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Sample records for brookhaven national synchrotron

  1. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science About Departments Partner With Us Careers News Feedback Directory BNL People a passion for discovery justincase02@ ... can partner with BNL to commercialize our diverse portfolio of licensable technologies. | More Outlook Web Access Brookhaven ...

  3. Programmed improvements of the alternating gradient synchrotron complex at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    The purpose and need for DOE to undertake the actions described in this document are to improve the efficiency of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) complex. Benefits would include optimization of the AGS scientific program, increased high-energy and nuclear physics experimentation, improved health and safety conditions for workers and users, reduced impact on the environment and the general public, energy conservation, decreased generation of hazardous and radioactive wastes, and completion of actions required to permit the AGS to be the injector to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)., Improved efficiency is defined as increasing the AGS`s capabilities to capture and accelerate the proton intensity transferred to the AGS from the AGS booster. Improved capture of beam intensity would reduce the beam losses which equate to lost scientific opportunity for study and increased potential for radiation doses to workers and the general public. The action would also refurbish magnets used in the transfer tunnel which connects the AGS complex to RHIC to permit smooth injection of beam into the RHIC accelerator. These magnets were previously used to direct beam to fixed targets for high energy physics studies but have hot received proper maintenance to be reliable as injectors to RHIC. The document describes alternative actions, the affected environment, and environmental impacts.

  4. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT PLAN.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NAIDU,J.R.

    2002-10-22

    The purpose of the Wildlife Management Plan (WMP) is to promote stewardship of the natural resources found at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and to integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission.

  5. Applied programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    This document overviews the areas of current research at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Technology transfer and the user facilities are discussed. Current topics are presented in the areas of applied physics, chemical science, material science, energy efficiency and conservation, environmental health and mathematics, biosystems and process science, oceanography, and nuclear energy. (GHH)

  6. Teaming with Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-06-06

    BNL has started growing CdZnTeSe crystals for room-temperature radiation detector applications. The addition of Se to CdTe reduces the concentration of secondary phases and sub-grain boundary networks. The addition of Zn increases the energy band gap. Material characterization to understand the limiting factors of radiation detection material and to improve the properties continues to be a core element of an extensive R&D program at the LBNL’s ALS and BNL’s NSLS-II synchrotron facilities. ALS’s Beamline 3.3.2 is available for 60% of its beamtime and allows us to perform both White Beam X-ray Diffraction Topography and Micron Scale X-ray Detector Mapping. The latter technique is extremely useful when measuring scintillators because it allows us to subtract contributions from the variability in the counting statistics, and also the fluctuations due to delta electrons, and non-proportionality. BNL has recently developed a new type of thermal neutron detector using pad technology in combination with 3He gas operated in ionization mode. The new detector is used for coded aperture thermal neutron imaging.

  7. Dr. Praveen Chaudhari named director of Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    "Brookhaven Science Associates announced today the selection of Dr. Praveen Chaudhari as Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. Dr. Chaudhari, who will begin his new duties on April 1, joins Brookhaven Lab after 36 years of distinguished service at IBM as a scientist and senior manager of research" (1 page).

  8. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A. [eds.

    1995-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory.

  9. High field magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, A; Muratore, J; Parker, B; Sampson, W; Wanderer, P J; Willen, E

    2000-01-01

    The magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focussed on superconducting magnets for particle accelerators. The effort includes magnet production at the laboratory and in industry, magnet R&D, and test facilities for magnets and superconductors. Nearly 2000 magnets-dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles and correctors for the arc and insertion regions-were produced for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which is being commissioned. Currently, production of helical dipoles for the polarized proton program at RHIC, insertion region dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and an insertion magnet system for the Hadron-Elektron-Ring- Analage (HERA) collider at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) is underway. The R&D effort is exploring dipoles with fields above 10 T for use in post-LHC colliders. Brittle superconductors-Nb/sub 3/Sn or HTS-are being used for these magnets. The superconductor test facility measures short-sample currents and other characteristics of sample...

  10. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, G.L.; Paquette, D.E.; Naidu, J.R.; Lee, R.J.; Briggs, S.L.K.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1996. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and non-radiological emissions and effluents to the environment.

  11. Geothermal materials development at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1997-06-01

    As part of the DOE/OGT response to recommendations and priorities established by industrial review of their overall R and D program, the Geothermal Materials Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focusing on topics that can reduce O and M costs and increase competitiveness in foreign and domestic markets. Corrosion and scale control, well completion materials, and lost circulation control have high priorities. The first two topics are included in FY 1997 BNL activities, but work on lost circulation materials is constrained by budgetary limitations. The R and D, most of which is performed as cost-shared efforts with US geothermal firms, is rapidly moving into field testing phases. FY 1996 and 1997 accomplishments in the development of lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant cements for well completions; corrosion resistant, thermally conductive polymer matrix composites for heat exchange applications; and metallic, polymer and ceramic-based corrosion protective coatings are given in this paper. In addition, plans for work that commenced in March 1997 on thermally conductive cementitious grouting materials for use with geothermal heat pumps (GHP), are discussed.

  12. Geothermal materials development at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukacka, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    As part of the DOE/OGT response to recommendations and priorities established by industrial review of their overall R&D program, the Geothermal Materials Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focusing on topics that can reduce O&M costs and increase competitiveness in foreign and domestic markets. Corrosion and scale control, well completion materials, and lost circulation control have high priorities. The first two topics are included in FY 1997 BNL activities, but work on lost circulation materials is constrained by budgetary limitations. The R&D, most of which is performed as cost-shared efforts with U.S. geothermal firms, is rapidly moving into field testing phases. FY 1996 and 1997 accomplishments in the development of lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant cements for well completions; corrosion resistant, thermally conductive polymer matrix composites for heat exchange applications; and metallic, polymer and ceramic-based corrosion protective coatings are given in this paper. In addition, plans for work that commenced in March 1997 on thermally conductive cementitious grouting materials for use with geothermal heat pumps (GHP), are discussed.

  13. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.E.; Schroeder, G.L. [eds.] [and others

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1995. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment. Areas of known contamination are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement established by the Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency and the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. Except for identified areas of soil and groundwater contamination, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with the applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. Also, the data show that the environmental impacts at Brookhaven National Laboratory are minimal and pose no threat to the public nor to the environment. This report meets the requirements of Department of Energy Orders 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

  14. Brookhaven National Laboratory moves to the fast lane

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The U.S. Department of Energy's energy sciences network (ESnet) continues to roll out its next-generation architecture on schedule with the March 14 completion of the Long Island Metropolitan Area Network, connecting Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to the ESnet point of presente (PO) 60 miles away in New York City." (1 page)

  15. Radiological environmental monitoring report for Brookhaven National Laboratory 1967--1970

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, C.B.; Hull, A.P.

    1998-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was established in 1947 on the former Army Camp Upton site located in central Long Island, New York. From the very beginning, BNL has monitored the environment on and around the Laboratory site to assess the effects of its operations on the environment. This document summarizes the environmental data collected for the years 1967, 1968, 1969, and 1970. Thus, it fills a gap in the series of BNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1962. The data in this document reflect measurements for those four years of concentrations and/or amounts of airborne radioactivity, radioactivity in streams and ground water, and external radiation levels in the vicinity of BNL. Also included are estimates, made at that time, of BNL`s contribution to radioactivity in the environment. Among the major scientific facilities operated at BNL are the High Flux Beam Reactor, Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, and the 60-inch Cyclotron.

  16. Brookhaven highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  17. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY INSTITUTIONAL PLAN FY2003-2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-10

    This document presents the vision for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the next five years, and a roadmap for implementing that vision. Brookhaven is a multidisciplinary science-based laboratory operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), supported primarily by programs sponsored by the DOE's Office of Science. As the third-largest funding agency for science in the U.S., one of the DOE's goals is ''to advance basic research and the instruments of science that are the foundations for DOE's applied missions, a base for U.S. technology innovation, and a source of remarkable insights into our physical and biological world, and the nature of matter and energy'' (DOE Office of Science Strategic Plan, 2000 http://www.osti.gov/portfolio/science.htm). BNL shapes its vision according to this plan.

  18. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1994.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NAIDU,J.R.; ROYCE,B.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory's operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory. Brookhaven National Laboratory's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment were evaluated. Among the permitted facilities, two instances of pH exceedances were observed at recharge basins, possibly related to rain-water run-off to these recharge basins. Also, the discharge from the Sewage Treatment Plant to the Peconic River exceeded. on ten occasions, one each for fecal coliform and 5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand (avg.) and eight for ammonia nitrogen. The ammonia and Biochemical Oxygen Demand exceedances were attributed to the cold winter and the routine cultivation of the sand filter beds which resulted in the hydraulic overloading of the filter beds and the possible destruction of nitrifying bacteria. The on-set of warm weather and increased aeration of the filter beds via cultivation helped to alleviate this condition. The discharge of fecal coliform may also be linked to this occurrence, in that the increase in fecal coliform coincided with the increased cultivation of the sand filter beds. The environmental monitoring data has identified site-specific contamination of groundwater and soil. These areas are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement. Except for the above, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with

  19. Brookhaven National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY2001--FY2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.

    2000-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory in the Department of Energy National Laboratory system and plays a lead role in the DOE Science and Technology mission. The Laboratory also contributes to the DOE missions in Energy Resources, Environmental Quality, and National Security. Brookhaven strives for excellence in its science research and in facility operations and manages its activities with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. The Laboratory's programs are aligned continuously with the goals and objectives of the DOE through an Integrated Planning Process. This Institutional Plan summarizes the portfolio of research and capabilities that will assure success in the Laboratory's mission in the future. It also sets forth BNL strategies for our programs and for management of the Laboratory. The Department of Energy national laboratory system provides extensive capabilities in both world class research expertise and unique facilities that cannot exist without federal support. Through these national resources, which are available to researchers from industry, universities, other government agencies and other nations, the Department advances the energy, environmental, economic and national security well being of the US, provides for the international advancement of science, and educates future scientists and engineers.

  20. 1995 Annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) conduct of epidemiologic surveillance provides an early warning system for health problems among workers. This program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report summarizes epidemiologic surveillance data collected from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at BNL and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out.

  1. Brookhaven National Laboratory site report for calendar year 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R.

    1989-06-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is managed by Associated Universities Inc. (AUI). AUI was formed in 1946 by a group of nine universities whose purpose was to create and manage a laboratory in the Northeast in order to advance scientific research in areas of interest to universities, industry, and government. On January 31, 1947, the contract for BNL was approved by the Manhattan District of the Army Corps of Engineers and BNL was established on the former Camp Upton army camp. 54 refs., 21 figs., 78 tabs.

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A.; Miltenberger, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    This publication presents the results of BNL`s environmental monitoring and compliance effort and provides an assessment of the impact of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) operations on the environment. This document is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Section of the Safety and Envirorunental Protection Division. Within this Section, the Environmental Monitoring Group (EMG) sample the environment, interpreted the results, performed the impact analysis of the emissions from BNL, and compiled the information presented here. In this effort, other groups of the Section: Compliance; Analytical; Ground Water; and Quality played a key role in addressing the regulatory aspects and the analysis and documentation of the data, respectively.

  3. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A.; Miltenberger, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    This publication presents the results of BNL's environmental monitoring and compliance effort and provides an assessment of the impact of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) operations on the environment. This document is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Section of the Safety and Envirorunental Protection Division. Within this Section, the Environmental Monitoring Group (EMG) sample the environment, interpreted the results, performed the impact analysis of the emissions from BNL, and compiled the information presented here. In this effort, other groups of the Section: Compliance; Analytical; Ground Water; and Quality played a key role in addressing the regulatory aspects and the analysis and documentation of the data, respectively.

  4. Deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory. With the exception of radium, there are no regulations or guidelines to establish cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soils at BNL. BNL must derive radionuclide soil cleanup guidelines for a number of Operable Units (OUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs). These guidelines are required by DOE under a proposed regulation for radiation protection of public health and the environment as well as to satisfy the requirements of CERCLA. The objective of this report is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL. Implementation of the approach is briefly discussed.

  5. Summary of failure analysis activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowgill, M.G.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Franz, E.M.

    1996-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has for many years conducted examinations related to the failures of nuclear materials and components. These examinations included the confirmation of root cause analyses, the determination of the causes of failure, identification of the species that accelerate corrosion, and comparison of the results of nondestructive examinations with those obtained by destructive examination. The results of those examinations, which had previously appeared in various formats (formal and informal reports, journal articles, etc.), have been collected together and summarized in the present report. The report is divided into sections according to the general subject matter (for example, corrosion, fatigue, etc.). Each section presents summaries of the information contained in specific reports and publications, all of which are fully identified as to title, authors, report number or journal reference, date of publication, and FIN number under which the work was performed.

  6. Current schemes for National Synchrotron Light Source UV beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G.P.; Howells, M.R.; McKinney, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    We describe in some detail four beamlines proposed for the National Synchrotron Light Source uv ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Three grazing-incidence instruments, one of the plane grating Mijake type and two with toroidal gratings at grazing angles of 2-1/2/sup 0/ and 15/sup 0/ are described. Two normal incidence instruments, one using the source as entrance slit and accepting 75 milliradians horizontally are also discussed. In each case we have estimated the output fluxes expected from such beamlines.

  7. WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION

    2003-09-01

    This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve) is based on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) fire management planning procedures and was developed in cooperation with the Department of Energy (DOE) by Brookhaven Science Associates. As the Upton Reserve is contained within the BNL 5,265-acre site, it is logical that the plan applies to both the Upton Reserve and BNL. The Department of the Interior policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas managed by FWS that can sustain fire must have an FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures and specifies values to be protected or enhanced. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, ''prescribed'' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL/Upton Reserve Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered and threatened species and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL and the Upton Reserve. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of FWS, BNL, and the Upton Reserve. This Fire Management Plan is a modified version of the Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex Fire plan (updated in 2000), which contains all FWS fire plan requirements and is presented in the format specified by the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. FWS shall be, through an Interagency Agreement dated November 2000 (Appendix C), responsible for coordinating and

  8. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) conducted April 6 through 17, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with BNL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at BNL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the BNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the BNL Survey. 80 refs., 24 figs., 48 tabs.

  9. Pollution, contamination and future land use at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, J; Gochfeld, M; Shukla, S; Jeitner, C; Ramos, R; Tsipoura, Nellie; Donio, M

    2008-10-01

    Scientists interested in contamination normally deal only with pollution itself, not with people's perceptions of pollution or the relationship between pollution and land use. The overall objective of this article was to examine the relationship between people's perceptions of pollution and their views on future land use. People were interviewed at an Earth Day Festival near the Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on Long Island, New York. On an open-ended question, people thought that BNL should be left as it is, or maintained as a preserve, park or conservation area, or used for environmental research. Almost no one thought that it should be used for housing or industrial purposes. When asked to rate a list of possible future land uses, maintaining BNL as a National Environmental Research Park for research and for recreation were rated the highest (nuclear storage was rated the lowest). This was consistent with the subjects' views that pollution was the greatest concern about BNL. The congruence between perceptions about concerns or problems and future land use preferences suggests a unified view of management of contaminated sites, such as BNL, at least among a group of people whose environmental interests were evident by their presence at the event.

  10. CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVIS, M.

    2005-04-01

    The Cultural Resource Management Plan (CRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides an organized guide that describes or references all facets and interrelationships of cultural resources at BNL. This document specifically follows, where applicable, the format of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management Plans, DOE G 450.1-3 (9-22-04[m1]). Management strategies included within this CRMP are designed to adequately identify the cultural resources that BNL and DOE consider significant and to acknowledge associated management actions. A principal objective of the CRMP is to reduce the need for additional regulatory documents and to serve as the basis for a formal agreement between the DOE and the New York State Historic Preservation Officer (NYSHPO). The BNL CRMP is designed to be a ''living document.'' Each section includes identified gaps in the management plan, with proposed goals and actions for addressing each gap. The plan will be periodically revised to incorporate new documentation.

  11. In vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, R.; Yasumura, Seiichi; Dilmanian, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    Seven important body elements, C, N, Ca, P, K, Na, and Cl, can be measured with great precision and accuracy in the in vivo neutron activation facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The facilities include the delayed-gamma neutron activation, the prompt-gamma neutron activation, and the inelastic neutron scattering systems. In conjunction with measurements of total body water by the tritiated-water dilution method several body compartments can be defined from the contents of these elements, also with high precision. In particular, body fat mass is derived from total body carbon together with total body calcium and nitrogen; body protein mass is derived from total body nitrogen; extracellular fluid volume is derived from total body sodium and chlorine; lean body mass and body cell mass are derived from total body potassium; and, skeletal mass is derived from total body calcium. Thus, we suggest that neutron activation analysis may be valuable for calibrating some of the instruments routinely used in clinical studies of body composition. The instruments that would benefit from absolute calibration against neutron activation analysis are bioelectric impedance analysis, infrared interactance, transmission ultrasound, and dual energy x-ray/photon absorptiometry.

  12. Tiger Team assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York, between March 26 and April 27, 1990. The BNL is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the Associated Universities, Inc., (AUI) for DOE. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at the Laboratory. The scope of the assessment included a review of management systems and operating procedures and records; observations of facility operations; and interviews at the facilities. Subteams in four areas performed the review: ES H, Occupational Safety and Health, and Management and Organization. The assessment was comprehensive, covering all areas of ES H activities and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; and internal BNL requirements was assessed. In addition, the assessment included an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractor, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), management, organization, and administration of the ES H programs at BNL.

  13. Brookhaven National Laboratory 2008 Site Environment Report Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2009-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the full report.

  14. Technical Safety Appraisal of the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of the Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) was to assess the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) through the evaluation of activities at selected facilities and in selected safety disciplines. The TSA was conducted in accordance with established procedures. The following BNL safety and health program elements were reviewed as a part of this TSA: Organization and Administration, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Auxiliary Systems, Technical Support, Site/Facility Safety Review, Emergency Preparedness, Radiological Protection, Industrial Hygiene, Occupational Safety, Fire Protection, Quality Verification, and Medical Services. The TSA was conducted from March 26--April 12, 1990. The evaluation was conducted by a team of experts assembled by EH, Office of Safety Appraisals (OSA). TSAs are operationally focused. As such, in terms of safety, health, and quality verification, the site and selected facilities were appraised relative to operations, and the condition of equipment and facilities. The evaluation thus addresses whether current operations are being conducted within the operational safety procedures established for specific facilities and activities.

  15. Tiger Team assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York, between March 26 and April 27, 1990. The BNL is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the Associated Universities, Inc., (AUI) for DOE. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at the laboratory. The scope of the assessment included a review of management systems and operating procedures and records; observations of facility operations; and interviews at the facilities. Subteams in four areas performed the review: ES H, Occupational Safety and Health, and Management and Organization. The assessment was comprehensive, covering all areas of ES H activities and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; and internal BNL requirements was assessed. In addition, the assessment included an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractor, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), management, organization, and administration of the ES H programs at BNL. This volume contains appendices.

  16. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-01-01

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory's activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  17. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-12-31

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory`s activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  18. Proto-2, an ALICE detector prototype, part of the STAR experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Proto-2, an LAICE detector prototype, overcame its prototype status to become a real part of the SDTAR, epxeriment at the US Brookhaven National Laboratory. After more than two years across the ocean, it has just arrived back at CERN.

  19. The Founding of the Brookhaven National Laboratory - Associated Universities, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    1948-01-15

    At the end of the war it became apparent that the teamwork of government and scientific institutions, which had been so effective in wartime work, must somehow be perpetuated in order to insure the continued progress of nuclear science in peace time. The enormous expense of the tools needed to pursue the next steps in this research -- nuclear reactors and high energy accelerators -- and the shortage of scientifically trained personnel pointed towards the establishment of a cooperative laboratory. Such a laboratory, using government funds, could carry out a comprehensive research program that would benefit the many interested research groups throughout the country. As a result of the wartime programs under the Manhattan District, centers of research in nuclear science were already active at the Radiation Laboratory in Berkeley, California, at Los Alamos in New Mexico, at the Clinton Laboratories in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and at the Argonne Laboratory in Chicago. No analogous nuclear research laboratories, however, had developed in the Northeast, and since so much of the nation's scientific talent and industrial activities are concentrated in the northeastern states, it was proposed that a new laboratory be established near New York City. As a result of this plan, the Brookhaven National Laboratory is now in operation at Upton, Long Island. The work of this Laboratory is performed under a contract between the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and a corporation, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) , formed by representatives of nine of the larger private universities in the northeast: Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, the University of Rochester, and Yale. The purpose of this laboratory is the advancement of knowledge in the fundamentals of nuclear science, the extension of its application to other fields, and the training of young scientists in these new subjects. This

  20. Wildland Fire Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green,T.

    2009-10-23

    This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) updates the 2003 plan incorporating changes necessary to comply with DOE Order 450.1 and DOE P 450.4, Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy and Program Review; Wildland and Prescribed Fire Management Policy and implementation Procedures Reference Guide. This current plan incorporates changes since the original draft of the FMP that result from new policies on the national level. This update also removes references and dependence on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and Department of the Interior, fully transitioning Wildland Fire Management responsibilities to BNL. The Department of Energy policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas, managed by the DOE and/or its various contractors, that can sustain fire must have a FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures associated with wild fire, operational, and prescribed fires. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, 'prescribed' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered, threatened, and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of the DOE and BNL. This Fire Management Plan is presented in a format that coverers all aspects specified by DOE guidance documents which are based on the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. This FMP is to be used and implemented for the

  1. NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN,T.ET AL.

    2003-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is located near the geographic center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated on 5,265 acres of land composed of Pine Barrens habitat with a central area developed for Laboratory work. In the mid-1990s BNL began developing a wildlife management program. This program was guided by the Wildlife Management Plan (WMP), which was reviewed and approved by various state and federal agencies in September 1999. The WMP primarily addressed concerns with the protection of New York State threatened, endangered, or species of concern, as well as deer populations, invasive species management, and the revegetation of the area surrounding the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The WMP provided a strong and sound basis for wildlife management and established a basis for forward motion and the development of this document, the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP), which will guide the natural resource management program for BNL. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B respectively), lists of actions in tabular format (Appendix C), and regulatory drivers for the Natural Resource Program (Appendix D). The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and incorporation of community involvement, where applicable.

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A. [eds.

    1994-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at BNL and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1993. To evaluate the effect of BNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, ground water and vegetation were made at the BNL site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory. Brookhaven National Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment were evaluated. Among the permitted facilities, two instances, of pH exceedances were observed at recharge basins, possible related to rain-water run-off to these recharge basins. Also, the discharge from the Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) to the Peconic River exceeded on five occasions, three for residual chlorine and one each for iron and ammonia nitrogen. The chlorine exceedances were related to a malfunctioning hypochlorite dosing pump and ceased when the pump was repaired. While the iron and ammonia-nitrogen could be the result of disturbances to the sand filter beds during maintenance. The environmental monitoring data has identified site-specific contamination of ground water and soil. These areas are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FS) under the Inter Agency Agreement (IAG). Except for the above, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment, and that the environmental impacts at BNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public or to the environment. This report meets the requirements of DOE Orders 5484. 1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

  3. Natural Resource Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    green, T.

    2011-08-15

    This comprehensive Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was built on the successful foundation of the Wildlife Management Plan for BNL, which it replaces. This update to the 2003 plan continues to build on successes and efforts to better understand the ecosystems and natural resources found on the BNL site. The plan establishes the basis for managing the varied natural resources located on the 5,265 acre BNL site, setting goals and actions to achieve those goals. The planning of this document is based on the knowledge and expertise gained over the past 10 years by the Natural Resources management staff at BNL in concert with local natural resource agencies including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Long Island Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission, The Nature Conservancy, and others. The development of this plan is an attempt at sound ecological management that not only benefits BNL's ecosystems but also benefits the greater Pine Barrens habitats in which BNL is situated. This plan applies equally to the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve). Any difference in management between the larger BNL area and the Upton Reserve are noted in the text. The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to sustainably integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, sustainability, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and the incorporation of community involvement, where applicable. The NRMP is periodically reviewed and updated, typically every five years. This review and update was delayed to develop documents associated with a new third party facility, the Long Island Solar Farm. This two hundred acre facility will result in

  4. Aberration-Coreected Electron Microscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu,Y.; Wall, J.

    2008-04-01

    The last decade witnessed the rapid development and implementation of aberration correction in electron optics, realizing a more-than-70-year-old dream of aberration-free electron microscopy with a spatial resolution below one angstrom [1-9]. With sophisticated aberration correctors, modern electron microscopes now can reveal local structural information unavailable with neutrons and x-rays, such as the local arrangement of atoms, order/disorder, electronic inhomogeneity, bonding states, spin configuration, quantum confinement, and symmetry breaking [10-17]. Aberration correction through multipole-based correctors, as well as the associated improved stability in accelerating voltage, lens supplies, and goniometers in electron microscopes now enables medium-voltage (200-300kV) microscopes to achieve image resolution at or below 0.1nm. Aberration correction not only improves the instrument's spatial resolution but, equally importantly, allows larger objective lens pole-piece gaps to be employed thus realizing the potential of the instrument as a nanoscale property-measurement tool. That is, while retaining high spatial resolution, we can use various sample stages to observe the materials response under various temperature, electric- and magnetic- fields, and atmospheric environments. Such capabilities afford tremendous opportunities to tackle challenging science and technology issues in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology. The research goal of the electron microscopy group at the Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science and the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, as well as the Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is to elucidate the microscopic origin of the physical- and chemical-behavior of materials, and the role of individual, or groups of atoms, especially in their native functional environments. We plan to accomplish this by developing and implementing various quantitative

  5. A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkovitz, Carmen; Bernholc, Nicole; Cohen, Anita; Eng, Susan; Enriquez-Leder, Rosario; Franz, Barbara; Gorden, Patricia; Hanson, Louise; Lamble, Geraldine; Martin, Harriet; Mastrangelo, Iris; McLane, Victoria; Villela, Maria-Alicia; Vivirito, Katherine; Woodhead, Avril

    1991-01-01

    This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

  6. A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Careers in action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

  7. SUNY beamline facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppens, Philip

    2003-06-22

    The DOE sponsored SUNY synchrotron project has involved close cooperation among faculty at several SUNY campuses. A large number of students and postdoctoral associates have participated in its operation which was centered at the X3 beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Four stations with capabilities for Small Angle Scattering, Single Crystal and Powder and Surface diffraction and EXAFS were designed and operated with capability to perform experiments at very low as well as elevated temperatures and under high vacuum. A large amount of cutting-edge science was performed at the facility, which in addition provided excellent training for students and postdoctoral scientists in the field.

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

    2010-12-29

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of

  9. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulbert, S.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the experiment done at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Most experiments discussed involves the use of the x-ray beams to study physical properties of solid materials. (LSP)

  10. 76 FR 70456 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From Brookhaven National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... evaluation, is as follows: Facility: Brookhaven National Laboratory. Location: Upton, New York. Job Titles... HUMAN SERVICES Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From Brookhaven...: Notice. SUMMARY: HHS gives notice as required by 42 CFR 83.12(e) of a decision to evaluate a petition to...

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory technology transfer report, fiscal year 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    An increase in the activities of the Office of Research and Technology Applications (ORTA) is reported. Most of the additional effort has been directed to the regional electric utility initiative, but intensive efforts have been applied to the commercialization of a compact synchrotron storage ring for x-ray lithography applications. At least six laboratory technologies are reported as having been transferred or being in the process of transfer. Laboratory accelerator technology is being applied to study radiation effects, and reactor technology is being applied for designing space reactors. Technologies being transferred and emerging technologies are described. The role of the ORTA and the technology transfer process are briefly described, and application assessment records are given for a number of technologies. A mini-incubator facility is also described. (LEW)

  12. First magnet constructed for the LHC by Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    CERN has taken delivery of the first US-built contribution to the LHC. The 25-tonne interaction-region dipole magnet, which will guide the LHC´s two counter-rotating beams of protons into collision, was built at the US Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is the first of 20 that the laboratory will ultimately provide and took nine months for more than 100 scientists, engineers and technicians to construct. Brookhaven´s Superconducting Magnet Division is now building the remaining 19 magnets, which will be shipped to CERN later this year. They are provided for the LHC under the terms of a 1998 agreement between CERN and the US Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  13. Qualitative risk evaluation of environmental restoration programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, S.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report documents the evaluation of risks associated with environmental restoration activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory using two tools supplied by DOE to provide a consistent set of risk estimates across the DOE complex: Risk Data Sheets (RDS) and Relative Risk Ranking. The tools are described, the process taken characterized, results provided and discussed. The two approaches are compared and recommendations provided for continuing improvement of the process.

  14. 2003 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-02

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Brookhaven National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  15. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORYS CAPABILITIES FOR ADVANCED ANALYSES OF CYBER THREATS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePhillips M. P.

    2014-06-06

    BNL has several ongoing, mature, and successful programs and areas of core scientific expertise that readily could be modified to address problems facing national security and efforts by the IC related to securing our nation’s computer networks. In supporting these programs, BNL houses an expansive, scalable infrastructure built exclusively for transporting, storing, and analyzing large disparate data-sets. Our ongoing research projects on various infrastructural issues in computer science undoubtedly would be relevant to national security. Furthermore, BNL frequently partners with researchers in academia and industry worldwide to foster unique and innovative ideas for expanding research opportunities and extending our insights. Because the basic science conducted at BNL is unique, such projects have led to advanced techniques, unlike any others, to support our mission of discovery. Many of them are modular techniques, thus making them ideal for abstraction and retrofitting to other uses including those facing national security, specifically the safety of the nation’s cyber space.

  16. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Project Financing Alternatives for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, W. D.; Hail, John C.; Sullivan, Gregory P.

    2000-02-14

    This document provides findings and recommendations that resulted from an assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory by a team from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to assess the site's potential for various alternative financing options as a means to implement energy-efficiency improvements. The assessment looked for life-cycle cost-effective energy-efficiency improvement opportunities, and through a series of staff interviews, evaluated the various methods by which these opportunities may be financed, while considering availability of funds, staff, and available financing options. This report summarizes the findings of the visit and the resulting recommendations.

  17. Brookhaven highlights, fiscal year 1985, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory are briefly discussed. These include work at the National Synchrotron Light Source, the High Flux Beam Reactor, and the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Areas of research include heavy ion reactions, neutrino oscillations, low-level waste, nuclear data, medicine, biology, chemistry, parallel computing, optics. Also provided are general and administrative news, a financial report. (LEW)

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source guidelines for the conduct of operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source

    1998-01-01

    To improve the quality and uniformity of operations at the Department of Energy`s facilities, the DOE issued Order 5480.19 ``Conduct of Operations Requirements at DOE facilities.`` This order recognizes that the success of a facilities mission critically depends upon a high level of performance by its personnel and equipment. This performance can be severely impaired if the facility`s Conduct of Operations pays inadequate attention to issues of organization, safety, health, and the environment. These guidelines are Brookhaven National Laboratory`s and the National Synchrotron Light Source`s acknowledgement of the principles of Conduct of Operations and the response to DOE Order 5480.19. These guidelines cover the following areas: (1) operations organization and administration; (2) shift routines and operating practices; (3) control area activities; (4) communications; (5) control of on-shift training; (6) investigation of abnormal events; (7) notifications; (8) control of equipment and system studies; (9) lockouts and tagouts; (10) independent verification; (11) log-keeping; (12) operations turnover; (13) operations aspects of facility process control (14) required reading; (15) timely orders to operators; (16) operations procedures; (17) operator aid posting; and (18) equipment sizing and labeling.

  19. Risk-based priority scoring for Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental restoration programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, S.C.; Meinhold, A.F.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes the process of estimating the risk associated with environmental restoration programs under the Brookhaven National Laboratory Office of Environmental Restoration. The process was part of an effort across all Department of Energy facilities to provide a consistent framework to communicate risk information about the facilities to senior managers in the DOE Office of Environmental Management to foster understanding of risk activities across programs. the risk evaluation was a qualitative exercise. Categories considered included: Public health and safety; site personnel safety and health; compliance; mission impact; cost-effective risk management; environmental protection; inherent worker risk; environmental effects of clean-up; and social, cultural, political, and economic impacts.

  20. Applications of nuclear techniques for in vivo body composition studies at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, S.H.; Ellis, K.J.; Vartsky, D.; Vaswani, A.N.; Wielopolski, L.

    1981-01-01

    A series of technical developments and their clinical applications in various nuclear technologies at Brookhaven National Laboratory is described. These include the development of a portable neutron activation facility for measuring cadmium in vivo in kidney and liver, a technique for the measurement of body iron utilizing nuclear resonant scattering of gamma rays, a non-invasive measure of the skeletal levels of lead by an x-ray fluorescence technique, and the development of a pulsed Van de Graaff generator as a source of pulsed neutrons for the measurement of lung silicon. (ACR)

  1. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Yamamoto, T; Sekine, M; Okamura, M

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  2. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion sourcea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Sekine, M.; Okamura, M.

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (˜100 μA) with high charge (˜10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  3. Summary of proposed approach for deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1996-11-01

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory, carried out under an Interagency Agreement (IAG) with the United States Department of Energy (DOE), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). The objective of this paper is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL.

  4. Proceedings of Brookhaven National Laboratory's fusion/synfuel workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R. (eds.)

    1979-01-01

    The fusion synfuels workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on August 27-29, 1979 examined the current status of candidate synfuel processes and the R and D required to develop the capability for fusion synfuel production. Participants divided into five working groups, covering the following areas: (1) economics and applications; (2) high-temperature electrolysis; (3) thermochemical processes (including hybrid thermo-electrochemical); (4) blanket and materials; and (5) high-efficiency power cycles. Each working group presented a summary of their conclusions and recommendations to all participants during the third day of the Workshop. These summaries are given.

  5. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  6. Brookhaven National Laboratory/Dale W. Jorgenson Associates long-term energy/economy reference projection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorosh, P.A.; Groncki, P.J.; Goettle, R.J. IV; Hudson, E.A.; Lewis, J.A.; Tingley, R.M.; Van Valkenburg, K.

    1981-07-01

    This report summarizes a detailed projection of the growth and structure of the US energy and economic systems for the period 1980 to 2000. The projection originates through use of a combined model system that simulates energy and economic activity under a comprehensive set of assumptions. These assumptions cover a range of demographic, economic, and energy conditions that define the circumstances and constraints influencing the directions of private and public decisions. Accordingly, many of the provisions of current public policy are included among these inputs. The framework employed in this analysis is provided by the linked energy-economy model system of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Dale W. Jorgenson Associates (DJA). This projection provides a point of reference for the quantitative analysis of proposed policy measures, research directions, and possible energy and economic contingencies.

  7. BNL National Synchrotron Light Source activity report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    During FY 1997 Brookhaven National Laboratory celebrated its 50th Anniversary and 50 years of outstanding achievement under the management of Associated Universities, Inc. This progress report is divided into the following sections: (1) introduction; (2) science highlights; (3) meetings and workshops; (4) operations; (5) projects; (6) organization; and (7) abstracts and publications.

  8. Environmental Remediation Science at Beamline X26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source- Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, Paul

    2013-11-07

    The goal of this project was to provide support for an advanced X-ray microspectroscopy facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. This facility is operated by the University of Chicago and the University of Kentucky. The facility is available to researchers at both institutions as well as researchers around the globe through the general user program. This facility was successfully supported during the project period. It provided access to advanced X-ray microanalysis techniques which lead to fundamental advances in understanding the behavior of contaminants and geochemistry that is applicable to environmental remediation of DOE legacy sites as well as contaminated sites around the United States and beyond.

  9. In-situ containment of buried waste at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, B.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heiser, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Stewart, W.; Phillips, S. [Applied Geotechnical Engineering and Construction, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The primary objective of this project was to further develop close-coupled barrier technology for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional cement grout curtain followed by a thin inner lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and chemically resistant polymer layer. The technology has matured from a regulatory investigation of issues concerning barriers and barrier materials to a pilot-scale, multiple individual column injections at Sandia National Labs (SNL) to full scale demonstration. The feasibility of this barrier concept was successfully proven in a full scale {open_quotes}cold test{close_quotes} demonstration at Hanford, WA. Consequently, a full scale deployment of the technology was conducted at an actual environmental restoration site at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), Long Island, NY. This paper discusses the installation and performance of a technology deployment implemented at OU-1 an Environmental Restoration Site located at BNL.

  10. Status of high current R&D Energy Recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayran, D.; Altinbas Z.; Beavis D.; Ben-Zvi I.; Calaga R.; Gassner D.M.; Hahn H.; Hammons L.; Jain A.; Jamilkowski J.; Lambiase R.; Lederle D.; Litvinenko V.N.; Laloudakis N.; Mahler G.; McIntyre G.; Meng W.; Oerter B.; Pate D.; Phillips D.; Reich J.; Roser T.; Schultheiss C.; Seda T.; Sheehy B.; Srinivasan-Rao T.; Than R.; Tuozzolo J.; Weiss D.; Xu W.; Zaltsman A.

    2011-03-28

    An ampere class 20 MeV superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for testing of concepts relevant for high-energy coherent electron cooling and electron-ion colliders. One of the goals is to demonstrate an electron beam with high charge per bunch ({approx} 5 nC) and low normalized emittance ({approx} 5 mm-mrad) at an energy of 20 MeV. Flexible lattice of ERL loop provides a test-bed for investigating issues of transverse and longitudinal instabilities, and diagnostics for intense CW e-beam. The superconducting 703 MHz RF photoinjector is considered as an electron source for such a facility. We will start with a straight pass (gun - 5 cell cavity - beam stop) test for the SRF Gun performance studies. Later, we will install and test a novel injection line concept for emittance preservation in a lower energy merger. In this paper we present the status and our plans for construction and commissioning of this facility.

  11. High brightness, high current injector design for the ATF upgrade at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-04-01

    Brookhaven National Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is in the process of moving to a new place and upgrading its major capabilities: The electron beam energy and CO2 laser power. Specifically, the maximum electron beam energy will be first projected to 100-150 MeV and then upgraded to 500 MeV while at the same time the laser power will increase 100 fold, thus making the new ATF a powerful tool in advanced accelerator concept research. The bright electron bunch produced by the new state-of-the-art photocathode rf gun will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. The injector is a key element of this accelerator upgrade. It must deliver a high average current beam with very small transverse and longitudinal emittances, at a sufficiently high energy that space charge effects are under control. We review here the detailed injector design and present first results from beam dynamics simulations. We give emphasis in the production of compressed flat beams which have important applications in novel light-source concepts and could possibly alleviate the need for damping rings in lepton colliders. We present a theoretical model and with the aid of simulation examine the influence of space charge, bunch compression and suggest a operating regime with minimal phase space dilutions.

  12. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, S., E-mail: ikeda.s.ae@m.titech.ac.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 216-8502 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Kumaki, M. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  13. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, S.; Kumaki, M.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  14. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, October 1976-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A.

    1979-01-01

    DOE Contract No. EY-76-S-02-4078 was started in October 1976 to set up an investigative radiochemical facility at the Yale Medical Center which would bridge the gap between current investigation with radionuclides at the Yale School of Medicine and the facilities in the Chemistry Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. To facilitate these goals, Dr. Mathew L. Thakur was recruited who joined the Yale University faculty in March of 1977. This report briefly summarizes our research accomplishments through the end of June 1979. These can be broadly classified into three categories: (1) research using indium-111 labelled cellular blood components; (2) development of new radiopharmaceuticals; and (3) interaction with Dr. Alfred Wolf and colleagues in the Chemistry Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  15. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility External Data Center Operations Plan Located At Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cialella, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gregory, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lazar, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liang, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ma, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tilp, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wagener, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The External Data Center (XDC) Operations Plan describes the activities performed to manage the XDC, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), for the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. It includes all ARM infrastructure activities performed by the Data Management and Software Engineering Group (DMSE) at BNL. This plan establishes a baseline of expectation within the ARM Operations Management for the group managing the XDC.

  16. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROTHMAN,E.

    1999-05-01

    In FY 1998, following the 50th Anniversary Year of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Brookhaven Science Associates became the new Managers of BNL. The new start is an appropriate time to take stock of past achievements and to renew or confirm future goals. During the 1998 NSLS Annual Users Meeting (described in Part 3 of this Activity Report), the DOE Laboratory Operations Board, Chaired by the Under Secretary for Energy, Ernest Moniz met at BNL. By chance all the NSLS Chairmen except Martin Blume (acting NSLS Chair 84-85) were present as recorded in the picture. Under their leadership the NSLS has improved dramatically: (1) The VUV Ring current has increased from 100 mA in October 1982 to nearly 1 A today. For the following few years 10 Ahrs of current were delivered most weeks - NSLS now exceeds that every day. (2) When the first experiments were performed on the X-ray ring during FY1985 the electron energy was 2 GeV and the current up to 100 mA - the X-Ray Ring now runs routinely at 2.5 GeV and at 2.8 GeV with up to 350 mA of current, with a very much longer beam half-life and improved reliability. (3) Starting in FY 1984 the proposal for the Phase II upgrade, mainly for a building extension and a suite of insertion devices and their associated beamlines, was pursued - the promises were delivered in full so that for some years now the NSLS has been running with two undulators in the VUV Ring and three wigglers and an undulator in the X-Ray Ring. In addition two novel insertion devices have been commissioned in the X13 straight. (4) At the start of FY 1998 the NSLS welcomed its 7000th user - attracted by the opportunity for pursuing research with high quality beams, guaranteed not to be interrupted by 'delivery failures', and welcomed by an efficient and caring user office and first class teams of PRT and NSLS staff. R & D have lead to the possibility of running the X-Ray Ring at the higher energy of 2.8 GeV. Figure 1 shows the first user beam, which was

  17. Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. E. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) [http://www.arm.gov/campaigns/osc2013rwpcf] campaign was scheduled to take place from 15 July 2013 through 15 July 2015 (or until shipped for the next U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Climate Research Facility first Mobile Facility [AMF1] deployment). The campaign involved the deployment of the AMF1 Scintec 915 MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) at BNL, in conjunction with several other ARM, BNL and National Weather Service (NWS) instruments. The two main scientific foci of the campaign were: 1) To provide profiles of the horizontal wind to be used to test and validate short-term cloud advection forecasts for solar-energy applications and 2) to provide vertical profiling capabilities for the study of dynamics (i.e., vertical velocity) and hydrometeors in winter storms. This campaign was a serendipitous opportunity that arose following the deployment of the RWP at the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign in Cape Cod, Massachusetts and restriction from participation in the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 (GoAmazon 2014/15) campaign due to radio-frequency allocation restriction for international deployments. The RWP arrived at BNL in the fall of 2013, but deployment was delayed until fall of 2014 as work/safety planning and site preparation were completed. The RWP further encountered multiple electrical failures, which eventually required several shipments of instrument power supplies and the final amplifier to the vendor to complete repairs. Data collection began in late January 2015. The operational modes of the RWP were changed such that in addition to collecting traditional profiles of the horizontal wind, a vertically pointing mode was also included for the purpose of precipitation sensing and estimation of vertical velocities. The RWP operated well until the end of the campaign in July 2015 and collected observations for more than 20 precipitation

  18. Brookhaven highlights. Report on research, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Belford, M.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. [eds.

    1993-12-31

    This report highlights the research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory during the period dating from October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. There are contributions to the report from different programs and departments within the laboratory. These include technology transfer, RHIC, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, physics, biology, national synchrotron light source, applied science, medical science, advanced technology, chemistry, reactor physics, safety and environmental protection, instrumentation, and computing and communications.

  19. Analytical summary of experimental data from two years of hourly sequential precipitation samples at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raynor, G.S.; Hayes, J.V.

    1979-05-01

    Hourly precipitation samples were collected at Brookhaven National Laboratory from June 1976 through May 1978 with the Brookhaven Automatic Sequential Precipitation Sampler. Conventional meteorological data were recorded for each sample period. The samples were analyzed for pH, conductivity, and concentrations of sulfate, nitrogen, ammonium, sodium, and chloride ions. Ratios of selected ions, excess conductivity above the H/sup +/ contribution, and excess sulfate and chloride above the seawater ratio were calculated and treated as additional variables. Statistical analyses were performed of the relationships between selected chemical variables and between them and meteorological conditions. Rainfall rate was also analyzed in terms of other meteorological variables. Because a number of units were changed after publication of an earlier report (BNL 50826), the results (presented in a series of tables) are given for each year separately and for both years jointly.

  20. 915-MHz Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    When considering the amount of shortwave radiation incident on a photovoltaic solar array and, therefore, the amount and stability of the energy output from the system, clouds represent the greatest source of short-term (i.e., scale of minutes to hours) variability through scattering and reflection of incoming solar radiation. Providing estimates of this short-term variability is important for determining and regulating the output from large solar arrays as they connect with the larger power infrastructure. In support of the installation of a 37-MW solar array on the grounds of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a study of the impacts of clouds on the output of the solar array has been undertaken. The study emphasis is on predicting the change in surface solar radiation resulting from the observed/forecast cloud field on a 5-minute time scale. At these time scales, advection of cloud elements over the solar array is of particular importance. As part of the BNL Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Operational Period (IOP), a 915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) was deployed to determine the profile of low-level horizontal winds and the depth of the planetary boundary layer. The initial deployment mission of the 915-MHz RWP for cloud forecasting has been expanded the deployment to provide horizontal wind measurements for estimating and constraining cloud advection speeds. A secondary focus is on the observation of dynamics and microphysics of precipitation during cold season/winter storms on Long Island. In total, the profiler was deployed at BNL for 1 year from May 2011 through May 2012.

  1. 915-Mhz Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    When considering the amount of shortwave radiation incident on a photovoltaic solar array and, therefore, the amount and stability of the energy output from the system, clouds represent the greatest source of short-term (i.e., scale of minutes to hours) variability through scattering and reflection of incoming solar radiation. Providing estimates of this short-term variability is important for determining and regulating the output from large solar arrays as they connect with the larger power infrastructure. In support of the installation of a 37-MW solar array on the grounds of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a study of the impacts of clouds on the output of the solar array has been undertaken. The study emphasis is on predicting the change in surface solar radiation resulting from the observed/forecast cloud field on a 5-minute time scale. At these time scales, advection of cloud elements over the solar array is of particular importance. As part of the BNL Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Operational Period (IOP), a 915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) was deployed to determine the profile of low-level horizontal winds and the depth of the planetary boundary layer. The initial deployment mission of the 915-MHz RWP for cloud forecasting has been expanded the deployment to provide horizontal wind measurements for estimating and constraining cloud advection speeds. A secondary focus is on the observation of dynamics and microphysics of precipitation during cold season/winter storms on Long Island. In total, the profiler was deployed at BNL for 1 year from May 2011 through May 2012.

  2. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasta,K.

    2009-05-01

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for

  3. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE MEDICAL PERSONNEL PROTECTION INTERLOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUDA,S.; GMUR,N.F.; LARSON,R.; THOMLINSON,W.

    1998-11-03

    This report is founded on reports written in April 1987 by Robert Hettel for angiography operations at the Stanford Synchrotron Research Laboratory (SSRL) and a subsequent report covering angiography operations at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS); BNL Informal Report 47681, June 1992. The latter report has now been rewritten in order to accurately reflect the design and installation of a new medical safety system at the NSLS X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF). Known originally as the Angiography Personnel Protection Interlock (APPI), this system has been modified to incorporate other medical imaging research programs on the same beamline and thus the name has been changed to the more generic Medical Personnel Protection Interlock (MPPI). This report will deal almost exclusively with the human imaging (angiography, bronchography, mammography) aspects of the safety system, but will briefly explain the modular aspects of the system allowing other medical experiments to be incorporated.

  4. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

  5. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S.C. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique. This document contains the Appendices for the report.

  6. Design and Fabrication of a Highly Integrated Silicon Detector for the STAR Experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Buck, Benjamin; Bessuille, Jason; Cepeda, Mario; Johnson, Thomas; Kelsey, James; van Nieuwenhuizen, Gerrit; Visser, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    We present the design of a detector used as a particle tracking device in the STAR experiment at the RHIC collider of Brookhaven National Laboratories. The "stave," 24 of which make up the completed detector, is a highly mechanically integrated design comprised of 6 custom silicon sensors mounted on a Kapton substrate. 4608 wire bonds connect these sensors to 36 analog front-end chips which are mounted on the same substrate. Power and signal connectivity from the hybrid to the front-end chips is provided by wire bonds. The entire circuit is mounted on a carbon fiber base co-cured to the Kapton substrate. We present the unique design challenges for this detector and some novel techniques for overcoming them.

  7. Brookhaven Highlights, January 1982-March 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuper, J.B.H.; Rustad, M.C. (eds.)

    1983-01-01

    Research at Brookhaven National Laboratory is summarized. Major headings are high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science, support activities and administration. (GHT)

  8. Higher-order-mode absorbers for energy recovery linac cryomodules at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hahn

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Several future accelerator projects at Brookhaven for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC are based on energy recovery linacs (ERLs with high-charge high-current electron beams. Their stable operation mandates effective higher-order-mode (HOM damping. The development of HOM dampers for these projects is pursued actively at this laboratory. Strong HOM damping was experimentally demonstrated both at room and at superconducting (SC temperatures in a prototype research and development (R&D five-cell niobium superconducting rf (SRF cavity with ferrite dampers. Two room-temperature mock-up five-cell copper cavities were used to study various damper configurations with emphasis on capacitive antenna dampers. An innovative type of ferrite damper over a ceramic break for an R&D SRF electron gun also was developed. For future SRF linacs longer cryomodules comprised of multiple superconducting cavities with reasonably short intercavity transitions are planned. In such a configuration, the dampers, located closer to the cavities, will be at cryogenic temperatures; this will impose additional constraints and complications. This paper presents the results of simulations and measurements of several damper configurations.

