spotted spider mite increases due to predator presence, not due to selective predation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, A.; Veenendaal, R.L.; Egas, C.J.M.; Bruin, J.; Sabelis, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    We recently reported evidence for increased diapause incidence in the spider mite Tetranychus urticae in the presence of the predatory mite Typhlodromus pyri. This effect may arise from (1) selective predation on non-diapause spider mites, (2) predator-induced diapause in spider mites, or (3) both.

  12. Silkworms transformed with chimeric silkworm/spider silk genes spin composite silk fibers with improved mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of a spider silk manufacturing process is of great interest. piggyBac vectors were used to create transgenic silkworms encoding chimeric silkworm/spider silk proteins. The silk fibers produced by these animals were composite materials that included chimeric silkworm/spider silk prote...

  13. Multi-wavelength Observations of the Black Widow Pulsar 2FGL J2339.6-0532 with OISTER and Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsu, Yoichi; Kataoka, Jun; Takahashi, Yosuke; Tachibana, Yutaro; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Shibata, Shimpei; Pike, Sean; Yoshii, Taketoshi; Arimoto, Makoto; Saito, Yoshihiko; Nakamori, Takeshi; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro; Kuroda, Daisuke; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Hanayama, Hidekazu; Watanabe, Makoto; Hamamoto, Ko; Nakao, Hikaru; Ozaki, Akihito; Motohara, Kentaro; Konishi, Masahiro; Tateuchi, Ken; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nagayama, Takahiro; Murata, Katsuhiro; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Ali, Gamal B.; Essam Mohamed, A.; Isogai, Mizuki; Arai, Akira; Takahashi, Hidenori; Hashimoto, Osamu; Miyanoshita, Ryo; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Takahashi, Jun; Tokimasa, Noritaka; Matsuda, Kentaro; Okumura, Shin-ichiro; Nishiyama, Kota; Urakawa, Seitaro; Nogami, Daisaku; Oasa, Yumiko; OISTER Team

    2015-04-01

    Multi-wavelength observations of the black widow binary system 2FGL J2339.6-0532 are reported. The Fermi gamma-ray source 2FGL J2339.6-0532 was recently categorized as a black widow in which a recycled millisecond pulsar (MSP) is evaporating the companion star with its powerful pulsar wind. Our optical observations show clear sinusoidal light curves due to the asymmetric temperature distribution of the companion star. Assuming a simple geometry, we constrained the range of the inclination angle of the binary system to 52{}^\\circ \\lt i\\lt 59{}^\\circ , which enables us to discuss the interaction between the pulsar wind and the companion in detail. The X-ray spectrum consists of two components: a soft, steady component that seems to originate from the surface of the MSP, and a hard, variable component from the wind-termination shock near the companion star. The measured X-ray luminosity is comparable to the bolometric luminosity of the companion, meaning that the heating efficiency is less than 0.5. In the companion orbit, 1011 cm from the pulsar, the pulsar wind is already in the particle-dominant stage with a magnetization parameter of σ \\lt 0.1. In addition, we precisely investigated the time variations of the X-ray periodograms and detected a weakening of the orbital modulation. The observed phenomenon may be related to unstable pulsar wind activity or weak mass accretion, both of which can result in the temporal extinction of the radio pulse.

  14. Radio Timing and Optical Photometry of the Black Widow System PSR J1518+0204C in the Globular Cluster M5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pallanca, C.; Ransom, S.M.; Ferraro, F.R.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Stairs, I.; Freire, P.C.C.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the determination of astrometric, spin, and orbital parameters for PSR J1518+0204C, a "black widow" binary millisecond pulsar in the globular cluster (GC) M5. The accurate position and orbital parameters obtained from radio timing allowed us to search for the optical companion. By using

  15. Toward the Development of an Inventory of Daily Widowed Life (IDWL): Guided by the Dual Process Model of Coping with Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, Michael S.; Lund, Dale A.

    2007-01-01

    "The Dual Process Model of Coping with Bereavement" (M. Stroebe & H. Schut, 1999) suggests that the most effective adaptation involves oscillation between 2 coping processes: loss-orientation (LO) and restoration-orientation (RO). A 22-item Inventory of Daily Widowed Life (IDWL) was developed to measure these processes and the…

  16. Untangling spider silk evolution with spidroin terminal domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garb Jessica E

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spidroins are a unique family of large, structural proteins that make up the bulk of spider silk fibers. Due to the highly variable nature of their repetitive sequences, spidroin evolutionary relationships have principally been determined from their non-repetitive carboxy (C-terminal domains, though they offer limited character data. The few known spidroin amino (N-terminal domains have been difficult to obtain, but potentially contain critical phylogenetic information for reconstructing the diversification of spider silks. Here we used silk gland expression data (ESTs from highly divergent species to evaluate the functional significance and phylogenetic utility of spidroin N-terminal domains. Results We report 11 additional spidroin N-termini found by sequencing ~1,900 silk gland cDNAs from nine spider species that shared a common ancestor > 240 million years ago. In contrast to their hyper-variable repetitive regions, spidroin N-terminal domains have retained striking similarities in sequence identity, predicted secondary structure, and hydrophobicity. Through separate and combined phylogenetic analyses of N-terminal domains and their corresponding C-termini, we find that combined analysis produces the most resolved trees and that N-termini contribute more support and less conflict than the C-termini. These analyses show that paralogs largely group by silk gland type, except for the major ampullate spidroins. Moreover, spidroin structural motifs associated with superior tensile strength arose early in the history of this gene family, whereas a motif conferring greater extensibility convergently evolved in two distantly related paralogs. Conclusions A non-repetitive N-terminal domain appears to be a universal attribute of spidroin proteins, likely retained from the origin of spider silk production. Since this time, spidroin N-termini have maintained several features, consistent with this domain playing a key role in silk

