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Sample records for brookhaven medical research

  1. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutronic feasibility study for converting the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with Brookhaven National Laboratory. Two possible LEU cores were identified that would provide nearly the same neutron flux and spectrum as the present HEU core at irradiation facilities that are used for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy and for animal research. One core has 17 and the other has 18 LEU MTR-type fuel assemblies with uranium densities of 2.5g U/cm3 or less in the fuel meat. This LEU fuel is fully-qualified for routine use. Thermal hydraulics and safety analyses need to be performed to complete the feasibility study. (author)

  2. Spectral characterization of the epithermal-neutron beam at the Brookhaven medical research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power burst facility boron neutron capture therapy (PBF/BNCT) program schedule required the use of an epithermal-neutron beam before the PBF would be available. The beam was needed to carry out the acute, dose-tolerance study on healthy canines and the treatment protocol on spontaneous tumor canines. Calculations on available U.S. test reactors confirmed that the Brookhaven medical research reactor (BMRR) would be capable of providing an epithermal-neutron beam with sufficient intensity while limiting the fast-neutron and gamma dose contamination to acceptable levels for the canine irradiation studies. A joint Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)/Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) program was instituted to design, construct, install, and measure the performance of an epithermal-neutron beam filter for the BMRR. Aluminum oxide was selected as the filter material because it provided the desired neutron spectrum characteristics given the physical constraints of the available BMRR irradiation beam port. Neutron spectrum measurements of the exit beam were undertaken by INEL as a means to evaluate the performance of the new filter and the validity of neutron transport calculations. The preliminary data from activation measurements were presented at the Neutron Beam Design Workshop at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in March 1989. The updated activation results and the proton-recoil measurements are presented in this paper and are compared with predictions derived from a two-dimensional transport calculation

  3. Physics design for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor epithermal neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A collaborative effort by researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Brookhaven National Laboratory has resulted in the design and implementation of an epithermal-neutron source at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Large aluminum containers, filled with aluminum oxide tiles and aluminum spacers, were tailored to pre-existing compartments on the animal side of the reactor facility. A layer of cadmium was used to minimize the thermal-neutron component. Additional bismuth was added to the pre-existing bismuth shield to minimize the gamma component of the beam. Lead was also added to reduce gamma streaming around the bismuth. The physics design methods are outlined in this paper. Information available to date shows close agreement between calculated and measured beam parameters. The neutron spectrum is predominantly in the intermediate energy range (0.5 eV - 10 keV). The peak flux intensity is 6.4E + 12 n/(m2.s.MW) at the center of the beam on the outer surface of the final gamma shield. The corresponding neutron current is 3.8E + 12 n/(m2.s.MW). Presently, the core operates at a maximum of 3 MW. The fast-neutron KERMA is 3.6E-15 cGy/(n/m2) and the gamma KERMA is 5.0E-16 cGY/(n/m2) for the unperturbed beam. The neutron intensity falls off rapidly with distance from the outer shield and the thermal flux realized in phantom or tissue is strongly dependent on the beam-delimiter and target geometry

  4. Design of small-animal thermal neutron irradiation facility at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The broad beam facility (BBF) at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) can provide a thermal neutron beam with flux intensity and quality comparable to the beam currently used for research on neutron capture therapy using cell-culture and small-animal irradiations. Monte Carlo computations were made, first, to compare with the dosimetric measurements at the existing BBF and, second, to calculate the neutron and gamma fluxes and doses expected at the proposed BBF. Multiple cell cultures or small animals could be irradiated simultaneously at the so-modified BBF under conditions similar to or better than those individual animals irradiated at the existing thermal neutron irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the BMRR. The flux intensity of the collimated thermal neutron beam at the proposed BBF would be 1.7 x 1010 n/cm2·s at 3-MW reactor power, the same as at the TNIF. However, the proposed collimated beam would have much lower gamma (0.89 x 10-11 cGy·cm2/nth) and fast neutron (0.58 x 10-11 cGy·cm2/nth) contaminations, 64 and 19% of those at the TNIF, respectively. The feasibility of remodeling the facility is discussed

  5. Neutron spectrum measurements in the aluminum oxide filtered beam facility at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron spectrum measurements were performed on the aluminum oxide filter installed in the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). For these measurements, activation foils were irradiated at the exit port of the beam facility. A technique based on dominant resonances in selected activation reactions was used to measure the epithermal neutron spectrum. The fast and intermediate-energy ranges of the neutron spectrum were measured by threshold reactions and 10B-shielded 235U fission reactions. Neutron spectral data were derived from the activation data by two approaches: (1) a short analysis which yields neutron flux values at the energies of the dominant or primary resonances in the epithermal activation reactions and integral flux data for neutrons above corresponding threshold or pseudo-threshold energies, and (2) the longer analysis which utilized all the activation data in a full-spectrum, unfolding process using the FERRET spectrum adjustment code. This paper gives a brief description of the measurement techniques, analysis methods, and the results obtained

  6. Epithermal beam development at the BMRR [Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor]: Dosimetric evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utilization of an epithermal neutron beam for neutron capture therapy (NCT) is desirable because of the increased tissue penetration relative to a thermal neutron beam. Over the past few years, modifications have been and continue to be made at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) by changing its filter components to produce an optimal epithermal beam. An optimal epithermal beam should contain a low fast neutron contamination and no thermal neutrons in the incident beam. Recently a new moderator for the epithermal beam has been installed at the epithermal port of the BMRR and has accomplished this task. This new moderator is a combination of alumina (Al2O3) bricks and aluminum (Al) plates. A 0.51 mm thick cadmium (Cd) sheet has reduced the thermal neutron intensity drastically. Furthermore, an 11.5 cm thick bismuth (Bi) plate installed at the port surface has reduced the gamma dose component to negligible levels. Foil activation techniques have been employed by using bare gold and cadmium-covered gold foil to determine thermal as well as epithermal neutron fluence. Fast neutron fluence has been determined by indium foil counting. Fast neutron and gamma dose in soft tissue, free in air, is being determined by the paired ionization chamber technique, using tissue equivalent (TE) and graphite chambers. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-700) have also been used to determine the gamma dose independently. This paper describes the methods involved in the measurements of the above mentioned parameters. Formulations have been developed and the various corrections involved have been detailed. 12 refs

  7. Hypernuclear physics research at Brookhaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the results of a recently completed study of the hypernucleus 12/sub Λ/C. The observed formation of hypernuclear states at large momentum is compared with theoretical expectations. Future directions of the research program at Brookhaven are outlined

  8. The Phase I/II BNCT Trials at the Brookhaven medical research reactor: Critical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A phase I/II clinical trial of boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F) mediated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) was initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in 1994. Many critical issues were considered during the design of the first of many sequential dose escalation protocols. These critical issues included patient selection criteria, boron delivery agent, dose limits to the normal brain, dose escalation schemes for both neutron exposure and boron dose, and fractionation. As the clinical protocols progressed and evaluation of the tolerance of the central nervous system (CNS) to BPA-mediated BNCT at the BMRR continued new specifications were adopted. Clinical data reflecting the progression of the protocols will be presented to illustrate the steps taken and the reasons behind their adoption. (author)

  9. Design of a high-flux epithermal neutron beam using 235U fission plates at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H B; Brugger, R M; Rorer, D C; Tichler, P R; Hu, J P

    1994-10-01

    Beams of epithermal neutrons are being used in the development of boron neutron capture therapy for cancer. This report describes a design study in which 235U fission plates and moderators are used to produce an epithermal neutron beam with higher intensity and better quality than the beam currently in use at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Monte Carlo calculations are used to predict the neutron and gamma fluxes and absorbed doses produced by the proposed design. Neutron flux measurements at the present epithermal treatment facility (ETF) were made to verify and compare with the computed results where feasible. The calculations indicate that an epithermal neutron beam produced by a fission-plate converter could have an epithermal neutron intensity of 1.2 x 10(10) n/cm2.s and a fast neutron dose per epithermal neutron of 2.8 x 10(-11) cGy.cm2/nepi plus being forward directed. This beam would be built into the beam shutter of the ETF at the BMRR. The feasibility of remodeling the facility is discussed. PMID:7869995

  10. OPTIMIZATION OF THE EPITHERMAL NEUTRON BEAM FOR BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY AT THE BROOKHAVEN MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for patients with malignant brain tumor had been carried out for half a decade, using an epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven's Medical Reactor. The decision to permanently close this reactor in 2000 cut short the efforts to implement a new conceptual design to optimize this beam in preparation for use with possible new protocols. Details of the conceptual design to produce a higher intensity, more forward-directed neutron beam with less contamination from gamma rays, fast and thermal neutrons are presented here for their potential applicability to other reactor facilities. Monte Carlo calculations were used to predict the flux and absorbed dose produced by the proposed design. The results were benchmarked by the dose rate and flux measurements taken at the facility then in use

  11. BROOKHAVEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutrino physics has been an integral part of the Brookhaven research programme for much of the Laboratory's 46-year history. Milestones have been the determination of the helicity of neutrinos (1958), the establishment of the existence of two kinds of neutrinos (1962) for which Leon Lederman, Mel Schwartz and Jack Steinberger were awarded the 1988 Nobel Physics Prize, the discovery of charmed baryons in the 7' Bubble Chamber in 1975, and the ongoing measurements by Ray Davis and collaborators of solar neutrinos, first reported in 1968. There have also been significant contributions to the understanding of neutral currents in exclusive hadron and electron channels. In addition some of the earliest, and to date best, accelerator limits on electron muon neutrino oscillations are from Brookhaven experiments. The Laboratory is also the 'B' in the IMB underground experiment, built to search for proton decay and which caught neutrinos from the SN 1987a supernova. At present Brookhaven is heavily involved in the Gallex project in the Gran Sasso and recently a new collaboration has received scientific approval for a long baseline experiment to search for muon neutrino oscillations via muon neutrino disappearance

  12. Biological efficiency of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor mixed neutron beam estimated from gene mutations in Tradescantia stamen hair cells assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of low energy neutrons for the induction of various abnormalities in Tradescantia stamen hair mutation (Trad-SH) assay was studied using two clones (T-4430 and T-02), heterozygous for flower color. Dose response relationship for gene mutations induced in somatic cells of Trad-SH were investigated after irradiation with a mixed neutron beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), currently used in a clinical trial of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma. To establish the RBE of the BMRR beam in the induction of various biological end-points in Tradescantia, irradiation with various doses of γ-rays was also performed. After irradiation all plants were cultivated several days at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), then transported to Poland for screening the biological end-points. Due to the post-exposure treatment, all plants showed high levels of lethal events and alteration of the cell cycle. Plants of clone 4430 were more reactive to post-treatment conditions, resulting in decreased blooming efficiency that affected the statistics. Slope coefficients estimated from the dose response curves for gene mutation frequencies allowed the evaluation of ranges for the maximal RBE values of the applied beam vs. γ rays as 6.0 and 5.4 for the cells of T-02 and T-4430, respectively. Estimated fraction of doses from neutrons and corresponding biological effects for the clones T-02 and T-4430 allowed to evaluate the RBE values for neutrons part in the beam as 32.3 and 45.4, respectively. (author)

  13. New Brookhaven chief seeks cross-cutting research

    CERN Multimedia

    Jones, D

    2003-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory will pursue opportunities for promoting commercial development of energy systems and other technologies while focusing on the lab's primary mission of basic science research, according to the incoming BNL director, Praveen Chaudhari (1 page).

  14. Clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy [in humans] [at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center][at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of research records of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy was conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center using the Code of Federal Regulations, FDA Regulations and Good Clinical Practice Guidelines. Clinical data were collected FR-om subjects' research charts, and differences in conduct of studies at both centers were examined. Records maintained at Brookhaven National Laboratory were not in compliance with regulatory standards. Beth Israel's records followed federal regulations. Deficiencies discovered at both sites are discussed in the reports

  15. Development of the epithermal neutron beam and its clinical application for boron neutron capture therapy at the Brookhaven medical research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The failures of the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) trials conducted between 1951 and 1961 were attributed to inadequate penetration of the thermal neutron beams and poor localization of boron compound in the tumour. The epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR was designed and installed to improve the penetration of the neutron beam. The use of this epithermal neutron beam for the clinical trial initiated in 1994 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was preceded by the neutron beam optimization and characterization, the validation of the treatment planning software and the establishment of a procedure for treatment plan evaluation and dose reporting and recording. To date, a total of 54 patients have been treated. Our experience in the development of the epithermal neutron beam for clinical BNCT at the BMRR may be useful to other investigators desirous of developing similar programs for cancer therapy. (author)

  16. Brookhaven highlights. Report on research, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Belford, M.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. [eds.

    1993-12-31

    This report highlights the research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory during the period dating from October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. There are contributions to the report from different programs and departments within the laboratory. These include technology transfer, RHIC, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, physics, biology, national synchrotron light source, applied science, medical science, advanced technology, chemistry, reactor physics, safety and environmental protection, instrumentation, and computing and communications.

  17. Brookhaven highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report highlights the research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory during the period dating from October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. There are contributions to the report from different programs and departments within the laboratory. These include technology transfer, RHIC, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, physics, biology, national synchrotron light source, applied science, medical science, advanced technology, chemistry, reactor physics, safety and environmental protection, instrumentation, and computing and communications

  18. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, October 1976-June 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE Contract No. EY-76-S-02-4078 was started in October 1976 to set up an investigative radiochemical facility at the Yale Medical Center which would bridge the gap between current investigation with radionuclides at the Yale School of Medicine and the facilities in the Chemistry Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. To facilitate these goals, Dr. Mathew L. Thakur was recruited who joined the Yale University faculty in March of 1977. This report briefly summarizes our research accomplishments through the end of June 1979. These can be broadly classified into three categories: (1) research using indium-111 labelled cellular blood components; (2) development of new radiopharmaceuticals; and (3) interaction with Dr. Alfred Wolf and colleagues in the Chemistry Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory

  19. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  20. Brookhaven highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future

  1. Brookhaven highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  2. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE BROOKHAVEN GRAPHITE RESEARCH REACTOR ENGINEERED CAP, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK DCN 5098-SR-07-0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-07-15

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) Engineered Cap at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) have completed removal of affected soils and performed as-left surveys by BSA associated with the BGRR Engineered Cap. Sample results have been submitted, as required, to demonstrate that remediation efforts comply with the cleanup goal of {approx}15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years (BNL 2011a).

  3. Lessons Learned from the Application of Bulk Characterization to Individual Containers on the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Decommissioning Project at Brookhaven National Laboratory - 12056

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When conducting environmental cleanup or decommissioning projects, characterization of the material to be removed is often performed when the material is in-situ. The actual demolition or excavation and removal of the material can result in individual containers that vary significantly from the original bulk characterization profile. This variance, if not detected, can result in individual containers exceeding Department of Transportation regulations or waste disposal site acceptance criteria. Bulk waste characterization processes were performed to initially characterize the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) graphite pile and this information was utilized to characterize all of the containers of graphite. When the last waste container was generated containing graphite dust from the bottom of the pile, but no solid graphite blocks, the material contents were significantly different in composition from the bulk waste characterization. This error resulted in exceedance of the disposal site waste acceptance criteria. Brookhaven Science Associates initiated an in-depth investigation to identify the root causes of this failure and to develop appropriate corrective actions. The lessons learned at BNL have applicability to other cleanup and demolition projects which characterize their wastes in bulk or in-situ and then extend that characterization to individual containers. (authors)

  4. Lessons Learned from the Application of Bulk Characterization to Individual Containers on the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Decommissioning Project at Brookhaven National Laboratory - 12056

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneitel, Terri [US DOE, Brookhaven Site Office (United States); Rocco, Diane [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-07-01

    When conducting environmental cleanup or decommissioning projects, characterization of the material to be removed is often performed when the material is in-situ. The actual demolition or excavation and removal of the material can result in individual containers that vary significantly from the original bulk characterization profile. This variance, if not detected, can result in individual containers exceeding Department of Transportation regulations or waste disposal site acceptance criteria. Bulk waste characterization processes were performed to initially characterize the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) graphite pile and this information was utilized to characterize all of the containers of graphite. When the last waste container was generated containing graphite dust from the bottom of the pile, but no solid graphite blocks, the material contents were significantly different in composition from the bulk waste characterization. This error resulted in exceedance of the disposal site waste acceptance criteria. Brookhaven Science Associates initiated an in-depth investigation to identify the root causes of this failure and to develop appropriate corrective actions. The lessons learned at BNL have applicability to other cleanup and demolition projects which characterize their wastes in bulk or in-situ and then extend that characterization to individual containers. (authors)

  5. [Research in medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    Research in medical education is a relatively new discipline. Over the past 30 years, the discipline has experienced a tremendous growth, which is reflected in an increase in the number of publications in both medical education journals and medical science journals. However, recent reviews of...... articles on medical education studies indicate a need for improvement of the quality of medical education research in order to contribute to the advancement of educational practice as well as educational research. In particular, there is a need to embed studies in a conceptual theoretical framework...

  6. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-12-31

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory`s activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  7. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-01-01

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory's activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  8. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory's activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed

  9. Understanding Medical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hear about the results of a new medical research study. Sometimes the results of one study seem ... a randomized controlled clinical trial? Where was the research done? If a new treatment was being tested, ...

  10. Medical application of in-vivo neutron activation analysis at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total-body calcium measurements utilizing TBNAA have been used in studies of osteoporosis to establish absolute and relative deficits of calcium in patients with this disease in comparison to a normal contrast population. Changes in total-body calcium (skeletal mass) have also been useful for quantitating the efficacy of various therapies in osteoporosis. Serial measurements over periods of years provide long-term balance data by direct measurement with a higher precision (+-2%) than is possible by the use of any other technique. In the renal osteodystrophy observed in patients with renal failure, disorders of both calcium and phosphorus, as well as electrolyte disturbances, have been studied. The measurement of bone changes in endocrine dysfunction have been studied, particularly in patients with thyroid and parathyroid disorders. In parathyroidectomy, the measurement of total-body calcium, post-operatively, can indicate the degree of bone resorption. Skeletal metabolism and body composition in acromegaly and Cushing's disease have also been investigated by TBNAA. Levels of cadmium in liver and kidney have also been measured in vivo by prompt-gamma neutron activation and associated with hypertension, emphysema and cigarette smoking. Total-body nitrogen and potassium measurements serve as indices of muscle mass and are useful in studies of the interrelation of cancer, diet and nutrition. An essential requirement in these studies is the in-vivo measurement of changes in body composition, primarily revealed by nitrogen content. Currently the optimal method for measurement of total-body nitrogen is prompt-gamma neutron activation. There can be little question that in-vivo neutron activation is a useful addition to the techniques for medical research which provides new and previously unavailable information

  11. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility External Data Center Operations Plan Located At Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cialella, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gregory, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lazar, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liang, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ma, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tilp, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wagener, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The External Data Center (XDC) Operations Plan describes the activities performed to manage the XDC, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), for the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. It includes all ARM infrastructure activities performed by the Data Management and Software Engineering Group (DMSE) at BNL. This plan establishes a baseline of expectation within the ARM Operations Management for the group managing the XDC.

  12. Burn-Up Calculations for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel bum-up calculations for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor involve a distribution of the thermal megawatt days of operations to the fuel elements in proportion to the average thermal neutron flux at their location in the reactor. The megawatt days so assigned can be converted to equivalent uranium-235 consumption when needed. The original fuel loading for the BGRR was neutral uranium and a single calculation was performed on each fuel element upon discharge from the reactor. A subsequent change to a fully enriched uranium-235 fuel element, however, introduced complications. The average loading of enriched uranium involves about 4800 individual elements, each occupying four different reactor positions during its term in the reactor. The total term for a central channel element is about one year as against six to eight years for an element in a peripheral channel. With the large number of individual fuel elements involved and the approximately monthly small changes needed for operation, it was necessary to resort to a computer programme to follow the burn-up of all the elements on the reactor continuously. Both this and other functions of the computer programme are discussed in the paper. To date, uranium has been recovered from two batches of spent fuel. On the first, involving 3674 elements discharged from the reactor over a period of 4.9 years, the recovery figures were 5.5% higher than the calculated total of 32.3 kg uranium-235. On the second batch, involving 1296 elements discharged from the reactor over a period of one year, the recovery figures were 2.3% higher than the calculated figures of 10.8 kg uranium-235. This relatively close agreement seems to indicate that the assumptions made to simplify the programme are acceptable and that the results of the programme are satisfactory for our particular accounting and operating requirements. (author)

  13. Deployment of Smart 3D Subsurface Contaminant Characterization at the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) Historical Site Assessment (BNL 1999) identified contamination inside the Below Grade Ducts (BGD) resulting from the deposition of fission and activation products from the pile on the inner carbon steel liner during reactor operations. Due to partial flooding of the BGD since shutdown, some of this contamination may have leaked out of the ducts into the surrounding soils. The baseline remediation plan for cleanup of contaminated soils beneath the BGD involves complete removal of the ducts, followed by surveying the underlying and surrounding soils, then removing soil that has been contaminated above cleanup goals. Alternatively, if soil contamination around and beneath the BGD is either non-existent/minimal (below cleanup goals) or is very localized and can be ''surgically removed'' at a reasonable cost, the BGD can be decontaminated and left in place. The focus of this Department of Energy Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (DOE ASTD) project was to determine the extent (location, type, and level) of soil contamination surrounding the BGD and to present this data to the stakeholders as part of the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) process. A suite of innovative characterization tools was used to complete the characterization of the soil surrounding the BGD in a cost-effective and timely fashion and in a manner acceptable to the stakeholders. The tools consisted of a tracer gas leak detection system that was used to define the gaseous leak paths out of the BGD and guide soil characterization studies, a small-footprint Geoprobe to reach areas surrounding the BGD that were difficult to access, two novel, field-deployed, radiological analysis systems (ISOCS and BetaScint) and a three-dimensional (3D) visualization system to facilitate data analysis/interpretation. All of the technologies performed as well or better than expected and the characterization could not have been completed in the same time or at

  14. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, A.; Qiu, Jianwei; Vogelsang, W.; Yuan, F.

    2011-08-02

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem to contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the

  15. Present and future directions of atomic physics research with multiply-charged ions at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic physics research with multiply-charged ions is now in progress using ion beams from the Brookhaven Double MP-Tandem van de Graaff facility. In the near future, experiments will start using ions produced by photons from the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Examples of typical experiments are discussed to illustrate the comprehensive nature of these facilities. Plans for future expansion by addition of a CRYEBIS type ion source coupled to a heavy-ion storage ring for use in crossed-beam experiments at the NSLS are discussed. 18 refs., 8 figs

  16. Regression methods for medical research

    CERN Document Server

    Tai, Bee Choo

    2013-01-01

    Regression Methods for Medical Research provides medical researchers with the skills they need to critically read and interpret research using more advanced statistical methods. The statistical requirements of interpreting and publishing in medical journals, together with rapid changes in science and technology, increasingly demands an understanding of more complex and sophisticated analytic procedures.The text explains the application of statistical models to a wide variety of practical medical investigative studies and clinical trials. Regression methods are used to appropriately answer the

  17. Research in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Vassallo, Josanne

    2009-01-01

    The year 2009 saw a number of developments in Medical Education in Malta that were initiated as a result of a commitment to revising the medical curriculum in order to meet the challenges in medical education. A record number of students were admitted to the medical course in 2009. There is concern that eventually this exponential increase in admissions is not sustainable due to infrastructural, financial and human resource restraints. Meanwhile there has been a simultane...

  18. BROOKHAVEN: Booster commissioned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction and first commissioning phase of the Booster synchrotron to inject into Brookhaven's veteran Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) were completed last year. Scheduled to come into operation this year, the new Booster will extend the research capabilities AGS, and with its ability to accelerate partially stripped heavy ions will play an essential role in the chain of accelerators serving the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

  19. Brookhaven Highlights, January 1982-March 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuper, J.B.H.; Rustad, M.C. (eds.)

    1983-01-01

    Research at Brookhaven National Laboratory is summarized. Major headings are high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science, support activities and administration. (GHT)

  20. Promote translational medical research and report high quality medical studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAORI Getu

    2011-01-01

    @@ Translational medical research, an emerging new important component of medical research, is now attracting attention of more and more researchers, experts and physicians in universities, medical research institutes,hospitals and relevant officers in government agencies.

  1. Dystonia Medical Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Dystonia Research Research News Funding Programs Current Research Dystonia Coalition About DMRF Mission People Dystonia Dialogue Financials For the Media Connect Contact Us Privacy Policy Support Groups Calendar

  2. How Big Science Came to Long Island: the Birth of Brookhaven Lab (429th Brookhaven Lecture)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert P. Crease, historian for the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and Chair of the Philosophy Department at Stony Brook University, will give two talks on the Laboratory's history on October 31 and December 12. Crease's October 31 talk, titled 'How Big Science Came to Long Island: The Birth of Brookhaven Lab,' will cover the founding of the Laboratory soon after World War II as a peacetime facility to construct and maintain basic research facilities, such as nuclear reactors and particle accelerators, that were too large for single institutions to build and operate. He will discuss the key figures involved in starting the Laboratory, including Nobel laureates I.I. Rabi and Norman Ramsey, as well as Donald Dexter Van Slyke, one of the most renowned medical researchers in American history. Crease also will focus on the many problems that had to be overcome in creating the Laboratory and designing its first big machines, as well as the evolving relations of the Laboratory with the surrounding Long Island community and news media. Throughout his talk, Crease will tell fascinating stories about Brookhaven's scientists and their research.

  3. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Preparation and delivery of ion beams for space radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was commissioned in October 2002 and became operational in July 2003. The NSRL was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing space radiation research as part of the NASA space program. The NSRL can accept a wide variety of ions from BNL's Collider Accelerator Department (CAD) Booster accelerator. These ion beams are extracted from the accelerator with kinetic energies ranging from 0.05 to 3 GeV/nucleon. Many different beam conditions have been produced for experiments at NSRL. The facilities at BNL and the design of the NSRL facility permit a wide variety of beams to be produced with a great degree of flexibility in the delivery of ion beams to experiments. In this report we will describe the facility and its performance over the eight experimental run periods that have taken place since it became operational. We will also describe the current and future capabilities of the NSRL.

  4. Brookhaven highlights, 1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The highlights of research conducted between October 1985 and September 1987 at Brookhaven National Laboratory are reviewed in this publication. Also covered are the administrative and financial status of the laboratory and a brief mention of meetings held and honors received. (FI)

  5. Brookhaven leak reactor to close

    CERN Multimedia

    MacIlwain, C

    1999-01-01

    The DOE has announced that the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven is to close for good. Though the news was not unexpected researchers were angry the decision had been taken before the review to assess the impact of reopening the reactor had been concluded (1 page).

  6. Dr. Praveen Chaudhari named director of Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Brookhaven Science Associates announced today the selection of Dr. Praveen Chaudhari as Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. Dr. Chaudhari, who will begin his new duties on April 1, joins Brookhaven Lab after 36 years of distinguished service at IBM as a scientist and senior manager of research" (1 page).

  7. Medical research and informational privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploem, M C

    1998-01-01

    This paper focuses on the processing of medical data for scientific research and the protection of privacy. Attention will be given to the collection, storage and use of medical data for research. First, the international framework, as provided by the Council of Europe's Convention for the protection of individuals with regard to automatic processing of personal data--and Recommendation No. R (83) 10 on the protection of personal data used for scientific research and statistics, and Draft Recommendation on the protection of medical data, based on this Convention--and the European Directive on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data, will be described in broad outlines. Within this international context, the relevant Dutch laws, that is to say the Law on Registration of Personal Data and the Medical Contract Act, will be discussed. The paper concludes with some remarks on the (Dutch) Code of Conduct on Health Care Research. PMID:9757742

  8. Inaugural editorial: Military Medical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Guo-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Military medicine is one of the most innovative part of human civilization. Along with the rapid development of medicine and advances in military techniques, military medicine has become the focus and intersection of new knowledge and new technologies. Innovation and development within military medicine are always ongoing, with a long and challenging path ahead. The establishment of "Military Medical Research" is expected to be a bounden responsibility in the frontline of Chinese military medicine. PMID:25722860

  9. Initiatives for Medical Education Research at the International Medical University

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh Chandra Jutti; Vishna Devi Nadarajah; Victor Lim

    2008-01-01

    Medical Education research is a relativelynew field but one that is progressing rapidly worldwide.This article is an attempt to take stock of the currentstatus of Medical Education research in InternationalMedical University and to explore the various factorsthat have influenced its direction. It also shares some ofthe initiatives that have been instituted or intended tobe instituted at our university.

  10. Energy-related perturbations of the northeast coastal zone: five years (1974-1979) of oceanographic research at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J.J.

    1980-03-01

    Since inception of oceanographic research at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1974, over 75 cruises and 150 papers and reports have been completed. In comparison of shelf ecosystems at high, mid, and low latitudes, an understanding of the natural variability of US coastal waters has been derived. Annual carbon and nitrogen budgets suggest that the energy flow is diverted to a pelagic food web in summer-fall and a demersal food web in winter-spring within the Mid-Atlantic Bight. The impact of energy-related perturbations can now be assessed within the context of natural oscillation of the coastal food web.

  11. Brookhaven highlights, October 1978-September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These highlights present an overview of the major research and development achievements at Brookhaven National Laboratory from October 1978 to September 1979. Specific areas covered include: accelerator and high energy physics programs; high energy physics research; the AGS and improvements to the AGS; neutral beam development; heavy ion fusion; superconducting power cables; ISABELLE storage rings; the BNL Tandem accelerator; heavy ion experiments at the Tandem; the High Flux Beam Reactor; medium energy physics; nuclear theory; atomic and applied physics; solid state physics; neutron scattering studies; x-ray scattering studies; solid state theory; defects and disorder in solids; surface physics; the National Synchrotron Light Source ; Chemistry Department; Biology Department; Medical Department; energy sciences; environmental sciences; energy technology programs; National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems; advanced reactor systems; nuclear safety; National Nuclear Data Center; nuclear materials safeguards; Applied Mathematics Department; and support activities

  12. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, June 1981-July 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A

    1982-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following research areas: (1) evaluation of /sup 14/C-labelled carboxyethyl ester 2-cardoxy methyl ester of arachidonic acid; (2) the effects of drug intervention on cardiac inflammatory response following experimental myocardial infarction using indium-111 labeled autologous leukoyctes; (3) the evaluation of /sup 97/Ru-oxine to label human platelets in autologous plasma; and (4) the specific in vitro radiolabeling of human neutrophils. (ACR)

  13. Dose measurements and calculations in the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of the epithermal neutron beam at BMRR were measured, calculated, and reported by R.G. Fairchild. This beam has already been used for animal irradiations. The authors anticipate that it will be used for clinical trials. Thermal and epithermal neutron flux densities distributions, and dose rate distributions, as a function of depth were measured in a lucite dog-head phantom. Monte Carlo calculations were performed and compared with the measured values

  14. Radiation Dosimetry in the BNCT Patient Treatment Room at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BMRR was a 3 MW light water reactor that had an epithermal neutron beam that was used to perform clinical trials on patients with malignant brain tumors. A series of measurements and calculations had been performed in the treatment room both prior to the trials and during the trials. The details of the measurements and the Monte Carlo calculations are presented and compared.

  15. Boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel, D.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.

    1996-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a bimodal form of radiation therapy for cancer. The first component of this treatment is the preferential localization of the stable isotope {sup 10}B in tumor cells by targeting with boronated compounds. The tumor and surrounding tissue is then irradiated with a neutron beam resulting in thermal neutron/{sup 10}B reactions ({sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li) resulting in the production of localized high LET radiation from alpha and {sup 7}Li particles. These products of the neutron capture reaction are very damaging to cells, but of short range so that the majority of the ionizing energy released is microscopically confined to the vicinity of the boron-containing compound. In principal it should be possible with BNCT to selectively destroy small nests or even single cancer cells located within normal tissue. It follows that the major improvements in this form of radiation therapy are going to come largely from the development of boron compounds with greater tumor selectivity, although there will certainly be advances made in neutron beam quality as well as the possible development of alternative sources of neutron beams, particularly accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams.

  16. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, November 1, 1980-October 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research conducted in three principal areas is discussed and summarized. (1) Investigation of the influence of antiarrhythmic agents, such as lidocaine and procainamide, on the chemotaxis and nylon fiber adherence of indium-111-labelled human polymorphonulcear leukocytes (PMNs) in vitro revealed that at normal therapeutic levels of lidocaine and procaine, the adherence and chemotactic function of In-111-PMNs remain unaltered. Results with higher therapeutic blood levels are also discussed. (2) An improved method for labeling human platelets with In-111-oxine is outlined, and the influence of centrifugal force, oxine, ethanol, and radiation on platelet function is reported. Results indicate that normal labeling procedures induce no gross changes in platelet function. (3) The chemical preparation of radioiodinated arachidonic acid (AA) and nonradioactive acid ester of AA, and the analysis of metabolites of these compounds following myocardial ischemia were investigated in dogs. The tissue uptake of 131I-AA was compared to that of thallium-201

  17. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, November 1, 1980-October 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A

    1981-10-31

    Research conducted in three principal areas is discussed and summarized. (1) Investigation of the influence of antiarrhythmic agents, such as lidocaine and procainamide, on the chemotaxis and nylon fiber adherence of indium-111-labelled human polymorphonulcear leukocytes (PMNs) in vitro revealed that at normal therapeutic levels of lidocaine and procaine, the adherence and chemotactic function of In-111-PMNs remain unaltered. Results with higher therapeutic blood levels are also discussed. (2) An improved method for labeling human platelets with In-111-oxine is outlined, and the influence of centrifugal force, oxine, ethanol, and radiation on platelet function is reported. Results indicate that normal labeling procedures induce no gross changes in platelet function. (3) The chemical preparation of radioiodinated arachidonic acid (AA) and nonradioactive acid ester of AA, and the analysis of metabolites of these compounds following myocardial ischemia were investigated in dogs. The tissue uptake of /sup 131/I-AA was compared to that of thallium-201.

  18. Brookhaven segment interconnect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have performed a high energy physics experiment using a multisegment Brookhaven FASTBUS system. The system was composed of three crate segments and two cable segments. We discuss the segment interconnect module which permits communication between the various segments

  19. Brookhaven highlights, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Highlights from all the department are illustrated. The main topics are on accelerator development and applications. (LSP)

  20. Brookhaven fastbus/unibus interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benenson, G.; Bauernfeind, J.; Larsen, R.C.; Leipuner, L.B.; Morse, W.M.; Adair, R.K.; Black, J.K.; Campbell, S.R.; Kasha, H.; Schmidt, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    A typical high energy physics experiment requires both a high speed data acquisition and processing system, for data collection and reduction; and a general purpose computer to handle further reduction, bookkeeping and mass storage. Broad differences in architecture, format or technology, will often exist between these two systems, and interface design can become a formidable task. The PDP-11 series minicomputer is widely used in physics research, and the Brookhaven FASTBUS is the only standard high speed data acquisition system which is fully implemented in a current high energy physics experiment. This paper will describe the design and operation of an interface between these two systems. The major issues are elucidated by a preliminary discussion on the basic principles of Bus Systems, and their application to Brookhaven FASTBUS and UNIBUS.

  1. Brookhaven fastbus/unibus interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A typical high energy physics experiment requires both a high speed data acquisition and processing system, for data collection and reduction; and a general purpose computer to handle further reduction, bookkeeping and mass storage. Broad differences in architecture, format or technology, will often exist between these two systems, and interface design can become a formidable task. The PDP-11 series minicomputer is widely used in physics research, and the Brookhaven FASTBUS is the only standard high speed data acquisition system which is fully implemented in a current high energy physics experiment. This paper will describe the design and operation of an interface between these two systems. The major issues are elucidated by a preliminary discussion on the basic principles of Bus Systems, and their application to Brookhaven FASTBUS and UNIBUS

  2. Medical issues and research activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We want to report on the CNAO Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy) Foundation activity aiming to create the clinical conditions that will enable CNAO to work in the most advantageous way. CNAO Foundation is taking care to inform the population, patients and medical community on the existence, potentiality and limits of hadrontherapy. To achieve this goal it has created a website that gives general information on hadrontherapy and a medical service that advises on specific clinical cases; it has moreover promoted seminars and courses for residents and specialists. Disease specific working groups have been created to define protocols on patients selection criteria, indications, dose and fractionation and to design clinical trials that will be carried out at CNAO. These protocols and trials are a working tool that will permit a more rational clinical activity. CNAO Foundation is promoting training of personnel that will work at CNAO and in the next few months physicians and physicists will be send abroad to learn the practical aspects of hadrontherapy in foreign facilities where hadrons are already in clinical use. CNAO Foundation is sponsoring research activity in the fields of precision patient positioning, organ motion management, in vivo dosimetry with in room positron emission tomography (PET) scan and radiobiology. These activities will help to take full advantage of the facility under construction and to better define the role of hadrontherapy in cancer care. (author)

  3. Emerging research trends in medical textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Gokarneshan, N; Rajendran, V; Lavanya, B; Ghoshal, Arundhathi

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of the significant researches reported during the recent years in the field of medical textiles. It also highlights the use of new types of fibres in developing medical textile products and their promising role in the respective areas of application. Considerable developments have taken place in the development of medical textiles for varied applications.

  4. Medical applications in a nuclear research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In these days of public aversion to nuclear power, it can be important to point at the medical applications of ionising radiation. Not only the general public, but also the authorities and research centres have to be aware of these medical applications, which are not without risk for public health. Now that funding for nuclear research is declining, an opening to the medical world can give new opportunities to a nuclear research centre. A lot of research could be done where the tools developed for the nuclear power world are very useful. Even new applications for the research reactors like BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy) can be envisaged for the near future. In this contribution an overview will be given of the different techniques used in the medical world with ionising radiation. The specific example of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre will be given where the mission statement was changed to include a certain number of medical research topics. (authors)

  5. Ethics in Medical Research and Publication

    OpenAIRE

    Izet Masic; Ajla Hodzic; Smaila Mulic

    2014-01-01

    To present the basic principles and standards of Ethics in medical research and publishing, as well as the need for continuing education in the principles and ethics in science and publication in biomedicine. An analysis of relevant materials and documents, sources from the published literature. Investing in education of researches and potential researches, already in the level of medical schools. Educating them on research ethics, what constitutes research misconduct and the seriousness of i...

  6. Undergraduate medical research: the student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise N. Burgoyne

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research training is essential in a modern undergraduate medical curriculum. Our evaluation aimed to (a gauge students’ awareness of research activities, (b compare students’ perceptions of their transferable and research-specific skills competencies, (c determine students’ motivation for research and (d obtain students’ personal views on doing research. Methods: Undergraduate medical students (N=317 completed a research skills questionnaire developed by the Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning in Applied Undergraduate Research Skills (CETL-AURS at Reading University. The questionnaire assessed students’ transferable skills, research-specific skills (e.g., study design, data collection and data analysis, research experience and attitude and motivation towards doing research. Results: The majority of students are motivated to pursue research. Graduate entrants and male students appear to be the most confident regarding their research skills competencies. Although all students recognise the role of research in medical practice, many are unaware of the medical research activities or successes within their university. Of those who report no interest in a career incorporating research, a common perception was that researchers are isolated from patients and clinical practice. Discussion: Students have a narrow definition of research and what it entails. An explanation for why research competence does not align more closely with research motivation is derived from students’ lack of understanding of the concept of translational research, as well as a lack of awareness of the research activity being undertaken by their teachers and mentors. We plan to address this with specific research awareness initiatives.

  7. Lack of research aptitude in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Students are attracted towards the medical profession to become a doctor and not to be a researcher. According to a recent study there are about 1,00,000 undergraduate medical students in India at a given point of time, out of them only 0.9% of the students have shown research aptitude. During their training period of graduation in medical sciences, they are so much burdened with the work load of exams, practicals, ward duties and tutorials. In such an over burdened situation very few of them can think about research. A study had shown that training in research methodology received early in medical school helps students to develop a positive attitude towards research. So changes in the undergraduate and postgraduate curriculum are required to promote research among medical students. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 247-248

  8. BROOKHAVEN: High energy gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On April 24, Brookhaven's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) started to deliver gold ions at 11.4 GeV per nucleon (2,000 GeV per ion) to experimenters who were delighted not only to receive the world's highest energy gold beam but also to receive it on schedule

  9. Trends in research about postgraduate medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galindo-Cárdenas, Leonor Angélica

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was framed in the research: Characterization of professional competency-based model in medical education developed in twelve clinical and nine surgical specializations at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Antioquia. Its aim was to inquire about the state of the art in medical postgraduate education. The guiding question was: Where is present-day research headed in medical postgraduate education. For this descriptive, nonexperimental work, 12 bibliographic databases were reviewed and 28 research articles related to graduate medical formation were selected. The findings were compared, analyzed and interpreted. The tendency in research on graduate medical education points to the need of having multi-inter-trans-disciplinary and humanistic proposals based on constructivism; to consider evaluation as a process emphasizing on learning and the participation of students, and to build systems of pedagogical formation of tutors and interactive and flexible curricula. The lack of studies that promote competencies-based training in postgraduate medical education is notorious.

  10. Research of Medication Use during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Websites About Us Medications and Pregnancy Pregnancy Research Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Pregnant woman ... when taken during pregnancy. Centers for Birth Defects Research and Prevention Studies CDC funds the Centers for ...

  11. Undergraduate medical research: the student perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burgoyne, Louise N

    2010-01-01

    Research training is essential in a modern undergraduate medical curriculum. Our evaluation aimed to (a) gauge students\\' awareness of research activities, (b) compare students\\' perceptions of their transferable and research-specific skills competencies, (c) determine students\\' motivation for research and (d) obtain students\\' personal views on doing research.

  12. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Quarkonium Production in Elementary and Heavy Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumitru, A.; Lourenco, C.; Petreczky, P.; Qiu, J., Ruan, L.

    2011-08-03

    Understanding the structure of the hadron is of fundamental importance in subatomic physics. Production of heavy quarkonia is arguably one of the most fascinating subjects in strong interaction physics. It offers unique perspectives into the formation of QCD bound states. Heavy quarkonia are among the most studied particles both theoretically and experimentally. They have been, and continue to be, the focus of measurements in all high energy colliders around the world. Because of their distinct multiple mass scales, heavy quarkonia were suggested as a probe of the hot quark-gluon matter produced in heavy-ion collisions; and their production has been one of the main subjects of the experimental heavy-ion programs at the SPS and RHIC. However, since the discovery of J/psi at Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory over 36 years ago, theorists still have not been able to fully understand the production mechanism of heavy quarkonia, although major progresses have been made in recent years. With this in mind, a two-week program on quarkonium production was organized at BNL on June 6-17, 2011. Many new experimental data from LHC and from RHIC were presented during the program, including results from the LHC heavy ion run. To analyze and correctly interpret these measurements, and in order to quantify properties of the hot matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, it is necessary to improve our theoretical understanding of quarkonium production. Therefore, a wide range of theoretical aspects on the production mechanism in the vacuum as well as in cold nuclear and hot quark-gluon medium were discussed during the program from the controlled calculations in QCD and its effective theories such as NRQCD to various models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. The scientific program was divided into three major scientific parts: basic production mechanism for heavy quarkonium in vacuum or in high energy elementary collisions; the

  13. Medical Robots: Current Systems and Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan A. Beasley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available First used medically in 1985, robots now make an impact in laparoscopy, neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery, emergency response, and various other medical disciplines. This paper provides a review of medical robot history and surveys the capabilities of current medical robot systems, primarily focusing on commercially available systems while covering a few prominent research projects. By examining robotic systems across time and disciplines, trends are discernible that imply future capabilities of medical robots, for example, increased usage of intraoperative images, improved robot arm design, and haptic feedback to guide the surgeon.