  9. Doses delivered to normal brain under different treatment protocols at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capala, J.; Coderre, J.A.; Liu, H.B. [and others

    1996-12-31

    As of October 31, 1996, 23 glioblastoma multiforme patients underwent BNCT under several treatment protocols at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. For treatment planning and dosimetry purposes, these protocols may be divided into four groups. The first group comprises protocols that used an 8-cm collimator and allowed a peak normal brain dose of 10.5 Gy-Eq to avolume of 1 cm{sup 3} were the thermal neutron flux was maximal (even if it happened to be in the tumor volume). The second group differs from the first in that it allowed a peak normal brain dose of 12.6 Gy-Eq. The protocols of the third and fourth groups allowed the prescribed peak normal brain dose of 12.6 Gy-Eq to be outside of the tumor volume, used a 12-cm collimator and, respectively, uni- or bilateral irradiations. We describe the treatment planning procedures and report the doses delivered to various structures of the brain.

  10. The national synchrotron ray of hope or ring of fire?

    CERN Document Server

    Hollis, T

    2002-01-01

    While most agree the synchrotron will be a boost for Australian science, the author reports on concerns about the cost of building and operating the project Biotech industry representatives want to know how that $100 million will be used and want to see the government's justification for pouring more than a third of its total technology budget for 2001/2 into the synchrotron. They, and the opposition, also want to know where the private money will come from to make up the balance or whether the state will ultimately have to pitch in the rest itself. Indeed, an Auditor-General's report released last week warned of the need for comprehensive financial risk management of the facility. The National Synchrotron, to be built at Monash University, will be a hollow ring of about 60 metres diameter and initially housing nine beamlines, each capable of performing independent experiments simultaneously. According to Dr Richard Garrett, director of the Australian Synchrotron Research Program (http://www.ansto.gov.au/natf...

  11. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J.B. [eds.

    1997-05-01

    The hard work done by the synchrotron radiation community, in collaboration with all those using large-scale central facilities during 1995, paid off in FY 1996 through the DOE`s Presidential Scientific Facilities Initiative. In comparison with the other DOE synchrotron radiation facilities, the National Synchrotron Light Source benefited least in operating budgets because it was unable to increase running time beyond 100%-nevertheless, the number of station hours was maintained. The major thrust at Brookhaven came from a 15% increase in budget which allowed the recruitment of seven staff in the beamlines support group and permitted a step increment in the funding of the extremely long list of upgrades; both to the sources and to the beamlines. During the December 1995 shutdown, the VUV Ring quadrant around U10-U12 was totally reconstructed. New front ends, enabling apertures up to 90 mrad on U10 and U12, were installed. During the year new PRTs were in formation for the infrared beamlines, encouraged by the investment the lab was able to commit from the initiative funds and by awards from the Scientific Facilities Initiative. A new PRT, specifically for small and wide angle x-ray scattering from polymers, will start work on X27C in FY 1997 and existing PRTs on X26C and X9B working on macromolecular crystallography will be joined by new members. Plans to replace aging radio frequency cavities by an improved design, originally a painfully slow six or eight year project, were brought forward so that the first pair of cavities (half of the project for the X-Ray Ring) will now be installed in FY 1997. Current upgrades to 350 mA initially and to 438 mA later in the X-Ray Ring were set aside due to lack of funds for the necessary thermally robust beryllium windows. The Scientific Facilities Initiative allowed purchase of all 34 windows in FY 1996 so that the power upgrade will be achieved in FY 1997.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Brookhaven National Laboratory Nuclear Decay Data and Super-Kamiokande Neutrino Data: Indication of a Solar Connection

    CERN Document Server

    Sturrock, P A

    2015-01-01

    An experiment carried out at the Brookhaven National Laboratory from February 1982 to December 1989 acquired 364 measurements of the beta-decay rates of a sample of 36Cl and of a sample of 32Si. The experimenters reported finding small periodic annual deviations of the data points from an exponential decay - of uncertain origin. We here analyze this dataset by power spectrum analysis and by forming spectrograms and phasegrams. We confirm the occurrence of annual oscillations but we also find evidence of oscillations in a band of frequencies appropriate for the internal rotation of the Sun. Both datasets show clear evidence of a transient oscillation with a frequency of 12.7 cycles per year that falls in the range of rotational frequencies for the solar radiative zone. We repeat these analyses for 358 neutrino measurements acquired by Super-Kamiokande over the interval May 1986 to August 2001. Spectrogram analysis yields a strong and steady oscillation at about 9.5 cycles per year and an intermittent oscillati...

  13. Brookhaven National Laboratory's capabilities for advanced analyses of cyber threats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePhillips, M. P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-01-01

    BNL has several ongoing, mature, and successful programs and areas of core scientific expertise that readily could be modified to address problems facing national security and efforts by the IC related to securing our nation’s computer networks. In supporting these programs, BNL houses an expansive, scalable infrastructure built exclusively for transporting, storing, and analyzing large disparate data-sets. Our ongoing research projects on various infrastructural issues in computer science undoubtedly would be relevant to national security. Furthermore, BNL frequently partners with researchers in academia and industry worldwide to foster unique and innovative ideas for expanding research opportunities and extending our insights. Because the basic science conducted at BNL is unique, such projects have led to advanced techniques, unlike any others, to support our mission of discovery. Many of them are modular techniques, thus making them ideal for abstraction and retrofitting to other uses including those facing national security, specifically the safety of the nation’s cyber space.

  14. DEVELOPMENTS IN SYNCHROTRON X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY AT THE NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOWD,B.A.

    1999-07-23

    Last year, the X27A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) became dedicated solely to X-Ray Computed Microtomography (XCMT). This is a third-generation instrument capable of producing tomographic volumes of 1-2 micron resolution over a 2-3mm field of view. Recent enhancements will be discussed. These have focused on two issues: the desire for real-time data acquisition and processing and the need for highly monochromatic beam (.1 % energy bandpass). The latter will permit k-edge subtraction studies and will provide improved image contrast from below the Cr (6 keV) up to the Cs (36 keV) k-edge. A range of applications that benefit from these improvements will be discussed as well. These two goals are somewhat counterproductive, however; higher monochromaticity yields a lower flux forcing longer data acquisition times. To balance the two, a more efficient scintillator for X-ray conversion is being developed. Some testing of a prototype scintillator has been performed; preliminary results will be presented here. In the meantime, data reconstruction times have been reduced, and the entire tomographic acquisition, reconstruction and volume rendering process streamlined to make efficient use of synchrotron beam time. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program recently developed helped to reduce the time to reconstruct a volume of 150 x 150 x 250 pixels{sup 3} (over 5 million voxels) from the raw camera data to 1.5 minutes on a dual R10,000 CPU. With these improvements, one can now obtain a ''quick look'' of a small tomographic volume ({approximately}10{sup 6}voxels) in just over 15 minutes from the start of data acquisition.

  15. Fibroma induction in rat skin following single or multiple doses of 1.0 GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions from the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. J.; Zhao, P.; Xu, G.; Roy, N.; Loomis, C.

    2001-01-01

    Rat skin was exposed to the plateau region of the 1.0 GeV/nucleon 56Fe beam at the Brookhaven AGS. Rats were irradiated or not with single of split doses of 56Fe or argon; some 56Fe-exposed rats were fed 250 ppm retinyl acetate continuously in the lab chow beginning 1 week before irradiation. All lesions were noted, photographed and identified for eventual histological diagnosis. The preponderance of the tumors so far are fibromas. The data show that single doses of 56Fe ions are 2 or 3 fold more effective than argon in producing tumors at 4.5 Gy but are about equally effective at 3.0 Gy and 9.0 Gy. The presence of 250 ppm retinyl acetate in the lab chow reduced the incidence of tumors by about 50-60% in comparison to groups exposed only to the radiation. These are preliminary findings based on only about one-fourth the eventual number of tumors expected.

  16. Assessment of energy efficiency project financing alternatives for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WDM Hunt; JC Hail; GP Sullivan

    2000-03-13

    Energy reduction goals for Federal agencies were first established in the National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1988, and directed 10{percent} reduction in facility energy use based on a 1985 baseline. Since that time, Federal sites have been actively seeking and implementing a wide variety of energy-efficiency measures in facilities across the Federal sector. In the intervening years this energy reduction goal has been progressively increased to 20{percent} through legislation (Public Law 102-486, The Energy Policy Act of 1992) and a number of Executive Orders. Executive Order 13123, Greening the Government Through Efficient Energy management (signed June 3, 1999), further increased the facility energy-efficiency improvement goal from 30{percent} in 2005 to 35{percent} by 2010 relative to the 1985 baseline.

  17. CSEWG SYMPOSIUM, A CSWEG RETROSPECTIVE. 35TH ANNIVERSARY CROSS SECTION EVALUATION WORKING GROUP, NOV. 5, 2001, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNFORD, C.; HOLDEN, N.; PEARLSTEIN, S.

    2001-11-05

    This publication has been prepared to record some of the history of the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG). CSEWG is responsible for creating the evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF/B) which is widely used by scientists and engineers who are involved in the development and maintenance of applied nuclear technologies. This organization has become the model for the development of nuclear data libraries throughout the world. The data format (ENDF) has been adopted as the international standard. On November 5, 2001, a symposium was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory to celebrate the 50 th meeting of the CSEWG organization and the 35 th anniversary of its first meeting in November 1966. The papers presented in this volume were prepared by present and former CSEWG members for presentation at the November 2001 symposium. All but two of the presentations are included. I have included an appendix to list all of the CSEWG members and their affiliations, which has been compiled from the minutes of each of the CSEWG meetings. Minutes exist for all meetings except the 4 th meeting held in January 1968. The list includes 348 individuals from 71 organizations. The dates for each of the 50 CSEWG meetings are listed. The committee structure and chairmen of all committees and subcommittees are also included in the appendix. This volume is dedicated to three individuals whose foresight and talents made CSEWG possible and successful. They are Henry Honeck who lead the effort to develop the ENDF format and the CSEWG system, Ira Zartman, the Atomic Energy Commission program manager who provided the programmatic direction and support, and Sol Pearlstein who led the development of the CESWG organization and the ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data library.

  18. Dipole magnet of synchrotron source for national synchrotron centre of Ukraine

    CERN Document Server

    Gladkikh, P I; Muratov, V I; Peev, F A

    2001-01-01

    The paper contains the revised design of a dipole magnet for a synchrotron radiation source.Usage of such a magnet allows to reach the energy of electrons in a ring up to 1.2 GeV.In paper the result of simulation of a magnet for all modes of operations of a source are shown.The proposed variant of the dipole magnet considerably raises parameters of the synchrotron radiation source.

  19. Application of the SmartSampling Methodology to the Evaluation of Contaminated Landscape Soils at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAUTMAN,CHRISTOPHER A.

    2000-08-01

    Portions of the SmartSampling{trademark} analysis methodology have been applied to the evaluation of radioactive contaminated landscape soils at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Specifically, the spatial, volumetric distribution of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) contamination within Area of Concern 16E-1 has been modeled probabilistically using a geostatistical methodology, with the purpose of identifying the likelihood of successfully reducing, with respect to a pre-existing, baseline remediation plan, the volume of soil that must be disposed of offsite during clean-up. The principal objective of the analysis was to evaluate the likelihood of successful deployment of the Segmented Gate System (SGS), a novel remediation approach that emphasizes real-time separation of clean from contaminated materials during remediation operations. One primary requirement for successful application of the segmented gate technology investigated is that a variety of contaminant levels exist at the deployment site, which would enable to the SGS to discriminate material above and below a specified remediation threshold value. The results of this analysis indicate that there is potential for significant volume reduction with respect to the baseline remediation plan at a threshold excavation level of 23 pCi/g {sup 137}Cs. A reduction of approximately 50%, from a baseline volume of approximately 1,064.7 yd{sup 3} to less than 550 yd{sup 3}, is possible with acceptance of only a very small level of engineering risk. The vast majority of this volume reduction is obtained by not excavating almost all of levels 3 and 4 (from 12 to 24 inches in depth), which appear to be virtually uncontaminated, based on the available data. Additional volume reductions related to soil materials on levels 1 (depths of 0--6 inches) and 2 (6--12 inches) may be possible, specifically through use of the SGS technology. Level-by-level evaluation of simulation results suggests that as much as 26 percent of level 1 and as

  20. Energy-related perturbations of the northeast coastal zone: five years (1974-1979) of oceanographic research at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J.J.

    1980-03-01

    Since inception of oceanographic research at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1974, over 75 cruises and 150 papers and reports have been completed. In comparison of shelf ecosystems at high, mid, and low latitudes, an understanding of the natural variability of US coastal waters has been derived. Annual carbon and nitrogen budgets suggest that the energy flow is diverted to a pelagic food web in summer-fall and a demersal food web in winter-spring within the Mid-Atlantic Bight. The impact of energy-related perturbations can now be assessed within the context of natural oscillation of the coastal food web.

  1. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1992-10-01

    The overriding features of the synchrotron beams which make them applicable to medical research are their extremely high intensity and broadband energy spectrum. Several orders of magnitude separate the smooth, continuous spectrum of the synchrotron from the sharply peaked characteristic emission spectrum of a conventional source. Basically, the high intensity and tunability allow monochromatic beams to be generated at virtually any energy. The standard problem of beam hardening in both medical imaging and therapy is eliminated by the monochromatic beams since the energy spectrum does not change with passage through tissue. The tunable spectrum allows enhancement of images and therapeutic dose by selection of the most effective energy for a given procedure.

  2. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1992-01-01

    The overriding features of the synchrotron beams which make them applicable to medical research are their extremely high intensity and broadband energy spectrum. Several orders of magnitude separate the smooth, continuous spectrum of the synchrotron from the sharply peaked characteristic emission spectrum of a conventional source. Basically, the high intensity and tunability allow monochromatic beams to be generated at virtually any energy. The standard problem of beam hardening in both medical imaging and therapy is eliminated by the monochromatic beams since the energy spectrum does not change with passage through tissue. The tunable spectrum allows enhancement of images and therapeutic dose by selection of the most effective energy for a given procedure.

  3. Brookhaven highlights, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Highlights from all the department are illustrated. The main topics are on accelerator development and applications. (LSP)

  4. National synchrotron light source. [Annual report], October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. [eds.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains brief discussions on the research being conducted at the National Synchrotron Light source. Some of the topics covered are: X-ray spectroscopy; nuclear physics; atomic and molecular science; meetings and workshops; operations; and facility improvements.

  5. A service-based SLA (Service Level Agreement) for the RACF (RHIC and ATLAS computing facility) at brookhaven national lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Mizuka; Chan, Tony; Smith, Jason

    2010-04-01

    The RACF provides computing support to a broad spectrum of scientific programs at Brookhaven. The continuing growth of the facility, the diverse needs of the scientific programs and the increasingly prominent role of distributed computing requires the RACF to change from a system to a service-based SLA with our user communities. A service-based SLA allows the RACF to coordinate more efficiently the operation, maintenance and development of the facility by mapping out a matrix of system and service dependencies and by creating a new, configurable alarm management layer that automates service alerts and notification of operations staff. This paper describes the adjustments made by the RACF to transition to a service-based SLA, including the integration of its monitoring software, alarm notification mechanism and service ticket system at the facility to make the new SLA a reality.

  6. Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Brookhaven Linac Isoptope Producer (BLIP)—positioned at the forefront of research into radioisotopes used in cancer treatment and diagnosis—produces commercially...

  7. Use of a Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Microprobe for Elemental Analysis at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, B. M.

    1980-04-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a facility consisting of a 700 MeV and a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring and dedicated to providing synchrotron radiation in the energy range from the vacuum ultraviolet to high energy x rays. Some of the properties of synchrotron radiation that contribute to its usefulness for x-ray fluorescence are: a continuous, tunable energy spectrum, strong collimation in the horizontal plane, high polarization in the storage ring plane, and relatively low energy deposition. The highest priority is for the development of an x-ray microprobe beam line capable of trace analysis in the parts per million range with spatial resolution as low as one micrometer. An eventual capability for bulk sample analysis is also planned with sensitivities in the more favorable cases being as low as 50 parts per billion in dry biological tissue. The microprobe technique has application to a variety of fields including the geological, medical, materials and environmental sciences. Examples of investigations include multielemental trace analysis across grain boundaries for the study of diffusion and cooling processes in geological and materials sciences samples; in leukocytes and other types of individual cells for studying the relationship between trace element concentrations and disease or nutrition; and in individual particles in air pollution samples.

  8. Brookhaven highlights. [Fiscal year 1992, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  9. 1994 Activity Report, National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report, October 1, 1993-September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, E.Z. [ed.

    1995-05-01

    This report is a summary of activities carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source during 1994. It consists of sections which summarize the work carried out in differing scientific disciplines, meetings and workshops, operations experience of the facility, projects undertaken for upgrades, administrative reports, and collections of abstracts and publications generated from work done at the facility.

  10. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety). (GHT)

  11. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (rhic) Cryogenic System at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Review of the Modifications and Upgrades Since 2002 and Planned Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, R.; Tuozzolo, J.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.; Arenius, D.

    2008-03-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory continues its multi-year program to improve the operational efficiency, reliability, and stability of the cryogenic system, which also resulted in an improved beam availability of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This paper summarizes the work and changes made after each phase over the past four years to the present, as well as proposed future improvements. Power usage dropped from an initial 9.4 MW to the present 5.1 MW and is expected to drop below 5 MW after the completion of the remaining proposed improvements. The work proceeded in phases, balancing the Collider's schedule of operation, time required for the modifications and budget constraints. The main changes include process control, compressor oil removal and management, elimination of the use of cold compressors and two liquid-helium storage tanks, insulation of the third liquid-helium storage tank, compressor-bypass flow reduction and the addition of a load turbine (Joule-Thomson expander) with associated heat exchangers at the cold end of the plant. Also, liquid helium pumps used for forced circulation of the sub-cooled helium through the magnet loops were eliminated by an accelerator supply flow reconfiguration. Planned future upgrades include the resizing of expanders 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies.

  12. Brookhaven highlights, October 1978-September 1979. [October 1978 to September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    These highlights present an overview of the major research and development achievements at Brookhaven National Laboratory from October 1978 to September 1979. Specific areas covered include: accelerator and high energy physics programs; high energy physics research; the AGS and improvements to the AGS; neutral beam development; heavy ion fusion; superconducting power cables; ISABELLE storage rings; the BNL Tandem accelerator; heavy ion experiments at the Tandem; the High Flux Beam Reactor; medium energy physics; nuclear theory; atomic and applied physics; solid state physics; neutron scattering studies; x-ray scattering studies; solid state theory; defects and disorder in solids; surface physics; the National Synchrotron Light Source ; Chemistry Department; Biology Department; Medical Department; energy sciences; environmental sciences; energy technology programs; National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems; advanced reactor systems; nuclear safety; National Nuclear Data Center; nuclear materials safeguards; Applied Mathematics Department; and support activities. (GHT)

  13. New Brookhaven chief seeks cross-cutting research

    CERN Multimedia

    Jones, D

    2003-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory will pursue opportunities for promoting commercial development of energy systems and other technologies while focusing on the lab's primary mission of basic science research, according to the incoming BNL director, Praveen Chaudhari (1 page).

  14. University-level Non-proliferation and Safeguards Education and Human Capital Development Activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachner K. M.; Pepper, S.; Gomera, J.; Einwechter, M.; Toler, L. T.

    2016-07-24

    BNL has offered Nuclear Nonproliferation, Safeguards and Security in the 21st Century,? referred to as NNSS, every year since 2009 for graduate students in technical and policy fields related to nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. The course focuses on relevant policy issues, in addition to technical components, and is part of a larger NGSI short course initiative that includes separate courses that are delivered at three other national laboratories and NNSA headquarters. [SCHOLZ and ROSENTHAL] The course includes lectures from esteemed nonproliferation experts, tours of various BNL facilities and laboratories, and in-field and table-top exercises on both technical and policy subjects. Topics include the history of the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and other relevant treaties, the history of and advances in international nuclear safeguards, current relevant political situations in countries such as Iran, Iraq, and the Democratic Peoples? Republic of Korea (DPRK), nuclear science and technology, instrumentation and techniques used for verification activities, and associated research and development. The students conduct a mock Design Information Verification (DIV) at BNL?s decommissioned Medical Research Reactor. The capstone of the course includes a series of student presentations in which students act as policy advisors and provide recommendations in response to scenarios involving a current nonproliferation related event that are prepared by the course organizers. ?The course is open to domestic and foreign students, and caters to students in, entering, or recently having completed graduate school. Interested students must complete an application and provide a resume and a statement describing their interest in the course. Eighteen to 22 students attend annually; 165 students have completed the course to date. A stipend helps to defray students? travel and subsistence expenses. In 2015, the course was shortened from three weeks to

  15. National Synchrotron Light Source users manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beam lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gmuer, N.F.; White-DePace, S.M. (eds.)

    1987-08-01

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source in the years to come will be based, in large part, on the size of the users community and the diversity of the scientific disciplines represented by these users. In order to promote this philosophy, this National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Users Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beam Lines, has been published. This manual serves a number of purposes. In an effort to attract new research, it will present to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture and capabilities of the various VUV and x-ray beam lines and storage rings. We anticipate that this publication will be updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes at the NSLS.

  16. National synchrotron light source. Annual report 1985, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomlinson, W.; White-DePace, S. (eds.)

    1985-10-01

    The NSLS has made great strides in the past year. Both storage rings are now in full operational status. The users have assembled a most impressive array of beam lines and are making creative use of them. This report outlines the status, describes the facility, and discusses some of the science which is being produced. The facility represents not only a large increase in the national capacity to do synchrotron research, but a new level of capability, with further gains occurring rapidly.

  17. Advances and synergy of high pressure sciences at synchrotron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.; Ehm, L.; Duffy, T.; Crichton, W.; Aoki, K.

    2009-01-01

    Introductory overview to the special issue papers on high-pressure sciences and synchrotron radiation. High-pressure research in geosciences, materials science and condensed matter physics at synchrotron sources is experiencing growth and development through synergistic efforts around the world. A series of high-pressure science workshops were organized in 2008 to highlight these developments. One of these workshops, on 'Advances in high-pressure science using synchrotron X-rays', was held at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA, on 4 October 2008. This workshop was organized in honour of Drs Jingzhu Hu and Quanzhong Guo in celebration of their retirement after up to 18 years of dedicated service to the high-pressure community as beamline scientists at X17 of NSLS. Following this celebration of the often unheralded role of the beamline scientist, a special issue of the Journal of Synchrotron Radiation on Advances and Synergy of High-Pressure Sciences at Synchrotron Sources was proposed, and we were pleased to invite contributions from colleagues who participated in the workshop as well as others who are making similar efforts at synchrotron sources worldwide.

  18. Assessment of the national need for facilities dedicated to the production of synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    The report begins with an introduction, followed by conclusions and recommendations. The scientific and technological impact of synchrotron radiation is described; a broad and significant impact is documented. An estimate of the present and future utilization of synchrotron radiation is made; it is shown that current U.S. facilities are not adequate to meet future needs. In an effort to lay the groundwork for decisions about existing and future storage ring sources, a review of the capabilities, design, and operation of storage rings is provided. It is recommended that an immediate commitment be made to construct new dedicated national facilities and to expand existing facilities so that optimized XUV and x-ray capabilities are provided. 13 figures, 6 tables. (RWR)

  19. Assessment of the national need for facilities dedicated to the production of synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    The report begins with an introduction, followed by conclusions and recommendations. The scientific and technological impact of synchrotron radiation is described; a broad and significant impact is documented. An estimate of the present and future utilization of synchrotron radiation is made; it is shown that current U.S. facilities are not adequate to meet future needs. In an effort to lay the groundwork for decisions about existing and future storage ring sources, a review of the capabilities, design, and operation of storage rings is provided. It is recommended that an immediate commitment be made to construct new dedicated national facilities and to expand existing facilities so that optimized XUV and x-ray capabilities are provided. 13 figures, 6 tables. (RWR)

  20. Refurbishment of a used in-vacuum undulator from the National Synchrotron Light Source for the National Synchrotron Light Source-II ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Toshiya; Bassan, Harmanpreet; Broadbent, Andrew; Cappadoro, Peter; Escallier, John; Harder, David; Hetzel, Charles; Hidas, Dean; Kitegi, Charles; Kosciuk, Bernard; Musardo, Marco; Kirkland, Johnny

    2017-09-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) ceased operation in September 2014 and was succeeded by NSLS-II. There were four in-vacuum undulators (IVUs) in operation at NSLS. The most recently constructed IVU for NSLS was the mini-gap undulator (MGU-X25, to be renamed IVU18 for NSLS-II), which was constructed in 2006. This device was selected to be reused for the New York Structural Biology Consortium Microdiffraction beamline at NSLS-II. At the time of construction, IVU18 was a state-of-the-art undulator designed to be operated as a cryogenic permanent-magnet undulator. Due to the more stringent field quality and impedance requirements of the NSLS-II ring, the transition region was redesigned. The control system was also updated to NSLS-II specifications. This paper reports the details of the IVU18 refurbishment activities including additional magnetic measurement and tuning.

  1. The Amtex DAMA Project: The Brookhaven contribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Amtex Partnership organized in 1993 as a Technology Transfer Collaboration among members of the integrated textile industry, the DOE National Laboratories, a number of universities, and several research/education/technology transfer organizations (RETTs). Under the Amtex umbrella organization, a number of technology areas were defined and individual projects were launched addressing various aspects of improving the health and competitiveness of the American textile industry. The first and, to date, the largest of these has been the computer-based Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project. Brookhaven National Laboratory became involved in DAMA beginning in March of 1993 and remained an active participant through January of 1995. It was staffed almost exclusively with personnel of the Computing and Communications Division. This document summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Brookhaven team in working with the larger collaboration. Detailed information about the Amtex Partnership, the DAMA Project, and specific BNL contributions are documented elsewhere.

  2. The Amtex DAMA Project: The Brookhaven contribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Amtex Partnership organized in 1993 as a Technology Transfer Collaboration among members of the integrated textile industry, the DOE National Laboratories, a number of universities, and several research/education/technology transfer organizations (RETTs). Under the Amtex umbrella organization, a number of technology areas were defined and individual projects were launched addressing various aspects of improving the health and competitiveness of the American textile industry. The first and, to date, the largest of these has been the computer-based Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project. Brookhaven National Laboratory became involved in DAMA beginning in March of 1993 and remained an active participant through January of 1995. It was staffed almost exclusively with personnel of the Computing and Communications Division. This document summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Brookhaven team in working with the larger collaboration. Detailed information about the Amtex Partnership, the DAMA Project, and specific BNL contributions are documented elsewhere.

  3. FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A. [Spectra-Tech, Inc., Shelton, CT (United States); Williams, G.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-01-01

    When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

  4. Sub-nanosecond, time-resolved, broadband infrared spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Lobo, R; Reitze, D H; Tanner, D B; Carr, G L

    2001-01-01

    A facility for sub-nanosecond time-resolved (pump-probe) infrared spectroscopy has been developed at the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory. A mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser produces 2 ps duration, tunable near-IR pump pulses synchronized to probe pulses from a synchrotron storage ring. The facility is unique on account of the broadband infrared from the synchrotron, which allows the entire spectral range from 2 cm-1 (0.25 meV) to 20,000 cm-1 (2.5 eV) to be probed. A temporal resolution of 200 ps, limited by the infrared synchrotron-pulse duration, is achieved. A maximum time delay of 170 ns is available without gating the infrared detector. To illustrate the performance of the facility, a measurement of electron-hole recombination dynamics for an HgCdTe semiconductor film in the far- and mid infrared range is presented.

  5. NSLS 2006 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2006)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MILLER, L. (EDITOR)

    2006-12-31

    This past year has seen both challenges and fantastic new opportunities for the user community at the NSLS. The fantastic new opportunities are clear and abundant. We now have a five-year strategic plan for new development and continued operation of the NSLS. The NSLS continues to be an extremely productive facility, and the UEC is delighted at how NSLS Chair Chi-Chang Kao has consulted widely within the user community to develop a five-year plan for strategic upgrades and continued operation of the facility. The NSLS-II project, led by Associate Lab Director Steve Dierker, has done very well in its Department of Energy (DOE) reviews and will hopefully soon receive Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) approval, which in DOE lingo gives a go-ahead to launch the detailed design of the facility. We also held the first joint user meeting between the NSLS and Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN), for which the building is near completion. The joint user meeting is an important step toward the close collaboration of the two facilities. The CFN, led by Emilio Mendez, promises to provide capabilities and research foci that are complementary to those at the NSLS. Together, all of these developments give a clear path to an exciting future of synchrotron radiation research at Brookhaven! However, with opportunities come challenges! One of the largest of these faced in the past year involved congressional support for scientific research in general, and DOE user facilities in particular. As you likely know, Congress did not complete its usual budget process in 2006, with the exceptions of the departments of Defense and Homeland Security. This left science funding at the budget levels enacted in late 2005 for FY2006, and unfortunately, FY2006 was not a particularly memorable vintage for science support. The good news is that you, the user community, have spoken up with unprecedented vigor about this, and Congress appears to be listening. As we look at the FY2007

  6. Omega Dante Soft X-Ray Power Diagnostic Component Calibration at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, K; Weber, F; Dewald, E; Glenzer, S; Landen, O; Turner, R; Waide, P

    2004-04-15

    The Dante soft x-ray spectrometer installed on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester is a twelve-channel filter-edge defined x-ray power diagnostic. It is used to measure the absolute flux from direct drive, indirect drive (hohlraums) and other plasma sources. Calibration efforts using two beam lines, U3C (50eV-1keV) and X8A (1keV-6keV) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) have been implemented to insure the accuracy of these measurements. We have calibrated vacuum x-ray diodes, mirrors and filters.

  7. Omega Dante soft x-ray power diagnostic component calibration at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, K. M.; Weber, F. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O. L.; Turner, R. E.; Waide, P. A.

    2004-10-01

    The Dante soft x-ray spectrometer, installed on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, is a 12-channel filter-edge defined soft x-ray power diagnostic. It is used to measure the spectrally resolved, absolute flux from direct drive, indirect drive (hohlraums) and other plasma sources. Dante component calibration efforts using two beam lines, U3C (50 eV-1 keV) and X8A (1-6 keV) at the National Synchrotron Light Source have been implemented to improve the accuracy of these measurements. We have calibrated metallic vacuum x-ray diodes, mirrors and filters.

  8. ATLAS Overview Week at Brookhaven

    CERN Multimedia

    Pilcher, J

    Over 200 ATLAS participants gathered at Brookhaven National Laboratory during the first week of June for our annual overview week. Some system communities arrived early and held meetings on Saturday and Sunday, and the detector interface group (DIG) and Technical Coordination also took advantage of the time to discuss issues of interest for all detector systems. Sunday was also marked by a workshop on the possibilities for heavy ion physics with ATLAS. Beginning on Monday, and for the rest of the week, sessions were held in common in the well equipped Berkner Hall auditorium complex. Laptop computers became the norm for presentations and a wireless network kept laptop owners well connected. Most lunches and dinners were held on the lawn outside Berkner Hall. The weather was very cooperative and it was an extremely pleasant setting. This picture shows most of the participants from a view on the roof of Berkner Hall. Technical Coordination and Integration issues started the reports on Monday and became a...

  9. Sirepo for Synchrotron Radiation Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-10-25

    Sirepo is an open source framework for cloud computing. The graphical user interface (GUI) for Sirepo, also known as the client, executes in any HTML5 compliant web browser on any computing platform, including tablets. The client is built in JavaScript, making use of the following open source libraries: Bootstrap, which is fundamental for cross-platform web applications; AngularJS, which provides a model–view–controller (MVC) architecture and GUI components; and D3.js, which provides interactive plots and data-driven transformations. The Sirepo server is built on the following Python technologies: Flask, which is a lightweight framework for web development; Jinja, which is a secure and widely used templating language; and Werkzeug, a utility library that is compliant with the WSGI standard. We use Nginx as the HTTP server and proxy, which provides a scalable event-driven architecture. The physics codes supported by Sirepo execute inside a Docker container. One of the codes supported by Sirepo is the Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW). SRW computes synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons in arbitrary magnetic fields and propagates the radiation wavefronts through optical beamlines. SRW is open source and is primarily supported by Dr. Oleg Chubar of NSLS-II at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  10. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube.

  11. Brookhaven Lab and Argonne Lab scientists invent a plasma valve

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have received U.S. patent number 6,528,948 for a device that shuts off airflow into a vacuum about one million times faster than mechanical valves or shutters that are currently in use (1 page).

  12. In-situ shearing interferometry of National Synchrotron Light Source mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, S.N.; Rarback, H.; Shu, D.; Takacs, P.Z.

    1987-01-01

    In situ mirror distortion measurements were made with a lateral shearing interferometer on three mirrors in beam line X17T at the National Syn203hrotron Light Source. Lateral shearing interference is insensitive to vibrational motion in five of the six degrees of freedom, so it is well-suited for investigations in the synchrotron radiation (SR) environment. No distortion was seen in an uncooled silicon carbide mirror and in a colled copper alloy mirror on X17TB, but a change in the radius of an uncooled electroless nickel-plated aluminium cylinder mirror of about 6.2% was observed on X17TA. Angular vibrations in the 2 to 3 arc second range were easily observed on one of the beam lines, as was an overall mirror rotation in the arc second range.

  13. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J. [eds.

    1996-05-01

    This report discusses research conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source in the following areas: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy, and tomography; nuclear physics; scattering and crystallography studies of biological materials; time resolved spectroscopy; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; the 1995 NSLS annual users` meeting; 17th international free electron laser conference; micro bunches workshop; VUV machine; VUV storage ring parameters; beamline technical improvements; x-ray beamlines; x-ray storage ring parameters; the NSLS source development laboratory; the accelerator test facility (ATF); NSLS facility improvements; NSLS advisory committees; NSLS staff; VUV beamline guide; and x-ray beamline guide.

  14. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2001 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE HELD AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, UPTON, N.Y., APRIL 30 - MAY 1, 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCDONALD, R.J.

    2001-04-30

    BNL is proud to acknowledge all of our 2001 sponsors, with their help and support this has correctly become an oilheat industry conference. It is quite gratifying to see an industry come together to help support an activity like the technology conference, for the benefit of the industry as a whole and to celebrate the beginning of the National Oilheat Research Alliance. This meeting is the fourteenth oil heat industry technology conference to be held since 1984 and the first under a new name, NORA, the National Oilheat research Alliance, and the very first in the new century. The conference is a very important part of the effort in technology transfer, which is supported by the Oilheat Research Program. The Oilheat Research Program at BNL is under the newly assigned program management at the Office of Power Technology within the US DOE. The foremost reason for the conference is to provide a platform for the exchange of information and perspectives among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, service technicians, and marketers of oil-fired space-conditioning equipment. The conference provides a conduit by which information and ideas can be exchanged to examine present technologies, as well as helping to develop the future course for oil heating advancement. These conferences also serve as a stage for unifying government representatives, researchers, fuel oil marketers, and other members of the oil-heat industry in addressing technology advancements in this important energy use sector. The specific objectives of the conference are to: (1) Identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; (2) Foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation. Seventeen technical presentations will be made

  15. Brookhaven leak reactor to close

    CERN Multimedia

    MacIlwain, C

    1999-01-01

    The DOE has announced that the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven is to close for good. Though the news was not unexpected researchers were angry the decision had been taken before the review to assess the impact of reopening the reactor had been concluded (1 page).

  16. A Database for modeling the Brookhaven AGS Booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, E.H.

    1991-01-01

    A Database has been developed for Brookhaven's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) Booster and its ancillary lines which contain both design and measured physical data for the accelerator lattice and its magnets and other components. This database may then be connected to programs for modeling, permitting the programs to use any degree of desired detail from the available data with a view toward increasingly model-based control of the accelerator. These methods are expandable to include the other machines in the AGS complex.

  17. Conceptual Design Report for a Phase 3 upgrade of the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foyt, W.; Krinsky, S.; Hastings, J. [eds.; Finlay, L.

    1994-03-01

    Considerable investment by both the Department of Energy and the facility`s Participating Research teams has permitted the NSLS to offer a national facility to a wide range of scientific pursuits. The purpose of the NSLS Phase III project is to maximize the scientific output of this premier 2nd generation synchrotron radiation facility through a number of distinct projects. Over the years the NSLS has made significant improvements in the area of beam reliability which has resulted in deliverable, reproducible beam during 98% and 97% of scheduled operations on the VUV and X-ray rings respectively. This project will focus on improving beam intensity and stability by upgrading the optics and detector systems on a number of beamlines as well as upgrading radio frequency (rf) and beam position monitoring systems in the storage rings. In addition, the project includes plans for the design and procurement of a utility isolation system that would guard against voltage transients that disrupt the facility`s electrical system. Also a new insertion device will be installed at beamline X25 and a 2nd floor will be constructed over the X6 -- X16 region which will provide sorely needed laboratory and office space for the user community. This project requests funding of 22.5 million dollars over a three year period: FY 1996 ($6.3M), FY 1997 ($13.4M) and FY 1998 ($2.8M).

  18. Heavy ion physics at the Brookhaven alternating gradient synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    The collision of large nuclei at relativistic energies is the only known mechanism for creating and studying the properties (equation-of-state, EOS) of extremely dense nuclear matter. At sufficiently high matter densities, one of the most exciting possibilities is the formation of a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). However, it is an extremely difficult task to determine the ultimate density achieved during these collisions due to the fleeting nature of the high density state (the lifetime of these states is typically a few times 10-24 ns). We must rely on detailed comparisons between experimental measurements and complex Monte Carlo simulations of the colliding nuclei in order to extract meaningful estimates of the nuclear matter EOS. Our approach has been to study the behavior of the spectator matter (those protons and neutrons which do not directly interact during the collision) to determine the dynamics of the high density state which must necessarily influence the spectator matter as it decays. This report summarizes some of the key results of our study.

  19. NSLS 2007 Activity Report (National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller ,L.; Nasta, K.

    2008-05-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source is one of the world's most productive and cost-effective user facilities. With 2,219 individual users, about 100 more than last year, and a record-high 985 publications, 2007 was no exception. In addition to producing an impressive array of science highlights, which are included in this Activity Report, many NSLS users were honored this year for their scientific accomplishments. Throughout the year, there were major strides in the development of the scientific programs by strengthening strategic partnerships with major research resources and with the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). Of particular note, the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) received renewed funding for the next five years through the National Science Foundation. COMPRES operates four high-pressure NSLS beamlines--X17B2, X17B3, X17C, and U2A--and serves the earth science community as well as the rapidly expanding segment of researchers using high-pressure techniques in materials, chemical, and energy-related sciences. A joint appointment was made between the NSLS and Stony Brook University to further enhance interactions with COMPRES. There was major progress on two key beamline projects outlined in the Five-Year Strategic Plan: the X25 beamline upgrade and the construction of the X9 small angle scattering (SAXS) beamline. The X25 overhaul, which began with the installation of the in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU) in January 2006, is now complete. X25 is once again the brightest beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the NSLS, and in tandem with the X29 undulator beamline, it will keep the NSLS at the cutting edge in this important area of research. Upgrade work associated with the new MGU and the front end for the X9 SAXS beamline--jointly developed by the NSLS and the CFN--also was completed. Beamline X9 will host the SAXS program that currently exists at beamline X21 and will provide new microbeam

  20. Comparative Analyses of Brookhaven National Laboratory Nuclear Decay Measurements and Super-Kamiokande Solar Neutrino Measurements: Neutrinos and Neutrino-Induced Beta-Decays as Probes of the Deep Solar Interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Fischbach, E.; Scargle, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    An experiment carried out at the Brookhaven National Laboratory over a period of almost 8 years acquired 364 measurements of the beta-decay rates of a sample of {}^{32}Si and, for comparison, of a sample of {}^{36}Cl. The experimenters reported finding " small periodic annual deviations of the data points from an exponential decay … of uncertain origin". We find that power-spectrum and spectrogram analyses of these datasets show evidence not only of the annual oscillations, but also of transient oscillations with frequencies near 11 year-1 and 12.5 year-1. Similar analyses of 358 measurements of the solar neutrino flux acquired by the Super-Kamiokande neutrino observatory over a period of about 5 years yield evidence of an oscillation near 12.5 year-1 and another near 9.5 year-1. An oscillation near 12.5 year-1 is compatible with the influence of rotation of the radiative zone. We suggest that an oscillation near 9.5 year-1 may be indicative of rotation of the solar core, and that an oscillation near 11 year-1 may have its origin in a tachocline between the core and the radiative zone. Modulation of the solar neutrino flux may be attributed to an influence of the Sun's internal magnetic field by the Resonant Spin Flavor Precession (RSFP) mechanism, suggesting that neutrinos and neutrino-induced beta decays can provide information about the deep solar interior.

  1. Support for the Advanced Polymers Beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Benjamin S. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stonybrook, NY (United States)

    2008-10-01

    The primary focus of the X27C beamline is to investigate frontier polymer science and engineering problems with emphasis on real-time studies of structures, morphologies and dynamics from atomic, nanoscopic, microscopic to mesoscopic scales using simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) techniques. The scientific merit of this project is as follows. Currently, many unique sample chambers for in-situ synchrotron studies, developed by the PI (B. Hsiao) and Co-PI (B. Chu), are available for general users of X27C at NSLS. These instruments include a gel/melt spinning apparatus, a continuous fiber drawing apparatus, a tensile stretching apparatus, a high pressure X-ray cell using supercritical carbon dioxide, a parallel plate strain-controlled shear stage and a dynamic rheometer for small-strain oscillatory deformation study. Based on the use of these instruments in combination with synchrotron X-rays, many new insights into the relationships between processing and structure have been obtained in recent years. The broader impact of this project is as follows. The X27C beamline is the first synchrotron facility in the United States dedicated to chemistry/materials research (with emphasis on polymers). The major benefit of this facility to the materials community is that no extensive synchrotron experience and equipment preparation are required from general users to carry out cutting-edge experiments.

  2. Minutes of the Fourth Annual Meeting of the Panel on Reference Nuclear Data, Brookhaven National Laboratory, November 1-2, 1979. [BNL, Nov. 1-2, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, T.W.; Stewart, L.; Coyne, J.J. (eds.)

    1980-06-01

    After the welcome and approval of the agenda and of the minutes of the Third Annual Meeting, the participants turned to reactor physics data needs, CTR data needs, status of international and national cooperation, status and availability of data files, election of officers, status of publications, biomedical data needs, and miscellaneous action items from the Third Meeting. A summary of recommendations and action items is given. Eighteen appendixes are included. (RWR)

  3. Optical design and performance of the phase II inelastic scattering beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caliebe, W.A.; Kao, C.-C.; Oversluizen, T.; Montanez, P.; Hastings, J.B. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York, 11973 (United States); Caliebe, W.A. [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22603Hamburg (Germany)] Krisch, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043Grenoble Cedex (France)

    1997-07-01

    We report the optical design and performance of the phase II inelastic scattering beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The new beamline consists of a four-crystal Si(220) monochromator followed by a bent cylinder mirror. The monochromator is tunable from 5 to 10 keV with about 0.2 eV energy resolution throughout the tuning range. The size of the focused beam is about 0.5mm(H){times}0.3mm(V). {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source: Annual report 1986 for the period of October 1, 1985 through September 30, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White-DePace, S.; Gmur, N. (eds.)

    1986-10-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is the nation's largest facility dedicated solely to the production of synchrotron radiation. The facility has two electron storage rings: a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ring which operates at an electron energy of 750 MeV designed for optimum radiation at energies from 10 eV to 1 keV, and an x-ray ring which operates at 2.5 GeV to optimize radiation from 1 keV to 20 keV. A total of 44 beam ports emanate from these rings. Each beam port is capable of supporting one to four experiments. The VUV and x-ray rings presently accommodate over 800 scientists representing over 71 universities, industries, and government laboratories. Both basic and applied research are being done at the NSLS by groups from a variety of disciplines which include physics, chemistry, materials science, metallurgy, biology, and medicine. Among the techniques used are EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure), scattering, diffraction, topography, fluorescence, gas phase spectroscopy, lithography, tomography, microscopy, and circular dichroism.

  5. H particle searches at Brookhaven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrien, R.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

    1997-09-01

    Following the suggestion by R.L. Jaffe twenty years ago, researchers have been trying to establish the existence of a six-quark object, termed the H dibaryon, predicted by the phenomenological quark bag model. This object quickly became the focus of experimental searches at several locations, including the AGS. This search still continues, with perhaps the most active program being carried out at the 2.0 GeV/c beam line at the BNL-AGS. The research was considerably enhanced by the writing of two notable papers at BNL by Aerts and Dover, which gave quantitative predictions for H-production cross sections in two very different reaction mechanisms. One of these, the formation of cascade atomic deuterium to form the H by fusion, had been first suggested by P.D. Barnes. The 2.0 GeV/c line at the AGS was specifically designed to provide an adequate kaon flux for double strangeness and charge exchange reactions. It has been used for two H searches, E813 and E836, as well as for several {Lambda}{Lambda} searches, E885 and E906. These four experiments are setting significant limits on H-production. The results of these experiments are discussed, and descriptions of related H searches at Brookhaven are given.

  6. Turn-By Beam Extraction during Acceleration in a Synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Trbojevic, Dejan

    2014-02-01

    A synchrotron to accelerate protons or carbon ions for medical applications is being designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Single beam bunches with maximum beam energy of 1.18 GeV and 400 MeV/u for protons and carbon ions respectively will be extracted from the synchrotron at 15 Hz. For protons, the maximum required energy for irradiating a tumor is ˜206 MeV. A pencil-like proton beam containing ˜5.4×107 p/bunch delivers a therapeutic dose of 2.5 Gy in ˜1.5 minutes to treat a tumor of 1 liter volume. It will take ˜80 minutes with bunches containing 4.5×104 ions/bunch to deliver the same dose of 2.5 Gy with a 400 MeV/u pencil-like carbon beam. This extended treatment time when using carbon ions is not acceptable. In addition, the synchrotron cannot be controlled with a beam bunch containing such a low number of carbon ions. To overcome these two problems of the extended treatment time and the low bunch intensity required for the treatment when carbon ions are used, we have devised a method to “peel” the required 4.5×104 carbon-ions/bunch from the accelerating carbon beam bunch containing ˜108 ions/bunch and deliver them to the tumor on a “turn-by-turn” basis. Unlike other methods of beam extraction from a synchrotron, such as resonance extraction, this method does not allow for any beam losses during the extraction and the carbon beam can be peeled off in less than 15 ms during the acceleration or deceleration cycle of the synchrotron. Thus, this turn-by-turn beam extraction method provides beam with variable energy and precisely controlled beam current during the 30 ms acceleration or deceleration time.

  7. Linear accelerator development at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, K

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of operating experience on the 200 MeV Proton Injector Linace of the A.G.S. emphasizing developments in field phase and amplitude control and beam diagnostics. Developments in auxilliary use of the machine are also described.

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source user`s manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beamlines. Fifth edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gmuer, N.F. [ed.

    1993-04-01

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source is based, in large part, on the size of the user community and the diversity of the scientific and technical disciplines represented by these users. As evidence of this success, the VUV Ring has just celebrated its 10th anniversary and the X-ray Ring will do the same in 1995. In order to enhance this success, the NSLS User`s Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beamlines - Fifth Edition, is being published. This Manual presents to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture, capabilities and research programs of the various VUV and X-ray beamlines. Also detailed is the research and computer equipment a General User can expect to find and use at each beamline when working at the NSLS. The Manual is updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes on these beamlines.

  9. A Fast, Versatile Nanoprobe for Complex Materials: The Sub-micron Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy Beamline at NSLS-II (491st Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, Juergen [BNL Photon Sciences Directorate

    2014-02-06

    Time is money and for scientists who need to collect data at research facilities like Brookhaven Lab’s National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), “beamtime” can be a precious commodity. While scanning a complex material with a specific technique and standard equipment today would take days to complete, researchers preparing to use brighter x-rays and the new sub-micron-resolution x-ray spectroscopy (SRX) beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) could scan the same sample in greater detail with just a few hours of beamtime. Talk about savings and new opportunities for researchers! Users will rely on these tools for locating trace elements in contaminated soils, developing processes for nanoparticles to deliver medical treatments, and much more. Dr. Thieme explains benefits for next-generation research with spectroscopy and more intense x-rays at NSLS-II. He discusses the instrumentation, features, and uses for the new SRX beamline, highlighting its speed, adjustability, and versatility for probing samples ranging in size from millimeters down to the nanoscale. He will talk about complementary beamlines being developed for additional capabilities at NSLS-II as well.

  10. A Proposal to the Department of Energy for The Fabrication of a Very High Energy Polarized Gama Ray Beam Facility and A Program of Medium Energy Physics Research at The National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandorfi, A.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Giordano, G.; Matone, G.