  17. The spider Harpactea sadistica: co-evolution of traumatic insemination and complex female genital morphology in spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řezáč, Milan

    2009-01-01

    The males of invertebrates from a few phyla, including arthropods, have been reported to practise traumatic insemination (TI; i.e. injecting sperm by using the copulatory organ to penetrate the female's body wall). As all previously reported arthropod examples have been insects, there is considerable interest in whether TI might have evolved independently in other arthropods. The research reported here demonstrates the first case of TI in the arthropod subphylum Chelicerata, in particular how the genital morphology and mating behaviour of Harpactea sadistica (Řezáč 2008), a spider from Israel, has become adapted specifically for reproduction based on TI. Males have needle-like intromittent organs and females have atrophied spermathecae. In other spiders, eggs are fertilized simultaneously with oviposition, but the eggs of H. sadistica are fertilized in the ovaries (internal fertilization) and develop as embryos before being laid. Sperm-storage organs of phylogenetically basal groups to H. sadistica provide males with last male sperm priority and allow removal of sperm by males that mate later, suggesting that TI might have evolved as an adaptive strategy to circumvent an unfavourable structure of the sperm-storage organs, allowing the first male to mate with paternity advantage. Understanding the functional significance of TI gives us insight into factors underlying the evolution of the genital and sperm-storage morphology in spiders. PMID:19403531

  18. Photoluminescent properties of spider silk coated with Eu-doped nanoceria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmitrović, Svetlana, E-mail: svetlana8@vin.bg.ac.rs [University of Belgrade, Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences (Serbia); Nikolić, Marko G.; Jelenković, Branislav [University of Belgrade, Institute of Physics (Serbia); Prekajski, Marija [University of Belgrade, Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences (Serbia); Rabasović, Mihailo [University of Belgrade, Institute of Physics (Serbia); Zarubica, Aleksandra [University of Niš, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Mathematics (Serbia); Branković, Goran [University of Belgrade, Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, Department of Material Science (Serbia); Matović, Branko [University of Belgrade, Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences (Serbia)

    2017-02-15

    Spider dragline silk was coated with pure as well as Eu-doped ceria nanopowders at the room temperature. The treatment was done by immersion of the spider silk mesh into aqueous solutions of cerium nitrate (Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}) and ammonium hydroxide (NH{sub 4}OH). Depending on the relationship between Ce{sup 3+} ion and ammonium hydroxide concentration, coated fibers exhibited a different thickness. Obtained materials were studied by means of FESEM. It was found that ceria nanoparticles of average size of 3 nm were coated along spider thread. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) confirmed crystal nature of nanoparticle coating of spider silk. By using Williamson-Hall plots, crystallite size and strain were estimated. EDS measurement confirmed the presence of Eu in spider-Eu-doped ceria composite, and according to FTIR analysis, the interaction between CeO2 and spider silk was proposed. The morphology of obtained composite was observed by TEM. The photoluminescence emission spectra of spider silk coated with Eu-doped ceria were measured with two different excitations of 385 and 466 nm. The two-photon excited auto-fluorescence of spider silk coated with Eu-doped ceria was detected using a nonlinear laser scanning microscope. Obtained composite has a potential as a fluorescent labeling material in diverse applications.

  19. Biased interpretation and memory in children with varying levels of spider fear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, A.M.; Titulaer, G.; Simons, C.; Allart, E.; de Gier, E.; Bögels, S.M.; Becker, E.S.; Rinck, M.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated multiple cognitive biases in children simultaneously, to investigate whether spider-fearful children display an interpretation bias, a recall bias, and source monitoring errors, and whether these biases are specific for spider-related materials. Furthermore, the independent

  20. High School Students' Attitudes Towards Spiders: A cross-cultural comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Pavol; Tolarovičová, Andrea; Camerik, Anne M.; Peterková, Viera

    2010-08-01

    Spiders are traditionally considered to be among the least popular of animals. Current evidence suggests that a negative attitude towards spiders could be influenced by both cultural and evolutionary pressures. Some researchers suggest that science education activities could positively influence students' perceptions of spiders. Their evidence is, however, ambivalent. Using a five-point score Likert-type questionnaire in which the items were developed in a similar way to four of Kellert's categories of attitude (scientistic, negativistic, naturalistic, and ecologistic) towards invertebrates, we compared the level of knowledge of and attitudes towards spiders of high school students from two countries, Slovakia (n = 354) and South Africa (n = 382). The students represented different cultures and followed dissimilar science education curricula. Only among the Slovakian students there was a statistically significant but low correlation between knowledge and attitude (r = 0.30). The South African students scored higher in the categories of scientistic, naturalistic, and ecologistic attitudes. Comparison of attitude towards spiders of indigenous Africans from coeducational Catholic schools revealed that South African students have greater fear of spiders than Slovakian students, supporting the biological preparedness hypothesis. This hypothesis predicts a greater fear of spiders in South Africa than in Europe since several South African spiders possess venoms that are dangerous to humans. The results of this study are discussed from science education, cultural, and evolutionary perspectives.