  14. Inaugural editorial: Military Medical Research

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Guo-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Military medicine is one of the most innovative part of human civilization. Along with the rapid development of medicine and advances in military techniques, military medicine has become the focus and intersection of new knowledge and new technologies. Innovation and development within military medicine are always ongoing, with a long and challenging path ahead. The establishment of “Military Medical Research” is expected to be a bounden responsibility in the frontline of Chinese military med...

  15. The principles of medical ethics and medical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Harris

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I discuss the application of the principles of medical ethics and of medical research to the case of children and others whose consent to treatment and to research is problematic. Public health depends substantially on the possibility of ongoing research into all conditions which affect the health of the people. Constraints on this research are therefore a public health issue. Moreover and more importantly the possibility of predictive testing and indeed of screening for health-relevant conditions is an important public health tool, and limitations on the use of this tool are of great significance to public health medicine. Having considered the particular problems created by research and predictive testing on children for late-onset conditions I go on to discuss research on those whose consent is problematic more generally. I conclude with radical recommendations for the reform of The Declaration of Helsinki and of the International Ethics Guidelines for Biomedical Research Involving Human Subjects, prepared by the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS.

  16. Ethics in Medical Research and Publication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izet Masic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To present the basic principles and standards of Ethics in medical research and publishing, as well as the need for continuing education in the principles and ethics in science and publication in biomedicine. An analysis of relevant materials and documents, sources from the published literature. Investing in education of researches and potential researches, already in the level of medical schools. Educating them on research ethics, what constitutes research misconduct and the seriousness of it repercussion is essential for finding a solution to this problem and ensuring careers are constructed on honesty and integrity.

  17. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety). (GHT)

  18. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety)

  19. Reflections on Experimental Research in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    As medical education research advances, it is important that education researchers employ rigorous methods for conducting and reporting their investigations. In this article we discuss several important yet oft neglected issues in designing experimental research in education. First, randomization controls for only a subset of possible confounders.…

  20. Can Medical Education be Researched?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, David A.

    1991-01-01

    The issues involved in conducting educational research are addressed. Some suggestions for methodology that can be used are suggested. Concerns about attempting to carry out investigations that follow the positivist model are discussed. (KR)

  1. Fraud and deceit in medical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umran Sarwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Publication of medical research is the cornerstone for the propagation and dissemination of medical knowledge, culminating in significant effects on the health of the world′s population. However, instances of individuals and institutions subverting the ethos of honesty and integrity on which medical research is built in order to advance personal ambitions have been well documented. Many definitions to describe this unethical behavior have been postulated, although the most descriptive is the "FFP" (fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism model put forward by the United States′ Office of Research Integrity. Research misconduct has many ramifications of which the world′s media are all too keen to demonstrate. Many high-profile cases the world over have demonstrated this lack of ethics when performing medical research. Many esteemed professionals and highly regarded world institutions have succumbed to the ambitions of a few, who for personal gains, have behaved unethically in pursuit of their own ideals. Although institutions have been set up to directly confront these issues, it would appear that a lot more is still required on the part of journals and their editors to combat this behavioral pattern. Individuals starting out at very junior positions in medical research ought to be taught the basics of medical research ethics so that populations are not failed by the very people they are turning to for assistance at times of need. This article provides a review of many of the issues of research misconduct and allows the reader to reflect and think through their own experiences of research. This hopefully will allow individuals to start asking questions on, what is an often, a poorly discussed topic in medical research.

  2. BLIP. [Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stang, Jr, L G

    1976-01-01

    The operation of the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) is discussed. Topics covered include targets, target holders, linac specifications, beam transport, and current production performance. The use of the BLIP is confined exclusively to the development of radionuclides that are, or should be, of medical interest, and the facility is moving rapidly into a self-supporting state from the income of the products. (PMA)

  3. Marketing research of medical services quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.T. Alkaravani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to identify and to analyze the characteristics of medical services quality and marketing research of medical services quality. The results of the analysis. The task of medical services is the proper control of health of the population and application of the necessary efforts to treat and prevent disease by providing quality and affordable medical services. In this regard, an important question is what characteristics of the medical services quality consumers consider the most significant and the most important, because the answer to this question will allow to develop marketing strategy to promote medical services. A lot of works of national and international scientists and economists are dedicated to problems of the theory and practice of medical services promotion. These researches have made a significant contribution to development of theoretical and practical instruments and technologies of development of marketing medical services, but there is a practical need and scientific interest in developing an approach for promoting medical services adapted to the present Ukrainian realities. To study the problems associated with the development, promotion and implementation of the medical services the survey of Donetsk region population was conducted. Analysis and data processing was performed using the software package IBM SPSS Statistics and Microsoft Excel. The survey was attended by 450 respondents of sexes, all ages, social status and income level. The research of medical services quality was made in Donetsk region in 1990. The results of it showed that 0,3% of respondents recognized the quality of medical services excellent, 1,5% – well, 36,9% – satisfactory, and 58,0% – unsatisfactory. Today the majority of respondents is not satisfied with medical services quality, analysis revealed no correlation answers the question of gender, education level and social status of the respondents. As

  4. Cost - benefit assessment in medical researches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Parsapour

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the fundamental issues in the ethics of medical researches is cost-benefit assessment which consists a main part of related codes. This article is aimed to propose a model for ethical assessment of researches with judgment about their costs and benefits."nAfter reviewing related materials and our experiences and discussions with experts, we proposed a model for ethical assessment of costs and benefits of medical researches. "nIt seems that there can be a complex table that shows the potential influenced groups such as patients, researchers, their families, society, and ... , and in the other side of the table, we can see the aspects of such influences, including physical, economical, psychological, social, spiritual, political, and so on. So, the authors designed a table showing the above mentioned types of influences, for using in ethical assessments of the costs and benefits of medical researches."nBecause of the complexity that exists in various aspects of the costs and benefits of a research, the researcher can not accomplish this analysis alone. It reveals the philosophy of the composition of the research ethics committees. The proposed table of this article will help the researchers and ethical committees for implementation of the above mentioned principles in research activities.

  5. Perceptions of Nigerian medical specialists on research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulraheem Olarongbe Mahmoud

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The current research aimed at collating the views of medical specialists on disease priorities, class and outcomes of health research in Nigeria, and draw appropriate policy implications. Structured questionnaires were distributed to consent 90 randomly selected medical specialists practising in six Nigerian tertiary health institutions. Participants' background information, relative disease priority, research types and class, type and class of publication media, frequency of publications, challenges faced in publishing research, impact of their research on health practice or policy, and inventions made were probed. Fifty-one out of the 90 questionnaires distributed were returned giving a response rate of 63.3%. Sixty-four point six percent indicated that the highest priority should be given to non communicable diseases while still recognizing that considerations should be giving to the others. They were largely “always” involved in simple low budget retrospective studies or cross-sectional and medical education studies (67.8% and over a third (37.5% had never been involved in clinical trials. They largely preferred to “always” publish in PubMed indexed journals that are foreign-based (65.0%. They also indicated that their research works very rarely resulted in inventions (4% and change (4% in clinical practice or health policy. Our study respondents indicated that they were largely involved in simple low budget research works that rarely had significant impacts and outcomes. We recommend that adequate resources and research infrastructures particularly funding be made available to medical specialists in Nigeria. Both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education in Nigeria should emphasize research training in their curricula.

  6. Medical Research in Norway: Bibliometric Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Aksnes, Dag W.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a bibliometric profile of medical research in Norway. The presentation gives a short overview of different macro indicators based on scientific publishing, including analyses of the citation and collaboration patterns of Norway. The report is written on request from the Research Council of Norway and function as a background report for the evaluation of clinical, epidemiological, public health, health-related and psychological research in Norway.

  7. Radiation protection in medical and biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human exposure to ionizing radiation in the context of medical and biomedical research raises specific ethical challenges whose resolution approaches should be based on scientific, legal and procedural matters. Joint Resolution MINSAP CITMA-Regulation 'Basic Standards of Radiation Safety' of 30 November 2001 (hereafter NBS) provides for the first time in Cuba legislation specifically designed to protect patients and healthy people who participate in research programs medical and biomedical and exposed to radiation. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the need to develop specific requirements for radiation protection in medical and biomedical research, as well as to identify all the institutions involved in this in order to establish the necessary cooperation to ensure the protection of persons participating in the investigation

  8. Landmarks in particle physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Brookhaven Lecture Series, Number 238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert Adair's lecture on Landmarks in Particle Physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a commemoration of the 40th Anniversary of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Adair describes ten researches in elementary particle physics at Brookhaven that had a revolutionary impact on the understanding of elementary particles. Two of the discoveries were made in 1952 and 1956 at the Cosmotron, BNL's first proton accelerator. Four were made in 1962 and 1964 at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, the Cosmotron's replacement. Two other discoveries in 1954 and 1956 were theoretical, and strong focusing (1952) is the only technical discovery. One discovery (1958) happened in an old barrack. Four of the discoveries were awarded the Nobel prize in Physics. Adair believes that all of the discoveries are worthy of the Nobel prize. 14 figs

  9. BROOKHAVEN: Booster boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After three months of intensive dedicated machine studies, Brookhaven's new Booster accelerated 5 x 1013 protons over four cycles, about 85% of the design intensity. This was made possible by careful matching of Linac beam into the Booster and by extensive resonance stop band corrections implemented during Booster acceleration. The best single cycle injection into the AGS Alternating Gradient Synchrotron was 1.14 x 1013 protons from the Booster. 1.05 x 1013 protons were kept in the AGS, a 92% combined efficiency of extraction, transfer, and injection. The maximum injected 1994 shutdown period, enabling the 1994 physics run to make use of the full Booster intensity and go for the stated AGS objective of 4x1013 protons per pulse

  10. Database activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-disciplinary lab in the DOE system of research laboratories. Database activities are correspondingly diverse within the restrictions imposed by the dominant relational database paradigm. The authors discuss related activities and tools used in RHIC and in the other major projects at BNL. The others are the Protein Data Bank being maintained by the Chemistry department, and a Geographical Information System (GIS)--a Superfund sponsored environmental monitoring project under development in the Office of Environmental Restoration

  11. Brookhaven at 40 - looking forward as well as back

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1947, the famous Camp Upton Army Base on New York's Long Island switched to a new career as Brookhaven National Laboratory. The reputation the Laboratory has established as a world-class research centre and its continued attraction for scientists looking for exciting possibilities were highlighted on 9-11 September at a symposium and celebration marking forty years of Brookhaven and its parent organization, AUI (Associated Universities Inc)

  12. Legal liability of physicians in medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sava, H; Matlow, P T; Sole, M J

    1994-04-01

    The intent of this paper is to provide an overview, in layperson's language, of the concepts in law which may be applicable to a physician who undertakes research. The paper is divided into 2 parts. Part I deals with liability issues and standards of care. It is meant to enable the physician/researcher to recognize a potential liability situation. Part II examines insurance and related issues such as the role of the Canadian Medical Protective Association (CMPA). The paper begins with a review of 2 potential categories of liability: criminal and civil tort. Next, legal issues surrounding the consent process, which form the majority of negligence claims, are dealt with. The research process is then discussed with emphasis on the Medical Research Council of Canada Guidelines on Human Experimentation. Part II covers how research projects are funded and identifies the parties from whom insurance coverage may be sought. Information is provided from the various sources offering insurance and quasi-insurance protection with special attention on the CMPA. Each source details the circumstances necessary for its particular coverage to be triggered. Other issues addressed include those arising when research is conducted outside Canada and multiple coverage. PMID:8004852

  13. The Amtex DAMA Project: The Brookhaven contribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Amtex Partnership organized in 1993 as a Technology Transfer Collaboration among members of the integrated textile industry, the DOE National Laboratories, a number of universities, and several research/education/technology transfer organizations (RETTs). Under the Amtex umbrella organization, a number of technology areas were defined and individual projects were launched addressing various aspects of improving the health and competitiveness of the American textile industry. The first and, to date, the largest of these has been the computer-based Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project. Brookhaven National Laboratory became involved in DAMA beginning in March of 1993 and remained an active participant through January of 1995. It was staffed almost exclusively with personnel of the Computing and Communications Division. This document summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Brookhaven team in working with the larger collaboration. Detailed information about the Amtex Partnership, the DAMA Project, and specific BNL contributions are documented elsewhere.

  14. On Academic Conflict in Medical Research Articles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-mei; CHEN Ning; NIE Wen-xin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the distribution of academic conflicts, if any, in medical research articles. Methods: Twenty-seven and 25 medical research articles in the field of internal medicine were selected from English and Chinese respectable jour⁃nals, respectively. Then, the speech acts that reflected a conflict between a scientist’s knowledge claim and another scientist’s knowledge claim were manually searched and recorded in each paper. Data were analyzed using non-parametric Chi-test. Results:There were 123 academic conflicts recorded in the English corpus and 49 Academic Conflicts in the Chinese corpus. Significant difference was observed in the overall frequency of academic conflicts between the English and Chinese medical discourse (p=0.001). Besides, as for the distribution within research articles, introduction and discussion sections were the sections where Aca⁃demic Conflict speech acts were most likely to occur in both corpra. Conclusion: The Chinese scholars are less likely to criticize peers. Introduction and discussion sections were the sections where Academic Conflict speech acts were most likely to occur. Our results are in agreement with previous results and confirmed the claim that highly different cultures vary in their discourse prefer⁃ences. Our findings are of pedagogical significance.

  15. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma multiforme using the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capala, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Diaz, A.Z.; Chadha, M. [Univ. Hospital, State Univ. of New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    The abstract describes evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for two groups of glioblastoma multiforme patients. From September 1994 to February 1996 15 patients have been treated. In September 1997 another 34 patients were examined. Authors determined a safe starting dose for BNCT using epithermal neutrons and BPA-F. They have also evaluated adverse effects of BNCT at this starting dose. Therapeutic effectiveness of this starting dose has been evaluated. No significant side effects from BPA-F infusion or BNCT treatment were observed in normal brains.

  16. Snake oil and venoms for medical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpert, H. D.

    2011-04-01

    Some think that using derivatives of snake venom for medical purposes is the modern version of snake oil but they are seriously misjudging the research potentials of some of these toxins in medicines of the 2000's. Medical trials, using some of the compounds has proven their usefulness. Several venoms have shown the possibilities that could lead to anticoagulants, helpful in heart disease. The blood clotting protein from the taipan snake has been shown to rapidly stop excessive bleeding. The venom from the copperhead may hold an answer to breast cancer. The Malaysian pit viper shows promise in breaking blood clots. Cobra venom may hold keys to finding cures for Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's. Rattlesnake proteins from certain species have produced blood pressure medicines. Besides snake venoms, venom from the South American dart frog, mollusks (i.e. Cone Shell Snail), lizards (i.e. Gila Monster & Komodo Dragon), some species of spiders and tarantulas, Cephalopods, mammals (i.e. Platypus & Shrews), fish (i.e. sting rays, stone fish, puffer fish, blue bottle fish & box jelly fish), intertidal marine animals (echinoderms)(i.e. Crown of Thorn Star Fish & Flower Urchin) and the Honeybee are being investigated for potential medical benefits.

  17. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medical projects employing synchrotron radiation as discussed in this paper are, for the most part, still in their infancies and no one can predict the direction in which they will develop. Both the basic research and applied medical programs are sure to be advanced at the new facilities coming on line, especially the ESRF and Spring- 8. However, success is not guaranteed. There is a lot of competition from advances in conventional imaging with the development of digital angiography, computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. The synchrotron programs will have to provide significant advantages over these modalities in order to be accepted by the medical profession. Advances in image processing and potentially the development of compact sources will be required in order to move the synchrotron developed imaging technologies into the clinical world. In any event, it can be expected that the images produced by the synchrotron technologies will establish ''gold standards'' to be targeted by conventional modalities. A lot more work needs to be done in order to bring synchrotron radiation therapy and surgery to the level of human studies and, subsequently, to clinical applications

  18. Prescriptions for medical research. I--Management within the Medical Research Council.

    OpenAIRE

    Gillett, R.; Harrow, J.

    1993-01-01

    In their submission to the government in advance of the white paper on science policy in the United Kingdom the Medical Research Council commends the MRC's own approach to managing directly funded research. But a series of semi-structured interviews with the directors of some of the MRC's units suggests a gap between the MRC's model of managed research and the reality. Although such units are theoretically managed from MRC head office (and units are charged an overhead for this), in practice ...

  19. Making physics: a biography of Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1946-1972, by R.P. Crease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory was the first major national laboratory built for basic civilian research. From Nobel Prize-winning work in atomic physics to addressing community concerns over radiation leaks, the history of Brookhaven parallels the changing fortunes of 'big science' in the United States. Robert P. Crease brings to life the people, the instruments, the science, and the politics of Brookhaven's first quarter-century.

  20. Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... big data challenges facing researchers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics ... fundamental research in nuclear and particle physics to gain a deeper understanding of matter, energy, ...

  1. The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), presently under construction at Brookhaven National laboratory, is described. It consists of a 50-MeV electron beam synchronizable to a high-peak power CO2 laser. The interaction of electrons with the laser field will be probed, with some emphasis on exploring laser-based acceleration techniques. 5 refs., 2 figs

  2. [Medical research using Internet questionnaire in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunaga, Hideo; Ide, Hiroo; Imamura, Tomoaki; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    As the method for questionnaire studies, mail survey and interview survey are frequently used. The utility and validity of applying the Internet method to medical studies have yet to be fully evaluated. For the present investigation, we reviewed 36 Japanese original articles using Internet questionnaire reported through to April 2005. Although original papers using the Internet method have been increasing in recent years, they are still limited in number. There is comparatively much research on disease with many patients in youth and early manhood, such as allergic ailments (allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and hives). As compared with conventional methods, the advantages of the Internet approach are convenience for both investigators and respondents and the ability to quickly collect data. The disadvantage is that the user's age range is more concentrated. Since samples are extracted from individuals who are registered as monitors, a greater sampling error may occur as compared with a random sampling method. However, it is to be expected that continued explosive growth of the Internet would decrease the limitation in user's age. If more elderly people participate in questionnaire studies using the web, research into more illnesses should be facilitated. Considering the inherent advantage, it is thought that Internet method can become the leading tool for sociomedical and clinical research in the near future. PMID:16502854

  3. Medical research with radioisotopes in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important program of research into the nature and causes of congenital haemolytic anaemias, notably the disease known as Mediterranean anaemia or Thalassaemia, which is a serious medical problem in the Mediterranean countries, is at present being carried out in the Department of Clinical Therapeutics of the University of Athens under a research contract awarded by the International Atomic Energy Agency. This program is concerned with diseases in which there is an inherited defect or abnormality in the production of haemoglobin, the iron-containing pigment of the red blood cells which is responsible for the carriage of oxygen in the blood. Two techniques have been widely used in the studies at the University of Athens. In the first of these, a radioisotope of iron, iron-59, is used to follow iron metabolism and haemoglobin production. Iron metabolism in the body is concerned largely with the synthesis and breakdown of haemoglobin, which consists of a protein, globin, linked to an iron containing substance, haeme. The second technique makes use of a radioisotope of chromium, chromium-51, to study the fate of the red cells in the blood. By performing simultaneous studies with iron- 59 and chromium-51, a detailed picture of haemoglobin synthesis and red cell production and destruction can be built up. Such investigations have been invaluable in establishing the characteristic patterns of different congenital haemolytic anaemias

  4. A Course in Medical Research Study Design and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linskey, Mark E.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A course to familiarize medical students with the principles of good medical research study design and analysis focuses on three types of studies: clinical trials, laboratory science, and epidemiology and biostatistics. (MSE)

  5. Clinical research and medical care: towards effective and complete integration

    OpenAIRE

    Sacristán, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite their close relationship, clinical research and medical care have become separated by clear boundaries. The purpose of clinical research is to generate generalizable knowledge useful for future patients, whereas medical care aims to promote the well-being of individual patients. The evolution towards patient-centered medicine and patient-oriented research, and the gradual standardization of medicine are contributing to closer ties between clinical research and medical pract...

  6. Basic research on cancer related to radiation associated medical researches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong In; Hwang, Dae Yong; Bang, Ho Yoon [and others

    2000-12-01

    Basic Research on Cancer related to Radiation Associated Medical Researches including 1. Establishment of animal model of colorectal cancer liver metastasis and measurement of angiogenesis, 2. Tissue expression of Tie-1 and Tie-2 in human colorectal cancer, 3. Enhancement of G2/Mphase Cell Fraction by Adenovirus-mediated p53 Gene Transfer in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines, 4. Clinical Characteristics of the patients with Non-B Non-C Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Frequency of HBV, HCV and TTV Viremia in these Patients, 5. Significance of serum iron and ferritin in patients with stomach cancer, 6. Telomerase assay for early detection of lung cancer, 7. Study on the Usefulness of Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 Genotyping for Risk Group of Alcohol-related Cancer Screening, 8. Gene therapy using hepatoma specific promoter, 9. Study on the Influence of DNA repair gene, XRCC1 Genotypes on the Risk of Head and Neck Cancer were performed.

  7. Basic research on cancer related to radiation associated medical researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic Research on Cancer related to Radiation Associated Medical Researches including 1. Establishment of animal model of colorectal cancer liver metastasis and measurement of angiogenesis, 2. Tissue expression of Tie-1 and Tie-2 in human colorectal cancer, 3. Enhancement of G2/Mphase Cell Fraction by Adenovirus-mediated p53 Gene Transfer in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines, 4. Clinical Characteristics of the patients with Non-B Non-C Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Frequency of HBV, HCV and TTV Viremia in these Patients, 5. Significance of serum iron and ferritin in patients with stomach cancer, 6. Telomerase assay for early detection of lung cancer, 7. Study on the Usefulness of Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 Genotyping for Risk Group of Alcohol-related Cancer Screening, 8. Gene therapy using hepatoma specific promoter, 9. Study on the Influence of DNA repair gene, XRCC1 Genotypes on the Risk of Head and Neck Cancer were performed

  8. Uses and abuses of biostatistics in medical research in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Z

    1990-11-01

    Medical research in Pakistan has gained momentum over the past several years. However, the logical conclusions based on information and data are rarely witnessed. This could be due to the fact that medical researchers and doctors are unaware of Biostatistics, its logic, use and inferences to be obtained. Most researches are based on the pattern of works already done elsewhere. Following others blindly generates various snags. In the present study, research articles published during 1986 in the Journal of Pakistan Medical Association (JPMA) and Pakistan Journal of Medical Research (PJMR) are being reviewed with respect to use and abuse of Statistical Methods. PMID:2126809

  9. DEMOGRAPHICAL AND MEDICAL GEOGRAPHY RESEARCHES IN BUCOWINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorin DUMITRAS

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the ecology factors of environment and medicaldemographycal situations of sickness rate and populations’mortality demonstrated with an example of urbanized landscapes of Bucowina. A greater corrective connection is revealed among cancer apathy (r=0.5-0.6, general dent rate (r=0.5, and an integral index of ecological safety of city’s landscape environment. The authors revealed backward (negative dependency among the increased harshness of drinking water and cancer pathology of digestion organs and abdominal cavity.This article deals with synthesis of medical-demographic study results of anthropic landscapes under the aspect of their utilization in order to increase human ecological conditions. One of the problems that authors tried to solve in the process of research lies indeveloping of theoretical and methodological thesis (based on combined analysis ofecological factors and demographical status in order to determine ecological situation inthe region and to evaluate life and activity conditions of population.

  10. Magnetic particles in medical research - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic (or magnetizable) particles have assumed increasing importance in medical and biological research since 1966 when the effect of a magnetic field on the movement of suspended particles was initially studied. In fields like haematology, cell biology, microbiology, biochemistry and immunoassays, they currently provide the basis for separation techniques, which previously relied on gravitational forces. The body cells (e.g., blood cells) can be made magnetic by incubating them in a medium containing several Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ particles, which are adsorbed to the membrane surfaces. Some bacteria (also called magnetostatic bacteria) respond to externally applied magnetic lines of force due to their intracellular magnetic particles. These properties are useful in the isolation of these cells/bacteria. In biochemistry magnetic particles are used to immobilize enzymes without any loss of enzyme activity. The immobilized enzymes can facilitate the separation of end products without extensive instrumentation. In immunoassays the antibodies are covalently linked to polymer coated iron oxide particles. An electromagnet is used to sediment these particles after reaction. This excludes the use of centrifuge to separate antigen-antibody complexes. In pharmacy and pharmacology the magnetic particles are important in drug transport. In techniques like ferrography, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI), spectroscopic studies and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) the magnetic particles serve as contrast agents and give clinically important spatial resolution. Magnetic particles also find extensive applications in cancer therapy, genetic engineering, pneumology, nuclear medicine, radiology and many other fields. This article reviews these applications. (author)

  11. Procedures for the medical application of research reactors (Appendix)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) is one of the four research reactors in Japan that are currently licensed for medical application, in addition to other research purposes. Taking the KUR as an example, legal and other procedures for using research reactors for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are described, which are practiced in accordance with the 'Provisional Guideline Pertaining to Medical Irradiation by Accelerators and/or Reactors, other than defined by the Medical Service Act' of the Science Council of Japan

  12. Brookhaven highlights 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Established in 1947 on Long Island, New York, on the site of the former army Camp Upton, BNL is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated Universities, Inc., under contract to the US Department of Energy. BNL`s annual budget is about $400 million, and the Laboratory`s facilities are valued at replacements cost in excess of over $2.8 billion. Employees number around 3,300,and over 4,000 guests, collaborators and students come each year to use the Laboratory`s facilities and work with the staff. Scientific and technical achievements at BNL have made their way into daily life in areas as varied as health care, construction materials and video games. The backbone of these developments is fundamental research, which is and always will be an investment in the future.

  13. Brookhaven highlights 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Established in 1947 on Long Island, New York, on the site of the former army Camp Upton, BNL is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated Universities, Inc., under contract to the US Department of Energy. BNL's annual budget is about $400 million, and the Laboratory's facilities are valued at replacements cost in excess of over $2.8 billion. Employees number around 3,300,and over 4,000 guests, collaborators and students come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. Scientific and technical achievements at BNL have made their way into daily life in areas as varied as health care, construction materials and video games. The backbone of these developments is fundamental research, which is and always will be an investment in the future

  14. Brookhaven highlights. [Fiscal year 1992, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  15. Research status and development tendency of medical psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li-yi; Gao-feng YAO

    2011-01-01

    Objective The present study aims to review the research status and development tendency of military medical psychology in China and abroad and proposes the development of medical psychology research in the Chinese military.Methods A literature search method was adopted to find and review major literature on military medical psychology,from basic studies,discipline construction,professional teaching,to the service force in the last 10 years.Results The last 10 years witnessed much development ...

  16. Methods to enhance capacity of medical teachers for research publications

    OpenAIRE

    Neelakandhan Asokan; Kunnukattil S Shaji

    2016-01-01

    In 2009, the Medical Council of India (MCI) made a certain number of research publications mandatory for the promotion to higher posts of medical teachers. Responding to this, there was a series of workshops on research and scientific writing for faculty members of a medical college. We decided to explore the opinions and perceptions of the participants on the need and relevance of such efforts, using qualitative methods such as focus-group discussions (FGDs) and semi-structured interview. Th...

  17. Medical Applications of Non-Medical Research: Applications Derived from BES-Supported Research and Research at BES Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    This publication contains stories that illustrate how the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) research and major user facilities have impacted the medical sciences in the selected topical areas of disease diagnosis, treatment (including drug development, radiation therapy, and surgery), understanding, and prevention.

  18. Ordinal scale and statistics in medical research.

    OpenAIRE

    Forrest, M.; Andersen, B.

    1986-01-01

    A survey of the 1982 editions of 12 medical journals showed that in at least 70% of 175 papers employing ordinal measurement scales, statistical methods were used, which do, in fact, assume a more refined measurement scale. Non-parametric methods suited for analysis of ordinal data are listed.

  19. Research status and development of medical science in cold regions

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jing-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Objective To propose the concept, objects of study,tasks and roles of military medical sciences in cold regions(CM), and provide a theoretical basis and academic reference for its establishment anddevelopment. Methods  Literature concerning medical sciences in cold regions were retrieved with infomatics method to analyze the research status and development of medical sciences in cold regions in the military,domestic and abroad, and venture to propose the strategy and direction of development ...

  20. Should Research be Made Compulsory in Medical School?

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Varshil

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare decision-making is mostly reliant on evidence–based medicine. Building and upgrading skills in scientific reasoning and thinking amongst medical students has now became an important part of medical education. But due to unforeseen reasons, medical students in developing countries have no or very little opportunities to develop research skills and become evidence based physician-scientist. Moreover, there is also an alarming decline in the current number of physician-sci...

  1. Should Research be Made Compulsory in Medical School?

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Varshil

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare decision-making is mostly reliant on evidence–based medicine. Building and upgrading skills in scientific reasoning and thinking amongst medical students has now became an important part of medical education. But due to unforeseen reasons, medical students in developing countries have no or very little opportunities to develop research skills and become evidence based physician-scientist. Moreover, there is also an alarming decline in the current...

  2. Teaching Medical Students Basic Neurotransmitter Pharmacology Using Primary Research Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Amy C.; Devonshire, Ian M.; Greenfield, Susan A.; Dommett, Eleanor J.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching pharmacology to medical students has long been seen as a challenge, and one to which a number of innovative approaches have been taken. In this article, we describe and evaluate the use of primary research articles in teaching second-year medical students both in terms of the information learned and the use of the papers themselves. We…

  3. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). The dedicated members of the USAMRIID staff ... military personnel and civilians from the threat of infectious diseases. We participate in support of emerging disease investigations, ...

  4. Mahajan, Dean to lead Virginia Tech Carilion Medical Research Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Roop Mahajan, the James S. Tucker Professor of Engineering at Virginia Tech, has been named director of the Virginia Tech Carilion Medical Research Institute, announced Mark McNamee, Virginia Tech senior vice president and provost.

  5. Brookhaven highlights, October 1978-September 1979. [October 1978 to September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    These highlights present an overview of the major research and development achievements at Brookhaven National Laboratory from October 1978 to September 1979. Specific areas covered include: accelerator and high energy physics programs; high energy physics research; the AGS and improvements to the AGS; neutral beam development; heavy ion fusion; superconducting power cables; ISABELLE storage rings; the BNL Tandem accelerator; heavy ion experiments at the Tandem; the High Flux Beam Reactor; medium energy physics; nuclear theory; atomic and applied physics; solid state physics; neutron scattering studies; x-ray scattering studies; solid state theory; defects and disorder in solids; surface physics; the National Synchrotron Light Source ; Chemistry Department; Biology Department; Medical Department; energy sciences; environmental sciences; energy technology programs; National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems; advanced reactor systems; nuclear safety; National Nuclear Data Center; nuclear materials safeguards; Applied Mathematics Department; and support activities. (GHT)

  6. Medical Education: A Particularly Complex Intervention to Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattick, Karen; Barnes, Rebecca; Dieppe, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Previous debate has explored whether medical education research should become more like health services research in terms of frameworks, collaborations and methodologies. Notable recent changes in health services research include an increasing emphasis on complex interventions, defined as interventions that involve more than one component. The…

  7. Meeting the needs of medical research with statistical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Dongfeng

    2011-01-01

    Dongfeng WuDepartment of Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Information Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USAOpen Access Medical Statistics is a brand new journal. The aim is to meet the needs of medical research with modern statistical methods.Medicine is a science dealing with health issues in a broad area, where chances or random events play a significant role. Statistics is a science that quantifies random events and helps researchers make vali...

  8. Fraud and Misconduct in Medical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Moghtaderi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last year we had observed different types of misconduct in the submitted manuscripts into the editorial office. Those are included attempted theft of data, presence of ghost authors, gift authorship, dual submissions, salami publications, falsification and some other types of fraud. Our analysis in the editorial office led us to conclude that research fraud is an important issue and should be discussed clearly. The emphasis on competition and pressure to produce published materials, while internal intention to discover the scientific truth may foster a conflict between personal career goals and human intellectual motivation; finally may induce research misconduct. Having accurate and good knowledge in this field is mandatory for researchers especially the younger ones. In the first part of this article we will discuss a short but important part of the history of this problem and in the second part definition and editorial response will be reviewed

  9. The ethics of conducting graduate medical education research on residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keune, Jason D; Brunsvold, Melissa E; Hohmann, Elizabeth; Korndorffer, James R; Weinstein, Debra F; Smink, Douglas S

    2013-04-01

    The field of graduate medical education (GME) research is attracting increased attention and broader participation. The authors review the special ethical and methodological considerations pertaining to medical education research. Because residents are at once a convenient and captive study population, a risk of coercion exists, making the provision of consent important. The role of the institutional review board (IRB) is often difficult to discern because GME activities can have multiple simultaneous purposes, educational activities may go forward with or without a research component, and the subjects of educational research studies are not patients. The authors provide a road map for researchers with regard to research oversight by the IRB and also address issues related to research quality. The matters of whether educational research studies should have educational value for the study subject and whether to use individual information obtained when residents participate as research subjects are explored. PMID:23425981

  10. Legislation hampers medical research in acute situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Informed consent in incapacitated adults is permitted in the form of proxy consent by both the patients' closest relative (next of kin, NOK) and general practitioner (GP). In research in acute situations not involving pharmaceuticals, Danish legislation allows for randomisation and...

  11. The Interdisciplinarity in the Romanian Medical Research

    OpenAIRE

    Ionescu, Ecaterina; DRĂGOI Mihaela Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Generally, the educational training and research / development process describes the following levels of disciplines interpenetration: pluridisciplinarity, multidisciplinarity, interdisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity. The interdisciplinarity implies phenomena, general laws and concepts common to several disciplines, analyzed in contexts as varied as possible, to highlight the many facets and possibilities of their application in the area of various disciplines. Through interdisciplinarity...

  12. Medical Research on Stem Cells to Continue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    China will maintain its opposition to human reproductive cloning but will continue to allow closely monitored embryo stem cell research for the treatment and prevention of disease, said Wang Hongguang, president of the China National Center for Biotechnology Development, on February 20 in Beijing.

  13. Legislation hampers medical research in acute situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Informed consent in incapacitated adults is permitted in the form of proxy consent by both the patients' closest relative (next of kin, NOK) and general practitioner (GP). In research in acute situations not involving pharmaceuticals, Danish legislation allows for randomisation and ...

  14. Misrepresentation and responsibility in medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, R L; Covell, J W; Friedman, P J; Kitcher, P S; Peters, R M

    1987-11-26

    Early in 1985, after being questioned about duplicate data in two of his papers, Robert A. Slutsky, M.D., resigned his appointments as a radiology resident (trainee) and nonsalaried associate clinical professor in the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Diego. During the following year, faculty committees investigated Slutsky's entire bibliography of 137 articles published in seven years; 77 (including reviews) were classified as valid, 48 were judged questionable, and 12 were deemed fraudulent. The majority of these papers were published while Slutsky was a research or clinical trainee in cardiology, nuclear medicine, and then radiology. Our analysis of this case leads us to conclude that research fraud, although probably rare, in view of the size of the research establishment, may evade detection, and that there are scientists prepared to run the appreciable risk of submitting inaccurate statements for publication. Sophisticated dishonesty can escape detection by peer review and replication. The emphasis on competition and the pressure to produce, while intended to advance the discovery of truth, may foster a conflict between personal career goals and the intellectual motivation of scientists to seek the truth. The scientific community needs to address the issues raised by recent reports of fraud. Each institution and granting agency must have procedures for investigating suspected fraud or unethical practices, procedures that protect both the person who reports such practices and the accused person from premature disclosure. As we heighten awareness, we must avoid a "witch hunt." Deterrence of research fraud is clearly needed, but institution of practices that might stifle originality or discourage cooperative research would be counterproductive. PMID:3317039

  15. Medical students as human subjects in educational research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina L. Kalet

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Special concerns often arise when medical students are themselves the subjects of education research. A recently completed large, multi-center randomized controlled trial of computer-assisted learning modules for surgical clerks provided the opportunity to explore the perceived level of risk of studies where medical students serve as human subjects by reporting on: 1 the response of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs at seven institutions to the same study protocol; and 2 the thoughts and feelings of students across study sites about being research subjects. Methods: From July 2009 to August 2010, all third-year medical students at seven collaborating institutions were eligible to participate. Patterns of IRB review of the same protocol were compared. Participation burden was calculated in terms of the time spent interacting with the modules. Focus groups were conducted with medical students at each site. Transcripts were coded by three independent reviewers and analyzed using Atlas.ti. Results: The IRBs at the seven participating institutions granted full (n=1, expedited (n=4, or exempt (n=2 review of the WISE Trial protocol. 995 (73% of those eligible consented to participate, and 207 (20% of these students completed all outcome measures. The average time to complete the computer modules and associated measures was 175 min. Common themes in focus groups with participant students included the desire to contribute to medical education research, the absence of coercion to consent, and the low-risk nature of the research. Discussion: Our findings demonstrate that risk assessment and the extent of review utilized for medical education research vary among IRBs. Despite variability in the perception of risk implied by differing IRB requirements, students themselves felt education research was low risk and did not consider themselves to be vulnerable. The vast majority of eligible medical students were willing to participate as research

  16. Use of radiation in medicine and medical research in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 1 April, 1994, The Age, Melbourne, published an article claiming that hundreds of Australians had been given radioactive doses in medical experiments performed after the Second World War. Data for the article were obtained by researching information available in the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) library and the Nation Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Minutes in Canberra. In this article, the author gives a balanced view of the situation relating to medical experiments with radioactive substances in the 1930-1940s. Usage can be classified into the following categories : established therapeutic use; investigational therapeutic use; established diagnostic use; investigational diagnostic use and research. The limited search has indicated that considerable use has been made of radioisotopes in medicine and medical research in Australia. In most of the research studies, there would have been no benefit to the patient. Although in some cases the radiation dose would have exceeded that which is acceptable today for research studies, no cases were found where the dose delivered was dangerous. The concern is that there may be isolated studies published in medical journals which could be described in poor light in the print and electronic news media

  17. Gender-sensitive reporting in medical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidari Shirin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sex and gender differences influence the health and wellbeing of men and women. Although studies have drawn attention to observed differences between women and men across diseases, remarkably little research has been pursued to systematically investigate these underlying sex differences. Women continue to be underrepresented in clinical trials, and even in studies in which both men and women participate, systematic analysis of data to identify potential sex-based differences is lacking. Standards for reporting of clinical trials have been established to ensure provision of complete, transparent and critical information. An important step in addressing the gender imbalance would be inclusion of a gender perspective in the next Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT guideline revision. Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals, as a set of well-recognized and widely used guidelines for authors and biomedical journals, should similarly emphasize the ethical obligation of authors to present data analyzed by gender as a matter of routine. Journal editors are also promoters of ethical research and adequate standards of reporting, and requirements for inclusion of gender analyses should be integrated into editorial policies as a matter of urgency.

  18. Medical and biomedical research productivity from Palestine, 2002 – 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweileh Waleed M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical research productivity reflects the level of medical education and practice in a particular country. The objective of this study was to examine the quantity and quality of medical and biomedical research published from Palestine. Findings Comprehensive review of the literature indexed by Scopus was conducted. Data from Jan 01, 2002 till December 31, 2011 was searched for authors affiliated with Palestine or Palestinian authority. Results were refined to limit the search to medical and biomedical subjects. The quality of publication was assessed using Journal Citation Report. The total number of publications was 2207. A total of 770 publications were in the medical and biomedical subject areas. The annual rate of publication was 0.077 articles per gross domestic product/capita. The 770 publications have an h-index of 32. One hundred and thirty eight (18% articles were published in 46 journals that were not indexed in the web of knowledge. Twenty two (22/770; 2.9% articles were published in journals with an IF > 10. Conclusions The quantity and quality of research originating from Palestinian institutions is promising given the scarce resources of Palestine. However, more effort is needed to bridge the gap in medical research productivity and to promote better health in Palestine.

  19. Operation of the Brookhaven AGS with the Booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) received protons directly from a Linac and heavy ions directly from a Tandem Van de Graaff before 1992. The newly constructed Booster has been brought on line to serve as an injector for the AGS. The operational status of the acceleration of proton and heavy ions through the Booster and the AGS is reviewed. Accelerator improvement programs to increase proton intensity for physics research and to prepare heavy ion beams for RHIC injection are discussed

  20. An overview of ethnography in healthcare and medical education research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Goodson

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Research in healthcare settings and medical education has relied heavily on quantitative methods. However, there are research questions within these academic domains that may be more adequately addressed by qualitative inquiry. While there are many qualitative approaches, ethnography is one method that allows the researcher to take advantage of relative immersion in order to obtain thick description. The purpose of this article is to introduce ethnography, to describe how ethnographic methods may be utilized, to provide an overview of ethnography's use in healthcare and medical education, and to summarize some key limitations with the method.

  1. Brief guidelines for methods and statistics in medical research

    CERN Document Server

    Ab Rahman, Jamalludin

    2015-01-01

    This book serves as a practical guide to methods and statistics in medical research. It includes step-by-step instructions on using SPSS software for statistical analysis, as well as relevant examples to help those readers who are new to research in health and medical fields. Simple texts and diagrams are provided to help explain the concepts covered, and print screens for the statistical steps and the SPSS outputs are provided, together with interpretations and examples of how to report on findings. Brief Guidelines for Methods and Statistics in Medical Research offers a valuable quick reference guide for healthcare students and practitioners conducting research in health related fields, written in an accessible style.

  2. Quarterly report of Biological and Medical Research Division, April 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brues, A.M.

    1955-04-01

    This report is a compilation of 48 investigator prepared summaries of recent progress in individual research programs of the Biology and Medical Division of the Argonne National Laboratory for the quarterly period ending April,1955. Individual reports are about 3-6 pages in length and often contain research data.

  3. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT PLAN.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NAIDU,J.R.

    2002-10-22

    The purpose of the Wildlife Management Plan (WMP) is to promote stewardship of the natural resources found at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and to integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission.

  4. Barrier Cavities in the Brookhaven AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In collaboration with KEK two barrier cavities, each generating 40 kV per turn have been installed in the Brookhaven AGS. Machine studies are described and their implications for high intensity operations are discussed

  5. Research status and development tendency of medical psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-yi ZHANG

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The present study aims to review the research status and development tendency of military medical psychology in China and abroad and proposes the development of medical psychology research in the Chinese military.Methods A literature search method was adopted to find and review major literature on military medical psychology,from basic studies,discipline construction,professional teaching,to the service force in the last 10 years.Results The last 10 years witnessed much development in the medical psychological branches,such as physiological psychology,mental measurement,psychological counseling,and treatment.With these developments,military medical psychology achieved much with regard to the reserve of talented men,the mental measurement for officers and soldiers,mental intervention for military stress,and psychological rehabilitation after stress.Conclusion Thus,future studies on military medical psychology should focus on intensifying the training of medical psychology experts to promote the study on the etiology of military mental diseases and on the prevention and treatment of mental disorders caused by wars.

  6. Self-Experimentation and Its Role in Medical Research

    OpenAIRE

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2012-01-01

    Although experimentation involving human volunteers has attracted intense study, the matter of self-experimentation among medical researchers has received much less attention. Many questions have been answered only in part, or have been left unanswered. How common is this practice? Is it more common among certain nationalities? What have been the predominant medical fields in which self-experimentation has occurred? How dangerous an act has this proved to be? What have been the trends over ti...