    1982-09-01

    This proposal requests support for the fabrication and operation of a modest facility that would provide relatively intense beams of monochromatic and polarized photons with energies in the range of several hundreds of MeV. These {gamma} rays would be produced by Compton backscattering laser light from the electrons circulating in the 2.5-3.0 GeV 'X-RAY' storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The excellent emittance, phase space, and high current of this state-of-the-art storage ring will allow the production of 2 x 10{sup 7} {gamma} rays per second. These photons would be tagged by detecting the scattered electrons, thereby determining the energy to 2.7 MeV for all {gamma}-ray energies. The efficiency of this tagging procedure is 100% and the {gamma}-ray beam would be essentially background free. Tagging will also allow the flexibility of operating with a dynamic range as large as 200 MeV in photon energy while still preserving high resolution and polarization. These beams will permit a fruitful study of important questions in medium-energy nuclear physics. The initial goals of this program are to reach reliable operation with photon energies up to 300 MeV and to develop {gamma}-ray beams with energies up to about 500 MeV. To demonstrate reliable operation, a modest physics program is planned that, for the most part, utilizes existing magnets and detector systems but nonetheless addresses several important outstanding problems. Gamma ray beams of the versatility, intensity, energy, and resolution that can be achieved at this facility are not currently available at any other world facility either existing or under construction. Furthermore, the proposed program would produce the first intense source of medium-energy {gamma} rays that are polarized. Because of the difficulties in producing such polarized beams, it is very unlikely that viable alternate sources can be developed in the near future; at

  11. In-situ Structural Studies during PBO Fiber Spinning by Synchrotron WAXD/SAXS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Shaofeng; Burger, Christian; Fang, Dufei; Zong, Xinhua; Cruz, Sharon; Hsiao, Benjamin; Chu, Benjamin; Bubeck, Robert; Yabuki, Kazuyuki; Teramoto, Yoshihiko; Martin, David; Johnson, Michael; Cunniff, Philip

    2001-03-01

    A spinning unit was adapted to the Advanced Polymers Beamline at X27C of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) to perform in-situ fiber spinning studies. WAXD patterns indicated that the structure before coagulation had a lyotropic liquid-crystalline order that cannot be simply nematic. After the fiber had passed through the coagulation water bath, ranging from 25-60 C, a significant ordering had taken place. The meridian peaks showed streaks. Two models, a Pi-interacting sanidic lyotropic solution and a crystal with translational disorder, could be used to explain the structures before and after coagulation. SAXS patterns of the PBO fiber after coagulation showed equatorial streaks.

  12. Design and fabrication of soft x-ray photolithography experimental beam line at Beijing National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changxin

    1991-08-01

    The synchrotron radiation (SR) soft x-ray photolithography experimental beam line (3B1 beam line) at Beijing National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, was completed and tested in June 1990. A soft x-ray photolithography experiment was successfully completed, and the width of linear etch on a silicon chip by the device with a 3B1 beam line is up to 0.5 micrometers . This SR soft x-ray photolithography experiment was done successfully for the first time in China. This paper describes the design of the beam line and the fabrication of the most important optical element--the cylindrical scanning mirror in the beam line. The 3B1 beam line consists of the shielding light plate with water-cooling, laser simulation light source system, 3-D adjustable scanning mirror, high pass-band filer (beryllium window), acoustic sensor, helium gas chamber, and vacuum system. The main specifications of the 3B1 beam line are as follows: spectral range 0.4-2 nm; horizontal acceptance angle 7.5 mrad; vertical acceptance angle 0.4 mrad; grazing incidence angle 1.5 deg; light spot size 35 nm X 12 nm; vacuum degree of the mirror box 5 X 10-10 torr (static). The cylindrical scanning mirror in grazing incidence is used in the beam line for photolithography to obtain uniform distributed intensity of illumination of the SR source in the vertical direction (Gaussian distribution) and sufficiently concentrated energy. It is made of aluminum alloy LD2 with a supersmooth optical surface. The curvature radius of the cylindrical surface is 527.5 mm; surface figure error is less than (lambda) /10; surface roughness is better than 1 nm RMS, and fold coating on the surface of the mirror under UHV of 109 torr. The laser simulation light source system is used for adjusting the optical system in the beam line instead of the SR source. The cylindrical mirror was polished supersmoothly using Al2O3 ultra micropower grinding material made in TOMAS in Japan on modified traditional machine tools, and surface

  13. Brookhaven Lab physicist William Willis wins the 2003 W.K.H. Panofsky prize

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    William Willis, a senior physicist Brookhaven National Laboratory, has won the American Physical Society's 2003 W.K.H. Panofsky Prize in Experimental Particle Physics. He received the prize, which consists of $5,000 and a certificate citing his contributions to physics, at the APS meeting in Philadelphia on April 6 (1 page).

  14. Role of Synchrotron infra red microspectroscopy in studying epidermotropism of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Bedewi, A.; El Anany, G; El Mofty, M

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of epidermotropism in mycosis fungoides (MF) are not well understood to date. The aim of this study was to differentiate between epidermal and dermal lymphocytes within the skin of MF patients. This study was done on 10 MF patients with a mean age of 50 years diagnosed clinically in the Department of Dermatology, Cairo University, Egypt. A 6 mm biopsy was taken from each patient in order to confirm the diagnosis. Skin biopsies were cut, put on low e-slides and then stained with H&E. Further examination with Synchrotron infrared (IR) microspectroscopy was done in National Synchrotron Light Source - Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York, USA. Immunophenotyping using antibodies CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20 and CD30 was also done. Statistical analysis was done by Student's t-test and cluster analysis. Both epidermal and dermal lymphocytes were clustered separately. Also, Amide I and RNA and DNA within the lymphocytes were significantly different between the epidermis and the dermis. The biochemical analysis of protein, RNA and DNA with Synchrotron IR microspectroscopy is a promising tool for studying epidermotropism in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

  15. The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, M.

    1991-12-18

    The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary.

  16. NSLS 2003 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2003)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MILLER,L.

    2004-05-01

    The scientific productivity of the NSLS continues to be outstanding and the research conducted here has high impact. 2003 was no exception and some of the many highlights from this year's research activity are included in this Activity Report. We are especially pleased that one of our users, Professor Roderick MacKinnon (Rockefeller University), was the co-recipient of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work, much of which was done at the NSLS, explaining how proteins known as ion channels help to generate nerve impulses. It is also a particular pleasure to note that NSLS accelerator physicist Li Hua Yu was awarded the 2003 International Free Electron Laser Prize in recognition of his outstanding achievements, especially demonstrating High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) at the DUV-FEL. Our vision for the NSLS in the next five to 10 years is for it to continue to serve as a vital resource for the nation and especially for the strong Northeast research community. To accomplish this, we are working to preserve and enhance its outstanding scientific productivity by providing increased user support and upgrading beamline and endstation instrumentation. For example, this past year we collaborated with scientists from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the BNL Biology Department to develop a new undulator beamline, X29, to meet the needs of macromolecular crystallography for high brightness x-rays. A new endstation on the undulator beamline X13B is being equipped with optics and instrumentation for microdiffraction and microprobe experiments. The wiggler beamline, X21, is being upgraded to provide high intensity and increased capacity for small angle x-ray scattering experiments on nanotemplated soft matter, biomaterials, and other systems. We are collaborating with the BNL Center for Functional Nanomaterials to develop a beamline for LEEM/PEEM studies, which will add important new capabilities for nanoscience and catalysis research. A new high

  17. Regions compete for French synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Ten regions in France have placed bids to host the planned national synchrotron Soleil. Leading contenders include a joint bid from Ile-de-France and Essonne for Orsay, offering FF 1 billion towards the construction costs (2 paragraphs).

  18. Design, construction, system integration, and test results of the 1 MW CW RF system for the e-gun cavity in the energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenci,S.J.; Eisen, E. L.; Dickey, D. L.; Sainz, J. E.; Utay, P. F.; Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2009-05-04

    Brookhaven's ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) requires a 1 MW CW RF system for the superconducting electron gun cavity. The system consists primarily of a klystron tube, transmitter, and High-Voltage Power Supply (HVPS). The 703.75 MHz klystron made by CPl, Inc. provides RF power of 1MW CW with efficiency of 65%. It has a single output window, diode-type electron gun, and collector capable of dissipating the entire beam power. It was fully factory tested including 24-hour heat run at 1.1 MW CWo The solid state HVPS designed by Continental Electronics provides up to 100 kV at low ripple and 2.1 MW CW with over 95% efficiency. With minimal stored energy and a fast shut-down mode no crowbar circuit is needed. Continental 's transmitter includes PLC based user interface and monitoring, RF pre-amplifier, magnet and Vac-Ion pump supplies, cooling water instrumentation, and integral safety interlock system. BNL installed the klystron, HVPS, and transmitter along with other items, such as circulator, water load, and waveguide components. The collaboration of BNL, CPI, and Continental in the design, installation, and testing was essential to the successful operation of the 1MW system.

  19. Synchrotron Vacuum Ultraviolet Light and Soft X-Ray Radiation Effects on Aluminized Teflon FEP Investigated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Gaier, James R.; Jalics, Alice I.

    1999-01-01

    Since the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was deployed in low Earth orbit in April 1990, two servicing missions have been conducted to upgrade its scientific capabilities. Minor cracking of second-surface metalized Teflon FEP (DuPont; fluorinated ethylene propylene) surfaces from multilayer insulation (MLI) was first observed upon close examination of samples with high solar exposure retrieved during the first servicing mission, which was conducted 3.6 years after deployment. During the second HST servicing mission, 6.8 years after deployment, astronaut observations and photographic documentation revealed significant cracks in the Teflon FEP layer of the MLI on both the solar- and anti-solar-facing surfaces of the telescope. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center directed the efforts of the Hubble Space Telescope MLI Failure Review Board, whose goals included identifying the low-Earth-orbit environmental constituent(s) responsible for the cracking and embrittling of Teflon FEP which was observed during the second servicing mission. The NASA Lewis Research Center provided significant support to this effort. Because soft x-ray radiation from solar flares had been considered as a possible cause for the degradation of the mechanical properties of Teflon FEP (ref. 1), the effects of soft xray radiation and vacuum ultraviolet light on Teflon FEP were investigated. In this Lewisled effort, samples of Teflon FEP with a 100-nm layer of vapor-deposited aluminum (VDA) on the backside were exposed to synchrotron radiation of various vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelengths between 18 nm (69 eV) and 0.65 nm (1900 eV). Synchrotron radiation exposures were conducted using the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Samples of FEP/VDA were exposed with the FEP surface facing the synchrotron beam. Doses and fluences were compared with those estimated for the 20-yr Hubble Space Telescope mission.

  20. Development of partially-coherent wavefront propagation simulation methods for 3rd and 4th generation synchrotron radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubar, Oleg; Berman, Lonny; Chu, Yong S.; Fluerasu, Andrei; Hulbert, Steve; Idir, Mourad; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Shapiro, David; Shen, Qun; Baltser, Jana

    2011-09-01

    Partially-coherent wavefront propagation calculations have proven to be feasible and very beneficial in the design of beamlines for 3rd and 4th generation Synchrotron Radiation (SR) sources. These types of calculations use the framework of classical electrodynamics for the description, on the same accuracy level, of the emission by relativistic electrons moving in magnetic fields of accelerators, and the propagation of the emitted radiation wavefronts through beamline optical elements. This enables accurate prediction of performance characteristics for beamlines exploiting high SR brightness and/or high spectral flux. Detailed analysis of radiation degree of coherence, offered by the partially-coherent wavefront propagation method, is of paramount importance for modern storage-ring based SR sources, which, thanks to extremely small sub-nanometer-level electron beam emittances, produce substantial portions of coherent flux in X-ray spectral range. We describe the general approach to partially-coherent SR wavefront propagation simulations and present examples of such simulations performed using "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) code for the parameters of hard X-ray undulator based beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), Brookhaven National Laboratory. These examples illustrate general characteristics of partially-coherent undulator radiation beams in low-emittance SR sources, and demonstrate advantages of applying high-accuracy physical-optics simulations to the optimization and performance prediction of X-ray optical beamlines in these new sources.

  1. Synchrotron radiation in biosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinkovic, Nebojsa S.; Gupta, Sayan; Zhan, Chenyang; Chance, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    The Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB) operates five beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Infrared (IR) micro-spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, structural proteomics and macromolecular footprinting are among the major technologies available through the Center. IR micro-spectroscopy is used to examine protein-folding in the microsecond time regime, image bone, neurons, seeds and other biological tissues, as well as image samples of interest in the chemical and environmental sciences. Structural proteomics research of New York Structural Genomics Research Consortium (NYSGRC) is steadily increasing the number of solved protein structures, with a goal to solve 100-200 structures per year. To speed up the research, a high-throughput method called 'metallomics' was implemented for NYSGRC crystallographers to detect intrinsic anomalous scatterers using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Hydroxyl radical mediated X-ray footprinting is capable of resolving folding events of RNA, at single base resolution on millisecond timescales using a synchrotron white beam. The high brightness of synchrotron source is essential for CSB projects as it permits the use of smaller sample sizes and/or concentration, and allows studies of more complicated biological systems than with conventional sources.

  2. Synchrotron radiation in biosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinkovic, Nebojsa S. [Center for Synchrotron Biosciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Ullman 315, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)]. E-mail: marinkov@bnl.gov; Gupta, Sayan [Center for Synchrotron Biosciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Ullman 315, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Zhan, Chenyang [Center for Synchrotron Biosciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Ullman 315, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Chance, Mark R. [Center for Synchrotron Biosciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Ullman 315, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    The Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB) operates five beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Infrared (IR) micro-spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, structural proteomics and macromolecular footprinting are among the major technologies available through the Center. IR micro-spectroscopy is used to examine protein-folding in the microsecond time regime, image bone, neurons, seeds and other biological tissues, as well as image samples of interest in the chemical and environmental sciences. Structural proteomics research of New York Structural Genomics Research Consortium (NYSGRC) is steadily increasing the number of solved protein structures, with a goal to solve 100-200 structures per year. To speed up the research, a high-throughput method called 'metallomics' was implemented for NYSGRC crystallographers to detect intrinsic anomalous scatterers using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Hydroxyl radical mediated X-ray footprinting is capable of resolving folding events of RNA, at single base resolution on millisecond timescales using a synchrotron white beam. The high brightness of synchrotron source is essential for CSB projects as it permits the use of smaller sample sizes and/or concentration, and allows studies of more complicated biological systems than with conventional sources.

  3. The new Brookhaven $(g-2)_{\\mu}$ experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Hertzog, D W; Bunce, G M; Carey, R M; Cushman, P B; Danby, G T; Debevec, P T; Deng, H; Deninger, W J; Dhawan, S K; Druzhinin, V P; Duong, L; Earle, W; Efstathiadis, E F; Farley, Francis J M; Fedotovich, G V; Giron, S; Gray, F; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Grossmann, A; Haeberlen, U; Hare, M; Hazen, E S; Hughes, V W; Iwassaki, M; Jungmann, Klaus; Kawall, D; Kawamura, M; Khazin, B I; Kindem, J; Krienen, F; Kronkvist, I J; Larsen, R; Lee, Y Y; Liu, W; Logashenko, I B; McNabb, R; Meng, W; Mi, J L; Miller, J P; Morse, W M; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlov, Yu F; Pai, C; Polly, C; Pretz, J; Prigl, R; zu Putlitz, Gisbert; Redin, S I; Rind, O; Roberts, B L; Ryskulov, N M; Sanders, R; Sedykh, S N; Semertzidis, Y K; Serednyakov, S I; Shatunov, Yu M; Solodov, E P; Sossong, M; Steinmetz, A; Sulak, Lawrence R; Timmermans, C; Trofimov, A V; Urner, D; Warburton, D; Winn, D; Xu, Q; Yamamoto, A; Zimmerman, D

    1999-01-01

    A new assault on the muon's anomalous magnetic moment has begun with a vigorous effort by the Brookhaven E821 collaboration. The present group has refined the design used in a series of successful CERN experiments in order to lower the systematic uncertainties. Consequently it will be possible to take advantage of the greatly increased muon flux provided for at the AGS. Several novel techniques are employed, of which the most significant is a direct muon injection scheme. Upon reaching the goal of the experiment, comparison with theory will offer sensitive teats of both the electroweak corrections and physics beyond the standard model. At the time of this symposium, data from the first engineering run has been analyzed, yielding a result whose precision and value are comparable to those generated by the last CERN effort. (23 refs).

  4. Acquisition of powder diffraction data with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, D.E.; Toby, B.H.; Eddy, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    During the past year, a dedicated triple-axis powder diffractometer has been in routine operation at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source as a user-oriented facility. The diffractometer is designed to allow easy interchange between energy-dispersive and monochromatic beam experiments. In the latter mode of operation, high resolution data have been collected for a variety of samples with the use of the crystal-analyzer technique, and in several cases these data sets have been used successfully for structure solution and Rietveld refinement. Several aspects of data acquisition at a synchrotron beam-line are described, and some of the different types of scattering geometry which have been used are discussed. Simple expressions are given for the instrumental resolution function expressed as the angular variation of peak widths for each of these. The peak shapes observed for a reference sample of Si on the present triple-axis instrument are well-described by the convolution of Gaussian and Lorentzian functions, and the angular dependence of the Gaussian component is in excellent agreement with the corresponding calculated instrumental function. One of the most important considerations for each type of experiment is the necessary compromise between intensity and resolution over a wide range of scattering angles, and some of the available options will be discussed. In particular, the use of Ge(440) and LiF(400) analyzer crystals gives a focussing minimum at relatively high angles (2 THETA approx. = 50/sup 0/ at 1.54A), a highly desirable feature for Rietveld analysis of complex structures. Absolute intensities from reference samples of Si and CeO/sub 2/ are calculated for these and several other scattering configurations involving both flat-plate and capillary geometry to illustrate this compromise. 26 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Small-gap insertion-device development at the National Synchrotron Light Source--performance of the new X13 mini-gap undulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablett, J M; Berman, L E; Kao, C C; Rakowsky, G; Lynch, D

    2004-03-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) 2.8 GeV electron storage ring continues to set high standards in insertion-device research and development. The Chasman-Green NSLS lattice design provides for dispersion-free long straight sections in addition to a very small vertical beta function. As the electron beam size is proportional to the square root of this function, a program to exploit this feature was undertaken more than a decade ago by implementing short-period small-gap insertion devices in the NSLS storage ring. The possibility of utilizing existing moderate-energy synchrotron radiation electron storage rings to produce high-brightness photon beams into the harder X-ray region have been realised using in-vacuum undulators. In this article the operation of a 1.25 cm-period mini-gap undulator, operating down to a gap of 3.3 mm within the NSLS X13 straight section, is reported. It is the brightest source of hard X-rays in the energy range approximately 3.7-16 keV at the NSLS, and replaces an in-vacuum undulator which had a more limited tunability.

  6. Brookhaven Lab physicists Edward Beebe and Alexander Pikin win 'Brightness Award' for achievement in ion source physics and technology

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Edward Beebe and Alexander Pikin, physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, have been awarded the Ion Source Prize, known as the "Brightness Award," which recognizes and encourages innovative and significant recent achievements in the fields of ion source physics and technology" (1 page).

  7. Doing More with Less: Cost-effective, Compact Particle Accelerators (489th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trbojevic, Dejan [BNL Collider-Accelerator Department

    2013-10-22

    Replace a 135-ton magnet used for cancer-fighting particle therapies with a magnet that weighs only two tons? Such a swap is becoming possible thanks to new particle accelerator advances being developed by researchers at Brookhaven Lab. With an approach that combines techniques used by synchrotron accelerators with the ability to accept more energy, these new technologies could be used for more than fighting cancer. They could also decrease the lifecycle of byproducts from nuclear power plants and reduce costs for eRHIC—a proposed electron-ion collider for Brookhaven Lab that researchers from around the world would use to explore the glue that holds together the universe’s most basic building blocks and explore the proton-spin puzzle. During this lecture, Dr. Trbojevic provides an overview of accelerator technologies and techniques—particularly a non-scaling, fixed-focused alternating gradient—to focus particle beams using fewer, smaller magnets. He discusses how these technologies will benefit eRHIC and other applications, including particle therapies being developed to combat cancer.

  8. Understanding the Differences in Molecular Conformation of Carbohydrate and Protein in Endosperm Tissues of Grains with Different Biodegradation Kinetics Using Advanced Synchrotron Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, P.; Block, H; Doiron, K

    2009-01-01

    Conventional 'wet' chemical analyses rely heavily on the use of harsh chemicals and derivatization, thereby altering native seed structures leaving them unable to detect any original inherent structures within an intact tissue sample. A synchrotron is a giant particle accelerator that turns electrons into light (million times brighter than sunlight) which can be used to study the structure of materials at the molecular level. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform IR microspectroscopy (SR-FTIRM) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive and bioanalytical technique. This technique, taking advantage of the brightness of synchrotron light and a small effective source size, is capable of exploring the molecular chemistry within the microstructures of a biological tissue without the destruction of inherent structures at ultraspatial resolutions within cellular dimensions. This is in contrast to traditional 'wet' chemical methods, which, during processing for analysis, often result in the destruction of the intrinsic structures of feeds. To date there has been very little application of this technique to the study of plant seed tissue in relation to nutrient utilization. The objective of this study was to use novel synchrotron radiation-based technology (SR-FTIRM) to identify the differences in the molecular chemistry and conformation of carbohydrate and protein in various plant seed endosperms within intact tissues at cellular and subcellular level from grains with different biodegradation kinetics. Barley grain (cv. Harrington) with a high rate (31.3%/h) and extent (78%), corn grain (cv. Pioneer) with a low rate (9.6%/h) and extent of (57%), and wheat grain (cv. AC Barrie) with an intermediate rate (23%/h) and extent (72%) of ruminal DM degradation were selected for evaluation. SR-FTIRM evaluations were performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (Brookhaven, NY). These results suggest

  9. Brookhaven buildings energy conservation optimization model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carhart, S C; Mulherkar, S S; Sanborn, Y

    1978-01-01

    The Brookhaven Buildings Energy Conservation Optimization Model is a linear programming representation of energy use in buildings. Starting with engineering and economic data on cost and performance of energy technologies used in buildings, including both conversion devices (such as heat pumps) and structural improvements, the model constructs alternative flows for energy through the technologies to meet demands for space heating, air conditioning, thermal applications, and electric lighting and appliances. Alternative paths have different costs and efficiencies. Within constraints such as total demand for energy services, retirement of existing buildings, seasonal operation of certain devices, and others, the model calculates an optimal configuration of energy technologies in buildings. The penetration of the various basic technologies within this configuration is specified in considerable detail, covering new and retrofit markets for nine building types in four regions. Each market may choose from several appropriate conversion devices and four levels each of new and retrofit structural improvement. The principal applications for which the model was designed described briefly.

  10. Report on the Brookhaven Solar Neutrino Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R. Jr.; Evans, J. C. Jr.

    1976-09-22

    This report is intended as a brief statement of the recent developments and results of the Brookhaven Solar Neutrino Experiment communicated through Professor G. Kocharov to the Leningrad conference on active processes on the sun and the solar neutrino problem. The report summarizes the results of experiments performed over a period of 6 years, from April 1970 to January 1976. Neutrino detection depends upon the neutrino capture reaction /sup 37/Cl(..nu..,e/sup -/)/sup 37/Ar producing the isotope /sup 37/Ar (half life of 35 days). The detector contains 3.8 x 10/sup 5/ liters of C/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/ (2.2 x 10/sup 30/ atoms of /sup 37/Cl) and is located at a depth of 4400 meters of water equivalent (m.w.e.) in the Homestake Gold Mine at Lead, South Dakota, U.S.A. The procedures for extracting /sup 37/Ar and the counting techniques used were described in previous reports. The entire recovered argon sample was counted in a small gas proportional counter. Argon-37 decay events were characterized by the energy of the Auger electrons emitted following the electron capture decay and by the rise-time of the pulse. Counting measurements were continued for a period sufficiently long to observe the decay of /sup 37/Ar.

  11. Decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, J. P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Reciniello, R. N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Holden, N. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2011-05-27

    The High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory was a heavy water cooled and moderated reactor that achieved criticality on October 31, 1965. It operated at a power level of 40 mega-watts. An equipment upgrade in 1982 allowed operations at 60 mega-watts. After a 1989 reactor shutdown to reanalyze safety impact of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident, the reactor was restarted in 1991 at 30 mega-watts. The HFBR was shutdown in December 1996 for routine maintenance and refueling. At that time, a leak of tritiated water was identified by routine sampling of ground water from wells located adjacent to the reactor’s spent fuel pool. The reactor remained shutdown for almost three years for safety and environmental reviews. In November 1999 the United States Department of Energy decided to permanently shutdown the HFBR. The decontamination and decommissioning of the HFBR complex, consisting of multiple structures and systems to operate and maintain the reactor, were complete in 2009 after removing and shipping off all the control rod blades. The emptied and cleaned HFBR dome which still contains the irradiated reactor vessel is presently under 24/7 surveillance for safety. Details of the HFBR cleanup conducted during 1999-2009 will be described in the paper.

  12. Decommissioning of the high flux beam reactor at Brookhaven Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, J.P. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Reciniello, R.N. [Radiological Control Div., Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Holden, N.E. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The high-flux beam reactor (HFBR) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory was a heavy water cooled and moderated reactor that achieved criticality on Oct. 31, 1965. It operated at a power level of 40 megawatts. An equipment upgrade in 1982 allowed operations at 60 megawatts. After a 1989 reactor shutdown to reanalyze safety impact of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident, the reactor was restarted in 1991 at 30 megawatts. The HFBR was shut down in December 1996 for routine maintenance and refueling. At that time, a leak of tritiated water was identified by routine sampling of groundwater from wells located adjacent to the reactor's spent fuel pool. The reactor remained shut down for almost three years for safety and environmental reviews. In November 1999 the United States Dept. of Energy decided to permanently shut down the HFBR. The decontamination and decommissioning of the HFBR complex, consisting of multiple structures and systems to operate and maintain the reactor, were complete in 2009 after removing and shipping off all the control rod blades. The emptied and cleaned HFBR dome, which still contains the irradiated reactor vessel, is presently under 24/7 surveillance for safety. Detailed dosimetry performed for the HFBR decommissioning during 1996-2009 is described in the paper. (authors)

  13. Funding problems threaten Middle East's synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    McCabe, H

    1999-01-01

    Scientists will tour the Middle East to try to raise support for the Synchrotron radiation for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East project. The plan is to dismantle and move a decommissioned synchrotron from Berlin to the Middle East where scientists of any nationality would be able to use it (3 paragraphs).

  14. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SSRL at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was built in 1974 to take and use for synchrotron studies the intense x-ray beams from the SPEAR storage ring that...

  15. Determination of floor response spectra for the Brookhaven HFBR reactor building structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subudhi, M.; Goradia, H.

    1978-11-01

    In order to perform the dynamic analysis of various structural components of the HFBR reactor building at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) subjected to seismic disturbances, it is necessary to obtain the floor response spectra of the primary structure. The mathematical model includes the four floor levels of the internal structure, the dome, and soil spring effects. The standard time history analysis is adopted to obtain the response spectrum for each floor of the internal structure. This report summarizes the results both in tabular and graphical form for various damping values.

  16. Performance of the undulator based ultraviolet and soft x-ray beamline for catalysis and surface science at National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liangliang; Du, Xuewei; Wei, Shen; Li, Chaoyang; Pan, Congyuan; Ju, Huanxin; Wang, Qiuping; Zhu, Junfa

    2016-12-01

    The undulator based ultraviolet and soft x-ray beamline BL11U for catalysis and surface science at National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) has been under opteration for months and the present performance is described. This beamline utilizes radiation from an in-vacuum undulator, which has 30 magnetic periods with the period length of 40 mm. A varied-line-spacing plane grating monochromator is employed tto cover the photon energy region of 20-600 eV by two gratings with nominal groove densities of 400 llmm and 1200 l/mm respectively. The energy resolution power E/ΔE is measured with a gas ionization chamber and the photon flux is measured by a photodiode. Results show that the resolution power is better than 10,000 at a photon energy of 29.2 eV. And the flux is higher than 1×1010 phs/s under 300 mA ring beam current for most of the covered photon energy.

  17. Vertical velocity variances and Reynold stresses at Brookhaven

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Niels E.; Brown, R.M.; Frizzola, J.A.

    1970-01-01

    Results of wind tunnel tests of the Brookhaven annular bivane are presented. The energy transfer functions describing the instrument response and the numerical filter employed in the data reduction process have been used to obtain corrected values of the normalized variance of the vertical wind v...... velocity component....

  18. Annual report for Brookhaven National Laboratory 1994 epidemiologic surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    Epidemiologic surveillance at DOE facilities consists of regular and systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on absences due to illness and injury in the work force. Its purpose is to provide an early warning system for health problems occurring among employees at participating sites. Data are collected by coordinators at each site and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and analyses are carried out. Rates of absences and rates of diagnoses associated with absences are analyzed by occupation and other relevant variables. They may be compared with the disease experience of different groups within the DOE work force and with populations that do not work for DOE to identify disease patterns or clusters that may be associated with work activities. In this annual report, the 1994 morbidity data for BNL are summarized. These analyses focus on absences of 5 or more consecutive workdays occurring among workers aged 16-80 years. They are arranged in five sets of tables that present: (1) the distribution of the labor force by occupational category and salary status; (2) the absences per person, diagnoses per absence, and diagnosis rates for the whole work force; (3) diagnosis rates by type of disease or injury; (4) diagnosis rates by occupational category; and (5) relative risks for specific types of disease or injury by occupational category.

  19. 2006 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2008-03-06

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  20. 2010 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-08-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  1. 2009 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2010-11-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  2. 2007 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2008-07-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  3. 2008 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-12-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  4. Building Magnets at Brookhaven National Laboratory - An Account

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willen, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The development of superconducting wire and cable in the late 20th century enabled high field magnets and thus much higher beam collision energies in accelerators. These higher collision energies have allowed experiments to probe further into the structure of matter at the most fundamental, subatomic level. The behavior of the early universe, where these high energies prevailed, and its evolution over time are what these experiments seek to investigate. The subject has aroused the curiosity of not only scientists but of the public as well and has facilitated the support needed to build and operate such expensive machines and experiments. The path forward has not been easy, however. Success in most projects has been mixed with failure, progress with ineptitude. The building of high energy accelerators is mostly a story of capable people doing their best to develop new and unusual technology toward some defined goal, with success and failure in uneven measure along the way. It is also a story of administrative imperatives that have had unpredictable effects on a project’s success, depending mostly on the people in the administrative roles and the decisions that they have made.

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental monitoring plan for Calendar Year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.; Lee, R. [and others

    1996-10-01

    As required by DOE Order 5400.1, each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials shall provide a written Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) covering effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, provides specific guidance regarding environmental monitoring activities.

  6. Wildland Fire Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwager, K.; Green, T. M.

    2014-10-01

    The DOE policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas managed by DOE and/or Its various contractors which can sustain fire must have a FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures associated with wildland fire, operational, and prescribed fires. FMPs provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled ''prescribed'' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered, threatened, and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL. The plan will be reviewed periodically to ensure fire program advances and will evolve with the missions of DOE and BNL.

  7. R&D Energy Recovery Linac at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, Vladimir; Beavis, D.; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Burrill, Andrew; Calaga, Rama; Cameron, Peter; Chang, Xiangyun; Drees, K.A.; Ganetis, G.; Gamble, Michael; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.R.; Hershcovitch, A.; Hseuh, H.C.; Jain, A.K.; Kayran, A.; Kewisch, Jorg; Lambiase, R.F.; Lederle, D.L.; Mahler, G.J.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Nehring, T.C.; Oerter, B.; Pai, C.; Pate, D.; Phillips, Daniel; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Rao, Triveni; Reich, J.; Roser, Thomas; Russo, T.; Smith, K.; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Weiss, D.; Williams, N.W.W.; Yip, Kin; Zaltsman, A.; Bluem, Hans; Cole, Michael; Favale, Anthony; Holmes, D.; Rathke, John; Schultheiss, Tom; Delayen, Jean; Funk, L.; Phillips, H.; Preble, Joseph

    2008-07-01

    Collider Accelerator Department at BNL is in the final stages of developing the 20-MeV R&D energy recovery linac with super-conducting 2.5 MeV RF gun and single-mode super-conducting 5-cell RF linac. This unique facility aims to address many outstanding questions relevant for high current (up to 0.5 A of average current), high brightness energy-recovery linacs with novel Zigzag-type merger. We present the performance of the R&D ERL elements and detailed commissioning plan.

  8. Challenge Team Report: Brookhaven National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. L. Page; M. S. Montgomery

    1999-07-19

    The overall conclusion is that the BNL ER program has accomplished much and is well positioned to move aggressively towards closure. Seven removal actions have been completed. A record of decision (ROD) has been reached on Operable Unit IV, and interim soil cleanup has been completed. The remaining three RODs are under negotiation now.

  9. Building Magnets at Brookhaven National Laboratory: A Condensed Account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willen, Erich

    2017-09-01

    The development of superconducting wire and cable in the late twentieth century enabled high-field magnets and thus much higher beam-collision energies in accelerators. These higher collision energies have allowed experimentalists to probe further into the structure of matter at the most fundamental, subatomic level. The behavior of the early universe, where these high energies prevailed, and its evolution over time are the realm their experiments seek to investigate. The subject has aroused the curiosity of the public as well as scientists and has facilitated the support needed to build and operate such expensive machines and experiments. The path forward has not been easy, however. Success in most projects has been mixed with failure, progress with ineptitude. The building of high energy accelerators is mostly a story of capable people doing their best to develop new and unusual technology toward some defined goal, facing both success and failure along the way. It is also a story of administrative imperatives that had unpredictable effects on a project's success, depending mostly on the people in the administrative roles and the decisions that they made.

  10. Amended annual report for Brookhaven National Laboratory: Epidemiologic surveillance - 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Epidemiologic surveillance at DOE facilities consists of regular and systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on absences due to illness and injury in the work force. Its purpose is to provide an early warning system for health problems occurring among employees at participating sites. Data are collected by coordinators at each site and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and analyses are carried out. Rates of absences and rates of diagnoses associated with absences are analyzed by occupation and other relevant variables. They may be compared with the disease experience of different groups within the DOE work force and with populations and do not work for DOE to identify disease patterns or clusters that may be associated work activities. This report provides a final summary for BNL.

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory meteorological services instrument calibration plan and procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser .

    2013-02-16

    This document describes the Meteorological Services (Met Services) Calibration and Maintenance Schedule and Procedures, The purpose is to establish the frequency and mechanism for the calibration and maintenance of the network of meteorological instrumentation operated by Met Services. The goal is to maintain the network in a manner that will result in accurate, precise and reliable readings from the instrumentation.

  12. Subacute neuropathological effects of microplanar beams of x-rays from a synchrotron wiggler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatkin, D N; Spanne, P; Dilmanian, F A; Gebbers, J O; Laissue, J A

    1995-09-12

    Microplanar beam radiation therapy has been proposed to treat brain tumors by using a series of rapid exposures to an array of parallel x-ray beams, each beam having uniform microscopic thickness and macroscopic breadth (i.e., microplanar). Thirty-six rats were exposed head-on either to an upright 4-mm-high, 20- or 37-microns-wide beam or to a horizontal 7-mm-wide, 42-microns-high beam of mostly 32- to 126-keV, minimally divergent x-rays from the X17 wiggler at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Parallel slices of the head, separated at either 75 or 200 microns on center, were exposed sequentially at 310-650 grays (Gy) per second until each skin-entrance absorbed dose reached 312, 625, 1250, 2500, 5000, or 10,000 Gy. The rats were euthanized 2 weeks or 1 month later. Two rats with 10,000-Gy-entrance slices developed brain tissue necrosis. All the other 10,000- and 5000-Gy-entrance slices and some of the 2500- and 1250-Gy-entrance slices showed loss of neuronal and astrocytic nuclei and their perikarya. No other kind of brain damage was evident histologically in any rat with entrance absorbed doses beam radiation therapy for brain tumors.

  13. GeoSoilEnviroCARS: A National User Facility for Synchrotron Radiation Research in GeoScience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, M. L.; Sutton, S. R.; Prakapenka, V.; Wang, Y.; Newville, M.; Eng, P.; Dera, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    GeoSoilEnviroCARS (GSECARS) is a national user facility for geoscience research at Sector 13 of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. GSECARS provides the scientific community with access to high-brightness x-rays and supports a wide range of experimental techniques. The operation of the facility is funded by the NSF Earth Sciences Facilities and Instrumentation Program, and by the Department of Energy Geosciences Program. GSECARS is managed by the Consortium for Advanced Radiation Sources (CARS) at the University of Chicago, and provides access to resources for earth science research which no single university or other institution could provide. By operating beamlines that are specialized for earth science research, we are able to provide staff who understand and participate in the research being conducted, which is critical for productivity. GSECARS began operations in 1996, and currently operates 4 experimental stations, two on the bending magnet beamline and two on the undulator beamline. The two bending magnet stations operate independently and simultaneously, while the two undulator stations currently share the beam time. (An upgrade proposal has recently been funded by NSF, DOE and NASA to allow the undulator stations to also operate independently and simultaneously). The experimental techniques provided at the facility include: - Diamond Anvil Cell: Monochromatic diffraction and spectroscopy. Online laser heating is available on the undulator beamline, and external heating is available on the bending magnet beamline. - Multi-anvil Press: energy-dispersive and monochromatic diffraction and imaging. There is a 250 ton press on the bending magnet beamline, and a 1000 ton press on the undulator beamline; deformation experiments, acoustic velocity measurements, and computed tomography can all be performed in the press. - Microprobe: micro-XRF, micro-XAFS, fluorescence microCMT, micro-XRD - Microtomography: absorption and differential

  14. Synchrotron radiation-based far-infrared spectroscopic ellipsometer with full Mueller-matrix capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavchuk, T N; Kang, T D; Rogers, P D; Standard, E C; Basistyy, R; Kotelyanskii, A M; Nita, G; Zhou, T; Carr, G L; Kotelyanskii, M; Sirenko, A A

    2013-02-01

    We developed far-IR spectroscopic ellipsometer at the U4IR beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source in Brookhaven National Laboratory. This ellipsometer is able to measure both, rotating analyzer and full-Mueller matrix spectra using rotating retarders, and wire-grid linear polarizers. We utilize exceptional brightness of synchrotron radiation in the broad spectral range between about 20 and 4000 cm(-1). Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer is used for multi-wavelength data acquisition. The sample stage has temperature variation between 4.2 and 450 K, wide range of θ-2θ angular rotation, χ tilt angle adjustment, and X-Y-Z translation. A LabVIEW-based software controls the motors, sample temperature, and FT-IR spectrometer and also allows to run fully automated experiments with pre-programmed measurement schedules. Data analysis is based on Berreman's 4 × 4 propagation matrix formalism to calculate the Mueller matrix parameters of anisotropic samples with magnetic permeability μ ≠ 1. A nonlinear regression of the rotating analyzer ellipsometry and∕or Mueller matrix (MM) spectra, which are usually acquired at variable angles of incidence and sample crystallographic orientations, allows extraction of dielectric constant and magnetic permeability tensors for bulk and thin-film samples. Applications of this ellipsometer setup for multiferroic and ferrimagnetic materials with μ ≠ 1 are illustrated with experimental results and simulations for TbMnO3 and Dy3Fe5O12 single crystals. We demonstrate how magnetic and electric dipoles, such as magnons and phonons, can be distinguished from a single MM measurement without adducing any modeling arguments. The parameters of magnetoelectric components of electromagnon excitations are determined using MM spectra of TbMnO3.

  15. Hazards analysis for the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory x-ray absorption experiments to be performed at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Bucher, J.B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the oxidation state(s) of neptunium (Np) in mouse skeleton and in soft tissue by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). If Np is present in sufficient concentration, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) data will be obtained in order to further identify the Np species present. These data will be crucial in understanding the metabolic pathway of Np in mammals which will help in the design of reagents which can eliminate Np from mammals in the event of accidental exposure. It is proposed to run these experiments at the Standard Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). This laboratory is a DOE national user facility located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The {sup 237}Np nucleus decays by the emission of an alpha particle and this particle emission is the principal hazard in handling Np samples. This hazard is mitigated by physical containment of the sample which stops the alpha particles within the containment. The total amount of Np material that will be shipped to and be at SSRL at any one time will be less than 1 gram. This limit on the amount of Np will ensure that SLAC remains a low hazard, non-nuclear facility. The Np samples will be solids or Np ions in aqueous solution. The Np samples will be shipped to SSRL/SLAC OHP. SLAC OHP will inventory the samples and swipe the containers holding the triply contained samples, and then bring them to the SSRL Actinide trailer located outside building 131. The QA counting records from the samples, as measured at LBNL, will be provided to SSRL and SLAC OHP prior to the arrival of the samples at SLAC OHP. In addition, strict monitoring of the storage and experimental areas will be performed in accordance with SLAC/OHP radiation protection procedures to ensure against the release of contamination.

  16. Self-Assembly by Instruction: Designing Nanoscale Systems Using DNA-Based Approaches (474th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang, Oleg [Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    2012-01-18

    In the field of nanoscience, if you can control how nanoparticles self-assemble in particular structures — joining each other, for example, as molecules can form, atom-by-atom — you can design new materials that have unique properties that industry needs. Nature already uses the DNA genetic code to instruct the building of specific proteins and whole organisms in both plants and people. Taking a cue from nature, scientists at BNL devised a way of using strands of synthetic DNA attached to the surface of nanoparticles to instruct them to self-assemble into specific nanoscale structures, clusters, and three-dimensional organizations. Novel materials designed and fabricated this way promise use in photovoltaics, energy storage, catalysis, cell-targeted systems for more effective medical treatments, and biomolecular sensing for environmental monitoring and medical applications. To find out more about the rapid evolution of this nanoassembly method and its applications, join Physicist Oleg Gang of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) as he gives the 474th Brookhaven Lecture, titled “Self-Assembly by Instruction: Designing Nanoscale Systems Using DNA-Based Approaches." Gang, who has led this work at the CFN, will explain the rapid evolution of this nanoassembly method, and discuss its present and future applications in highly specific biosensors, optically active nano-materials, and new ways to fabricate complex architectures in a rational manner via self-assembly. Gang and his colleagues used the CFN and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) facilities to perform their groundbreaking research. At the CFN, the scientists used electron microscopes and optical methods to visualize the clusters that they fabricated. At the NSLS, they applied x-rays to study a particles-assembly process in solution, DNA’s natural environment. Gang earned a Ph.D. in soft matter physics from Bar-Ilan University in 2000, and he was a Rothschild Fellow at Harvard

  17. The Australian synchrotron; Le synchrotron australien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhi, R

    2005-06-15

    This document recalls the historical aspects of the Australian Synchrotron which will be implemented in 2007. It presents then the objectives of this program, the specifications of the ring and the light lines. (A.L.B.)

  18. Is Overeating Behavior Similar to Drug Addiction? (427th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gene-Jack

    2007-09-27

    The increasing number of obese individuals in the U.S. and other countries world-wide adds urgency to the need to understand the mechanisms underlying pathological overeating. Research by the speaker and others at Brookhaven National Laboratory and elsewhere is compiling evidence that the brain circuits disrupted in obesity are similar to those involved in drug addiction. Using positron emission tomography (PET), the speaker and his colleagues have implicated brain dopamine in the normal and the pathological intake of food by humans. During the 427th Brookhaven Lecture, speaker will review the findings and implications of PET studies of obese subjects and then compare them to PET research involving drug-addicted individuals. For example, in pathologically obese subjects, it was found that reductions in striatal dopamine D2 receptors are similar to those observed in drug-addicted subjects. The speaker and his colleagues have postulated that decreased levels of dopamine receptors predisposed subjects to search for strongly rewarding reinforcers, be it drugs for the drug-addicted or food for the obese, as a means to compensate for decreased sensitivity of their dopamine-regulated reward circuits. As the speaker will summarize, multiple but similar brain circuits involved in reward, motivation, learning and inhibitory control are disrupted both in drug addiction and obesity, resulting in the need for a multimodal approach to the treatment of obesity.

  19. Synchrotron radiation facilities

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Particularly in the past few years, interest in using the synchrotron radiation emanating from high energy, circular electron machines has grown considerably. In our February issue we included an article on the synchrotron radiation facility at Frascati. This month we are spreading the net wider — saying something about the properties of the radiation, listing the centres where synchrotron radiation facilities exist, adding a brief description of three of them and mentioning areas of physics in which the facilities are used.

  20. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation (SRI2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Paul; Susini, Jean

    2013-03-01

    reference as well as the reviewers for their careful reading and constructive recommendations for improving the articles. We are looking forward to a successful and exciting next conference in this series, which will be hosted by Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2015. The co-Editors: Jean Susini (ESRF) Paul Dumas (SOLEIL)

  1. Brookhaven highlights, July 1976-September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    Some of the most significant research accomplishments during this 27-month period are presented. Although some data are given, this report is primarily descriptive in outlook; detailed information on completed work should be sought from the references cited herein or from the usual sources of physics research information. The report is organized as follows: High-energy Physics (general introduction, physics research, accelerators, ISABELLE); Nuclear and Solid State Physics, and Chemistry; Life Sciences (biology, medicine); Applied Energy Science (energy and the environment, reactor systems and safety, National Nuclear Data Center, nuclear materials safeguards); Support Activities (applied mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, safety and environmental protection); and General and Administrative. 117 figures, 16 tables, 315 references. (RWR)

  2. Clash over demand for more synchrotron sources in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    Butler, D

    1998-01-01

    French synchrotron staff accused the science minister, Claude Allegre, of misleading the National Assembly over the need to replace LURE, Paris. Allegre believes all big science facilities should be European with national facilities the exception (1 page).

  3. Physics design for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor epithermal neutron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, F J; Parsons, D K; Nigg, D W; Wessol, D E; Miller, L G; Fairchild, R G

    1990-01-01

    A collaborative effort by researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Brookhaven National Laboratory has resulted in the design and implementation of an epithermal-neutron source at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Large aluminum containers, filled with aluminum oxide tiles and aluminum spacers, were tailored to pre-existing compartments on the animal side of the reactor facility. A layer of cadmium was used to minimize the thermal-neutron component. Additional bismuth was added to the pre-existing bismuth shield to minimize the gamma component of the beam. Lead was also added to reduce gamma streaming around the bismuth. The physics design methods are outlined in this paper. Information available to date shows close agreement between calculated and measured beam parameters. The neutron spectrum is predominantly in the intermediate energy range (0.5 eV - 10 keV). The peak flux intensity is 6.4E + 12 n/(m2.s.MW) at the center of the beam on the outer surface of the final gamma shield. The corresponding neutron current is 3.8E + 12 n/(m2.s.MW). Presently, the core operates at a maximum of 3 MW. The fast-neutron KERMA is 3.6E-15 cGy/(n/m2) and the gamma KERMA is 5.0E-16 cGY/(n/m2) for the unperturbed beam. The neutron intensity falls off rapidly with distance from the outer shield and the thermal flux realized in phantom or tissue is strongly dependent on the beam-delimiter and target geometry.

  4. Inauguration of Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    On 5 February 1960, the Proton Synchrotron (PS) was formally inaugurated. The great Danish physicist, Niels Bohr, releases a bottle of champagne against a shielding block to launch the PS on its voyage in physics.

  5. Understanding the differences in molecular conformation of carbohydrate and protein in endosperm tissues of grains with different biodegradation kinetics using advanced synchrotron technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, P.; Block, H. C.; Doiron, K.

    2009-01-01

    Conventional "wet" chemical analyses rely heavily on the use of harsh chemicals and derivatization, thereby altering native seed structures leaving them unable to detect any original inherent structures within an intact tissue sample. A synchrotron is a giant particle accelerator that turns electrons into light (million times brighter than sunlight) which can be used to study the structure of materials at the molecular level. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform IR microspectroscopy (SR-FTIRM) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive and bioanalytical technique. This technique, taking advantage of the brightness of synchrotron light and a small effective source size, is capable of exploring the molecular chemistry within the microstructures of a biological tissue without the destruction of inherent structures at ultraspatial resolutions within cellular dimensions. This is in contrast to traditional 'wet' chemical methods, which, during processing for analysis, often result in the destruction of the intrinsic structures of feeds. To date there has been very little application of this technique to the study of plant seed tissue in relation to nutrient utilization. The objective of this study was to use novel synchrotron radiation-based technology (SR-FTIRM) to identify the differences in the molecular chemistry and conformation of carbohydrate and protein in various plant seed endosperms within intact tissues at cellular and subcellular level from grains with different biodegradation kinetics. Barley grain (cv. Harrington) with a high rate (31.3%/h) and extent (78%), corn grain (cv. Pioneer) with a low rate (9.6%/h) and extent of (57%), and wheat grain (cv. AC Barrie) with an intermediate rate (23%/h) and extent (72%) of ruminal DM degradation were selected for evaluation. SR-FTIRM evaluations were performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (Brookhaven, NY). The molecular structure spectral analysis

  6. Future Synchrotron Radiation Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Winick, Herman

    2003-01-01

    Sources of synchrotron radiation (also called synchrotron light) and their associated research facilities have experienced a spectacular growth in number, performance, and breadth of application in the past two to three decades. In 1978 there were eleven electron storage rings used as light sources. Three of these were small rings, all below 500 mega-electron volts (MeV), dedicated to this purpose; the others, with energy up to 5 giga-electron volts (GeV), were used parasitically during the operation of the ring for high energy physics research. In addition, at that time synchrotron radiation from nine cyclic electron synchrotrons, with energy up to 5 GeV, was also used parasitically. At present no cyclic synchrotrons are used, while about 50 electron storage rings are in operation around the world as fully dedicated light sources for basic and applied research in a wide variety of fields. Among these fields are structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, materials, analytic chemistry, micr...

  7. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  8. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HULBERT,S.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

    1998-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light.