  7. Portraits of care: medical research through portraiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aita, Virginia A; Lydiatt, William M; Gilbert, Mark A

    2010-06-01

    The Portraits of Care study used portraiture to investigate ideas about care and care giving at the intersection of art and medicine. The study employed mixed methods involving both qualitative and quantitative research techniques. All aspects of the study were approved by the Institutional Review Board. The study included 26 patient and 20 caregiver subjects. Patient subjects were drawn from across the lifespan and included healthy and ill patients. Caregiver subjects included professional and familial caregivers. All subjects gave their informed consent for the study and the subsequent exhibition of artwork. The artist drew or painted 100 portraits during the 2-year study. A multi-disciplinary analysis team carried out the initial analysis of portraits and subject data. Findings from their qualitative analysis were used to develop a quantitative survey and qualitative journal tool that the public used to give feedback at the subsequent exhibition. Exhibition data confirmed the initial findings. Study results showed the introspection of subjects that revealed their sense of identity and psychological status. Patients appear as 'whole people', not fragmented by diagnosis. Caregivers' portraits reveal their commitment to care. There is also a sense of mutuality and fluidity in the background stories of subjects. Many patient subjects have been caregivers and, at times, caregivers are also patients. Public data emphasised the identity transformation of subjects, the centrality of the idea of mortality, the presence of hope despite adversity, and the importance of empathy and compassion in care. PMID:21393267

  8. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2001 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE HELD AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, UPTON, N.Y., APRIL 30 - MAY 1, 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCDONALD, R.J.

    2001-04-30

    BNL is proud to acknowledge all of our 2001 sponsors, with their help and support this has correctly become an oilheat industry conference. It is quite gratifying to see an industry come together to help support an activity like the technology conference, for the benefit of the industry as a whole and to celebrate the beginning of the National Oilheat Research Alliance. This meeting is the fourteenth oil heat industry technology conference to be held since 1984 and the first under a new name, NORA, the National Oilheat research Alliance, and the very first in the new century. The conference is a very important part of the effort in technology transfer, which is supported by the Oilheat Research Program. The Oilheat Research Program at BNL is under the newly assigned program management at the Office of Power Technology within the US DOE. The foremost reason for the conference is to provide a platform for the exchange of information and perspectives among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, service technicians, and marketers of oil-fired space-conditioning equipment. The conference provides a conduit by which information and ideas can be exchanged to examine present technologies, as well as helping to develop the future course for oil heating advancement. These conferences also serve as a stage for unifying government representatives, researchers, fuel oil marketers, and other members of the oil-heat industry in addressing technology advancements in this important energy use sector. The specific objectives of the conference are to: (1) Identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; (2) Foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation. Seventeen technical presentations will be made

  9. Medical Researchers' Ancillary Care Obligations: The Relationship-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Nate W

    2016-06-01

    In this article, I provide a new account of the basis of medical researchers' ancillary care obligations. Ancillary care in medical research, or medical care that research participants need but that is not required for the validity or safety of a study or to redress research injuries, is a topic that has drawn increasing attention in research ethics over the last ten years. My view, the relationship-based approach, improves on the main existing theory, Richardson and Belsky's 'partial-entrustment model', by avoiding its problematic restriction on the scope of health needs for which researchers could be obligated to provide ancillary care. Instead, it grounds ancillary care obligations in a wide range of morally relevant features of the researcher-participant relationship, including the level of engagement between researchers and participants, and weighs these factors against each other. I argue that the level of engagement, that is, the duration and intensity of interactions, between researchers and participants matters for ancillary care because of its connection to the meaningfulness of a relationship, and I suggest that other morally relevant features can be grounded in researchers' role obligations. PMID:26424512

  10. ATLAS Overview Week at Brookhaven

    CERN Multimedia

    Pilcher, J

    Over 200 ATLAS participants gathered at Brookhaven National Laboratory during the first week of June for our annual overview week. Some system communities arrived early and held meetings on Saturday and Sunday, and the detector interface group (DIG) and Technical Coordination also took advantage of the time to discuss issues of interest for all detector systems. Sunday was also marked by a workshop on the possibilities for heavy ion physics with ATLAS. Beginning on Monday, and for the rest of the week, sessions were held in common in the well equipped Berkner Hall auditorium complex. Laptop computers became the norm for presentations and a wireless network kept laptop owners well connected. Most lunches and dinners were held on the lawn outside Berkner Hall. The weather was very cooperative and it was an extremely pleasant setting. This picture shows most of the participants from a view on the roof of Berkner Hall. Technical Coordination and Integration issues started the reports on Monday and became a...

  11. The Brookhaven Radiation Effects Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Radiation Effects Facility (REF), funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) through the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) and the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL), has been constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Operation started in October 1986. The facility is capable of delivering pulsed H-, H/sup o/, and H+ beams of 100 to 200 MeV energy up to 30 mA peak current. Pulses can be adjusted from 5 μs to 500 μs length at a repetition rate of 5 pps. The beam spot on target is adjustable from 3 to 100 cm diameter (2 σ) resulting in a maximum dose of about 10 MRads (Si) per pulse (small beam spot). Experimental use of the REF is being primarily supported by the SDI lethality (LTH-4) program. The program has addressed ionization effects in electronics, both dose rate and total dose dependence, radiation-sensitive components, and dE/dx effects in energetic materials including propellants and high explosives (HE). This paper describes the facility, its capabilities and potential, and the experiments that have been carried out to date or are being planned. 2 refs., 10 figs

  12. Industry Support of Medical Research: Important Opportunity or Treacherous Pitfall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, William M; Meslin, Eric M; Kroenke, Kurt

    2016-02-01

    Pharmaceutical and device manufacturers fund more than half of the medical research in the U.S. Research funding by for-profit companies has increased over the past 20 years, while federal funding has declined. Research funding from for-profit medical companies is seen as tainted by many academicians because of potential biases and prior misbehavior by both investigators and companies. Yet NIH is encouraging partnerships between the public and private sectors to enhance scientific discovery. There are instances, such as methods for improving drug adherence and post-marketing drug surveillance, where the interests of academician researchers and industry could be aligned. We provide examples of ethically performed industry-funded research and a set of principles and benchmarks for ethically credible academic-industry partnerships that could allow academic researchers, for-profit companies, and the public to benefit. PMID:26307387

  13. Grounded theory in medical education research: AMEE Guide No. 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watling, Christopher J; Lingard, Lorelei

    2012-01-01

    Qualitative research in general and the grounded theory approach in particular, have become increasingly prominent in medical education research in recent years. In this Guide, we first provide a historical perspective on the origin and evolution of grounded theory. We then outline the principles underlying the grounded theory approach and the procedures for doing a grounded theory study, illustrating these elements with real examples. Next, we address key critiques of grounded theory, which continue to shape how the method is perceived and used. Finally, pitfalls and controversies in grounded theory research are examined to provide a balanced view of both the potential and the challenges of this approach. This Guide aims to assist researchers new to grounded theory to approach their studies in a disciplined and rigorous fashion, to challenge experienced researchers to reflect on their assumptions, and to arm readers of medical education research with an approach to critically appraising the quality of grounded theory studies. PMID:22913519

  14. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY INSTITUTIONAL PLAN FY2003-2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-10

    This document presents the vision for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the next five years, and a roadmap for implementing that vision. Brookhaven is a multidisciplinary science-based laboratory operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), supported primarily by programs sponsored by the DOE's Office of Science. As the third-largest funding agency for science in the U.S., one of the DOE's goals is ''to advance basic research and the instruments of science that are the foundations for DOE's applied missions, a base for U.S. technology innovation, and a source of remarkable insights into our physical and biological world, and the nature of matter and energy'' (DOE Office of Science Strategic Plan, 2000 http://www.osti.gov/portfolio/science.htm). BNL shapes its vision according to this plan.

  15. Recruiting Underserved Mothers to Medical Research: Findings from North Carolina

    OpenAIRE

    Spears, Chaya R.; Sandberg, Joanne C.; O’Neill, Jenna L.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Howard, Timothy D.; Feldman, Steven R.; Arcury, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Representative samples are required for ethical, valid, and useful health research. Yet, recruiting participants, especially from historically underserved communities, can be challenging. This paper presents findings from in-depth interviews with 40 mothers about factors that might influence their willingness to participate or allow their children to participate in medical research. Saliency analysis organizes the findings. Frequent and important salient themes about research participation in...

  16. Has the commercialisation of medical research gone too far?

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    Government policy has been complicit in the increasing role of commercial companies in research, which in turn have little incentive to share the benefits of research. As a result, huge swathes of medical research rely on commercialisation and related patent protection in order to thrive. There is a distinct lack of evidence that commercialisation has led to an improvement in public health, the claim of increased innovation simply does not have empirical support. Commercialisation has led to ...

  17. Nuclear medicine at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkins, H.L.

    1976-01-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Program at the Brookhaven National Laboratory seeks to develop new materials and methods for the investigation of human physiology and disease processes. Some aspects of this research are related to basic research of how radiopharmaceuticals work. Other aspects are directed toward direct applications as diagnostic agents. It is likely that cyclotron-produced positron emitting nuclides will assume greater importance in the next few years. This can be attributed to the ability to label biologically important molecules with high specific activity without affecting biological activity, using /sup 11/C, /sup 13/N, and /sup 15/O. Large quantities of these short-lived nuclides can be administered without excessive radiation dose and newer instrumentation will permit reconstructive axial tomography, providing truly quantitative display of distribution of radioactivity. The /sup 122/Xe-/sup 122/I generator has the potential for looking at rapid dynamic processes. Another generator, the /sup 68/Ge-/sup 68/Ga generator produces a positron emitter for the use of those far removed from cyclotrons. The possibilities for /sup 68/Ga radiopharmaceuticals are as numerous as those for /sup 99m/Tc diagnostic agents.

  18. Growing Research Among Osteopathic Residents and Medical Students: A Consortium-Based Research Education Continuum Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannan, Grace D

    2016-05-01

    In general, physicians' interest in research continues to be a challenge. The lack of research culture is more pronounced in the osteopathic medical profession, which is historically not research oriented. With increasing focus on evidence-based medicine and with the single accreditation system for graduate medical education in motion, growing research and scholarly activities among osteopathic physicians and students and residents becomes imperative. This article illustrates how an educational consortium, such as an osteopathic postdoctoral training institution, can play a pivotal role in creating a culture of research through broad-based training of medical students and residents. PMID:27111784

  19. Review of existing issues, ethics and practices in general medical research and in radiation protection research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature review was carried out in relation to general medical research and radiation protection research. A large number of documents were found concerning the subject of ethics in general medical research. For radiation protection research, the number of documents and the information available is very limited. A review of practices in 13 European countries concerning general medical research and radiation protection research was carried out by sending a questionnaire to each country. It was found that all countries reviewed were well regulated for general medical research. For research that involves ionising radiation, the UK and Ireland are by far the most regulated countries. For other countries, there does not seem to be much information available. From the literature review and the review of practices, a number of existing ethical issues were identified and exposed, and a number of conclusions were drawn. (authors)

  20. Medical Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within Brookhaven National Laboratory, the life sciences program is carried out under two departments, the Medical Department and the Biological Department. The Medical Research Center contains three major divisions: the Hospital, the Research Laboratories, and the Occupational Medicine Clinic. The hospital, which is devoted entirely to research patients, supports clinical studies in: pulmonary diseases; neuropsychiatric disorders; hematological diseases (e.g., chronic lymphocytic leukemia); cardiopulmonary disorders; hepatobiliary dysfunction; cancer of various types; toxicological problems; bone and mineral metabolism; and dietary and nutritional disorders. Research efforts are also made to improve therapeutic measures for disease: brain tumor therapy through boron capture of epithermal neutrons, and proton beam irradiation; extracorporeal irradiation of blood in leukemia; iron chelator efficacy in thalassemia; and nonsurgical treatment of ocular melanoma. Early diagnoses and studies of the mechanism of disease are approached through medical applications of nuclear technology, including positron emission tomography. Work carried out within the Biological Department includes: biological structure determination, molecular genetics, DNA repair and plant sciences. A large part of the research is devoted to understanding how biological systems work. Central to this aim is the study of DNA. This includes effects of damage by physical and chemical agents, gene cloning of bacteria and plants and effects of low doses of radiation and other energy derived hazards

  1. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual research summary, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, S.H. (ed.)

    1984-08-01

    This research summary contains brief descriptions of research in the following areas: (1) mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis; (2) role of metals in cocarcinogenesis and the use of liposomes for metal mobilization; (3) control of mutagenesis and cell differentiation in cultured cells by tumor promoters; (4) radiation effects in mammalian cells; (5) radiation carcinogenesis and radioprotectors; (6) life shortening, tumor induction, and tissue dose for fission-neutron and gamma-ray irradiations; (7) mammalian genetics and biostatistics; (8) radiation toxicity studies; (9) hematopoiesis in chronic toxicity; (10) molecular biology studies; (11) chemical toxicology; (12) carcinogen identification and metabolism; (13) metal metabolism and toxicity; and (14) neurobehavioral chronobiology. (ACR)

  2. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual research summary, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research summary contains brief descriptions of research in the following areas: (1) mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis; (2) role of metals in cocarcinogenesis and the use of liposomes for metal mobilization; (3) control of mutagenesis and cell differentiation in cultured cells by tumor promoters; (4) radiation effects in mammalian cells; (5) radiation carcinogenesis and radioprotectors; (6) life shortening, tumor induction, and tissue dose for fission-neutron and gamma-ray irradiations; (7) mammalian genetics and biostatistics; (8) radiation toxicity studies; (9) hematopoiesis in chronic toxicity; (10) molecular biology studies; (11) chemical toxicology; (12) carcinogen identification and metabolism; (13) metal metabolism and toxicity; and (14) neurobehavioral chronobiology

  3. Quality assurance in military medical research and medical radiation accident management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotz, Mark E; Meineke, Viktor

    2012-08-01

    The provision of quality radiation-related medical diagnostic and therapeutic treatments cannot occur without the presence of robust quality assurance and standardization programs. Medical laboratory services are essential in patient treatment and must be able to meet the needs of all patients and the clinical personnel responsible for the medical care of these patients. Clinical personnel involved in patient care must embody the quality assurance process in daily work to ensure program sustainability. In conformance with the German Federal Government's concept for modern departmental research, the international standard ISO 9001, one of the relevant standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), is applied in quality assurance in military medical research. By its holistic approach, this internationally accepted standard provides an excellent basis for establishing a modern quality management system in line with international standards. Furthermore, this standard can serve as a sound basis for the further development of an already established quality management system when additional standards shall apply, as for instance in reference laboratories or medical laboratories. Besides quality assurance, a military medical facility must manage additional risk events in the context of early recognition/detection of health risks of military personnel on deployment in order to be able to take appropriate preventive and protective measures; for instance, with medical radiation accident management. The international standard ISO 31000:2009 can serve as a guideline for establishing risk management. Clear organizational structures and defined work processes are required when individual laboratory units seek accreditation according to specific laboratory standards. Furthermore, international efforts to develop health laboratory standards must be reinforced that support sustainable quality assurance, as in the exchange and comparison of test results within

  4. Research on medical applications of radioisotopes and radiation in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC) produces and distributes commercially in Australia and abroad a range of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals for medical applications. The AAEC carries out research and development on new and improved processes and procucts is collaboration with medical specialists in hospitals and research workers in other organisations. Examples of these processes and products are: a gel generator for production of 99mTc; radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis of tumours and brain disease and therapy for arthritis; 64Cu for study of copper metabolism; and monoclonal antibodies for tumour diagnosis and therapy. New medical applications in Australia of neutron irradiation include the measurement of total body nitrogen and neutron capture in boron-labelled compounds in vivo for melanoma therapy. (author)

  5. Methods to enhance capacity of medical teachers for research publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asokan, Neelakandhan; Shaji, Kunnukattil S

    2016-01-01

    In 2009, the Medical Council of India (MCI) made a certain number of research publications mandatory for the promotion to higher posts of medical teachers. Responding to this, there was a series of workshops on research and scientific writing for faculty members of a medical college. We decided to explore the opinions and perceptions of the participants on the need and relevance of such efforts, using qualitative methods such as focus-group discussions (FGDs) and semi-structured interview. The main themes that emerged from the study were as follows: a) presently, there are several hurdles for research and publication; b) recent attempts to upgrade skills of research methodology and scientific writing are encouraging, but need to be sustained; c) the traditional role of clinician - teacher is being replaced with that of clinician-teacher-researcher. Suggestions for future included - a) combined workshops on research methodology and scientific writing skills, b) continuous institutional support system for research and publication, and c) effective mentorship. PMID:27350712

  6. Methods to enhance capacity of medical teachers for research publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelakandhan Asokan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, the Medical Council of India (MCI made a certain number of research publications mandatory for the promotion to higher posts of medical teachers. Responding to this, there was a series of workshops on research and scientific writing for faculty members of a medical college. We decided to explore the opinions and perceptions of the participants on the need and relevance of such efforts, using qualitative methods such as focus-group discussions (FGDs and semi-structured interview. The main themes that emerged from the study were as follows: a presently, there are several hurdles for research and publication; b recent attempts to upgrade skills of research methodology and scientific writing are encouraging, but need to be sustained; c the traditional role of clinician - teacher is being replaced with that of clinician-teacher-researcher. Suggestions for future included - a combined workshops on research methodology and scientific writing skills, b continuous institutional support system for research and publication, and c effective mentorship.

  7. Clinical research ethics in Irish healthcare: diversity, dynamism and medicalization.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Condell, Sarah L

    2012-11-01

    Gaining ethical clearance to conduct a study is an important aspect of all research involving humans but can be time-consuming and daunting for novice researchers. This article stems from a larger ethnographic study that examined research capacity building in Irish nursing and midwifery. Data were collected over a 28-month time frame from a purposive sample of 16 nurse or midwife research fellows who were funded to undertake full-time PhDs. Gaining ethical clearance for their studies was reported as an early \\'rite of passage\\' in the category of \\'labouring the doctorate\\'. This article penetrates the complexities in Irish clinical research ethics by describing the practices these nurse and midwife researchers encountered and the experiences they had. The key issue of representation that occurred in the context of \\'medicalized\\' research ethics is further explored including its meaning for nursing or midwifery research.

  8. Medical Settings as a Context for Research on Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Karen; Brown, Deirdre A.

    2013-01-01

    Medical contexts provide a rich opportunity to study important theoretical questions in cognitive development and to investigate the influence of a range of interacting factors relating to the child, the experience, and the broader social context on children's cognition. In the context of examples of research investigating these issues, we…

  9. High-Dimensional Statistical Methods for Medical Research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, Jan

    Warsaw : Polish Academy of Sciences ICB, 2011. s. 46-49. [ICB Seminar /114./. International Seminar on Statistics and Clinical Practice /8./. 08.06.2011-11.06.2011, Warsaw] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : linear regression * molecular genetics * statistics in medicine * medical signal and image processing Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  10. Include medical ethics in the Research Excellence Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, W.M.; Vernon, B.; Boyd, K; Gillon, R; Farsides, B; Stirrat, G

    2011-01-01

    The Research Excellence Framework of the Higher Education Funding Council for England is taking place in 2013, its three key elements being outputs (65% of the profile), impact (20%), and “quality of the research environment” (15%). Impact will be assessed using case studies that “may include any social, economic or cultural impact or benefit beyond academia that has taken place during the assessment period.”1 Medical ethics in the UK still does not have its own cognate ...

  11. Introduction to Biostatistics—An Annotated Bibliography for Medical Researchers

    OpenAIRE

    Sacks, Susan T.; Glantz, Stanton A.

    1983-01-01

    Biostatistical methods have become thoroughly integrated into modern biomedical and clinical research. Nevertheless, every observer who has evaluated articles in medical journals has noted that as many as half the reported results were based on questionable statistical analysis. This situation, combined with the fact that most errors involve relatively simple statistical procedures, points to the need for researchers and practitioners to be able to personally judge the quality of the statisti...

  12. "Medical informatics in a medical research facility. An interactive multimedia presentation". Diabetes as a model.

    OpenAIRE

    Vinik, E.; Sirman, D.; Georges, L. P.; Phillips, J.

    1991-01-01

    This interactive demonstration provides a model for integrating information in a medical facility. By the use of networking computers, diagnostic data and scientific data are shared between geographically-separated clinical and research units. Data collected in a patient database in the outpatient clinic is sorted on specified qualifying criteria and the resulting subset further analyzed for research studies. To show the process of patient selection from a general database to a diabetes datab...

  13. Large-scale User Facility Imaging and Scattering Techniques to Facilitate Basic Medical Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceptually, modern medical imaging can be traced back to the late 1960's and into the early 1970's with the advent of computed tomography . This pioneering work was done by 1979 Nobel Prize winners Godfrey Hounsfield and Allan McLeod Cormack which evolved into the first prototype Computed Tomography (CT) scanner in 1971 and became commercially available in 1972. Unique to the CT scanner was the ability to utilize X-ray projections taken at regular angular increments from which reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) images could be produced. It is interesting to note that the mathematics to realize tomographic images was developed in 1917 by the Austrian mathematician Johann Radon who produced the mathematical relationships to derive 3D images from projections - known today as the Radon Transform . The confluence of newly advancing technologies, particularly in the areas of detectors, X-ray tubes, and computers combined with the earlier derived mathematical concepts ushered in a new era in diagnostic medicine via medical imaging (Beckmann, 2006). Occurring separately but at a similar time as the development of the CT scanner were efforts at the national level within the United States to produce user facilities to support scientific discovery based upon experimentation. Basic Energy Sciences within the United States Department of Energy currently supports 9 major user facilities along with 5 nanoscale science research centers dedicated to measurement sciences and experimental techniques supporting a very broad range of scientific disciplines. Tracing back the active user facilities, the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) a SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was built in 1974 and it was realized that its intense x-ray beam could be used to study protein molecular structure. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory was commissioned in 1982 and currently has 60 x-ray beamlines optimized for a number of different

  14. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) carries out basic and applied research in the following fields: high-energy nuclear and solid state physics; fundamental material and structure properties and the interactions of matter; nuclear medicine, biomedical and environmental sciences; and selected energy technologies. In conducting these research activities, it is Laboratory policy to protect the health and safety of employees and the public, and to minimize the impact of BNL operations on the environment. This document is the BNL environmental report for the calendar year 1990 for the safety and Environmental Protection division and corners topics on effluents, surveillance, regulations, assessments, and compliance

  15. A horizon of medical education research approach in 21st century

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhendu Dutta

    2014-01-01

    The author is a reviewer of various peer reviewed journals and during the review of the medical education research manuscript was observed that many novice of the field of medical education research do not follow the scientific steps of the medical education research. Therefore, this paper is aimed to reflect the essence of medical education research approach and to help the novice medical education research investigators to design the project in scientific approach. An intensive review is ma...

  16. Perspectives on electronic medical records adoption: electronic medical records (EMR in outcomes research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Belletti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Dan Belletti1, Christopher Zacker1, C Daniel Mullins21Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 2University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Health information technology (HIT is engineered to promote improved quality and efficiency of care, and reduce medical errors. Healthcare organizations have made significant investments in HIT tools and the electronic medical record (EMR is a major technological advance. The Department of Veterans Affairs was one of the first large healthcare systems to fully implement EMR. The Veterans Health Information System and Technology Architecture (VistA began by providing an interface to review and update a patient’s medical record with its computerized patient record system. However, since the implementation of the VistA system there has not been an overall substantial adoption of EMR in the ambulatory or inpatient setting. In fact, only 23.9% of physicians were using EMRs in their office-based practices in 2005. A sample from the American Medical Association revealed that EMRs were available in an office setting to 17% of physicians in late 2007 and early 2008. Of these, 17% of physicians with EMR, only 4% were considered to be fully functional EMR systems. With the exception of some large aggregate EMR databases the slow adoption of EMR has limited its use in outcomes research. This paper reviews the literature and presents the current status of and forces influencing the adoption of EMR in the office-based practice, and identifies the benefits, limitations, and overall value of EMR in the conduct of outcomes research in the US.Keywords: electronic medical records, health information technology, medical errors

  17. Utilization of research reactors in universities and their medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, five research reactors and a critical assembly are operated by the universities. They are opened to all university researchers, the system of which is financially supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the Japanese government. Usually KUR is operated eight cycles per year. One cycle consists of the following four week operation: 1. Mainly for researchers from other universities; 2. Mainly for researchers in the institute; 3. Mainly for beam experiment; 4. Sort time experiment. In the weeks of 1 ∼ 3 the KUR is operated continously from Tuesday morning to Friday evening. The experiment include studies on physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, engineering etc. Recently the medical application of research reactors has become popular in Japan. The new technique of the boron neutron capture thereby has been successfully applied to brain tumors and will be to melanoma (skin cancer) in near future. (author)

  18. The researches of medical and environmental radiation protection dose

    OpenAIRE

    盧, 暁光

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, with the development of modern radiation science, application of radiation exposure has been paid more and more attention in various fields. Although there are many benefits for human by the use of radiation in such as medical diagnose and treatment, utilization of nuclear power, more efforts should be made to radiation hazards and their control that are often neglected. The researches in this study were intended to meet the requirements with the center of radiation protection dose ...

  19. [Research advances on medical genetics in China in 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanfeng; Han, Yubo; Cao, Pengbo; Meng, Jinfeng; Li, Haibei; Qin, Geng; Zhang, Feng; Jin, Guangfu; Yang, Yong; Wu, Lingqian; Ping, Jie; Zhou, Gangqiao

    2016-05-01

    Steady progress has been achieved in the medical genetics in China in 2015, as numerous original researches were published in the world's leading journals. Chinese scientists have made significant contributions to various fields of medical genetics, such as pathogenicity of rare diseases, predisposition of common diseases, somatic mutations of cancer, new technologies and methods, disease-related microRNAs (miRNAs), disease-related long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), disease-related competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs), disease-related RNA splicing and molecular evolution. In these fields, Chinese scientists have gradually formed the tendency, from common variants to rare variants, from single omic analyses to multipleomics integration analyses, from genetic discovery to functional confirmation, from basic research to clinical application. Meanwhile, the findings of Chinese scientists have been drawn great attentions of international peers. This review aims to provide an overall picture of the front in Chinese medical genetics, and highlights the important findings and their research strategy. PMID:27232486

  20. A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkovitz, Carmen; Bernholc, Nicole; Cohen, Anita; Eng, Susan; Enriquez-Leder, Rosario; Franz, Barbara; Gorden, Patricia; Hanson, Louise; Lamble, Geraldine; Martin, Harriet; Mastrangelo, Iris; McLane, Victoria; Villela, Maria-Alicia; Vivirito, Katherine; Woodhead, Avril

    1991-01-01

    This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

  1. A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Careers in action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

  2. Technical aspects of boron neutron capture therapy at the BNL Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, BMRR, is a 3 MW heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for biomedical studies. Early BNL work in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) used a beam of thermal neutrons for experimental treatment of brain tumors. Research elsewhere and at BNL indicated that higher energy neutrons would be required to treat deep seated brain tumors. Epithermal neutrons would be thermalized as they penetrated the brain and peak thermal neutron flux densities would occur at the depth of brain tumors. One of the two BMRR thermal port shutters was modified in 1988 to include plates of aluminum and aluminum oxide to provide an epithermal port. Lithium carbonate in polyethylene was added in 1991 around the bismuth port to reduce the neutron flux density coming from outside the port. To enhance the epithermal neutron flux density, the two vertical thimbles A-3 (core edge) and E-3 (in core) were replaced with fuel elements. There are now four fuel elements of 190 grams each and 28 fuel elements of 140 grams each for a total of 4.68 kg of 235U in the core. The authors have proposed replacing the epithermal shutter with a fission converter plate shutter. It is estimated that the new shutter would increase the epithermal neutron flux density by a factor of seven and the epithermal/fast neutron ratio by a factor of two. The modifications made to the BMRR in the past few years permit BNCT for brain tumors without the need to reflect scalp and bone flaps. Radiation workers are monitored via a TLD badge and a self-reading dosimeter during each experiment. An early concern was raised about whether workers would be subject to a significant dose rate from working with patients who have been irradiated. The gamma ray doses for the representative key personnel involved in the care of the first 12 patients receiving BNCT are listed. These workers did not receive unusually high exposures

  3. Elastic neutrino electron scattering at Brookhaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A progress report is given of Experiment 734 at Brookhaven, with a focus on the elastic reactions nu/sub μ/ + e- → nu/sub μ/ + e- and anti nu/sub μ/ + e- → anti nu/sub μ/ + e-. The present status, recent results, and future plans are discussed

  4. Operational research methodology in the general medical rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Leslie

    2009-07-01

    Operations Research (OR), also called Operational Research in the United Kingdom (UK), uses various computational tools for solutions to complex problems within a system. It deals with challenges in planning, scheduling, forecasting, process analysis and decision analysis. It also addresses individual components of the system. The methodology used for decisions based upon stochastic (random) processes can also be adapted for the common general medical ward round. Operational Research techniques add speed, efficiency, quality and consistency to the documentation in the case notes, and reduces the time taken for ward rounds. There is obvious benefit to the individual patient. It also acts as a learning tool which can be audited, and lends itself to research questions. PMID:19652857

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory site report for calendar year 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R.

    1989-06-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is managed by Associated Universities Inc. (AUI). AUI was formed in 1946 by a group of nine universities whose purpose was to create and manage a laboratory in the Northeast in order to advance scientific research in areas of interest to universities, industry, and government. On January 31, 1947, the contract for BNL was approved by the Manhattan District of the Army Corps of Engineers and BNL was established on the former Camp Upton army camp. 54 refs., 21 figs., 78 tabs.

  6. Brookhaven National Laboratory site report for calendar year 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is managed by Associated Universities Inc. (AUI). AUI was formed in 1946 by a group of nine universities whose purpose was to create and manage a laboratory in the Northeast in order to advance scientific research in areas of interest to universities, industry, and government. On January 31, 1947, the contract for BNL was approved by the Manhattan District of the Army Corps of Engineers and BNL was established on the former Camp Upton army camp. 54 refs., 21 figs., 78 tabs

  7. Methodologies and study designs relevant to medical education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Teri L; Balmer, Dorene F; Coverdale, John H

    2013-06-01

    Research is an important part of educational scholarship. Knowledge of research methodologies is essential for both conducting research as well as determining the soundness of the findings from published studies. Our goals for this paper therefore are to inform medical education researchers of the range and key components of educational research designs. We will discuss both qualitative and quantitative approaches to educational research. Qualitative methods will be presented according to traditions that have a distinguished history in particular disciplines. Quantitative methods will be presented according to an evidence-based hierarchy akin to that of evidence-based medicine with the stronger designs (systematic reviews and well conducted educational randomized controlled trials) at the top, and weaker designs (descriptive studies without comparison groups, or single case studies) at the bottom. It should be appreciated, however, that the research question determines the study design. Therefore, the onus is on the researcher to choose a design that is appropriate to answering the question. We conclude with an overview of how educational researchers should describe the study design and methods in order to provide transparency and clarity. PMID:23859093

  8. Summaries of research projects for fiscal years 1996 and 1997, medical applications and biophysical research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Medical Applications and Biophysical Research Division of the Office of Biological and Environmental Research supports and manages research in several distinct areas of science and technology. The projects described in this book are grouped by the main budgetary areas: General Life Sciences (structural molecular biology), Medical Applications (primarily nuclear medicine) and Measurement Science (analytical chemistry instrumentation), Environmental Management Science Program, and the Small Business Innovation Research Program. The research funded by this division complements that of the other two divisions in the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER): Health Effects and Life Sciences Research, and Environmental Sciences. Most of the OBER programs are planned and administered jointly by the staff of two or all three of the divisions. This summary book provides information on research supported in these program areas during Fiscal Years 1996 and 1997.

  9. Brookhaven National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY2001--FY2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.

    2000-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory in the Department of Energy National Laboratory system and plays a lead role in the DOE Science and Technology mission. The Laboratory also contributes to the DOE missions in Energy Resources, Environmental Quality, and National Security. Brookhaven strives for excellence in its science research and in facility operations and manages its activities with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. The Laboratory's programs are aligned continuously with the goals and objectives of the DOE through an Integrated Planning Process. This Institutional Plan summarizes the portfolio of research and capabilities that will assure success in the Laboratory's mission in the future. It also sets forth BNL strategies for our programs and for management of the Laboratory. The Department of Energy national laboratory system provides extensive capabilities in both world class research expertise and unique facilities that cannot exist without federal support. Through these national resources, which are available to researchers from industry, universities, other government agencies and other nations, the Department advances the energy, environmental, economic and national security well being of the US, provides for the international advancement of science, and educates future scientists and engineers.

  10. Is Qualitative Research Second Class Science? A Quantitative Longitudinal Examination of Qualitative Research in Medical Journals

    OpenAIRE

    Shuval, K.; Harker, K.; Roudsari, B; Groce, N. E.; Mills, B.; Siddiqi, Z.; Shachak, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Qualitative research appears to be gaining acceptability in medical journals. Yet, little is actually known about the proportion of qualitative research and factors affecting its publication. This study describes the proportion of qualitative research over a 10 year period and correlates associated with its publication. Design: A quantitative longitudinal examination of the proportion of original qualitative research in 67 journals of general medicine during a 10 year period (1998...

  11. The two revolutions in bio-medical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai R. Singh

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available In the field of modern medical science, we can identify certain epochs. Some of these will be our concern here, for they offer important insights into the development of modern medicine and offer equally important predictors of where it is heading in the future. In fact they are so important that they qualify to be called nothing less than revolutions.Till the early twentieth century, medicine was an activity dependent on a small privileged elite. This changed by the mid-twentieth century into a vast publicly owned enterprise with enlightened governmental approach, support and funding. One example of this was in the 1940s, sixty five years ago, when Vannever Bush in the US, for example, persuaded the government there to divert resources allocated for the then war effort (World War II to fund basic research in academic institutions. Similarly, in India, what was earlier dependent on the benevolence of zamindars/philanthropists and some missionaries who set up charitable dispensaries/hospitals to serve certain sections of the population was supplemented, and then overtaken, by governmental funding after independence in 1947.This major governmental support to medical science was an important development that led to great advances in medical research and facilities all over. Such funding and consequent blossoming of medical science was nothing less than a revolution, which we can legitimately consider the first revolution in modern medicine.A second revolution was soon to follow four decades later. It was fuelled by a vast upsurge in medical research, training and therapy, with capital pouring in from private enterprise and philanthropy. This revolution is still on. It is aided by efforts like the Bayh-Dole Amendments of 1980 in the US, for example. This epoch making amendment conferred intellectual property rights to institutions and connected scientists even if they had developed their products/inventions with government funding. It was followed

  12. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual report 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research during 1978 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory, is summarized. Studies related to nuclear energy include responses of beagles to continuous low-level 60Co gamma radiation, and development of leukemic indicators; comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low-level neutron and 60Co gamma radiation; genetic effects of high LET radiations; and metabolic and therapeutic studies of heavy metals. Studies of nonnuclear energy sources deal with characterization and toxicological evaluation of effluents of fluidized bed combustion and coal gasification; electrical storage systems; electric fields associated with energy transmission; and development of population projection models and assessment of human risk. Basic research studies include fundamental structural and biophysical investigations; circadian rhythms; mutagenesis in bacteria and mammalian cells; cell killing, damage, and repair in mammalian cells; carcinogenesis and cocarcinogenesis; the use of liposomes as biological carriers; and studies of environmental influences on life-span, physiological performance, and circadian cycles. In the area of medical development, proteins in urine and tissues of normal and diseased humans are analyzed, and advanced analytical procedures for use of stable isotopes in clinical research and diagnosis are developed and applied. The final sections of the report cover support facilities, educational activities, the seminar program, staff talks, and staff publications

  13. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual report 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.W. (ed.)

    1978-01-01

    The research during 1978 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory, is summarized. Studies related to nuclear energy include responses of beagles to continuous low-level /sup 60/Co gamma radiation, and development of leukemic indicators; comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low-level neutron and /sup 60/Co gamma radiation; genetic effects of high LET radiations; and metabolic and therapeutic studies of heavy metals. Studies of nonnuclear energy sources deal with characterization and toxicological evaluation of effluents of fluidized bed combustion and coal gasification; electrical storage systems; electric fields associated with energy transmission; and development of population projection models and assessment of human risk. Basic research studies include fundamental structural and biophysical investigations; circadian rhythms; mutagenesis in bacteria and mammalian cells; cell killing, damage, and repair in mammalian cells; carcinogenesis and cocarcinogenesis; the use of liposomes as biological carriers; and studies of environmental influences on life-span, physiological performance, and circadian cycles. In the area of medical development, proteins in urine and tissues of normal and diseased humans are analyzed, and advanced analytical procedures for use of stable isotopes in clinical research and diagnosis are developed and applied. The final sections of the report cover support facilities, educational activities, the seminar program, staff talks, and staff publications.

  14. Research trends in biomimetic medical materials for tissue engineering: commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki Dong; Wang, Xiumei; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Kyung Min; Zhang, ShengMin; Noh, Insup

    2016-01-01

    We introduce our active experts' communications and reviews (Part II) of 2015 Korea-China Joint Symposium on Biomimetic Medical Materials in Republic of Korea, which reflect their perspectives on current research trends of biomimetic medical materials for tissue regeneration in both Korea and China. The communications covered three topics of biomimetics, i.e., 1) hydrogel for therapeutics and extracellular matrix environments, 2) design of electrical polymers for communications between electrical sources and biological systems and 3) design of biomaterials for nerve tissue engineering. The reviews in the Part II will cover biomimetics of 3D bioprinting materials, surface modifications, nano/micro-technology as well as clinical aspects of biomaterials for cartilage. PMID:27026826

  15. Competition in health research: the experience of the John Curtin School of Medical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Judith A

    2005-03-16

    BACKGROUND: In 2002 the Australian National Competitive Grants System was opened to the Institute of Advanced Studies at the Australian National University as part of a commitment to transparency, competitiveness, and collaboration in national research funding. RESULTS: The block grant to the John Curtin School of Medical Research had progressively eroded over many years. Access to the National Competitive Grants Schemes and associated infrastructure (through an agreed 'buy-in' price of 20% of block funding) has succeeded in its aims and in reversing this progressive effective decrease in funding. CONCLUSION: Access to the National Competitive Grant Scheme has allowed the John Curtin School of Medical Research to contribute more broadly to Australia's health and medical research effort through increased collaboration, in a transparent and competitive funding environment. PMID:15771773

  16. Ethik in der Medizinischen Ausbildungsforschung [Ethics in medical education research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marienhagen, Jörg

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available [english] Research ethics criteria that are used for reviewing clinical trials are also applicable to research designs used within the field of medical education. Especially the principles of nonmaleficence, informed consent, and freedom to participate are relevant in this area of research. Due to the high impact of university education on tomorrow’s doctors, high-quality ethical and methodological standards are essential in medical education research. A responsible handling of ethical problems in the area of medical education research requires careful handling of issues concerning participants, informed consent, and the methodology used. As it is obligatory in clinical trials, risk-benefit and cost-performance analyses have to be a part of the complete process, from the planning phase onwards, to avoid potential harm to the participants. Every publication of study results should contain information about the methodology used and the reliability of the data. It is important that the contribution of all mentioned co-authors becomes clear. The authors recommend the constitution of an ethics committee within the German Association for Medical Education (Gesellschaft für Medizinische Ausbildung, GMA to support researchers and to meet the interests of all groups involved. Additionally, more and more journals dealing with publications in the area of medical education demand an ethical statement as part of their publication requirements. The GMA is called on to establish such a committee to secure ethical standards for medical education research. [german] Es zeigt sich, dass forschungsethische Kriterien wie in medikamentösen Interventionsstudien auch in der Ausbildungsforschung sinnvoll und ohne große Einschnitte ins Studiendesign applizierbar sind. Das Nichtschadensprinzip, die informierte Einwilligung und Freiwilligkeit der Teilnahme stehen hierbei im Vordergrund. Aus dem hohen Stellenwert der Ausbildung für Studierende begründet sich ein

  17. Canadian Neutron Source (CNS): a research reactor solution for medical isotopes and neutrons for science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation describes a dual purpose research facility at the University of Saskatchewan for Canada for the production of medical isotopes and neutrons for scientific research. The proposed research reactor is intended to supply most of Canada's medical isotope requirements and provide a neutron source for Canada's research community. Scientific research would include materials research, biomedical research and imaging.

  18. Has the commercialisation of medical research gone too far?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R. Barker

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Government policy has been complicit in the increasing role of commercial companies in research, which in turn have little incentive to share the benefits of research. As a result, huge swathes of medical research rely on commercialisation and related patent protection in order to thrive. There is a distinct lack of evidence that commercialisation has led to an improvement in public health, the claim of increased innovation simply does not have empirical support. Commercialisation has led to skewed benefits in favour of companies, whereby industry is using the public's resource without adequately paying for it, this imbalance may be seen as a form of exploitation. In this paper I argue that the skewed relationship between commercial and public interest needs to be addressed in order to ensure we meet healthcare needs of our patients in the future and ensuring the healthcare remains affordable. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(10.000: 2841-2843

  19. Quality of published Iranian medical education research studies: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Golnari, Pedram; Sodagari, Faezeh; Baradaran, Hamid Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Research in medical education has been paid more attention than before; however the quality of research reporting has not been comprehensively appraised. To evaluate the methodological and reporting quality of Iranian published medical education articles. Methods: Articles describing medical students, residents, fellows or program evaluation were included. Articles related to continuing medical education or faculty development, review articles and reports, and studies considering ...

  20. Research reactor production of radioisotopes for medical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 70% of all radioisotopes applied in medical diagnosis and research are currently produced in research reactors. Research reactors are also an important source of certain radioisotopes, such as 60Co, 90Y, 137Cs and 198Au, which are employed in teletherapy and brachytherapy. For regular medical applications, mainly 29 radionuclides produced in research reactors are used. These are now produced on an 'industrial scale' by many leading commercial manufacturers in industrialized countries as well as by national atomic energy establishments in developing countries. Five main neutron-induced reactions have been employed for the regular production of these radionuclides, namely: (n,γ), (n,p), (n,α), (n,γ) followed by decay, and (n, fission). In addition, the Szilard-Chalmers process has been used in low- and medium-flux research reactors to enrich the specific activity of a few radionuclides (mainly 51Cr) produced by the (n,γ) reaction. Extensive work done over the last three decades has resulted in the development of reliable and economic large-scale production methods for most of these radioisotopes and in the establishment of rigorous specifications and purity criteria for their manifold applications in medicine. A useful spectrum of other radionuclides with suitable half-lives and low to medium toxicity can be produced in research reactors, with the requisite purity and specific activity and at a reasonable cost, to be used as tracers. Thanks to the systematic work done in recent years by many radiopharmaceutical scientists, the radionuclides of several elements, such as arsenic, selenium, rhenium, ruthenium, palladium, cadmium, tellurium, antimony, platinum, lead and the rare earth elements, which until recently were considered 'exotic' in the biomedical field, are now gaining attention. (author)

  1. Facilities for Research and Development of Medical Radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is carried out by KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) to construct the basic facilities for development and production of medical radioisotope. For the characteristics of radiopharmaceuticals, the facilities should be complied with the radiation shield and GMP(Good Manufacturing Practice) guideline. The KAERI, which has carried out the research and development of the radiopharmaceuticals, made a design of these facilities and built them in the HANARO Center and opened the technique and facilities to the public to give a foundation for research and development of the radiopharmaceuticals. In the facilities, radiation shielding utilities and GMP instruments were set up and their operating manuals were documented. Every utilities and instruments were performed the test to confirm their efficiency and the approval for use of the facilities will be achieved from MOST(Ministry of Science and Technology). It is expected to be applied in development of therapeutic radioisotope such as Re-188 generator and Ho-166, as well as Tc-99m generator and Sr-89 chloride for medical use. And it also looks forward to the contribution to the related industry through the development of product in high demand and value

  2. Seeing is believing: good graphic design principles for medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Susan P; Bancken, Fabrice; Crowe, Brenda; Soukup, Mat; Botsis, Taxiarchis; Forshee, Richard

    2015-09-30

    Have you noticed when you browse a book, journal, study report, or product label how your eye is drawn to figures more than to words and tables? Statistical graphs are powerful ways to transparently and succinctly communicate the key points of medical research. Furthermore, the graphic design itself adds to the clarity of the messages in the data. The goal of this paper is to provide a mechanism for selecting the appropriate graph to thoughtfully construct quality deliverables using good graphic design principles. Examples are motivated by the efforts of a Safety Graphics Working Group that consisted of scientists from the pharmaceutical industry, Food and Drug Administration, and academic institutions. PMID:26112209

  3. Some results of medical researches at Ulba Metallurgical Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of 45-years medical researches at beryllium production of Ulba Metallurgical Plant are summarized in this report. Statistic data on different kinds of occupational diseases, related to beryllium production and the dynamics of changing occupational diseases with the development of beryllium production, are given there. Data on average duration of life of occupational disease patients are presented in the report. It includes the description of problems, related to berylliosis diagnosis. Issues, connected to beryllium production effect on health of man, located nearby beryllium production are also discussed there as well. (author)

  4. Some results of medical researches at Ulba Metallurgical Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemieva, G.I.; Novikov, V.G.; Savchuk, V.V. [Ulba Metallurgical Plant, Ust-Kamenogorsk (Kazakhstan)

    1998-01-01

    The results of 45-years medical researches at beryllium production of Ulba Metallurgical Plant are summarized in this report. Statistic data on different kinds of occupational diseases, related to beryllium production and the dynamics of changing occupational diseases with the development of beryllium production, are given there. Data on average duration of life of occupational disease patients are presented in the report. It includes the description of problems, related to berylliosis diagnosis. Issues, connected to beryllium production effect on health of man, located nearby beryllium production are also discussed there as well. (author)

  5. Evaluation of the medical student research programme in Norwegian medical schools. A survey of students and supervisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tømmerås Karin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Medical Student Research Programme is a national education and grant scheme for medical students who wish to carry out research in parallel with their studies. The purpose of the programme is to increase recruitment of people with a standard medical degree to medical research. The Research Programme was established in 2002 and underwent a thorough evaluation during the spring of 2007. The evaluation should investigate if the programme had fulfilled its objectives of increased recruitment to medical research, in addition to the students' and supervisors' satisfaction of the programme, and unwanted differences between the universities. Methods Data was collected from students, supervisors and administrative staff via web-based questionnaires. Information about admission, implementation, results achieved and satisfaction was analysed and compared between the four Norwegian medical schools. In addition, the position of the scheme in relation to the national Quality Reform of Higher Education was analysed. Results At the end of 2006, the Medical Student Research Programme had recruited 265 medical students to research. These consisted of 214 active students, 35 who had completed their studies and only 17 who had dropped out. Both students and supervisors were generally very satisfied with the scheme, including the curriculum, the results achieved and the administrative service. The majority of students wanted to continue their research towards a PhD and, of those who had completed the Medical Student Research Programme, practically all had published one or several scientific papers. The survey showed only small differences between the four medical schools, despite their choice of somewhat different solutions in terms of administration and organisation. The Medical Student Research Programme satisfies the majority of the demands of the Quality Reform, however as an integrated research programme aimed at a PhD it presupposes

  6. Research and Medical Study in Iran: New Proposals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Beiraghdar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir;Thank you for the opportunity to present our views in the Hepatitis Monthly and through this letter. We genuinely enjoyed the informative and instructive article by Professor Bagheri Lankarani (1, the Iranian Minister of Health & Medical Education and the chairman of Hepatitis Monthly, on the current status of research in our country and the future perspectives. In this article, a number of directions have been proposed by the minister for changing some improper methods that are currently practiced mostly in research areas in our country, in order to employ the available limited resources to achieve greater goals. Moreover, he focused on the importance of scorings awarded by highly referred scientific databanks, i.e. "ISI web of knowledge", to Iran's scientific production volume, as a sign of the country's science production activity.As mentioned above, one of the very most important issues that were noted in the article was the fact that our financial resources for medical research are limited; so we should carefully manage their utilization in the most significant local problems of our country. Unfortunately, there is no scoring system in the world that measures the relevance and problem-solving potency of articles for regional health concerns In fact, also it is very important, even for developing countries, to move toward exploring basic sciences and to use them in clinical practices, it seems that in several countries, mostly developing ones, research funds are being used in the areas which are not of relevance in local perspectives. Fortunately in our country, researches have recently been more aimed at local health interests of our own nation, most notably in hepatology and virology (2-4, because of the existence of powerful research centers and scientists as well as the strong support from health authorities. However, several important issues in some other branches of health have still not been addressed as they deserved. For

  7. Medical workstations for applied imaging and graphics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehricke, H H; Grunert, T; Buck, T; Kolb, R; Skalej, M

    1994-01-01

    We present a medical workstation for the efficient implementation of research ideas related to image processing and computer graphics. Based on standard hardware platforms the software system encompasses two major components: A turnkey application system provides a functionally kernel for a broad community of clinical users working with digital imaging devices, including methods of noise suppression, interactive and automatic segmentation, 3D surface reconstruction and multi-modal registration. A development toolbox allows new algorithms and applications to be efficiently implemented and consistently integrated with the common framework of the turnkey system. The platform is based on an elaborate object class structure describing objects for image processing, computer graphics, study handling and user interface control. Thus expertise of computer scientists familiar with this application domain is brought into the hospital and can be readily used by clinical researchers. PMID:7850734

  8. Photodynamic research at Baylor University Medical Center Dallas, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Aronoff, Billie L.; Judy, Millard M.

    1993-03-01

    We received our first CO2 laser at Baylor University Medical Center in December 1974, following a trip to Israel in January of that year. Discussion with the customs office of the propriety of charging an 18% import tax lasted for nine months. We lost that argument. Baylor has been using lasers of many types for many procedures since that time. About ten years ago, through the kindness of Tom Dougherty and Roswell Park, we started working with photodynamic therapy, first with hematoporphyrin I and later with dihematoporphyrin ether (II). In February 1984, we were invited to a conference at Los Alamos, New Mexico, U.S.A. on medical applications of the free electron laser as part of the Star Wars Program. A grant application from Baylor was approved that November, but funding did not start for many months. This funding contributed to the development of a new research center as part of Baylor Research Institute. Many of the projects investigated at Baylor dealt with applications of the free electron laser (FEL), after it became available. A staff was assembled and many projects are still ongoing. I would like to outline those which are in some way related to photodynamic therapy.

  9. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes research during 1981 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Low Level Radiation include comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, delineation of the responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, elucidation of mechanisms of radiation damage and repair in mammalian cells, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiations. Carcinogenesis research addresses mechanisms of tumor initiation and promotion in rat liver, chemical carcinogenesis in cultured mammalian cells, and molecular and genetic mechanisms of chemical and ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteria. Research in Toxicology uses a variety of cellular, whole animal, and chronobiological end points, chemical separations, and statistical models to evaluate the hazards and mechanisms of actions of metals, coal gasification by products, and other energy-related pollutants. Human Protein Index studies develop two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other disease. Biophysics research includes fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and key biological molecules using NMR, crystallographic, and x-ray and neutron small-angle scattering techniques. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies

  10. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.W. (ed.)

    1982-06-01

    This report summarizes research during 1981 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Low Level Radiation include comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, delineation of the responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, elucidation of mechanisms of radiation damage and repair in mammalian cells, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiations. Carcinogenesis research addresses mechanisms of tumor initiation and promotion in rat liver, chemical carcinogenesis in cultured mammalian cells, and molecular and genetic mechanisms of chemical and ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteria. Research in Toxicology uses a variety of cellular, whole animal, and chronobiological end points, chemical separations, and statistical models to evaluate the hazards and mechanisms of actions of metals, coal gasification by products, and other energy-related pollutants. Human Protein Index studies develop two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other disease. Biophysics research includes fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and key biological molecules using NMR, crystallographic, and x-ray and neutron small-angle scattering techniques. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  11. The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary

  12. The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, M.

    1991-12-18

    The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary.

  13. The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility comprises a 50 MeV traveling wave electron linear accelerator utilizing a high gradient, photo-excited, raidofrequency electron gun as an injector and an experimental area for study of new acceleration methods or advanced radiation sources using free electron lasers. Early operation of the linear accelerator system including calculated and measured beam parameters are presented together with the experimental program for accelerator physics and free electron laser studies

  14. Division of Biological and Medical Research research summary 1984-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Biological and Medical Research at Argonne National Laboratory conducts multidisciplinary research aimed at defining the biological and medical hazards to man from energy technologies and new energy options. These technically oriented studies have a strong base in fundamental research in a variety of scientific disciplines, including molecular and cellular biology, biophysics, genetics, radiobiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, chemistry, environmental toxicology, and epidemiology. This research summary is organized into six parts. The first five parts reflect the Divisional structure and contain the scientific program chapters, which summarize the activities of the individual groups during the calendar year 1984 and the first half of 1985. To provide better continuity and perspective, previous work is sometimes briefly described. Although the summaries are short, efforts have been made to indicate the range of research activities for each group

  15. Division of Biological and Medical Research research summary 1984-1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, S.H. (ed.)

    1985-08-01

    The Division of Biological and Medical Research at Argonne National Laboratory conducts multidisciplinary research aimed at defining the biological and medical hazards to man from energy technologies and new energy options. These technically oriented studies have a strong base in fundamental research in a variety of scientific disciplines, including molecular and cellular biology, biophysics, genetics, radiobiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, chemistry, environmental toxicology, and epidemiology. This research summary is organized into six parts. The first five parts reflect the Divisional structure and contain the scientific program chapters, which summarize the activities of the individual groups during the calendar year 1984 and the first half of 1985. To provide better continuity and perspective, previous work is sometimes briefly described. Although the summaries are short, efforts have been made to indicate the range of research activities for each group.

  16. Introduction to Medical Research Council Delivery Plan during 2009 to 2014

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The Medical Research Foundation is the Medical Research Council's (MRC) independently managed charity.It receives funds from the giving public to support medical research, training, public engagement and dissemination of knowledge.Since it was first established in 1920, the MRC has been able to accept charitable bequests, endowments and donations from the public to contribute towards the costs of the research that it undertakes.The MRC registered these charitable funds with the Charity Commission in the late 1960's and its charity - the Medical Research Foundation-has been successfully supporting medical research for over 80 years.

  17. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.W. (ed.)

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes research during 1982 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Carcinogenesis address mechanisms of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis including the processes of tumor initiation and promotion. The studies employ rat liver and mouse skin models as well as human rodent cell culture systems. The use of liposomes for metal mobilization is also explored. Low Level Radiation studies include delineation of the hematopoietic and other responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiation. Molecular Biology research develops two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other diseases. Fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and other key proteins are included, as are studies of cell growth, and of molecular and cellular effects of solar uv light. Research in Toxicology uses cellular, physiological, whole animal, and chronobiological end points and chemical separations to elucidate mechanisms and evaluate hazards of coal conversion by-products, actinides, and toxic metals. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  18. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes research during 1982 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Carcinogenesis address mechanisms of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis including the processes of tumor initiation and promotion. The studies employ rat liver and mouse skin models as well as human rodent cell culture systems. The use of liposomes for metal mobilization is also explored. Low Level Radiation studies include delineation of the hematopoietic and other responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiation. Molecular Biology research develops two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other diseases. Fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and other key proteins are included, as are studies of cell growth, and of molecular and cellular effects of solar uv light. Research in Toxicology uses cellular, physiological, whole animal, and chronobiological end points and chemical separations to elucidate mechanisms and evaluate hazards of coal conversion by-products, actinides, and toxic metals. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies

  19. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual report, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research during 1980 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory, is summarized. Research related to nuclear energy includes the delineation, in the beagle, of the responses to continuous low level 60Co gamma radiation and the development of cellular indicators of preclinical phases of leukemia; comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and 60Co gamma radiation; studies of the genetic effects of high LET radiations; and studies of the gastrointestinal absorption of the actinide elements. Research related to nonuclear energy sources deals with characterization and toxicological evaluation of process streams and effluents of coal gasification; with electrical storage systems; and electric fields associated with energy transmission. Proteins in human urine and selected tissues are examined by two-dimensional electrophoresis to detect disease and pollutant related changes. Assessment of human risk associated with nuclearing collective dose commitment will result in more attention being paid to potential releases of radionuclides at relatively short times after disposal

  20. Radiation regulation and security in a medical research institute setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientists within the Medical Research Community are a collaborative group, with publications often showing authors of different organisations and/or countries. Work within a medical research institute is also a multicultural affair and there are scientists and students from all over the world. Scientists now visit different labs, either as part of their training or as part of collaborations to undertake a set of experiments and then leave again a few weeks later, often back overseas making for quite a mobile community. This can lead to regulatory and security issues for organisations not just in radiation but also in biosecurity fields. Regulation and security is not high on the agenda for scientists, who are used to sharing techniques, knowledge and information. The best scientists are often those who think laterally and who will try something different. Their need is usually immediate and delays cost precious research time in a very competitive world where grant funding is short and limited and overseas organisations may not have similar restraints. The idea of needing licences to undertake radiation work (QLD Act 1999), was not accepted easily by the scientific community nor is the continuing need to wait on amendments to their licence or the organisations Possession Licence when a new isotope would just answer that quick question raised by the reviewer in order to have their paper accepted for publication. With the ARPANSA requirements for high energy sources, scientists who have been using an irradiator since 2002 now find they are required to undergo identity checks and go through heightened security procedures to access the facility. Research has moved from looking at individual genes and proteins mainly using S35 and P32 easily shielded with Perspex for the quantities in use, to attempting to cure cancers in animal models with radionuclide linked antibodies, often high energy short lived isotopes such as Lu177, or imaging with F18-FDG. Research institutes

  1. Brookhaven highlights, fiscal year 1985, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory are briefly discussed. These include work at the National Synchrotron Light Source, the High Flux Beam Reactor, and the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Areas of research include heavy ion reactions, neutrino oscillations, low-level waste, nuclear data, medicine, biology, chemistry, parallel computing, optics. Also provided are general and administrative news, a financial report. (LEW)

  2. Brookhaven highlights, fiscal year 1985, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory are briefly discussed. These include work at the National Synchrotron Light Source, the High Flux Beam Reactor, and the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Areas of research include heavy ion reactions, neutrino oscillations, low-level waste, nuclear data, medicine, biology, chemistry, parallel computing, optics. Also provided are general and administrative news, a financial report

  3. Screening for depression in medical research: ethical challenges and recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheehan Aisling M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the important role of depression in major illnesses, screening measures for depression are commonly used in medical research. The protocol for managing participants with positive screens is unclear and raises ethical concerns. The aim of this article is to identify and critically discuss the ethical issues that arise when a positive screen for depression is detected, and offer some guidance on managing these issues. Discussion Deciding on whether to report positive screens to healthcare practitioners is both an ethical and a pragmatic dilemma. Evidence suggests that reporting positive depression screens should only be considered in the context of collaborative care. Possible adverse effects, such as the impact of false-positive results, potentially inappropriate labelling, and potentially inappropriate treatment also need to be considered. If possible, the psychometric properties of the selected screening measure should be determined in the target population, and a threshold for depression that minimises the rate of false-positive results should be chosen. It should be clearly communicated to practitioners that screening scores are not diagnostic for depression, and they should be informed about the diagnostic accuracy of the measure. Research participants need to be made aware of the consequences of the detection of high scores on screening measures, and to be fully informed about the implications of the research protocol. Summary Further research is needed and the experiences of researchers, participants, and practitioners need to be collated before the value of reporting positive screens for depression can be ascertained. In developing research protocols, the ethical challenges highlighted should be considered. Participants must be agreeable to the agreed protocol and efforts should be made to minimise potentially adverse effects.

  4. Clinical research and the development of medical therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antman, Elliott M

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research plays a central role in the development of medical therapeutics, but the current system is estimated to take 10-15 years from initial discovery to regulatory approval, at a cost of approximately US$1 billion. Contrast the paths by which 2 anticoagulant options for atrial fibrillation were discovered and ultimately established as treatment options in clinical medicine. Warfarin was discovered by serendipity and compared with placebo in relatively small trials; this was associated with a low cost of development. The new oral anticoagulants were synthesized to provide highly specific, targeted inhibition of critical steps in the coagulation system. They were compared with warfarin for prevention of stroke and systemic embolic events in large, phase 3 trials; this resulted in very expensive development programs. Neither of these paths is desirable for future development of therapeutics. We need to focus on innovative approaches at the preclinical level (systems approach, greater use of inducible pluripotent stem cells, use of novel bioengineering platforms) and clinical trial level (adaptive design, greater use of new and emerging technology). Focusing on disruptive innovations for development of medical therapeutics has the potential to bring us closer to the goal of precision medicine where safer, more effective treatments are discovered in a more efficient system. PMID:24837573

  5. The Medical Science Research and Development Supported by the Korea Science and Engineering Foundation

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Tae-Sun; Han, Jin; Kim, Seong-Yong; Rhee, Byoung-Doo; Kim, Myung-Suk

    2005-01-01

    This study examined ways of promoting research in the medical sciences by evaluating trends in research funding, and the present status of research funding by the Korea Science and Engineering Foundation (KOSEF). This study analyzed statistics from KOSEF from 1978 to 2003 to examine support for research. In medical science field, group-based programs receive more funding than do individual-based programs. The proportion of research funds allocated to the medical sciences has increased markedl...

  6. Integrating medical and research information: a big data approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilve Álvarez, Carlos M; Ayora Pais, Alberto; Ruíz Romero, Cristina; Llamas Gómez, Daniel; Carrajo García, Lino; Blanco García, Francisco J; Vázquez González, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Most of the information collected in different fields by Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de A Coruña (INIBIC) is classified as unstructured due to its high volume and heterogeneity. This situation, linked to the recent requirement of integrating it to the medical information, makes it necessary to implant specific architectures to collect and organize it before it can be analysed. The purpose of this article is to present the Hadoop framework as a solution to the problem of integrating research information in the Business Intelligence field. This framework can collect, explore, process and structure the aforementioned information, which allow us to develop an equivalent function to a data mart in an Intelligence Business system. PMID:25991244

  7. Research on medical image encryption in telemedicine systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yin; Wang, Huanzhen; Zhou, Zixia; Jin, Ziyi

    2016-04-29

    Recently, advances in computers and high-speed communication tools have led to enhancements in remote medical consultation research. Laws in some localities require hospitals to encrypt patient information (including images of the patient) before transferring the data over a network. Therefore, developing suitable encryption algorithms is quite important for modern medicine. This paper demonstrates a digital image encryption algorithm based on chaotic mapping, which uses the no-period and no-convergence properties of a chaotic sequence to create image chaos and pixel averaging. Then, the chaotic sequence is used to encrypt the image, thereby improving data security. With this method, the security of data and images can be improved. PMID:27163302

  8. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A. [eds.

    1995-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory.

  9. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory's operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory

  10. A horizon of medical education research approach in 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhendu Dutta

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The author is a reviewer of various peer reviewed journals and during the review of the medical education research manuscript was observed that many novice of the field of medical education research do not follow the scientific steps of the medical education research. Therefore, this paper is aimed to reflect the essence of medical education research approach and to help the novice medical education research investigators to design the project in scientific approach. An intensive review is made on the available printed and online resources. The resources were mainly on the social science and medical education research methodologies. Medical education research steps must follow the various steps of social science research methodology. Due to various reasons case study methodology became popular approach in medical education. The case study comprises of interview survey, questionnaire survey, participant observation and documentary analysis. To overcome the inherent weakness of the non-experimental subjective research, triangulation methodology is being used in recent years. Case study approach is the best way to explore the research issues of the medical education. The triangulation methodology must be applied to overcome the inherent subjectivity of the research approach. This paper may be used as a guide to design the various steps of case study research approach in medical education.

  11. Analysing the Research Articles Published in Three Periodicals of Medical Librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiqi, Zhang

    1995-01-01

    Reports findings from a bibliometric study of research articles published in the "Bulletin of the Medical Library Association," the "Journal of the Japan Medical Library Association," and the "Medical Information Services" from 1990 to 1992. Subject categories, length of articles, methods of research, and number of references are examined.…

  12. An International Basic Science and Clinical Research Summer Program for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramjiawan, Bram; Pierce, Grant N.; Anindo, Mohammad Iffat Kabir; AlKukhun, Abedalrazaq; Alshammari, Abdullah; Chamsi, Ahmad Talal; Abousaleh, Mohannad; Alkhani, Anas; Ganguly, Pallab K.

    2012-01-01

    An important part of training the next generation of physicians is ensuring that they are exposed to the integral role that research plays in improving medical treatment. However, medical students often do not have sufficient time to be trained to carry out any projects in biomedical and clinical research. Many medical students also fail to…

  13. Final report of the group research. Advanced Technology for Medical Imaging Research. 1996-2000 FY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report involves the organization of the research groups (4 units of radiopharmaceutical chemistry, radiotracer and radiopharmacology, clinical imaging, and molecular informative research), 5 research reports and 38 published research papers. The research reports concern Fundamental researches on the availability and production of PET radiopharmaceuticals using the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) cyclotron, Design and evaluation of in vivo radiopharmaceuticals for PET measurement (kinetics and metabolism in small animals and primates), Fundamental studies on development of technique radiation measurement, Clinical application of medical imaging technology in the fields of neuroscience, cardiovascular, cancer diagnosis and others, and A study to establish and evaluate a lung cancer screening system using spiral CT units which is in pilot-progress in Kanto and Kansai regions. (N.I.)

  14. Summaries of fiscal year 1994 projects in medical applications and biophysical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides information on the research supported in Fiscal Year 1994 by the Medical Applications and Biophysical Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. A brief statement of the scope of the following areas is presented: dosimetry; measurement science; radiological and chemical physics; structural biology; human genome; and medical applications. Summaries of the research projects in these categories are presented

  15. Symposium 'methodology in medical education research' organised by the Methodology in Medical Education Research Committee of the German Society of Medical Education May, 25th to 26th 2013 at Charité, Berlin

    OpenAIRE

    Schüttpelz-Brauns, Katrin; Kiessling, Claudia; Ahlers, Olaf; Hautz, Wolf E.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, the Methodology in Medical Education Research Committee ran a symposium on “Research in Medical Education” as part of its ongoing faculty development activities. The symposium aimed to introduce to participants educational research methods with a specific focus on research in medical education. Thirty-five participants were able to choose from workshops covering qualitative methods, quantitative methods and scientific writing throughout the one and a half days. The symposium’s evalua...

  16. Polarization in inclusive production at Brookhaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Brookhaven, Λ's are produced polarized in p-p interactions perpendicular to a horizontal production plane defined by proton-unit vector x Λ-unit vector with their spins pointing down roughly twice as often as up, for a 1 GeV/c transverse Λ momentum. Such a large effect must indicate a simplicity in the underlying dynamics of particle production, even at low transverse momentum. Four BNL experiments are discussed in the context of experiments done at other energies with respect to present (lack of) understanding of the origin of the effect. 3 figures

  17. Transverse beam dampers for the Brookhaven AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide band damper system has been developed for the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The system consists of two sets of PUE pickups, analog and digital processing electronics, four 500 Watt wide band power amplifiers, and two pairs of strip line deflectors. The system is currently used to damp transverse coherent instabilities and injection errors, in both planes, for protons and all species of Heavy Ions. This paper discusses the system design and operation, focusing on the engineering considerations and problems encountered in the actual implementation. Operational data from both protons and Heavy Ion beams is presented

  18. Challenges of the Health Research System in a Medical Research Institute in Iran: A Qualitative Content Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Medical research institute is the main basis for knowledge production through conducting research, and paying attention to the research is one of the most important things in the scientific communities. At present, there is a large gap between knowledge production in Iran compared to that in other countries. This study aimed to identify the challenge of research system in a research institute of medical sciences in Iran. Matherials and Methods: This was a descriptive and q...

  19. Retrospective review of the clinical BNCT trial at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, A.Z.; Chanana, A.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Ma, R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Medical Department, Upton, NY (United States)

    2000-10-01

    The primary objective of the phase I/II dose escalation studies was to evaluate the safety of the boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F) mediated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in subjects with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). A secondary objective was to retrospectively assess the palliation of GBM by BNCT. Fifty-three subjects with GBM were treated under multiple dose escalation protocols at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Twenty-six subjects were treated using one field, 17 subjects were treated using 2 fields and 10 subjects were treated using 3 fields. BPA-F related toxicity was not observed. The maximum radiation dose to a volume of approximately 1 cc of the normal brain varied from 8.9 to 15.9 gray-equivalent (Gy-Eq). The volume-weighted average radiation dose to normal brain varied from 1.9 to 9.5 Gy-Eq. Six RTOG (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) grade 3 or 4 toxicities were attributed to BNCT. Four of the 53 subjects are still alive with 3 of them free of recurrent disease with over two years follow-up. The median times to progression and median survival time from diagnosis were 28.4 weeks and 12.8 months respectively. (author)

  20. Retrospective review of the clinical BNCT trial at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of the phase I/II dose escalation studies was to evaluate the safety of the boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F) mediated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in subjects with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). A secondary objective was to retrospectively assess the palliation of GBM by BNCT. Fifty-three subjects with GBM were treated under multiple dose escalation protocols at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Twenty-six subjects were treated using one field, 17 subjects were treated using 2 fields and 10 subjects were treated using 3 fields. BPA-F related toxicity was not observed. The maximum radiation dose to a volume of approximately 1 cc of the normal brain varied from 8.9 to 15.9 gray-equivalent (Gy-Eq). The volume-weighted average radiation dose to normal brain varied from 1.9 to 9.5 Gy-Eq. Six RTOG (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) grade 3 or 4 toxicities were attributed to BNCT. Four of the 53 subjects are still alive with 3 of them free of recurrent disease with over two years follow-up. The median times to progression and median survival time from diagnosis were 28.4 weeks and 12.8 months respectively. (author)

  1. Research priorities in medical education at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences: categories and subcategories in the Iranian context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PARISA NABEIEI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Research in education is a globally significant issue without a long history. Due to the importance of the issue in Health System Development programs, this study intended to determine research priorities in medical education, considering their details and functions. By determining barriers existing in research in education progress, it is tried to make research priorities more functional by recommending acceptable strategies. Methods: This is a qualitative-descriptive study in two descriptive phases. The goal of these phases was to determine research priorities subcategories in medical education by Nominal Group Technique (NGT and two rounds of Delphi method. Through the first phase, subcategories of research priorities were determined, using Nominal Group Technique under medical education experts’ supervision. Through two rounds of Delphi, a questionnaire was constructed based on the subcategories. Eventually, research priorities were determined based on their highest score (scores more than 7 out of 10. Results: In the first phase (NGT, 35 priorities in 5 major fields of medical education were presented. In the second phase, priorities were scored, using Delphi method. Medical Ethics and professionalism gained the highest scores (7.63±1.26 and educational evaluation the lowest (7.28±1.52. In this stage, 7 items were omitted but 2 of them were added again after experts’ revision in the third round of Delphi. Conclusion: According to the results of the present study and based on previous studies, it really seems that the fields of “Learning and Teaching Approaches” and “Medical Ethics and Professionalism” were more important. Because of financial and resource limitations in our country and the importance of research priorities, it is recommended to frequently study “research priorities determination program” at universities.

  2. Optimize Use of Space Research and Technology for Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnifield, Nona K.

    2012-01-01

    systems, and cutting-edge component technologies to conduct a wide range of scientific observations and measurements. These technologies are also considered for practical applications that benefit society in remarkable ways. At NASA Goddard, the technology transfer initiative promotes matching technologies from Earth and space science needs to targeted industry sectors. This requires clear knowledge of industry needs and priorities and social demands. The process entails matching mature technologies where there are known innovation challenges and good opportunities for matching technology needs. This requires creative thinking and takes commitment of time and resources. Additionally, we also look at applications for known hot industry or societal needs. Doing so has given us occasion to host discussions with representatives from industry, academia, government organizations, and societal special interest groups about the application of NASA Goddard technologies for devices used in medical monitoring and detection tools. As a result, partnerships have been established. Innovation transpired when new products were enabled because of NASA Goddard research and technology programs.

  3. Radiation exposure of fertile women in medical research studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertile women may be exposed to ionizing radiation as human subjects in medical research studies. If the woman is pregnant, such exposures may result in risk to an embryo/fetus. Fertile women may be screened for pregnancy before exposure to ionizing radiation by interview, general examination, or pregnancy test. Use of the sensitive serum pregnancy test has become common because it offers concrete evidence that the woman is not pregnant (more specifically, that an embryo is not implanted). Evidence suggests that risk to the embryo from radiation exposure before organogenesis is extremely low or nonexistent. Further, demonstrated effects on organogenesis are rare or inconclusive at fetal doses below 50 mSv (5 rem). Therefore, there may be some level of radiation exposure below which risk to the fetus may be considered essentially zero, and a serum pregnancy test is unnecessary. This paper reviews the fetal risks and suggests that consideration be given to establishing a limit to the fetus of 0.5 mSv (50 mrem), below which pregnancy screening need not include the use of a serum pregnancy test

  4. Tritium toxicity program in the Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is possible to detect somatic, cytogenetic and genetic effects resulting from exposures at 33 to 100 times the mpc's for tritiated water (HTO). The reduction in bone marrow cells in animals maintaining normal total cellularity demonstrate both the presence of an effect at the primitive cell level as well as the animal's ability to compensate for this effect by recruiting stem cells from the G0 resting state. This evidence of damage together with the observed cytogenetic changes leads one to contemplate the possible importance of radiation exposures at these levels for the induction of leukemia or other blood dyscrasias. As predicted on the basis of established principles of radiobiology, exposure to tritium beta rays from HTO ingestion results in measureable effects on several animal systems

  5. 76 FR 59407 - Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Report of Scientific and Medical Literature and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... Scientific and Medical Literature and Information on Non-Standardized Allergenic Extracts in the Diagnosis... scientific and medical literature and information concerning the use of non-standardized allergenic extracts... ``Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Report of Scientific and Medical Literature and...

  6. Endpoints in medical communication research, proposing a framework of functions and outcomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Haes, H. de; Bensing, J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The evidence base of medical communication has been underdeveloped and the field was felt to be in need for thorough empirical investigation. Studying medical communication can help to clarify what happens during medical encounters and, subsequently, whether the behavior displayed is effective. However, before effectiveness can be established, one should argue what functions or goals the communication has and what outcomes are relevant in medical communication research. RESULTS AND...

  7. Brookhaven National Laboratory ADS concepts (USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three types of accelerator driven system have been investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory: the accelerator driven energy producer (ADEP) which is intended for energy production, incineration of minor actinides (MA) and long-lived fission products (LLFP) using a small power accelerator; the Phoenix concept aimed at transmuting large amounts of MA and LLFP using a high current linear accelerator; the accelerator driven particle fuel transmutor (ADPF) which also transmutes the MA and LLFP at high rate by using a high neutron flux. The paper presents these three concepts and other related problems such as fuel and coolant materials, targets, subcriticality and safety issues, the use of Thorium cycle, and non-proliferation issue

  8. Decommissioning of small medical, industrial and research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the technical literature on decommissioning addresses the regulatory, organizational, technical and other aspects for large facilities such as nuclear power plants, reprocessing plants and relatively large prototype, research and test reactors. There are, however, a much larger number of licensed users of radioactive material in the fields of medicine, research and industry. Most of these nuclear facilities are smaller in size and complexity and may present a lower radiological risk during their decommissioning. Such facilities are located at research establishments, biological and medical laboratories, universities, medical centres, and industrial and manufacturing premises. They are often operated by users who have not been trained or are unfamiliar with the decommissioning, waste management and associated safety aspects of these types of facility at the end of their operating lives. Also, for many small users of radioactive material such as radiation sources, nuclear applications are a small part of the overall business or process and, although the operating safety requirements may be adhered to, concern or responsibility may not go much beyond this. There is concern that even the minimum requirements of decommissioning may be disregarded, resulting in avoidable delays, risks and safety implications (e.g. a loss of radioactive material and a loss of all records). Incidents have occurred in which persons have been injured or put at risk. It is recognized that the strategies and specific requirements for small facilities may be much less onerous than for large ones such as nuclear power plants or fuel processing facilities, but many of the same principles apply. There has been considerable attention given to nuclear facilities and many IAEA publications are complementary to this report. This report, however, attempts to give specific guidance for small facilities. 'Small' in this report does not necessarily mean small in size but generally modest in terms

  9. Evaluation of medical research performance – position paper of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available [english] Objective: The evaluation of medical research performance is a key prerequisite for the systematic advancement of medical faculties, research foci, academic departments, and individual scientists’ careers. However, it is often based on vaguely defined aims and questionable methods and can thereby lead to unwanted regulatory effects. The current paper aims at defining the position of German academic medicine toward the aims, methods, and consequences of its evaluation. Methods: During the Berlin Forum of the Association of the Scientific Societies in Germany (AWMF held on 18 October 2013, international experts presented data on methods for evaluating medical research performance. Subsequent discussions among representatives of relevant scientific organizations and within three ad-hoc writing groups led to a first draft of this article. Further discussions within the AWMF Committee for Evaluation of Performance in Research and Teaching and the AWMF Executive Board resulted in the final consented version presented here.Results: The AWMF recommends modifications to the current system of evaluating medical research performance. Evaluations should follow clearly defined and communicated aims and consist of both summative and formative components. Informed peer reviews are valuable but feasible in longer time intervals only. They can be complemented by objective indicators. However, the Journal Impact Factor is not an appropriate measure for evaluating individual publications or their authors. The scientific “impact” rather requires multidimensional evaluation. Indicators of potential relevance in this context may include, e.g., normalized citation rates of scientific publications, other forms of reception by the scientific community and the public, and activities in scientific organizations, research synthesis and science communication. In addition, differentiated recommendations are made for evaluating the acquisition of third

  10. Drug Interactions between Antiretroviral Medications and Medications Used in the Treatment of Drug Addiction: Research Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Khalsa, Jag H.; Elkashef, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Today substance dependence is one of the major public health problems in the world with millions of people abusing legal and illegal drugs. In addition, almost one-third of the world’s population suffers with one or more infections. Both drugs of abuse and infections are associated with serious medical and health consequences, some of which may be exacerbated by the occurrence of pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic interactions between medications used in the treatment of these conditions ...

  11. Perspectives on electronic medical records adoption: electronic medical records (EMR) in outcomes research

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Belletti; Christopher Zacker; C Daniel Mullins

    2010-01-01

    Dan Belletti1, Christopher Zacker1, C Daniel Mullins21Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 2University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Health information technology (HIT) is engineered to promote improved quality and efficiency of care, and reduce medical errors. Healthcare organizations have made significant investments in HIT tools and the electronic medical record (EMR) is a major technological advance. The Department of Veterans Affairs ...

  12. Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations in Medical Research: Perceptions and Experiences of Older Italians, Their Families, Ethics Administrators and Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Hughson, Jo-anne; Parker, Anna; Bresin, Agnese; Hajek, John; Knoch, Ute; Phan, Tuong Dien; Story, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-participation of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) patients in medical research remains a problem in migrant and refugee destination countries such as Australia. The aims of this study were to explore i) CALD persons’ perceptions and experiences of the medical system and medical research, in this case, older Italian Australians; and ii) the views of research professionals on CALD patient participation in medical research. Design and Methods A qualitative study was conducted in Melbourne, Australia, in 2015 utilising in-depth interviews and focus groups with four stakeholder groups: older Italian Australians (n=21); adult children of older Italian Australians (n=10); hospital Human Research Ethics Committee administrators (n=4); and clinical researchers (n=4). The data were analysed for content and thematic analysis. Results Themes for the CALD and family group were getting by in medical interactions; receptivity to medical research: testing the waters; and, receptivity to technology for support: passive versus active. Themes for the researcher and HREC groups about CALD patient participation in research were: exclusion; cultural factors; and e-consent. Conclusions Our findings from four stakeholder perspectives and experiences confirm that there were considerable cultural, linguistic, and resourcing barriers hindering the participation of older Italian-Australians in medical research. Furthermore, our findings showed that in this study setting there were few enabling strategies in place to address these barriers despite the national ethics guidelines for equitable participation in research. The findings informed the creation of a multimedia tool whose purpose is to address and improve representation of CALD groups in clinical research. Significance for public health Many people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds remain excluded from medical research such as clinical trials due to a range of language and

  13. Trend of knowledge production of research centers in the field of medical sciences in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falahat, K; Eftekhari, Mb; Habibi, E; Djalalinia, Sh; Peykari, N; Owlia, P; Malekafzali, H; Ghanei, M; Mojarrab, Sh

    2013-01-01

    Establishment of medical research centers at universities and health-related organizations and annually evaluation of their research activities was one of the strategic policies which followed by governmental organization in last decade in order to strengthening the connections between health research system and health system. The aim of this study is to scrutinize the role of medical research centers in medical science production in Iran. This study is a cross sectional which has been performed based on existing reports on national scientometrics and evaluation results of research performance of medical research centers between years 2001 to 2010. During last decade number of medical research centers increased from 53 in 2001 to 359 in 2010. Simultaneous scientific output of medical research centers has been increased especially articles indexed in ISI (web of science). Proper policy implementation in the field of health research system during last decades led to improving capacity building and growth knowledge production of medical science in recent years in Iran. The process embedding research into the health systems requires planning up until research products improves health outcomes and health equity in country. PMID:23865017

  14. Trend of Knowledge Production of Research Centers in the Field of Medical Sciences in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Owlia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Establishment of medical research centers at universities and health-related organizations and annually evaluation of their research activities was one of the strategic policies which followed by governmental organization in last decade in order to strengthening the connections between health research system and health system. The aim of this study is to scrutinize the role of medical research centers in medical science production in Iran. This study is a cross sectional which has been performed based on existing reports on national scientometrics and evaluation results of research performance of medical research centers between years 2001 to 2010. During last decade number of medical research centers increased from 53 in 2001 to 359 in 2010. Simultaneous scientific output of medical research centers has been increased especially articles indexed in ISI (web of science. Proper policy implementation in the field of health research system during last decades led to improving capacity building and growth knowledge production of medical science in recent years in Iran. The process embedding research into the health systems requires planning up until research products improves health outcomes and health equity in country.

  15. Productivity in medical education research: an examination of countries of origin

    OpenAIRE

    Doja, Asif; Horsley, Tanya; Sampson, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Background Productivity and countries of origin of publications within the field of medical education research have not been explored. Using bibliometric techniques we conducted an analysis of studies evaluating medical education interventions, examining the country where research originated as well as networks of authors within countries identified as ‘most productive’. Methods PubMed was used to search for evaluative studies of medical education. We then examined relative productivity of co...

  16. Medication adherence: a review of pharmacy education, research, practice and policy in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Bell JS; Enlund H; Vainio K

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To describe pharmacy education, research, practice and policy related to medication adherence in Finland since the year 2000.Methods: The three universities that provide pharmacy education (Åbo Akademi, University of Eastern Finland, and University of Helsinki) completed a structured pro-forma questionnaire regarding education related to medication adherence. A MEDLINE and EMBASE literature search was performed to identify English language peer-reviewed research that reported medication...

  17. Space The New Medical Frontier / NASA Spinoffs Milestones in Space Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Space The New Medical Frontier Past Issues / Fall 2007 ... the occasion. Photo courtesy of NIH Long-Term Space Research Until the advent of the ISS, research ...

  18. Instruction in Research-Related Topics in U.S. and Canadian Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, James R.; Baer, Lawrence J.

    1988-01-01

    A questionnaire developed and mailed to administrators of all accredited U.S., Canadian, and Puerto Rican medical schools, asked for information on courses offered in epidemiology, statistics, evaluation of medical literature, and research design. Future research should evaluate the effectiveness of such courses. (Author/MLW)

  19. Molecules, magic and forgetful fruit flies: the supernatural science of medical gas research

    OpenAIRE

    Mychaskiw George

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Medical gas research often involves the study of molecules under extraphysiologic conditions, that is, conditions that do not exist in nature. This "supernatural" nature of medical gas research sometimes produces results that appear to be almost "magic" to those schooled in traditional physiology "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic". -Arthur C. Clarke

  20. Action research to promote medical students' motivation in an English for Specific Purposes class.

    OpenAIRE

    Afsaneh Dehnad; Hayedeh Nasser

    2014-01-01

    Action research is an attempt to seek immediate solutions to the problems experienced in educational settings. In this type of research, teachers are the researchers who intend to make instant reforms to develop, and improve their teaching styles and reflect on pedagogical practices. The purpose of this study was to conduct an action research to tackle the problem of students' low motivation in English classes at the medical school of Iran University of Medical Sciences in fall 2010. Particip...

  1. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, G.L.; Paquette, D.E.; Naidu, J.R.; Lee, R.J.; Briggs, S.L.K.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1996. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and non-radiological emissions and effluents to the environment.

  2. Research Ideas for the Journal of Health & Medical Economics: Opinion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this Opinion article is to discuss some ideas that might lead to papers that are suitable for publication in the Journal of Health and Medical Economics. The suggestions include the affordability and sustainability of universal health care insurance, monitoring and managin

  3. Metafunctional Practices in Medical Research Articles: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadi, Nader; Ghassemi, Mojtaba; Madadi, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore any possible difference among the verb types chosen in articles written in English by the non-natives and natives. In so doing, Halliday's Systemic Functional Grammar (1994) was employed. 80 published articles from the medical sciences field of study were chosen from among which 40 were written by native…

  4. Foregrounding possibilities and backgrounding exploitation in transnational medical research projects in Lusaka, Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    Today medical research funded by resourceful commercial companies and philanthropic organizations increasingly takes place in much less resourceful settings across the globe. Recent academic studies of this trend have observed how global inequalities have shaped the movements of this research, and...... how human subjects who make their blood and bodies available are at risk of exploitation. In Lusaka, people expressed their fears of being used by transnational medical research projects in various idioms of concern. While such concerns were always latent, people were generally eager to join the...... inherent in transnational medical research projects are intertwined with scenarios of possibility....