  9. RF gymnastics in synchrotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Garoby, R

    2011-01-01

    The RF systems installed in synchrotrons can be used to change the longitudinal beam characteristics. 'RF gymnastics' designates manipulations of the RF parameters aimed at providing such non-trivial changes. Some keep the number of bunches constant while changing bunch length, energy spread, emittance, or distance between bunches. Others are used to change the number of bunches. After recalling the basics of longitudinal beam dynamics in a hadron synchrotron, this paper deals with the most commonly used gymnastics. Their principle is described as well as their performance and limitations.

  10. RF Gymnastics in Synchrotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Garoby, R

    2005-01-01

    The RF systems installed in synchrotrons can be used to change the longitudinal beam characteristics. "RF gymnastics" designates manipulations of the RF parameters aimed at providing such non-trivial changes. Some keep the number of bunches constant while changing bunch length, energy spread, emittance or distance between bunches. Others are used to change the number of bunches. After recalling the basics of longitudinal beam dynamics in a hadron synchrotron, this paper deals with the most commonly used gymnastics. Their principle is described as well as their performance and limitations.

  11. Compact synchrotron light sources

    CERN Document Server

    Weihreter, Ernst

    1996-01-01

    This book covers a new niche in circular accelerator design, motivated by the promising industrial prospects of recent micromanufacturing methods - X-ray lithography, synchrotron radiation-based micromachining and microanalysis techniques. It describes the basic concepts and the essential challenges for the development of compact synchrotron radiation sources from an accelerator designer's point of view and gives an outline of the actual state of the art. The volume is intended as an introduction and as a reference for physicists, engineers and managers involved in this rapidly developing fiel

  12. In situ monitoring of the electrochemical absorption of deuterium into palladium by x-ray diffraction using synchrotron-wiggler radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez, D.D.; Hagans, P.L.; Skelton, E.F.; Qadri, S.B.; Nagel, D.J. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-12-31

    With low energy x-rays, such as those from a Cu x-ray tube, only the outer few microns of a metallic sample can be probed. This low penetrating power prohibits structural studies from being carried out on the interior of an electrode in an electrochemical cell because of absorption by the cell material, electrodes and the electrolyte. The work described in this paper circumvents this problem by utilizing high energy, high brightness x-rays produced on the superconducting wiggler beam line, X-17C, at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The penetrating power of the higher energy x-rays allowed Pd diffraction spectra to be obtained in-situ on a 1 mm diameter Pd wire cathode during electrolysis of heavy water. Moreover, the beam (28 x 28 {micro}m in cross-section) allowed diffraction spectra to be acquired as a function of distance across the sample. Spectra were recorded in 50 {micro}m steps from the edge of the Pd wire to its core. This was done at 2 minute intervals as a function of electrolysis time. The {alpha}-{beta} phase transition induced in the Pd while deuterium was electrochemically absorbed was observed by monitoring the Pd-(422) diffraction peaks. Results allowed the diffusion rate and the diffusivity of deuterium atoms in the Pd wire to be determined. Other features of the structural changes associated with the absorption of deuterium into Pd are reported.

  13. Scientists at Brookhaven contribute to the development of a better electron accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Scientists working at Brookhaven have developed a compact linear accelerator called STELLA (Staged Electron Laser Acceleration). Highly efficient, it may help electron accelerators become practical tools for applications in industry and medicine, such as radiation therapy (1 page)

  14. Ultrasonic Velocity Measurements in Conjunction With Synchrotron Radiation to the Conditions of the Earth's Interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B.; Kung, J.; Liebermann, R. C.; Weidner, D. J.; Uchida, T.; Wang, Y.

    2002-12-01

    In conjunction with synchrotron radiation, our capabilities in ultrasonic experiments have been greatly increased in multiple dimensions. The experimental set-up installed at X17B1 of NSLS at Brookhaven National Lab enables us to conduct simultaneous studies of sound wave velocity using ultrasonic interferomtery and crystal structure refinement using X-ray diffraction at the conditions of the Earth's mantle. In these experiments, a complete characterization of the sample, such as sample length and stress at high pressure and high temperature, can be quantitatively addressed. The stress is measured using multi-element/multi-position detectors mounted at fixed diffraction angle, while the sample length is recorded using X-ray imaging techniques. Measurements at high pressure and high temperature not only provide the determination of pressure derivatives of the elastic moduli without using secondary pressure standard, but also can be used to establish the absolute pressure scale. Higher order elastic constants can also be investigate with the current experimental set-up. We have successfully applied these advanced techniques to the study of the elastic properties of unquenchable mantle phases (Calcium silicate perovskite) and materials undergone phase transitions (pyroxenes), melting, plastic deformation, and multi-phase aggregate (KLB-1) at high pressure and temperature, in which the sample length can not be retrieved from other techniques. More over, the utilization of digital equipment provides fast data collection, enabling us to capture instant variation or the time dependence of the elastic properties under above circumstances. These new developments will bring us high quality elasticity data for mantle phases at Earth's mantle conditions, providing crucial information in interpreting seismic observations and constraining the composition of the Earth's interior.

  15. Summary update of the Brookhaven tritium toxicity program with emphasis on recent cytogenetic and lifetime-shortening studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carsten, A.L.; Benz, R.D.; Hughes, W.P.; Ichimasa, Yusuke; Ikushima, Takaji; Tezuka, Hideo

    1988-01-01

    A number of years ago a multiparameter program to evaluate the toxicity of tritiated water (HTO) was undertaken in the Medical Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The results of most of these studies have been published and will receive brief attention. Emphasis will be placed on the unpublished studies involving the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE's) in bone marrow of mice, new biochemical information, and preliminary results on lifetime-shortening and carcinogenesis. In brief, male Hale-Stoner Brookhaven (HSB) mice maintained on HTO concentrations ranging from 3.0 to 30.0 ..mu..Ci/ml exhibited essentially the same number of SCE's per cell throughout their lifetime. Control mice showed a decrease in number of SCE's with age. The lack of a dose-response effect and the constant level of SCE's in HTO mice as compared to controls will be discussed. In the carcinogenesis study C57BL/6J male mice received various x-ray or HTO regimens. Mortality data from these and other studies in which CBA/Ca/BNL mice received single x-ray exposures or equivalent integrated dose exposures by single HTO injections will be discussed. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  16. A Synchrotron-Based Facility for the in-situ Location, Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of ~10 um Particles Captured in Aerogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, G.; Sutton, S; Lanzirotti, A

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust mission collected dust from the coma of Comet Wild-2 on January 2nd, 2004, by direct capture into aerogel cells that flew through the dust coma at 6 km/s. Stardust collected several hundred comet particles >10 {mu}m in size. These comet samples were delivered to Earth on January 15th, 2006. We developed a facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY, USA) for the in-situ characterization of 10 {mu}m particles collected in aerogel. These analytical instruments allow us to perform extensive chemical, mineralogical, and size-frequency characterization of particles captured in aerogel. These analyses are conducted without any invasive extraction, minimizing the possibility of contamination or particle loss during preparation. This facility was used to determine the chemical composition, the oxidation state, the mineralogy and to provide an indication of the grain size of the Wild-2 particles before they were removed from the aerogel. This information provides a catalog of particle types, allowing a more reasoned allocation of the particles to subsequent investigators based on a relatively detailed knowledge of the chemical composition and mineralogy of each particle. These measurements allowed a comparison of the chemical and mineralogical properties of the Wild-2 particles with other types of extraterrestrial materials, including interplanetary dust particles and meteorites. The success of in-situ analysis for Wild 2 particles demonstrates that synchrotron-based facilities will be important for the analysis of particles collected in aerogel on future earth-orbiting satellites and spacecraft.

  17. Design of the beryllium window for Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mapes, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Raparia, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-11-01

    In the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) beam line, there were two Beryllium (Be) windows with an air gap to separate the high vacuum upstream side from low vacuum downstream side. There had been frequent window failures in the past which affected the machine productivity and increased the radiation dose received by workers due to unplanned maintenance. To improve the window life, design of Be window is reexamined. Detailed structural and thermal simulations are carried out on Be window for different design parameters and loading conditions to come up with better design to improve the window life. The new design removed the air gap and connect the both beam lines with a Be window in-between. The new design has multiple advantages such as 1) reduces the beam energy loss (because of one window with no air gap), 2) reduces air activation due to nuclear radiation and 3) increased the machine reliability as there is no direct pressure load during operation. For quick replacement of this window, an aluminum bellow coupled with load binder was designed. There hasn’t been a single window failure since the new design was implemented in 2012.

  18. HOM identification by bead pulling in the Brookhaven ERL cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, H; Jain, Puneet; Johnson, Elliott C; Xu, Wencan

    2014-01-01

    Exploratory measurements of the Brookhaven Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) cavity at superconducting temperature produced a long list of high order modes (HOMs). The niobium 5-cell cavity is terminated at each end with HOM ferrite dampers that successfully reduce the Q-factors to levels required to avoid beam break up (BBU) instabilities. However, a number of un-damped resonances with Q≥106 were found at 4 K and their mode identification forms the focus of this paper. The approach taken here consists of bead pulling on a copper (Cu) replica of the ERL cavity with dampers involving various network analyzer measurements. Several different S21 transmission measurements are used, including those taken from the fundamental input coupler to the pick-up probe across the cavity, others between beam-position monitor probes in the beam tubes, and also between probes placed into the cells. The bead pull technique suitable for HOM identification with a metallic needle or dielectric bead is detailed. This paper presents the...

  19. Production of platinum radioisotopes at Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Suzanne V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The accelerator production of platinum isotopes was investigated at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP. In this study high purity natural platinum foils were irradiated at 53.2, 65.7, 105.2, 151.9, 162.9 and 173.3.MeV. The irradiated foils were digested in aqua regia and then converted to their hydrochloride salt with concentrated hydrochloric acid before analyzing by gamma spectrometry periodically for at least 10 days post end of bombardment. A wide range of platinum (Pt, gold (Au and iridium (Ir isotopes were identified. Effective cross sections at BLIP for Pt-188, Pt-189, Pt-191 and Pt-195m were compared to literature and theoretical cross sections determined using Empire-3.2. The majority of the effective cross sections (<70 MeV confirm those reported in the literature. While the absolute values of the theoretical cross sections were up to a factor of 3 lower, Empire 3.2 modeled thresholds and maxima correlated well with experimental values. Preliminary evaluation into a rapid separation of Pt isotopes from high levels of Ir and Au isotopes proved to be a promising approach for large scale production. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that with the use of isotopically enriched target material accelerator production of selected platinum isotopes is feasible over a wide proton energy range.

  20. Brookhaven solar-heat-pump simulator: technical description and experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catan, M.

    1982-07-01

    The series solar-assisted heat pump (SAHP) system has the potential to deliver heat with very high seasonal coefficients of performance (coefficient of performance or COP is the ratio of useful heat delivered to electrical power consumed). This potential rests on the ability of the heat-pump component to use the high source temperatures available from the solar-collector component to deliver heat with a COP which rises monotonically with source temperature. The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Heat Pump Simulator has played an important role in a program aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of building simple potentially inexpensive heat pumps for use in SAHP systems. Basically the work described here consists of the following: (1) The construction and testing of a laboratory heat pump built from conventional components and characterized by a very desirable COP versus source temperature profile. (2) The testing of two prototype SAHPs built by heat-pump manufacturers under contract to DOE. (3) Detailed component and control tests aimed at establishing improvements in the SAHP prototypes. The paper describes, in some detail, the BNL Heat Pump Simulator, a versatile instrument used to test heat pumps and heat-pump subcomponents under transient and steady-state conditions.

  1. Synchrotrons for Hadrontherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullia, Marco G.

    Since 1990, when the world's first hospital-based proton therapy center opened in Loma Linda, California, interest in dedicated proton and carbon ion therapy facilities has been growing steadily. Today, many proton therapy centers are in operation, but the number of centers offering carbon ion therapy is still very low. This difference reflects the fact that protons are well accepted by the medical community, whereas radiotherapy with carbon ions is still experimental. Furthermore, accelerators for carbon ions are larger, more complicated and more expensive than those for protons only. This article describes the accelerator performance required for hadrontherapy and how this is realized, with particular emphasis on carbon ion synchrotrons.

  2. CERN PSB Beam Tests of CNAO Synchrotron's Digital LLRF

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; De Martinis, C; Falbo, L; Findlay, A; Foglio, R; Hunt, S; Tourres, D; Vescovi, C

    2008-01-01

    The Italian National Centre for Oncological hAdrontherapy (CNAO), in its final construction phase, uses proton and carbon ion beams to treat patients affected by solid tumours. At the heart of CNAO is a 78- meter circumference synchrotron that accelerates particles to up to 400 MeV/u. The synchrotron relies on a digital LLRF system based upon Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) and Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). This system implements cavity servoing and beam control capabilities, such as phase and radial loops. Beam tests of the CNAO synchrotron LLRF system were carried out at CERN's Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) in autumn 2007, to verify the combined DSP/FPGA architecture and the beam control capabilities. For this, a prototype version of CNAO's LLRF system was adapted to the PSB requirements. This paper outlines the prototype system layout and describes the tests carried out and their results. In particular, system architecture and beam control capabilities were successfully proven by comparison wit...

  3. Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of Meteorites in Thin Section: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, A. H.; Lanzirotti, A.; Xirouchakis, D.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray diffraction is the pre-eminent technique for mineral identification and structure determination, but is difficult to apply to grains in thin section, the standard meteorite preparation. Bright focused X-ray beams from synchrotrons have been used extensively in mineralogy and have been applied to extraterrestrial particles. The intensity and small spot size achievable in synchrotron X-ray beams makes them useful for study of materials in thin sections. Here, we describe Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction (SXRD) in thin section as done at the National Synchrotron Light Source, and cite examples of its value for studies of meteorites in thin section.

  4. T.D. LEE: RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AND THE RIKEN BROOKHAVEN CENTER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCLERRAN,L.; SAMIOS, N.

    2006-11-24

    This paper presents the history of Professor T. D. Lee's seminal work on the theory of relativistic heavy ion collisions, and the founding and development of the Riken Brookhaven Center. A number of anecdotes are given about Prof. Lee, and his strong positive effect on his colleagues, particularly young physicists.

  5. Synchrotron radiation facilities in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, G.

    1996-07-01

    With the successful commissioning and achievement of significant milestones at both the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) and the 1.5- GeV Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, synchrotron radiation research capability in the United States holds the promise of many important discoveries in the decade to come. An overview of current accelerator commissioning performance at the American third-generation light sources, state-of-the-art developments at first- and second-generation sources, and a preview of fourth-generation source progress is presented.

  6. Reshuffle lifts French synchrotron hopes

    CERN Multimedia

    McCabe, H

    2000-01-01

    The sacking of Claude Allegre as research minister has raised doubts over the level of France's promised participation in the construction of Diamond but reawakened French hopes that the synchrotron Soleil may now be built (1 page).

  7. Proton synchrotron radiation at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman-Keup, Randy; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    While protons are not generally associated with synchrotron radiation, they do emit visible light at high enough energies. This paper presents an overview of the use of synchrotron radiation in the Tevatron to measure transverse emittances and to monitor the amount of beam in the abort gap. The latter is necessary to ensure a clean abort and prevent quenches of the superconducting magnets and damage to the silicon detectors of the collider experiments.

  8. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis.

  9. National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. [eds.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains seven sections discussing the following: (1) scientific research at the NSLS; (2) symposia and workshops held at the NSLS; (3) a facility report; (4) NSLS projects; (5) NSLS operational highlights; (6) informational guides to the VUV and X-ray beamlines; and (7) appendices which include abstracts on projects carried out at the VUV and X-ray beamlines.

  10. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. (eds.)

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  11. The Proton Synchrotron, going strong at fifty years

    CERN Multimedia

    Django Manglunki

    It was on the evening of 24 November 1959 that an incredulous Hildred Blewett, on detachment to CERN from the Brookhaven laboratory, exclaimed “Yes! We’re through transition!” The first beam of ten billion protons had not only broken through the 5.2 GeV barrier but gone on all the way to 24 GeV, the machine’s top energy at that time.   An operational screenshot from the PS, taken on its 50th anniversary. The three white peaks depict different phases (cycles) of the PS’s operation. In the first and third cycle, the PS is producing a very low-intensity beam for LHC commissioning. In the second cycle, protons are being spilled out for use in the East Area. Fifty years ago the PS, the first strong-focusing proton synchrotron using alternating gradient technology, first began to circulate beams at an unprecedented level of energy. Over the years, a complex of linear and circular accelerators and storage rings grew up around the PS. In the mid-1990s ...

  12. Combustion study with synchrotron radiation single photon ionization technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Rui; WANG Jing; HUANG Chaoqun; YANG Bin; WEI Lixia; SHAN Xiaobin; SHENG Liusi; ZHANG Yunwu; QI Fei

    2005-01-01

    Here we report a combustion endstation at National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) and some primary experimental results. Synchrotron radiation can provide the tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photon with the high intensity and the good collimation. VUV photoionization is a single-photon ionization process. Combined with molecular-beam mass spectrometry (MBMS), the VUV single-photon ionization can be applied to detect the combustion products, especially the intermediates and free radicals produced from combustion process. This method is proved to be a powerful tool for combustion study, which could be helpful for developing combustion kinetic models and understanding the mechanism of combustion reactions.

  13. Spin echo in synchrotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Alexander W.; Courant, Ernest D.

    2007-01-01

    As a polarized beam is accelerated through a depolarization resonance, its polarization is reduced by a well-defined calculable reduction factor. When the beam subsequently crosses a second resonance, the final beam polarization is considered to be reduced by the product of the two reduction factors corresponding to the two crossings, each calculated independently of the other. This is a good approximation when the spread of spin precession frequency Δνspin of the beam (particularly due to its energy spread) is sufficiently large that the spin precession phases of individual particles smear out completely during the time τ between the two crossings. This approximate picture, however, ignores two spin dynamics effects: an interference-overlap effect and a spin echo effect. This paper is to address these two effects. The interference-overlap effect occurs when Δνspin is too small, or when τ is too short, to complete the smearing process. In this case, the two resonance crossings overlap each other, and the final polarization exhibits constructive or destructive interference patterns depending on the exact value of τ. Typically, the beam’s energy spread is large and this interference-overlap effect does not occur. To study this effect, therefore, it is necessary to reduce the beam energy spread and to consider two resonance crossings very close to each other. The other mechanism, also due to the interplay between two resonance crossings, is spin echo. It turns out that even when the precession phases appear to be completely smeared between the two crossings, there will still be a sudden and short-lived echo signal of beam polarization at a time τ after the second crossing; the magnitude of which can be as large as 57%. This echo signal exists even when the beam has a sizable energy spread and when τ is very large, and could be a sensitive (albeit challenging) way to experimentally test the intricate spin dynamics in a synchrotron. After giving an analysis

  14. Spin Echo in Synchrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alexander W.; /SLAC; Courant, Ernest D.; /Brookhaven

    2006-12-01

    As a polarized beam is accelerated through a depolarization resonance, its polarization is reduced by a well-defined calculable reduction factor. When the beam subsequently crosses a second resonance, the final beam polarization is considered to be reduced by the product of the two reduction factors corresponding to the two crossings, each calculated independently of the other. This is a good approximation when the spread of spin precession frequency {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} of the beam (particularly due to its energy spread) is sufficiently large that the spin precession phases of individual particles smear out completely during the time {tau} between the two crossings. This approximate picture, however, ignores two spin dynamics effects: an interference effect and a spin echo effect. This paper is to address these two effects. The interference effect occurs when {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} is too small, or when {tau} is too short, to complete the smearing process. In this case, the two resonance crossings interfere with each other, and the final polarization exhibits constructive or destructive patterns depending on the exact value of {tau}. Typically, the beam's energy spread is large and this interference effect does not occur. To study this effect, therefore, it is necessary to reduce the beam energy spread and to consider two resonance crossings very close to each other. The other mechanism, also due to the interplay between two resonance crossings, is spin echo. It turns out that even when the precession phases appear to be completely smeared between the two crossings, there will still be a sudden and short-lived echo signal of beam polarization at a time {tau} after the second crossing; the magnitude of which can be as large as 57%. This echo signal exists even when the beam has a sizable energy spread and when {tau} is very large, and could be a sensitive (albeit challenging) way to experimentally test the intricate spin dynamics in a synchrotron. After giving

  15. Report of the workshop on transferring X-ray Lithography Synchrotron (XLS) technology to industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcuse, W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on plans to develop an x-ray synchrotron for use in lithography. The primary concern of the present paper is technology transfer from national laboratories to private industry. (JDH)

  16. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, A.; Qiu, Jianwei; Vogelsang, W.; Yuan, F.

    2011-08-02

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem to contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the

  17. RF-knockout Extraction System for the CNAO Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Carmignani, Nicola; Serio, Mario; Balbinot, Giovanni; Bressi, Erminia; Caldara, Michele; Pullia, Marco; Bosser, Jacques; Venchi, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO) is a centre in Italy for the treatment of patients affected by tumours with proton and carbon ions beams accelerated in a synchrotron. The synchrotron extraction method is based on the use of a betatron core. This work aims to verify, through a theoretical study and a simulation, the possibility of using the RF-knockout extraction method exploiting the existing hardware. A simulation program has been written to simulate the extraction system of the synchrotron with the purpose to define the parameters of the radio frequency. Two types of radio frequencies have been compared in order to obtain a constant spill with the minimum ripple: a carrier wave with a frequency and amplitude modulation, and a gaussian narrow band noise modulated in amplitude. Results of the simulation and considerations on the kicker characteristics are presented

  18. Transvenous coronary angiography in humans with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1994-10-01

    The transvenous coronary angiography project at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is presently undergoing a significant upgrade to the hardware and software in the synchrotron medical facility. When completed, the project will have reached a level of maturity in the imaging technology which will allow the research team to begin to concentrate on medical research programs. This paper will review the status of the project and imaging technology and will discuss the current upgrades and future advanced technology initiatives. The advantages of using the radiation from a synchrotron, over that from a standard x-ray source, were the motivation for the project. A total of 23 human imaging sessions have been carried out with in the project. The primary goals have been to establish the imaging parameters and protocol necessary to obtain clinically useful images.

  19. Towards synchrotron-based nanocharacterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleuet, Pierre; Arnaud, Lucile; Biquard, Xavier; Cloetens, Peter; Doyen, Lise; Gergaud, Patrice; Lamontagne, Patrick; Lavayssière, Maylis; Micha, Jean-Sébastien; Renault, Olivier; Rieutord, François; Susini, Jean; Ulrich, Olivier

    2009-09-01

    The advent of 3rd generation synchrotron sources coupled with high efficiency x-ray focusing optics opened new nanocharacterization possibilities. This paper is an overview of synchrotron-based techniques that may be of interest for nanotechnology researchers. Although not exhaustive, it includes a general background of synchrotron principle and main x-ray interactions before addressing nanoimaging possibilities. Three-dimensional (3D) hard x-ray multimodal tomography is now doable that allows producing 3D morphological, chemical and crystalline images with a sub-100 nm resolution. Although the resolution is still limited with respect to electron imaging, it presents attractive features like depth resolution and non-destructive exam. Besides imaging, diffraction also allows strain determination within microstructures and is illustrated here on 100 nm copper lines. Surface analysis is illustrated through X-ray Photoelectron Emission Microscopy (XPEEM).

  20. Synchrotron radiation and structural proteomics

    CERN Document Server

    Pechkova, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the current state of research in both synchrotron radiation and structural proteomics from different laboratories worldwide. The book presents recent research results in the most advanced methods of synchrotron radiation analysis, protein micro- and nano crystallography, X-ray scattering and X-ray optics, coherent X-Ray diffraction, and laser cutting and contactless sample manipulation are described in details. The book focuses on biological applications and highlights important aspects such as radiation damage and molecular modeling.

  1. Berkeley Lab's ALS generates femtosecond synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, A L

    2000-01-01

    A team at Berkeley's Advanced Light Source has shown how a laser time-slicing technique provides a path to experiments with ultrafast time resolution. A Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory team has succeeded in generating 300 fs pulses of synchrotron radiation at the ALS synchrotron radiation machine. The team's members come from the Materials Sciences Division (MSD), the Center for Beam Physics in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division and the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Although this proof-of principle experiment made use of visible light on a borrowed beamline, the laser "time-slicing" technique at the heart of the demonstration will soon be applied in a new bend magnet beamline that was designed specially for the production of femtosecond pulses of X-rays to study long-range and local order in condensed matter with ultrafast time resolution. An undulator beamline based on the same technique has been proposed that will dramatically increase the flux and brightness. The use of X-rays to study the c...

  2. Optical systems for synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, M.R.

    1985-12-01

    Various fundamental topics which underlie the design and use of optical systems for synchrotron radiation are considered from the viewpoint of linear system theory. These topics include the damped harmonic oscillator, free space propagation of an optical field, electromagnetic theory of optical properties of materials, theory of dispersion, and the Kramers-Kronig relations. 32 refs., 5 figs. (LEW)

  3. DESY: Synchrotron and storage rings

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    An improvement programme has been under way for several years at the 7.5 GeV électron synchrotron at DESY. In particular it has been designed to increase the accelerated beam intensity, to achieve better quality of the ejected électron beams and photon beams and to improve machine reliability.

  4. Biological physics and synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filhol, J.M.; Chavanne, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Weckert, E. [Hasylab at Desy, Hamburg (Germany)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    This conference deals with the applications of synchrotron radiation to current problems in biology and medicine. Seven sessions take stock on the subject: sources and detectors; inelastic scattering and dynamics; muscle diffraction; reaction mechanisms; macromolecular assemblies; medical applications; imaging and spectroscopy. The document presents the papers abstracts. (A.L.B.)

  5. Synchrotron radiation and biomedical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luccio, A.

    1986-08-01

    In this lecture we describe the characteristics of Synchrotron radiation as a source of X rays. We discuss the properties of SR arc sources, wigglers, undulators and the use of backscattering of laser light. Applications to angiography, X ray microscopy and tomography are reviewed. 16 refs., 23 figs.

  6. Microprobing the molecular spatial distribution and structural architecture of feed-type sorghum seed tissue (Sorghum Bicolor L.) using the synchrotron radiation infrared microspectroscopy technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2011-09-01

    Sorghum seed (Sorghum bicolor L.) has unique degradation and fermentation behaviours compared with other cereal grains such as wheat, barley and corn. This may be related to its cell and cell-wall architecture. The advanced synchrotron radiation infrared microspectroscopy (SR-IMS) technique enables the study of cell or living cell biochemistry within cellular dimensions. The objective of this study was to use the SR-IMS imaging technique to microprobe molecular spatial distribution and cell architecture of the sorghum seed tissue comprehensively. High-density mapping was carried out using SR-IMS on beamline U2B at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Brookhaven National Laboratory, NY, USA). Molecular images were systematically recorded from the outside to the inside of the seed tissue under various chemical functional groups and their ratios [peaks at ∼1725 (carbonyl C=O ester), 1650 (amide I), 1657 (protein secondary structure α-helix), 1628 (protein secondary structure β-sheet), 1550 (amide II), 1515 (aromatic compounds of lignin), 1428, 1371, 1245 (cellulosic compounds in plant seed tissue), 1025 (non-structural CHO, starch granules), 1246 (cellulosic material), 1160 (CHO), 1150 (CHO), 1080 (CHO), 930 (CHO), 860 (CHO), 3350 (OH and NH stretching), 2960 (CH(3) anti-symmetric), 2929 (CH(2) anti-symmetric), 2877 (CH(3) symmetric) and 2848 cm(-1) (CH(2) asymmetric)]. The relative protein secondary structure α-helix to β-sheet ratio image, protein amide I to starch granule ratio image, and anti-symmetric CH(3) to CH(2) ratio image were also investigated within the intact sorghum seed tissue. The results showed unique cell architecture, and the molecular spatial distribution and intensity in the sorghum seed tissue (which were analyzed through microprobe molecular imaging) were generated using SR-IMS. This imaging technique and methodology has high potential and could be used for scientists to develop specific cereal grain varieties with targeted food and

  7. Microprobing the Molecular Spatial Distribution and Structural Architecture of Feed-type Sorghum Seed Tissue (Sorghum Bicolor L.) using the Synchrotron Radiation Infrared Microspectroscopy Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P Yu

    2011-12-31

    Sorghum seed (Sorghum bicolor L.) has unique degradation and fermentation behaviours compared with other cereal grains such as wheat, barley and corn. This may be related to its cell and cell-wall architecture. The advanced synchrotron radiation infrared microspectroscopy (SR-IMS) technique enables the study of cell or living cell biochemistry within cellular dimensions. The objective of this study was to use the SR-IMS imaging technique to microprobe molecular spatial distribution and cell architecture of the sorghum seed tissue comprehensively. High-density mapping was carried out using SR-IMS on beamline U2B at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Brookhaven National Laboratory, NY, USA). Molecular images were systematically recorded from the outside to the inside of the seed tissue under various chemical functional groups and their ratios [peaks at {approx}1725 (carbonyl C=O ester), 1650 (amide I), 1657 (protein secondary structure {alpha}-helix), 1628 (protein secondary structure {beta}-sheet), 1550 (amide II), 1515 (aromatic compounds of lignin), 1428, 1371, 1245 (cellulosic compounds in plant seed tissue), 1025 (non-structural CHO, starch granules), 1246 (cellulosic material), 1160 (CHO), 1150 (CHO), 1080 (CHO), 930 (CHO), 860 (CHO), 3350 (OH and NH stretching), 2960 (CH{sub 3} anti-symmetric), 2929 (CH{sub 2} anti-symmetric), 2877 (CH{sub 3} symmetric) and 2848 cm{sup -1} (CH{sub 2} asymmetric)]. The relative protein secondary structure {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheet ratio image, protein amide I to starch granule ratio image, and anti-symmetric CH{sub 3} to CH{sub 2} ratio image were also investigated within the intact sorghum seed tissue. The results showed unique cell architecture, and the molecular spatial distribution and intensity in the sorghum seed tissue (which were analyzed through microprobe molecular imaging) were generated using SR-IMS. This imaging technique and methodology has high potential and could be used for scientists to develop

  8. Epidemiologic surveillance. [1994] amended annual report for Brookhaven National Laboratory. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Epidemiologic surveillance at DOE facilities consists of regular and systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on absences due to illness and injury in the work force. Its purpose is to provide an early warning system for health problems occurring among employees at participating sites. Data are collected by coordinators at each site and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and analyses are carried out. Rates of absences and rates of diagnoses associated with absences are analyzed by occupation and other relevant variables. They may be compared with the disease experience of different groups within the DOE work force and with populations that do not work for DOE to identify disease patterns or clusters that may be associated with work activities. This amended annual report corrects errors in the initial release of the BNL report for 1994. In this annual report, the 1994 morbidity data for BNL are summarized.

  9. The Brookhaven National Laboratory filter pack system for collection and determination of air pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leahy, D.F.; Klotz, P.J.; Springston, S.R.; Daum, P.H.

    1995-04-01

    A filter pack system for sampling trace constituents in the atmosphere from aircraft and ground-based measurement platforms has been developed. The system simultaneously and quantitatively collects atmospheric aerosol, nitric acid, and sulfur dioxide using three sequential filter stages. The quartz aerosol filter is routinely analyzed for sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and hydrogen ions, and specifically for sulfuric acid. The sodium chloride filter is analyzed for nitrate ion (from collected nitric acid), and the carbonate-glycerine filter for sulfate ion (from collected sulfur dioxide). Details of the procedures used for filter preparation, sampling, extraction and analysis are given.

  10. Investigation of ISIS and Brookhaven National Laboratory ion source electrodes after extended operationa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettry, J.; Alessi, J.; Faircloth, D.; Gerardin, A.; Kalvas, T.; Pereira, H.; Sgobba, S.

    2012-02-01

    Linac4 accelerator of Centre Européen de Recherches Nucléaires is under construction and a RF-driven H- ion source is being developed. The beam current requirement for Linac4 is very challenging: 80 mA must be provided. Cesiated plasma discharge ion sources such as Penning or magnetron sources are also potential candidates. Accelerator ion sources must achieve typical reliability figures of 95% and above. Investigating and understanding the underlying mechanisms involved with source failure or ageing is critical when selecting the ion source technology. Plasma discharge driven surface ion sources rely on molybdenum cathodes. Deformation of the cathode surfaces is visible after extended operation periods. A metallurgical investigation of an ISIS ion source is presented. The origin of the deformation is twofold: Molybdenum sputtering by cesium ions digs few tenths of mm cavities while a growth of molybdenum is observed in the immediate vicinity. The molybdenum growth under hydrogen atmosphere is hard and loosely bound to the bulk. It is, therefore, likely to peel off and be transported within the plasma volume. The observation of the cathode, anode, and extraction electrodes of the magnetron source operated at BNL for two years are presented. A beam simulation of H-, electrons, and Cs- ions was performed with the IBSimu code package to qualitatively explain the observations. This paper describes the operation conditions of the ion sources and discusses the metallurgical analysis and beam simulation results.

  11. Investigation of ISIS and Brookhaven National Laboratory ion source electrodes after extended operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lettry, J.; Gerardin, A.; Pereira, H.; Sgobba, S. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Alessi, J. [BNL, P.O. Box 5000, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Faircloth, D. [RAL, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Kalvas, T. [University of Jyvaskyla, P.O.Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)

    2012-02-15

    Linac4 accelerator of Centre Europeen de Recherches Nucleaires is under construction and a RF-driven H{sup -} ion source is being developed. The beam current requirement for Linac4 is very challenging: 80 mA must be provided. Cesiated plasma discharge ion sources such as Penning or magnetron sources are also potential candidates. Accelerator ion sources must achieve typical reliability figures of 95% and above. Investigating and understanding the underlying mechanisms involved with source failure or ageing is critical when selecting the ion source technology. Plasma discharge driven surface ion sources rely on molybdenum cathodes. Deformation of the cathode surfaces is visible after extended operation periods. A metallurgical investigation of an ISIS ion source is presented. The origin of the deformation is twofold: Molybdenum sputtering by cesium ions digs few tenths of mm cavities while a growth of molybdenum is observed in the immediate vicinity. The molybdenum growth under hydrogen atmosphere is hard and loosely bound to the bulk. It is, therefore, likely to peel off and be transported within the plasma volume. The observation of the cathode, anode, and extraction electrodes of the magnetron source operated at BNL for two years are presented. A beam simulation of H{sup -}, electrons, and Cs{sup -} ions was performed with the IBSimu code package to qualitatively explain the observations. This paper describes the operation conditions of the ion sources and discusses the metallurgical analysis and beam simulation results.

  12. Investigation of ISIS and Brookhaven National Laboratory ion source electrodes after extended operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lettry J.; Alessi J.; Faircloth, D.; Gerardin, A.; Kalvas, T.; Pereira, H.; Sgobba, S.

    2012-02-23

    Linac4 accelerator of Centre Europeen de Recherches Nucleaires is under construction and a RF-driven H{sup -} ion source is being developed. The beam current requirement for Linac4 is very challenging: 80 mA must be provided. Cesiated plasma discharge ion sources such as Penning or magnetron sources are also potential candidates. Accelerator ion sources must achieve typical reliability figures of 95% and above. Investigating and understanding the underlying mechanisms involved with source failure or ageing is critical when selecting the ion source technology. Plasma discharge driven surface ion sources rely on molybdenum cathodes. Deformation of the cathode surfaces is visible after extended operation periods. A metallurgical investigation of an ISIS ion source is presented. The origin of the deformation is twofold: Molybdenum sputtering by cesium ions digs few tenths of mm cavities while a growth of molybdenum is observed in the immediate vicinity. The molybdenum growth under hydrogen atmosphere is hard and loosely bound to the bulk. It is, therefore, likely to peel off and be transported within the plasma volume. The observation of the cathode, anode, and extraction electrodes of the magnetron source operated at BNL for two years are presented. A beam simulation of H{sup -}, electrons, and Cs{sup -} ions was performed with the IBSimu code package to qualitatively explain the observations. This paper describes the operation conditions of the ion sources and discusses the metallurgical analysis and beam simulation results.

  13. Investigation of ISIS and Brookhaven National Laboratory ion source electrodes after extended operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettry, J; Alessi, J; Faircloth, D; Gerardin, A; Kalvas, T; Pereira, H; Sgobba, S

    2012-02-01

    Linac4 accelerator of Centre Européen de Recherches Nucléaires is under construction and a RF-driven H(-) ion source is being developed. The beam current requirement for Linac4 is very challenging: 80 mA must be provided. Cesiated plasma discharge ion sources such as Penning or magnetron sources are also potential candidates. Accelerator ion sources must achieve typical reliability figures of 95% and above. Investigating and understanding the underlying mechanisms involved with source failure or ageing is critical when selecting the ion source technology. Plasma discharge driven surface ion sources rely on molybdenum cathodes. Deformation of the cathode surfaces is visible after extended operation periods. A metallurgical investigation of an ISIS ion source is presented. The origin of the deformation is twofold: Molybdenum sputtering by cesium ions digs few tenths of mm cavities while a growth of molybdenum is observed in the immediate vicinity. The molybdenum growth under hydrogen atmosphere is hard and loosely bound to the bulk. It is, therefore, likely to peel off and be transported within the plasma volume. The observation of the cathode, anode, and extraction electrodes of the magnetron source operated at BNL for two years are presented. A beam simulation of H(-), electrons, and Cs(-) ions was performed with the IBSimu code package to qualitatively explain the observations. This paper describes the operation conditions of the ion sources and discusses the metallurgical analysis and beam simulation results.

  14. The electron lens test bench for the relativistic heavy ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, X., E-mail: xgu@bnl.gov; Altinbas, F.Z.; Beebe, E.; Fischer, W.; Frak, B.M.; Gassner, D.M.; Hamdi, K.; Hock, J.; Hoff, L.; Kankiya, P.; Lambiase, R.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Mi, J.; Miller, T.; Montag, C.; Nemesure, S.; Okamura, M.; Olsen, R.H.; Pikin, A.I.; and others

    2014-04-11

    To compensate for the beam–beam effects from the proton–proton interactions at the two interaction points IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we are constructing two electron lenses (e-lenses) that we plan to install in the interaction region IR10. Before installing them, the electron gun, collector, instrumentation were tested and the electron beam properties were qualified on an electron lens test bench. We will present the test results and discuss our measurement of the electron beam current and of the electron gun perveance. We achieved a maximum current of 1 A with 5 kV energy for both the pulsed- and the DC-beam (which is a long turn-by-turn pulse beam). We measured beam transverse profiles with an yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) screen and pinhole detector, and compared those to simulated beam profiles. Measurements of the pulsed electron beam stability were obtained by measuring the modulator voltage.

  15. The electron lens test bench for the relativistic heavy ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, X.; Altinbas, F. Z.; Beebe, E.; Fischer, W.; Frak, B. M.; Gassner, D. M.; Hamdi, K.; Hock, J.; Hoff, L.; Kankiya, P.; Lambiase, R.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Mi, J.; Miller, T.; Montag, C.; Nemesure, S.; Okamura, M.; Olsen, R. H.; Pikin, A. I.; Raparia, D.; Rosas, P. J.; Sandberg, J.; Tan, Y.; Theisen, C.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, W.

    2014-04-01

    To compensate for the beam-beam effects from the proton-proton interactions at the two interaction points IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we are constructing two electron lenses (e-lenses) that we plan to install in the interaction region IR10. Before installing them, the electron gun, collector, instrumentation were tested and the electron beam properties were qualified on an electron lens test bench. We will present the test results and discuss our measurement of the electron beam current and of the electron gun perveance. We achieved a maximum current of 1 A with 5 kV energy for both the pulsed- and the DC-beam (which is a long turn-by-turn pulse beam). We measured beam transverse profiles with an yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) screen and pinhole detector, and compared those to simulated beam profiles. Measurements of the pulsed electron beam stability were obtained by measuring the modulator voltage.

  16. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY INSTRUMENTATION DIVISION, R AND D PROGRAMS, FACILITIES, STAFF.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    INSTRUMENTATION DIVISION STAFF

    1999-06-01

    To develop state-of-the-art instrumentation required for experimental research programs at BNL, and to maintain the expertise and facilities in specialized high technology areas essential for this work. Development of facilities is motivated by present BNL research programs and anticipated future directions of BNL research. The Division's research efforts also have a significant impact on programs throughout the world that rely on state-of-the-art radiation detectors and readout electronics. Our staff scientists are encouraged to: Become involved in challenging problems in collaborations with other scientists; Offer unique expertise in solving problems; and Develop new devices and instruments when not commercially available. Scientists from other BNL Departments are encouraged to bring problems and ideas directly to the Division staff members with the appropriate expertise. Division staff is encouraged to become involved with research problems in other Departments to advance the application of new ideas in instrumentation. The Division Head integrates these efforts when they evolve into larger projects, within available staff and budget resources, and defines the priorities and direction with concurrence of appropriate Laboratory program leaders. The Division Head also ensures that these efforts are accompanied by strict adherence to all ES and H regulatory mandates and policies of the Laboratory. The responsibility for safety and environmental protection is integrated with supervision of particular facilities and conduct of operations.

  17. Paving the way to personalized medicine. Production of some theragnostic radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.

    2011-07-01

    This paper introduces a relatively novel paradigm that involves specific individual radionuclides or radionuclide pairs that have emissions that allow pre-therapy low-dose imaging plus higher-dose therapy in the same patient. We have made an attempt to sort out and organize a number of such theragnostic radionuclides and radionuclide pairs that may potentially bring us closer to the age-long dream of personalized medicine for performing tailored low-dose molecular imaging (SPECT/CT or PET/CT) to provide the necessary pre-therapy information on biodistribution, dosimetry, the limiting or critical organ or tissue, and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), etc. If the imaging results then warrant it, it would be possible to perform higher-dose targeted molecular therapy in the same patient with the same radiopharmaceutical. A major problem that remains yet to be fully resolved is the lack of availability, in sufficient quantities, of a majority of the best candidate theragnostic radionuclides in a no-carrier-added (NCA) form. A brief description of the recently developed new or modified methods at BNL for the production of four theragnostic radionuclides, whose nuclear, physical, and chemical characteristics seem to show great promise for personalized cancer therapy are described.

  18. Paving the way to personalized medicine: production of some theragnostic radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava S. C.

    2011-06-06

    This paper introduces a relatively novel paradigm that involves specific individual radionuclides or radionuclide pairs that have emissions that allow pre-therapy low-dose imaging plus higher-dose therapy in the same patient. We have made an attempt to sort out and organize a number of such theragnostic radionuclides and radionuclide pairs that may potentially bring us closer to the age-long dream of personalized medicine for performing tailored low-dose molecular imaging (SPECT/CT or PET/CT) to provide the necessary pre-therapy information on biodistribution, dosimetry, the limiting or critical organ or tissue, and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), etc. If the imaging results then warrant it, it would be possible to perform higher-dose targeted molecular therapy in the same patient with the same radiopharmaceutical. A major problem that remains yet to be fully resolved is the lack of availability, in sufficient quantities, of a majority of the best candidate theragnostic radionuclides in a no-carrier-added (NCA) form. A brief description of the recently developed new or modified methods at BNL for the production of four theragnostic radionuclides, whose nuclear, physical, and chemical characteristics seem to show great promise for personalized cancer therapy are described.

  19. Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  20. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  1. Breast tomography with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Silvia; Arfelli, Fulvia; Dreossi, Diego; Montanari, Francesco; Longo, Renata; Olivo, Alessandro; Poropat, Paolo; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Palma, Ludovico D.; Castelli, Edoardo

    2002-05-01

    A feasibility study of breast CT with synchrotron radiation is currently being carried on at Elettra, the Trieste synchrotron radiation facility. Breast CT cannot be implemented easily with conventional radiographic tubes, due to the high dose that would be delivered to the breast by a polychromatic X-ray spectrum. The possibility of tuning the beam energy, available at a synchrotron radiation beamline, allows a significant reduction in the delivered dose, and at the same time the use of monochromatic beams avoids beam hardening artifacts on the reconstructed image. Images of in vitro breast tissue samples have been acquired by means of a high efficiency linear array detector coupled to a VLSI single photon counting readout electronics. The pixel width, determining the pixel size of the reconstructed image, is 200 micrometers , while the pixel height, determining the CT slice thickness, is 300 micrometers . Tomograms have been reconstructed by means of standard filtered backprojection algorithms. Images of normal and pathologic breast tissue samples show a good visibility of glandular structure. The delivered dose was in all cases comparable to the one delivered in clinical planar mammography. Due to the promising results we obtained, in vivo studies are under evaluation.

  2. A Remote and Virtual Synchrotron Beamline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, J. M.; Alp, E.; Sturhahn, W.

    2012-12-01

    National facilities offer one-of-a-kind opportunities to apply state-of-the-art experimental techniques to the pressing scientific problems of today. Yet, few students are able to experience research projects at national facilities due to limited accessibility caused in part by limited involvement in the local academic institution, constrained working areas at the experimental stations, and/or travel costs. We present a virtual and remote beam-line for Earth science studies using nuclear resonant and inelastic x-ray scattering methods at Sector 3 of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Off-site students have the capability of controlling their measurements via secure internet connections and webcams. Students can access a 'view only mode' for ease of interaction and safety-control. More experienced users have exclusive control of the experiment and can remotely change variables within the experimental setup. Students may also access the virtual aspects these experiments by simulating certain conditions with our newly developed software. We evaluate such a tool by giving "before" and "after" assignments to students at different levels. These levels include high-school students from the Pasadena and greater Los Angeles area school districts, undergraduate students from Caltech's SURF/MURF program, and graduate students at Caltech. We specifically target underrepresented groups. Our results thus far show that the capabilities offered by our remote and virtual beamline show improved knowledge and understanding of applying experimental-based studies at the synchrotron to solve problems in the Earth sciences.

  3. National Nuclear Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 National Nuclear Physics Summer School (NNPSS) will be held from Monday July 18 through Friday July 29, 2016, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The summer school is open to graduate students and postdocs within a few years of their PhD (on either side) with a strong interest in experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. The program will include the following speakers: Accelerators and Detectors - Elke-Caroline Aschenauer, Brookhaven National Laboratory Data Analysis - Michael Williams, MIT Double Beta Decay - Lindley Winslow, MIT Electron-Ion Collider - Abhay Deshpande, Stony Brook University Fundamental Symmetries - Vincenzo Cirigliano, Los Alamos National Laboratory Hadronic Spectroscopy - Matthew Shepherd, Indiana University Hadronic Structure - Jianwei Qiu, Brookhaven National Laboratory Hot Dense Nuclear Matter 1 - Jamie Nagle, Colorado University Hot Dense Nuclear Matter 2 - Wilke van der Schee, MIT Lattice QCD - Sinead Ryan, Trinity College Dublin Neutrino Theory - Cecil...

  4. Manipulating Light to Understand and Improve Solar Cells (494th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisaman, Matthew [BNL, Sustainable Energy Technologies Department

    2014-04-16

    Energy consumption around the world is projected to approximately triple by the end of the century, according to the 2005 Report from the U.S. Department of Energy's Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization. Much will change in those next 86 years, but for all the power the world needs—for everything from manufacturing and transportation to air conditioning and charging cell phone batteries—improved solar cells will be crucial to meet this future energy demand with renewable energy sources. At Brookhaven Lab, scientists are probing solar cells and exploring variations within the cells—variations that are so small they are measured in billionths of a meter—in order to make increasingly efficient solar cells and ultimately help reduce the overall costs of deploying solar power plants. Dr. Eisaman will discuss DOE's Sunshot Initiative, which aims to reduce the cost of solar cell-generated electricity by 2020. He will also discuss how he and collaborators at Brookhaven Lab are probing different material compositions within solar cells, measuring how efficiently they collect electrical charge, helping to develop a new class of solar cells, and improving solar-cell manufacturing processes.

  5. Synchrotron-driven spallation sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bryant, P J

    1996-01-01

    The use of synchrotrons for pulsed neutron spallation sources is an example of scientific and technological spin-off from the accelerator development for particle physics. Accelerator-driven sources provide an alternative to the continuous-flux, nuclear reactors that currently furnish the majority of neutrons for research and development. Although the present demand for neutrons can be adequately met by the existing reactors, this situation is unlikely to continue due to the increasing severity of safety regulations and the declared policies of many countries to close down their reactors within the next decade or so. Since the demand for neutrons as a research tool is, in any case,expected to grow, there has been a corresponding interest in sources that are synchrotron-driven or linac-driven with a pulse compression ring and currently several design studies are being made. These accelerator-driven sources also have the advantage of a time structure with a high peak neutron flux. The basic requirement is for a...

  6. Wide Band-Gap Semiconductor Radiation Detectors: Science Fiction, Horror Story, or Headlines (460th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Ralph (BNL Nonproliferation and National Security Department)

    2010-08-18

    With radiation constantly occurring from natural sources all around us -- from food, building materials, and rays from the sun, to name a few -- detecting radiotracers for medical procedures and other radiation to keep people safe is not easy. In order to make better use of radiation to diagnose or treat certain health conditions, or to track radiological materials being transported, stored, and used, the quest is on to develop improved radiation detectors. James gives a brief introduction on radiation detection and explain how it is used in applications ranging from medical to homeland security. He then discusses how new materials and better ways to analyze them here at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and the future NSLS-II will lead to a new class of radiation detectors that will provide unprecedented advances in medical and industrial imaging, basic science, and the nonproliferation of nuclear materials.

  7. Synchrotron applications in wood preservation and deterioration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara L. Illman

    2003-01-01

    Several non-intrusive synchrotron techniques are being used to detect and study wood decay. The techniques use high intensity synchrotron-generated X-rays to determine the atomic structure of materials with imaging, diffraction, and absorption. Some of the techniques are X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XFS), X-ray...