  5. Rebuilding the Brookhaven high flux beam reactor: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After nearly thirty years of operation, Brookhaven's High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) is still one of the world's premier steady-state neutron sources. A major center for condensed matter studies, it currently supports fifteen separate beamlines conducting research in fields as diverse as crystallography, solid-state, nuclear and surface physics, polymer physics and structural biology and will very likely be able to do so for perhaps another decade. But beyond that point the HFBR will be running on borrowed time. Unless appropriate remedial action is taken, progressive radiation-induced embrittlement problems will eventually shut it down. Recognizing the HFBR's value as a national scientific resource, members of the Laboratory's scientific and reactor operations staffs began earlier this year to consider what could be done both to extend its useful life and to assure that it continues to provide state-of-the-art research facilities for the scientific community. This report summarizes the findings of that study. It addresses two basic issues: (i) identification and replacement of lifetime-limiting components and (ii) modifications and additions that could expand and enhance the reactor's research capabilities

  6. The U.S. Public's Investment in Medical Research: An Evolving Social Contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinig, Stephen J; Dev, Anurupa; Bonham, Ann C

    2016-01-01

    Medical researchers and their institutions are operating under extraordinary financial stress. More than a decade after completion of the 5-year doubling of the National Institutes of Health budget, the medical research community must confront a significant loss in National Institutes of Health purchasing power and downward pressures in federal discretionary spending. In part, this trend results from a federal budget stalemate over the growth in entitlement programs, particularly spending on medical care. This article considers the changing nature of the federal investment in medical research and the potential for medical researchers and institutions conducting the full spectrum of research to improve health system performance and health equity. In our view, continued federal investments reflect an evolving social contract for research serving the public good; the term contract is used metaphorically to represent a figurative, implicit agreement between the scientific community and the public's representatives in government. Under this conceptual contract, the American people--who are ultimately the funders of research, research training and infrastructure--expect outcomes that lead to better health, security or other benefits. The evolving contract includes expectations for more accountability, transparency, sharing of results and resources, and better integration of research systems and cultures that used to take pride in boundaries and distinctions. We outline here some of the major movements of organizations realigning to social support, which are increasingly essential to sustain public investment in medical research. PMID:26802760

  7. Research Workshop 1: Basics of Medical Journalism and How to Write a Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Bagheri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this workshop is to present an introduction to medical journalism and to describe current aspects of research writing and publication, examine the features that make research articles in English, communicate scientific findings effectively and efficiently, and help participants learn to identify and implement these features themselves. Topics to be covered are international scientific, technical and medical research publishing, writing to make the results easy to understand, good scientific English style, and responding to peer review.

  8. Research strategies that result in optimal data collection from the patient medical record

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, Katherine E.; Radovinsky, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Data obtained from the patient medical record are often a component of clinical research led by nurse investigators. The rigor of the data collection methods correlates to the reliability of the data and, ultimately, the analytical outcome of the study. Research strategies for reliable data collection from the patient medical record include the development of a precise data collection tool, the use of a coding manual, and ongoing communication with research staff.

  9. The Value of Learning, Researching and Publishing in Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, James A

    2007-01-01

    The skills required of a doctor are multiple, extendingacross several domains of performance: diagnosticthinking, organisation and management skills,communicating through verbal means with patients andother health care workers, writing, and a variety ofpsychomotor skills. These skills build on knowledge,and also require personal characteristics. Entry criteriafor medical schools ensure a certain level of intelligenceand knowledge, but are less able to distinguish othercapabilities. The educat...

  10. Research about Three Dimensional Reconstruction of Medical Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiechun Chen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, through comparison of different reconstruction algorithms for volume rendering, we put forward Ray Casting algorithm as the scheme of 3D reconstruction of medical image. We improved the image synthesis operator, and combined section sampling mode to reconstruct the image. Finally we rendered images on GPU. By using improved operator, we not only made the rendering speed accelerated, but also made the quality of rendering images improved.

  11. Research about Three Dimensional Reconstruction of Medical Image

    OpenAIRE

    Qiechun Chen; Guangyuan Zhang; Xin Wang; Linan Fan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, through comparison of different reconstruction algorithms for volume rendering, we put forward Ray Casting algorithm as the scheme of 3D reconstruction of medical image. We improved the image synthesis operator, and combined section sampling mode to reconstruct the image. Finally we rendered images on GPU. By using improved operator, we not only made the rendering speed accelerated, but also made the quality of rendering images improved.

  12. Research on dose setting for radiation sterilization of medical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To establish the radiation sterilization dose for medical devices using data of bioburden on the medical device. Methods: Firstly determination of recovery ratio and correction coefficient of the microbiological test method was used according to ISO11737 standard, then determination of bioburden on the products, finally the dose setting was completed based on the Method 1 in ISO11137 standard. Results: Fifteen kinds of medical devices were tested. Bioburden range was from 8.6-97271.2 CFU/device, recovery ration range 54.6%-100%, correction co-efficiency range 1.00-1.83, D10 distribution from 1.40 to 2.82 kGy, verification dose (dose at SAL = 10-2) range 5.1-17.6 kGy and sterilization dose (dose at SAL 10-6) range 17.5-32.5 kGy. Conclusion: One hundred samples of each kind of product were exposed to the pre-determined verification dose and then the sterility test was performed. Each sterility test showed positive number was not greater than two. This indicated that the sterilization dose established for each kind of product was statistically acceptable

  13. Report on the Brookhaven Solar Neutrino Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R. Jr.; Evans, J. C. Jr.

    1976-09-22

    This report is intended as a brief statement of the recent developments and results of the Brookhaven Solar Neutrino Experiment communicated through Professor G. Kocharov to the Leningrad conference on active processes on the sun and the solar neutrino problem. The report summarizes the results of experiments performed over a period of 6 years, from April 1970 to January 1976. Neutrino detection depends upon the neutrino capture reaction /sup 37/Cl(..nu..,e/sup -/)/sup 37/Ar producing the isotope /sup 37/Ar (half life of 35 days). The detector contains 3.8 x 10/sup 5/ liters of C/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/ (2.2 x 10/sup 30/ atoms of /sup 37/Cl) and is located at a depth of 4400 meters of water equivalent (m.w.e.) in the Homestake Gold Mine at Lead, South Dakota, U.S.A. The procedures for extracting /sup 37/Ar and the counting techniques used were described in previous reports. The entire recovered argon sample was counted in a small gas proportional counter. Argon-37 decay events were characterized by the energy of the Auger electrons emitted following the electron capture decay and by the rise-time of the pulse. Counting measurements were continued for a period sufficiently long to observe the decay of /sup 37/Ar.

  14. Geothermal materials development at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukacka, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    As part of the DOE/OGT response to recommendations and priorities established by industrial review of their overall R&D program, the Geothermal Materials Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focusing on topics that can reduce O&M costs and increase competitiveness in foreign and domestic markets. Corrosion and scale control, well completion materials, and lost circulation control have high priorities. The first two topics are included in FY 1997 BNL activities, but work on lost circulation materials is constrained by budgetary limitations. The R&D, most of which is performed as cost-shared efforts with U.S. geothermal firms, is rapidly moving into field testing phases. FY 1996 and 1997 accomplishments in the development of lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant cements for well completions; corrosion resistant, thermally conductive polymer matrix composites for heat exchange applications; and metallic, polymer and ceramic-based corrosion protective coatings are given in this paper. In addition, plans for work that commenced in March 1997 on thermally conductive cementitious grouting materials for use with geothermal heat pumps (GHP), are discussed.

  15. The Two Revolutions In Bio-Medical Research

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ajai R.; Shakuntala A. Singh

    2005-01-01

    In the field of modern medical science, we can identify certain epochs. Some of these will be our concern here, for they offer important insights into the development of modern medicine and offer equally important predictors of where it is heading in the future. In fact they are so important that they qualify to be called nothing less than revolutions.Till the early twentieth century, medicine was an activity dependent on a small privileged elite. This changed by the mid-twentieth century int...

  16. Advance directives in dementia research: A medical ethical inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    Jongsma, Karin

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractDementia is highly prevalent and incurable. The participation of dementia patients in clinical research is indispensable if we want to find an effective treatment for dementia. However, one of the primary challenges in dementia research is the patients’ gradual loss of the capacity to consent. Patients with dementia are characterized by the fact that, at an earlier stage of their life, they were able to give their consent to participation in research. Therefore, the phase when...

  17. "Bionic Man" Showcases Medical Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Bionic Man Meet the Bionic Man Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of Contents ... and medical imaging, visit www.nibib.nih.gov "Bionic Man" Showcases Medical Research The National Institute of ...

  18. SIGAPS: a prototype of bibliographic tool for medical research evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, P; Dufresne, E; Renard, J M; Beuscart, R

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of research activity is extremely important but remains a complex domain. There's no standardized methods and evaluation is often based on the scientific publications. It is easy to identify, for a researcher, all the publications realized over a given period of time. At the level of an important establishment like an University Hospital, with about 500 researchers, this sort of inventory is very difficult to realize: we have to list the researchers, to list their publications, to determine the quality of articles produced, to store retrieved data and to calculate summary statistics. We have developed a full-Web prototype, using free software which, for a given researchers' list, interrogates the Pubmed server, downloads the found references and stores them in a local database. They are then enriched with local data which allow the realization of more or less complex analyses, the automatic production of reports, or keyword search. This tool is very easy to use, allowing for immediate analysis of publications of a researcher or a research team. This tool will allow to identify those active teams to be maintained or emergent teams to be supported. It will also allow to compare candidate profiles for appointments to research posts. PMID:14664073

  19. Model for Developing Educational Research Productivity: The Medical Education Research Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Perry

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Education research and scholarship are essential for promotion of faculty as well as dissemination of new educational practices. Educational faculty frequently spend the majority of their time on administrative and educational commitments and as a result educators often fall behind on scholarship and research. The objective of this educational advance is to promote scholarly productivity as a template for others to follow. Methods: We formed the Medical Education Research Group (MERG of education leaders from our emergency medicine residency, fellowship, and clerkship programs, as well as residents with a focus on education. First, we incorporated scholarship into the required activities of our education missions by evaluating the impact of programmatic changes and then submitting the curricula or process as peer-reviewed work. Second, we worked as a team, sharing projects that led to improved motivation, accountability, and work completion. Third, our monthly meetings served as brainstorming sessions for new projects, research skill building, and tracking work completion. Lastly, we incorporated a workstudy graduate student to assist with basic but time-consuming tasks of completing manuscripts. Results: The MERG group has been highly productive, achieving the following scholarship over a three-year period: 102 abstract presentations, 46 journal article publications, 13 MedEd Portal publications, 35 national didactic presentations and five faculty promotions to the next academic level. Conclusion: An intentional focus on scholarship has led to a collaborative group of educators successfully improving their scholarship through team productivity, which ultimately leads to faculty promotions and dissemination of innovations in education.

  20. Symposium 'methodology in medical education research' organised by the Methodology in Medical Education Research Committee of the German Society of Medical Education May, 25 to 26 2013 at Charité, Berlin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schüttpelz-Brauns, Katrin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, the Methodology in Medical Education Research Committee ran a symposium on “Research in Medical Education” as part of its ongoing faculty development activities. The symposium aimed to introduce to participants educational research methods with a specific focus on research in medical education. Thirty-five participants were able to choose from workshops covering qualitative methods, quantitative methods and scientific writing throughout the one and a half days. The symposium’s evaluation showed participant satisfaction with the format as well as suggestions for future improvement. Consequently, the committee will offer the symposium again in a modified form in proximity to the next annual Congress of the German Society of Medical Education.

  1. WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION

    2003-09-01

    This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve) is based on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) fire management planning procedures and was developed in cooperation with the Department of Energy (DOE) by Brookhaven Science Associates. As the Upton Reserve is contained within the BNL 5,265-acre site, it is logical that the plan applies to both the Upton Reserve and BNL. The Department of the Interior policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas managed by FWS that can sustain fire must have an FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures and specifies values to be protected or enhanced. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, ''prescribed'' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL/Upton Reserve Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered and threatened species and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL and the Upton Reserve. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of FWS, BNL, and the Upton Reserve. This Fire Management Plan is a modified version of the Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex Fire plan (updated in 2000), which contains all FWS fire plan requirements and is presented in the format specified by the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. FWS shall be, through an Interagency Agreement dated November 2000 (Appendix C), responsible for coordinating and

  2. Safety Analysis Report: X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a safety analysis for the X17B2 beamline synchrotron medical research facility. Health hazards, risk assessment and building systems are discussed. Reference is made to transvenous coronary angiography

  3. Uptake of Discourse Research in Interprofessional Settings: Reporting from Medical Consultancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Celia; Sarangi, Srikant

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on relations between applied discourse analysts and professional colleagues in the field of medicine. Examines how discourse-based research findings were taken up and responded to by the medical professions. (Author/VWL)

  4. Safety Analysis Report: X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gmuer, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.

    1990-02-01

    This report contains a safety analysis for the X17B2 beamline synchrotron medical research facility. Health hazards, risk assessment and building systems are discussed. Reference is made to transvenous coronary angiography. (LSP)

  5. Conceptualising spirituality for medical research and health service provision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koenig Harold G

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The need to take account of spirituality in research and health services provision is assuming ever greater importance. However the field has long been hampered by a lack of conceptual clarity about the nature of spirituality itself. We do not agree with the sceptical claim that it is impossible to conceptualise spirituality within a scientific paradigm. Our aims are to 1 provide a brief over-view of critical thinking that might form the basis for a useful definition of spirituality for research and clinical work and 2 demystify the language of spirituality for clinical practice and research.

  6. Stable isotopes: essential tools in biological and medical research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, P. D.; Hachey, D. L.; Kreek, M. J.; Schoeller, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Recent developments in the use of the stable isotopes, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N, /sup 17/O, and /sup 18/O, as tracers in research studies in the fields of biology, medicine, pharmacology, and agriculture are briefly reviewed. (CH)

  7. Radiation safety status at a bio medical research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes are being used for biomedical research purpose at School of Life Science, Jawaharlal Nehru University for the last twenty five years. Present paper analyses the overall status of radiation safety at this Centre

  8. Digital Libraries : a challenge for Medical Research and Education

    OpenAIRE

    Linde, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Since the early 1990s Digital Libraries have become a major factor for collecting, organising and distributing scientific research. This is especially true in the biomedical sciences. In this article, different definitions of the term Digital Libraries are discussed. Two major definitions are dwelled upon: one emerging from the library world and the other from the world of scientific research. Librarians tend to speak for a broader definition of the term “Library”. They see a library as an or...

  9. Research performance of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 1385 (April 2006- March 2007)

    OpenAIRE

    Farzaneh Aminpour

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the frequently used measures of research performance of a country or a university is counting the related scientific production. In the present study the number of scientific production including research projects, books, journal articles and conference proceedings published under the name of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences were identified and then compared with those reported by Iranian Ministry of Health and Medical Education for the ye...

  10. Recruiting for health, medical or psychosocial research using Facebook: Systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Louise Thornton; Batterham, Philip J; Daniel B. Fassnacht; Frances Kay-Lambkin; Calear, Alison L; Sally Hunt

    2016-01-01

    Recruiting participants is a challenge for many health, medical and psychosocial research projects. One tool more frequently being used to improve recruitment is the social networking website Facebook. A systematic review was conducted to identify studies that have used Facebook to recruit participants of all ages, to any psychosocial, health or medical research. 110 unique studies that used Facebook as a recruitment source were included in the review. The majority of studies used a cross-sec...

  11. Concepts of Disease, Medical Research and the Challenges to the Schools of the Healing Professions

    OpenAIRE

    Farber, Emmanuel

    1985-01-01

    The study of disease is a significant part of the pattern of funding for medical research in North America and elsewhere. Also, the existence of disease and its importance in all branches of the healing professions is the major justification for separate professional schools of medicine. These considerations should encourage a vigorous exploration and development of concepts of disease as an important part of any medical education. Based on much of the current research activities, concepts of...

  12. ТHE CONCEPTUAL PRINCIPLES OF MEDICAL AND ECOLOGICAL RESEARCHES IN THE CONTEXT OF MEDICAL GEOGRAPHY

    OpenAIRE

    Vasile Gutsuleak; K. Nakonechny; N. Аndriychuk

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays ecological situation and population morbidity is generatedmost of all by the high level of anthropogenic effect. That is why the conception of medico-ecological researches is studied in the system “environment–population health”.The bases of conception are ecological researches, determination of the level of intensity of medico -becological situation, integral index of ecological dangerof landscape, cartographic modeling and geoecological monitoring

  13. Securing medical research: a cybersecurity point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneier, Bruce

    2012-06-22

    The problem of securing biological research data is a difficult and complicated one. Our ability to secure data on computers is not robust enough to ensure the security of existing data sets. Lessons from cryptography illustrate that neither secrecy measures, such as deleting technical details, nor national solutions, such as export controls, will work. PMID:22723410

  14. Senator Arlen Specter: Backing Medical Research and Battling Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... us know people who have been stricken by cancer or other maladies. This is the time to seize the scientific opportunities that lie before us, and to ensure that all avenues of research toward cures—including stem cell research—are open for investigation. MedlinePlus : What were ...

  15. The 2011 Medical Molecular Hydrogen Symposium: An inaugural symposium of the journal Medical Gas Research

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta Shigeo; Nakao Atsunori; Ohno Kinji

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This report summarizes a brief description/history of the Hydrogen Research Meetings as well as key presentations/oral abstracts delivered in the most recent symposium. Additionally, we introduced 38 diseases and physiological states for which hydrogen exhibits beneficial effects.

  16. A History of the Research Department of the Severance Union Medical College

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YEO In-Sok

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Research Department of the Severance Union Medical College was founded on November 4th, 1914. Drs. R. G. Mills, J. D. VanBuskirk and A. I. Ludlow were the co-founders of the department. The department aimed at investigating the medical problems of Koreans which originated from the differences of diet, customs and habits. The main fields of the research were divided into three: traditional medicine, diet of the Koreans, and special diseases in Korea. As to the research of the traditional medicine, Mills conducted extensive investigations on the drugs mentioned in the pharmacopeia of the traditional medical texts. His work included the translation of the medical texts into English, which unfortunately was not published, and the collection of thousands traditional drugs and botanical specimens. To the second field, VanBuskirk contributed much. His research was mainly focused on investigating the characteristics of Korean diet, finding out its problems, and recommending more balanced diet. The third field was the research of the diseases specific in Korea. The diseases caused by various parasites were the main targets of the research. At first, the Research Department was a laboratory where research was actually being carried out. But, its nature has been changed as each department became the center of research activities. The Research Department became a research promoting center which provides research funds for each department or individual researchers. The founding of the Research Department in the Severance Union Medical College marks a turning point in the history of SUMC in the sense that academic activities began to become more important in the missionary institute.

  17. CURRENT STATUS OF RESEARCH PROJECT ACTIVITIES IN MEDICAL UNIVERSITIES IN BULGARIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav Garov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Bulgaria there are five medical universities: in the cities of Sofia, Plovdiv, Varna, Pleven and Stara Zagora. Their main mission is training specialists in the fields of medicine and health care, increasing their qualification by means of postgraduate education and performing research activities. One of medical universities’ top priorities is encouraging research activities mainly aimed at preparation and implementation of research projects. Aim: The purpose of our study is to examine the current status of research project activities in Bulgarian medical universities.Material and methods: In order to define the science competitions related to Bulgarian medical universities we have applied a documentary and sociological approach. Results: Research projects that Bulgarian medical universities can apply for are divided into two groups – national and international. The most significant international projects are European ones since Bulgaria is an EU member state and this allows us to participate in such projects. Conclusion: Universities should strive for establishing even better conditions for encouraging application for research projects aimed at developing competent and experienced staff, even though the majority of them may not obtain approval for financing.The changes in the situation regarding Bulgarian science require the implementation and development of more research staff motivated to improve their knowledge and skills in the relevant dynamically changing competition and project field.

  18. The role of electromagnetic separators in the production of radiotracers for bio-medical research and nuclear medical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Gerd J.; Ruth, Thomas J.

    2003-05-01

    With the growing complexity of positron emission tomography/single photon emission computed tomography imaging and the new developments in systemic radionuclide therapy there is a growing need for radioisotope preparations with higher radiochemical and radionuclidic purity that has not been achievable before. Especially important for the new applications is the specific activity of the radiotracer. Conventional methods in medical isotope production have reached their technical limitations. The role of isotope separators is discussed with examples of typical production and characterization experiments conducted at the ISOLDE and TRIUMF facilities. These preliminary experiments indicate that isotope separators have a definite role to play in the future for the production of radioisotopes for biomedical research and medical application.

  19. The role of electromagnetic separators in the production of radiotracers for bio-medical research and nuclear medical application

    CERN Document Server

    Beyer, Gerd-Jürgen

    2003-01-01

    With the growing complexity of positron emission tomography/single photon emission computed tomography imaging and the new developments in systemic radionuclide therapy there is a growing need for radioisotope preparations with higher radiochemical and radionuclidic purity that has not been achievable before. Especially important for the new applications is the specific activity of the radiotracer. Conventional methods in medical isotope production have reached their technical limitations. The role of isotope separators is discussed with examples of typical production and characterization experiments conducted at the ISOLDE and TRIUMF facilities. These preliminary experiments indicate that isotope separators have a definite role to play in the future for the production of radioisotopes for biomedical research and medical application.

  20. Translation through argumentation in medical research and physician-citizenship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Gordon R; McTigue, Kathleen M

    2012-06-01

    While many "benchtop-to-bedside" research pathways have been developed in "Type I" translational medicine, vehicles to facilitate "Type II" and "Type III" translation that convert scientific data into clinical and community interventions designed to improve the health of human populations remain elusive. Further, while a high percentage of physicians endorse the principle of citizen leadership, many have difficulty practicing it. This discrepancy has been attributed, in part, to lack of training and preparation for public advocacy, time limitation, and institutional resistance. As translational medicine and physician-citizenship implicate social, political, economic and cultural factors, both enterprises require "integrative" research strategies that blend insights from multiple fields of study, as well as rhetorical acumen in adapting messages to reach multiple audiences. This article considers how argumentation theory's epistemological flexibility, audience attentiveness, and heuristic qualities, combined with concepts from classical rhetoric, such as rhetorical invention, the synecdoche, and ethos, yield tools to facilitate translational medicine and enable physician-citizenship. PMID:22392535

  1. Medical and radiobiological applications at the research reactor TRIGA Mainz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the University of Mainz, Germany, a boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) project has been started with the aim to expand and advance the research on the basis of the TAOrMINA protocol for the BNCT treatment of liver metastases of colorectal cancer. Irradiations take place at the TRIGA Mark II reactor. Biological and clinical research and surgery take place at the University and its hospital of Mainz. Both are situated in close vicinity to each other, which is an ideal situation for BNCT treatment, as similarly performed in Pavia, in 2001 and 2003. The application of BNCT to auto-transplanted organs requires development in the methodology, as well as regard to the irradiation facility and is part of the complex, interdisciplinary treatment process. The additional high surgical risk of auto-transplantation is only justified when a therapeutic benefit can be achieved. A BNCT protocol including explantation and conservation of the organ, neutron irradiation and re-implantation is logistically a very challenging task. Within the last years, research on all scientific, clinical and logistical aspects for the therapy has been performed. This includes work on computational modelling for the irradiation facility, tissue and blood analysis, radiation biology, dosimetry and surgery. Most recently, a clinical study on boron uptake in both healthy and tumour tissue of the liver and issues regarding dosimetry has been started, as well as a series of cell-biology experiments to obtain concrete results on the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ionizing radiation in liver tissue. (author)

  2. Sample size and power analysis in medical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zodpey Sanjay

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Among the questions that a researcher should ask when planning a study is "How large a sample do I need?" If the sample size is too small, even a well conducted study may fail to answer its research question, may fail to detect important effects or associations, or may estimate those effects or associations too imprecisely. Similarly, if the sample size is too large, the study will be more difficult and costly, and may even lead to a loss in accuracy. Hence, optimum sample size is an essential component of any research. When the estimated sample size can not be included in a study, post-hoc power analysis should be carried out. Approaches for estimating sample size and performing power analysis depend primarily on the study design and the main outcome measure of the study. There are distinct approaches for calculating sample size for different study designs and different outcome measures. Additionally, there are also different procedures for calculating sample size for two approaches of drawing statistical inference from the study results, i.e. confidence interval approach and test of significance approach. This article describes some commonly used terms, which need to be specified for a formal sample size calculation. Examples for four procedures (use of formulae, readymade tables, nomograms, and computer software, which are conventionally used for calculating sample size, are also given

  3. New Belgian Law on Research on Human Embryos: Trust in Progress Through Medical Science

    OpenAIRE

    Pennings, G

    2003-01-01

    The new Belgian law on research on embryos in vitro accepts all types of research directed at therapeutic purposes and at increased medical knowledge. This includes research for germline and somatic gene therapy, therapeutic cloning, and the development of embryonic stem cell lines. As this presupposes the creation of embryos for research, this too is allowed. Other goals like sex selection for nonmedical reasons, eugenic practices and reproductive cloning are prohibited. In general, the law ...

  4. A Diagnostic Analysis of Erroneous Language in Iranian Medical Specialists’ Research Papers

    OpenAIRE

    Javad Gholami; Maryam Zeinolabedini

    2015-01-01

    Background: As English has increasingly become the lingua franca in science and international journals require native- like academic writing standards from nonnative researchers, there is more pressure on nonnative scholars to write their research articles more accurately and appropriately in English.This study was conducted to determine the most-occurring language-related errors which Iranian medical authors/ researchers commit while trying to have their research published in international E...

  5. Important steps to improve translation from medical research to health policy

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang Fan; Zhang Jun; Wang Xiangdong; Shen Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Translational medicine entails not only “from-bench-to-bedside” but also preventive medicine. The present article proposes a conceptual framework of translational research from scientific research to health care policy and public health policy. We highlight the importance of translational medicine to bridge between research and policy and share our experience of translating medical research to public health policy in China as well as obstacles and challenges we are facing in the tran...

  6. Plucked Human Hair Shafts and Biomolecular Medical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Schembri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The hair follicle is a skin integument at the boundary between an organism and its immediate environment. The biological role of the human hair follicle has lost some of its ancestral importance. However, an indepth investigation of this miniorgan reveals hidden complexity with huge research potential. An essential consideration when dealing with human research is the awareness of potential harm and thus the absolute need not to harm—a rule aptly qualified by the Latin term “primum non nocere” (first do no harm. The plucked hair shaft offers such advantages. The use of stem cells found in hair follicles cells is gaining momentum in the field of regenerative medicine. Furthermore, current diagnostic and clinical applications of plucked hair follicles include their use as autologous and/or three-dimensional epidermal equivalents, together with their utilization as surrogate tissue in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics studies. Consequently, the use of noninvasive diagnostic procedures on hair follicle shafts, posing as a surrogate molecular model for internal organs in the individual patient for a spectrum of human disease conditions, can possibly become a reality in the near future.

  7. [Preliminary research on the transmission of official printed medical books in the Song dynasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Xin

    2010-09-01

    In the Song dynasty, central and municipal governments edited and published a large quantity of medical books. Surveying the transmission of official printed books is important in exploring the process of the transmission of medical knowledge in the Song dynasty. Various library catalogues and related historical materials provided convenient sources for research on the transmission of these medical books. Collections of archives, sales to the public and grants from the court for court ministers, foreign countries and municipalities were the main routes of medical book transmission, by which medical knowledge was widely spread among both city and local areas, to intellectuals and the general public, and which laid the foundation for the prosperity of medicine in the Song dynasty. PMID:21163080

  8. Outcome orientation - a misconception of probability that harms medical research and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Humphrey, Parris Taylor

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainty is an everyday experience in medical research and practice, but theory and methods for reasoning clearly about uncertainty were developed only recently. Confirmation bias, selective memory, and many misleading heuristics are known enemies of the insightful clinician, researcher, or citizen; but other snares worth exposing lurk in how we reason about uncertainty in our everyday lives. Here we draw attention to a cognitive bias described by Konold as the "outcome orientation" - little known or possibly unknown to those outside the field of probability pedagogy - and point out how this form of reasoning creates hazards for medical research and practice.

  9. Innovating in the medical device industry - challenges & opportunities ESB 2015 translational research symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayon, Y; Bohner, M; Eglin, D; Procter, P; Richards, R G; Weber, J; Zeugolis, D I

    2016-09-01

    The European Society for Biomaterials 2015 Translational Research Symposium focused on 'Innovating in the Medical Device Industry - Challenges & Opportunities' from different perspectives, i.e., from a non-profit research organisation to a syndicate of small and medium-sized companies and large companies. Lecturers from regulatory consultants, industry and research institutions described the innovation process and regulatory processes (e.g., 510K, PMA, combination product) towards market approval. The aim of the present article is to summarise and explain the main statements made during the symposium, in terms of challenges and opportunities for medical device industries, in a constantly changing customer and regulatory environment. PMID:27552808

  10. Participatory Action Research in clinical nursing practice in a medical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerholt, Mette; Wagner, Lis; Lindhardt, Tove;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Action research with a participatory approach (PAR) was used as research design in a medical ward but stopped midway because of lack of active actor participation in the actions. Aim: To describe challenges and barriers influencing lack of participation. Setting: A medical hospital ward...... framework and conditions are present not only prior to but during the entire project process. Implications. The study shows that PAR is not always suitable as research approach in a busy hospital ward. Furthermore, the study outlines methodological questions in relation to use of PAR....

  11. Use of Radioactive Beams for Bio-Medical Research

    CERN Multimedia

    Miederer, M; Allen, B

    2002-01-01

    %title\\\\ \\\\With this Proposal we wish to replace the two previous proposals P42 and P48 (corresponding to the ISOLDE Experiments IS330 and IS331, respectively, including the Addendum 1 dated 04.05.94). Based on experimental results obtained during the last four year's research in the framework of the two proposals and considering modern trends in radiopharmaceutical developments we propose as a first main direction to study systematically relationships between physico-chemical parameters, the concentration and specific activity of tracer molecules and the corresponding biological response. This kind of studies requires highest achievable quality and a universality of radio-tracers, available at ISOLDE. Special attention in this concern is paid to bio-specific tracers (receptor-binding ligands, bio-conjugates etc.) aiming to search for new and more efficient radiopharmaceuticals for radionuclide therapy. The second direction is to support clinical radionuclide therapy by a quantitative follow up of the radionu...

  12. MODEL ORGANISMS USED IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OR MEDICAL RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Govind

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A model organism is a non-human species that is studied to understand specific biological phenomena with the expectation that investigations made in the organism model will provide insight into the workings of other organisms. The model organisms are widely used to explore potential causes and treatments for human as well as animal diseases when experiments on animals or humans would be unfeasible or considered less ethical. Studying model organisms may be informative, but care must be taken when generalizing from one organism to another. Often, model organisms are chosen on the basis that they are amenable to experimental manipulation. When researchers look for an organism to use in their studies, they look for several traits. Among these are size, generation time, accessibility, manipulation, genetics, conservation of mechanisms and potential economic benefit. As comparative molecular biology has become more common, some researchers have sought model organisms from a wider assortment of lineages on the tree of life. There are many model organisms, such as viruses (e.g., Phage lambda virus, Tobacco mosaic virus, etc., bacteria (e.g., Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Vibrio fischeri, etc., algae (e.g., Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Emiliania huxleyi, etc., molds (e.g., Aspergillus nidulans, Neurospora crassa, etc., yeasts (e.g., Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ustilago maydis, etc., higher plants (e.g., Arabidopsis thaliana, Lemna gibba, Lotus japonicus, Nicotiana tabaccum, Oryza sativa, Physcomitrella patens, Zea mays, etc. and animals (e.g., Caenorhabditis elegans, guinea pig, hamster, mouse, rat, cat, chicken, dog, frog, Hydra, Drosophila melanogaster fruit fly, fish, etc..

  13. Publishing Research in a Second Language: The Case of Sudanese Contributors to International Medical Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElMalik, Abdullahi Tambul; Nesi, Hilary

    2008-01-01

    This paper compares published writing produced by British and Sudanese medical researchers. Twenty research articles were examined, 10 by British and 10 by Sudanese writers. All had been published in highly regarded international journals. As expected, all 20 articles conformed to editorial requirements and followed the conventional IMRD structure…

  14. Bioorganic chemistry research in the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry - medical aspects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holý, Antonín

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 10, Supplement (2004), s. 107. ISSN 1075-2617. [ International /3./ and European Peptide Symposium /28./. 05.09.2004-10.09.2004, Praha] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : bioorganic chemistry research * medical aspects Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  15. Supporting Medical Students to Do International Field Research: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Stephen; Parr, Jennifer; Ullah, Zafar; Omar, Maye

    2014-01-01

    Field research can benefit medical students' learning through experiential engagement with research and personal exposure to foreign health systems. However, the off-campus nature of the activity raises challenges for teachers. This article presents a case study that illustrates the benefits and challenges of organising a field research…

  16. Developing a Sustainable Research Culture in an Independent Academic Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Jeffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Independent academic medical centers (IAMC) are challenged to develop and support a research enterprise and maintain primary goals of healthcare delivery and financial solvency. Strategies for promoting translational research have been shown to be effective at institutions in the top level of federal funding, but not for smaller IAMCs. The…

  17. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF RESEARCH PROJECT ACTIVITIES PERFORMED AT MEDICAL UNIVERSITIES IN BULGARIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav Garov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are five Bulgarian medical universities in the cities of Sofia, Plovdiv, Varna, Pleven and Stara Zagora. A major priority of medical universities is to encourage research activities mainly aimed at preparation and implementation of research projects. Projects are managed by the participating organizations called “beneficiaries”. Beneficiaries develop projects, apply for finances and if approved they implement those projects.Aim: The purpose of our study is to examine the organizational structure of research project activities on the macro level and on the micro level in Bulgarian medical universities.Material and methods: In order to define the separate elements of the organizational structure and to analyze the relations and interaction between them we have applied a documentary and sociological approach. Results: During the last six years there was a significant increase in the number and the overall annual financial value of the projects performed at medical universities in Bulgaria. The reasons for such increase are: managers realizing the advantages of and benefits from the implementation of research projects ensuring high quality modernization of research units’ equipment and facilities; access to innovative technologies; development of interdisciplinary relations, etc. Benefits arising from improved results motivate us to consider as appropriate some additional investments aimed at increasing the number of team members and further optimization of the currently existing structures (research centers in charge of research with the purpose of achieving even better results in this particular field. Conclusion: The role of research project activities in medical universities’ research field is of vital importance for the educational institutions’ success. Taking into consideration the changed conditions, European possibilities and the highly competitive environment, realizing this aspect will be essential for the

  18. Barriers and challenges in researches by Iranian students of medical universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Anbari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health sciences research (HSR is an essential part of improving health care which plays a critical role in the field of medicine and clinical practice. The aim of the current study was to assess barriers to the research by students of medical sciences as well as to find out effective strategies for management of student researches in Iranian universities. Materials and Methods: This study utilized a hybrid design with quantitative and qualitative analytical approaches conducted on 627 students in six schools of medical sciences in two universities in Central Province in Iran from April to December, 2012. Questionnaires were distributed among researcher and non-researcher students to find barriers to the research. These barriers were approved and validated by similar studies and strategies using the Delphi technique on 36 students. Results: The most important barriers among researcher students were institutional barriers (3.3 ± 1.3, but in non-researcher students they were individual barriers (3.6 ± 1.7. The majority of barriers to involvement in the research among researcher students appeared to be time, lack of access to electronic resources and prolongation of the process of buying equipment. In addition, the greatest barriers among non-researcher students included the lack of time, scientific writing skills, and access to trained assistants. Conclusion: The results showed the issue of attitudes towards compulsory research as a component of critical scholarship in the curriculum of medical courses. Moreover, employment of the research experts can be helpful for research training in schools of medical sciences.

  19. Impact of Mode of Curriculum on Knowledge and Attitudes of Medical Students towards Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseeb, Abdul; Ansari, M. Ahmed; Raheem, Ahmed; Khan, Aleena; Arshad, Mohammad Hussham; Motiani, Vanita; Akhtar, Muhammad Shahzeb

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Equipping students with skills in medical research should be an integral part of medical education systems. This study is designed to gauge the difference in knowledge and attitudes towards health research between two sets of undergraduate medical students; those enrolled in the new Problem Based Learning (PBL) education system versus those of the conventional Lecture Based Learning (LBL) curricula. Materials and Methods From the 4th and 5th years of medical university students, 90 participants were recruited from the Aga Khan University (PBL group) and Dow University of Health Sciences (LBL group) and were presented with structured and pre-validated questionnaire. Responses obtained for knowledge and attitudes of each group were recorded on a scale and graduated in percentages to be compared statistically for differences to identify the effectiveness of each curriculum. Results The score on the knowledge scale for the PBL group was found to be 44.77% against the 31.55% of the LBL students (p-value<0.001). Furthermore, the mean attitude score of AKU students was 72.22% as opposed to the 56.11% of the DUHS participants (p-value<0.001). Conclusion The PBL group achieved significantly higher scores in all aspects than the LBL group, showing healthier attitudes towards health science research along with better knowledge. Hence, the apparent positive influence of PBL curricula on attitudes towards research may be helpful in improving research output of medical students in Pakistan. PMID:27190837

  20. Medical post-traumatic stress disorder: catching up with the cutting edge in stress research

    OpenAIRE

    Weinert, Craig; Meller, William

    2007-01-01

    We briefly summarize two original research papers and a review article. We then review the formal structure of the diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and discuss the use of continuous measures of PTSD in comparison with diagnostic instruments. Problems with distinguishing incident from prevalent PTSD cases lead to questions of whether medical PTSD is a new important problem. By examining current studies, we demonstrate that medical PTSD is lagging in fundamental and interventi...

  1. Educational strategies aimed at improving student nurse's medication calculation skills: a review of the research literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolic, Snezana

    2014-09-01

    Medication administration is an important and essential nursing function with the potential for dangerous consequences if errors occur. Not only must nurses understand the use and outcomes of administering medications they must be able to calculate correct dosages. Medication administration and dosage calculation education occurs across the undergraduate program for student nurses. Research highlights inconsistencies in the approaches used by academics to enhance the student nurse's medication calculation abilities. The aim of this integrative review was to examine the literature available on effective education strategies for undergraduate student nurses on medication dosage calculations. A literature search of five health care databases: Sciencedirect, Cinahl, Pubmed, Proquest, Medline to identify journal articles between 1990 and 2012 was conducted. Research articles on medication calculation educational strategies were considered for inclusion in this review. The search yielded 266 papers of which 20 meet the inclusion criteria. A total of 5206 student nurse were included in the final review. The review revealed educational strategies fell into four types of strategies; traditional pedagogy, technology, psychomotor skills and blended learning. The results suggested student nurses showed some benefit from the different strategies; however more improvements could be made. More rigorous research into this area is needed. PMID:25001180

  2. Restriction on animal experimentation for medical education and research: pros and cons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a lot have been written and discussed about animal experiments and ethics. Still there is too much confusion among academicians and researchers about the future of use of animals in biomedical research and up to what extent their use in laboratory, research institutions, and medical colleges. This article highlighted and discussed about various aspects of this burning issue along with several pros and cons. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(2.000: 388-390

  3. Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission: Annual Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute was established in 2009, as the forth research institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. This Annual Report provides an overview of the major activities of the Institutes in the year 2014. Major items covered in the report include: Strategic objectives; Collaborations; Personnel and Organisational Structure; Facilities and Technical Services; Summary of Research and Development Projects; Human Resource Development; Publications and Technical Reports.

  4. The Concept of Exploitation in Medical and Health Related Research Ethics: Literature Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Increased International collaborative research activities in poor and low-income countries have several unique claims on our attention. First, the idea of involving human beings in research, putting forward participants openly to trials presents a novel experiment in which various academic disciplines can play in order to enhance fair studies. Second, apart from the need to conduct research in medical and health related areas, there have been many ethical challenges including the necessity to...

  5. Restriction on animal experimentation for medical education and research: pros and cons

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul Kumar; Sarvesh Singh; Rishi Pal; Rakesh Kumar Dixit; Rajendra Nath; Narendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a lot have been written and discussed about animal experiments and ethics. Still there is too much confusion among academicians and researchers about the future of use of animals in biomedical research and up to what extent their use in laboratory, research institutions, and medical colleges. This article highlighted and discussed about various aspects of this burning issue along with several pros and cons. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(2.000): 388-390

  6. Radiation protection in medical and biomedical research; Proteccion radiologica en la investigacion medica y biomedica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuente Puch, A.E. de la, E-mail: andres@orasen.co.cuES [Centro Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba)

    2013-11-01

    The human exposure to ionizing radiation in the context of medical and biomedical research raises specific ethical challenges whose resolution approaches should be based on scientific, legal and procedural matters. Joint Resolution MINSAP CITMA-Regulation 'Basic Standards of Radiation Safety' of 30 November 2001 (hereafter NBS) provides for the first time in Cuba legislation specifically designed to protect patients and healthy people who participate in research programs medical and biomedical and exposed to radiation. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the need to develop specific requirements for radiation protection in medical and biomedical research, as well as to identify all the institutions involved in this in order to establish the necessary cooperation to ensure the protection of persons participating in the investigation.

  7. BioGrid Australia facilitates collaborative medical and bioinformatics research across hospitals and medical research institutes by linking data from diverse disease and data types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriel, Robert B; Gibbs, Peter; O'Brien, Terence J; Hibbert, Marienne

    2011-05-01

    BioGrid Australia is a federated data linkage and integration infrastructure that uses the Internet to enable patient specific information to be utilized for research in a privacy protected manner, from multiple databases of various data types (e.g. clinical, treatment, genomic, image, histopathology and outcome), from a range of diseases (oncological, neurological, endocrine and respiratory) and across more than 20 health services, universities and medical research institutes. BioGrid has demonstrated an ability to facilitate powerful research into the causation of human disease and the prediction of disease and treatment outcomes. BioGrid has successfully implemented technology and processes that allow researchers to efficiently extract data from multiple sources, without compromising data security and privacy. This article reviews BioGrid's first seven years and how it has overcome 9 of its top 10 challenges. PMID:21309032

  8. Researchers' experience with project management in health and medical research: Results from a post-project review

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott Elizabeth J; Bartu Anne E; D'Antoine Heather A; Henley Nadine; France Kathryn E; Payne Janet M; Bower Carol

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Project management is widely used to deliver projects on time, within budget and of defined quality. However, there is little published information describing its use in managing health and medical research projects. We used project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project (2006-2008) http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy and in this paper report researchers' opinions on project management and whether it made a difference to the project. Methods A national ...

  9. Design and safety analysis report of facilities for research and development of medical radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For production and research for practical use of radio-pharmaceuticals using for medical treatment and diagnosis, the complex facility offer shield and clean environment is basically required for protecting personnel from radiation, and the product from contamination. The facilities was designed for research and development of medical radioisotopes. This facility was designed to comply with GMP(Good Manufacturing Practice) requirements and safety requirements against radiation. In this technical report, technical requirements and design summary for construction of hot cell and clean room are described. And also, This facility will be utilized for production of Tc-99m generator and R and D of other radio-pharmaceuticals(Ho-166 etc.).

  10. Brookhaven Lab and Argonne Lab scientists invent a plasma valve

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have received U.S. patent number 6,528,948 for a device that shuts off airflow into a vacuum about one million times faster than mechanical valves or shutters that are currently in use (1 page).

  11. From heavy ions to light sources at Brookhaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory, recovered from the debacle of the cancelled CBA proton-proton collider project, is now more than busy with an excellent physics programme at the 33 GeV Alternating Gradient Synchrotron and with solid projects for the years to come. (orig.).

  12. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.E.; Schroeder, G.L. [eds.] [and others

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1995. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment. Areas of known contamination are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement established by the Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency and the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. Except for identified areas of soil and groundwater contamination, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with the applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. Also, the data show that the environmental impacts at Brookhaven National Laboratory are minimal and pose no threat to the public nor to the environment. This report meets the requirements of Department of Energy Orders 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

  13. Vertical velocity variances and Reynold stresses at Brookhaven

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Niels E.; Brown, R.M.; Frizzola, J.A.