  8. Synchrotron radiation absorber for high density loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anashin, V. V.; Kuzminych, V. S.; Trakhtenberg, E. M.; Zholents, A. A.

    1991-10-01

    A design of a special synchrotron radiation absorber for the storage ring VEPP-4M is presented. The density of the synchrotron radiation power on the absorber surface is up to 500 W/mm 2. The absorber is made from a beryllium plate, brazed inside to the copper vacuum chamber, which is intensively water-cooled from outside.

  9. High pressure and synchrotron radiation satellite workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, J.; Guignot, N.; Morard, G.; Mezouar, M.; Andrault, D.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Sturhahn, W.; Daniel, I.; Reynard, B.; Simionovici, A.; Sanchez Valle, C.; Martinez, I.; Kantor, I.; Dubrovinsky, I.; Mccammon, C.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; Kurnosiv, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Goncharenko, I.; Loubeyre, P.; Desgreniers, S.; Weck, G.; Yoo, C.S.; Iota, V.; Park, J.; Cynn, H.; Gorelli, F.; Toulemonde, P.; Machon, D.; Merlen, A.; San Miguel, A.; Amboage, M.; Aquilanti, G.; Mathon, O.; Pascarelli, S.; Itie, J.P.; Mcmillan, P.F.; Trapananti, A.; Di Cicco, A.; Panfilis, S. de; Filipponi, A.; Kreisel, J.; Bouvier, P.; Dkhil, B.; Chaabane, B.; Rosner, H.; Koudela, D.; Schwarz, U.; Handestein, A.; Hanfland, M.; Opahle, I.; Koepernik, K.; Kuzmin, M.; Mueller, K.H.; Mydosh, J.; Richter, M.; Hejny, C.; Falconi, S.; Lundegaard, L.F.; Mcmahon, M.I; Loa, I.; Syassen, K.; Wang, X.; Roth, H.; Lorenz, T.; Farber Daniel, I.; Antonangeli Daniele, I.; Krisch, M.; Badro, J.; Fiquet, G.; Occelli, F.; Mao, W.L.; Mao, H.K.; Eng, P.; Kao, C.C.; Shu, J.F.; Hemley, R.J.; Tse, J.S.; Yao, Y.; Deen, P.P.; Paolasini, I.; Braithwaite, D.; Kernavanois, N.; Lapertot, G.; Rupprecht, K.; Leupold, O.; Ponkratz, U.; Wortmann, G.; Beraud, A.; Krisch, M.; Farber, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Aracne, C.; Zarestky, J.L.; Mcqueeney, R.; Mathon, O.; Baudelet, F.; Decremps, F.; Itie, J.P.; Nataf, I.; Pascarelli, S.; Polian, A

    2006-07-01

    The workshop is dedicated to recent advances on science at high pressure at third generation synchrotron sources. A variety of experiments using synchrotron radiation techniques including X-ray diffraction, EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure), inelastic X-ray scattering, Compton scattering and Moessbauer spectroscopy of crystalline, liquid or amorphous samples, are reported. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations.

  10. High-Intensity Synchrotron Radiation Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Suetsugu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Various effects of intense synchrotron radiation on the performance of particle accelerators, especially for storage rings, are discussed. Following a brief introduction to synchrotron radiation, the basic concepts of heat load, gas load, electron emission, and the countermeasures against these effects are discussed.

  11. Highway accident involving radiopharmaceuticals near Brookhaven, Mississippi on December 3, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, P.B.; Mount, M.E.; Schwartz, M.W.

    1985-04-01

    A rear-end collision occurred between a passenger automobile and a luggage trailer carrying 84 packages, 76 of which contained radiopharmaceuticals, on US Highway 84 near Brookhaven, Mississippi on the afternoon of December 3, 1983. The purpose of this report is to document the mechanical circumstances of the accident, confirm the nature and quantity of radioactive materials involved, and assess the nature of the physical environment to which the packages were exposed and the response of the packages. The report consists of three major sections. The first deals wth the nature and circumstances of the accident and findings of fact. The second gives an accounting and description of the materials involved and the consequences of their exposure. The third gives an assessment and analysis of the mechanisms of damage and the conclusions which may be drawn from the investigation. 4 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Radiation dosimetry for NCT facilities at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, N.E.; Hu, J.P.; Greenberg, D.D.; Reciniello, R.N.

    1998-12-31

    Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) is a 3 mega-watt (MW) heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for medical and biological studies and became operational in 1959. Over time, the BMRR was modified to provide thermal and epithermal neutron beams suitable for research studies. NCT studies have been performed at both the epithermal neutron irradiation facility (ENIF) on the east side of the BMRR reactor core and the thermal neutron irradiation facility (TNIF) on the west side of the core. Neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry performed from 1994 to the present in both facilities are described and the results are presented and discussed.

  13. Carbyne formation by synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaito, C.; Kimura, Y.; Hanamoto, K.; Sasaki, M.; Kimura, S.; Nakada, T.; Saito, Y.; Koike, C.; Nakayama, Y. E-mail: nakayamy@se.ritsumei.ac.jp

    2001-07-21

    Thin carbon films prepared by vacuum evaporation using the arc method were mounted on a standard electron microscope copper grid. They were irradiated by white synchrotron radiation (SR) beam by the use of cylindrical and toroidal mirrors. The irradiated film was examined using a high-resolution electron microscope. {alpha} and {alpha}+{beta} mixture carbyne crystals were grown in round and the elongated shapes. The round crystals were composed of 5-10 nm crystallites of a carbyne form. The elongated crystal grew into a single crystal 100 nm in size. The c-axes of both grown crystals were oblique to the film. The growth of the carbynes was discussed as being the result of nucleation due to graphite microcrystallites formed by SR beam irradiation.

  14. Beam dumps design and local radiation protection at TERA synchrotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, A; Campi, F; Agosteo, S

    2005-01-01

    The realisation of the National Center of Hadrontherapy was funded by the Italian Government in 2002. The Centre will be built in the area of Pavia (Italy). The synchrotron designed in the framework of this programme will accelerate protons and carbon ions up to 250 MeV and 400 MeV u(-1), respectively. Some of the main aspects which were taken into account in the design of the acceleration system are the patient's safety and the beam control. From this point of view an important role is played by the beam dumps in the synchrotron ring and upstream of the extraction system. In particular, an horizontal and a vertical beam dump will be installed in the synchrotron ring: the former will be used for lowering the beam intensity and the latter for beam abortion. The dump at the extraction will absorb the particles during the mounting and the falling ramps of the synchrotron magnetic cycle, thus extracting only the flat top of the ion spill. Beam dumps can produce intense fields of secondary radiation (neutrons, charged light-hadrons and photons) and high rates of induced activity, since they can absorb the beam completely. Usually they have to be shielded to protect the electronics during machine operation and to attenuate the radiation dose below the limits imposed by the law when the personnel access to the synchrotron hall. The part of the shielding design of the beam dumps concerning with the acceleration of protons was made using Monte Carlo simulations with the FLUKA code. Both induced activity and secondary radiation were taken into account. The shields against secondary radiation produced by carbon ions were designed, referring only to secondary neutrons, taking double-differential distributions from the literature as sources for the FLUKA simulations. The induced activity from carbon ions interactions was estimated analytically, using the data generated by the EPAX 2 code. The dose-equivalent rates from the induced radionuclides were calculated at 1 m from the

  15. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Quarkonium Production in Elementary and Heavy Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumitru, A.; Lourenco, C.; Petreczky, P.; Qiu, J., Ruan, L.

    2011-08-03

    Understanding the structure of the hadron is of fundamental importance in subatomic physics. Production of heavy quarkonia is arguably one of the most fascinating subjects in strong interaction physics. It offers unique perspectives into the formation of QCD bound states. Heavy quarkonia are among the most studied particles both theoretically and experimentally. They have been, and continue to be, the focus of measurements in all high energy colliders around the world. Because of their distinct multiple mass scales, heavy quarkonia were suggested as a probe of the hot quark-gluon matter produced in heavy-ion collisions; and their production has been one of the main subjects of the experimental heavy-ion programs at the SPS and RHIC. However, since the discovery of J/psi at Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory over 36 years ago, theorists still have not been able to fully understand the production mechanism of heavy quarkonia, although major progresses have been made in recent years. With this in mind, a two-week program on quarkonium production was organized at BNL on June 6-17, 2011. Many new experimental data from LHC and from RHIC were presented during the program, including results from the LHC heavy ion run. To analyze and correctly interpret these measurements, and in order to quantify properties of the hot matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, it is necessary to improve our theoretical understanding of quarkonium production. Therefore, a wide range of theoretical aspects on the production mechanism in the vacuum as well as in cold nuclear and hot quark-gluon medium were discussed during the program from the controlled calculations in QCD and its effective theories such as NRQCD to various models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. The scientific program was divided into three major scientific parts: basic production mechanism for heavy quarkonium in vacuum or in high energy elementary collisions; the

  16. Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, R.T.

    1984-06-01

    The Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop was held to consider two vacuum-related problems that bear on the design of storage rings and beam lines for synchrotron radiation facilities. These problems are gas desorption from the vacuum chamber walls and carbon deposition on optical components. Participants surveyed existing knowledge on these topics and recommended studies that should be performed as soon as possible to provide more definitive experimental data on these topics. This data will permit optimization of the final design of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its associated beam lines. It also should prove useful for other synchrotron radiation facilities as well.

  17. Experimental demonstration of the induction synchrotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Ken; Arakida, Yoshio; Dixit, Tanuja; Iwashita, Taiki; Kono, Tadaaki; Nakamura, Eiji; Otsuka, Kazunori; Shimosaki, Yoshito; Torikai, Kota; Wake, Masayoshi

    2007-02-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of the induction synchrotron, the concept of which has been proposed as a future accelerator for the second generation of neutrino factory or hadron collider. The induction synchrotron supports a superbunch and a superbunch permits more charge to be accelerated while observing the constraints of the transverse space-charge limit. By using a newly developed induction acceleration system instead of radio-wave acceleration devices, a single proton bunch injected from the 500 MeV booster ring and captured by the barrier bucket created by the induction step voltages was accelerated to 6 GeV in the KEK proton synchrotron.

  18. Electric dipole moment planning with a resurrected BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron electron analog ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talman, Richard M.; Talman, John D.

    2015-07-01

    There has been much recent interest in directly measuring the electric dipole moments (EDM) of the proton and the electron, because of their possible importance in the present day observed matter/antimatter imbalance in the Universe. Such a measurement will require storing a polarized beam of "frozen spin" particles, 15 MeV electrons or 230 MeV protons, in an all-electric storage ring. Only one such relativistic electric accelerator has ever been built—the 10 MeV "electron analog" ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1954; it can also be referred to as the "AGS analog" ring to make clear it was a prototype for the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) proton ring under construction at that time at BNL. (Its purpose was to investigate nonlinear resonances as well as passage through "transition" with the newly invented alternating gradient proton ring design.) By chance this electron ring, long since dismantled and its engineering drawings disappeared, would have been appropriate both for measuring the electron EDM and to serve as an inexpensive prototype for the arguably more promising, but 10 times more expensive, proton EDM measurement. Today it is cheaper yet to "resurrect" the electron analog ring by simulating its performance computationally. This is one purpose for the present paper. Most existing accelerator simulation codes cannot be used for this purpose because they implicitly assume magnetic bending. The new ual/eteapot code, described in detail in an accompanying paper, has been developed for modeling storage ring performance, including spin evolution, in electric rings. Illustrating its use, comparing its predictions with the old observations, and describing new expectations concerning spin evolution and code performance, are other goals of the paper. To set up some of these calculations has required a kind of "archeological physics" to reconstitute the detailed electron analog lattice design from a 1991 retrospective report by Plotkin as well

  19. Molecular photoemission studies using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truesdale, C.M.

    1983-04-01

    The angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons were measured by electron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations to interpret the electronic behavior of photoionization for molecular systems.

  20. Panel backs next-generation synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    Service, R F

    1999-01-01

    A key federal panel recommended continued research into development of a fourth-generation synchrotron. It would be capable of creating x-ray pulses billions of times more intense than current designs (1 page).

  1. Solenoid and Synchrotron radiation effects in CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Dalena, B; Tomás, R; Angal-Kalinin, D

    2010-01-01

    The emission of Synchrotron Radiation in the CLIC BDS is one of the major limitations of the machine performance. An extensive revision of this phenomenon is presented with special emphasis on the Interaction point (IP) solenoid.

  2. Fiber structural analysis by synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, J I; Kikutani, T

    2003-01-01

    Topics of fiber structural analysis by synchrotron radiation are explained. There are only three synchrotron radiation facilities in the world, SPring-8 (Super Photon ring-8) in Japan, APS (Advanced Photon Source) in U.S.A. and ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility) in France. Online measurement of melt spinning process of PET and Nylon6 is explained in detail. Polypropylene and PBO (poly-p-phenylenebenzobisoxazole) was measured by WAXD (Wide Angle X-ray Diffraction)/SAXS (Small Angle X-ray Scattering) at the same time. Some examples of measure of drawing process of fiber are described. The structure formation process of spider's thread was measured. Micro beam of X-ray of synchrotron facility was improved and it attained to 65nm small angle resolving power by 10 mu m beamsize. (S.Y.)

  3. Simulation of synchrotron motion with rf noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemann, B.T.; Forest, E.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    1986-08-01

    The theoretical formulation is described that is behind an algorithm for synchrotron phase-space tracking with rf noise and some preliminary simulation results of bunch diffusion under rf noise obtained by actual tracking.

  4. Precision Calibration of Infrared Synchrotron Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Maltsev, A A; Maslova, M V

    2003-01-01

    The technique of calibration of synchrotron radiation precision detectors on a tungsten source based on similarity (close similarity) of character of spectral distributions of synchrotron and thermal radiations is given. The characteristics of various commonly used lamps, used as "standard" ones, are given. The errors of measurements are analyzed. The detectors are intended for absolute measurements of the number of electrons in a ring-shaped bunch.

  5. Modulation of synchrotron radiation by acoustic oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Mkrtchyan, A R; Kocharyan, L A; Mirzoyan, V K

    1986-01-01

    By means of a quartz single crystal excited by piezoelectric oscillations, the modulation of synchrotron radiation reflected from the quartz planes (1011) is realized for frequencies ranging from 1 Hz to 15 kHz when the Bragg condition is satisfied. The wavelength of synchrotron radiation ranged from 0.3 to 12A. The patterns of modulated beams taken from oscillograph and analyzer screens are shown.

  6. Wakefields in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billinghurst, Brant E.; Bergstrom, J. C.; Baribeau, C.; Batten, T.; Dallin, L.; May, Tim E.; Vogt, J. M.; Wurtz, Ward A.; Warnock, Robert L.; Bizzozero, D. A.; Kramer, S.; Michaelian, K. H.

    2016-06-01

    When the electron bunches in a storage ring are sufficiently short the electrons act coherently producing radiation several orders of magnitude more intense than normal synchrotron radiation. This is referred to as Coherent Syncrotron Radiation (CSR). Due to the potential of CSR to provide a good source of Terahertz radiation for our users, the Canadian Light Source (CLS) has been researching the production and application of CSR. CSR has been produced at the CLS for many years, and has been used for a number of applications. However, resonances that permeate the spectrum at wavenumber intervals of 0.074 cm-1, and are highly stable under changes in the machine setup, have hampered some experiments. Analogous resonances were predicted long ago in an idealized theory. Through experiments and further calculations we elucidate the resonance and wakefield mechanisms in the CLS vacuum chamber. The wakefield is observed directly in the 30-110 GHz range by rf diodes. These results are consistent with observations made by the interferometer in the THz range. Also discussed will be some practical examples of the application of CSR for the study of condensed phase samples using both transmission and Photoacoustic techniques.

  7. Synchrotron radiation from massless charge

    CERN Document Server

    Gal'tsov, D V

    2015-01-01

    Classical radiation power from an accelerated massive charge diverges in the zero-mass limit, while some general arguments suggest that strictly massless charge does not not radiate at all. On the other hand, the regularized classical radiation reaction force, though looking odd, is non-zero and finite. To clarify this controversy, we consider radiation problem in massless scalar quantum electrodynamics in the external magnetic field. In this framework, synchrotron radiation is found to be non-zero, finite, and essentially quantum. Its spectral distribution is calculated using Schwinger's proper time technique for {\\em ab initio} massless particle of zero spin. Provided $E^2\\gg eH$, the maximum in the spectrum is shown to be at $\\hbar \\omega=E/3$, and the average photon energy is $4E/9$. The normalized spectrum is universal, depending neither on $E$ nor on $H$. Quantum nature of radiation makes classical radiation reaction equation meaningless for massless charge. Our results are consistent with the view (sup...

  8. Synchrotron radiation from massless charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Gal'tsov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Classical radiation power from an accelerated massive charge diverges in the zero-mass limit, while some authors suggest that strictly massless charge does not radiate at all. On the other hand, the regularized classical radiation reaction force, though looking odd, is non-zero and finite. To clarify this controversy, we consider radiation problem in massless scalar quantum electrodynamics in the external magnetic field. In this framework, synchrotron radiation is found to be non-zero, finite, and essentially quantum. Its spectral distribution is calculated using Schwinger's proper time technique for ab initio massless particle of zero spin. Provided E2≫eH, the maximum in the spectrum is shown to be at ħω=E/3, and the average photon energy is 4E/9. The normalized spectrum is universal, depending neither on E nor on H. Quantum nature of radiation makes classical radiation reaction equation meaningless for massless charge. Classical theory is reliable only as providing the low-frequency part of the true quantum radiation spectrum.

  9. Optical diffusion property of cerumen from ear canal and correlation to metal content measured by synchrotron x-ray absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Todd; Dehipawala, Sumudu; Cheung, E.; Golebiewska, U.; Schneider, P.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Kokkinos, D.; Lieberman, D.; Dehipawala, Sunil; Cheung, T.

    2012-03-01

    Human (and other mammals) would secrete cerumen (ear wax) to protect the skin of the ear canal against pathogens and insects. The studies of biodiversity of pathogen in human include intestine microbe colony, belly button microbe colony, etc. Metals such as zinc and iron are essentials to bio-molecular pathways and would be related to the underlying pathogen vitality. This project studies the biodiversity of cerumen via its metal content and aims to develop an optical probe for metal content characterization. The optical diffusion mean free path and absorption of human cerumen samples dissolved in solvent have been measured in standard transmission measurements. EXFAS and XANES have been measured at Brookhaven Synchrotron Light Source for the determination of metal contents, presumably embedded within microbes/insects/skin cells. The results show that a calibration procedure can be used to correlate the optical diffusion parameters to the metal content, thus expanding the diagnostic of cerumen in the study of human pathogen biodiversity without the regular use of a synchrotron light source. Although biodiversity measurements would not be seriously affected by dead microbes and absorption based method would do well, the scattering mean free path method would have potential to further study the cell based scattering centers (dead or live) via the information embedded in the speckle pattern in the deep-Fresnel zone.

  10. A Really Good Hammer: Quantification of Mass Transfer Using Perfluorocarbon Tracers (475th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Tom [BNL Environmental Sciences, Tracer Technology Group

    2012-02-15

    Brookhaven Lab’s perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology can be viewed as a hammer looking for nails. But, according to Tom Watson, leader of the Lab’s Tracer Technology Group in the Environmental Research and Technology Division (ERTD), “It’s a really good hammer!” The colorless, odorless and safe gases have a number of research uses, from modeling how airborne contaminants might move through urban canyons to help first responders plan their response to potential terrorist attacks and accidents to locating leaks in underground gas pipes. Their extremely low background level — detectable at one part per quadrillion — allows their transport to be easily tracked. Lab researchers used PFTs during the 2005 Urban Dispersion Program field studies in New York City, gathering data to help improve models of how a gas or chemical release might move around Manhattan’s tall buildings and canyons. Closer to home, scientists also used PFTs to make ventilation measurements in Bldg. 400 on the Lab site to provide data to test air flow models used in determining the effects of passive and active air exchange on the levels of indoor and outdoor air pollution, and to determine the effects of an accidental or intentional release of hazardous substances in or around buildings.

  11. What Goes Up Must Come Down: The Lifecycle of Convective Clouds (492nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Michael [BNL Environmental Sciences

    2014-02-19

    Some clouds look like cotton balls and others like anvils. Some bring rain, some snow and sleet, and others, just shade. But, whether big and billowy or dark and stormy, clouds affect far more than the weather each day. Armed with measurements of clouds’ updrafts and downdrafts—which resemble airflow in a convection oven—and many other atmospheric interactions, scientists from Brookhaven Lab and other institutions around the world are developing models that are crucial for understanding Earth’s climate and forecasting future climate change. During his lecture, Dr. Jensen provides an overview of the importance of clouds in the Earth’s climate system before explaining how convective clouds form, grow, and dissipate. His discussion includes findings from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), a major collaborative experiment between U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA scientists to document precipitation, clouds, winds, and moisture in 3-D for a holistic view of convective clouds and their environment.

  12. BESTIA (Brookhaven Experimental Supra-Terawatt Infrared at ATF) laser: A status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.; Babzien, Marcus; Pogorelsky, Igor V.

    2017-03-01

    Development of a next-generation CO2 laser aiming at 100 TW peak power at a wavelength of 10 µm ts underway at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A new laser facility is being deployed as part of the ATF-II upgrade. New high-pressure power amplifiers are being fabricated and assembled, while R&D continues with ATF's present 2 TW CO2 laser system. Our plan for increasing the peak laser power envisions several discrete steps in the upgrade. First will be demonstration of a 10 TW capability utilizing chirped pulse amplification, with an extended power amplifier chain filled with high-pressure isotopic gas. Further development aimed at a demonstration of 25 TW operation will require the addition of a nonlinear compressor system to shrink the pulse width below the nominal gain-bandwidth limit. These upgrades will then enable a longer-term R&D effort to achieve the 100 TW goal. Over the last two years, significant R&D effort has been focused on the development of chirped-pulse amplification, the study of the behavior of optical materials under the action of high-peak-power mid-IR pulses, and the optimization of the beam quality, which is required for nonlinear pulse compression. The results of this R&D have been implemented into the ongoing operation of the ATF's CO2 laser and have already benefited our users in their experimental programs.

  13. The Shape and Flow of Heavy Ion Collisions (490th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenke, Bjoern [BNL Physics Department

    2014-12-18

    The sun can’t do it, but colossal machines like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe sure can. Quarks and gluons make up protons and neutrons found in the nucleus of every atom in the universe. At heavy ion colliders like RHIC and the LHC, scientists can create matter more than 100,000 times hotter than the center of the sun—so hot that protons and neutrons melt into a plasma of quarks and gluons. The particle collisions and emerging quark-gluon plasma hold keys to understanding how these fundamental particles interact with each other, which helps explain how everything is held together—from atomic nuclei to human beings to the biggest stars—how all matter has mass, and what the universe looked like microseconds after the Big Bang. Dr. Schenke discusses theory that details the shape and structure of heavy ion collisions. He will also explain how this theory and data from experiments at RHIC and the LHC are being used to determine properties of the quark-gluon plasma.

  14. Reliable operation of the Brookhaven EBIS for highly charged ion production for RHIC and NSRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beebe, E., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Alessi, J., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Binello, S., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Kanesue, T., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; McCafferty, D., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Morris, J., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Okamura, M., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Pikin, A., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Ritter, J., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Schoepfer, R., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-01-09

    An Electron Beam Ion Source for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC EBIS) was commissioned at Brookhaven in September 2010 and since then it routinely supplies ions for RHIC and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) as the main source of highly charged ions from Helium to Uranium. Using three external primary ion sources for 1+ injection into the EBIS and an electrostatic injection beam line, ion species at the EBIS exit can be switched in 0.2 s. A total of 16 different ion species have been produced to date. The length and the capacity of the ion trap have been increased by 20% by extending the trap by two more drift tubes, compared with the original design. The fraction of Au{sup 32+} in the EBIS Au spectrum is approximately 12% for 70-80% electron beam neutralization and 8 pulses operation in a 5 Hertz train and 4-5 s super cycle. For single pulse per super cycle operation and 25% electron beam neutralization, the EBIS achieves the theoretical Au{sup 32+} fractional output of 18%. Long term stability has been very good with availability of the beam from RHIC EBIS during 2012 and 2014 RHIC runs approximately 99.8%.

  15. Reliable operation of the Brookhaven EBIS for highly charged ion production for RHIC and NSRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, E.; Alessi, J.; Binello, S.; Kanesue, T.; McCafferty, D.; Morris, J.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.; Ritter, J.; Schoepfer, R.

    2015-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Source for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC EBIS) was commissioned at Brookhaven in September 2010 and since then it routinely supplies ions for RHIC and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) as the main source of highly charged ions from Helium to Uranium. Using three external primary ion sources for 1+ injection into the EBIS and an electrostatic injection beam line, ion species at the EBIS exit can be switched in 0.2 s. A total of 16 different ion species have been produced to date. The length and the capacity of the ion trap have been increased by 20% by extending the trap by two more drift tubes, compared with the original design. The fraction of Au32+ in the EBIS Au spectrum is approximately 12% for 70-80% electron beam neutralization and 8 pulses operation in a 5 Hertz train and 4-5 s super cycle. For single pulse per super cycle operation and 25% electron beam neutralization, the EBIS achieves the theoretical Au32+ fractional output of 18%. Long term stability has been very good with availability of the beam from RHIC EBIS during 2012 and 2014 RHIC runs approximately 99.8%.

  16. 6th international conference on biophysics and synchrotron radiation. Program/Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittroff, Connie; Strasser, Susan Barr [lead editors

    1999-08-03

    This STI product consists of the Program/Abstracts book that was prepared for the participants in the Sixth International Conference on Biophysics and Synchrotron Radiation that was held August 4-8, 1998, at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. This book contains the full conference program and abstracts of the scientific presentations.

  17. Bringing Physics, Synchrotron Light and Probing Neutrons to the Public: A Collaborative Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micklavzina, Stanley; Almqvist, Monica; Sörensen, Stacey L.

    2014-01-01

    Stanley Micklavzina, a US physics educator on sabbatical, teams up with a Swedish national research laboratory, a synchrotron radiation experimental group and a university science centre to develop and create educational and public outreach projects. Descriptions of the physics, science centre displays and public demonstrations covering the…

  18. Bringing Physics, Synchrotron Light and Probing Neutrons to the Public: A Collaborative Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micklavzina, Stanley; Almqvist, Monica; Sörensen, Stacey L.

    2014-01-01

    Stanley Micklavzina, a US physics educator on sabbatical, teams up with a Swedish national research laboratory, a synchrotron radiation experimental group and a university science centre to develop and create educational and public outreach projects. Descriptions of the physics, science centre displays and public demonstrations covering the…

  19. Spatial Coherence of Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesini, S; Coisson, R

    2003-10-30

    Synchrotron Radiation (SR) has been widely used since the 80's as a tool for many applications of UV, soft X rays and hard X rays in condensed matter physics, chemistry and biology. The evolution of SR sources towards higher brightness has led to the design of low-emittance electron storage rings (emittance is the product of beam size and divergence), and the development of special source magnetic structures, as undulators. This means that more and more photons are available on a narrow bandwidth and on a small collimated beam; in other words there is the possibility of getting a high power in a coherent beam. In most applications, a monochromator is used, and the temporal coherence of the light is given by the monochromator bandwidth. With smaller and smaller sources, even without the use of collimators, the spatial coherence of the light has become appreciable, first in the UV and soft X ray range, and then also with hard X rays. This has made possible new or improved experiments in interferometry, microscopy, holography, correlation spectroscopy, etc. In view of these recent possibilities and applications, it is useful to review some basic concepts about spatial coherence of SR, and its measurement and applications. In particular we show how the spatial coherence properties of the radiation in the far field can be calculated with simple operations from the single-electron amplitude and the electron beam angular and position spreads. The gaussian approximation will be studied in detail for a discussion of the properties of the far field mutual coherence and the estimate of the coherence widths, and the comparison with the VanCittert-Zernike limit.

  20. Nation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Uffe

    2014-01-01

    Nation er et gammelt begreb, som kommer af det latinske ord for fødsel, natio. Nationalisme bygger på forestillingen om, at mennesker har én og kun én national identitet og har ret til deres egen nationalstat. Ordet og forestillingen er kun godt 200 år gammel, og i 1900-tallet har ideologien bredt...... sig over hele verden. Nationalisme er blevet global....

  1. 1994 activity report: Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K.; Dunn, L. [eds.

    1994-01-01

    The SSRL facility delivered 89% of the scheduled user beam to 25 experimental stations during 6.5 months of user running. Users from private industry were involved in 31% of these experiments. The SPEAR accelerator ran very well with no major component failures and an unscheduled down time of only 2.9%. In addition to this increased reliability, there was a significant improvement in the stability of the beam. The enhancements to the SPEAR orbit as part of a concerted three-year program were particularly noticeable to users. The standard deviation of beam movement (both planes) in the last part of the run was 80 microns, major progress toward the ultimate goal of 50-micron stability. This was a significant improvement from the previous year when the movement was 400 microns in the horizontal and 200 microns in the vertical. A new accelerator Personal Protection System (PPS), built with full redundancy and providing protection from both radiation exposure and electrical hazards, was installed in 1994. It is not possible to describe in this summary all of the scientific experimentation which was performed during the run. However, the flavor of current research projects and the many significant accomplishments can be realized by the following highlights: A multinational collaboration performed several experiments involving x-ray scattering from nuclear resonances; Studies related to nuclear waste remediation by groups from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratories continued in 1994; Diffraction data sets for a number of important protein crystals were obtained; During the past two years a collaboration consisting of groups from Hewlett Packard, Intel, Fisons Instruments and SSRL has been exploring the utility of synchrotron radiation for total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TRXRF); and High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments have continued to generate exciting new results from highly correlated and magnetic materials.

  2. Synchrotron based spallation neutron source concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Y.

    1998-07-01

    During the past 20 years, rapid-cycling synchrotrons (RCS) have been used very productively to generate short-pulse thermal neutron beams for neutron scattering research by materials science communities in Japan (KENS), the UK (ISIS) and the US (IPNS). The most powerful source in existence, ISIS in the UK, delivers a 160-kW proton beam to a neutron-generating target. Several recently proposed facilities require proton beams in the MW range to produce intense short-pulse neutron beams. In some proposals, a linear accelerator provides the beam power and an accumulator ring compresses the pulse length to the required {approx} 1 {micro}s. In others, RCS technology provides the bulk of the beam power and compresses the pulse length. Some synchrotron-based proposals achieve the desired beam power by combining two or more synchrotrons of the same energy, and others propose a combination of lower and higher energy synchrotrons. This paper presents the rationale for using RCS technology, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of synchrotron-based spallation sources.

  3. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1995-12-31

    The medical projects employing synchrotron radiation as discussed in this paper are, for the most part, still in their infancies and no one can predict the direction in which they will develop. Both the basic research and applied medical programs are sure to be advanced at the new facilities coming on line, especially the ESRF and Spring- 8. However, success is not guaranteed. There is a lot of competition from advances in conventional imaging with the development of digital angiography, computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. The synchrotron programs will have to provide significant advantages over these modalities in order to be accepted by the medical profession. Advances in image processing and potentially the development of compact sources will be required in order to move the synchrotron developed imaging technologies into the clinical world. In any event, it can be expected that the images produced by the synchrotron technologies will establish ``gold standards`` to be targeted by conventional modalities. A lot more work needs to be done in order to bring synchrotron radiation therapy and surgery to the level of human studies and, subsequently, to clinical applications.

  4. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  5. Fifth school on Magnetism and Synchrotron Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Beaurepaire, Eric; Scheurer, Fabrice; Kappler, Jean-Paul; Magnetism and Synchrotron Radiation : New Trends

    2010-01-01

    Advances in the synthesis of new materials with often complex, nano-scaled structures require increasingly sophisticated experimental techniques that can probe the electronic states, the atomic magnetic moments and the magnetic microstructures responsible for the properties of these materials. At the same time, progress in synchrotron radiation techniques has ensured that these light sources remain a key tool of investigation, e.g. synchrotron radiation sources of the third generation are able to support magnetic imaging on a sub-micrometer scale. With the Fifth Mittelwihr School on Magnetism and Synchrotron Radiation the tradition of teaching the state-of-the-art on modern research developments continues and is expressed through the present set of extensive lectures provided in this volume. While primarily aimed at postgraduate students and newcomers to the field, this volume will also benefit researchers and lecturers actively working in the field.

  6. Paraxial Green's functions in Synchrotron Radiation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, G; Schneidmiller, E; Yurkov, M; Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni; Schneidmiller, Evgeni; Yurkov, Mikhail

    2005-01-01

    This work contains a systematic treatment of single particle Synchrotron Radiation and some application to realistic beams with given cross section area, divergence and energy spread. Standard theory relies on several approximations whose applicability limits and accuracy are often forgotten. We begin remarking that on the one hand, a paraxial approximation can always be applied without loss of generality and with ultra relativistic accuracy. On the other hand, dominance of the acceleration field over the velocity part in the Lienard-Wiechert expressions is not always granted and constitutes a separate assumption, whose applicability is discussed. Treating Synchrotron Radiation in paraxial approximation we derive the equation for the slow varying envelope function of the Fourier components of the electric field vector. Calculations of Synchrotron Radiation properties performed by others showed that the phase of the Fourier components of the electric field vector differs from the phase of a virtual point sourc...

  7. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2012-03-29

    The physics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by ultra-relativistic electron bunches, known since the last century, has become increasingly important with the development of high peak current free electron lasers and shorter bunch lengths in storage rings. Coherent radiation can be described as a low frequency part of the familiar synchrotron radiation in bending magnets. As this part is independent of the electron energy, the fields of different electrons of a short bunch can be in phase and the total power of the radiation will be quadratic with the number of electrons. Naturally the frequency spectrum of the longitudinal electron distribution in a bunch is of the same importance as the overall electron bunch length. The interest in the utilization of high power radiation from the terahertz and far infrared region in the field of chemical, physical and biological processes has led synchrotron radiation facilities to pay more attention to the production of coherent radiation. Several laboratories have proposed the construction of a facility wholly dedicated to terahertz production using the coherent radiation in bending magnets initiated by the longitudinal instabilities in the ring. Existing synchrotron radiation facilities also consider such a possibility among their future plans. There is a beautiful introduction to CSR in the 'ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter' N 35 (Editor C. Biscari). In this paper we recall the basic properties of CSR from the theory and what new effects, we can get from the precise simulations of the coherent radiation using numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. In particular, transverse variation of the particle energy loss in a bunch, discovered in these simulations, explains the slice emittance growth in bending magnets of the bunch compressors and transverse de-coherence in undulators. CSR may play same the role as the effect of quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation in damping rings. It can limit

  8. Study of silicon pixel sensor for synchrotron radiation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Jie; Jia, Yun-Cong; Hu, Ling-Fei; Liu, Peng; Yin, Hua-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    The silicon pixel sensor (SPS) is one of the key components of hybrid pixel single-photon-counting detectors for synchrotron radiation X-ray detection (SRD). In this paper, the design, fabrication, and characterization of SPSs for single beam X-ray photon detection is reported. The designed pixel sensor is a p+-in-n structure with guard-ring structures operated in full-depletion mode and is fabricated on 4-inch, N type, 320 μm thick, high-resistivity silicon wafers by a general Si planar process. To achieve high energy resolution of X-rays and obtain low dark current and high breakdown voltage as well as appropriate depletion voltage of the SPS, a series of technical optimizations of device structure and fabrication process are explored. With optimized device structure and fabrication process, excellent SPS characteristics with dark current of 2 nA/cm2, full depletion voltage 150 V are achieved. The fabricated SPSs are wire bonded to ASIC circuits and tested for the performance of X-ray response to the 1W2B synchrotron beam line of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The measured S-curves for SRD demonstrate a high discrimination for different energy X-rays. The extracted energy resolution is high (10 keV) and the linear properties between input photo energy and the equivalent generator amplitude are well established. It confirmed that the fabricated SPSs have a good energy linearity and high count rate with the optimized technologies. The technology is expected to have a promising application in the development of a large scale SRD system for the Beijing Advanced Photon Source. Supported by Prefabrication Research of Beijing Advanced Photon Source (R&D for BAPS) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11335010)

  9. 12 Experimental Techniques at Synchrotron Lightsource Beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Peter L [US Department of Energy Office of Science Office Basic Energy Sciences; Rhyne, James J [US Department of Energy Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences

    2015-01-01

    The unique properties of synchrotron radiation are its continuous spectrum, high flux and brightness, and high coherence, which make it an indispensable tool in the exploration of matter. The wavelengths of the emitted photons span a range of dimensions from the atomic level to biological cells, thereby providing incisive probes for advanced research in materials science, physical and chemical sciences, metrology, geosciences, environmental sciences, biosciences, medical sciences, and pharmaceutical sciences. The features of synchrotron radiation are especially well matched to the needs of nanoscience.

  10. Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Synchrotron Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bagrov, V G; Levin, A; Tlyachev, V B

    2001-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation of a charged particle in a constant uniform magnetic field and in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm solenoid field is studied in the frame of the relativistic quantum theory. First, to this end exact solutions of the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations are found. Using such solutions, all characteristics of one photon spontaneous irradiation, such as its intensity and angular distribution and polarization were calculated and analyzed. It is shown that usual spectrum of the synchrotron radiation is essentially affected by the presence of the solenoid (the Aharonov-Bohm effect). We believe that this deformation may be observed by spectroscopic methods of measurement. It is shown that

  11. Update on synchrotron radiation TXRF: New results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, S.; Pianetta, P.; Ghosh, S. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.] [and others

    1998-12-31

    Synchrotron-based total-reflection x-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF) has been developed as a leading technique for measuring wafer cleanliness. It holds advantages over other techniques in that it is non-destructive and allows mapping of the surface. The highest sensitivity observed thus far is 3 {times} 10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2} ({approx} 3fg) for 1,000 second count time. Several applications of SR-TXRF are presented which take advantage of the energy tunability of the synchrotron source or the mapping capability.

  12. Compact synchrotron light source of the HSRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K; Takayama, T; Hori, T

    1998-05-01

    A 700 MeV synchrotron radiation source optimized in order to be incorporated in the university laboratory is under commissioning at Hiroshima University. The storage ring is of a racetrack type with two long straight sections for installing undulators. The bending field is as strong as 2.7 T, produced by normal-conducting magnet technology, and delivers synchrotron radiation with a critical wavelength of 1.42 nm. The strong magnetic field also enables a low-energy injection scheme to be employed owing to the fast radiation damping. A 150 MeV microtron has been adopted as the injector.

  13. High pressure x-ray diffraction techniques with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Liu

    2016-07-01

    This article summarizes the developments of experimental techniques for high pressure x-ray diffraction (XRD) in diamond anvil cells (DACs) using synchrotron radiation. Basic principles and experimental methods for various diffraction geometry are described, including powder diffraction, single crystal diffraction, radial diffraction, as well as coupling with laser heating system. Resolution in d-spacing of different diffraction modes is discussed. More recent progress, such as extended application of single crystal diffraction for measurements of multigrain and electron density distribution, time-resolved diffraction with dynamic DAC and development of modulated heating techniques are briefly introduced. The current status of the high pressure beamline at BSRF (Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility) and some results are also presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 10875142, 11079040, and 11075175). The 4W2 beamline of BSRF was supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. KJCX2-SW-N20, KJCX2-SW-N03, and SYGNS04).

  14. Synchrotron IR spectromicroscopy: chemistry of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N; Bechtel, Hans A; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C

    2010-11-01

    Advanced analytical capabilities of synchrotron IR spectromicroscopy meet the demands of modern biological research for studying molecular reactions in individual living cells. (To listen to a podcast about this article, please go to the Analytical Chemistry multimedia page at pubs.acs.org/page/ancham/audio/index.html.).

  15. Polymer research and synchrotron radiation perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portale, Giuseppe; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Bras, Wim

    2016-01-01

    The developments in synchrotron radiation based polymer research have been profound over the last two decades. Not only have many more beamlines suitable for soft condensed matter research become available since the pioneering days but also the technical developments with respect to X-ray beam quali

  16. Wellcome Trust backs Rutherford to host synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    Leder, N

    1999-01-01

    The Wellcome Trust has stated its preference for the site of the new Anglo-French synchrotron to be at RAL in Oxfordshire. But the statement coincides with an announcement from the UK government that a decision on the location of 'Diamond' will be delayed to allow two new reports on the canditate sites to be commissioned (1/2 page).

  17. The Synchrotron Radiation for Steel Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyada Suwanpinij

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The synchrotron X-ray radiation is a great tool in materials characterization with several advantageous features. The high intensity allows clear interaction signals and high energy of X-ray yields higher sampling volume. The samples do not need extra preparation and the microstructure is therefore not affected. With the tunability of the X-ray energy, a large range of elements and features in the samples can be investigated by different techniques, which is a significant difference between a stand-alone X-ray tube and synchrotron X-ray. Moreover, any experimental equipment can be installed through which the synchrotron beam travels. This facilitates the so-called in situ characterization such as during heat treatment, hot deformation, chemical reaction or welding. Although steel which possesses rather high density requires very high energy X-ray for large interaction volume, lower energy is still effective for the investigation of local structure of nanoconstituents. This work picks up a couple examples employing synchrotron X-ray for the characterization of high strength steels. The first case is the quantification of precipitates in high strength low alloyed (HSLA steel by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The other case is the in situ X-ray diffraction for phase fraction and carbon partitioning in multiphase steels such as transformation induced plasticity (TRIP steel.

  18. Optimization on Synchrotron Radiation Lattice of BEPCⅡ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yi-Peng; GAO Jie; GUO Zhi-Yu

    2007-01-01

    @@ The Beijing Electron and Positron Collider H (BEPCⅡ) is a double ring electron-positron collider, which can also be used as a synchrotron radiation (SR) light source. Since the BEPCⅡ will start commissioning with SR mode in November 2006, it is essential to have a satisfying SR lattice.

  19. Laboratory source of synchrotron radiation: TROLL-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anevsky, S. I.; Vernyi, A. E.; Panasjuk, V. S.; Khromchenko, V. B.

    1987-11-01

    A laboratory synchrotron radiation (SR) source TROLL-2 is described. Its main parameters are as follows: the energy of the accelerated particles = 24 MeV; the orbit radius = 20 mm; the SR pulse half-width = 2 ms, the maximum spectral radiant power (at λ = 350 nm) = 1.2×10 6 W/m.

  20. Assessing noise sources at synchrotron infrared ports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Ph; Dumas, P; Schilcher, T; Nadji, A; Luedeke, A; Hubert, N; Cassinari, L; Boege, M; Denard, J-C; Stingelin, L; Nadolski, L; Garvey, T; Albert, S; Gough, Ch; Quack, M; Wambach, J; Dehler, M; Filhol, J-M

    2012-01-01

    Today, the vast majority of electron storage rings delivering synchrotron radiation for general user operation offer a dedicated infrared port. There is growing interest expressed by various scientific communities to exploit the mid-IR emission in microspectroscopy, as well as the far infrared (also called THz) range for spectroscopy. Compared with a thermal (laboratory-based source), IR synchrotron radiation sources offer enhanced brilliance of about two to three orders of magnitude in the mid-IR energy range, and enhanced flux and brilliance in the far-IR energy range. Synchrotron radiation also has a unique combination of a broad wavelength band together with a well defined time structure. Thermal sources (globar, mercury filament) have excellent stability. Because the sampling rate of a typical IR Fourier-transform spectroscopy experiment is in the kHz range (depending on the bandwidth of the detector), instabilities of various origins present in synchrotron radiation sources play a crucial role. Noise recordings at two different IR ports located at the Swiss Light Source and SOLEIL (France), under conditions relevant to real experiments, are discussed. The lowest electron beam fluctuations detectable in IR spectra have been quantified and are shown to be much smaller than what is routinely recorded by beam-position monitors.

  1. Remote Synchrotron Light Instrumentation Using Optical Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Santis, S.; Yin, Y.

    2009-05-04

    By coupling the emitted synchrotron light into an optical fiber, it is possible to transmit the signal at substantial distances from the light port, without the need to use expensive beamlines. This would be especially beneficial in all those cases when the synchrotron is situated in areas not easily access because of their location, or due to high radiation levels. Furthermore, the fiber output can be easily switched, or even shared, between different diagnostic instruments. We present the latest results on the coupling and dispersion measurements performed at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley. In several cases, coupling synchrotron light into optical fibers can substantially facilitate the use of beam diagnostic instrumentation that measures longitudinal beam properties by detecting synchrotron radiation. It has been discussed in with some detail, how fiberoptics can bring the light at relatively large distances from the accelerator, where a variety of devices can be used to measure beam properties and parameters. Light carried on a fiber can be easily switched between instruments so that each one of them has 100% of the photons available, rather than just a fraction, when simultaneous measurements are not indispensable. From a more general point of view, once synchrotron light is coupled into the fiber, the vast array of techniques and optoelectronic devices, developed by the telecommunication industry becomes available. In this paper we present the results of our experiments at the Advanced Light Source, where we tried to assess the challenges and limitations of the coupling process and determine what level of efficiency one can typically expect to achieve.

  2. Dynamics of synchrotron VUV-induced intracluster reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grover, J.R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) using the tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation available at the National Synchrotron Light Source is being exploited to study photoionization-induced reactions in small van der Waals mixed complexes. The information gained includes the observation and classification of reaction paths, the measurement of onsets, and the determination of relative yields of competing reactions. Additional information is obtained by comparison of the properties of different reacting systems. Special attention is given to finding unexpected features, and most of the reactions investigated to date display such features. However, understanding these reactions demands dynamical information, in addition to what is provided by PIMS. Therefore the program has been expanded to include the measurement of kinetic energy release distributions.

  3. PHENIX Conceptual Design Report. An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamiya, Shoji; Aronson, Samuel H.; Young, Glenn R.; Paffrath, Leo

    1993-01-29

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the detector design of the PHENIX experiment for Day-1 operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The CDR presents the physics capabilities, technical details, cost estimate, construction schedule, funding profile, management structure, and possible upgrade paths of the PHENIX experiment. The primary goals of the PHENIX experiment are to detect the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and to measure its properties. Many of the potential signatures for the QGP are measured as a function of a well-defined common variable to see if any or all of these signatures show a simultaneous anomaly due to the formation of the QGP. In addition, basic quantum chromodynamics phenomena, collision dynamics, and thermodynamic features of the initial states of the collision are studied. To achieve these goals, the PHENIX experiment measures lepton pairs (dielectrons and dimuons) to study various properties of vector mesons, such as the mass, the width, and the degree of yield suppression due to the formation of the QGP. The effect of thermal radiation on the continuum is studied in different regions of rapidity and mass. The e{mu} coincidence is measured to study charm production, and aids in understanding the shape of the continuum dilepton spectrum. Photons are measured to study direct emission of single photons and to study {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} production. Charged hadrons are identified to study the spectrum shape, production of antinuclei, the {phi} meson (via K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decay), jets, and two-boson correlations. The measurements are made down to small cross sections to allow the study of high p{sub T} spectra, and J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production. The PHENIX collaboration consists of over 300 scientists, engineers, and graduate students from 43 institutions in 10 countries. This large international collaboration is supported by US resources and significant foreign resources.

  4. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON BARYON DYNAMICS AT RHIC, MARCH 28-30, 2002, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GYULASSY,M.; KHARZEEV,D.; XU,N.

    2002-03-28

    One of the striking observations at RHIC is the large valence baryon rapidity density observed at mid rapidity in central Au+Au at 130 A GeV. There are about twice as many valence protons at mid-rapidity than predicted based on extrapolation from p+p collisions. Even more striking PHENIX observed that the high pt spectrum is dominated by baryons and anti-baryons. The STAR measured event anisotropy parameter v2 for lambdas are as high as charged particles at pt {approx} 2.5 GeV/c. These are completely unexpected based on conventional pQCD parton fragmentation phenomenology. One exciting possibility is that these observables reveal the topological gluon field origin of baryon number transport referred to as baryon junctions. Another is that hydrodynamics may apply up to high pt in A+A. There is no consensus on what are the correct mechanisms for producing baryons and hyperons at high pt and large rapidity shifts and the new RHIC data provide a strong motivation to hold a meeting focusing on this class of observables. The possible role of junctions in forming CP violating domain walls and novel nuclear bucky-ball configurations would also be discussed. In this workshop, we focused on all measured baryon distributions at RHIC energies and related theoretical considerations. To facilitate the discussions, results of heavy ion collisions at lower beam energies, results from p+A /p+p/e+e collisions were included. Some suggestions for future measurements have been made at the workshop.

  5. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, June 1981-July 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A

    1982-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following research areas: (1) evaluation of /sup 14/C-labelled carboxyethyl ester 2-cardoxy methyl ester of arachidonic acid; (2) the effects of drug intervention on cardiac inflammatory response following experimental myocardial infarction using indium-111 labeled autologous leukoyctes; (3) the evaluation of /sup 97/Ru-oxine to label human platelets in autologous plasma; and (4) the specific in vitro radiolabeling of human neutrophils. (ACR)

  6. PHENIX CDR update: An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory relativistic heavy ion collider. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report Update (CDR Update) is intended for use together with the Conceptual Design Report (CDR). The CDR Update is a companion document to the CDR, and it describes the collaboration`s progress since the CDR was submitted in January 1993. Therefore, this document concentrates on changes, refinements, and decisions that have been made over the past year. These documents together define the baseline PHENIX detector that the collaboration intends to build for operation at RHIC startup. In this chapter the current status of the detector and its motivation are briefly described. In Chapters 2 and 3 the detector and the physics performance are more fully developed. In Chapters 4 through 13 the details of the present design status, the technology choices, and the construction costs and schedules are presented. The physics goals of PHENIX collaboration have remained exactly as they were described in the CDR. Primary among these is the detection of a new phase of matter, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), and the measurement of its properties. The PHENIX experiment will measure many of the best potential QGP signatures to see if any or all of these physics variables show anomalies simultaneously due to the formation of the QGP.