    1970-01-01

    Results of wind tunnel tests of the Brookhaven annular bivane are presented. The energy transfer functions describing the instrument response and the numerical filter employed in the data reduction process have been used to obtain corrected values of the normalized variance of the vertical wind...

  14. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY: THREE SELECTED TOPICS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT,J.W.DENG,Y.GLIMM,J.SAMULYAK,R.

    2003-09-15

    We present an overview of computational science at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), with selections from three areas: fluids, nanoscience, and biology. The work at BNL in each of these areas is itself very broad, and we select a few topics for presentation within each of them.

  15. Brookhaven National Laboratory moves to the fast lane

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The U.S. Department of Energy's energy sciences network (ESnet) continues to roll out its next-generation architecture on schedule with the March 14 completion of the Long Island Metropolitan Area Network, connecting Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to the ESnet point of presente (PO) 60 miles away in New York City." (1 page)

  16. RESEARCH OF RUSSIAN HIGH TECHNOLOGY MEDICAL EQUIPMENT MARKET: THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Станислав Сергеевич Отставнов

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data obtained from comprehensive study of russian hi-tech medical equipment market. The size and the structure of Russian medical equipment market in 2005-2011 were investigated and market size forecast for 2012-2015 was given. Priority segments of Russian high-tech medical equipment market were identified (products with a high degree of visualization, anesthetic and ventilation equipment, patient monitors  based on the analysis of literature sources and morbidity structure. Key players in key segments of the market were identified and their financial performance such as number of employees, revenue, net profit, researches and development expenses were compared (according to actual annual reports.Research allowed to draw the following conclusion: today in the key segments of Russian high-tech medical equipment market the leadership of foreign companies  (Hitachi, Philips, Siemens, Toshiba, General Electric, Dräger is indisputable, objective preconditions for the fundamental change of the situation are absent. Import substitution requires the consolidation of domestic producers, adequate funding and human resource.The results can be used in practice by medical industry companies and State authorities on purpose to upgrade the medical industry.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-1-31

  17. RESEARCH OF RUSSIAN HIGH TECHNOLOGY MEDICAL EQUIPMENT MARKET: THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otstavnov Stanislav Sergeevich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data obtained from comprehensive study of russian hi-tech medical equipment market. The size and the structure of Russian medical equipment market in 2005-2011 were investigated and market size forecast for 2012-2015 was given. Priority segments of Russian high-tech medical equipment market were identified (products with a high degree of visualization, anesthetic and ventilation equipment, patient monitors based on the analysis of literature sources and morbidity structure. Key players in key segments of the market were identified and their financial performance such as number of employees, revenue, net profit, researches and development expenses were compared (according to actual annual reports. Research allowed to draw the following conclusion: today in the key segments of Russian high-tech medical equipment market the leadership of foreign companies (Hitachi, Philips, Siemens, Toshiba, General Electric, Dräger is indisputable, objective preconditions for the fundamental change of the situation are absent. Import substitution requires the consolidation of domestic producers, adequate funding and human resource. The results can be used in practice by medical industry companies and State authorities on purpose to upgrade the medical industry.

  18. Researchers' experience with project management in health and medical research: Results from a post-project review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Elizabeth J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Project management is widely used to deliver projects on time, within budget and of defined quality. However, there is little published information describing its use in managing health and medical research projects. We used project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project (2006-2008 http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy and in this paper report researchers' opinions on project management and whether it made a difference to the project. Methods A national interdisciplinary group of 20 researchers, one of whom was the project manager, formed the Steering Committee for the project. We used project management to ensure project outputs and outcomes were achieved and all aspects of the project were planned, implemented, monitored and controlled. Sixteen of the researchers were asked to complete a self administered questionnaire for a post-project review. Results The project was delivered according to the project protocol within the allocated budget and time frame. Fifteen researchers (93.8% completed a questionnaire. They reported that project management increased the effectiveness of the project, communication, teamwork, and application of the interdisciplinary group of researchers' expertise. They would recommend this type of project management for future projects. Conclusions Our post-project review showed that researchers comprehensively endorsed project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project and agreed that project management had contributed substantially to the research. In future, we will project manage new projects and conduct post-project reviews. The results will be used to encourage continuous learning and continuous improvement of project management, and provide greater transparency and accountability of health and medical research. The use of project management can benefit both management and scientific outcomes of health and medical research projects.

  19. Orientations and outcome of interdisciplinary research: the case of research behaviour in translational medical science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Finn; Norn, Maria Theresa; Alkærsig, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The importance of interdisciplinary research in accelerating the progress and commercialization of science is widely recognized, yet little is known about how academic research self-organizes towards interdisciplinarity. In this paper, we therefore explore the micro-level behavior of researchers as...... they venture into a promising space for interdisciplinary research, namely translational research—a bridge between basic and applied biomedical research. More specifically, we ask (1) whether the researchers who choose to engage in translational research have a strong scientific record, (2) how...... interdisciplinary research spanning basic and applied research influences the output of academic research, and (3) how different disciplinary distance in interdisciplinary research contributes to reputational benefits of researchers. We find that for some types of collaboration, interdisciplinarity results in more...

  20. Automated collection of medical images for research from heterogeneous systems: trials and tribulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M. N.; Looney, P.; Young, K.; Halling-Brown, M. D.

    2014-03-01

    Radiological imaging is fundamental within the healthcare industry and has become routinely adopted for diagnosis, disease monitoring and treatment planning. Over the past two decades both diagnostic and therapeutic imaging have undergone a rapid growth, the ability to be able to harness this large influx of medical images can provide an essential resource for research and training. Traditionally, the systematic collection of medical images for research from heterogeneous sites has not been commonplace within the NHS and is fraught with challenges including; data acquisition, storage, secure transfer and correct anonymisation. Here, we describe a semi-automated system, which comprehensively oversees the collection of both unprocessed and processed medical images from acquisition to a centralised database. The provision of unprocessed images within our repository enables a multitude of potential research possibilities that utilise the images. Furthermore, we have developed systems and software to integrate these data with their associated clinical data and annotations providing a centralised dataset for research. Currently we regularly collect digital mammography images from two sites and partially collect from a further three, with efforts to expand into other modalities and sites currently ongoing. At present we have collected 34,014 2D images from 2623 individuals. In this paper we describe our medical image collection system for research and discuss the wide spectrum of challenges faced during the design and implementation of such systems.

  1. Medical Universities Educational and Research Online Services: Benchmarking Universities’ Website Towards E-Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzandipour, Mehrdad; Meidani, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Websites as one of the initial steps towards an e-government adoption do facilitate delivery of online and customer-oriented services. In this study we intended to investigate the role of the websites of medical universities in providing educational and research services following the E-government maturity model in the Iranian universities. Methods: This descriptive and cross- sectional study was conducted through content analysis and benchmarking the websites in 2012. The research population included the entire medical university website (37). Delivery of educational and research services through these university websites including information, interaction, transaction, and Integration were investigated using a checklist. The data were then analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and using SPSS software. Results: Level of educational and research services by websites of the medical universities type I and II was evaluated medium as 1.99 and 1.89, respectively. All the universities gained a mean score of 1 out of 3 in terms of integration of educational and research services. Conclusions: Results of the study indicated that Iranian universities have passed information and interaction stages, but they have not made much progress in transaction and integration stages. Failure to adapt to e-government in Iranian medical universities in which limiting factors such as users’ e-literacy, access to the internet and ICT infrastructure are not so crucial as in other organizations, suggest that e-government realization goes beyond technical challenges. PMID:25132713

  2. The joint cardiovascular research profile of the university medical centres in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Welie, S D; van Leeuwen, T N; Bouma, C J; Klaassen, A B M

    2016-05-01

    Biomedical scientific research in the Netherlands has a good reputation worldwide. Quantitatively, the university medical centres (UMCs) deliver about 40 % of the total number of scientific publications of this research. Analysis of the bibliometric output data of the UMCs shows that their research is highly cited. These output-based analyses also indicate the high impact of cardiovascular scientific research in these centres, illustrating the strength of this research in the Netherlands. A set of six joint national cardiovascular research topics selected by the UMCs can be recognised. At the top are heart failure, rhythm disorder research and atherosclerosis. National collaboration of top scientists in consortia in these three areas is successful in acquiring funding of large-scale programs. Our observations suggest that funding national consortia of experts focused on a few selected research topics may increase the international competitiveness of cardiovascular research in the Netherlands. PMID:27043238

  3. Development and Evaluation of the Habitat Demonstration Unit Medical Operations Workstation and Opportunities for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Robert L., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    As NASA develops missions to leave Earth orbit and explore distant destinations (Mars, Moon, Asteroids) it is necessary to rethink human spaceflight paradigms in the life sciences. Standards developed for low earth orbit human spaceflight may not be fully applicable and in-space research may be required to develop new standards. Preventative and emergency medical care may require new capabilities never before used in space. Due to spacecraft volume limitations, this work area may also be shared with various animal and plant life science research. This paper explores the prototype Medical Operations Workstation within the NASA Habitat Demonstration Unit and discusses some of the lessons learned from field analogue missions involving the workstation. Keywords: Exploration, medical, health, crew, injury emergency, biology, animal, plant, science, preventative, emergency.

  4. A critical review of glove and hand research with regard to medical glove design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylon, Peter; Lewis, Roger; Carré, Matt J; Martin, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Research from a number of areas was surveyed, including hand function; skin friction; manual performance testing; glove comfort, fit and durability; and user perception. The relevance of the research to medical glove design was discussed. It was concluded that, while an understanding has been gained of the factors that affect glove performance in general, specific application to thin rubber gloves has not been well explored. The focus in glove performance testing has also been on simple tasks such as pegboards, which do not necessarily assess the fine dexterity required in many surgical tasks. Recommendations were made for the development of a new battery of tests specific to medical gloves that would simulate real medical tasks and could produce repeatable results and have sufficient resolution to differentiate between glove types. PMID:24219777

  5. Ethics by opinion poll? The functions of attitudes research for normative deliberations in medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloch, Sabine; Vollmann, Jochen; Schildmann, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Empirical studies on people's moral attitudes regarding ethically challenging topics contribute greatly to research in medical ethics. However, it is not always clear in which ways this research adds to medical ethics as a normative discipline. In this article, we aim to provide a systematic account of the different ways in which attitudinal research can be used for normative reflection. In the first part, we discuss whether ethical judgements can be based on empirical work alone and we develop a sceptical position regarding this point, taking into account theoretical, methodological and pragmatic considerations. As empirical data should not be taken as a direct source for normative justification, we then delineate different ways in which attitudes research can be combined with theoretical accounts of normative justification in the second part of the article. Firstly, the combination of attitudes research with normative-ethical theories is analysed with respect to three different aspects: (a) The extent of empirical data which is needed, (b) the question of which kind of data is required and (c) the ways in which the empirical data are processed within the framework of an ethical theory. Secondly, two further functions of attitudes research are displayed which lie outside the traditional focus of ethical theories: the exploratory function of detecting and characterising new ethical problems, and the field of 'moral pragmatics'. The article concludes with a methodological outlook and suggestions for the concrete practice of attitudinal research in medical ethics. PMID:23632008

  6. Publication rate and PhD enrolment following a medical pre-graduate research programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Marlene; Okkels, Niels; Christensen, Mette Krogh;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In the 1990s, the publication and PhD recruitment rates following the Danish pre-graduate research programme (PGRP) in medicine were 54% and 33%, respectively. Updated estimates are unknown. METHODS: All medical students enrolled in the PGRP at the Faculty of Medicine, Aarhus...... PGRP compared to female medical students (28% versus 19%; p < 0.01). Within three and a half years from PGRP initiation, 13% of the research students had enrolled in a PhD programme at Health, and 52% had published ≥ 1 paper with ≥ 1 supervisor. The research student was the first author on 43% of the...... University (Health), Denmark, during 2003-2012 were included (n = 687). The PGRP files were merged with PhD students' files at Health. A systematic literature search was completed for research students who had enrolled during the 2006-2009 period (n = 227). The factors investigated were student age, sex...

  7. What is the reward? Medical students’ learning and personal development during a research project course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riitta Möller

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Until recently, the outcome of medical students’ research projects has mainly been assessed in terms of scientific publications, whereas other results important for students’ development have been less studied. The aim of this study was to investigate medical students’ experiences of learning as an outcome of the research project course. Method: Written reflections of 50 students were analyzed by manifest inductive content analysis. Results: Three categories emerged: ‘thinking as a scientist’, ‘working as a scientist’, and ‘personal development’. Students became more aware about the nature of knowledge, how to generate new knowledge, and developed skills in scientific thinking and critical appraisal. Unexpectedly, effects on personal characteristics, such as self-confidence, self-discipline, independence, and time management skills were also acknowledged. Conclusions: We conclude that individual research projects enhance research-specific skills and competencies needed in evidence-based clinical work and are beneficial for personal and professional development.

  8. Research on Practice Carrier and Method Formed by Medical Humanistic Spirit for Medical Students: Tianjin Medical University as a Case in Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jie; Geng, Xin; Su, Zhenxing; Wang, Yutao

    2014-01-01

    Medical humanistic quality is an indispensable quality that eligible doctors should possess, and medical humanism is strongly advocated and carried forward by contemporary medicine. These are commonly understood worldwide, and formed by reflection on medicine and medical education. Cultivation of medical humanism requires in-depth discussions of…

  9. Data Mining and Domain Knowledge: An Exploration of Methods to Advance Medical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Kelley M.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers in the medical domain consider the double-blind placebo controlled clinical trial the gold standard. The data for these clinical trials are collected for a specifically defined hypothesis and there is very little in the realm of secondary data analyses conducted. The underlying purpose of this work is to demonstrate the value and…

  10. Medical and biomedical research productivity from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (2008-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Latif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biomedical publications from a country mirror the standard of Medical Education and practice in that country. It is important that the performance of the health profession is occasionally documented. Aims: This study aimed to analyze the quantity and quality of biomedical publications from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA in international journals indexed in PubMed between 2008 and 2012. Materials and Methods: PubMed was searched for publications associated with KSA from 2008 to 2012. The search was limited to medical and biomedical subjects. Results were saved in a text file and later checked carefully to exclude false positive errors. The quality of the publication was assessed using Journal Citation Report 2012. Results: Biomedical research production in KSA in those 5 years showed a clear linear progression. Riyadh was the main hub of medical and biomedical research activity. Most of the publications (40.9% originated from King Saud University (KSU. About half of the articles were published in journals with an Impact Factor (IF of < 1, one-fourth in journals with no IF, and the remaining one-fourth in journals with a high IF (≥1. Conclusion: This study revealed that research activity in KSA is increasing. However, there is an increasing trend of publishing in local journals with a low IF. More effort is required to promote medical research in Saudi Arabia.

  11. What a Change in DEA's Pot Rules Might Mean for Medical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drug laws to "develop a special schedule for marijuana to facilitate study of its potential medical utility in prescription drug ... a statement its officials provided ABC News . "While studies related to ... the lack of solid marijuana research in a position paper. Due to strict ...

  12. A Diagnostic Analysis of Erroneous Language in Iranian Medical Specialists’ Research Papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Gholami

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: As English has increasingly become the lingua franca in science and international journals require native- like academic writing standards from nonnative researchers, there is more pressure on nonnative scholars to write their research articles more accurately and appropriately in English.This study was conducted to determine the most-occurring language-related errors which Iranian medical authors/ researchers commit while trying to have their research published in international English journals. Also, this article seeks to provide useful guidelines to reduce such linguistic mistakes.Methods: The present study investigated the most common language-related errors in Iranian medical specialists' research articles. To this end, the first drafts of 60 published research articles in medical sciences were cross-checked against their peer-reviewed published versions in order to identify the most frequent non-target language forms which received discoursal, lexical, grammatical, and mechanical revisions by peer editors.Results: The findings revealed that the editors had surprisingly dealt with discoursal errors more than any other linguistic aspects of these research articles. This was followed by lexical replacements. In third place were grammatical improvements, where erroneous structures mostly related to tenses, usage of articles and prepositions, and agreement between verbs and nouns were treated. The least common revisions were on the mechanics of academic writing, consisting of hyphenating, spelling, case lettering, spacing, and spacing with commas.Conclusion: Although most of the Iranian medical authors/researchers enjoyed a good level of proficiency in English, their manuscripts required discoursal, lexical, grammatical, and mechanical revisions before publication in credited international journals.

  13. A Diagnostic Analysis of Erroneous Language in Iranian Medical Specialists’ Research Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Javad; Zeinolabedini, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: As English has increasingly become the lingua franca in science and international journals require native-like academic writing standards from nonnative researchers, there is more pressure on nonnative scholars to write their research articles more accurately and appropriately in English. This study was conducted to determine the most-occurring language-related errors which Iranian medical authors/researchers commit while trying to have their research published in international English journals. Also, this article seeks to provide useful guidelines to reduce such linguistic mistakes. Methods: The present study investigated the most common language-related errors in Iranian medical specialists’ research articles. To this end, the first drafts of 60 published research articles in medical sciences were cross-checked against their peer-reviewed published versions in order to identify the most frequent non-target language forms which received discoursal, lexical, grammatical, and mechanical revisions by peer editors. Results: The findings revealed that the editors had surprisingly dealt with discoursal errors more than any other linguistic aspects of these research articles. This was followed by lexical replacements. In third place were grammatical improvements, where erroneous structures mostly related to tenses, usage of articles and prepositions, and agreement between verbs and nouns were treated. The least common revisions were on the mechanics of academic writing, consisting of hyphenating, spelling, case lettering, spacing, and spacing with commas. Conclusion: Although most of the Iranian medical authors/researchers enjoyed a good level of proficiency in English, their manuscripts required discoursal, lexical, grammatical, and mechanical revisions before publication in credited international journals. PMID:26157466

  14. Two h-Index Benchmarks for Evaluating the Publication Performance of Medical Informatics Researchers

    OpenAIRE

    El Emam, Khaled; Arbuckle, Luk; Jonker, Elizabeth; Anderson, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Background The h-index is a commonly used metric for evaluating the publication performance of researchers. However, in a multidisciplinary field such as medical informatics, interpreting the h-index is a challenge because researchers tend to have diverse home disciplines, ranging from clinical areas to computer science, basic science, and the social sciences, each with different publication performance profiles. Objective To construct a reference standard for interpreting the h-index of medi...

  15. A guide to appropriate use of Correlation coefficient in medical research

    OpenAIRE

    Mukaka, MM

    2012-01-01

    Correlation is a statistical method used to assess a possible linear association between two continuous variables. It is simple both to calculate and to interpret. However, misuse of correlation is so common among researchers that some statisticians have wished that the method had never been devised at all. The aim of this article is to provide a guide to appropriate use of correlation in medical research and to highlight some misuse. Examples of the applications of the correlation coefficien...

  16. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Medical Students' Perspectives on the Engagement in Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Cho; Wai, Victor Nyunt; Durham, Jo; Whittaker, Maxine A; Win, Ni Ni; Aung, Kyan; Mak, Joon Wah

    2015-07-01

    Engaging students in active learning lies at the center of effective higher education. In medical schools, students' engagement in learning and research has come under increasing attention. The objective of this study was to synthesize evidence on medical students' perspectives on the engagement in research. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis. Relevant studies were searched in electronic databases. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed. Overall, 14 observational studies (with 17 data sets) were included. In general, many studies did not use the same questionnaires and the outcome measurements were not consistently reported; these presented some difficulties in pooling the results. Whenever data permitted, we performed pooled analysis for the 4 education outcomes. A Bayesian meta-analytical approach was supplemented as a measure of uncertainty. A pooled analysis showed that 74% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.57%-11.07%; I2: 95.2%) of those students who engaged in research (while at the medical school) had positive attitudes toward their research experiences, whereas 49.5% (95% CI: 36.4%-62.7%; I2: 93.4%) had positive attitudes toward the study of medical sciences, 62.3% (95% CI: 46.7%-77.9%; I2: 96.3%) had self-reported changes in their practices, and 64% (95% CI: 30.8%-96.6%; I2: 98.5%) could have published their work. There was substantial heterogeneity among studies. We acknowledged the caveats and the merit of the current review. Findings showed that engagement in research resulted in favorable reactions toward research and academic learning. Future well-designed studies using standardized research tools on how to engage students in research are recommended. PMID:26181541

  17. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Medical Students’ Perspectives on the Engagement in Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Cho; Wai, Victor Nyunt; Durham, Jo; Whittaker, Maxine A.; Win, Ni Ni; Aung, Kyan; Mak, Joon Wah

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Engaging students in active learning lies at the center of effective higher education. In medical schools, students’ engagement in learning and research has come under increasing attention. The objective of this study was to synthesize evidence on medical students’ perspectives on the engagement in research. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis. Relevant studies were searched in electronic databases. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed. Overall, 14 observational studies (with 17 data sets) were included. In general, many studies did not use the same questionnaires and the outcome measurements were not consistently reported; these presented some difficulties in pooling the results. Whenever data permitted, we performed pooled analysis for the 4 education outcomes. A Bayesian meta-analytical approach was supplemented as a measure of uncertainty. A pooled analysis showed that 74% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.57%–11.07%; I2: 95.2%) of those students who engaged in research (while at the medical school) had positive attitudes toward their research experiences, whereas 49.5% (95% CI: 36.4%–62.7%; I2: 93.4%) had positive attitudes toward the study of medical sciences, 62.3% (95% CI: 46.7%–77.9%; I2: 96.3%) had self-reported changes in their practices, and 64% (95% CI: 30.8%–96.6%; I2: 98.5%) could have published their work. There was substantial heterogeneity among studies. We acknowledged the caveats and the merit of the current review. Findings showed that engagement in research resulted in favorable reactions toward research and academic learning. Future well-designed studies using standardized research tools on how to engage students in research are recommended. PMID:26181541

  18. WORK EXPERIENCE OF THE OPERA TIVE INFORMATION SUPPORT SERVICE FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH A T THE MEDICAL RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH CENTER NAMED AFTER A.F . TSYB – BRANCH OF THE FEDERAL STATE BUDGET INSTITUTION "NATIONAL MEDICAL RESEARCH RADIOLOGICAL CENTER” OF T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Savina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The Operative Information Support Service for Scientific Research of the Medical Radiological Research Center named after A. F. Tsyb — Branch of the FSBI «National Medical Research Radiological Center” of the RF Health Ministry presented a report on providing off-budget support for scientific activities over the period from 1993 to 2014 using domestic and foreign information resources. The dynamics of employee activities in institutional sectors with aim to receive financial support for fundamental and applied scientific research on a competitive and non-competitive basis was given. The analysis of the obtained data indicated that a multi-channeling in off-budget funding was formed. It also showed to some extent a situation at the open market of grants in the field of medical radiology, radiobiology, and radiation epidemiology among leading investors in intellectual products.

  19. Good Publication Practice for Communicating Company-Sponsored Medical Research: GPP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, Wendy P; Wager, Elizabeth; Baltzer, Lise; Bridges, Dan; Cairns, Angela; Carswell, Christopher I; Citrome, Leslie; Gurr, James A; Mooney, LaVerne A; Moore, B Jane; Peña, Teresa; Sanes-Miller, Carol H; Veitch, Keith; Woolley, Karen L; Yarker, Yvonne E

    2015-09-15

    This updated Good Publication Practice (GPP) guideline, known as GPP3, builds on earlier versions and provides recommendations for individuals and organizations that contribute to the publication of research results sponsored or supported by pharmaceutical, medical device, diagnostics, and biotechnology companies. The recommendations are designed to help individuals and organizations maintain ethical and transparent publication practices and comply with legal and regulatory requirements. These recommendations cover publications in peer-reviewed journals and presentations (oral or poster) at scientific congresses. The International Society for Medical Publication Professionals invited more than 3000 professionals worldwide to apply for a position on the steering committee, or as a reviewer, for this guideline. The GPP2 authors reviewed all applications (n = 241) and assembled an 18-member steering committee that represented 7 countries and a diversity of publication professions and institutions. From the 174 selected reviewers, 94 sent comments on the second draft, which steering committee members incorporated after discussion and consensus. The resulting guideline includes new sections (Principles of Good Publication Practice for Company-Sponsored Medical Research, Data Sharing, Studies That Should Be Published, and Plagiarism), expands guidance on the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors' authorship criteria and common authorship issues, improves clarity on appropriate author payment and reimbursement, and expands information on the role of medical writers. By following good publication practices (including GPP3), individuals and organizations will show integrity; accountability; and responsibility for accurate, complete, and transparent reporting in their publications and presentations. PMID:26259067

  20. A Fast, Versatile Nanoprobe for Complex Materials: The Sub-micron Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy Beamline at NSLS-II (491st Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, Juergen [BNL Photon Sciences Directorate

    2014-02-06

    Time is money and for scientists who need to collect data at research facilities like Brookhaven Lab’s National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), “beamtime” can be a precious commodity. While scanning a complex material with a specific technique and standard equipment today would take days to complete, researchers preparing to use brighter x-rays and the new sub-micron-resolution x-ray spectroscopy (SRX) beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) could scan the same sample in greater detail with just a few hours of beamtime. Talk about savings and new opportunities for researchers! Users will rely on these tools for locating trace elements in contaminated soils, developing processes for nanoparticles to deliver medical treatments, and much more. Dr. Thieme explains benefits for next-generation research with spectroscopy and more intense x-rays at NSLS-II. He discusses the instrumentation, features, and uses for the new SRX beamline, highlighting its speed, adjustability, and versatility for probing samples ranging in size from millimeters down to the nanoscale. He will talk about complementary beamlines being developed for additional capabilities at NSLS-II as well.

  1. /sup 123/I research and production at Brookhaven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.; Mirzadeh, S.; Meinken, G.E.; Prach, T.

    1985-01-01

    The procedures for preparing high purity /sup 123/I at the BLIP using the /sup 127/I(p,5n)/sup 123/Xe reaction on an NaI target are described. The activity is supplied in a glass ampoule with anhydrous /sup 123/I deposited on the interior walls, allowing maximum flexibility in subsequent iodinations. Preliminary experience with a continuous flow target is also described. The results of a series of measurements of specific activity by neutron activation, x-ray fluorescence, uv absorption, and wet chemistry generally showed no detectable carrier. HPLC methods to analyse the chemical form of radioiodine and to characterize various iodinated radiopharmaceuticals have been developed. These methods provide higher sensitivity, speed and resolution than commonly used techniques. 19 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Brookhaven highlights, July 1976-September 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the most significant research accomplishments during this 27-month period are presented. Although some data are given, this report is primarily descriptive in outlook; detailed information on completed work should be sought from the references cited herein or from the usual sources of physics research information. The report is organized as follows: High-energy Physics (general introduction, physics research, accelerators, ISABELLE); Nuclear and Solid State Physics, and Chemistry; Life Sciences (biology, medicine); Applied Energy Science (energy and the environment, reactor systems and safety, National Nuclear Data Center, nuclear materials safeguards); Support Activities (applied mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, safety and environmental protection); and General and Administrative. 117 figures, 16 tables, 315 references

  3. Analysis of 10-Year Training Results of Medical Students Using the Microvascular Research Center Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Satoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Narushi; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Matsumoto, Kumiko; Ota, Tomoyuki; Thuzar, Moe

    2016-06-01

    Background In this article, we reviewed the training results of medical students using the Microvascular Research Center Training Program (MRCP), and proposed an ideal microsurgical training program for all individuals by analyzing the training results of medical students who did not have any surgical experience. Methods As of 2015, a total of 29 medical students completed the MRCP. In the most recent 12 medical students, the number of trials performed for each training stage and the number of rats needed to complete the training were recorded. Additionally, we measured the operating time upon finishing stage 5 for the recent six medical students after it became a current program. Results The average operating time upon finishing stage 5 for the recent six medical students was 120 minutes ± 11 minutes (standard deviation [SD]). The average vascular anastomosis time (for the artery and vein) was 52 minutes ± 2 minutes (SD). For the most recent 12 medical students, there was a negative correlation between the number of trials performed in the non-rat stages (stages 1-3) and the number of rats used in the rat stages (stages 4-5). Conclusion Analysis of the training results of medical students suggests that performing microsurgery first on silicon tubes and chicken wings saves animals' lives later during the training program. We believe that any person can learn the technique of microsurgery by performing 7 to 8 hours of training per day over a period of 15 days within this program setting. PMID:26636888

  4. E-book for Knowledge Management in Scientific Research Conducted in the Medical Sciences Graduate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oramis Sosa Palacios

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The training of students enrolled in the Medical Sciences graduate program (residents includes research activities such as research projects, the final paper of the specialty, scientific events and scientific publications. Knowledge gaps in residents lead to problems seen in both the poor quality of the research project and the final paper of the specialty and in the lack of autonomy to make decisions, affecting their overall training. An electronic book aimed at residents was created for knowledge management in scientific research. The first version was designed using the Crheasoft 2.0 program. It consists of: presentation, start modules, list of topics and complementary information. It comprises condensed knowledge on: research management, research methodology, statistics, information management, computer science, linguistics and language. This e-book contributes to the execution of research activities and promotes learning independence.

  5. Research and development of semiconductor-based instrumentation with application to medical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Over the last ten years the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics at the University of Wollongong has established a research programme in the area of medical physics that is centred on new and novel silicon semiconductor detectors. Arising from this research is the development of innovative instrumentation with application to radiation medicine. This paper will describe the motivation and background research of several instruments, that are at different stages of development and commercialisation, including the Semiconductor Microdosimeter, Radiation Damage Monitoring System, MOSFET dosimetry System, Urethra Probe Mini-Spectroscopy System and Anti-Compton Probe These instruments have found application in a wide variety of radiation medicine related areas includng Proton Therapy, Fast Neutron Therapy, Microbeam Radiation Therapy, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, Permanent Seed Implant Prostate Brachytherapy and Radionuclide Image Guided Surgery. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  6. Understanding the value of mixed methods research: the Children's Safety Initiative-Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Matthew; O'Brien, Kerth; Meckler, Garth; Chang, Anna Marie; Guise, Jeanne-Marie

    2016-07-01

    Mixed methods research has significant potential to broaden the scope of emergency care and specifically emergency medical services investigation. Mixed methods studies involve the coordinated use of qualitative and quantitative research approaches to gain a fuller understanding of practice. By combining what is learnt from multiple methods, these approaches can help to characterise complex healthcare systems, identify the mechanisms of complex problems such as medical errors and understand aspects of human interaction such as communication, behaviour and team performance. Mixed methods approaches may be particularly useful for out-of-hospital care researchers because care is provided in complex systems where equipment, interpersonal interactions, societal norms, environment and other factors influence patient outcomes. The overall objectives of this paper are to (1) introduce the fundamental concepts and approaches of mixed methods research and (2) describe the interrelation and complementary features of the quantitative and qualitative components of mixed methods studies using specific examples from the Children's Safety Initiative-Emergency Medical Services (CSI-EMS), a large National Institutes of Health-funded research project conducted in the USA. PMID:26949970

  7. Brookhaven highlights, July 1976-September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    Some of the most significant research accomplishments during this 27-month period are presented. Although some data are given, this report is primarily descriptive in outlook; detailed information on completed work should be sought from the references cited herein or from the usual sources of physics research information. The report is organized as follows: High-energy Physics (general introduction, physics research, accelerators, ISABELLE); Nuclear and Solid State Physics, and Chemistry; Life Sciences (biology, medicine); Applied Energy Science (energy and the environment, reactor systems and safety, National Nuclear Data Center, nuclear materials safeguards); Support Activities (applied mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, safety and environmental protection); and General and Administrative. 117 figures, 16 tables, 315 references. (RWR)

  8. Students' perceptions of peer-organized extra-curricular research course during medical school: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazha, Bassel; Salloum, Rony H; Fahed, Akl C; Nabulsi, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Early integration of research education into medical curricula is crucial for evidence-based practice. Yet, many medical students are graduating with no research experience due to the lack of such integration in their medical school programs. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of a peer-organized, extra-curricular research methodology course on the attitudes of medical students towards research and future academic careers. Twenty one medical students who participated in a peer-organized research course were enrolled in three focus group discussions to explore their experiences, perceptions and attitudes towards research after the course. Discussions were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide, and were transcribed and thematically analyzed for major and minor themes identification. Our findings indicate that students' perceptions of research changed after the course from being difficult initially to becoming possible. Participants felt that their research skills and critical thinking were enhanced and that they would develop research proposals and abstracts successfully. Students praised the peer-assisted teaching approach as being successful in enhancing the learning environment and filling the curricular gap. In conclusion, peer-organized extra-curricular research courses may be a useful option to promote research interest and skills of medical students when gaps in research education in medical curricula exist. PMID:25764441

  9. Doing More with Less: Cost-effective, Compact Particle Accelerators (489th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trbojevic, Dejan [BNL Collider-Accelerator Department

    2013-10-22

    Replace a 135-ton magnet used for cancer-fighting particle therapies with a magnet that weighs only two tons? Such a swap is becoming possible thanks to new particle accelerator advances being developed by researchers at Brookhaven Lab. With an approach that combines techniques used by synchrotron accelerators with the ability to accept more energy, these new technologies could be used for more than fighting cancer. They could also decrease the lifecycle of byproducts from nuclear power plants and reduce costs for eRHIC—a proposed electron-ion collider for Brookhaven Lab that researchers from around the world would use to explore the glue that holds together the universe’s most basic building blocks and explore the proton-spin puzzle. During this lecture, Dr. Trbojevic provides an overview of accelerator technologies and techniques—particularly a non-scaling, fixed-focused alternating gradient—to focus particle beams using fewer, smaller magnets. He discusses how these technologies will benefit eRHIC and other applications, including particle therapies being developed to combat cancer.

  10. Is Overeating Behavior Similar to Drug Addiction? (427th Brookhaven Lecture)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing number of obese individuals in the U.S. and other countries world-wide adds urgency to the need to understand the mechanisms underlying pathological overeating. Research by the speaker and others at Brookhaven National Laboratory and elsewhere is compiling evidence that the brain circuits disrupted in obesity are similar to those involved in drug addiction. Using positron emission tomography (PET), the speaker and his colleagues have implicated brain dopamine in the normal and the pathological intake of food by humans. During the 427th Brookhaven Lecture, speaker will review the findings and implications of PET studies of obese subjects and then compare them to PET research involving drug-addicted individuals. For example, in pathologically obese subjects, it was found that reductions in striatal dopamine D2 receptors are similar to those observed in drug-addicted subjects. The speaker and his colleagues have postulated that decreased levels of dopamine receptors predisposed subjects to search for strongly rewarding reinforcers, be it drugs for the drug-addicted or food for the obese, as a means to compensate for decreased sensitivity of their dopamine-regulated reward circuits. As the speaker will summarize, multiple but similar brain circuits involved in reward, motivation, learning and inhibitory control are disrupted both in drug addiction and obesity, resulting in the need for a multimodal approach to the treatment of obesity.

  11. Is Overeating Behavior Similar to Drug Addiction? (427th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gene-Jack

    2007-09-27

    The increasing number of obese individuals in the U.S. and other countries world-wide adds urgency to the need to understand the mechanisms underlying pathological overeating. Research by the speaker and others at Brookhaven National Laboratory and elsewhere is compiling evidence that the brain circuits disrupted in obesity are similar to those involved in drug addiction. Using positron emission tomography (PET), the speaker and his colleagues have implicated brain dopamine in the normal and the pathological intake of food by humans. During the 427th Brookhaven Lecture, speaker will review the findings and implications of PET studies of obese subjects and then compare them to PET research involving drug-addicted individuals. For example, in pathologically obese subjects, it was found that reductions in striatal dopamine D2 receptors are similar to those observed in drug-addicted subjects. The speaker and his colleagues have postulated that decreased levels of dopamine receptors predisposed subjects to search for strongly rewarding reinforcers, be it drugs for the drug-addicted or food for the obese, as a means to compensate for decreased sensitivity of their dopamine-regulated reward circuits. As the speaker will summarize, multiple but similar brain circuits involved in reward, motivation, learning and inhibitory control are disrupted both in drug addiction and obesity, resulting in the need for a multimodal approach to the treatment of obesity.

  12. The four-dimensional mouse whole-body phantoms and its application in medical imaging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical imaging simulation is a powerful tool for characterizing,evaluating,and optimizing medical imaging devices and techniques. A vital aspect of simulation is to have a realistic phantom or model of the subject's anatomy. Four-dimensional mouse whole-body phantoms provide realistic models of the mouse anatomy and physiology for imaging studies. When combined with accurate models for the imaging process,are capable of providing a wealth of realistic imaging data from subjects with various anatomies and motions (cardiac and respiratory) in health and disease. With this ability, the four-dimensional mouse whole-body phantoms have enormous potential to study the effects of anatomical, physiological and physical factors on medical and small animal imaging and to research new instrumentation, image acquisition strategies, image processing, reconstruction methods, image visualization and interpretation techniques. (authors)

  13. The Nordic medical birth registers--a potential goldmine for clinical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Krebs, Lone; Klungsøyr, Kari;

    2014-01-01

    The Nordic medical birth registers have long been used for valuable clinical research. Their collection of data for more than four decades offers unusual possibilities for research across generations. At the same time, serum and blotting paper blood samples have been stored from most neonates. Two...... preceding, underlying and present health problems of the parents and their offspring. Researchers may, with permission from the national authorities, obtain access to individualized or anonymized data from the registers and tissue-banks. These data allow for multivariate analyses but their usefulness...

  14. The use of intelligent modules in Brookhaven FASTBUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many considerations go into the design of modules for data acquisition. I address some of the more general aspects of this rather than the specifics of a particular design. The experience gained from using Brookhaven Fastbus in two finished experiments and one eminent one is used as a guide for these remarks. The physical size of modules used by Brookhaven Fastbus is such that the number of channels that can be handled is generally limited by front panel space, or front end layout logistics rather than area. One of the effects of large scale integrated circuits is that the cost of computational elements is relatively small. This, plus the space consideration, allows the assignment of low level data processing to the acquisition modules. Since these elements operate in parallel there is an obvious speed advantage

  15. Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility photocathode gun and transport beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an analysis of the electron beam emitted from a laser driven photocathode injector (Gun, operating at 2856 MHZ), through a Transport beamline, to the LINAC entrance for the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The beam parameters including beam energy, and emittance are calculated. Some of our results, are tabulated and the phase plots of the beam parameters, from Cathode, through the Transport line elements, to the LINAC entrance, are shown

  16. Brookhaven National Laboratory's multiparticle spectrometer drift chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system of drift chambers is being built to replace the present spark chambers in the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Multiparticle Spectrometer. This system will handle a beam of approx. 3 million particles per second and have a resolution of 200 μm. A summary of the status of the chambers and the custom integrated circuits is presented. The data acquisition system is described. Prototype chambers have been built and tested with results that are consistent with the expected chamber properties

  17. Safety in home care: A research protocol for studying medication management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Easty Anthony

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient safety is an ongoing global priority, with medication safety considered a prevalent, high-risk area of concern. Yet, we have little understanding of the supports and barriers to safe medication management in the Canadian home care environment. There is a clear need to engage the providers and recipients of care in studying and improving medication safety with collaborative approaches to exploring the nature and safety of medication management in home care. Methods A socio-ecological perspective on health and health systems drives our iterative qualitative study on medication safety with elderly home care clients, family members and other informal caregivers, and home care providers. As we purposively sample across four Canadian provinces: Alberta (AB, Ontario (ON, Quebec (QC and Nova Scotia (NS, we will collect textual and visual data through home-based interviews, participant-led photo walkabouts of the home, and photo elicitation sessions at clients' kitchen tables. Using successive rounds of interpretive description and human factors engineering analyses, we will generate robust descriptions of managing medication at home within each provincial sample and across the four-province group. We will validate our initial interpretations through photo elicitation focus groups with home care providers in each province to develop a refined description of the phenomenon that can inform future decision-making, quality improvement efforts, and research. Discussion The application of interpretive and human factors lenses to the visual and textual data is expected to yield findings that advance our understanding of the issues, challenges, and risk-mitigating strategies related to medication safety in home care. The images are powerful knowledge translation tools for sharing what we learn with participants, decision makers, other healthcare audiences, and the public. In addition, participants engage in knowledge exchange

  18. Health research barriers in the faculties of two medical institutions in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamdari A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A Alamdari,1 S Venkatesh,2 A Roozbehi,3 AT Kannan41Research Center of Factors Affecting Health, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Yasouj University of Medical Sciences, Yasouj, Iran; 2National AIDS Control Organization, Janpath Road, Chandralok Building, New Delhi, India; 3Education Development Office, Yasouj University of Medical Sciences, Yasouj, Iran; 4Department of Community Medicine, University College of Medical Sciences and Guru Tegh Bahadur Hospital, Delhi, IndiaBackground: Health policy formation refers to the design of a conceptual framework to find possibilities, facilitate feasibilities, and identify strong and weak points, as well as insufficiencies, by research. Doing research should clarify qualities and standards for policy and decision-making to enable the success of development of health care in a country. Evaluation of the impact of health interventions is particularly poorly represented in public health research. This study attempted to identify barriers and facilitators of health research among faculty members in two major institutions in India, ie, the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS and the University College of Medical Sciences (UCMS and Guru Tegh Bahadur (GTB Hospital in Delhi.Methods: The participants were asked to fill in a questionnaire that canvassed individual characteristics, ie, years of experience, place of work, academic rank, final educational qualification, work setting, educational group, primary activity, and number of publications in the previous 5 years. Barriers and facilitators were categorized into personal, resources, access, and administration groups. The data were processed using SPSS version 16, independent t-tests, Chi-square tests, and multivariate logistic regression.Results: The total number of faculty members at both institutions was 599, 456 (76% of whom participated in this study. The primary activities reported by faculty at UCMS (teaching and Faculty at AIIMS reported

  19. The use of radioisotopes in medicine and medical research, Australia 1947-73

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korszniak, N

    1994-12-01

    On March 31, 1994, an article appeared in the Melbourne Age claiming that after the Second World War `hundreds of people were injected with radioactive materials in medical experiments that continued in Australian hospitals until the 1960s. Similar reports subsequently appeared in other newspapers and on the television and radio news. The archival records held at the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) pertaining to the medical uses of radioisotopes during the period 1947-1973 have been examined to ascertain the nature of radioisotope use, and in the case of experimental procedures, any ethical considerations. The material examined indicates that the distribution and medical use of radioactive isotopes was stringently controlled by the Radio-isotope Standing Committee (established by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) in 1947 to oversee this area) until its disbandment in 1973, when the responsibility for regulation of the use of radioactive isotopes for medical purposes in Australia passed to the Therapeutic Goods Administration. A database, showing details of over 500 radioisotope use in Australia between 1947-1973 is given in Appendix III . (author) refs., tabs.

  20. The use of radioisotopes in medicine and medical research, Australia 1947-73

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On March 31, 1994, an article appeared in the Melbourne Age claiming that after the Second World War 'hundreds of people were injected with radioactive materials in medical experiments that continued in Australian hospitals until the 1960s. Similar reports subsequently appeared in other newspapers and on the television and radio news. The archival records held at the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) pertaining to the medical uses of radioisotopes during the period 1947-1973 have been examined to ascertain the nature of radioisotope use, and in the case of experimental procedures, any ethical considerations. The material examined indicates that the distribution and medical use of radioactive isotopes was stringently controlled by the Radio-isotope Standing Committee (established by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) in 1947 to oversee this area) until its disbandment in 1973, when the responsibility for regulation of the use of radioactive isotopes for medical purposes in Australia passed to the Therapeutic Goods Administration. A database, showing details of over 500 radioisotope use in Australia between 1947-1973 is given in Appendix III . (author)

  1. Overview of medical and research activities in the Cuban Chernobyl Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cuban Program for the medical attention of children from areas affected by the Chernobyl accident was created in 1990. The main objective of the program is to offer highly specialised medical attention and to develop, in an appropriate atmosphere, a rehabilitation plan, with integral health actions. Up to the moment, more than 23 067 children and adults had been assisted in the program, with a significant set of medical procedures done. The more significant medical attention activities include the treatment of 289 children with haematological disorders, including 6 bone marrow transplantation, more than 100 surgeries, and the treatment of 117 children with solid tumours. The program is not design to carry out epidemiological studies or to establish any correlation between the accident and the health status of the children. Nevertheless, dosimetric, biomedical and psychological research had been carried out as part of the program. The dosimetric results on more than 7000 children are including in a database with information on internal 137Cs contamination, internal, external and total doses, children living location, and its contamination by 137Cs, and other significant information for radiological impact evaluation. The behaviour of all the medical information of the program in relation to the contamination of the land and the internal contamination of the children was analysed using this database. Chromosomal aberrations and DNA damage have been also evaluated. The program has accumulated an experience of interest for physicians, psychologists and in general persons interested in Chernobyl consequences. (author)

  2. What makes a top research medical school? A call for a new model to evaluate academic physicians and medical school performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Matthew J; Lunn, Mitchell R; Peng, Lily

    2015-05-01

    Since the publication of the Flexner Report in 1910, the medical education enterprise has undergone many changes to ensure that medical schools meet a minimum standard for the curricula and clinical training they offer students. Although the efforts of the licensing and accrediting bodies have raised the quality of medical education, the educational processes that produce the physicians who provide the best patient care and conduct the best biomedical research have not been identified. Comparative analyses are powerful tools to understand the differences between institutions, but they are challenging to carry out. As a result, the analysis performed by U.S. News & World Report (USN&WR) has become the default tool to compare U.S. medical schools. Medical educators must explore more rigorous and equitable approaches to analyze and understand the performance of medical schools. In particular, a better understanding and more thorough evaluation of the most successful institutions in producing academic physicians with biomedical research careers are needed. In this Perspective, the authors present a new model to evaluate medical schools' production of academic physicians who advance medicine through basic, clinical, translational, and implementation science research. This model is based on relevant and accessible objective criteria that should replace the subjective criteria used in the current USN&WR rankings system. By fostering a national discussion about the most meaningful criteria that should be measured and reported, the authors hope to increase transparency of assessment standards and ultimately improve educational quality. PMID:25607941

  3. Integrating the results of user research into medical device development: insights from a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Jennifer L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that considering users is an important aspect of medical device development. However it is also well established that there are numerous barriers to successfully conducting user research and integrating the results into product development. It is not sufficient to simply conduct user research, it must also be effectively integrated into product development. Methods A case study of the development of a new medical imaging device was conducted to examine in detail how users were involved in a medical device development project. Two user research studies were conducted: a requirements elicitation interview study and an early prototype evaluation using contextual inquiry. A descriptive in situ approach was taken to investigate how these studies contributed to the product development process and how the results of this work influenced the development of the technology. Data was collected qualitatively through interviews with the development team, participant observation at development meetings and document analysis. The focus was on investigating the barriers that exist to prevent user data from being integrated into product development. Results A number of individual, organisational and system barriers were identified that functioned to prevent the results of the user research being fully integrated into development. The user and technological aspects of development were seen as separate work streams during development. The expectations of the developers were that user research would collect requirements for the appearance of the device, rather than challenge its fundamental concept. The manner that the user data was communicated to the development team was not effective in conveying the significance or breadth of the findings. Conclusion There are a range of informal and formal organisational processes that can affect the uptake of user data during medical device development. Adopting formal decision

  4. Proposal for a European Public Health Research Infrastructure for Sharing of health and Medical administrative data (PHRIMA).

    OpenAIRE

    Oksen, Dina V; Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Ganslandt, Thomas; Buchan, Iain; van Staa, Tjeerd; Cunningham, James; Gjerstorff, Marianne L; Dufour, Jean-Charles; Gibrat, Jean-Francois; Nikolski, Macha; VERGER, Pierre; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Masella, Cristina; Lettieri, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    In Europe, health and medical administrative data is increasingly accumulating on a national level. Looking further than re-use of this data on a national level, sharing health and medical administrative data would enable large-scale analyses and European-level public health projects. There is currently no research infrastructure for this type of sharing. The PHRIMA consortium proposes to realise the Public Health Research Infrastructure for Sharing of health and Medical Administrative data (...

  5. An analysis of radiological research publications in high impact general medical journals between 1996 and 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, You Jin [Department of Radiology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 445 Gil-dong Kangdong-Gu, Seoul 134-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Dae Young, E-mail: evee0914@chollian.net [Department of Radiology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 445 Gil-dong Kangdong-Gu, Seoul 134-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Eun Joo [Department of Radiology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 445 Gil-dong Kangdong-Gu, Seoul 134-701 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Sora [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 445 Gil-dong Kangdong-Gu, Seoul 134-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Kyoung Ja; Seo, Young Lan; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon [Department of Radiology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 445 Gil-dong Kangdong-Gu, Seoul 134-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► Radiologists published only 0.2% of articles in five general medical journals. ► Most original articles from radiologists were funded and were prospective studies. ► Radiology researchers from only 11 countries published at least one original article. -- Abstract: Objective: To evaluate scientific papers published by radiologists in high impact general medical journals between 1996 and 2010. Methods: A MEDLINE search was performed in five high impact general medical journals (AIM, BMJ, JAMA, Lancet, and NEJM) for all articles of which a radiologist was the first author between 1996 and 2010. The following information was abstracted from the original articles: radiological subspecialty, imaging technique used, type of research, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study outcome, declared funding, number of authors, collaboration, and country of the first author. Results: Of 216 (0.19%) articles were published by radiologists in five general medical journals between 1996 and 2010, 83 were original articles. Fifteen (18.1%) original articles were concerned with the field of vascular/interventional radiology, 24 (28.9%) used combined imaging techniques, 76 (91.6%) were clinical research, 63 (75.9%) had a sample size of >50, 65 (78.3%) were prospective, 78 (94.0%) performed statistical analysis, 83 (100%) showed positive study outcomes, 57 (68.7%) were funded, 49 (59.0%) had from four to seven authors, and 79 (95.2%) were collaborative studies. Conclusions: A very small number (0.19%) in five high impact general medical journals was published by radiologists between 1996 and 2010.

  6. An analysis of radiological research publications in high impact general medical journals between 1996 and 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Radiologists published only 0.2% of articles in five general medical journals. ► Most original articles from radiologists were funded and were prospective studies. ► Radiology researchers from only 11 countries published at least one original article. -- Abstract: Objective: To evaluate scientific papers published by radiologists in high impact general medical journals between 1996 and 2010. Methods: A MEDLINE search was performed in five high impact general medical journals (AIM, BMJ, JAMA, Lancet, and NEJM) for all articles of which a radiologist was the first author between 1996 and 2010. The following information was abstracted from the original articles: radiological subspecialty, imaging technique used, type of research, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study outcome, declared funding, number of authors, collaboration, and country of the first author. Results: Of 216 (0.19%) articles were published by radiologists in five general medical journals between 1996 and 2010, 83 were original articles. Fifteen (18.1%) original articles were concerned with the field of vascular/interventional radiology, 24 (28.9%) used combined imaging techniques, 76 (91.6%) were clinical research, 63 (75.9%) had a sample size of >50, 65 (78.3%) were prospective, 78 (94.0%) performed statistical analysis, 83 (100%) showed positive study outcomes, 57 (68.7%) were funded, 49 (59.0%) had from four to seven authors, and 79 (95.2%) were collaborative studies. Conclusions: A very small number (0.19%) in five high impact general medical journals was published by radiologists between 1996 and 2010

  7. Natural Resource Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    green, T.

    2011-08-15

    This comprehensive Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was built on the successful foundation of the Wildlife Management Plan for BNL, which it replaces. This update to the 2003 plan continues to build on successes and efforts to better understand the ecosystems and natural resources found on the BNL site. The plan establishes the basis for managing the varied natural resources located on the 5,265 acre BNL site, setting goals and actions to achieve those goals. The planning of this document is based on the knowledge and expertise gained over the past 10 years by the Natural Resources management staff at BNL in concert with local natural resource agencies including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Long Island Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission, The Nature Conservancy, and others. The development of this plan is an attempt at sound ecological management that not only benefits BNL's ecosystems but also benefits the greater Pine Barrens habitats in which BNL is situated. This plan applies equally to the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve). Any difference in management between the larger BNL area and the Upton Reserve are noted in the text. The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to sustainably integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, sustainability, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and the incorporation of community involvement, where applicable. The NRMP is periodically reviewed and updated, typically every five years. This review and update was delayed to develop documents associated with a new third party facility, the Long Island Solar Farm. This two hundred acre facility will result in

  8. Is It Science? A Study of the Attitudes of Medical Trainees and Physicians toward Qualitative and Quantitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguen, Jeannette; Knight, Melanie; Tiberius, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the degree of acceptance of qualitative research by medical trainees and physicians, and explored the causes for any differences in their support of qualitative versus quantitative research. Thirty-two individuals at four levels of medical training were studied. Eight philosophers of science served for construct validation.…

  9. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1994.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NAIDU,J.R.; ROYCE,B.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory's operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory. Brookhaven National Laboratory's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment were evaluated. Among the permitted facilities, two instances of pH exceedances were observed at recharge basins, possibly related to rain-water run-off to these recharge basins. Also, the discharge from the Sewage Treatment Plant to the Peconic River exceeded. on ten occasions, one each for fecal coliform and 5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand (avg.) and eight for ammonia nitrogen. The ammonia and Biochemical Oxygen Demand exceedances were attributed to the cold winter and the routine cultivation of the sand filter beds which resulted in the hydraulic overloading of the filter beds and the possible destruction of nitrifying bacteria. The on-set of warm weather and increased aeration of the filter beds via cultivation helped to alleviate this condition. The discharge of fecal coliform may also be linked to this occurrence, in that the increase in fecal coliform coincided with the increased cultivation of the sand filter beds. The environmental monitoring data has identified site-specific contamination of groundwater and soil. These areas are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement. Except for the above, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with

  10. Implementation of a versatile research data acquisition system using a commercially available medical ultrasound scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Pedersen, Mads Møller;

    2012-01-01

    to give researchers and clinicians the ability to utilize third-party software for data analysis and flexible manipulation of control parameters. Because of the advantages of speed of acquisition and clinical benefit, research projects have successfully used the system to test and implement......This paper describes the design and implementation of a versatile, open-architecture research data acquisition system using a commercially available medical ultrasound scanner. The open architecture will allow researchers and clinicians to rapidly develop applications and move them relatively easy...... to the clinic. The system consists of a standard PC equipped with a camera link and an ultrasound scanner equipped with a research interface. The ultrasound scanner is an easy-to-use imaging device that is capable of generating high-quality images. In addition to supporting the acquisition of multiple data...

  11. Recruiting for health, medical or psychosocial research using Facebook: Systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Thornton

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recruiting participants is a challenge for many health, medical and psychosocial research projects. One tool more frequently being used to improve recruitment is the social networking website Facebook. A systematic review was conducted to identify studies that have used Facebook to recruit participants of all ages, to any psychosocial, health or medical research. 110 unique studies that used Facebook as a recruitment source were included in the review. The majority of studies used a cross-sectional design (80% and addressed a physical health or disease issue (57%. Half (49% of the included studies reported specific details of the Facebook recruitment process. Researchers paid between $1.36 and $110 per completing participants (Mean = $17.48, SD = $23.06. Among studies that examined the representativeness of their sample, the majority concluded (86% their Facebook-recruited samples were similarly representative of samples recruited via traditional methods. These results indicate that Facebook is an effective and cost-efficient recruitment method. Researchers should consider their target group, advertisement wording, offering incentives and no-cost methods of recruitment when considering Facebook as a recruitment source. It is hoped this review will assist researchers to make decisions regarding the use of Facebook as a recruitment tool in future research.

  12. Innovation of medical products: the evolution of regulatory science, research and education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Per; Bach, Karin Friis; Schmiegelow, Merete; Bedlington, Nicola; Eichler, Hans-Georg

    We present a commentary on the international aspects of the evolution of regulatory science as a multidisciplinary, multistakeholder academic discipline of education and applied research emphasizing the need for seamless interaction between stakeholders such as regulatory authorities, the...... pharmaceutical industry, universities, payers, and patient organizations. Regulatory science is the science of developing new tools, standards, and approaches to evaluate the efficacy, safety, quality, and performance of medical products in order to assess benefit/risk and facilitate a sound and transparent...

  13. Medication Assisted Treatment Research with Criminal Justice Populations: Challenges of Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Michael S.; KINLOCK, TIMOTHY W.; Miller, Patrice M.

    2011-01-01

    Creating, implementing and evaluating substance abuse interventions, especially medication-assisted treatments, for prisoners, parolees, and probationers with histories of heroin addiction is an especially challenging endeavor because of the difficulty in coordinating and achieving cooperation among diverse criminal justice, substance abuse treatment, research, and social service agencies, each with its own priorities and agenda. In addition, there are special rules that must be followed when...

  14. Research design and statistical methods in Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences (PJMS)

    OpenAIRE

    AKHTAR, Sohail; Shah, Syed Wadood Ali; Rafiq, M.; Khan, Ajmal

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This article compares the study design and statistical methods used in 2005, 2010 and 2015 of Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences (PJMS). Methods: Only original articles of PJMS were considered for the analysis. The articles were carefully reviewed for statistical methods and designs, and then recorded accordingly. The frequency of each statistical method and research design was estimated and compared with previous years. Results: A total of 429 articles were evaluated (n=74 in 20...

  15. Computer-based diagnostic and prognostic approaches in medical research using brain MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Weygandt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Die vorliegende Habilitationsschrift zu „Computer-based diagnostic and prognostic approaches in medical research using brain MRI“ ist in zwei Abschnitte gegliedert. Konkret wird im ersten Abschnitt eine Übersicht über verschiedene Aspekte des Computer- und MRT-basierten Vorhersageansatzes gegeben. Im zweiten Abschnitt werden die Artikel aus diesem Feld beschrieben, die ich für die Habilitation eingereicht habe. Konkret beginnt der erste Abschnitt der Habilitationsschrift damit, das grundlege...

  16. Construction and operation of a 10 MeV electron accelerator and associated experimental facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this environmental impact statement is to determine whether there would be significant environmental impacts associated with the construction of an experimental facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory for radiation chemistry research and operation of the 10-MeV electron accelerator proposed for it. The document describes the need for action, alternative actions, the affected environment, and potential environmental impacts

  17. Medical students’ perceptions and attitudes about family practice: a qualitative research synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selva Olid Anna

    2012-08-01

    find family medicine appealing, it is regarded as a career of low interest and prestige. More research is needed on the influence of role models, medical school and post graduate training.

  18. Research on the Present Status of the Five-Year Medical Training Program in Chinese Medical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Dong, Zhe; Miao, Le; Ke, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The five-year program is the main path for undergraduate medical training in China. Studies have shown that during the past eleven years, the scale of medical student enrollment increased annually with a relatively simple entrance exam. The ideas, teaching contents and methods, assessment and evaluation should be updated and improved. In general,…

  19. Bureaucracy stifles medical research in Britain: a tale of three trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snooks Helen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent developments aiming to standardise and streamline processes of gaining the necessary approvals to carry out research in the National Health Service (NHS in the United Kingdom (UK, have resulted in lengthy and costly delays. The national UK governmental Department of Health’s Research Governance Framework (RGF for Health and Social Care requires that appropriate checks be conducted before research involving human participants, their organs, tissues or data can commence in the NHS. As a result, medical research has been subjected to increased regulation and governance, with the requirement for approvals from numerous regulatory and monitoring bodies. In addition, the processes and outcomes of the attribution of costs in NHS research have caused additional difficulties for researchers. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate, through three trial case studies, the difficulties encountered during the set-up and recruitment phases of these trials, related to gaining the necessary ethical and governance approvals and applying for NHS costs to undertake and deliver the research. Methods Empirical evidence about delays and difficulties related to regulation and governance of medical research was gathered during the period 2009–2010 from three UK randomised controlled trials with sites in England, Wales and Scotland (1. SAFER 2- an emergency care based trial of a protocol for paramedics to refer patients directly to community based falls services; 2. COnStRUCT- a trial of two drugs for acute ulcerative colitis; and 3. Family Links - a trial of a public health intervention, a 10 week community based parenting programme. Findings and recommendations were reported in response to a call for evidence from The Academy of Medical Sciences regarding difficulties encountered in conducting medical research arising from R&D governance and regulation, to inform national policy. Results Difficulties and delays in navigating and

  20. Blood as a research object at the Prague medical faculties. History mingled with politics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štrbáňová, Soňa

    Essen: Klartext, 2011 - (Pešek, J.; Wiesemann, F.), s. 205-217. (Veröffentlichungen zur Kultur und Geschichte im östlichen Europa. 38). ISBN 978-3-8375-0503-0. [Blut, ein besonderer Saft. Perspektiven aus Medizin, Geschichte und Gesellschaft. Praha (CZ), 01.10.2009-03.10.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00630801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80630520 Keywords : history of biochemistry * history of blood research * history of medical chemistry Subject RIV: AB - History

  1. Statistics corner: A guide to appropriate use of correlation coefficient in medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaka, M M

    2012-09-01

    Correlation is a statistical method used to assess a possible linear association between two continuous variables. It is simple both to calculate and to interpret. However, misuse of correlation is so common among researchers that some statisticians have wished that the method had never been devised at all. The aim of this article is to provide a guide to appropriate use of correlation in medical research and to highlight some misuse. Examples of the applications of the correlation coefficient have been provided using data from statistical simulations as well as real data. Rule of thumb for interpreting size of a correlation coefficient has been provided. PMID:23638278

  2. Health Benefits of Animal Research: Medical and Behavioral Benefits from Primate Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Frederick A.; Yarbrough, Cathy J.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a sampling of the contributions of primate research to human health and welfare through discussions of: atherosclerosis; aging; endocrine and seasonality influences on reproductive behavior; emotional expression; communication; infectious diseases (viruses, polio, acquired immune deficiency syndrome-AIDS; and others); cancer; the brain;…

  3. Social research in health and the American sociopolitical context: the changing fortunes of medical sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanic, D

    1993-01-01

    The fortunes of medical sociology, like other public policy-relevant disciplines, are shaped by political dynamics and prevailing values and attitudes. In the 1980s the field, which views disease and disability as consequences to a substantial degree of material conditions, social stratification, and inequalities among varying strata, lost ground to economics as societal attention focused on cost containment issues. Sociological concern with social structures clashed with dominant conservative and individualistic perspectives and the increased focus on personal responsibility and market strategies. There was decreasing tolerance in policy circles for the view that health, and the problems affecting disenfranchised groups such as the poor, the homeless, the uninsured and people with disabilities, were more due to our politics and social arrangements than the personal characteristics of those affected. Thus, little attention has been given in public health discourse to how life imperatives and social opportunities and constraints shape behavior. The paper documents the important role of the social sciences in health services research with special attention to examining the social context of the RAND Health Insurance Experiment. Although many of the questions medical sociology address sit on the periphery of policy-makers' concerns, a strong case is made for the revitalization of a critical scholarly role in medical sociology. I conclude, given the short and longterm problems we face in medicine and health, that we would have to invent a vigorous critical medical sociological enterprise if we did not already have one. PMID:8421794

  4. [Challenges in the context of medical care during a naval research expedition. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, C; Schwarz-Schampera, U; Mommsen, P; Krettek, C

    2014-05-01

    Exploration for natural resources in the seabed of the Indian Ocean was undertaken by the German government institution of earth sciences and resources ("Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe", BGR) in November 2012. To provide for the medical safety of crew and scientists, a cooperation between the BGR and the trauma department of the Hannover Medical School was established. Research by physicians accompanying the naval expedition revealed that medical consultations mainly occur because of respiratory infections, abdominal discomfort, genitourinary discomfort and seasickness, with the rate of traumas being between 31% and 41%. Di Giovanna et al. stated that 97% of all emergencies on cruise ships are not critical and only 3% need an immediate emergency medical intervention. Consultations were already performed on the mainland prior to departure and included minor traumas due to non-appropriate footwear, otitis and respiratory infections. Seasickness was the main reason for consultation during the first days at sea. Strong seas resulted in some bruises. Minor injuries and foreign body injuries to the hands and feet also required consultation. First-degree sunburns resulted from exposure to the sun, while air-conditioning caused rhinosinusitis and conjunctivitis. A special consultation was a buccal splitting of tooth 36. An immediate emergency medical intervention was not necessary due to the relative low level of pain for the patient; however, due to the risk of further damage caused by nocturnal bruxism, a protective splint was formed using a small syringe. Other reasons for consultation were similar to those reported in the general literature. Medical activities at exotic locations may create the vision of a holiday character at first; however, intensive planning and preparation are needed. We recommend contacting police, customs, the federal institute for drugs and medical devices as well as the labour inspectorate, preferably in both the originating

  5. Implementing Effective Substance Abuse Treatments in General Medical Settings: Mapping the Research Terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Lori J; Chandler, Redonna K; Harris, Alex H S

    2016-01-01

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), and Veterans Health Administration (VHA) share an interest in promoting high quality, rigorous health services research to improve the availability and utilization of evidence-based treatment for substance use disorders (SUD). Recent and continuing changes in the healthcare policy and funding environments prioritize the integration of evidence-based substance abuse treatments into primary care and general medical settings. This area is a prime candidate for implementation research. Recent and ongoing implementation projects funded by these agencies are reviewed. Research in five areas is highlighted: screening and brief intervention for risky drinking; screening and brief intervention for tobacco use; uptake of FDA-approved addiction pharmacotherapies; safe opioid prescribing; and disease management. Gaps in the portfolios, and priorities for future research, are described. PMID:26233697

  6. Finding the right doctoral thesis – an innovative research fair for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen, Julius

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of research, as promoted by the framework, is widely acknowledged. Many medical students in Germany work on a research project as part of their doctoral thesis whilst still going to medical school. However, a significant amount of projects are abandoned unfinished, which leads to substantial wastage of resources. One reason for this is an information deficit concerning undergraduate research projects.Project description: To counteract this, we introduced an annual event at LMU Munich called with more than 600 visitors each year. It combines medical convention and research fair including keynote lectures, workshops and poster sessions as well as an exhibition of research groups and institutes. is a peer-to-peer event organized by a team of 40 students. Results: A needs analysis before its implementation underlined the information deficit as a possible cause for the high rate of abandoned projects. In the annual evaluation, visitors of rate the event with an average grade of 2.1 on a six-level Likert scale (n=558, SD=1.06, with "1=very good", "6=poor". They stated to now feel better informed about the topic and regarded visiting as a worthwhile investment of time.Discussion: Students are generally satisfied with the event and feel better informed after visiting . However, many students never visit DoktaMed for various reasons. A possible improvement would be to present a greater number of clinical studies in addition to the laboratory work that focuses on now.Conclusion: Evaluation after six years of is very promising. Visitors seem to be better informed. Nevertheless there is space for improvement in order to get more students and more faculty members involved. More studies are needed to assess long-term effects.

  7. Finding the right doctoral thesis – an innovative research fair for medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Julius; Grabbert, Markus; Pander, Tanja; Gradel, Maximilian; Köhler, Lisa-Maria; Fischer, Martin R.; von der Borch, Philip; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The importance of research, as promoted by the CanMEDS framework, is widely acknowledged. Many medical students in Germany work on a research project as part of their doctoral thesis whilst still going to medical school. However, a significant amount of projects are abandoned unfinished, which leads to substantial wastage of resources. One reason for this is an information deficit concerning undergraduate research projects. Project description: To counteract this, we introduced an annual event at LMU Munich called DoktaMed with more than 600 visitors each year. It combines medical convention and research fair including keynote lectures, workshops and poster sessions as well as an exhibition of research groups and institutes. DoktaMed is a peer-to-peer event organized by a team of 40 students. Results: A needs analysis before its implementation underlined the information deficit as a possible cause for the high rate of abandoned projects. In the annual evaluation, visitors of DoktaMed rate the event with an average grade of 2.1 on a six-level Likert scale (n=558, SD=1.06, with "1=very good", "6=poor"). They stated to now feel better informed about the topic and regarded visiting DoktaMed as a worthwhile investment of time. Discussion: Students are generally satisfied with the event and feel better informed after visiting DoktaMed. However, many students never visit DoktaMed for various reasons. A possible improvement would be to present a greater number of clinical studies in addition to the laboratory work that DoktaMed focuses on now. Conclusion: Evaluation after six years of DoktaMed is very promising. Visitors seem to be better informed. Nevertheless there is space for improvement in order to get more students and more faculty members involved. More studies are needed to assess long-term effects. PMID:26413167

  8. 医学生同理心的研究进展%Research Progress of Medical Students' Empathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周琴飞; 张亚林

    2011-01-01

    As one of medical personnel necessary qualities, Empathy gets more and more attention in the medical field. This article discussed foreign and domestic research progress of empathy in medical students, ijlustrated the deficiency of empathy research in domestic medical students, and the significance of empathy in improving medical relationship. In recent years , the domestic medical relationship is growing tension, medical students are the subject of future medical relationship,we should intensify the research and cultivation of empathy in medical students , establish good foundation for better medical relationship.%同理心作为医务人员必备素质乏一,越来越受到医疗领域的关注.探讨了国外以及国内关于医学生同理心的研究进展,阐述了国内在医学生同理心研究方面的不足以及同理心在改善医患关系方面的重要性,为应对国内的紧张医患关系,加大对医学生同理心研究和培养的力度,为将来更好的医疗关系打好基础.

  9. Enhancement, ethics and society: towards an empirical research agenda for the medical humanities and social sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickersgill, Martyn; Hogle, Linda

    2015-12-01

    For some time now, bioethicists have paid close attention to issues associated with 'enhancement'; specifically, the appropriate use and regulation of substances and artefacts understood by some to improve the functioning of human bodies beyond that associated with 'normal' function. Medical humanities scholars (aside from philosophers and lawyers) and social scientists have not been frequent participants in debates around enhancement, but could shine a bright light on the range of dilemmas and opportunities techniques of enhancement are purported to introduce. In this paper, we argue that empirical research into the notion and practice of enhancement is necessary and timely. Such work could fruitfully engage with-and further develop-existing conceptual repertoires within the medical humanities and social sciences in ways that would afford benefit to scholars in those disciplines. We maintain that empirical engagements could also provide important resources to bioethicists seeking to regulate new enhancements in ways that are sensitive to societal context and cultural difference. To this end, we outline an empirical agenda for the medical humanities and social sciences around enhancement, emphasising especially how science and technology studies could bring benefits to-and be benefitted by-research in this area. We also use the example of (pharmaceutical) cognitive enhancement to show how empirical studies of actual and likely enhancement practices can nuance resonant bioethical debates. PMID:26260624

  10. Perception, Practices Towards Research and Predictors of Research Career Among UG Medical Students from Coastal South India: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Harsha Kumar H; Jayaram S; Kumar Ganesh; Vinita J; Rohit S; Satish M; Shusruth K; Nitin; Akhilesh

    2009-01-01

    Background : The number of physician scientists worldwide is decreasing. A review of literature suggests paucity of information examining perceptions and practices towards research among medical undergraduate students in India. Hence, this study was undertaken. Objectives : To understand (a) the awareness, skills, perceptions and practices among undergraduate (UG) medical students towards research, (b) the factors responsible for willingness to take up research as a career among the undergra...

  11. Virtual microscopy in medical research: Open European Nephrology Science Center (OpEN.SC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Thomas; Beil, Michael; Schmidt, Danilo; Dietel, Manfred; Lindemann, Gabriela

    2007-03-01

    The amount and heterogeneity of data in biomedical research, notably in transnational research, requires new methods for the collection, presentation and analysis of information. Important data from laboratory experiments as well as patient trials are available as images. Thus, the integration and processing of image data represent a crucial component of information systems in biomedical research. The Charité Medical School in Berlin has established a new information service center for kidney diseases and transplantation (Open European Nephrology Science Centre - OpEN.SC) together with the German Research Agency (DFG). The aims of this project are (i) to improve the availability of raw data, (ii) to establish an infrastructure for clinical trials, (iii) to monitor the occurrence of rare disease patterns and (iv) to establish a quality assurance system. Major diagnostic procedures in medicine are based on the processing and analysis of image data. In diagnostic pathology, the availability of automated slide scanners provide the opportunity to digitize entire microscopic slides. The processing, presentation and analysis of these image data are called virtual microscopy. The integration of this new technology into the OpEN.SC system and the link to other heterogeneous data of individual patients represent a major technological challenge. Thus, new ways in communication between clinical and scientific partners have to be established and will be promoted by the project. The technological basis of the repository are web services for a scalable and adaptable system. HL7 and DICOM are considered the main medical standards of communication.

  12. The European Research Infrastructures of the ESFRI Roadmap in Biological and Medical Sciences: status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Calzolari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION. Since 2002, the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures identified the needs for Research Infrastructures (RIs in Europe in priority fields of scientific research and drafted a strategic document, the ESFRI Roadmap, defining the specific RIs essential to foster European research and economy. The Biological and Medical Sciences RIs (BMS RIs were developed thanks to the active participation of many institutions in different European member states associated to address the emerging needs in biomedicine and, among these, the Italian National Institute of Health (ISS, in virtue of its role in public health and research, has been specifically involved in the national development and implementation of three RIs: the Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure (BBMRI, the European Advanced Translational Research Infrastructure in Medicine (EATRIS and the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN. AIM. This article outlines the design and development of these RIs up to the recent achievement of the ERIC status, their importance in the Horizon 2020 programme and their societal and economic potential impact, with special attention to their development and significance in Italy. CONCLUSIONS. The ISS plays a unique role in fostering a coordinated participation of excellence Italian institutes/facilities to different European biomedical RIs, thus contributing to health innovation, healthcare optimization, and healthcare cost containment.

  13. Research and Realization of Medical Image Fusion Based on Three-Dimensional Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new medical image fusion technique is presented. The method is based on three-dimensional reconstruction. After reconstruction, the three-dimensional volume data is normalized by three-dimensional coordinate conversion in the same way and intercepted through setting up cutting plane including anatomical structure, as a result two images in entire registration on space and geometry are obtained and the images are fused at last.Compared with traditional two-dimensional fusion technique, three-dimensional fusion technique can not only resolve the different problems existed in the two kinds of images, but also avoid the registration error of the two kinds of images when they have different scan and imaging parameter. The research proves this fusion technique is more exact and has no registration, so it is more adapt to arbitrary medical image fusion with different equipments.

  14. Research into cost and value in medical education: can we make findings more generalisable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran Walsh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a growing number of papers have started to appear in the literature on the subject of cost and value in medical education. However many of the articles describe tactical projects within specific areas. As a result the generalisability of such articles is often questionable. Lack of generalisability will mean that progress in research and practice in this field will be slow. Generalisability of cost-value analyses in any discipline is not always straightforward. However reports on cost and value in medical education should ideally ensure absolute clarity with regard to study centres, enrolment of learners, alternative options, perspectives of stakeholders, resources used and their costs, instruments used, variability, and any problems with the analyses (such as incomplete data.

  15. Early-career researchers in medical applications @ CERN | 6 June | Main Auditorium

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

      Discover how technological advances for high-energy physics have become essential tools for modern medicine. CERN seeks to answer fundamental questions about the Universe, and this mission naturally contributes to advancing the frontiers of technology. State-of-the-art techniques developed for particle accelerators, detectors, and physics computing have applications beyond the high-energy physics community in the medical field. These applications now have an essential role in clinical practices and medical research centres: from imaging devices, accelerator-technology dedicated to cancer therapy, to simulations and data science tools. This knowledge transfer from the high energy physics community to innovation in other fields is an inherent component of CERN’s mission and culture. It fuels scientific collaboration and technological advances, and drives innovation. In addition, it motivates future generations of scientists, and contributes to the public awareness of the impact of fu...

  16. Post-market clinical research conducted by medical device manufacturers: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross JS

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Joseph S Ross, Katrina L Blount, Jessica D Ritchie, Beth Hodshon, Harlan M Krumholz Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT, USA Background: In the US, once a medical device is made available for use, several requirements have been established by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA to ensure ongoing post-market surveillance of device safety and effectiveness. Our objective was to determine how commonly medical device manufacturers initiate post-market clinical studies or augment FDA post-market surveillance requirements for higher-risk devices that are most often approved via the FDA's pre-market approval (PMA pathway. Methods and results: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 47 manufacturers with operations in California, Minnesota, and Massachusetts who market devices approved via the PMA pathway. Among 22 respondents (response rate =47%, nearly all self-reported conducting post-market clinical research studies, commonly between 1 and 5; only 1 respondent reported never conducting post-market clinical research studies. While manufacturers most often engaged in these studies to satisfy FDA requirements, other reasons were reported, including performance monitoring and surveillance and market acceptance initiatives. Risks of conducting and not conducting post-market clinical research studies were described through open-ended response to questions. Conclusion: Medical device manufacturers commonly initiate post-market clinical studies at the request of the FDA. Clinical data from these studies should be integrated into national post-market surveillance initiatives. Keywords: FDA, PMA pathway, post-market surveillance

  17. Aberration-Coreected Electron Microscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu,Y.; Wall, J.

    2008-04-01

    The last decade witnessed the rapid development and implementation of aberration correction in electron optics, realizing a more-than-70-year-old dream of aberration-free electron microscopy with a spatial resolution below one angstrom [1-9]. With sophisticated aberration correctors, modern electron microscopes now can reveal local structural information unavailable with neutrons and x-rays, such as the local arrangement of atoms, order/disorder, electronic inhomogeneity, bonding states, spin configuration, quantum confinement, and symmetry breaking [10-17]. Aberration correction through multipole-based correctors, as well as the associated improved stability in accelerating voltage, lens supplies, and goniometers in electron microscopes now enables medium-voltage (200-300kV) microscopes to achieve image resolution at or below 0.1nm. Aberration correction not only improves the instrument's spatial resolution but, equally importantly, allows larger objective lens pole-piece gaps to be employed thus realizing the potential of the instrument as a nanoscale property-measurement tool. That is, while retaining high spatial resolution, we can use various sample stages to observe the materials response under various temperature, electric- and magnetic- fields, and atmospheric environments. Such capabilities afford tremendous opportunities to tackle challenging science and technology issues in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology. The research goal of the electron microscopy group at the Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science and the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, as well as the Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is to elucidate the microscopic origin of the physical- and chemical-behavior of materials, and the role of individual, or groups of atoms, especially in their native functional environments. We plan to accomplish this by developing and implementing various quantitative

  18. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication presents the results of BNL's environmental monitoring and compliance effort and provides an assessment of the impact of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) operations on the environment. This document is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Section of the Safety and Envirorunental Protection Division. Within this Section, the Environmental Monitoring Group (EMG) sample the environment, interpreted the results, performed the impact analysis of the emissions from BNL, and compiled the information presented here. In this effort, other groups of the Section: Compliance; Analytical; Ground Water; and Quality played a key role in addressing the regulatory aspects and the analysis and documentation of the data, respectively

  19. The relativistic heavy ion collider project at Brookhaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility will provide collision energies of 100 GeV/nucleon per beam for heavy ions as massive as gold. RHIC will use the existing Brookhaven AGS and Tandem Van de Graaff as injector. The new accelerator facility, which is a nuclear physics initiative, will utilize the existing facilities of the partially completed CBA project. This report discusses the physics motivation for such a facility, the status of the machine design, R and D work and preparations for experiments at RHIC

  20. Proceedings of Brookhaven National Laboratory's fusion/synfuel workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fusion synfuels workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on August 27-29, 1979 examined the current status of candidate synfuel processes and the R and D required to develop the capability for fusion synfuel production. Participants divided into five working groups, covering the following areas: (1) economics and applications; (2) high-temperature electrolysis; (3) thermochemical processes (including hybrid thermo-electrochemical); (4) blanket and materials; and (5) high-efficiency power cycles. Each working group presented a summary of their conclusions and recommendations to all participants during the third day of the Workshop. These summaries are given

  1. 1995 Annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) conduct of epidemiologic surveillance provides an early warning system for health problems among workers. This program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report summarizes epidemiologic surveillance data collected from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at BNL and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out.

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A.; Miltenberger, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    This publication presents the results of BNL`s environmental monitoring and compliance effort and provides an assessment of the impact of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) operations on the environment. This document is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Section of the Safety and Envirorunental Protection Division. Within this Section, the Environmental Monitoring Group (EMG) sample the environment, interpreted the results, performed the impact analysis of the emissions from BNL, and compiled the information presented here. In this effort, other groups of the Section: Compliance; Analytical; Ground Water; and Quality played a key role in addressing the regulatory aspects and the analysis and documentation of the data, respectively.

  3. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A.; Miltenberger, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    This publication presents the results of BNL's environmental monitoring and compliance effort and provides an assessment of the impact of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) operations on the environment. This document is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Section of the Safety and Envirorunental Protection Division. Within this Section, the Environmental Monitoring Group (EMG) sample the environment, interpreted the results, performed the impact analysis of the emissions from BNL, and compiled the information presented here. In this effort, other groups of the Section: Compliance; Analytical; Ground Water; and Quality played a key role in addressing the regulatory aspects and the analysis and documentation of the data, respectively.

  4. Strom Thurmond Biomedical Research Center at the Medical Univesity for South Carolina Charleston, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the proposed construction and operation of the Strom Thurmond Biomedical Research Center (Center) at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), Charleston, SC. The DOE is evaluating a grant proposal to authorize the MUSC to construct, equip and operate the lower two floors of the proposed nine-story Center as an expansion of on-going clinical research and out-patient diagnostic activities of the Cardiology Division of the existing Gazes Cardiac Research Institute. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  5. Survey of French research in biological and medical engineering - aims, means, results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the aims and means available is followed by an outline of the results of French research in biological and medical engineering. Most of the work undertaken has given very positive results from the scientific view-point, followed up by industrial applications. Scintigraphic image processing research has led to CINE 200. A study of heart output quantification in real time has produced a haemodynamic investigation system, the Sysconoram, now commercialized. The study of heart signal recording methods has led to a marketable and reliable system for the detection of pathological heart conditions. Research in neurosurgery on the use of pressure transducers in integrated technology, using a piezoelectric detector associated with a field effect amplifier, has enabled two types of extradural pressure transducer and one cervical intraventricular pressure transducer to be industrialized. Finally the study of a gamma detector combined with a light-amplifier tube has led to the development of camera giving quite exceptional results

  6. 2011 Lasker Clinical Medical Research Award Honors Prof.TU You-you for the Discovery of Artemisinin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Lasker Clinical Medical Research Award honors a scientist who discovered artemisinin and its utility for treating malaria.Prof.TU You-you (China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences,Beijing) transformed an ancient Chinese healing method into the most powerful antimalarial medicine currently available that has saved millions of lives across the globe,especially in the developing world.

  7. Learning in context: identifying gaps in research on the transfer of medical communication skills to the clinical workplace.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eertwegh, V. van den; Dulmen, S. van; Dalen, J. van; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In order to reduce the inconsistencies of findings and the apparent low transfer of communication skills from training to medical practice, this narrative review identifies some main gaps in research on medical communication skills training and presents insights from theories on learning

  8. Learning in context: identifying gaps in research on the transfer of medical communication skills to the clinical workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eertwegh, V. van den; Dulmen, S. van; Dalen, J. Van; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In order to reduce the inconsistencies of findings and the apparent low transfer of communication skills from training to medical practice, this narrative review identifies some main gaps in research on medical communication skills training and presents insights from theories on learning

  9. Patenting of university and non-university public research organisations in Germany: evidence from patent applications for medical research results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Tinnemann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patents are one of the most important forms of intellectual property. They grant a time-limited exclusivity on the use of an invention allowing the recuperation of research costs. The use of patents is fiercely debated for medical innovation and especially controversial for publicly funded research, where the patent holder is an institution accountable to public interest. Despite this controversy, for the situation in Germany almost no empirical information exists. The purpose of this study is to examine the amount, types and trends of patent applications for health products submitted by German public research organisations. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a systematic search for patent documents using the publicly accessible database search interface of the German Patent and Trademark Office. We defined keywords and search criteria and developed search patterns for the database request. We retrieved documents with application date between 1988 and 2006 and processed the collected data stepwise to compile the most relevant documents in patent families for further analysis. We developed a rationale and present individual steps of a systematic method to request and process patent data from a publicly accessible database. We retrieved and processed 10194 patent documents. Out of these, we identified 1772 relevant patent families, applied for by 193 different universities and non-university public research organisations. 827 (47% of these patent families contained granted patents. The number of patent applications submitted by universities and university-affiliated institutions more than tripled since the introduction of legal reforms in 2002, constituting almost half of all patent applications and accounting for most of the post-reform increase. Patenting of most non-university public research organisations remained stable. CONCLUSIONS: We search, process and analyse patent applications from publicly accessible databases

  10. Chelation research at the Institute of Environmental Medicine, New York University Medical Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelation research should be continued in order to improve the effectiveness and safety of this mode of decontamination therapy. At the New York University Medical Center we are evaluating various treatment procedures using Na3(Zn-DTPA) and Na3(CA-DTPA) for removing americium, curium, and plutonium from the baboon, an animal whose blood and urine chemistries are similar to those of man. It has been determined, thus far, that the treatment schedules presently recommended for man may not be optimal

  11. Classroom to Clinic: Merging Education and Research to Efficiently Prototype Medical Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanumara, Nevan C; Begg, Nikolai D; Walsh, Conor; Custer, David; Gupta, Rajiv; Osborn, Lynn R; Slocum, Alexander H

    2013-01-01

    Innovation in patient care requires both clinical and technical skills, and this paper presents the methods and outcomes of a nine-year, clinical-academic collaboration to develop and evaluate new medical device technologies, while teaching mechanical engineering. Together, over the course of a single semester, seniors, graduate students, and clinicians conceive, design, build, and test proof-of-concept prototypes. Projects initiated in the course have generated intellectual property and peer-reviewed publications, stimulated further research, furthered student and clinician careers, and resulted in technology licenses and start-up ventures. PMID:27170859

  12. Classroom to Clinic: Merging Education and Research to Efficiently Prototype Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Nikolai D.; Walsh, Conor; Custer, David; Gupta, Rajiv; Osborn, Lynn R.; Slocum, Alexander H.

    2013-01-01

    Innovation in patient care requires both clinical and technical skills, and this paper presents the methods and outcomes of a nine-year, clinical-academic collaboration to develop and evaluate new medical device technologies, while teaching mechanical engineering. Together, over the course of a single semester, seniors, graduate students, and clinicians conceive, design, build, and test proof-of-concept prototypes. Projects initiated in the course have generated intellectual property and peer-reviewed publications, stimulated further research, furthered student and clinician careers, and resulted in technology licenses and start-up ventures.