  7. PHENIX Conceptual Design Report. An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamiya, Shoji; Aronson, Samuel H.; Young, Glenn R.; Paffrath, Leo

    1993-01-29

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the detector design of the PHENIX experiment for Day-1 operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The CDR presents the physics capabilities, technical details, cost estimate, construction schedule, funding profile, management structure, and possible upgrade paths of the PHENIX experiment. The primary goals of the PHENIX experiment are to detect the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and to measure its properties. Many of the potential signatures for the QGP are measured as a function of a well-defined common variable to see if any or all of these signatures show a simultaneous anomaly due to the formation of the QGP. In addition, basic quantum chromodynamics phenomena, collision dynamics, and thermodynamic features of the initial states of the collision are studied. To achieve these goals, the PHENIX experiment measures lepton pairs (dielectrons and dimuons) to study various properties of vector mesons, such as the mass, the width, and the degree of yield suppression due to the formation of the QGP. The effect of thermal radiation on the continuum is studied in different regions of rapidity and mass. The e{mu} coincidence is measured to study charm production, and aids in understanding the shape of the continuum dilepton spectrum. Photons are measured to study direct emission of single photons and to study {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} production. Charged hadrons are identified to study the spectrum shape, production of antinuclei, the {phi} meson (via K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decay), jets, and two-boson correlations. The measurements are made down to small cross sections to allow the study of high p{sub T} spectra, and J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production. The PHENIX collaboration consists of over 300 scientists, engineers, and graduate students from 43 institutions in 10 countries. This large international collaboration is supported by US resources and significant foreign resources.

  8. Simulation Prediction and Experiment Setup of Vacuum Laser Acceleration at Brookhaven National Lab-Accelerator Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, L; Ding, X; Ho, Y K; Kong, Q; Xu, J J; Pogorelsky, I; Yakimenko, V; Kusche, K

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the pre-experiment plan and prediction of the first stage of Vacuum Laser Acceleration (VLA) collaborating by UCLA, Fudan University and ATF-BNL. This first stage experiment is a Proof-of-Principle to support our previously posted novel VLA theory. Simulations show that based on ATF's current experimental conditions, the electron beam with initial energy of 15MeV can get net energy gain from intense CO2 laser beam. The difference of electron beam energy spread is observable by ATF beam line diagnostics system. Further this energy spread expansion effect increases along with the laser intensity increasing. The proposal has been approved by ATF committee and experiment will be the next project.

  9. Multiple species beam production on laser ion source for electron beam ion source in Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, M., E-mail: sekine.m.ae@m.titech.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Department of Energy Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Hayashizaki, N. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Extracted ion beams from the test laser ion source (LIS) were transported through a test beam transport line which is almost identical to the actual primary beam transport in the current electron beam ion source apparatus. The tested species were C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Cu, Ag, Ta, and Au. The all measured beam currents fulfilled the requirements. However, in the case of light mass ions, the recorded emittance shapes have larger aberrations and the RMS values are higher than 0.06 π mm mrad, which is the design goal. Since we have margin to enhance the beam current, if we then allow some beam losses at the injection point, the number of the single charged ions within the acceptance can be supplied. For heaver ions like Ag, Ta, and Au, the LIS showed very good performance.

  10. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, November 1, 1980-October 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A

    1981-10-31

    Research conducted in three principal areas is discussed and summarized. (1) Investigation of the influence of antiarrhythmic agents, such as lidocaine and procainamide, on the chemotaxis and nylon fiber adherence of indium-111-labelled human polymorphonulcear leukocytes (PMNs) in vitro revealed that at normal therapeutic levels of lidocaine and procaine, the adherence and chemotactic function of In-111-PMNs remain unaltered. Results with higher therapeutic blood levels are also discussed. (2) An improved method for labeling human platelets with In-111-oxine is outlined, and the influence of centrifugal force, oxine, ethanol, and radiation on platelet function is reported. Results indicate that normal labeling procedures induce no gross changes in platelet function. (3) The chemical preparation of radioiodinated arachidonic acid (AA) and nonradioactive acid ester of AA, and the analysis of metabolites of these compounds following myocardial ischemia were investigated in dogs. The tissue uptake of /sup 131/I-AA was compared to that of thallium-201.

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, HADRON STRUCTURE FROM LATTICE QCD, MARCH 18 - 22, 2002, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLUM, T.; BOER, D.; CREUTZ, M.; OHTA, S.; ORGINOS, K.

    2002-03-18

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop on ''Hadron Structure from Lattice QCD'' was held at BNL during March 11-15, 2002. Hadron structure has been the subject of many theoretical and experimental investigations, with significant success in understanding the building blocks of matter. The nonperturbative nature of QCD, however, has always been an obstacle to deepening our understanding of hadronic physics. Lattice QCD provides the tool to overcome these difficulties and hence a link can be established between the fundamental theory of QCD and hadron phenomenology. Due to the steady progress in improving lattice calculations over the years, comparison with experimentally measured hadronic quantities has become important. In this respect the workshop was especially timely. By providing an opportunity for experts from the lattice and hadron structure communities to present their latest results, the workshop enhanced the exchange of knowledge and ideas. With a total of 32 registered participants and 26 talks, the interest of a growing community is clearly exemplified. At the workshop Schierholz and Negele presented the current status of lattice computations of hadron structure. Substantial progress has been made during recent years now that the quenched results are well under control and the first dynamical results have appeared. In both the dynamical and the quenched simulations the lattice results, extrapolated to lighter quark masses, seem to disagree with experiment. Melnitchouk presented a possible explanation (chiral logs) for this disagreement. It became clear from these discussions that lattice computations at significantly lighter quark masses need to be performed.

  12. Radiation protection at synchrotron radiation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J C; Vylet, V

    2001-01-01

    A synchrotron radiation (SR) facility typically consists of an injector, a storage ring, and SR beamlines. The latter two features are unique to SR facilities, when compared to other types of accelerator facilities. The SR facilities have the characteristics of low injection beam power, but high stored beam power. The storage ring is generally above ground with people occupying the experimental floor around a normally thin concrete ring wall. This paper addresses the radiation issues, in particular the shielding design, associated with the storage ring and SR beamlines. Normal and abnormal beam losses for injection and stored beams, as well as typical storage ring operation, are described. Ring shielding design for photons and neutrons from beam losses in the ring is discussed. Radiation safety issues and shielding design for SR beamlines, considering gas bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation, are reviewed. Radiation source terms and the methodologies for shielding calculations are presented.

  13. Synchrotron masers and fast radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ghisellini, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs), with a typical duration of 1 ms and 1 Jy flux density at GHz frequencies, have brightness temperatures exceeding 1e33 K, requiring a coherent emission process. This can be achieved by bunching particles in volumes smaller than the typical wavelength, but this may be challenging. Alternatively, we can have maser emission. Under certain conditions, the synchrotron stimulated emission process can be more important than true absorption, and a synchrotron maser can be created. This occurs when the emitting electrons have a very narrow distribution of pitch angles and energies. This process overcomes the difficulties of having extremely dense bunches of particles and relaxes the light crossing time limits, since there is no simple relation between the actual size of the source and the observed variability timescale.

  14. Synchrotron Applications of High Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This workshop aims at discussing the scientific potential of X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy in magnetic fields above 30 T. Pulsed magnetic fields in the range of 30 to 40 T have recently become available at Spring-8 and the ESRF (European synchrotron radiation facility). This document gathers the transparencies of the 6 following presentations: 1) pulsed magnetic fields at ESRF: first results; 2) X-ray spectroscopy and diffraction experiments by using mini-coils: applications to valence state transition and frustrated magnet; 3) R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4}: an ideal system to be studied in X-ray under high magnetic field?; 4) high field studies at the Advanced Photon Source: present status and future plans; 5) synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies under extreme conditions; and 6) projects for pulsed and steady high magnetic fields at the ESRF.

  15. Synchrotron Mossbauer spectroscopy of powder samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Toellner, T.

    1995-05-01

    Synchrotron Mossbauer spectroscopy, SMS, is an emerging technique that allows fast and accurate determination of hyperfine field parameters similar to conventional Mossbauer spectroscopy with radioactive sources. This new technique, however, is qualitatively different from Mossbauer spectroscopy in terms of equipment, methodology, and analysis to warrant a new name. In this paper, we report on isomer shift and quadrupole splitting measurements of Mohr's salt, Fe(NH4)2 (SO4)2 · 6H2O for demonstration purposes. Theoretical calculations were performed and compared to experiments both in energy and time domain to demonstrate the influence of thickness distribution and preferential alignment of powder samples. Such measurements may prove to be useful when the data collection times are reduced to few seconds in the third generation, undulator based synchrotron radiation sources.

  16. Synchrotron masers and fast radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisellini, G.

    2017-02-01

    Fast radio bursts, with a typical duration of 1 ms and 1 Jy flux density at gigahertz frequencies, have brightness temperatures exceeding 1033 K, requiring a coherent emission process. This can be achieved by bunching particles in volumes smaller than the typical wavelength, but this may be challenging. Maser emission is a possibility. Under certain conditions, the synchrotron-stimulated emission process can be more important than true absorption, and a synchrotron maser can be created. This occurs when the emitting electrons have a very narrow distribution of pitch angles and energies. This process overcomes the difficulties of having extremely dense bunches of particles and relaxes the light-crossing time limits, since there is no simple relation between the actual size of the source and the observed variability time-scale.

  17. Resonant diffraction of synchrotron radiation: New possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikova, E. N.; Mukhamedzhanov, E. Kh.

    2016-09-01

    Resonant diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) is a modern method of studying the structure and properties of condensed matter that can be implemented on third-generation synchrotrons. This method allows one to investigate local properties of media (including magnetic and electronic ones) and observe thermal vibrations, defects, and orbital and charge orderings. A brief review of the advance provided by SR resonant diffraction is presented, and the capabilities of this method for analyzing phase transitions are considered in more detail by the example of potassium dihydrogen phosphate and rubidium dihydrogen phosphate crystals. It is shown that the investigation of the temperature dependence of forbidden reflections not only makes it possible to observe the transition from para- to ferroelectric phase, but also gives information about the proton distribution at hydrogen bonds.

  18. Direct Comparison of Brookhaven Reflectivity Measurements with Free-Electron Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, Karl L.F.

    2010-12-13

    The reflectivity at normal incidence of copper and aluminum samples was recently measured over a large frequency range at Brookhaven by one of us (JT). Then using the Kramers-Kroning integrals, and assuming the free-electron model of conductivity, the dependence of conductivity on frequency was obtained. The results seemed to suggest, for example, that the dc conductivities of the copper and evaporated aluminum samples are a factor of 3 lower than expected. We propose in this report, instead, directly fitting the free-electron model to the low frequency end of the reflectivity data. This fitting does not depend on the higher frequency results and on Kramers-Kronig integrations, but it does assume that the data at the low frequency end is sufficiently accurate. Note that for our LCLS wakefield studies, it is only over these (relatively) low frequencies that we need to know the electrical properties of the metals. The equations that relate reflectivity R with the free electron parameters dc conductivity {sigma} and relaxation time {tau} are: (1) {tilde {sigma}} = {sigma}/1-ikc{tau}; (2) {tilde n} = {radical} {tilde {epsilon}} = {radical}(1+4{pi}i{tilde k}c/{omega}); and (3) R = |{tilde n}-1/{tilde n} + 1|{sup 2}. The parameters are ac conductivity {tilde {sigma}}, index of refraction {tilde n}, dielectric constant {tilde {epsilon}}, and wave number k = {omega}/c, with {omega} frequency and c the speed of light. In Fig. 1 we show the ideal behavior of R for a reasonably good conducting metal, where {sigma} = 0.12 x 10{sup 17}/s and {tau} = 0.55 x 10{sup -14} s (solid line); these parameters are, respectively, 2% ({sigma}) and 20% ({tau}) of the nominal values for copper. The parameters were chosen so that the important features of R(k) could be seen easily in one plot. We see 3 distinct regions: (1) for low frequencies, k {approx}< 1/c{tau}, R continually decreases, with positive curvature, and with a low frequency asymptote of (1 - {radical}2kc/{pi}{sigma}); (2) for

  19. National Synchrotron Light Source guidelines for the conduct of operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fewell, N.

    1990-03-01

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: NSLS operations organization and administration; shift routines and operating practices; NSLS control room activities; communications; control of on-shift training; investigation of abnormal events; notifications; control of equipment and system status; lock-out tagout; independent verification; logkeeping; shift turnover; required reading; shift orders; equipment operations guides; operator aid postings; and equipment labeling.

  20. High precision power supplies for the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, R.; Langenbach, H.

    1987-04-01

    Since beam stability depends to a considerable degree on the stability of the magnet power supplies, and it is desired to push for 3 GeV operation, it was required that new power supplies be obtained for the quadrupoles and sextupoles. These power supplies were to have the lowest ripple that could be reasonably achieved, and were to have a current regulation of better than 10 PPM. In addition, since they operate over a 5 : 1 voltage range, it was considered desirable to ensure that they operated with a good power factor over the operating range. The dipole power supply was modified to use the techniques employed in the smaller supplies.

  1. The tomography beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Wu, X.Y.; Parsons, E.C. [and others

    1996-12-31

    We compared the image contrast of a monochromatic CT, Multiple Energy Computed Tomography (MECT), and conventional CT scanner using phantoms. The experimental results indicate that monochromatic CT, with beam energy tuned just above the iodine K-edge, has about a 3 fold advantage in iodine contrast over conventional CT with a 120 kVp beam. Modeling using the same beams at a 3 rad dose and 3 mm slice height on an 18 cm diameter acrylic phantom, the simulations show a noise of 1.2 HU for MECT and 1.9 HU for CCT. Furthermore, despite the Cupping-effect corrections the bone contrast is lower in CCT and varies by 24 HU moving from the phantom`s center to the edge; this indicates an advantage for MECT in detecting and quantifying lesions differing from surrounding tissue by their mean atomic number.

  2. (SUNY beamline facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppens, P.

    1992-01-01

    This report contains short discussions on the following topics which mainly deal with superconductors: crystallography; surface structure; scattering and EXAFS studies; small angle scattering of x-rays. (LSP)

  3. National synchrotron light source in the infra-red region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G.P.

    1981-01-01

    A discussion of the utilization of the NSLS in the 1 to 100 micron infra-red spectral region is presented. A comparison is made of the respective brightnesses of the NSLS and of black-body sources. The way in which each source may be utilized with a monochromator is discussed and comparative exit slit brightnesses are calculated for selected cases.

  4. Plasma diagnostics using synchrotron radiation in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidone, I.; Giruzzi, G.; Granata, G.

    1995-09-01

    This report deal with the use of synchrotron radiation in tokamaks. The main advantage of this new method is that it enables to overcome several deficiencies, caused by cut-off, refraction, and harmonic overlap. It also makes it possible to enhance the informative contents of the familiar low harmonic scheme. The basic theory of the method is presented and illustrated by numerical applications, for plasma parameters of relevance in present and next step tokamaks. (TEC). 10 refs., 13 figs.

  5. The Synchrotron Radiation for Steel Research

    OpenAIRE

    Piyada Suwanpinij

    2016-01-01

    The synchrotron X-ray radiation is a great tool in materials characterization with several advantageous features. The high intensity allows clear interaction signals and high energy of X-ray yields higher sampling volume. The samples do not need extra preparation and the microstructure is therefore not affected. With the tunability of the X-ray energy, a large range of elements and features in the samples can be investigated by different techniques, which is a significant difference between a...

  6. Hammurabi: Simulating polarized Galactic synchrotron emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Tess; Waelkens, Andre; Reinecke, M.; Kitaura, F. S.; Enßlin, T. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Hammurabi code is a publicly available C++ code for generating mock polarized observations of Galactic synchrotron emission with telescopes such as LOFAR, SKA, Planck, and WMAP, based on model inputs for the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), the cosmic-ray density distribution, and the thermal electron density. The Hammurabi code allows one to perform simulations of several different data sets simultaneously, providing a more reliable constraint of the magnetized ISM.

  7. Coherent synchrotron radiation: Theory and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtland L. Bohn

    2002-07-19

    Our understanding of the generation of coherent synchrotron radiation in magnetic bending systems and its impact on beam dynamics has grown considerably over the past few years. The search for understanding has brought a number of surprises, all related to the complexity of the fully self-consistent problem. Herein I survey the associated phenomenology, theory, and experiments while emphasizing important subtleties that have recently been uncovered. I conclude by speculating on courses of future investigations that may prove fruitful.

  8. Linear accelerators for high energies. A report on the 1962 conference at Brookhaven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blewett, John P.

    1963-01-01

    The linear accelerator was invented very early in the history of particle accelerators, but it has been one of the latest accelerators to be exploited. This is principally because of the very large quantities of radio-frequency power required to attain respectable energies in a reasonable distance. Radar developments during World War II resulted in production of the necessary megawatt oscillators or amplifiers, and linear accelerators, both for electrons and positive ions, are now operating in several centers. The electron linear accelerator has been extended to billion-volt energies, and in the Stanford two-mile version it will soon set new energy records between 20 and 40 BeV. The proton linear accelerator has had a less spectacular history. The highest energy yet achieved in a proton linac is about 70 MeV (at the University of Minnesota). Smaller proton linacs are in use as injectors for proton-synchrotrons, but no machine has been built or is under construction for the range above 100 MeV. This is because synchro-cyclotrons for this energy range are much cheaper and have been preferred for this reason, in spite of the fact that the beam from a synchro-cyclotron cannot be nearly as intense or as well collimated as the beam from a linear accelerator.

  9. Beer analysis by synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo. Dept. de Recursos Hidricos]. E-mail: silvana@fec.unicamp.br; Vives, Ana Elisa S. de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: aesvives@unimep.br; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio F. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: virgilio@cena.usp.br; Zucchi, Orgheda L.D.A. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto]. E-mail: olzucchi@fcfrp.usp.br

    2005-07-01

    In this work the concentrations of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn and Br in twenty-nine brands of national and international beers were determined by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence analysis (SR-TXRF). The results were compared with the limits established by the Brazilian Legislation and the nutritive values established by National Agricultural Library (NAL). The measurements were performed at the X-ray Fluorescence Beamline at Synchrotron Light Source Laboratory, in Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil, using a polychromatic beam for excitation. A small volume of 5 {mu}L of sample beers containing just an internal standard, used to correct geometry effects, were analyzed without any pre-treatment. The measuring time was 100 s and the detection limits obtained varied from 1{mu}g.L{sup -1} for Mn and Fe to 15{mu}g.L{sup -1} for P. (author)

  10. MICROANALYSIS OF MATERIALS USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.

    2000-12-01

    High intensity synchrotron radiation produces photons with wavelengths that extend from the infrared to hard x rays with energies of hundreds of keV with uniquely high photon intensities that can be used to determine the composition and properties of materials using a variety of techniques. Most of these techniques represent extensions of earlier work performed with ordinary tube-type x-ray sources. The properties of the synchrotron source such as the continuous range of energy, high degree of photon polarization, pulsed beams, and photon flux many orders of magnitude higher than from x-ray tubes have made possible major advances in the possible chemical applications. We describe here ways that materials analyses can be made using the high intensity beams for measurements with small beam sizes and/or high detection sensitivity. The relevant characteristics of synchrotron x-ray sources are briefly summarized to give an idea of the x-ray parameters to be exploited. The experimental techniques considered include x-ray fluorescence, absorption, and diffraction. Examples of typical experimental apparatus used in these experiments are considered together with descriptions of actual applications.

  11. 50 Years of synchrotrons Adams' Memorial lecture

    CERN Document Server

    Lawson, J D; CERN. Geneva

    1996-01-01

    Fifty years ago Frank Goward of the Atomic Energy Research Establishment Group at Malvern converted a small American betatron to make the worldÕs first synchrotron. At the same time Marcus Oliphant was planning to build at Birmingham a large proton machine with a ring magnet and variable magnetic field. Ideas for this had come to him during night-shifts tending the electromagnetic separators at Oak Ridge during the war. Some seven years later, in 1953, a group gathered together in Geneva to build the PS. A major contributor to the design work which had made this possible was John Adams. An account of some of the achievements in these eventful years will be presented. CERN has built nine synchrotrons/colliders and two temporary test rings. Eight machines are still running. The review will start with the PS, the first proton synchrotron based on the alternating gradient principle invented in 1952 at BNL. The design work of the PS team, under the enlightened leadership of J.B. Adams, and the construction of the...

  12. Theory of the Alternating-Gradient Synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, E. D.; Snyder, H. S.

    2000-04-01

    The equations of motion of the particles in a synchrotron in which the field gradient indexn=-(r/B) ∂B/∂rvaries along the equilibrium orbit are examined on the basis of the linear approximation. It is shown that if n alternates rapidly between large positive and large negative values, the stability of both radial and vertical oscillations can be greatly increased compared to conventional accelerators in which n is azimuthally constant and must lie between 0 and 1. Thus aperture requirements are reduced. For practical designs, the improvement is limited by the effects of constructional errors; these lead to resonance excitation of oscillations and consequent instability if 2νx or 2νz or νx+νz is integral, where νx and νz are the frequencies of horizontal and vertical betatron oscillations, measured in units of the frequency of revolution. The mechanism of phase stability is essentially the same as in a conventional synchrotron, but the radial amplitude of synchrotron oscillations is reduced substantially. Furthermore, at a "transition energy" E1≈νxMc2 the stable and unstable equilibrium phases exchange roles, necessitating a jump in the phase of the radiofrequency accelerating voltage. Calculations indicate that the manner in which this jump is performed is not very critical.

  13. Tabletop synchrotron and its unique features

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, H

    2002-01-01

    Two synchrotrons, AURORA and MIRRORCLE, were built in Ritsumeikan University. MIRRORCLE-20 is the smallest normal conduction synchrotron (15 cm orbit radius and 1.2 m outer diameter) in the world. It uses 2/3 resonance method for electron beam incidence but is not optimized for X-ray generation. MIRRORCLE-6 shall be optimized for X-ray generation. X-ray generated by MIRRORCLE shows very flat white light, rich in hard X-ray, pulse with width changeable from a few mu s to a few ms , wide radiation angle of 25 mrad at MIRRORCLE-20 and 80 mrad at MIRRORCLE-8 and high coherence. The feature such as pulsed light and high coherence is expected to new application which photon radiation cannot practice. Imaging experiments by MIRRORCLE were carried out by Cu plate, Al plate, Teflon and acryl plate. We took a photograph of insect, electric lamp, connector, and cyclotron. New X-ray generation mechanism, X-ray strength, development of tabletop synchrotron and features of X-ray beam are explained. (S.Y.)

  14. New synchrotron radiation facility project. Panel on new synchrotron radiation facility project

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, S; Kimura, Y

    2003-01-01

    The project for constructing a new synchrotron radiation facility dedicated to the science in VUV (or EUV) and Soft X-ray (SX) region has been discussed for these two years at the Panel on New Synchrotron Radiation Facility Project. The Panel together with the Accelerator Design Working Group (WG), Beamline Design WG and Research Program WG suggested to the Ministry of Education, Science, Culture and Sports the construction of a 1.8 GeV electron storage ring suitable for 'Top-Up' operation and beamlines and monochromators designed for undulator radiation. The scientific programs proposed by nationwide scientists are summarized with their requirements of the characteristics of the beam. (author)

  15. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF MULTI-TURN EXTRACTION FROM THE PROTON SYNCHROTRON TO THE SUPER PROTON SYNCHROTRON

    CERN Document Server

    Abernethy, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Within CERN's accelerator complex, the extraction from the Proton Synchrotron to the Super Proton Synchrotron has been done using the so-called ``Continuous Transfer" (CT) method since the 1970's. A new technique, known as Multi-Turn Extraction (MTE), has now been implemented and is in full operation. This report examines a holistic performance analysis of the novel technique in multiple aspects of the accelerator complex, as well as a direct comparison with its predecessor, CT, from the implementation of MTE in 2010 until the end of 2015.

  16. Ground-water quality and geochemical processes at a municipal landfill, Town of Brookhaven, Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearsall, Kenneth A.; Aufderheide, Mary Jean

    1995-01-01

    The principal geochemical process within a plume of leachate-contaminated ground water downgradient from the municipal landfill in the Town of Brookhaven is the oxidation of organic matter. Concurrent reducing processes are the reduction of iron and manganese oxyhydroxides to soluble ferrous and manganous forms, of nitrate and nitrite to nitrogen and ammonia, of sulfate to sulfide (sulfide precipitates from solution as iron and manganese sulfides), and, under extreme conditions, of some organic matter to methane. Secondary processes unrelated to bacterial activity and redox processes are the exchange of dissolved sodium and potassium for calcium and magnesium at ion-exchange sites and the dissolution of calcium and magnesium silicate minerals; these processes cause sodium and potassium concentrations to decrease with depth and with distance from the landfill and cause calcium, magnesium, and silica concentrations to increase.

  17. Optimization of the Epithermal Neutron Beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jih-Perng; Rorer, David C.; Reciniello, Richard N.; Holden, Norman E.

    2003-06-01

    Clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for patients with malignant brain tumor had been carried out for half a decade, using an epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Reactor. The decision to permanently close this reactor in 2000 cut short the efforts to implement a new conceptual design to optimize this beam in preparation for use with possible new protocols. Details of the conceptual design to produce a higher intensity, more forward-directed neutron beam with less contamination from gamma rays, fast and thermal neutrons are presented here for their potential applicability to other reactor facilities. Monte Carlo calculations were used to predict the flux and absorbed dose produced by the proposed design. The results were benchmarked by the dose rate and flux measurements taken at the facility then in use.

  18. Optimization of the epithermal neutron beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jih-Perng; Reciniello, Richard N; Holden, Norman E

    2004-05-01

    The use of epithermal neutron beam in clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for patients with malignant brain tumors had been carried out for half a decade at the Brookhaven's Medical Reactor. The decision to permanently close this reactor in 2000 cut short the efforts to implement a new conceptual design to optimize this beam in preparation for use with possible new BNCT protocols. Details of the conceptual design to produce a highly intensified and focused neutron beam with less gamma and neutron contamination in tissues are presented here for their potential applicability to other reactor facilities. Neutron-photon coupled Monte Carlo calculations were used to predict the flux, current, heating, and absorbed dose produced by the proposed design. The results were benchmarked by the dose rate and flux measurements taken at the facility then in use.

  19. Longitudinal Flow from 2-8 AGeV Au+Au Collisions at the Brookhaven AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Klay, J L; Alexander, J M; Anderson, M; Best, D; Brady, F P; Case, T; Caskey, W; Cebra, D; Chance, J L; Chung, P; Cole, B; Crowe, K; Das, A C; Draper, J E; Gilkes, M L; Gushue, S; Heffner, M; Hirsch, A S; Hjort, E L; Huo, L; Justice, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kintner, J C; Krofcheck, D; Lacey, R A; Law, C; Lauret, J; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Liu, Y M; McGrath, R; Milosevich, Z; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Olson, D L; Panitkin, S Y; Pinkenburg, C H; Porile, N T; Rai, G; Ritter, H G; Romero, J L; Scharenberg, R P; Schröder, L; Srivastava, B; Stone, N T B; Symons, T J M; Wang, S; Wells, R; Whitfield, J; Wienold, T; Witt, R; Wood, L; Zhang Wei Ning

    2002-01-01

    Longitudinal flow extracted from the rapidity density distributions of protons from Au + Au collisions measured by the E895 Collaboration in the energy range from 2 to 8 AGeV at the Brookhaven AGS is presented. The almost 4pi coverage provided by the EOS Time Projection Chamber allows reconstruction of proton transverse mass spectra over a broad range of rapidities. The asymptotic slope of each mt-m0 spectrum provides a temperature with which to calculate an expected dN/dy using a thermal model which includes collective longitudinal flow. This expected dN/dy is fit to the data to extract the longitudinal flow. The results show an approximately linear increase in the longitudinal flow velocity, beta*gamma_{L}, as a function of the logarithm of beam energy.

  20. Injection System design for a hadron therapy Synchrotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-Quan; SONG Ming-Tao; WEI Bao-Wen

    2008-01-01

    A synchrotron is designed for tumour therapy with C6+ ions or proton.Its injector is a cyclotron, which delivers C5+or H+2 ions to the synchrotron.After comparing the methods of the single-turn injection, the multi-turn injection and the stripping injection,this paper chooses the stripping injection method.In addition,the concept design of the injection system is presented,in which the synchrotron lattice is optimized.

  1. Improvements of the TROLL-2 synchrotron and new developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anevsky, S. I.; Vernyi, A. E.; Panasyuk, V. S.; Khromchenko, V. B.

    1991-10-01

    Information on radical improvements of the TROLL-2 synchrotron, a specialized pulsed synchrotron radiation source, is presented in this article. Two new variants for particle injection from a solid electromagnet to a ring one, as a specialized continuous synchrotron radiation source are considered. Particle pre-acceleration from thermal velocities to injection energy herewith may take place both in the synchronous and in the isochrone regime.

  2. Elemental concentration in normal skin and fibroepithelial polip lesions by synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Julio C.A.C.R.; Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: jcorsini@lin.ufrj.br [Nuclear Laboratory Instrumentation/COPPE, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Anjos, Marcelino J., E-mail: marcelin@lin.ufrj.br [Physics Institute, State University of Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this work, the concentrations of trace elements were measured in acrochordon, a skin lesion also known as skin tag or fibroepithelial polyp, as well as in normal skin from the same patient. The samples were analysed by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X- ray Fluorescence (SRTXRF) in the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas/Sao Paulo-Brazil. The collection of lesion and healthy skin samples, including papillary dermis and epidermis, has involved 17 patients. It was evaluated the presence of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br and Rb in the paired samples, which were compared, and significant differences were found in some of them. (author)

  3. Elemental concentrations in skin of patients with fibroeptelial polip using synchrotron radiation total reflection x-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Júlio C. A. C. R.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Canellas, Catarine G. L.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, the concentrations of trace elements were measured in acrochordon, a skin lesion also known as skin tag or fibroepithelial polyp, as well as in normal skin from the same patient. The samples were analyzed by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (SRTXRF) in the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas/São Paulo-Brazil. The collection of lesion and healthy skin samples, including papillary dermis and epidermis, has involved 17 patients. It was evaluated the presence of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in the paired samples, which were compared, and significant differences were found in some of them.

  4. Bystander Effects During Synchrotron Imaging Procedures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schültke, Elisabeth; Bewer, Brian; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean; Nikkhah, Guido

    2010-07-01

    Using monochromatic beam and synchrotron phase-contrast technique at the biomedical beamline of the Italian synchrotron facility Elettra (SYRMEP), we have shown in a small animal model of malignant brain tumor that it is possible to obtain high-resolution images of very small tumors when they have developed from implanted tumor cells loaded with colloidal gold nanoparticles (GNP). All previous experiments were conducted in post-mortem samples. We have now designed a cell culture experiment to investigate the effects of synchrotron radiation with an energy and dose profile similar to that expected in our first in vivo imaging studies according to the protocol developed at SYRMEP. Materials and Methods: Culture flasks containing either gold-loaded or naïve C6 glioma cells were exposed to a dose of 0.5 Gy at 24 keV. The irradiated medium was aspirated and replaced with fresh growth medium. Twenty-four hours later this non-irradiated medium exposed to irradiated cells was aspirated, then added to non-irradiated C6 cells in order to investigate whether bystander effects are seen under the conditions of our image acquisition protocol. The irradiated medium was added to a number of other non-irradiated cell cultures. Cell counts were followed until 72 hrs after irradiation. Western blots were conducted with H2AX antibodies. This experiment was one of the first biomedical experiments conducted at BMIT, the new biomedical imaging and therapy beamline of the Canadian Light Source. Results: No significant differences in proliferation were seen between cells that were directly irradiated, exposed to irradiated medium or exposed to the non-irradiated 24-hr-medium from the irradiated cells. However, there was a tendency towards a higher number of double strand breaks in previously irradiated cells when they were exposed to non-irradiated medium that had been in contact with irradiated cells for 24 hrs.

  5. Laser synchrotron radiation and beam cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.; Ting, A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of intense {approx_gt} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, short pulse ({approx_lt} 1 ps) lasers with electron beams and plasmas can lead to the generation of harmonic radiation by several mechanisms. Laser synchrotron radiation may provide a practical method for generating tunable, near monochromatic, well collimated, short pulse x-rays in compact, relatively inexpensive source. The mechanism for the generation of laser synchrotron radiation is nonlinear Thomson scattering. Short wavelengths can be generated via Thomson scattering by two methods, (i) backscattering from relativistic electron beams, in which the radiation frequency is upshifted by the relativistic factor 4{gamma}{sup 2}, and (ii) harmonic scattering, in which a multitude of harmonics are generated with harmonic numbers extending out to the critical harmonic number nc{approx_equal}a{sub 0}{sup 3} {much_gt} 1, where a{sub 0} {approx_equal}10{sup -9}{lambda}I{sup 1/2}, {lambda} is the laser wavelength in {mu}m and I is the laser intensity in W/cm{sup 2}. Laser synchrotron sources are capable of generating short ({approx_lt} ps) x-ray pulses with high peak flux ({approx_gt} 10{sup 21} photons/s) and brightness ({approx_gt}{sup 19} photons/s-mm{sup 2}-mrad{sup 2} 0.1%BW. As the electron beam radiates via Thomson scattering, it can subsequently be cooled, i.e., the beam emittance and energy spread can be reduced. This cooling can occur on rapid ({approximately} ps) time scales. In addition, electron distributions with sufficiently small axial energy spreads can be used to generate coherent XUV radiation via a laser-pumped FEL mechanism.

  6. Glancing angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernik, R.J. [Daresbury Lab., Warrington, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes in basic detail some of the techniques that can be used to study thin films and surfaces. These are all in the X-ray region and cover reflectivity, diffraction form polycrystalline films, textured films and single crystal films. Other effects such as fluorescence and diffuse scattering are mentioned but not discussed in detail. Two examples of the reflectivity from multilayers and the diffraction from iron oxide films are discussed. The advantages of the synchrotron for these studies is stressed and the experimental geometries that can be employed are described i detail. A brief bibliography is provided at the end to accompany this part of the 1996 Frascati school.

  7. Multi turn beam extraction from synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoupas, Nicholaos

    2017-01-24

    This disclosure relates to apparatuses and methods for the extraction of particle beams while maintaining the energy levels and precision of the particles and the particle beam. Apparatuses and methods for extracting a charged particle beam from a central orbit in a synchrotron are provided, in which a particle beam is deflected from the central orbit. Parts of the deflected particle beam passes through a stripping foil placed in at least parts of the deflected path such that the particles that pass through the foil are stripped of at least one electron. The electron stripped particles and the non-stripped particles may be separated magnetically.

  8. Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  9. Exposure from residual radiation after synchrotron shutdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyers, M.F. [Proton Therapy, Inc., Colton, CA 92324 (United States)], E-mail: mfmoyers@roadrunner.com; Lesyna, D.A. [Optivus Proton Therapy, San Bernardino, CA 92408 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Personnel exposure from residual radiation present after an accelerator is shutdown for preventative or corrective maintenance is an important aspect that governs the manner in which a light ion facility can be used. This radiation is not only a safety issue for maintenance personnel but also can affect the patient throughput of the facility. Measurements were made with survey instruments around the synchrotron accelerator at the Loma Linda University Proton Treatment Facility and personnel dosimetry records of maintenance staff were reviewed. Results showed that the residual radiation in this facility design is very low, does not significantly impact maintenance staff safety, and has placed no restrictions on patient throughput.

  10. Analytical Fits to the Synchrotron Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Fouka, M

    2013-01-01

    Accurate fitting formulae to the synchrotron function, $F(x)$, and its complementary function, $G(x)$, are performed and presented. The corresponding relative errors are less than $0.26\\%$ and $0.035\\%$ for $F(x) $ and $G(x)$, respectively. To this aim we have, first, fitted the modified Bessel functions, $K_{5/3}(x)$ and $K_{2/3}(x)$. For all the fitted functions, the general fit expression is the same, and is based on the well known asymptotic forms for low and large $x$-values for each function. It consists of multiplying each asymptotic form by a function that tends to unity or zero for low and large $x$-values. Simple formulae are suggested in this paper, depending on adjustable parameters. The latter have been determined by adopting the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The proposed formulae should be of great utility and simplicity for computing spectral powers and the degree of polarization for the synchrotron radiation, both for laboratory and astrophysical applications.

  11. Physics design of SSRF synchrotron radiation security

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yi; DAI Zhi-Min; LIU Gui-Min

    2009-01-01

    High brightness of SSRF brings about synchrotron radiation security problems,which will be solved in physics design.The main radiations are generated from bending magnets and insertion devices.Since the fact that radiation power and radiating area are different in these two kinds of synchrotron radiation,the arrangements of photon absorbers,diaphragms and other vacuum components need to be treated distinctively.In addition.SSRF interlock protection threshold is defined and the beam orbit in the straight line is limited.Hence.beam orbit in the bending magnets and IDs are also restricted by the threshold.The orbit restriction is calculated and helps us to arrange the vacuum components.In this paper,beam orbit distortion restricted by interlock protection threshold,radiation power,radiation angle and illuminating area are calculated.From the calculation results,the physics designs in manufacture and installation vacuum components are put forward.By commissioning,it is shown that physics requirements are met rigidly in the engineering process.

  12. Injection Efficiency Monitor for the Australian Synchrotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rassool R. P.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Synchrotron AS is moving towards a continuous injection mode called top-up. During top-up the linac and booster synchrotron injection system will be in continuous operation rather than usedevery eight hours the way they are used at present. In order to monitor the performance of the injection system areal-time injection efficiency monitoring system has been developed. The system consists of several Fast CurrentTransformers [1] and matching digitisers [2] and is designed to count every beam pulse and measure the transmission efficiency through the whole accelerator complex. After calibrating the system using a properly matchedFaraday Cup at the electron gun, a transmission efficiency is then calculated at each stage of transferring the beamfrom 90 keV out of the gun to 3 GeV in the storage ring. The system is used to optimise the injection process inorder to maximise the injection efficiency and as an early warning system when equipment starts to fail and theinjection efficiency decreases.

  13. Mapping prehistoric ghosts in the synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, N.P.; Wogelius, R.A. [University of Manchester, School of Earth, Atmospheric, and Environmental Sciences, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Williamson Research Centre for Molecular Environmental Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); Bergmann, U. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Linac Coherent Light Source, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Larson, P. [Black Hills Institute of Geological Research, Inc., Hill City, SD (United States); Sellers, W.I. [University of Manchester, Faculty of Life Sciences, Manchester (United Kingdom); Manning, P.L. [University of Manchester, School of Earth, Atmospheric, and Environmental Sciences, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Williamson Research Centre for Molecular Environmental Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Pennsylvania, Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The detailed chemical analysis of fossils has the potential to reveal great insight to the composition, preservation and biochemistry of ancient life. Such analyses would ideally identify, quantify, and spatially resolve the chemical composition of preserved bone and soft tissue structures, but also the embedding matrix. Mapping the chemistry of a fossil in situ can place constraints on mass transfer between the enclosing matrix and the preserved organism(s), and therefore aid in distinguishing taphonomic processes from original chemical zonation remnant within the fossils themselves. Conventional analytical methods, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) have serious limitations in this case, primarily, an inability to provide large (i.e., decimeter) scale chemical maps. Additionally, vacuum chamber size and the need for destructive sampling preclude analysis of large and precious fossil specimens. However, the recent development of Synchrotron Rapid Scanning X-ray Fluorescence (SRS-XRF) at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) allows the non-destructive chemical analysis and imaging of major, minor, and trace element concentrations of large paleontological and archeological specimens in rapid scanning times. Here we present elemental maps of a fossil reptile produced using the new SRS-XRF method. Our results unequivocally show that preserved biological structures are not simply impressions or carbonized remains, but possess a remnant of the original organismal biochemistry. We show that SRS-XRF is a powerful new tool for the study of paleontological and archaeological samples. (orig.)

  14. Enhanced analysis of biomaterials by synchrotron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, K. [Cranfield Postgraduate Medical School, Cranfield University, Shrivenham, Swindon, Wiltshire, SN6 8LA (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: k.d.rogers@cranfield.ac.uk; Etok, S. [Cranfield Postgraduate Medical School, Cranfield University, Shrivenham, Swindon, Wiltshire, SN6 8LA (United Kingdom); Broadhurst, A. [Cranfield Postgraduate Medical School, Cranfield University, Shrivenham, Swindon, Wiltshire, SN6 8LA (United Kingdom); Scott, R. [Biomet-Europe, Dorcan Way, Swindon, Wiltshire, SN3 5HY (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-11

    There is an increasing body of evidence that prosthetic implants based upon titanium alloys attain improved performance when coated with calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP). Such coatings appear to promote osteointegration and bone in-growth. Plasma spraying is the most frequently employed route to coating fabrication. Detailed chemical and structural characterisation of these coatings is essential for (i) coating technology development (ii) ensuring consistent material quality and (iii) assessing coating performance. The work presented here employed combined conventional powder diffraction and glancing angle synchrotron diffraction to examine the in vitro performance of apatite coatings formed by plasma spraying. Coatings were exposed to simulated body fluid and foetal calf serum, and changes to the coating chemistry and structure determined. A new analysis method, synchrotron depth profiling tomography, has been applied to obtain structural features through the coating depth. The dissolution and re-precipitation behaviour of the coatings was found to be significantly different for each media. For the first time, it has been possible to identify and quantify the formation of a nanocrystalline, carbonated HAP phase. It has been possible to simultaneously model all coating phases apparent within the X-ray diffraction data and thus quantify changes to film composition. DPT has also revealed subtle changes in coating features with depth and these may have a significant impact on coating dissolution. The findings are discussed in the context of kinematic models for the coating behaviour and implications for the performance of such coatings in vivo.

  15. Magnetic Field Structure from Synchrotron Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, R

    2006-01-01

    Total magnetic fields in spiral galaxies, as observed through their total synchrotron emission, are strongest (up to \\simeq 30\\mu G) in the spiral arms. The degree of radio polarization is low; the field in the arms must be mostly turbulent or tangled. Polarized synchrotron emission shows that the resolved regular fields are generally strongest in the interarm regions (up to \\simeq 15\\mu G), sometimes forming 'magnetic arms' parallel to the optical arms. The field structure is spiral in almost every galaxy, even in flocculent and bright irregular types which lack spiral arms. The observed large-scale patterns of Faraday rotation in several massive spiral galaxies reveal coherent regular fields, as predicted by dynamo models. However, in most galaxies observed so far no simple patterns of Faraday rotation could be found. Either many dynamo modes are superimposed and cannot be resolved by present-day telescopes, or most of the apparently regular field is in fact anisotropic random, with frequent reversals, due ...

  16. Beam halo collimation in heavy ion synchrotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strašík, I.; Prokhorov, I.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a systematic study of the halo collimation of ion beams from proton up to uranium in synchrotrons. The projected Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research synchrotron SIS100 is used as a reference case. The concepts are separated into fully stripped (e.g., 238U92+ ) and partially stripped (e.g., 238U28+ ) ion collimation. An application of the two-stage betatron collimation system, well established for proton accelerators, is intended also for fully stripped ions. The two-stage system consists of a primary collimator (a scattering foil) and secondary collimators (bulky absorbers). Interaction of the particles with the primary collimator (scattering, momentum losses, and nuclear interactions) was simulated by using fluka. Particle-tracking simulations were performed by using mad-x. Finally, the dependence of the collimation efficiency on the primary ion species was determined. The influence of the collimation system adjustment, lattice imperfections, and beam parameters was estimated. The concept for the collimation of partially stripped ions employs a thin stripping foil in order to change their charge state. These ions are subsequently deflected towards a dump location using a beam optical element. The charge state distribution after the stripping foil was obtained from global. The ions were tracked by using mad-x.

  17. Synchrotrons for hadron therapy: Part I

    CERN Document Server

    Badano, L; Bryant, P; Crescenti, M; Holy, P; Knaus, P; Maier, A; Pullia, M; Rossi, S

    1999-01-01

    The treatment of cancer with accelerator beams has a long history with betatrons, linacs, cyclotrons and now synchrotrons being exploited for this purpose. Treatment techniques can be broadly divided into the use of spread-out beams and scanned 'pencil' beams. The Bragg-peak behaviour of hadrons makes them ideal candidates for the latter. The combination of precisely focused 'pencil' beams with controllable penetration (Bragg peak) and high, radio-biological efficiency (light ions) opens the way to treating the more awkward tumours that are radio-resistant, complex in shape and lodged against critical organs. To accelerate light ions (probably carbon) with pulse-to-pulse energy variation, a synchrotron is the natural choice. The beam scanning system is controlled via an on-line measurement of the particle flux entering the patient and, for this reason, the beam spill must be extended in time (seconds) by a slow-extraction scheme. The quality of the dose intensity profile ultimately depends on the uniformity o...

  18. Synchrotrons for hadron therapy, part 1

    CERN Document Server

    Badano, L; Bryant, P J; Crescenti, M; Holy, P; Knaus, P; Maier, A T; Pullia, M; Rossi, S

    1999-01-01

    The treatment of cancer with accelerator beams has a long history with linacs, cyclotrons and now synchrotrons being exploited for this purpose. Treatment techniques can be broadly divided into the use of spread-out beams and scanned 'pencil' beams. The Bragg-peak behaviour of hadrons makes them ideal candidates for the latter. The combination of precisely focused 'pencil' beams with controllable penetration (Bragg peak) and high, radio-biological efficiency (light ions) opens the way to treating the more awkward tumours that are radio-resistant, complex in shape and lodged against critical organs. To accelerate light ions (probably carbon) with pulse-to-pulse energy variation, a synchrotron is the natural choice. The beam scanning system is controlled via an on-line measurement of the particle flux entering the patient and, for this reason, the beam spill must be extended in time (seconds) by a slow-extraction scheme. The quality of the dose intensity profile ultimately depends on the uniformity of the beam ...

  19. Ferroelectrics under the Synchrotron Light: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Fuentes-Cobas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, an intensive search for high-performance lead-free ferroelectric materials is taking place. ABO3 perovskites (A = Ba, Bi, Ca, K and Na; B = Fe, Nb, Ti, and Zr appear as promising candidates. Understanding the structure–function relationship is mandatory, and, in this field, the roles of long- and short-range crystal orders and interactions are decisive. In this review, recent advances in the global and local characterization of ferroelectric materials by synchrotron light diffraction, scattering and absorption are analyzed. Single- and poly-crystal synchrotron diffraction studies allow high-resolution investigations regarding the long-range average position of ions and subtle global symmetry break-downs. Ferroelectric materials, under the action of electric fields, undergo crystal symmetry, crystallite/domain orientation distribution and strain condition transformations. Methodological aspects of monitoring these processes are discussed. Two-dimensional diffraction clarify larger scale ordering: polycrystal texture is measured from the intensities distribution along the Debye rings. Local order is investigated by diffuse scattering (DS and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS experiments. DS provides information about thermal, chemical and displacive low-dimensional disorders. XAFS investigation of ferroelectrics reveals local B-cation off-centering and oxidation state. This technique has the advantage of being element-selective. Representative reports of the mentioned studies are described.

  20. Progress of the Synchrotron Light Source ALBA

    CERN Document Server

    Einfeld, Dieter; Campmany, Josep; Muñoz, Marc; Pont, Montserrat

    2005-01-01

    ALBA will be a third generation synchrotron light source built in Spain near Barcelona. Commissioning of the storage ring is foreseen to start at the end of 2008. The design phase of ALBA is almost completed and the first components are ready to be ordered. A 100 MeV LINAC will inject electrons into a nominal energy booster synchrotron of similar circumference as the storage ring, so that both accelerators will share the same tunnel. The storage ring, working at 3 GeV with a circumference of 268.8 m, has been designed for a maximum current of 400 mA. The lattice is based on an extended DBA structure and has a nominal emittance of 4 nm.rad.The machine has a four fold symmetry with 4 long straight sections (8 m), 12 medium (4.2 m) and 8 short (2.6 m). This report concentrates on recent design developments, component choices and current status. Another paper at this conference deals with accelerator physics issues.

  1. ANKA - Service-oriented synchrotron radiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babayan, Ruben Albert; Birkel, Ingrid; Buth, Gernot [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, ANKA Project Group, Karlsruhe (DE)] [and others

    1999-06-01

    ANKA is a 2.5 GeV synchrotron radiation facility under construction at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. ANKA is based on a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring injected from a 500 MeV booster synchrotron and a 50 MeV racetrack microtron. Nominal circulating electron current will be 400 mA. The facility is scheduled to become operational in fall 2000. ANKA will deliver photons predominantly in the hard X-ray range but it will also feature both XUV and infrared beamlines. So far, all beamlines will use bending magnets as sources, while provision is made to install appropriate insertion devices later on. ANKA has a novel mission which is characterised by giving preference to providing service to customers while maintaining a significant fraction of research work. ANKA will offer full service in X-ray lithography, mainly for micro- and nanofabrication, and in analysing and investigating non-destructively various structural, mechanical, chemical, electronic, magnetic, and molecular properties of samples and components. (author)

  2. Analytical fits to the synchrotron functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mourad Fouka; Saad Ouichaoui

    2013-01-01

    Accurate fitting formulae to the synchrotron function,F(x),and its complementary function,G(x),are performed and presented.The corresponding relative errors are less than 0.26% and 0.035% for F(x) and G(x),respectively.To this end we have,first,fitted the modified Bessel functions,K5/3(x) and K2/3(x).For all the fitted functions,the general fit expression is the same,and is based on the well known asymptotic forms for low and large values of x for each function.It consists of multiplying each asymptotic form by a function that tends to unity or zero for low and large values of x.Simple formulae are suggested in this paper,depending on adjustable parameters.The latter have been determined by adopting the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm.The proposed formulae should be of great utility and simplicity for computing spectral powers and the degree of polarization for synchrotron radiation,both for laboratory and astrophysical applications.

  3. The radiation measurement applied to beam lifetime study on the synchrotron radiation facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuxiong; Li, Juexin; Liu, Zuping; Cui, Yonggang; Gong, Guanghua; Shao, Beibei

    2003-06-01

    To collect beam loss information from an accelerator radiation field is helpful to machine study and operation. For a synchrotron radiation storage ring, shower electrons give a distinct clue to loss location and a BLM-XS model detector is suitable to detect them. Recently, we set up a new beam loss monitoring system by this method for National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) storage ring. It does not interfere with the vacuum chamber and machine operation. Different from other systems, the detectors are used in pairs, fixed on opposite sides of the chamber separately. Some interesting phenomena about beam lifetime were observed. We located exactly where an excessive beam loss took place during ramping process and solved the problem. It was proved that gas accumulated at the front ends of photo-beam lines strongly impacted the electron beam and led to beam lifetime decreases. The cause of beam lifetime decrease because of superconducting wiggler is discussed.

  4. X-ray Absorption Imaging of High-Intensity Discharge Lamps Using Monochromatic Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, John J.; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Hechtfischer, Ulrich; Adler, Helmar G.

    2002-10-01

    We will report results from the imaging of Hg vapor in high-intensity discharge lamps using synchrotron radiation and digital detectors. These measurements extend previous work on x-ray absorption imaging in arc lamps using an x-ray tube and a passive phosphor image plate detector^i. The large x-ray flux obtained from the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory) combined with the electronic gating capabilities of an intensified charge-coupled device detector have allowed us to obtain time-resolved Hg distributions with high spatial resolution. Monochromatic synchrotron radiation improves the accuracy over what can be obtained with quasi-continuum radiation from an x-ray tube source. ^iJ. J. Curry, M. Sakai, and J. E. Lawler, Journal of Applied Physics 84, 3066 (1998).

  5. Tracing X-rays through an L-shaped laterally graded multilayer mirror: a synchrotron application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnicke, Marcelo Goncalves; Huang, Xianrong; Keister, Jeffrey W; Kodituwakku, Chaminda Nalaka; Cai, Yong Q

    2010-05-01

    A theoretical model to trace X-rays through an L-shaped (nested or Montel Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors) laterally graded multilayer mirror to be used in a synchrotron application is presented. The model includes source parameters (size and divergence), mirror figure (parabolic and elliptic), multilayer parameters (reflectivity, which depends on layer material, thickness and number of layers) and figure errors (slope error, roughness, layer thickness fluctuation Deltad/d and imperfection in the corners). The model was implemented through MATLAB/OCTAVE scripts, and was employed to study the performance of a multilayer mirror designed for the analyzer system of an ultrahigh-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer at National Synchrotron Light Source II. The results are presented and discussed.

  6. Low frequency interference between short synchrotron radiation sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Méot

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A recently developed analytical formalism describing low frequency far-field synchrotron radiation (SR is applied to the calculation of spectral angular radiation densities from interfering short sources (edge, short magnet. This is illustrated by analytical calculation of synchrotron radiation from various assemblies of short dipoles, including an “isolated” highest density infrared SR source.

  7. A synchrotron radiation facility for x-ray astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, C.J.; Lewis, R.A.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    1997-01-01

    A proposal for an x-ray optics test facility based at a synchrotron radiation source is presented. The facility would incorporate a clean preparation area, and a large evacuable test area. The advantages of using a synchrotron as the source of the test radiation are discussed. These include the a...

  8. Synchrotron radiation in art and archaeology SRA 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollard, A.M.; Janssens, K.; Artioli, G.; Young, M.L.; Casadio, F.; Schnepp, S.; Marvin, J.; Dunand, D.C.; Almer, J.; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W.K.; Haeffner, D.R.; Reguer, S.; Dillmann, Ph.; Mirambet, F.; Susini, J.; Lagarde, P.; Pradell, T.; Molera, J.; Brunetti, B.; D' acapito, F.; Maurizio, C.; Mazzoldi, P.; Padovani, S.; Sgamellotti, A.; Garges, F.; Etcheverry, M.P.; Flank, A.M.; Lagarde, P.; Marcus, M.A.; Scheidegger, A.M.; Grolimund, D.; Pallot-Frossard, I.; Smith, A.D.; Jones, M.; Gliozzo, E.; Memmi-Turbanti, I.; Molera, J.; Vendrell, M.; Mcconachie, G.; Skinner, T.; Kirkman, I.W.; Pantos, E.; Wallert, A.; Kanngiesser, B.; Hahn, O.; Wilke, M.; NekaT, B.; Malzer, W.; Erko, A.; Chalmin, E.; Vignaud, C.; Farges, F.; Susini, J.; Menu, M.; Sandstrom, M.; Cotte, M.; Kennedy, C.J.; Wess, T.J.; Muller, M.; Murphy, B.; Roberts, M.A.; Burghammer, M.; Riekel, C.; Gunneweg, J.; Pantos, E.; Dik, J.; Tafforeau, P.; Boistel, R.; Boller, E.; Bravin, A.; Brunet, M.; Chaimanee, Y.; Cloetens, P.; Feist, M.; Hoszowska, J.; Jaeger, J.J.; Kay, R.F.; Lazzari, V.; Marivaux, L.; Nel, A.; Nemoz, C.; Thibault, X.; Vignaud, P.; Zabler, S.; Sciau, P.; Goudeau, P.; Tamura, N.; Doormee, E.; Kockelmann, W.; Adriaens, A.; Ryck, I. de; Leyssens, K.; Hochleitner, B.; Schreiner, M.; Drakopoulos, M.; Snigireva, I.; Snigirev, A.; Sanchez Del Rio, M.; Martinetto, P.; Dooryhee, E.; Suarez, M.; Sodo, A.; Reyes-Valerio, C.; Haro Poniatowski, E.; Picquart, M.; Lima, E.; Reguera, E.; Gunneweg, J.; Reiche, I.; Berger, A.; Bevers, H.; Duval, A

    2005-07-01

    Materials - bones, artifacts, artwork,.... - lie at the heart of both archaeology and art conservation. Synchrotron radiation techniques provide powerful ways to interrogate these records of our physical and cultural past. In this workshop we will discuss and explore the current and potential applications of synchrotron radiation science to problems in archaeology and art conservation. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations.

  9. Comments on Landau damping due to synchrotron frequency spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    An inductive/space-charge impedance shifts the synchrotron frequency downwards above/below transition, but it is often said that the coherent synchrotron frequency of the bunch is not shifted in the rigid-dipole mode. On the other hand, the incoherent synchrotron frequency due to the sinusoidal rf always spreads in the downward direction. This spread will therefore not be able to cover the coherent synchrotron frequency, implying that there will not be any Landau damping no matter how large the frequency spread is. By studying the dispersion relation, it is shown that the above argument is incorrect, and there will be Landau damping if there is sufficient frequency spread. The main reason is that the coherent frequency of the rigid-dipole mode will no longer remain unshifted in the presence of a synchrotron frequency spread.

  10. Status of the booster synchrotron for SPring-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H.; Yonehara, H.; Aoki, T.; Tani, N.; Kaneda, T.; Ueyama, Y.; Sasaki, Y.; Nagafuchi, T.; Hayashi, S.; Yokomizo, H.

    1995-02-01

    The specification and the layout of the booster synchrotron for SPring-8 were decided. The synchrotron is designed to accelerate electron or positron beams from 1 to 8 GeV with a repetition cycle of 1 Hz. The construction of the synchrotron was started in 1993. First, one bending, one quadrupole, and one sextupole magnet were made and the results of the magnetic field measurement were acquired. Two septum, one bump, and one kicker magnets for the beam extraction have been made, the field measurement and a few improvements have progressed. The high power test of the first rf cavity was finished successfully. The calibration test of the button position monitor with the signal treatment circuits is advanced now. The residual components of the synchrotron are designed and constructed, and the commissioning of the synchrotron will start in 1996. This paper presents the first measurement of each component.

  11. 3D Detectors for Synchrotron Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pennicard, D

    2009-01-01

    3D detectors are a novel variety of photodiode radiation detector, invented by Parker, Kenney and Segal (1997). Instead of having n- and p-type contacts on the front and back surfaces of a silicon substrate, like a standard photodiode, they have columns of doped material passing through the thickness of the silicon. This structure means that the detector can combine a reasonable substrate thickness with a very small electrode spacing, resulting in a low depletion voltage, fast charge collection and low charge sharing. These detectors have a couple of promising applications. Their fast charge collection and low depletion voltage should make them very radiation-tolerant. So, they could be used for future particle physics experiments at the Super Large Hadron Collider (SLHC), where high levels of radiation damage are expected. Also, their low charge sharing means they could potentially improve X-ray diffraction measurements at synchrotrons such as Diamond Light Source. This would allow these experiments, for exa...

  12. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    According to literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so called `depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. I...

  13. Silicon Pixel Detectors for Synchrotron Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Graeme Douglas

    Recent advances in particle accelerators have increased the demands being placed on detectors. Novel detector designs are being implemented in many different areas including, for example, high luminosity experiments at the LHC or at next generation synchrotrons. The purpose of this thesis was to characterise some of these novel detectors. The first of the new detector types is called a 3D detector. This design was first proposed by Parker, Kenney and Segal (1997). In this design, doped electrodes are created that extend through the silicon substrate. When compared to a traditional photodiode with electrodes on the opposing surfaces, the 3D design can combine a reasonable detector thickness with a small electrode spacing resulting in fast charge collection and limited charge sharing. The small electrode spacing leads to the detectors having lower depletion voltages. This, combined with the fast collection time, makes 3D detectors a candidate for radiation hard applications. These applications include the upgra...

  14. Quadrupole magnet for a rapid cycling synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berg, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    Rapid Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS) feature interleaved warm and cold dipole magnets; the field of the warm magnets is used to modulate the average bending field depending on the particle energy. It has been shown that RCS can be an attractive option for fast acceleration of particles, for example, muons, which decay quickly. In previous studies it was demonstrated that in principle warm dipole magnets can be designed which can provide the required ramp rates, which are equivalent to frequencies of about 1 kHz. To reduce the losses it is beneficial to employ two separate materials for the yoke; it was also shown that by employing an optimized excitation coil geometry the eddy current losses are acceptable. In this paper we show that the same principles can be applied to quadrupole magnets targeting 30 T/m with a repetition rate of 1kHz and good field quality.

  15. Real-time animation of synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shintake, Tsumoru E-mail: shintake@spring8.or.jp

    2003-07-11

    New mathematical method has been developed to compute radiation field from a moving charge in free space. It is not based on the retarded potential or its derivation [R.Y. Tsien, Picture of dynamic electric fields, Am. J. Phys. 40, 1972]. It solves conformal mapping of electric field lines based on the following two facts: (1) once a wave is emitted from a particle, it propagates as a spherical wave. The wavelet (a part of the wave-front) runs with speed of the light, and does not change its direction, (2) the initial direction of the wavelet is determined by the Lorentz transformation between the electron-rest-frame to the laboratory frame, which gives the light aberration effect. 2D radiation simulator has been developed based on this method, which simulates synchrotron, undulator and dipole radiation in time domain [T. Shintake, Simulation of field lines generated by a moving charge, private note 1984 March 19 at KEK, not published].

  16. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, M.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Paquin, R.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Optical Sciences Center

    1997-06-01

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop{trademark}, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research.

  17. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Mei; Hirshfield, J L

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude.

  18. A guide to synchrotron radiation science

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Shigeru; Munro, Ian; Lodha, G S

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron Radiation (SR), as a light source is now in use around the world to provide brilliant radiation from the infrared into the soft and hard X-ray regions. It is an indispensible and essential tool to establish the physic-chemical characteristics of materials and surfaces from an atomic and molecular view point. It is being applied to topics which range from mineralogy to protein crystallography, embracing research in areas from the physical to the life sciences. This new guide is a concise yet comprehensive and easily readable introduction to an expanding area of science. It presents in a readily assimilable form the basic concepts of SR science from its generation principles, through source design and operation to the principles of instruments for SR exploitation followed by a survey of its actual applications in selected research fields, including spectroscopy, diffractometry, microanalysis and chemical processing.

  19. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    According to literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so called 'depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. In the geometrical optics limit computations can be performed analytically. Within this limit, we restrict ourselves to the case of the beam size-dominated regime, which is typical for synchrotron radiation facilities in the X-ray wavelength range. We give a direct demonstration of the fact that the apparent horizontal source size is broadened in proportion to the beamline opening angle and to the length of the wiggler. While this effect is well-understood, a direct proof appears not to have been given elsewhere. We consider the problem of the calculation of the wiggler source size by means of numerical simulations alone, which play the same role of an experiment. We report a significant numerical disagreement between exact calculations and approximations currently used in literature.

  20. Time-resolved spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poliakoff, E.D.

    1979-08-01

    Work performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is reported. The timing characteristics of the SPEAR beam (pulse width less than or equal to 0.4 nsec, pulse repetition period = 780 nsec) were exploited to determine dynamic behavior of atomic, molecular, excimeric, and photodissociative gas-phase species excited by vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. Fast fluorescence timing measurements were done to determine excited-state lifetimes of Kr and Xe. Pressure-dependent timing studies on Xe gas at higher concentrations demonstrated some of the problems associated with previous kinetic modeling of the Xe/sub 2/ system. It was found that even qualitative agreement of observed Xe/sub 2/ lifetimes as a function of pressure required the assumption that the radiative lifetime was a strong function of internuclear separation. The radiative decays of chemically unstable fragments, CN* (B/sup 2/..sigma../sup +/) and XeF* (B/sup 2/..sigma../sup +/ and C/sup 2/ Pi/sub 3/2//), were studied by pulsed photodissociation of stable parent compounds, ICN and XeF/sub 2/. When the polarization of the CN* (B/sup 2/..sigma../sup +/) fragment fluorescence was measured, it was found to be non-zero and strongly dependent on excitation wavelength. This polarization is related to the symmetry of the photodissociative surface via a classical model, and the variations in the polarization with wavelength is attributed to symmetry and lifetime effects of a predissociating parent molecule. Despite the drawbacks of limited availability and low radiation flux, synchrotron radiation is definitely a useful spectroscopic tool for VUV studies of gas-phase systems.

  1. Commissioning and Early Operation for the NSLS-II Booster RF System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cupolo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Davila, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gao, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Goel, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Holub, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kulpin, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McDonald, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Oliva, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Papu, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ramirez, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rose, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sikora, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sorrentino, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Towne, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a third generation 3GeV, 500mA synchrotron light source. We discuss the booster synchrotron RF system responsible for providing power to accelerate an electron beam from 200MeV to 3GeV. The RF system design and construction are complete and is currently in the operational phase of the NSLS-II project. Preliminary operational data is also discussed.

  2. Use of synchrotron tomography to image naturalistic anatomy in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socha, John J.; De Carlo, Francesco

    2008-08-01

    Understanding the morphology of anatomical structures is a cornerstone of biology. For small animals, classical methods such as histology have provided a wealth of data, but such techniques can be problematic due to destruction of the sample. More importantly, fixation and physical slicing can cause deformation of anatomy, a critical limitation when precise three-dimensional data are required. Modern techniques such as confocal microscopy, MRI, and tabletop x-ray microCT provide effective non-invasive methods, but each of these tools each has limitations including sample size constraints, resolution limits, and difficulty visualizing soft tissue. Our research group at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory) studies physiological processes in insects, focusing on the dynamics of breathing and feeding. To determine the size, shape, and relative location of internal anatomy in insects, we use synchrotron microtomography at the beamline 2-BM to image structures including tracheal tubes, muscles, and gut. Because obtaining naturalistic, undeformed anatomical information is a key component of our studies, we have developed methods to image fresh and non-fixed whole animals and tissues. Although motion artifacts remain a problem, we have successfully imaged multiple species including beetles, ants, fruit flies, and butterflies. Here we discuss advances in biological imaging and highlight key findings in insect morphology.

  3. Design of a high-flux epithermal neutron beam using 235U fission plates at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H B; Brugger, R M; Rorer, D C; Tichler, P R; Hu, J P

    1994-10-01

    Beams of epithermal neutrons are being used in the development of boron neutron capture therapy for cancer. This report describes a design study in which 235U fission plates and moderators are used to produce an epithermal neutron beam with higher intensity and better quality than the beam currently in use at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Monte Carlo calculations are used to predict the neutron and gamma fluxes and absorbed doses produced by the proposed design. Neutron flux measurements at the present epithermal treatment facility (ETF) were made to verify and compare with the computed results where feasible. The calculations indicate that an epithermal neutron beam produced by a fission-plate converter could have an epithermal neutron intensity of 1.2 x 10(10) n/cm2.s and a fast neutron dose per epithermal neutron of 2.8 x 10(-11) cGy.cm2/nepi plus being forward directed. This beam would be built into the beam shutter of the ETF at the BMRR. The feasibility of remodeling the facility is discussed.

  4. Probing combustion chemistry in a miniature shock tube with synchrotron VUV photo ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Patrick T; Troy, Tyler P; Ahmed, Musahid; Tranter, Robert S

    2015-02-17

    Tunable synchrotron-sourced photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PI-TOF-MS) is an important technique in combustion chemistry, complementing lab-scale electron impact and laser photoionization studies for a wide variety of reactors, typically at low pressure. For high-temperature and high-pressure chemical kinetics studies, the shock tube is the reactor of choice. Extending the benefits of shock tube/TOF-MS research to include synchrotron sourced PI-TOF-MS required a radical reconception of the shock tube. An automated, miniature, high-repetition-rate shock tube was developed and can be used to study high-pressure reactive systems (T > 600 K, P shock waves. In this paper, we present results of a PI-TOF-MS study at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dimethyl ether pyrolysis (2% CH3OCH3/Ar) was observed behind the reflected shock (1400 shock tube studies. The signal levels attained and data throughput rates with this technique are comparable to those with other synchrotron-based PI-TOF-MS reactors, and it is anticipated that this high pressure technique will greatly complement those lower pressure techniques.

  5. Mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of atoms and molecules using VUV synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostko, Oleg; Kim, Sang Kyu; Leone, Stephen R; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-12-31

    Mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation (Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) has been performed for Ar, N(2), O(2), N(2)O, H(2)O, C(2)H(2), and C(6)H(6). MATI allows for a better determination of ionization energies compared to those derived from photoionization efficiency curves traditionally used in synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry. The separation of the long-lived Rydberg state from the directly formed prompt ion, essential for a meaningful MATI spectrum, has been accomplished by employing an arrangement of ion optics coupled to unique electric field pulsing schemes. For Ar, a number of resolved bands below the ionization energy are observed, and these are ascribed to high-n,l Rydberg states prepared in the MATI scheme. The first vibrational state resolved MATI spectra of N(2) and O(2) are reported, and spectral characteristics are discussed in comparison with previously reported threshold photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Although MATI performed with synchrotron radiation is intrinsically less sensitive compared to laser-based sources, this work demonstrates that MATI spectroscopy performed with widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation is a complementary technique for studying the ionization spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules.

  6. Limitations on plasma acceleration due to synchrotron losses

    CERN Document Server

    Barletta, W A; Bonifacio, R; De Salvo, L

    1999-01-01

    In this letter we consider the effect of synchrotron radiation losses due to the betatron motion of the electron beam in its self-induced magnetic field in a plasma accelerator taking into account the charge neutralization factor. The most favorable case is where the plasma density is smaller than the beam density. The contrary regime is strongly disfavored by the synchrotron radiation loss for beams with characteristics for TeV energies. In both cases we find that upon increasing the plasma density the synchrotron losses kill the acceleration process, so that there are limitations on the maximum allowable plasma density.

  7. 3 GeV Booster Synchrotron Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2009-06-02

    Synchrotron light cna be produced from a relativistic particle beam circulating in a storage ring at extremely high intensity and brilliance over a large spectral region reaching from the far infrared regime to hard x-rays. The particles, either electrons or positrons, radiate as they are deflected in the fields of the storage ring bending magnets or of magnets specially optimized for the production of synchrotron light. The synchrotron light being very intense and well collimated in the forward direction has become a major tool in a large variety of research fields in physics, chemistry, material science, biology, and medicine.

  8. Optical systems for synchrotron radiation. Lecture 2. Mirror systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, M.R.

    1986-02-01

    The process of reflection of VUV and x-radiation is summarized. The functions of mirrors in synchrotron beamlines are described, which include deflection, filtration, power absorption, formation of a real image, focusing, and collimation. Fabrication of optical surfaces for synchrotron radiation beamlines are described, and include polishing of a near spherical surface as well as bending a cylindrical surface to toroidal shape. The imperfections present in mirrors, aberrations and surface figure inaccuracy, are discussed. Calculation of the thermal load of a mirror in a synchrotron radiation beam and the cooling of the mirror are covered briefly. 50 refs., 7 figs. (LEW)

  9. A novel gas-filled detector for synchrotron radiation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocsis, Menyhert [ESRF BP 220 38043 Grenoble (France)]. E-mail: kocsis@esrf.fr; Boesecke, P. [ESRF BP 220 38043 Grenoble (France); Carbone, D. [ESRF BP 220 38043 Grenoble (France); Herve, C. [ESRF BP 220 38043 Grenoble (France); Becker, B. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Diawara, Y. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Durst, R. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Khazins, D. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); He, B. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Medved, S. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Sedov, V. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Thorson, T. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Wachter, G. [Bruker AXS, Inc 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    We describe in this paper the performance under synchrotron radiation of a sealed gaseous detector, Vantec-1, operating at high pressure and less prone to discharges. It is consequently operating at high gain (>10{sup 5}) at high local counting rates up to 10{sup 6} cps/mm{sup 2}. To achieve these characteristics, a thin resistive layer is used on a glass plate between the mesh and the readout anode. The performance achieved with this detector is suited for applications in X-ray diffraction and synchrotron radiation. This detector has shown high reliability over time under harsh synchrotron radiation environment and robustness in manufacturing environment.

  10. Proceedings of the workshop on LAMPF II synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.K. (comp.)

    1983-01-01

    Topics covered at the workshop include: considerations for a staged approach to synchrotron construction; consideration of energy and cost for a kaon and/or antiproton factory; changing the transition energy in the main ring for the Fermilab antiproton beam; a lattice with 50% undispersed straight sections; bunch width considerations in a stretcher ring; a self-consistent longitudinal distribution; rapid-cycling tuned rf cavity for synchrotron use; considerations on a high-shunt impedance tunable RF cavity; rotating condensers; low extraction from the stretcher ring; an antiproton source for LAMPF II; synchrotron magnet circuit; power supply and ring magnet options; and notes for a kaon factory design. (GHT)

  11. ISO 14001 IMPLEMENTATION AT A NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRIGGS,S.L.K.

    2001-06-01

    After a tumultuous year discovering serious lapses in environment, safety and health management at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Department of Energy established a new management contract. It called for implementation of an IS0 14001 Environmental Management System and registration of key facilities. Brookhaven Science Associates, the managing contractor for the Laboratory, designed and developed a three-year project to change culture and achieve the goals of the contract. The focus of its efforts were to use IS0 14001 to integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of the Laboratory's mission, and manage its programs in a manner that protected the ecosystem and public health. A large multidisciplinary National Laboratory with over 3,000 employees and 4,000 visiting scientists annually posed significant challenges for IS0 14001 implementation. Activities with environmental impacts varied from regulated industrial waste generation, to soil activation from particle accelerator operations, to radioactive groundwater contamination from research reactors. A project management approach was taken to ensure project completion on schedule and within budget. The major work units for the Environmental Management System Project were as follows: Institutional EMS Program Requirements, Communications, Training, Laboratory-wide Implementation, and Program Assessments. To minimize costs and incorporate lessons learned before full-scale deployment throughout the Laboratory, a pilot process was employed at three facilities. Brookhaven National Laboratory has completed its second year of the project in the summer of 2000, successfully registering nine facilities and self-declaring conformance in all remaining facilities. Project controls, including tracking and reporting progress against a model, have been critical to the successful implementation. Costs summaries are lower than initial estimates, but as expected legal requirements, training, and assessments are key

  12. SYNCHROTRON HEATING BY A FAST RADIO BURST IN A SELF-ABSORBED SYNCHROTRON NEBULA AND ITS OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yuan-Pei; Dai, Zi-Gao [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, Bing, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are mysterious transient sources. If extragalactic, as suggested by their relative large dispersion measures, their brightness temperatures must be extremely high. Some FRB models (e.g., young pulsar model, magnetar giant flare model, or supra-massive neutron star collapse model) suggest that they may be associated with a synchrotron nebula. Here we study a synchrotron-heating process by an FRB in a self-absorbed synchrotron nebula. If the FRB frequency is below the synchrotron self-absorption frequency of the nebula, electrons in the nebula would absorb FRB photons, leading to a harder electron spectrum and enhanced self-absorbed synchrotron emission. In the meantime, the FRB flux is absorbed by the nebula electrons. We calculate the spectra of FRB-heated synchrotron nebulae, and show that the nebula spectra would show a significant hump in several decades near the self-absorption frequency. Identifying such a spectral feature would reveal an embedded FRB in a synchrotron nebula.

  13. Proceedings of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Brookhaven National Laboratory workshop on neutron scattering instrumentation at high-flux reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBee, M.R. (ed.); Axe, J.D.; Hayter, J.B.

    1990-07-01

    For the first three decades following World War II, the US, which pioneered the field of neutron scattering research, enjoyed uncontested leadership in the field. By the mid-1970's, other countries, most notably through the West European consortium at Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France, had begun funding neutron scattering on a scale unmatched in this country. By the early 1980's, observers charged with defining US scientific priorities began to stress the need for upgrading and expansion of US research reactor facilities. The conceptual design of the ANS facility is now well under way, and line-item funding for more advanced design is being sought for FY 1992. This should lead to a construction request in FY 1994 and start-up in FY 1999, assuming an optimal funding profile. While it may be too early to finalize designs for instruments whose construction is nearly a decade removed, it is imperative that we begin to develop the necessary concepts to ensure state-of-the-art instrumentation for the ANS. It is in this context that this Instrumentation Workshop was planned. The workshop touched upon many ideas that must be considered for the ANS, and as anticipated, several of the discussions and findings were relevant to the planning of the HFBR Upgrade. In addition, this report recognizes numerous opportunities for further breakthroughs on neutron instrumentation in areas such as improved detection schemes (including better tailored scintillation materials and image plates, and increased speed in both detection and data handling), in-beam monitors, transmission white beam polarizers, multilayers and supermirrors, and more. Each individual report has been cataloged separately.

  14. PREFACE: 17th Pan-American Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Conference SRI2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gwyn P.; Revesz, Peter; Arp, Uwe

    2014-03-01

    These proceedings are a collection of the articles presented at the seventeenth Pan-American Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Conference SRI2013, held on the campus of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), located in Gaithersburg, Maryland, United States of America, 19-21 June, 2013. SRI2013 was jointly hosted by the Cornell University Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), and the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF III) at NIST. This meeting's focus was clearly on instrumentation, thus fulfilling the intent of this SRI meeting series, which was initiated at NIST, then the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), in 1979. SRI2013 hosted more than 150 delegates, despite the new US governmental travel restrictions. This proceedings series aims to be an essential reference work for practitioners in the field. It primarily documents the evolution and development of techniques, but also recent scientific advances, that were presented during the two and a half days of the conference. We are extremely thankful to all the authors who contributed to making these proceedings a volume of reference as well as to the reviewers for their careful reading and constructive recommendations for improving the articles. Great thanks go to Robert Dragoset at NIST, for creating and maintaining the conference website and generating the conference logo. We are also thankful for the excellent support we received from the Conference Program at NIST, especially Kathy Kilmer and Angela Ellis. And we would like to dedicate these proceedings to the memory of Kathy Kilmer, who passed away on 15 October, 2013. NIST will not be the same without her. The Co-Editors: Uwe Arp (SURF/NIST) Peter Reversz (CHESS) Gwyn P Williams (Jefferson Lab)

  15. Multiple energy synchrotron biomedical imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassey, B.; Martinson, M.; Samadi, N.; Belev, G.; Karanfil, C.; Qi, P.; Chapman, D.

    2016-12-01

    A multiple energy imaging system that can extract multiple endogenous or induced contrast materials as well as water and bone images would be ideal for imaging of biological subjects. The continuous spectrum available from synchrotron light facilities provides a nearly perfect source for multiple energy x-ray imaging. A novel multiple energy x-ray imaging system, which prepares a horizontally focused polychromatic x-ray beam, has been developed at the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy bend magnet beamline at the Canadian Light Source. The imaging system is made up of a cylindrically bent Laue single silicon (5,1,1) crystal monochromator, scanning and positioning stages for the subjects, flat panel (area) detector, and a data acquisition and control system. Depending on the crystal’s bent radius, reflection type, and the horizontal beam width of the filtered synchrotron radiation (20-50 keV) used, the size and spectral energy range of the focused beam prepared varied. For example, with a bent radius of 95 cm, a (1,1,1) type reflection and a 50 mm wide beam, a 0.5 mm wide focused beam of spectral energy range 27 keV-43 keV was obtained. This spectral energy range covers the K-edges of iodine (33.17 keV), xenon (34.56 keV), cesium (35.99 keV), and barium (37.44 keV) some of these elements are used as biomedical and clinical contrast agents. Using the developed imaging system, a test subject composed of iodine, xenon, cesium, and barium along with water and bone were imaged and their projected concentrations successfully extracted. The estimated dose rate to test subjects imaged at a ring current of 200 mA is 8.7 mGy s-1, corresponding to a cumulative dose of 1.3 Gy and a dose of 26.1 mGy per image. Potential biomedical applications of the imaging system will include projection imaging that requires any of the extracted elements as a contrast agent and multi-contrast K-edge imaging.

  16. Brookhaven integrated energy/economy modeling system and its use in conservation policy analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groncki, P.J.; Marcuse, W.

    1979-07-01

    The approach used at BNL to model the impact of the introduction of advanced energy technologies in response to increased energy prices has been to link econometric, process, and input-output models. The econometric model generates growth, employment, productivity, inflation, final demand, and price-determined input-output coefficients for a ten-sector interindustry model. The outputs from the six energy sectors are used to drive a national energy process model which supplies energy prices, fuel mix, and energy capital requirements to the econometric model. The four nonenergy final demands from the econometric model are disaggregated and used with the energy demands from the process model to drive a 110-sector input-output model. The nonenergy coefficients in the input-output model are fixed, but the energy coefficients are variable - reflecting the technologies chosen by the solution of the process model. Coefficients representing advanced-energy-technology production functions have been incorporated in the input-output structure. This approach is briefly described, and three applications of this set of linked models are presented: (1) reports the findings of a study of the effects of various levels of conservation on the rate of growth in GNP and other economic indicators; (2) describes an application of the linked models to an accelerated solar-technology scenario, focusing on the long-run macroeconomic impacts of increased solar utilization; and (3) currently in progress, examines the robustness of two policies (a supply and a demand policy) and their effect on the penetration of renewable technologies across a range of reference cases designed to capture several of the uncertainties faced by decision makers. 63 references.

  17. A Monitor and Control System for the Synchrotron Radiation Beam Lines at DAΦNE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Three synchrotron radiation beam lines have been built on DAΦNE,the Frascati electron-positron accelerator.It is Possible to monitor and control all the elements on the beam lines using a modular network distributed I/O system by National Instrunments (FieldPoint) with Bridge VIEW/Lab VIEW programs,Two of these beam lines have radiation safety problems solved by two independent and redundant systems,using mechanical switches ,and S7-200 PLC's by Siemens.In this article our solution will be described in details.

  18. Synchrotron Photoionization Investigation of the Oxidation of Ethyl tert-Butyl Ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfough, Matthew; Yao, Rong; Ng, Martin; Catani, Katherine; Meloni, Giovanni

    2017-02-23

    The oxidation of ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), a widely used fuel oxygenated additive, is investigated using Cl atoms as initiators in the presence of oxygen. The reaction is carried out at 293, 550, and 700 K. Reaction products are probed by a multiplexed chemical kinetics photoionization mass spectrometer coupled with the synchrotron radiation produced at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Products are identified on the basis of mass-to-charge ratio, ionization energies, and shape of photoionization spectra. Reaction pathways are proposed together with detected primary products.

  19. Synchronization of Synchrotrons for bunch-to-bucket Transfers

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrand, Thibault; Damerau, Heiko; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    To reach high particle energies with synchrotrons, a chain of several accelerators is required, as the ratio of extraction and injection energy is in the range of 10 to 20 per synchrotron. Hence the beam must be transfered from one accelerator to the next one. This document deals with the bunch-to-bucket transfer method to inject particle bunches composing the beam from a source synchrotron to a target synchrotron. After we highlight the theoretical concept of the bunch-to-bucket transfer, we determine physical limitations due to the beam dynamics and the adiabatic aspect of the particle bunches. A summary of the currently performed bunch-to-bucket transfer scenarios between the accelerators at CERN is given and set in relation with the mentioned theoretical concepts.

  20. The Scale Invariant Synchrotron Jet of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L. M. Du; J. M. Bai; Z. H. Xie; T. F. Yi; Y. B. Xu; R. Xue; X. H. Wang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the scale invariance of the synchrotron jet of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars has been studied using a sample of combined sources from FKM04 and from SDSS DR3 catalogue. Since the research of scale invariance has been focused on sub-Eddington cases that can be fitted onto the fundamental plane, while near-Eddington sources such as FSRQs have not been explicitly studied. The extracted physical properties of synchrotron jet of FSRQs have been shown to be scale invariant using our sample. The results are in good agreement with theoretical expectations of Heinz & Sunyaev (2003). Therefore, the jet synchrotron is shown to be scale independent, regardless of the accretion modes. Results in this article thus lend support to the scale invariant model of the jet synchrotron throughout the mass scale of black hole systems.

  1. The use of slow-cycling synchrotrons in injection systems

    CERN Multimedia

    1966-01-01

    The PS improvement programme is concerned with increasing the potential of the PS for high energy physics. It involves developing the performance of the proton synchrotron itself and providing major items of experimental equipment to be used on the machine.

  2. Daresbury senses victory in battle for UK synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    Loder, N

    1999-01-01

    Scientists campaigning for the future synchrotron source, Diamond, to be sited at Daresbury rather than RAL, believe they have won their case following a meeting between the Office of Science & Technology and the director of the Welcome Trust (1 pg).

  3. Staff accuse bosses of secrecy over British synchrotron plans

    CERN Multimedia

    Loder, N

    1999-01-01

    Scientific staff at Daresbury who have worked on the Diamond project for many years, believe senior management has kept them in the dark over discussions about the possible siting of the synchrotron at RAL (1 page).

  4. Open Cell Conducting Foams for High Synchrotron Radiation Beam Liners

    CERN Document Server

    Petracca, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    The possible use of open-cell conductive foams in high synchrotron radiation particle accelerator beam liners is considered. Available materials and modeling tools are reviewed, potential pros and cons are discussed, and preliminary conclusions are drawn.

  5. Coherence Inherent in an Incoherent Synchrotron Radio Source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok K. Singal

    2011-12-01

    We show that a partial coherence due to antenna mechanism can be inherently present in any compact synchrotron source, which resolves many long-standing problems in the spectra and variability of compact extragalactic radio sources.

  6. Aerial view of the 28 GeV Protron Synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    The underground ring of the 28 GeV proton synchrotron in 1965. Left, the South and North experimental halls. Top right, part of the East hall. Bottom right, the main generator room and the cooling condensers.

  7. Synchrotron radiation for direct analysis of metalloproteins on electrophoresis gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Richard

    2009-03-01

    Metalloproteomics requires analytical techniques able to assess and quantify the inorganic species in metalloproteins. The most widely used methods are hyphenated techniques, based on the coupling of a high resolution chromatographic method with a high sensitivity method for metal analysis in solution. An alternative approach is the use of methods for solid sample analysis, combining metalloprotein separation by gel electrophoresis and direct analysis of the gels. Direct methods are based on beam analysis, such as lasers, ion beams or synchrotron radiation beams. The aim of this review article is to present the main features of synchrotron radiation based methods and their applications for metalloprotein analysis directly on electrophoresis gels. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence has been successfully employed for sensitive metal identification, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for metal local structure speciation in proteins. Synchrotron based methods will be compared to ion beam and mass spectrometry for direct analysis of metalloproteins in electrophoresis gels.

  8. Synchrotron radiation from a curved plasma channel laser wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Palastro, J P; Hafizi, B; Chen, Y -H; Johnson, L A; Penano, J R; Helle, M H; Mamonau, A A

    2016-01-01

    A laser pulse guided in a curved plasma channel can excite wakefields that steer electrons along an arched trajectory. As the electrons are accelerated along the curved channel, they emit synchrotron radiation. We present simple analytical models and simulations examining laser pulse guiding, wakefield generation, electron steering, and synchrotron emission in curved plasma channels. For experimentally realizable parameters, a ~2 GeV electron emits 0.1 photons per cm with an average photon energy of multiple keV.

  9. Study of complex molecules of biological interest with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prince, K.C. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14–km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Molecular Model Discovery Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Melbourne, Victoria, 3122 (Australia); Bolognesi, P., E-mail: paola.bolognesi@cnr.it [CNR-ISM, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Via Salaria Km. 29,300, Monterotondo (Roma) (Italy); Feyer, V. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14–km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Research Center Jülich, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-6), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Plekan, O. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14–km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Avaldi, L. [CNR-ISM, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Via Salaria Km. 29,300, Monterotondo (Roma) (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Synchrotron radiation and synchrotron based spectroscopic techniques have found important applications in the study of isolated molecular species of biological interest. In this paper, some examples of spectroscopic and dynamic studies of amino acids and small peptides, nucleobases and pharmaceuticals are reviewed. Opportunities offered by the advent of new radiation sources combined with novel methods for the production of beams of these molecules are also discussed.

  10. On the polarized beam acceleration in medium energy synchrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1992-12-31

    This lecture note reviews physics of spin motion in a synchrotron, spin depolarization mechanisms of spin resonances, and methods of overcoming the spin resonances during acceleration. Techniques used in accelerating polarized ions in the low/medium energy synchrotrons, such as the ZGS, the AGS, SATURNE, and the KEK PS and PS Booster are discussed. Problems related to polarized proton acceleration with snakes or partial snake are also examined.

  11. An introduction to synchrotron radiation techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Willmott, Philip

    2011-01-01

    This book introduces the reader to the basic concepts of the generation and manipulation of synchrotron light, its interaction with matter, and the application of synchrotron light in the “classical” techniques, while including some of the most modern technological developments. As much as possible, complicated mathematical derivations and formulas are avoided. A more heuristic approach is adopted, whereby the general physical reasoning behind the equations is highlighted.

  12. Synchrotron powder diffraction on Aztec blue pigments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez del Rio, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220, Grenoble Cedex (France); Gutierrez-Leon, A.; Castro, G.R.; Rubio-Zuazo, J. [Spanish CRG Beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, SpLine, B.P. 220, Grenoble Cedex (France); Solis, C. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Fisica, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Sanchez-Hernandez, R. [INAH Subdireccion de Laboratorios y Apoyo Academico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Robles-Camacho, J. [INAH Centro Regional Michoacan, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Rojas-Gaytan, J. [INAH Direccion de Salvamento Arqueologico, Naucalpan de Juarez (Mexico)

    2008-01-15

    Some samples of raw blue pigments coming from an archaeological rescue mission in downtown Mexico City have been characterized using different techniques. The samples, some recovered as a part of a ritual offering, could be assigned to the late Aztec period (XVth century). The striking characteristic of these samples is that they seem to be raw pigments prior to any use in artworks, and it was possible to collect a few {mu}g of pigment after manual grain selection under a microscopy monitoring. All pigments are made of indigo, an organic colorant locally known as anil or xiuhquilitl. The colorant is always found in combination with an inorganic matrix, studied by powder diffraction. In one case the mineral base is palygorskite, a rare clay mineral featuring micro-channels in its structure, well known as the main ingredient of the Maya blue pigment. However, other samples present the minerals sepiolite (a clay mineral of the palygorskite family) and calcite. Another sample contains barite, a mineral never reported in prehispanic paints. We present the results of characterization using high resolution powder diffraction recorded at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM25A, SpLine beamline) complemented with other techniques. All of them gave consistent results on the composition. A chemical test on resistance to acids was done, showing a high resistance for the palygorskite and eventually sepiolite compounds, in good agreement with the excellent resistance of the Maya blue. (orig.)

  13. The RF Cycle of the PIMMS Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Crescenti, M; Rossi, S

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of the rf cycle of the synchrotron of the Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS) hosted at CERN. The cycle comprises the adiabatic trapping, the acceleration and the rf gymnastics, both for protons and fully stripped carbon ions. The injection energy is 20 MeV for protons and 7 MeV/u for carbon. The maximum extraction energies are 250 MeV for protons and 400 MeV/u for carbon ions. The reserved time is less than 1 s, with a maximum magnetic field ramp of less than 3 T/s. The simulations show that the beam stays inside the aperture of the machine, and that there are no longitudinal losses. At the end of the cycle the beam is ready for extraction with a Dp/p of 0.4 %. The peak rf voltage is 3 kV and the frequency range is from 0.49 to 2.85 MHz.

  14. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca, E-mail: gianluca.geloni@xfel.eu [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-01-21

    According to the literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so-called ‘depth-of-field’ effects. In fact, the particle beam cross-section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. We exemplify this formalism in simple limiting cases. We consider the problem of the calculation of the wiggler source size by means of numerical simulations alone, which play the same role of an experiment. We report a significant numerical disagreement between exact calculations and approximations currently used in the literature.

  15. The AGS synchrotron with four helical magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoupas N.; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; MacKay, W.W.; Trbojevic, D.

    2012-05-20

    The idea of using two partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. The placement of four helical magnets in the AGS ring provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets allows for a better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection, second, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, and third, it provides for a larger 'spin tune gap', which allows the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed, and prevent the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS to occur during the acceleration cycle. Although the same spin gap can be obtained with a single or two partial helices, the required high field strength of a single helix makes its use impractical, and that of the double helix rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  16. Imaging using synchrotron radiation for forensic science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervelli, F.; Carrato, S.; Mattei, A.; Jerian, M.; Benevoli, L.; Mancini, L.; Zanini, F.; Vaccari, L.; Perucchi, A.; Aquilanti, G.

    2011-03-01

    Forensic science is already taking benefits from synchrotron radiation (SR) sources in trace evidence analysis. In this contribution we show a multi-technique approach to study fingerprints from the morphological and chemical point of view using SR based techniques such as Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRMS), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray absorption structure (XAS), and phase contrast microradiography. Both uncontaminated and gunshot residue contaminated human fingerprints were deposited on lightly doped silicon wafers and on poly-ethylene-terephthalate foils. For the uncontaminated fingerprints an univariate approach of functional groups mapping to model FT-IRMS data was used to get the morphology and the organic compounds map. For the gunshot residue contaminated fingerprints, after a preliminary elemental analysis using XRF, microradiography just below and above the absorption edge of the elements of interest has been used to map the contaminants within the fingerprint. Finally, XAS allowed us to determine the chemical state of the different elements. The next step will be fusing the above information in order to produce an exhaustive and easily understandable evidence.

  17. Characterization of Medipix3 With Synchrotron Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Gimenez, E N; Marchal, J; Turecek, D; Ballabriga, R; Tartoni, N; Campbell, M; Llopart, X; Sawhney, K J S

    2011-01-01

    Medipix3 is the latest generation of photon counting readout chips of the Medipix family. With the same dimensions as Medipix2 (256 x 256 pixels of 55 mu m x 55 mu m pitch each), Medipix3 is however implemented in an 8-layer metallization 0.13 mu m CMOS technology which leads to an increase in the functionality associated with each pixel over Medipix2. One of the new operational modes implemented in the front-end architecture is the Charge Summing Mode (CSM). This mode consists of a charge reconstruction and hit allocation algorithm which eliminates event-by-event the low energy counts produced by charge-shared events between adjacent pixels. The present work focuses on the study of the CSM mode and compares it to the Single Pixel Mode (SPM) which is the conventional readout method for these kind of detectors and it is also implemented in Medipix3. Tests of a Medipix3 chip bump-bonded to a 300 mu m thick silicon photodiode sensor were performed at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron to evaluate the performan...

  18. Phase analysis and focusing of synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Chubar, O; Snigirev, A

    1999-01-01

    High accuracy calculations of synchrotron radiation (SR) emitted by a relativistic electron show that the phase of the frequency domain electric field of SR differs from the phase of radiation of a virtual point source. These differences may result in the reduction of focusing efficiency of diffraction-limited SR, if the focusing is performed by conventional optical components optimised for point sources. We show that by applying a phase correction locally, one may transform the phase of SR electric field at a desired polarisation to that of a point source. Such corrections are computed for undulator radiation (planar and helical) and bending magnet radiation (central part and edges). The focusing of the corrected SR wavefront can result in the increase of peak intensity in the focused spot up to several times compared to the focusing without correction. For non-diffraction-limited radiation, the effect of the phase corrections is reduced. Due to this reason, the use of the proposed phase corrections in exist...

  19. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2016-01-01

    According to the literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so-called 'depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross-section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. We exemplify this formalism in simple limiting cases. We consider the problem of the calculation of the wiggler source size by means of numerical simulations alone, which play the same role of an experiment. We report a significant numerical disagreement between exact calculations and approximations currently used in the literature.

  20. Golden Jubilee photos: The Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Energy record Standing before the CERN personnel in the Main Auditorium on 25 November 1959, John Adams held not a bottle of champagne but a bottle of vodka. It had been presented to him a few months earlier during a visit to Dubna in the Soviet Union, where the world's most powerful accelerator had just been commissioned. He had been given strict instructions not to open the bottle until Dubna's energy record of 10 GeV had been broken. On 24 November, the record was smashed by CERN's brand new machine, the Proton Synchrotron, which accelerated protons at 24 GeV, over twice the energy of the Dubna machine. Before sending the empty bottle back to the Soviet Union, John Adams, who had headed the accelerator's construction, placed the recording of the signal in it as proof of the record. More than 40 years later, the PS is still going strong, delivering beams with particle densities a thousand times greater than when it first started operation. Over the years, other accelerators have grown up around it and the...

  1. Synchrotron Intensity Gradients as Tracers of Interstellar Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarian, A.; Yuen, Ka Ho; Lee, Hyeseung; Cho, J.

    2017-06-01

    On the basis of the modern understanding of MHD turbulence, we propose a new way of using synchrotron radiation: using synchrotron intensity gradients (SIGs) for tracing astrophysical magnetic fields. We successfully test the new technique using synthetic data obtained with 3D MHD simulations and provide the demonstration of the practical utility of the technique by comparing the directions of magnetic fields that are obtained with PLANCK synchrotron intensity data to the directions obtained with PLANCK synchrotron polarization data. We demonstrate that the SIGs can reliably trace magnetic fields in the presence of noise and can provide detailed maps of magnetic field directions. We also show that the SIGs are relatively robust for tracing magnetic fields while the low spatial frequencies of the synchrotron image are removed. This makes the SIGs applicable to the tracing of magnetic fields using interferometric data with single-dish measurement absent. We discuss the synergy of using the SIGs together with synchrotron polarization in order to find the actual direction of the magnetic fields and quantify the effects of Faraday rotation as well as with other ways of studying astrophysical magnetic fields. We test our method in the presence of noise and the resolution effects. We stress the complementary nature of the studies using the SIG technique and those employing the recently introduced velocity gradient techniques that trace magnetic fields using spectroscopic data.

  2. Operation of the Australian Store.Synchrotron for macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Grischa R. [Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Aragão, David; Mudie, Nathan J.; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T. [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); McGowan, Sheena; Bertling, Philip J.; Groenewegen, David; Quenette, Stevan M. [Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Bond, Charles S. [The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley 6009, Western Australia (Australia); Buckle, Ashley M. [Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Androulakis, Steve, E-mail: steve.androulakis@monash.edu [Monash Bioinformatics Platform, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2014-10-01

    The Store.Synchrotron service, a fully functional, cloud computing-based solution to raw X-ray data archiving and dissemination at the Australian Synchrotron, is described. The Store.Synchrotron service, a fully functional, cloud computing-based solution to raw X-ray data archiving and dissemination at the Australian Synchrotron, is described. The service automatically receives and archives raw diffraction data, related metadata and preliminary results of automated data-processing workflows. Data are able to be shared with collaborators and opened to the public. In the nine months since its deployment in August 2013, the service has handled over 22.4 TB of raw data (∼1.7 million diffraction images). Several real examples from the Australian crystallographic community are described that illustrate the advantages of the approach, which include real-time online data access and fully redundant, secure storage. Discoveries in biological sciences increasingly require multidisciplinary approaches. With this in mind, Store.Synchrotron has been developed as a component within a greater service that can combine data from other instruments at the Australian Synchrotron, as well as instruments at the Australian neutron source ANSTO. It is therefore envisaged that this will serve as a model implementation of raw data archiving and dissemination within the structural biology research community.

  3. Pushing the Frontiers of Science with Synchrotron Radiation: BESAC Panel on DOE Synchrotron Radiation Sources and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgeneau, Robert J.

    1998-04-01

    During 1997 a panel empowered by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee and chaired by the speaker carried out a comprehensive review of the four DOE synchrotron sources, the ALS, APS, NSLS and SSRL^1.(Report of Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Panel on DOE Synchrotron Radiation Sources and Science, November 1997) We also reviewed the science and technology, past and present, carried out at these facilities. This included the areas of materials research, surface science, polymers and other forms of soft condensed matter, atomic, optical, and molecular physics and chemistry, molecular environmental science, the geosciences and structural biology. We also considered more cursorily ongoing and proposed research on fourth generation sources. The most straightforward and most important conclusion of this study is that over the past 20 years in the United States synchrotron radiation research has evolved from an esoteric endeavor practiced by a small number of scientists primarily from the fields of solid state physics and surface science to a mainstream activity which provides essential information in all of the above fields. The user community at U.S. synchrotron facilities continues to grow exponentially, having reached more than 4000 on-site users annually in FY97. The research carried out at the four DOE synchrotron sources is both very broad and often exceptionally deep. We will review the results of this study with emphasis on the current science and anticipated future research carried out at modern synchrotron sources.

  4. Supporting facilities for synchrotron high-pressure high/low temperature research at HPCAT, APS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinogeikin, S. V.; Rod, E.; Kenney-Benson, C.; Shen, G.

    2012-12-01

    High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) is dedicated to advancing cutting-edge, multidisciplinary, high-pressure science and technology using synchrotron radiation at Sector 16 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne National Laboratory. At HPCAT an array of novel x-ray diffraction and spectroscopic techniques has been integrated with high pressure and extreme temperature instrumentation. Over the last several years a number of supporting facilities have been developed and implemented to expand the available P-T range of the experimental conditions, increase efficiency and productivity of the beamlines, improve the quality of experimental data, and integrate additional methods of sample characterization with synchrotron investigations. A considerable effort was put into developing instrumentation which allows remote and automatic pressure control in diamond anvil cells (DACs) during synchrotron experiments. We have developed a number mechanical devices (gearboxes) for controlling pressure in DACs at a variety pressure and temperature conditions. Such devices can be used for automated data collection along predefined P-T paths. We also designed and implemented a double-diaphragm (membrane) pressure control system is capable of adopting many types of DAC and allows accurate sample pressure control at a variety of PT conditions - from cryogenic to laser heating experiments. These remote pressure control instrumentation can be easily integrated into cryostats and devices for high-temperature measurements at high pressure. In addition to existing cryogenic facilities, we have designed and implemented a variety of compact cryostats for different synchrotron techniques (powder and single crystal diffraction, inelastic scattering, etc.) The cryostats can accommodate a variety of standard and novel DACs, can be easily integrated with remote pressure control devices, and allow for high-pressure measurements at temperatures down to 2-4 K. We have designed a

  5. Nuclear dynamical diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.E.

    1993-05-01

    The scattering of synchrotron radiation by nuclei is extensively explored in this thesis. From the multipole electric field expansion resulting from time-dependent nonrelativistic perturbation theory, a dynamical scattering theory is constructed. This theory is shown, in the many particle limit, to be equivalent to the semi-classical approach where a quantum mechanical scattering amplitude is used in the Maxwell inhomogeneous wave equation. The Moessbauer specimen whose low-lying energy levels were probed is a ferromagnetic lattice of {sup 57}Fe embedded in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) crystal matrix. The hyperfine fields in YIG thin films were studied at low and room temperature using time-resolved quantum beat spectroscopy. Nuclear hyperfine structure quantum beats were measured using a fast plastic scintillator coincidence photodetector and associated electronics having a time resolution of 2.5 nsec. The variation of the quantum beat patterns near the Bragg [0 0 2] diffraction peak gave a Lamb-Moessbauer factor of 8.2{plus_minus}0.4. Exploring characteristic dynamical features in the higher order YIG [0 0 10] reflection revealed that one of the YIG crystals had bifurcated into two different layers. The dynamics of nuclear superradiance was explored. This phenomenon includes the radiative speedup exhibited by a collective state of particles, and, in striking concurrence, resonance frequency shifts. A speedup of a factor of 4 in the total decay rate and a beat frequency shift of 1{1/2} natural resonance linewidths were observed. Nuclear resonance scattering was also found to be a useful way of performing angular interferometry experiments, and it was used to observe the phase shift of a rotated quantum state. On the whole, nuclear dynamical diffraction theory has superbly explained many of the fascinating features of resonant magnetic dipole radiation scattered by a lattice of nuclei.

  6. New Developments and Geoscience Applications of Synchrotron Computed Microtomography (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, M. L.; Wang, Y.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S. R.; Yu, T.; Lanzirotti, A.

    2013-12-01

    Computed microtomography is the extension to micron spatial resolution of the CAT scanning technique developed for medical imaging. Synchrotron sources are ideal for the method, since they provide a monochromatic, parallel beam with high intensity. High energy storage rings such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory produce x-rays with high energy, high brilliance, and high coherence. All of these factors combine to produce an extremely powerful imaging tool for earth science research. Techniques that have been developed include: - Absorption and phase contrast computed tomography with spatial resolution below one micron. - Differential contrast computed tomography, imaging above and below the absorption edge of a particular element. - High-pressure tomography, imaging inside a pressure cell at pressures above 10GPa. - High speed radiography and tomography, with 100 microsecond temporal resolution. - Fluorescence tomography, imaging the 3-D distribution of elements present at ppm concentrations. - Radiographic strain measurements during deformation at high confining pressure, combined with precise x-ray diffraction measurements to determine stress. These techniques have been applied to important problems in earth and environmental sciences, including: - The 3-D distribution of aqueous and organic liquids in porous media, with applications in contaminated groundwater and petroleum recovery. - The kinetics of bubble formation in magma chambers, which control explosive volcanism. - Studies of the evolution of the early solar system from 3-D textures in meteorites - Accurate crystal size distributions in volcanic systems, important for understanding the evolution of magma chambers. - The equation-of-state of amorphous materials at high pressure using both direct measurements of volume as a function of pressure and also by measuring the change x-ray absorption coefficient as a function of pressure. - The location and chemical speciation of toxic

  7. A Synchrotron-based Facility for Location and In-situ Chemical and Mineralogical Analysis of ~10 mm Particles From Comets and Asteroids Returned to Earth in Aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, G. J.; Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S. R.

    In January 2006, NASA's Stardust spacecraft is expected to deliver to Earth more than 1,000 dust particles collected in aerogel capture cells from the coma of Comet Wild-2. These dust particles, which impacted the aerogel surface at ˜ 6 km/sec, are expected to produce cone-shaped entry tracks, each about 100 to 200 times as long as the particle diameter, with the particle at the end of the track. However, weak particles may fragment during capture, leaving debris along the sides of the entry track. In addition, the impact of numerous sub-micron, carbon-rich particles (like the CHON particles identified by the Giotto and VEGA spacecraft at Comet Halley) may discolor the surface of the aerogel, interfering with the visual location/identification of the captured particles. Extraction of these particles from the aerogel will, eventually, be required in order to perform analyses that cannot be performed in-situ. However, extraction involves the risk of particle contamination or particle loss. For this reason, we have developed techniques to employ a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe and x-ray diffraction facility on Beamline X26A of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the in-situ chemical and mineralogical characterization of the Wild-2 particles and particles returned in aerogel capture cells on future space missions. This facility is designed to perform: 3-D particle location by detection of Fe-fluorescence from ˜ 10 μ m particles, in case carbon-rich debris reduces the optical transparency of the aerogel, semi-quantitative x-ray fluorescence chemical analysis on particles ˜ 10 μ m in size for the elements from Ca to Sr, mineral identification by x-ray diffraction on particles ˜ 10 μ m in size, oxidation state characterization by X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy of Fe, Cr, etc. in ˜ 10 μ m particles, chemical analysis of fragments and vapor deposited along the entry track, to reconstruct

  8. Industrial Use of Synchrotron Radiation:. Love at Second Sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormes, Josef; Warner, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) has become one of the most valuable tools for many areas of basic and applied research. In some cases, techniques have been developed that rely completely on the specific properties of synchrotron radiation; in many other cases, using synchrotron radiation has opened completely new and exciting opportunities for conventional techniques. In this chapter, the challenges, problems, and advantages of the industrial use of synchrotron radiation will be highlighted, in an admittedly subjective way, based on the experience of the authors at various synchrotron radiation facilities. "Typical" examples of industrial use of SR will be discussed for all areas of industrial activities, i.e., production, quality control and control of regulatory requirements, and research and development. Emphasis will be put on examples from R&D as this is the most intensively used area. Because this field is much too broad for a complete review here, examples will focus on applications from just three major sectors: biotechnology, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, and automotive and mining. Environmental research is a fourth area that will be partly covered in the section on regulatory requirements.

  9. Mono-Energy Coronary Angiography with a Compact Synchrotron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggl, Elena; Mechlem, Korbinian; Braig, Eva; Kulpe, Stephanie; Dierolf, Martin; Günther, Benedikt; Achterhold, Klaus; Herzen, Julia; Gleich, Bernhard; Rummeny, Ernst; Noёl, Peter B.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Muenzel, Daniela

    2017-02-01

    X-ray coronary angiography is an invaluable tool for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. However, the use of iodine-based contrast media can be contraindicated for patients who present with chronic renal insufficiency or with severe iodine allergy. These patients could benefit from a reduced contrast agent concentration, possibly achieved through application of a mono-energetic x-ray beam. While large-scale synchrotrons are impractical for daily clinical use, the technology of compact synchrotron sources strongly advanced during the last decade. Here we present a quantitative analysis of the benefits a compact synchrotron source can offer in coronary angiography. Simulated projection data from quasi-mono-energetic and conventional x-ray tube spectra is used for a CNR comparison. Results show that compact synchrotron spectra would allow for a significant reduction of contrast media. Experimentally, we demonstrate the feasibility of coronary angiography at the Munich Compact Light Source, the first commercial installation of a compact synchrotron source.

  10. Vacuum chambers full of ideas for the Swedish synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2016-01-01

    CERN’s Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings group has contributed to the development of vacuum chambers for the MAX IV synchrotron, which has just been officially opened in Sweden.   A section of the new 3 GeV MAX IV synchrotron at the time of installation. In the centre of the magnets you can see the vacuum chamber developed in collaboration with CERN. (Photo: Marek Grabski, MAX IV Vacuum group) On 21 June, the King and the Prime Minister of Sweden officially opened MAX IV, a brand-new synchrotron in Lund, Sweden. The summer solstice, the longest day of the year, was deliberately chosen for the ceremony: MAX IV, a cutting-edge synchrotron, will deliver the brightest X-rays ever produced to more than 2000 users. Some 1500 kilometres away, a team at CERN followed the opening ceremony with a touch of pride. The Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings group in the Technology department (TE-VSC) participated in the construction of this new synchrotron. Its contribution lies at the very hea...

  11. Modelisation of synchrotron radiation losses in realistic tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albajar, F.; Johner, J.; Granata, G

    2000-08-01

    Synchrotron radiation losses become significant in the power balance of high-temperature plasmas envisaged for next step tokamaks. Due to the complexity of the exact calculation, these losses are usually roughly estimated with expressions derived from a plasma description using simplifying assumptions on the geometry, radiation absorption, and density and temperature profiles. In the present article, the complete formulation of the transport of synchrotron radiation is performed for realistic conditions of toroidal plasma geometry with elongated cross-section, using an exact method for the calculation of the absorption coefficient, and for arbitrary shapes of density and temperature profiles. The effects of toroidicity and temperature profile on synchrotron radiation losses are analyzed in detail. In particular, when the electron temperature profile is almost flat in the plasma center, as for example in ITB confinement regimes, synchrotron losses are found to be much stronger than in the case where the profile is represented by its best generalized parabolic approximation, though both cases give approximately the same thermal energy contents. Such an effect is not included in present approximate expressions. Finally, we propose a seven-variable fit for the fast calculation of synchrotron radiation losses. This fit is derived from a large database, which has been generated using a code implementing the complete formulation and optimized for massively parallel computing. (author)

  12. Optoelectronic Picosecond Detection of Synchrotron X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Stephen M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2017-08-04

    The goal of this research program was to develop a detector that would measure x-ray time profiles with picosecond resolution. This was specifically aimed for use at x-ray synchrotrons, where x-ray pulse profiles have Gaussian time spreads of 50-100 ps (FWHM), so the successful development of such a detector with picosecond resolution would permit x-ray synchrotron studies to break through the pulse width barrier. That is, synchrotron time-resolved studies are currently limited to pump-probe studies that cannot reveal dynamics faster than ~50 ps, whereas the proposed detector would push this into the physically important 1 ps domain. The results of this research effort, described in detail below, are twofold: 1) the original plan to rely on converting electronic signals from a semiconductor sensor into an optical signal proved to be insufficient for generating signals with the necessary time resolution and sensitivity to be widely applicable; and 2) an all-optical method was discovered whereby the x-rays are directly absorbed in an optoelectronic material, lithium tantalate, which can then be probed by laser pulses with the desired picosecond sensitivity for detection of synchrotron x-rays. This research program has also produced new fundamental understanding of the interaction of x-rays and optical lasers in materials that has now created a viable path for true picosecond detection of synchrotron x-rays.

  13. Brookhaven highlights 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Established in 1947 on Long Island, New York, on the site of the former army Camp Upton, BNL is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated Universities, Inc., under contract to the US Department of Energy. BNL`s annual budget is about $400 million, and the Laboratory`s facilities are valued at replacements cost in excess of over $2.8 billion. Employees number around 3,300,and over 4,000 guests, collaborators and students come each year to use the Laboratory`s facilities and work with the staff. Scientific and technical achievements at BNL have made their way into daily life in areas as varied as health care, construction materials and video games. The backbone of these developments is fundamental research, which is and always will be an investment in the future.

  14. Virtual synchrotron experiments for deep Earth studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, J. M.; Alp, E. E.; Zhao, J.; Alatas, A.; Sturhahn, W.

    2011-12-01

    National facilities offer one-of-a-kind opportunities to apply state-of-the-art experimental techniques to the pressing scientific problems of today. Yet, few students are able to experience research projects at national facilities due to limited accessibility caused in part by limited involvement in the local academic institution, constrained working areas at the experimental stations, and/or travel costs. We present a virtual and remote beam-line for deep Earth mineral physics studies using nuclear resonant and inelastic x-ray scattering methods at Sector 3 of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Off-site students have the capability of controlling their measurements via secure internet connections and webcams. Students can access a 'view only mode' for ease of interaction and safety-control. More experienced users have exclusive control of the experiment and can remotely change variables within the experimental setup.

  15. HSC5: synchrotron radiation and neutrons for cultural heritage studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, Anne [Institut Neel - CNRS, 38 - Grenoble (France); Artioli, G. [Padova Univ. (Italy); Bleuet, P.; Cotte, M.; Tafforeau, P.; Susini, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Dumas, P.; Somogyl, A. [SOLEIL Synchrotron, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Cotte, M. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, UMR171, 75 - Paris (France)]|[European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Kockelmann, W. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom); Kolar, J. [Ljubljana Univ., Morana RTD, Slovenia, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology (Slovenia); Areon, I. [Nova Gorica Univ. (Slovenia); Meden, A.; Strlie, M. [Ljubljana Univ., Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology (Slovenia); Pantos, M. [Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom); Vendrell, M. [Barcelona Univ., dept. of Crystallography and Mineralogy (Spain); Wess, T. [Cardiff Univ., School of Optometry and Institute of Vision (Ireland); Gunneweg, J. [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel)

    2007-07-01

    Synchrotron and neutron sources offer recent and additional insight into the records of our cultural past. Over the last years, there has been an increasing demand for access to synchrotron radiation- and neutron-based techniques, and their applications in the fields of archaeological science and cultural heritage. The purpose of this Hercules Specialized Course is to give the participants an introduction to the basic principles of synchrotron radiation and neutron techniques (imaging, microscopy, diffraction, absorption and fluorescence, IR spectroscopy). The school provides cross-disciplinary examples illustrating the abilities of these techniques in a representative range of scientific cases concerning painting, archaeological artefacts, inks, pigments, fossils and the Dead Sea scrolls. This document gathers only the resumes of the lectures.

  16. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Larkin, Kieran G.

    2016-08-01

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required.

  17. K-Edge Subtraction Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomini, J C

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to utilize dual energy, monochromatic X-rays produced from synchrotrons radiation in order to obtain noninvasive medical imaging. The application of synchrotrons radiation to medical imaging is based on the principle of iodine dichromography, first described by Bertil Jacobson of the Karolinska Institute in 1953. Medical imaging using synchrotrons radiation and K-edge dichromography was pioneered at Stanford University under the leadership of Dr. Ed Rubenstein, and the late Nobel Laureate in Physics, Dr. Robert Hofstadter. With progressive refinements in hardware, clinical-quality images were obtained of human coronary arteries utilizing peripheral injections of iodinated contrast agent. These images even now are far superior to those being presented by investigators using MRI as an imaging tool for coronary arteries. However, new supplies and instruments in the cardiac catheterization laboratory have served to transform coronary angiography into an outpatient procedure, with r...

  18. 6th International School “Synchrotron Radiation and Magnetism”

    CERN Document Server

    Bulou, Hervé; Joly, Loic; Scheurer, Fabrice; Magnetism and Synchrotron Radiation : Towards the Fourth Generation Light Sources

    2013-01-01

     Advances in the synthesis of new materials with often complex, nano-scaled structures require increasingly sophisticated experimental techniques that can probe the electronic states, the atomic magnetic moments and the magnetic microstructures responsible for the properties of these materials. At the same time, progress in synchrotron radiation techniques has ensured that these light sources remain a key tool of investigation, e.g. synchrotron radiation sources of the third generation are able to support magnetic imaging on a sub-micrometer scale. With the Sixth Mittelwihr School on Magnetism and Synchrotron Radiation the tradition of teaching the state-of-the-art on modern research developments continues and is expressed through the present set of extensive lectures provided in this volume. While primarily aimed at postgraduate students and newcomers to the field, this volume will also benefit researchers and lecturers actively working in the field.

  19. Transfiguration of extracting mirror in synchrotron radiation system at SSRF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The first extracting mirror is very important for synchrotron radiation monitor (SRM). The SRM system of SSRF (Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility) should extract the visible light with low optical distortion. The analysis of SR power spectrum and heat transfiguration based on Matlab is introduced in this paper, which will be used in calibration. One beryllium mirror with water-cooling is used to transmit X-ray and reflect visible light to satisfy the measurement request. The existing system suffers from a dynamic problem in some beam physics study. The system includes optics, image acquisition and interferometers. One of the instruments is a digital camera providing the image of the beam transverse profile. The hardware configuration will be summarized. The synchrotron radiation measurement system has been in operation in SSRF for more than one year.

  20. High Intensity Beam Issues in the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Aumon, Sandra; Rivkin, Leonid

    This PhD work is about limitations of high intensity proton beams observed in the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) and, in particular, about issues at injection and transition energies. With its 53 years, the CERN PS would have to operate beyond the limit of its performance to match the future requirements. Beam instabilities driven by transverse impedance and aperture restrictions are important issues for the operation and for the High-Luminosity LHC upgrade which foresees an intensity increase delivered by the injectors. The main subject of the thesis concerns the study of a fast transverse instability occurring at transition energy. The proton beams crossing this energy range are particularly sensitive to wake forces because of the slow synchrotron motion. This instability can cause a strong vertical emittance blow-up and severe losses in less than a synchrotron period. Experimental observations show that the particles at the peak density of the beam longitudinal distribution oscillate in the vertical plane du...

  1. Applications of synchrotron radiation techniques to materials science 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mini, S.M. [ed.] [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Stock, S.R. [ed.] [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States); Perry, D.L. [ed.] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Terminello, L.J. [ed.] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    As more synchrotron facilities are constructed and go online both in the US and in other countries, even more applications of synchrotron radiation will be realized. Both basic and applied research possibilities are manifold, including studies of materials mentioned below and those that are yet to be discovered. Also, the combination of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques with ever increasing high-resolution microscopy allows researchers to study very small domains of materials in an attempt to understand their chemical and electronic properties. This is especially important in the areas of composites and other related materials involving material bonding interfaces. The topics covered in this symposium include surfaces, interfaces, electronic materials, metal oxides, solar cells, thin films, carbides, polymers, alloys, nanoparticles, and graphitic materials. Results reported at this symposium relate recent advances in X-ray absorption and scattering, imaging, tomography, microscopy, and topography methods.

  2. Rising dough and baking bread at the Australian synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, S. C.; McCann, T.; Day, L.; Favaro, J.; Tuhumury, H.; Thompson, D.; Maksimenko, A.

    2016-01-01

    Wheat protein quality and the amount of common salt added in dough formulation can have a significant effect on the microstructure and loaf volume of bread. High-speed synchrotron micro-CT provides an ideal tool for observing the three dimensional structure of bread dough in situ during proving (rising) and baking. In this work, the synchrotron micro-CT technique was used to observe the structure and time evolution of doughs made from high and low protein flour and three different salt additives. These experiments showed that, as expected, high protein flour produces a higher volume loaf compared to low protein flour regardless of salt additives. Furthermore the results show that KCl in particular has a very negative effect on dough properties resulting in much reduced porosity. The hundreds of datasets produced and analysed during this experiment also provided a valuable test case for handling large quantities of data using tools on the Australian Synchrotron's MASSIVE cluster.

  3. Synchrotron X-ray induced solution precipitation of nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H J; Hwu, Y; Tsai, W L

    2003-01-01

    By irradiating a solution in electroless Ni deposition using synchrotron X-rays, Ni composite was found to nucleate homogeneously and eventually precipitate in the form of nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles precipitated is rather uniform (100-300 nm depending on the applied temperature). By the addition of an organic acid, well-dispersed nanoparticles could be effectively deposited on glass substrate. The hydrated electrons (e sub a sub q sup -), products of radiolysis of water molecules by synchrotron X-rays, may be responsible for the effective reduction of the metal ions, resulting in homogeneous nucleation and nanoparticle formation. Our results suggest that synchrotron X-ray can be used to induce solution precipitation of nanoparticles and therefore lead to a new method of producing nanostructured particles and coating.

  4. A dedicated infrared synchrotron ring at the ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, W.; Biocca, A.; Byrd, J. M.; Byrne, W.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Nishimura, H.; Sannibale, F.; Steier, C.; Rex, K.; Robin, D.; Stover, G.; Thur, W.; Wu, Y.

    2002-03-01

    We present preliminary plans for a storage ring dedicated to and optimized for the production of synchrotron radiation over the infrared wavelength range from 1 micron to > 1 mm. The site for the 66 m circumference ring is atop the existing ALS booster synchrotron shielding. This area provides enough floor space for both the ring and beamlines, and hutches. We plan to operate the ring in two modes: as a conventional light source and as a superradiant source in the far-IR. In the conventional mode, our design allows greater transmission of light in the far-infrared than typical light sources, and significantly improves beam stability. In the superradiant mode, we hope to achieve very intense coherent emission of synchrotron radiation over the 0.2 - 10 mm wavelength range by shortening the electron bunches. This mode will generate much higher flux & brightness than conventional far-IR and coherent THz sources.

  5. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  6. Monte Carlo simulations for the design of the treatment rooms and synchrotron access mazes in the CNAO Hadrontherapy facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Alessandro; Agosteo, Stefano; Campi, Fabrizio

    2005-01-01

    The Italian National Centre for Hadrontherapy is based on a synchrotron capable of accelerating protons and carbon ions up to 250 MeV and 400 MeV u(-1), respectively. The present work describes some Monte Carlo simulations performed to verify the design of the treatment rooms and synchrotron access mazes. The different shielding efficiency and induced activations of the common concrete and the baryte concrete were analysed. In such a radiation field, i.e. with high-energy neutrons, the baryte concrete gains twice the activation than the common concrete without any relevant dose reduction. Moreover, the simulations have stressed, again, the discrepancies between H*(10) and E in such cases where the neutron radiation field is the dominant component and, particularly, in the medium-high energy range.

  7. PMAA`s national certification program for oil heat technicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D.B. Jr. [E.T. Lawson and Son, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    In response to an initiative by Roger McDonald to bring the benefits of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) research and development to the oil heated homes of America PMAA in conjunction with its member associations has created a voluntary national certification for oil heat technicians. The text which support these programs are the Petroleum Marketers Association of America`s (PMAA`s) Oil Heat Technician`s Manual, and the PMAA`s Advanced Oil Heat - A Guide to Improved Efficiency.

  8. Analysis of bone protein and mineral composition in bone disease using synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lisa M.; Hamerman, David; Chance, Mark R.; Carlson, Cathy S.

    1999-10-01

    Infrared (IR) microspectroscopy is an analytical technique that is highly sensitive to the chemical components in bone. The brightness of a synchrotron source permits the examination of individual regions of bone in situ at a spatial resolution superior to that of a conventional infrared source. At Beamlines U10B and U2B at the National Synchrotron Light Source, we are examining the role of bone chemical composition in bone disease. In osteoarthritis (OA), it has been demonstrated that the bone underlying the joint cartilage (subchondral bone) becomes thickened prior to cartilage breakdown. Using synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy, we have examined the chemical composition of the subchondral bone in histologically normal and OA monkeys. Results demonstrate that the subchondral bone of OA monkeys is significantly more mineralized than the normal bone, primarily due to an increase in carbonate concentration in the OA bone. High resolution analysis indicates that differences in carbonate content are uniform throughout the subchondral bone region, suggesting that high subchondral bone carbonate may be a marker for OA. Conversely, increases in phosphate content are more pronounced in the region near the marrow space, suggesting that, as the subchondral bone thickens, the bone also becomes more mineralized. Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by a reduction in bone mass and a skeleton that is more susceptible to fracture. To date, it is unclear whether bone remodeled after the onset of osteoporosis differs in chemical composition from older bone. Using fluorescence-assisted infrared microspectroscopy, we are comparing the composition of monkey bone remodeled at various time points after the onset of osteoporosis (induced by ovariectomy). We find that the chemical composition of bone remodeled one year after ovariectomy and one year prior to necropsy is similar to normal bone. On the other hand, bone remodeled two years after ovariectomy is less mature, indicated

  9. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION XRF MICROPROBE STUDY OF HUMAN BONE TUMOR SLICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The experimental apparatus of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe analysis at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) is described Using the bovine liver as the standard reference.the minimum detection limit(MDL) of trace element was measured to determine the capability of biological sample analysis by synchrotron radiation XRF microprobe.The relative change of the content of the major or trace element in the normal and tumor part of human bone tissue slice was investigated The experimental result relation to the clinical medicine was also discussed.

  10. Extended 1D Method for Coherent Synchrotron Radiation including Shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Sagan, David; Mayes, Christopher; Sae-Ueng, Udom

    2008-01-01

    Coherent Synchrotron Radiation can severely limit the performance of accelerators designed for high brightness and short bunch length. Examples include light sources based on ERLs or FELs, and bunch compressors for linear colliders. In order to better simulate Coherent Synchrotron Radiation, the established 1-dimensional formalism is extended to work at lower energies, at shorter bunch lengths, and for an arbitrary configuration of multiple bends. Wide vacuum chambers are simulated by means of vertical image charges. This formalism has been implemented in the general beam dynamics code "Bmad" and its results are here compared to analytical approximations, to numerical solutions of the Maxwell equations, and to the simulation code "elegant".

  11. Observation of wide rf induced synchrotron sideband depolarizing resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, M. A.; Anferov, V. A.; Blinov, B. B.; Courant, E. D.; Crandell, D. A.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Kaufman, W. A.; Krisch, A. D.; Lorenzon, W.; Nurushev, T. S.; Phelps, R. A.; Wong, V. K.; Caussyn, D. D.; Chu, C. M.; Ellison, T. J. P.; Lee, S. Y.; Rinckel, T.; Schwandt, P.; Sperisen, F.; Stephenson, E. J.; von Przewoski, B.; Ohmori, C.; Minty, M. G.; Russell, A. D.

    1997-04-01

    In a recent experiment with a stored 104.1 MeV vertically polarized proton beam at the IUCF Cooler Ring, we depolarized the beam using an rf solenoid with a magnetic field of about 1.3\\cdot10-3T\\cdotm. We observed the two expected rf depolarizing resonances centered around the protons' 1.5 MHz circulation frequency as in previous experiments. Near each of these resonances, we also found synchrotron sidebands which are caused by the proton's energy oscillations. The strengths and widths of the synchrotron resonances were quite different for the sidebands above and below the circulation frequency.

  12. Design of a compact synchrotron for medical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Harbi, N A

    2003-01-01

    An optimal design of a low energy (300 MeV) proton synchrotron for medical applications is addressed. The machine has the following properties: (1) The transition energy is higher than the targets final proton beam energy of 300 MeV; (2) the betatron tunes are chosen such that the machine is free of systematic resonances; (3) the machine can accommodate both slow and fast extraction systems; and (4) the machine can provide rapid cycling operations depending on the rf cavity voltage. Applications of this low energy synchrotron are discussed. (10 refs).

  13. Atmospheric pressure photoionization using tunable VUV synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, A.; Giorgetta, J.-L.; Ricaud, J.-P.; Jamme, F.; Rouam, V.; Wien, F.; Laprévote, O.; Réfrégiers, M.

    2012-05-01

    We report here the first coupling of an atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source with a synchrotron radiation beamline in the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV). A commercial APPI source of a QStar Pulsar i from AB Sciex was modified to receive photons from the DISCO beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation facility. Photons are delivered at atmospheric pressure in the 4-20 eV range. The advantages of this new set up, termed SR-APPI, over classical APPI are spectral purity and continuous tunability. The technique may also be used to perform tunable photoionization mass spectrometry on fragile compounds difficult to vaporize by classical methods.

  14. Singapore Synchrotron Light Source - Status, first results, program

    CERN Document Server

    Moser, H O; Kempson, V C; Kong, J R; Li, Z W; Nyunt, T; Qian, H J; Rossmanith, R; Tor, P H; Wilhelmi, O; Yang, P; Zheng, H W; Underhay, I J

    2003-01-01

    The Singapore Synchrotron Light Source is a general-purpose synchrotron radiation facility serving research organisations and industry. Beamlines active or coming up within 2002 include lithography for micro/nanofabrication, phase contrast imaging, surface science, and X-ray diffraction and absorption. An infrared spectro/microscopy beamline is expected to become operational in 2003. Further beamlines are under discussion with user groups. The Microtron Undulator Radiation Facility (MURF) is under development to provide brilliant VUV radiation and to prepare for subsequent development of an EUV and X-ray FEL.

  15. The Nanohana 2 GeV Synchrotron light source

    CERN Document Server

    Korchuganov, V; Mezentsev, N A; Sajaev, Vadim; Takahashi, K; Aizawa, K; Kamiya, S; Oku, Y; Ohwaki, K

    2000-01-01

    Nanohana SR light source has been planned to be constructed in Chiba prefecture, Japan. The Nanohana is a synchrotron light source proposed for mainly industrial users. The electron storage ring has been designed to operate at injection energy of 500 MeV with a nominal energy of 2 GeV. The lattice is a Chasman-Green type with straight sections for up to six insertion devices. Several modes of operation are optimized to accommodate high-field superconducting wigglers, mini-pole undulators and VUV/SX undulators. Conceptual design of the synchrotron light source is presented.

  16. LNLS - Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory Activity Report 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This activity report highlight the activities as follows: atomic local order of hafnium and silicon in dielectric films; development of bio absorbent for arsenite; insights into enzyme-substrate interaction; investigation of metastable phases in zirconia-ceria nano-ceramics by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction; lattice distortion effects on magneto-structural phase transition of Mn As; mechanism of orbital ordering in transition-metal oxides; organic molecules in star-forming regions; spatially ordered In P dots grown on compositionally modulated In Ga P layers; structural insights into {beta}-Xylosidase from Trichoderma reesei, and surface random alloys studied by synchrotron based photoelectron diffraction.

  17. Synchrotron radiation as a light source in confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Oord, C.J.R.; Gerritsen, H.C.; Levine, Y.K. (University of Utrecht, P.O. Box 80.000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)); Myring, W.J.; Jones, G.R.; Munro, I.H. (Daresbury Laboratory (United Kingdom))

    1992-01-01

    The optical properties of a confocal scanning microscope that was designed to utilize a synchrotron as light source are presented. The usable spectral range is from 200 nm up to 700 nm. Using 325-nm laser light, it is shown that the lateral resolution is about 125 nm, and the axial resolution better than 250 nm. After transport of the microscope from Utrecht to the Daresbury Synchrotron Source, 200-nm excitation can be applied, and the lateral resolution will drop to below 100 nm.

  18. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change

  19. Analysis of synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns from fluorotic enamel samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Ana P.G.; Braz, Delson, E-mail: anapaulagalmeida@gmail.co [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Colaco, Marcos V.; Barroso, Regina C., E-mail: cely@uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Porto, Isabel M., E-mail: belporto@ig.com.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia; Gerlach, Raquel F., E-mail: rfgerlach@forp.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia; Droppa Junior, Roosevelt, E-mail: rdroppa@lnls.b [Associacao Brasileira de Tecnologia de Luz Sincrotron (ABTLuS), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    With the introduction of fluoride as the main anticaries agent used in preventive dentistry, and perhaps an increase in fluoride in our food chain, dental fluorosis has become an increasing world-wide problem. Visible signs of fluorosis begin to become obvious on the enamel surface as opacities, implying some porosity in the tissue. The mechanisms that conduct the formation of fluorotic enamel are unknown, but should involve modifications in the basics physical-chemistry reactions of demineralisation and remineralisation of the enamel of the teeth, which is the same reaction of formation of the enamel's hydroxyapatite (HAp) in the maturation phase. The increase of the amount of fluoride inside of the apatite will result in gradual increase of the lattice parameters. The hexagonal symmetry seems to work well with the powder diffraction data, and the crystal structure of HAp is usually described in space group P63/m. The aim of this work is to characterize the healthy and fluorotic enamel in human tooth using technique Synchrotron X-ray diffraction in order to determine the crystal structure and crystallinity of on fluoroapatite (FAp) crystal present in fluoritic enamel. All the scattering profile measurements was carried out at the X-ray diffraction beamline (XRD1) at the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory - LNLS, Campinas, Brazil. (author)

  20. A bent Laue-Laue monochromator for a synchrotron-based computed tomography system

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, B; Chapman, L D; Ivanov, I; Wu, X Y; Zhong, Z; Huang, X

    1999-01-01

    We designed and tested a two-crystal bent Laue-Laue monochromator for wide, fan-shaped synchrotron X-ray beams for the program multiple energy computed tomography (MECT) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). MECT employs monochromatic X-ray beams from the NSLS's X17B superconducting wiggler beamline for computed tomography (CT) with an improved image quality. MECT uses a fixed horizontal fan-shaped beam with the subject's apparatus rotating around a vertical axis. The new monochromator uses two Czochralski-grown Si crystals, 0.7 and 1.4 mm thick, respectively, and with thick ribs on their upper and lower ends. The crystals are bent cylindrically, with the axis of the cylinder parallel to the fan beam, using 4-rod benders with two fixed rods and two movable ones. The bent-crystal feature of the monochromator resolved the difficulties we had had with the flat Laue-Laue design previously used in MECT, which included (a) inadequate beam intensity, (b) excessive fluctuations in beam intensity, and (c) i...

  1. Top-Off Injection and Higher Currents at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Johannes M.; Liu, James C.; Prinz, Alyssa A.; Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is a 234 m circumference storage ring for 3 GeV electrons with its synchrotron radiation serving currently 13 beamlines with about 27 experimental stations. It operated for long time with 100 mA peak current provided by usually three injections per day. In July 2009, the maximum beam current was raised to 200 mA. Over the period from June 2009 to March 2010, Top-Off operation started at every beamline. Top-Off, i.e., the injection of electrons into the storage ring with injection stoppers open, is necessary for SSRL to reach its design current of 500 mA. In the future, the maximal power of the injection current will also soon be raised from currently 1.5 W to 5 W. The Radiation Protection Department at SLAC worked with SSRL on the specifications for the safety systems for operation with Top-Off injection and higher beam currents.

  2. Recent results and future prospects of dynamic intravenous coronary angiography using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuka, Sadanori [Cardio Vascular Div., Dept. of Internal Medicine, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    We have developed a dynamic intravenous coronary angiography (IVCAG) by using synchrotron radiation (SR) as a less invasive and more easy examination in place of CAG. Twelve patients suspected to have angina pectoris underwent IVCAG at the clinic in the National Laboratory for High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The patients received an intravenous injection of 40m/of contrast agent, and then irradiation was performed with a wide (130 mm x 80 mm) and monochromatic (35 KeV) X-ray beam. Images were acquired with an image intensifier and recorded with a digital fluorography system as dynamic angiography at 30 or 10 images/sec. IVCAG was repeated in 2 or 3 projections. In all patients, the dynamic images permitted clear visualization of the coronary arteries and enabled evaluation of coronary anatomy. Two patients were diagnosed to have coronary stenosis by IVCAG and were confirmed by conventional CAG. The total irradiation doses used for IVCAG were less than those for conventional angiography. Although the image definition obtained with dynamic IVCAG was somewhat less than that of conventional CAG and needs to be improved, the IVCAG can be easily used for the evaluation of coronary arteries and may be clinically used for screening and follow-up of coronary artery disease. In future, the improvement of imaging system, such as increased intensity of synchrotron radiation and high sensitivity in imaging detector, will make more advance in image quality. (author)

  3. TXRF analysis of multielements in serum of patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) by synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Jesus, Edgar F.O. de; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: catarine@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: edgar@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: marcelin@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.b [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). COPPE Technology Center. Nuclear Instrumentation Lab.; Carvalho, Silvia M.F., E-mail: silvia@hemorio.rj.gov.b [State Institute of Hematology Arthur de Siqueira Cavalcanti (HEMORIO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The determination of trace elements levels in physiological fluids is of considerable interest in clinical chemistry. Since it has been established these levels in human serum can be utilized as indicators for several pathological conditions, diagnosis and treatment of various diseases. In this work, trace elements were analyzed in serum of patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) by total reflection X-ray fluorescence using synchrotron radiation (SRTXRF). Sickle cell Anemia is a blood disorder that affects hemoglobin, the protein found in red blood cells that help carry oxygen throughout the body. SCA occurs when a person inherits two abnormal genes (one from each parent) that cause their red blood cells to change shape. These irregular-shaped blood cells die prematurely, resulting in a chronic shortage of red blood cells. We studied forty-three patients (15 males and 28 females) aged 18 to 50 years, suffering SCA and Sixty healthy volunteers (41 males and 19 females) aged 18 to 60 years. All the serum samples had been collected of people who live in the urban area of Rio de Janeiro City/Brazil. The measurements were performed at the X-ray fluorescence beam line at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), in Campinas, Sao Paulo using a polychromatic beam. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cu, Zn, Br and Rb. (author)

  4. Practical application of noise diffusion in U-70 synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, S. V.; Lebedev, O. P.

    2016-12-01

    This paper briefly outlines the physical substantiation and the engineering implementation of technological systems in the U-70 synchrotron based on controllable noise diffusion of the beam. They include two systems of stochastic slow beam extraction (for high and intermediate energy) and the system of longitudinal noise RF gymnastics designated for flattening the bunch distribution over the azimuth.

  5. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingguang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY; Frenkel, Anatoly [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Rodriguez, Jose [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Adzic, Radoslav [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bare, Simon R. [UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Hulbert, Steve L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Karim, Ayman [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mullins, David R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Overbury, Steve [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  6. Detection and spectral measurements of coherent synchrotron radiation at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2010-02-15

    The operation of high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) underlies tremendous demands on high quality electron beams with high peak currents. At the Free-Electron-Laser in Hamburg (FLASH), two magnetic bunch compressors are used to compress the electron bunches longitudinally. In the bunch compressor magnets, these short electron bunches generate coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). This CSR contains information on the longitudinal bunch profile, which is relevant for driving an FEL. In order to investigate coherent synchrotron radiation at the second bunch compressor BC3 at FLASH, a new setup behind the last dipole was installed. For the detection of coherent synchrotron radiation, which is emitted in the infrared regime, pyroelectric detectors were used. These pyroelectric detectors have been calibrated at the free-electron laser FELIX in the wavelength range from 5 {mu}m to 110 {mu}m. For characterisation of the emitted radiation, a transverse scanning device was used to measure the transverse intensity distribution. Various transmission filters were used to obtain additional information about the spectral content. In order to get spectral information with high resolution over a wide wavelength range, a rotating mirror spectrometer using reflective blazed gratings was installed. Using this spectrometer, the first spectral measurements of coherent synchrotron radiation at FLASH in a wavelength range from 10 {mu}m to 160 {mu}m were done. (orig.)

  7. Applying Frequency Map Analysis to the Australian Synchrotron Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Yaw-Ren E; Le Blanc, Gregory Scott

    2005-01-01

    The technique of frequency map analysis has been applied to study the transverse dynamic aperture of the Australian Synchrotron Storage Ring. The results have been used to set the strengths of sextupoles to optimise the dynamic aperture. The effects of the allowed harmonics in the quadrupoles and dipole edge effects are discussed.

  8. Reminder of the edge effect in Synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, H

    1998-01-01

    The synchrotron radiation in the LHC will be rather soft and weak, compared to high energy electron machines. Still it is expected to generate non negligible heating and photon-induced gas desorption. A summary of standard formulas and numbers for the LHC have been collected in this note, including a very rough discussion of the spectrum shift expected by the edge effect.

  9. Science minister puts French synchrotron back on the agenda

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The new French minister of Science has said that he would pursue plans to build a synchrotron in France, reversing the decision of his predecessor. He is still intending to participate in the British project Diamond though (1/2 page).

  10. Moessbauer optics of synchrotron radiation at an isotope interface

    CERN Document Server

    Belyakov, V A

    2000-01-01

    Coherent inelastic Moessbauer scattering (CIMS) of synchrotron radiation (SR) at an isotope interface (plane interface between two regions differing only in the concentration of the Moessbauer isotope) is investigated theoretically. Main attention is paid to the CIMS component resulting from SR quanta absorption by Moessbauer nuclei accompanied by creation or annihilation of the phonons in sample and following recoilless reemission of Moessbauer quanta.

  11. Design of slow extraction system for therapy synchrotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-Quan; SONG Ming-Tao; WEI Bao-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Based on the optimized design of the lattice for therapy synchrotron and considering the requirement of radiation therapy,the third order resonant extraction is adopted.Using the momentum-amplitude selection method,the extraction system is designed and optimized.An extraction efficiency of more than 97%and a momentum spread less than 0.11%are obtained.

  12. Characterizing THz Coherent Synchrotron Radiation at Femtosecond Linear Accelerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Xu-Ling; ZHANG Jian-Bing; LU YU; LUO Feng; LU Shan-Liang; YU Tie-Min; DAI Zhi-Min

    2009-01-01

    The generation and observation of coherent THz synchrotron radiation from femtosecond electron bunches in the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics femtosecond accelerator device is reported.We describe the experiment setup and present the first result of THz radiation properties such as power and spectrum.

  13. Status of the delta synchrotron light-monitoring-system

    CERN Document Server

    Berges, U

    2000-01-01

    A synchrotron radiation source like DELTA needs an optical monitoring system to measure the beam size at different points of the ring with high resolution and accuracy. The measurements with the present synchrotron light monitors show that beam sizes larger than 250 μm can be measured. The measured emittance is of the order of the theoretical values of the optics and goes down to 8 nm rad. The magnification of the system can simply be increased by adding another lens to measure smaller emittances and beamsizes down to 100 μm. In this case you still have an optical image of the beam available, but sometimes the position of the camera has to be adapted due to the great magnification of the optical system. The image processing system which is based on a VME Framegrabber makes a two dimensional gaussian fit to the images from different synchrotron light-monitors. First tests with monochromatic components of the synchrotron radiation (500 nm and 550 nm) and with short time cameras (shutter time...

  14. Spatially Varying X-ray Synchrotron Emission in SN 1006

    CERN Document Server

    Dyer, K K; Borkowski, K; Petre, R; Dyer, Kristy; Reynolds, Stephen P; Borkowski, Kazik; Petre, Rob

    2001-01-01

    A growing number of both galactic and extragalactic supernova remnants show non-thermal (non-plerionic) emission in the X-ray band. New synchrotron models, realized as SRESC and SRCUT in XSPEC 11, which use the radio spectral index and flux as inputs and include the full single-particle emissivity, have demonstrated that synchrotron emission is capable of producing the spectra of dominantly non-thermal supernova remnants with interesting consequences for residual thermal abundances and acceleration of particles. In addition, these models deliver a much better-constrained separation between the thermal and non-thermal components, whereas combining an unconstrained powerlaw with modern thermal models can produce a range of acceptable fits. While synchrotron emission can be approximated by a powerlaw over small ranges of energy, the synchrotron spectrum is in fact steepening over the X-ray band. Having demonstrated that the integrated spectrum of SN 1006, a remnant dominated by non-thermal emission, is well desc...

  15. Operation of the Australian Store.Synchrotron for macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Grischa R; Aragão, David; Mudie, Nathan J; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T; McGowan, Sheena; Bertling, Philip J; Groenewegen, David; Quenette, Stevan M; Bond, Charles S; Buckle, Ashley M; Androulakis, Steve

    2014-10-01

    The Store.Synchrotron service, a fully functional, cloud computing-based solution to raw X-ray data archiving and dissemination at the Australian Synchrotron, is described. The service automatically receives and archives raw diffraction data, related metadata and preliminary results of automated data-processing workflows. Data are able to be shared with collaborators and opened to the public. In the nine months since its deployment in August 2013, the service has handled over 22.4 TB of raw data (∼1.7 million diffraction images). Several real examples from the Australian crystallographic community are described that illustrate the advantages of the approach, which include real-time online data access and fully redundant, secure storage. Discoveries in biological sciences increasingly require multidisciplinary approaches. With this in mind, Store.Synchrotron has been developed as a component within a greater service that can combine data from other instruments at the Australian Synchrotron, as well as instruments at the Australian neutron source ANSTO. It is therefore envisaged that this will serve as a model implementation of raw data archiving and dissemination within the structural biology research community.

  16. Polarization factor measurements of flat crystals using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohrer, K.; Touati, A.; Chetioui, A.; Rozet, J.P.; Chevallier, P.; Wang, J.X.; Bouisset, P.

    1989-01-01

    A method for measuring polarization factors of flat crystals, using a highly polarized beam source provided by synchrotron radiation, is presented. Application to the test of a graphite mosaic crystal, performed at the LURE-DCI facility in Orsay (France), is reported. Results concerning polarization factors at different energies are discussed in connection with measured crystal reflectivities.

  17. Synchrotron Radiation in eRHIC Interaction Region

    CERN Document Server

    Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Montag, Christoph; Rondeau, Daniel J; Surrow, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    The eRHIC currently under study at BNL consists of an electron storage ring added to the existing RHIC complex. The interaction region of this facility has to provide the required low-beta focusing while accommodating the synchrotron radiation generated by beam separation close to the interaction point. In the current design, the synchrotron radiation caused by 10GeV electrons bent by low-beta triplet magnets will be guided through the interaction region and dumped 5m downstream. However, it is unavoidable to stop a fraction of the photons at the septum where the electron and ion vacuum system are separated. In order to protect the septum and minimize the backward scattering of the synchrotron radiation, an absorber and collimation system will be employed. In this paper, we first present the overview of the current design of the eRHIC interaction region with special emphasis on the synchrotron radiation. Then the initial design of the absorber and collimation system, including their geometrical and physical p...

  18. Polarized galactic synchrotron and dust emission and their correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Steve K

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the level of polarized dust and synchrotron emission using the WMAP9 and Planck data. The primary goal of this study is to inform the assessment of foreground contamination in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements below $\\ell\\sim200$ from 23 to 353 GHz. We compute angular power spectra as a function of sky cut based on the Planck 353 GHz polarization maps. Our primary findings are the following. (1) There is a spatial correlation between the dust emission as measured by Planck at 353 GHz and the synchrotron emission as measured by WMAP at 23 GHz with $\\rho\\approx0.4$ or greater for $\\ell<20$ and $f_{\\mathrm{sky}}\\geq0.5$, dropping to $\\rho\\approx0.2$ for $30<\\ell<200$. (2) A simple foreground model with dust, synchrotron, and their correlation fits well to all possible cross spectra formed with the WMAP and Planck 353 GHz data given the current uncertainties. (3) In the 50$\\%$ cleanest region of the polarized dust map, the ratio of synchrotron to dust amplitudes...

  19. Cored Rutherford cables for the GSI fast ramping synchrotron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, M.N.; Ghosh, A.K.; Haken, ten B.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Kaugerts, J.; Moritz, G.; Muehle, C.; Ouden, den A.; Soika, R.; Wanderer, P.; Wessel, W.A.J.

    2003-01-01

    The new heavy ion synchrotron facility proposed by GSI will have two superconducting magnet rings in the same tunnel, with rigidities of 200 T/spl middot/m and 100 T/spl middot/m. Fast ramp times are needed, which can cause significant problems for the magnets, particularly in the areas of ac loss a

  20. Dazzling new light source opens at Stanford synchrotron radiation laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    SPEAR3, the Stanford Positron Electron Asymmetric Ring, was formally opened at a dedication ceremony at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center on Jan. 29. It incorporates the latest technology to make it competitive with the best synchrotron sources in the world (1/2 page)