  13. What Medical Oncologist Residents Think about the Italian Speciality Schools: A Survey of the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) on Educational, Clinical and Research Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Anna; De Angelis, Carmine; Lambertini, Matteo; Cremolini, Chiara; Imbimbo, Martina; Berardi, Rossana; Di Maio, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano; La Verde, Nicla

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Relevant heterogeneity exists among Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, also within the same country. In order to provide a comprehensive overview of the landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) undertook an online survey, inviting all the residents to describe their daily activities and to express their overall satisfaction about their programs. Methods A team composed of five residents and three consultants in medical oncology prepared a 38 items questionnaire that was published online in a reserved section, accessible through a link sent by e-mail. Residents were invited to anonymously fill in the questionnaire that included the following sub-sections: quality of teaching, clinical and research activity, overall satisfaction. Results Three-hundred and eleven (57%) out of 547 invited residents filled in the questionnaire. Two-hundred and twenty-three (72%) participants declared that attending lessons was frequently difficult and 153 (49%) declared they did not gain substantial improvement in their knowledge from them. Fifty-five percent stated that they did not receive lessons on palliative care. Their overall judgment about didactic activity was low in 63% of the interviewed. The satisfaction for clinical activity was in 86% of cases good: 84% recognized that, during the training period, they acquired a progressive independence on patients' management. About research activity, the majority (79%) of participants in the survey was actively engaged in managing patients included in clinical trials but the satisfaction level for the involvement in research activities was quite low (54%). Overall, 246 residents (79%) gave a positive global judgment of their Medical Oncology Schools. Conclusions The landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology is quite heterogeneous across the country. Some improvements in the organization of teaching and in the

  14. How Medical Practice Has Gone Wrong: Causes of the Lack-of-Reproducibility Crisis in Medical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Hermann Bauer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern medical practice has gone wrong by over-emphasizing drug-based treatment for chronic, constitutional conditions. The failure to distinguish between infectious and innate conditions was exacerbated by misinterpretation of quantitative measures, inappropriate statistical analysis, and inadequate regulation. The drug industry has become too influential as a result of these mis-steps and is a source of many conflicts of interest that are barriers to improving matters. This article summarizes some of the current problems facing medical practice and offers suggestions to address these problems.

  15. Use of Neutron Irradiations in the Brookhaven Mutations Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Co-operative Radiation-Mutations Programme was established at Brookhaven National Laboratory approximately ten years ago to enable plant breeders and agriculturalists to make use of irradiation techniques in plant improvement programmes. The radiation facilities used in the programme are the thermal neutron column at the BGRR reactor, the 250-kVp X-ray machine in the Biology Department, the kilocurie gamma-sources in the Nuclear Engineering Department, a 12 c Co60 gamma-source in the greenhouse, and a 4000 c Co60 source located in a 13-acre field. The development of facilities, techniques, and theory represent Brookhaven's role in this cooperative project whereas the plant material and seed are provided by agricultural experts who are responsible for growing the irradiated material and screening for mutations. More than 150 scientists in 45 states and Puerto Rico are availing themselves of the programme's facilities. Projects have also initiated with Australia, Belgium, Chile, Costa Rica, Denmark, Ecuador, Formosa, Greece, Guatemala, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, the Netherlands, Pakistan, Peru, the Philippines, Romania, South Africa.Thailand, Venezuela, West Germany and Yugoslavia. A review of the above cc-operative projects is presented with emphasis on the use of neutrons in mutation induction. (author)

  16. Possibilities for relativistic heavy ion collisions at Brookhaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1980 there has been considerable interest at Brookhaven in exploiting the existence of the Colliding Beam Accelerator, CBA, earlier referred to as Isabelle, for the generation of heavy ion collisions at very high energies. The only requirement for a heavy ion collider would have been for an energy booster for the Tandem accelerator and a tunnel and magnet transport system to the AGS. For a few million dollars heavy ions up to nearly 200 GeV/amu could be collided with luminosities of 1027 to 1028/cm2 sec in experimental halls with ideal facilities for heavy ion physics studies. Although the CBA project has been stopped, it is still true that Brookhaven has in place enormous advantages for constructing a heavy ion collider. This paper describes a design that exploits those advantages. It uses the tunnel and other civil construction, the refrigerator, vacuum equipment, injection line components, and the magnet design for which there is expertise and a production facility in place. The result is a machine that appears quite different than would a machine designed from first principles without access to these resources but one which is of high performance and of very attractive cost

  17. Engaging current and potential medical students in clinical research during an elective hospital attachment: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Sihoe, AD; Clin, H; Shing, LK

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Exposure of medical students to research may increase the probability of their pursuing postgraduate research involvement(1,2). However, whether research exposure should ideally be mandatory (student-passive) or extra-curricular (student-proactive) is unclear(2-4). Furthermore, whether research exposure has any impact on students interested in but not yet studying medicine is also unknown. This study examines a strategy of actively offering clinical research opportunit...

  18. Experience with a sustained policy of radiation exposure control and research in a medical center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a radiation protection policy and its implementation over a 27-yr period are described. Radiation uses included radionuclides and radiation generators for diagnosis, treatment and research. The original policy has been successfully applied and personnel radiation exposure has been controlled despite increasing radiation uses. The program included research and development on measurement and reduction of staff and patient exposure; the development of ionization chambers for different diagnostic energy ranges, including mammographic; a special 'flat' chamber for high energy therapy installation surveys; and the design of phantoms. A record of over 95% of the 'exposed population' with exposures below 0.5 rem/yr has been achieved, with maximum exposures substantially less than 2.0 rem. At the same time new procedures of improved quality have developed for uses of radiation. The achievement of radiation control has facilitated rather than inhibited medical uses of radiation. (author)

  19. Papua New Guinea's next generation of medical researchers: Celestine Aho, Patricia Rarau and Pamela Toliman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilakiva, Geraldine; Gibbs, Tammy

    2013-01-01

    Celestine Aho, Patricia Rarau and Pamela Toliman are amongst the next generation of health researchers at the Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research (PNGIMR). Face-to-face interviews were conducted with all three women for the purpose of profiling women who are leaders in health and medicine in Papua New Guinea (PNG). They were asked questions about their early life and childhood, education, work life and training, and mentors who have supported their career path and leadership role. All three see opportunities before them to tackle the health challenges facing PNG, find solutions and contribute to human development in their country. At PNGIMR, Pamela is a senior scientific officer in the HIV and STI laboratory; Celestine is a senior scientific officer in the bacteriology laboratory working on pneumococcal vaccines; and Patricia is the study clinician for the Partnership in Health Project, monitoring the impact of the PNG liquefied natural gas (LNG) project. PMID:25507581

  20. Progress on the disposal project of LLW generated from research, industrial and medical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low level nuclear wastes (LLW) are generated from the R and D of the nuclear energy, medical and industrial use of radioisotope as well as NPP in Japan. The LLW is stored and accumulated in each facility. The issues will after R and D facility operations because of no organization assigned a role of waste disposal and repository operation. Therefore, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was assigned to the implementing organization for the disposal with the amendment of JAEA Act in 2008. JAEA had started their activity on the promoting of the disposal project of these LLW following to JAEA's 'Executing plan for the disposal project of LLW from research institutes etc.' based on the 'Basic plan of promotion for the disposal project of LLW from research institutes etc. 'decided by government. This report summarizes the conceptual design of the disposal facility and reviewing the procedure and criteria for site selection for the disposal project. (author)

  1. Analysis of overexposure cases for female radiation workers in medical and research institutions in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Protection Services Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre conducts country wide personnel monitoring service for 40,000 radiation workers, of which about 22,000 radiation workers are from industrial, medical and research institutions. The number of female radiation workers constitute about 5% of the total radiation workers monitored. Basis for control of occupational exposures of women are same as that for men except for pregnant women (foetus). Equivalent dose above 10 mSv in a service period is investigated as to the causes of exposure whether the exposure was really received by the worker (genuine) or only the monitoring badge received the exposure due to other reasons (non-genuine) and necessary remedial actions are taken. Analysis of overexposure cases in female radiation workers as a group has been done for the period of four years (1990-1993) and the conclusions are presented. (author). 2 refs., 4 tabs

  2. Utility of YAKAMI DICOM Tools for researches on medical imaging in DICOM format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'YAKAMI digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) Tools' is a package of programs to facilitate researches using DICOM image files, developed by ourselves, and freely available via the Internet. The functions of the programs were investigated. A massive DICOM data storage system was implemented using several programs included in the 'YAKAMI DICOM Tools'. The system performances were evaluated after over three-year continuous use. More than 40TB of DICOM files were stored in the storage system with maintenance workload of several hours per a month, and the cost was 3.5 million yens in total. It was proved that DICOM file format and header contents were easily manipulated with 'DICOM Converter' and that 'DICOM Viewer' had enough functions and performance to view medical images compared with enterprise processor array for continuum simulation (PACS). 'YAKAMI DICOM Tools' had enough functions and stability to use DICOM files for research, and supposed to save workload and cost. (author)

  3. Changes in the 'medical research' licensing procedure under the German Radiation Protection Ordinance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication outlines the 'medical research' licensing procedure as specified in the amendment of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance of November 1, 2011. The general licensing requirements for the use of radiation have not been changed by the amendment. Three so-called use restrictions (i.e., dose limits of 10 mSv and 20 mSv, age limit of 50 years) have been modified. They will only apply to healthy volunteers in the future. In addition, there are considerable simplifications with respect to applications and licensing procedures of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, BfS) regarding the use of radiation in the newly introduced 'accompanying diagnostics' ('Begleitdiagnostik') case group. The newly established, independent panel of experts at the German Radiological Society (Deutsche Roentgengesellschaft, DRG) may provide essential support to principal investigators, qualified physicians and sponsors for differentiating between 'medical research' and 'health care', the latter not being subject to licensing. An expert statement will be issued by the DRG within four weeks of an inquiry. This consulting service is subject to confidentiality, and is free of charge for inquirers and without any commitment. (orig.)

  4. Diagnostic imaging over the last 50 years: research and development in medical imaging science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last 50 years, diagnostic imaging has grown from a state of infancy to a high level of maturity. Many new imaging modalities have been developed. However, modern medical imaging includes not only image production but also image processing, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), image recording and storage, and image transmission, most of which are included in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS). The content of this paper includes a short review of research and development in medical imaging science and technology, which covers (a) diagnostic imaging in the 1950s, (b) the importance of image quality and diagnostic performance, (c) MTF, Wiener spectrum, NEQ and DQE, (d) ROC analysis, (e) analogue imaging systems, (f) digital imaging systems, (g) image processing, (h) computer-aided diagnosis, (i) PACS, (j) 3D imaging and (k) future directions. Although some of the modalities are already very sophisticated, further improvements will be made in image quality for MRI, ultrasound and molecular imaging. The infrastructure of PACS is likely to be improved further in terms of its reliability, speed and capacity. However, CAD is currently still in its infancy, and is likely to be a subject of research for a long time. (review)

  5. Radiation Protection for Medical Research Laboratories in the General Hospital of Vienna (University Hospital)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In the floors six, seven and eight of the general hospital of Vienna over eighty research laboratories for medical investigations with open and closed radioactive sources are installed. In these laboratories different working places and digestors for the handling of open radioactive materials in gaseous, liquid and aerosol form are placed for medical research purposes. These laboratories are divided due to the manner of handling and the amount of activity in three categories. The laboratories themselves and the different types of digestors are mantled and shielded with lead of variable thickness. For all these categories of working places and digestors the radionuclides were listed and the highest amount of these different radionuclides were calculated and tabulated in a form sheet, which is the basis for working procedures in these laboratories. Also the paper shows all radiation protection measures and the results of the dose- and dose rate measurements and the various inspection tests. At least the licensing procedures for radiation protection in detail will be shown and the important features listed. (author)

  6. Systems Medicine: The Application of Systems Biology Approaches for Modern Medical Research and Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Ayers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The exponential development of highly advanced scientific and medical research technologies throughout the past 30 years has arrived to the point where the high number of characterized molecular agents related to pathogenesis cannot be readily integrated or processed by conventional analytical approaches. Indeed, the realization that several moieties are signatures of disease has partly led to the increment of complex diseases being characterized. Scientists and clinicians can now investigate and analyse any individual dysregulations occurring within the genomic, transcriptomic, miRnomic, proteomic, and metabolomic levels thanks to currently available advanced technologies. However, there are drawbacks within this scientific brave new age in that only isolated molecular levels are individually investigated for their influence in affecting any particular health condition. Since their conception in 1992, systems biology/medicine focuses mainly on the perturbations of overall pathway kinetics for the consequent onset and/or deterioration of the investigated condition/s. Systems medicine approaches can therefore be employed for shedding light in multiple research scenarios, ultimately leading to the practical result of uncovering novel dynamic interaction networks that are critical for influencing the course of medical conditions. Consequently, systems medicine also serves to identify clinically important molecular targets for diagnostic and therapeutic measures against such a condition.

  7. Patient and public perspectives shaping scientific and medical research: panels for data, discussions, and decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Seilin Uhm1, Kristin Liabo1, Ruth Stewart1,2, Rebecca Rees1, Sandy Oliver11Social Science Research Unit, Institute of Education, University of London, London, UK; 2The Centre for Language and Culture, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South AfricaAbstract: This paper explores the role of patient panels for shaping research for health, scientific research about health and illness, and applied medical research. After examining the history and purposes of involving patients in discussions and decision making for research, it outlines the expertise and skills required if panels are to be successful. The paper also analyses existing guidance for panels that include patients. Panels benefit from the experiential knowledge of panel members, craft knowledge of panel facilitators, and organizational knowledge gained through previous experience of hosting panels. Guidance is available that addresses structures and resources (for panel funders and interpersonal communication and group dynamics (for panel members and facilitators. This guidance is most comprehensive when it has itself been developed by all these types of stakeholders.Keywords: public involvement, patient panels, expert panels, guidelines, guidance

  8. Proposal for a European Public Health Research Infrastructure for Sharing of health and Medical administrative data (PHRIMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgun, Anita; Oksen, Dina V; Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Ganslandt, Thomas; Buchan, Iain; van Staa, Tjeerd; Cunningham, James; Gjerstorff, Marianne L; Dufour, Jean-Charles; Gibrat, Jean-Francois; Nikolski, Macha; Verger, Pierre; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Masella, Cristina; Lettieri, Emanuele; Bertele, Paolo; Salokannel, Marjut; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Persoz, Charles; Chêne, Geneviève; Ohmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In Europe, health and medical administrative data is increasingly accumulating on a national level. Looking further than re-use of this data on a national level, sharing health and medical administrative data would enable large-scale analyses and European-level public health projects. There is currently no research infrastructure for this type of sharing. The PHRIMA consortium proposes to realise the Public Health Research Infrastructure for Sharing of health and Medical Administrative data (PHRIMA) which will enable and facilitate the efficient and secure sharing of healthcare data. PMID:26262306

  9. Big Data in medical research and EU data protection law: challenges to the consent or anonymise approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostert, Menno; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Biesaart, Monique C I H; van Delden, Johannes J M

    2016-07-01

    Medical research is increasingly becoming data-intensive; sensitive data are being re-used, linked and analysed on an unprecedented scale. The current EU data protection law reform has led to an intense debate about its potential effect on this processing of data in medical research. To contribute to this evolving debate, this paper reviews how the dominant 'consent or anonymise approach' is challenged in a data-intensive medical research context, and discusses possible ways forwards within the EU legal framework on data protection. A large part of the debate in literature focuses on the acceptability of adapting consent or anonymisation mechanisms to overcome the challenges within these approaches. We however believe that the search for ways forward within the consent or anonymise paradigm will become increasingly difficult. Therefore, we underline the necessity of an appropriate research exemption from consent for the use of sensitive personal data in medical research to take account of all legitimate interests. The appropriate conditions of such a research exemption are however subject to debate, and we expect that there will be minimal harmonisation of these conditions in the forthcoming EU Data Protection Regulation. Further deliberation is required to determine when a shift away from consent as a legal basis is necessary and proportional in a data-intensive medical research context, and what safeguards should be put in place when such a research exemption from consent is provided. PMID:26554881

  10. Self-Assembly by Instruction: Designing Nanoscale Systems Using DNA-Based Approaches (474th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang, Oleg [Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    2012-01-18

    In the field of nanoscience, if you can control how nanoparticles self-assemble in particular structures — joining each other, for example, as molecules can form, atom-by-atom — you can design new materials that have unique properties that industry needs. Nature already uses the DNA genetic code to instruct the building of specific proteins and whole organisms in both plants and people. Taking a cue from nature, scientists at BNL devised a way of using strands of synthetic DNA attached to the surface of nanoparticles to instruct them to self-assemble into specific nanoscale structures, clusters, and three-dimensional organizations. Novel materials designed and fabricated this way promise use in photovoltaics, energy storage, catalysis, cell-targeted systems for more effective medical treatments, and biomolecular sensing for environmental monitoring and medical applications. To find out more about the rapid evolution of this nanoassembly method and its applications, join Physicist Oleg Gang of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) as he gives the 474th Brookhaven Lecture, titled “Self-Assembly by Instruction: Designing Nanoscale Systems Using DNA-Based Approaches." Gang, who has led this work at the CFN, will explain the rapid evolution of this nanoassembly method, and discuss its present and future applications in highly specific biosensors, optically active nano-materials, and new ways to fabricate complex architectures in a rational manner via self-assembly. Gang and his colleagues used the CFN and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) facilities to perform their groundbreaking research. At the CFN, the scientists used electron microscopes and optical methods to visualize the clusters that they fabricated. At the NSLS, they applied x-rays to study a particles-assembly process in solution, DNA’s natural environment. Gang earned a Ph.D. in soft matter physics from Bar-Ilan University in 2000, and he was a Rothschild Fellow at Harvard

  11. Situational judgement tests in medical education and training: Research, theory and practice: AMEE Guide No. 100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Fiona; Zibarras, Lara; Ashworth, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    Why use SJTs? Traditionally, selection into medical education professions has focused primarily upon academic ability alone. This approach has been questioned more recently, as although academic attainment predicts performance early in training, research shows it has less predictive power for demonstrating competence in postgraduate clinical practice. Such evidence, coupled with an increasing focus on individuals working in healthcare roles displaying the core values of compassionate care, benevolence and respect, illustrates that individuals should be selected on attributes other than academic ability alone. Moreover, there are mounting calls to widen access to medicine, to ensure that selection methods do not unfairly disadvantage individuals from specific groups (e.g. regarding ethnicity or socio-economic status), so that the future workforce adequately represents society as a whole. These drivers necessitate a method of assessment that allows individuals to be selected on important non-academic attributes that are desirable in healthcare professionals, in a fair, reliable and valid way. What are SJTs? Situational judgement tests (SJTs) are tests used to assess individuals' reactions to a number of hypothetical role-relevant scenarios, which reflect situations candidates are likely to encounter in the target role. These scenarios are based on a detailed analysis of the role and should be developed in collaboration with subject matter experts, in order to accurately assess the key attributes that are associated with competent performance. From a theoretical perspective, SJTs are believed to measure prosocial Implicit Trait Policies (ITPs), which are shaped by socialisation processes that teach the utility of expressing certain traits in different settings such as agreeable expressions (e.g. helping others in need), or disagreeable actions (e.g. advancing ones own interest at others, expense). Are SJTs reliable, valid and fair? Several studies, including good

  12. Perception, practices towards research and predictors of research career among UG medical students from coastal South India: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha Kumar H

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The number of physician scientists worldwide is decreasing. A review of literature suggests paucity of information examining perceptions and practices towards research among medical undergraduate students in India. Hence, this study was undertaken. Objectives : To understand (a the awareness, skills, perceptions and practices among undergraduate (UG medical students towards research, (b the factors responsible for willingness to take up research as a career among the undergraduates. Material and Methods : This is a questionnaire-based qualitative study. This study was conducted in Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore. A pre-tested questionnaire examining their awareness, perceptions and practices towards research in medical field was used. Consent was obtained from the Dean of the College and student participation was voluntary. Analysis : The information was analyzed using SPSS version 11. Univariate and Multivariate analyses were done to know the willingness to consider research as a career. Results : A total of 471 students responded giving a response rate of 55.41%. Nearly 70% were aware about research though their level of awareness varied. Various skills of conducting research were known to 47% of the students. Most (76% were part of a research team mainly as a part of the medical curriculum, a few (8.3% were confident of research as a career option. The multivariate reveals that those with good skill and students who involved in research in addition to curriculum were more likely to take up research as career option/would continue to do research in future. Conclusions : Good training and student support programs exclusively for research would motivate students to opt for research careers.

  13. Use of anonymous Web communities and websites by medical consumers in Japan to research drug information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Keiko; Fukushima, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the status of researching drug information online, and the type of Internet user who uses anonymous Web communities and websites. A Web-based cross-sectional survey of 10875 male and female Internet users aged 16 and over was conducted in March 2010. Of 10282 analyzed respondents, excluding medical professionals, about 47% reported that they had previously searched the Internet for drug information and had used online resources ranging from drug information search engines and pharmaceutical industry websites to social networking sites and Twitter. Respondents who had researched drug information online (n=4861) were analyzed by two multivariable logistic regressions. In Model 1, the use of anonymous websites associated with age (OR, 0.778; 95% CI, 0.742-0.816), referring to the reputation and the narrative of other Internet users on shopping (OR, 1.640; 95% CI, 1.450-1.855), taking a prescription drug (OR, 0.806; 95% CI, 0.705-0.922), and frequent consulting with non-professionals about medical care and health (OR, 1.613; 95% CI, 1.396-1.865). In Model 2, use of only anonymous websites was associated with age (OR, 0.753; 95% CI, 0.705-0.805), using the Internet daily (OR, 0.611; 95% CI, 0.462-0.808), taking a prescription drug (OR, 0.614; 95% CI, 0.505-0.747), and experience a side effect (OR, 0.526; 95% CI, 0.421-0.658). The analysis revealed the profiles of Internet users who researched drug information on social media sites where the information providers are anonymous and do not necessarily have adequate knowledge of medicine and online information literacy. PMID:21532265

  14. Research on cultivating medical students' self-learning ability using teaching system integrated with learning analysis technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Wu, Cheng; He, Qian; Wang, Shi-Yong; Ma, Xiu-Qiang; Wang, Ri; Li, Bing; He, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Along with the advancement of information technology and the era of big data education, using learning process data to provide strategic decision-making in cultivating and improving medical students' self-learning ability has become a trend in educational research. Educator Abuwen Toffler said once, the illiterates in the future may not be the people not able to read and write, but not capable to know how to learn. Serving as educational institutions cultivating medical students' learning ability, colleges and universities should not only instruct specific professional knowledge and skills, but also develop medical students' self-learning ability. In this research, we built a teaching system which can help to restore medical students' self-learning processes and analyze their learning outcomes and behaviors. To evaluate the effectiveness of the system in supporting medical students' self-learning, an experiment was conducted in 116 medical students from two grades. The results indicated that problems in self-learning process through this system was consistent with problems raised from traditional classroom teaching. Moreover, the experimental group (using this system) acted better than control group (using traditional classroom teaching) to some extent. Thus, this system can not only help medical students to develop their self-learning ability, but also enhances the ability of teachers to target medical students' questions quickly, improving the efficiency of answering questions in class. PMID:26550446

  15. A national research agenda for pre-hospital emergency medical services in the Netherlands: a Delphi-study

    OpenAIRE

    van de Glind, Irene; Berben, Sivera; Zeegers, Fon; Poppen, Henk; Hoogeveen, Margreet; Bolt, Ina; van Grunsven, Pierre; Vloet, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    Background In pre-hospital Emergency Medical Services (EMS) more research is needed to direct and underpin care delivery and inform policy. To target future research efforts, this study aimed to determine future research priorities with representatives of the EMS field. Methods A four-round online Delphi survey was used to discuss different viewpoints and reach consensus on research priorities. A multidisciplinary panel of experts was recruited in the field of pre-hospital EMS and adjoining (...

  16. Medical relevance of UK-funded non-human primate research published from January 1997 to July 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Edward

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the Bateson Review of research using non-human primates (NHPs) recommended the commissioning of a working group to identify and follow-up the results of UK-funded NHP research of potential benefit for human health (Recommendation 4), but the Medical Research Council (MRC) has postponed implementation of the recommendation. Information on results and potential benefits of NHP research therefore remains unavailable. To fill this gap in knowledge, this study identified all published NHP...

  17. The Quality of Collaboration among Medical Research Centers, Universities, Health Executives and the Community in İran

    OpenAIRE

    Asefzadeh, Saeed

    2005-01-01

    A health research system is defined as a system for planning, coordinating, monitoring and managing health research resources and activities, and for promoting research aimed at effective and equitable national health development. This study was conducted to describe the quality of mutual collaboration among medical research centers, universities, executive organizations and the community. In this situation analysis qualitative methods were applied. In-depth interviews were held with the ...

  18. Visualization analysis of research hotspots based on CiteSpace II: taking medical devices as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu DD

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dong-Dong Liu, Sheng-Lin Liu, Jia-Hua Zhang Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province, People's Republic of China Abstract: Biomedical engineering has been one of the hottest fields in biology and engineering. As an important branch, the medical device has achieved significant progress in the past decades. As a useful method in evaluative bibliometrics, mapping knowledge has been used to explore the trend of one field. In the present study, we retrieve literatures about the medical device from the Web of Science™ (2004–2013, and acquire 26,793 related records, then analyze time range, region distribution, and main research directions of the literatures, and try to use keywords combined with mapping knowledge to explore the main trends of the medical device, and then aim to provide more information for medical device research. Through the study, we discover: 1 the publications regarding medical devices show an upward trend over the past decade in general; 2 the percentage of publications in the USA (38.49% is the highest all over the world; 3 engineering (20.64% is the hottest research direction, and takes up about one-fifth of the total publications; 4 the Journal of the American Medical Association and The New England Journal of Medicine are among the two journals that are the most highly cited, followed by Science and The Lancet; and 5 keywords of the medical device include in vitro, quality-of-life, outcomes, management, mortality, depression, and so on. With the help of mapping knowledge, we dig out some hot topics of medical devices and provide more information through trend analysis, and we discover that our findings are related to previous research and further research can enlarge the number of records and optimize the algorithm. We provide a systematic approach for researchers to keep abreast of the development and state of the research of

  19. WE-A-16A-01: International Medical Physics Symposium: Increasing Access to Medical Physics Education/Training and Research Excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to a world in which cancer is a growing global health challenge, there is now a greater need for US Medical Physicists and other Radiation Oncology professionals across institutions to work together and be more globally engaged in the fight against cancer. There are currently many opportunities for Medical Physicists to contribute to alleviating this pressing need, especially in helping enhance access to Medical Physics Education/training and Research Excellence across international boundaries, particularly for low and middle-income countries (LMIC), which suffer from a drastic shortage of accessible knowledge and quality training programs in radiotherapy. Many Medical Physicists are not aware of the range of opportunities that even with small effort could have a high impact. Faculty at the two CAMPEP-accredited Medical Physics Programs in New England: the University of Massachusetts Lowell and Harvard Medical School have developed a growing alliance to increase Access to Medical Physics Education/training and Research Excellence (AMPERE), and facilitate greater active involvement of U.S. Medical Physicists in helping the global fight against cancer and cancer disparities. In this symposium, AMPERE Alliance members and partners from Europe and Africa will present and discuss the growing global cancer challenge, the dearth of knowledge, research, and other barriers to providing life-saving radiotherapy in LMIC, mechanisms for meeting these challenges, the different opportunities for participation by Medical Physicists, including students and residents, and how participation can be facilitated to increase AMPERE for global health. Learning Objectives: To learn about the growing global cancer challenge, areas of greatest need and limitations to accessing knowledge and quality radiotherapy training programs, especially in LMIC; To learn about the range of opportunities for Medical Physicists, including students and residents, to work together in global

  20. Deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL's Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory. With the exception of radium, there are no regulations or guidelines to establish cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soils at BNL. BNL must derive radionuclide soil cleanup guidelines for a number of Operable Units (OUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs). These guidelines are required by DOE under a proposed regulation for radiation protection of public health and the environment as well as to satisfy the requirements of CERCLA. The objective of this report is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL. Implementation of the approach is briefly discussed

  1. Summary of failure analysis activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has for many years conducted examinations related to the failures of nuclear materials and components. These examinations included the confirmation of root cause analyses, the determination of the causes of failure, identification of the species that accelerate corrosion, and comparison of the results of nondestructive examinations with those obtained by destructive examination. The results of those examinations, which had previously appeared in various formats (formal and informal reports, journal articles, etc.), have been collected together and summarized in the present report. The report is divided into sections according to the general subject matter (for example, corrosion, fatigue, etc.). Each section presents summaries of the information contained in specific reports and publications, all of which are fully identified as to title, authors, report number or journal reference, date of publication, and FIN number under which the work was performed

  2. Upgrade of the Brookhaven 200 MeV linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brookhaven 200 MeV linac serves as the injector for the AGS Booster, as well as delivering beam to the Biomedical Isotope Resource Center. During the past year, many linac systems have been upgraded to allow operation at 2.5 times higher average current (150 μA). This was achieved by an increase in rep-rate from 5 to 7.5 Hz, an increase in beam current from 25 mA to 37 mA, and a slight increase in pulse width to ∼530 μs. Additional upgrades were made to improve reliability and modernize old systems. This paper describes improvements made in the 35 keV and 750 keV beam transport, 200 MeV beam transport, rf transmission line, rf power supplies, control systems, and instrumentation

  3. Digital transverse beam dampers from the Brookhaven AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide band, digital damper system has been developed and is in use at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The system consists of vertical and horizontal capacitive pickups, analog and digital processing electronics, four 500 Watt wide band power amplifiers, and two pairs of strip line beam kickers. The system is currently used to damp transverse coherent instabilities and injection errors, in both planes, for protons and all species of heavy ions. This paper discusses the system design and operation, particularly with regard to stabilization of the high intensity proton beam. The analog and digital signal processing techniques used to achieve optimum results are discussed. Operational data showing the effect of the damping are presented

  4. Development of H/sup -/ sources at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prelec, K.

    1977-01-01

    Negative hydrogen ion sources have been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for several years, with the initial goal to design a source for accelerator applications and later on to design a large unit for applications in neutral beam injectors of magnetic fusion devices. Three types of sources were investigated, a hollow discharge duoplasmatron yielding H/sup -/currents up to 60 mA, a Penning source yielding H/sup -/ currents up to 440 mA, and a magnetron source yielding H/sup -/ currents up to 1 A. All sources operate with a mixture of hydrogen gas and cesium vapors, and H/sup -/ ions are most likely produced on cesium covered electrode surfaces. A larger model of a Penning/magnetron source was constructed and will be tested soon; it incorporates among other new features a system for the cooling of the cathode.

  5. High field magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, A; Muratore, J; Parker, B; Sampson, W; Wanderer, P J; Willen, E

    2000-01-01

    The magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focussed on superconducting magnets for particle accelerators. The effort includes magnet production at the laboratory and in industry, magnet R&D, and test facilities for magnets and superconductors. Nearly 2000 magnets-dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles and correctors for the arc and insertion regions-were produced for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which is being commissioned. Currently, production of helical dipoles for the polarized proton program at RHIC, insertion region dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and an insertion magnet system for the Hadron-Elektron-Ring- Analage (HERA) collider at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) is underway. The R&D effort is exploring dipoles with fields above 10 T for use in post-LHC colliders. Brittle superconductors-Nb/sub 3/Sn or HTS-are being used for these magnets. The superconductor test facility measures short-sample currents and other characteristics of sample...

  6. Deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory. With the exception of radium, there are no regulations or guidelines to establish cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soils at BNL. BNL must derive radionuclide soil cleanup guidelines for a number of Operable Units (OUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs). These guidelines are required by DOE under a proposed regulation for radiation protection of public health and the environment as well as to satisfy the requirements of CERCLA. The objective of this report is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL. Implementation of the approach is briefly discussed.

  7. First experiences with a fastbus system at Brookhaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new concept in high energy data acquisition systems called Fastbus has been developed and implemented at Brookhaven. The system which is capable of sub-gigabit/sec speeds has been operating for some time now. A number of modules including an on-bus processor, a PDP11 interface, 32 channel coincidence latches, a 16 channel scaler, a 32 channel μ-clock device, a 60 nsec memory and a predetermined time module have been developed and built. Features of the system include extensive use of ECL logic and a water cooled crate with conduction heat transfer within a module. The system is used in an on-line experiment at the AGS. Operating experience will be discussed

  8. Thermal performance of the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaffari, H. T.; Jones, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    In the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house, an energy-efficient envelope, passive solar collectors, and a variety of energy conservation methods are incorporated. The thermal characteristics of the house during the tested heating season are evaluated. Temperature distributions at different zones are displayed, and the effects of extending heating supply ducts only to the main floor and heating return ducts only from the second floor are discussed. The thermal retrievals from the structure and the passive collectors are assessed, and the total conservation and passive solar contributions are outlined. Several correlation factors relating these thermal behaviors are introduced, and their diurnal variations are displayed. Finally, the annual energy requirements, and the average load factors are analyzed and discussed.

  9. Summary update of the Brookhaven tritium toxicity program with emphasis on recent cytogenetic and lifetime-shortening studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of years ago a multiparameter program to evaluate the toxicity of tritiated water (HTO) was undertaken in the Medical Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The results of most of these studies have been published and will receive brief attention. Emphasis will be placed on the unpublished studies involving the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE's) in bone marrow of mice, new biochemical information, and preliminary results on lifetime-shortening and carcinogenesis. In brief, male Hale-Stoner Brookhaven (HSB) mice maintained on HTO concentrations ranging from 3.0 to 30.0 μCi/ml exhibited essentially the same number of SCE's per cell throughout their lifetime. Control mice showed a decrease in number of SCE's with age. The lack of a dose-response effect and the constant level of SCE's in HTO mice as compared to controls will be discussed. In the carcinogenesis study C57BL/6J male mice received various x-ray or HTO regimens. Mortality data from these and other studies in which CBA/Ca/BNL mice received single x-ray exposures or equivalent integrated dose exposures by single HTO injections will be discussed. 25 refs., 4 figs

  10. MARVIN: a medical research application framework based on open source software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Tobias; Puls, Marc; Anderegg, Christoph; Ebert, Lars; Broehan, Martina; Rudin, Adrian; Kowal, Jens

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes the open source framework MARVIN for rapid application development in the field of biomedical and clinical research. MARVIN applications consist of modules that can be plugged together in order to provide the functionality required for a specific experimental scenario. Application modules work on a common patient database that is used to store and organize medical data as well as derived data. MARVIN provides a flexible input/output system with support for many file formats including DICOM, various 2D image formats and surface mesh data. Furthermore, it implements an advanced visualization system and interfaces to a wide range of 3D tracking hardware. Since it uses only highly portable libraries, MARVIN applications run on Unix/Linux, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows. PMID:18541330

  11. [Practice and research into multi-unit teaching of Medical Genetics.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shao-Ling; Xu, Si-Bin; Gong, Lei; Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Ping; Lin, Ai-Qin

    2010-10-01

    In order to fully arise the enthusiasm of students in active learning and promote their development, we attempted such multiple class teaching methods in teaching medical science of genetics as elaboration of the basic theory of genetics, synopsis on the advance of this field, application of multimedia teaching, case-based teaching, role-play change in class teaching, instructions on writing of reviewing articles and academic assessment by diverse examination. The results suggest that multiple teaching methods can greatly enhance the efficiency of class teaching and comprehensively cultivate the academic ability of the students as well as improve the quality of teachers. Compared with the conventional class teaching, students are much interested in giving lessons by case-based study, CAI teaching and role change of teachers and students in class teaching, which resulted in improvement of self-disciplined study of students, problem settlement, class performance, awareness of the importance of scientific research and reinforcement of team work. PMID:20943498

  12. First operation of the medical research facility at the NSLS for coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomlinson, W.; Gmuer, N.; Chapman, D.; Garrett, R.; Lazarz, N.; Moulin, H. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Thompson, A.C. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Zeman, H.D. (Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee, 38163 (US)); Brown, G.S. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Morrison, J.; Reiser, P

    1991-01-01

    The Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF) at the National Synchrotron Light Source has been completed and is operational for human coronary angiography experiments. The imaging system and hardware have been brought to SMERF from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory where prior studies were carried out. SMERF consists of a suite of rooms at the end of the high field superconducting wiggler X17 beamline and is classified as an Ambulatory health Care Facility. Since October of 1990 the coronary arteries of five patients have been imaged. Continuously improving image quality has shown that a large part of both the right coronary artery and the left anterior descending coronary artery can be imaged following a venous injection of contrast agent. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  13. First operation of the medical research facility at the NSLS for coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF) at the National Synchrotron Light Source has been completed and is operational for human coronary angiography experiments. The imaging system and hardware have been brought to SMERF from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory where prior studies were carried out. SMERF consists of a suite of rooms at the end of the high field superconducting wiggler X17 beamline and is classified as an Ambulatory health Care Facility. Since October of 1990 the coronary arteries of five patients have been imaged. Continuously improving image quality has shown that a large part of both the right coronary artery and the left anterior descending coronary artery can be imaged following a venous injection of contrast agent. 16 refs., 4 figs

  14. Hyperbaric oxygen: the Medical Research Council trials and their clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical trials of the use of hyperbaric oxygen in radiotherapy conducted by the Medical Research Council's working party have shown that local cure and survival can be improved in head and neck and cervical cancer. Evidence for benefit has been presented in carcinoma of bronchus, but none has so far been found in carcinoma of the bladder. Although hyperbaric oxygen has produced increased effect upon normal tissues as well as upon tumour, a real improvement in therapeutic ratio appears to be present. The future use of hyperbaric oxygen in radiotherapy will depend upon a comparison of effectiveness with other methods now being tested to improve radiotherapy. The trials have yielded much fundamental and clinical data of general relevance in the radiotherapy of malignant disease. (author)

  15. Acquiring evidence-based medicine and research skills in the undergraduate medical curriculum: three different didactical formats compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Zee; M. de Boer; A.D.C. Jaarsma

    2014-01-01

    Medical schools have recently witnessed a call for authentic research activities that equip students with the skills required for evidence-based medicine (EBM) and research. Because it is not always possible to make such activities available as a part of the curriculum, evaluating the effectiveness

  16. The Themes, Institutions, and People of Medical Education Research 1988-2010: Content Analysis of Abstracts from Six Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotgans, Jerome I.

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed at providing an overview of the most common themes of research into medical education. Changes in frequency of occurrence of these themes over time and differences between US and European journals were studied. The most productive institutions and researchers in the field were examined. A content analysis was carried out on…

  17. Association of Research Self-Efficacy with Medical Student Career Interests, Specialization, and Scholarship: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierer, S. Beth; Prayson, Richard A.; Dannefer, Elaine F.

    2015-01-01

    This study used variables proposed in social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to focus the evaluation of a research curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University (CCLCM). Eight cohorts of CCLCM medical students completed a web-based version of the six-scale Clinical Research Appraisal…

  18. [Whiplash and Werther effect: the potential of google insights for search for medical research and public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll-Hussong, M; Lahmann, C

    2011-06-01

    Illness behaviour involves cultural, situational and personal predispositions. World Wide Web search statistics provided by internet applications like Google Insights for Search have the potential to facilitate our research on the distribution of mental disorders, our understanding of both sociocultural imprintings and trends in psychophenomenology and could make a remarkable contribution to medical research and public health. PMID:21598205

  19. Organizational Culture, Performance and Career Choices of Ph.D.s: A Case Study of Dutch Medical Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weijden, Inge; de Gilder, Dick; Groenewegen, Peter; Geerling, Maaike

    2008-01-01

    Increasing demands for accountability and applicability raise the question of how organizational factors affect researchers' performance and career choices. In a study of Dutch medical Ph.D. student's experiences, organizational culture and climate and attitudes towards research quality are related to performance and career choices. Ph.D.s who…

  20. EVALUATION OF RESEARCH METHODOLOGY WORKSHOP FOR POSTGRADUATES IN A MEDICAL COLLEGE, TIRUPATI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Prabhu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dissertation writing and research has become mandatory for all the postgraduate students. As per the University norms, a postgraduate student has to undertake a research study and submit dissertation as per the rules and regulations. This present study aims to find out the improvement in the knowledge level of the first year postgraduate students in research methodology as assessed by pretest and posttest evaluations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study was done on research methodology workshops conducted during 2–4 September 2015 at SV Medical College, Tirupati. The improvement in the awareness levels was tested by pretest and posttest. Participant evaluation of the programme and feedback was also collected. The evaluation of the sessions was done using Median and 25-75 percentile grading. The grades converted into a numerical percentage and average grade % was calculated. A probability value of less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. RESULTS: The mean pretest score of 3.32 significantly improved to 10.53 in the posttest. The improvement was found to be relatively high with regard to reference writing (93%, type of referencing (88%, entering data on excel (78%, objectives (75% and framing a title (72%. The quality of the sessions was graded being good for all topics while some topics were graded as being excellent. Overall, all the topics had achieved a minimum mean percentage grade of 70% while reference writing guidelines, discussion writing and ethical issues in research had scored higher relative grade. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to improve the format of the workshop for addressing the needs of the postgraduates in dissertation work. The sessions should be short with higher emphasis in improving the skills in dissertation writing rather than improving their awareness level.

  1. Implementation of a versatile research data acquisition system using a commercially available medical ultrasound scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Enevoldsen, Marie Sand; Hansen, Jens Munk; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a versatile, open-architecture research data acquisition system using a commercially available medical ultrasound scanner. The open architecture will allow researchers and clinicians to rapidly develop applications and move them relatively easy to the clinic. The system consists of a standard PC equipped with a camera link and an ultrasound scanner equipped with a research interface. The ultrasound scanner is an easy-to-use imaging device that is capable of generating high-quality images. In addition to supporting the acquisition of multiple data types, such as B-mode, M-mode, pulsed Doppler, and color flow imaging, the machine provides users with full control over imaging parameters such as transmit level, excitation waveform, beam angle, and focal depth. Beamformed RF data can be acquired from regions of interest throughout the image plane and stored to a file with a simple button press. For clinical trials and investigational purposes, when an identical image plane is desired for both an experimental and a reference data set, interleaved data can be captured. This form of data acquisition allows switching between multiple setups while maintaining identical transducer, scanner, region of interest, and recording time. Data acquisition is controlled through a graphical user interface running on the PC. This program implements an interface for third-party software to interact with the application. A software development toolkit is developed to give researchers and clinicians the ability to utilize third-party software for data analysis and flexible manipulation of control parameters. Because of the advantages of speed of acquisition and clinical benefit, research projects have successfully used the system to test and implement their customized solutions for different applications. Three examples of system use are presented in this paper: evaluation of synthetic aperture sequential beamformation, transverse

  2. Medical Speciality Thesis: Contribution to a Controversial Issue with a Research Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Bilgin SAYDAM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aquisition of clinical and practical skills is the main target during the speciality training program. On the other hand, acquisition of skills in reading and interpreting scientific knowledge are also important training targets in order to develop and update clinical practice constantly. The process of thesis preparation during the speciality training provides an important opportunity to capture the skills in interpreting scientific knowledge. In Turkey, thesis writing has been obligatory for completion of speciality training for several years. Recently, there has been a discussion about the obligation for clinicians to write a thesis, especially those who are undertaking specialist training in education and research hospitals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pros and cons of thesis writing during speciality training using a questionnaire that was sent to specialists. This descriptive and analytical study was conducted as an e-questionnaire between December, 2013, and May, 2014. A likert scale consisted of 18 questions has been prepared in accordance with this study. Th e questionnaire was sent to 1536 physicians. 328 of the questionnaires have been included in the study by evaluating the responses obtained from 345 of the participants. Th e response rate was 23%. Th e Cronbach alpha coeff icient was 0.77. Out of the 328 questionnaires, 11.9 %were from Basic Medical Sciences, 57%from Internal Medical Sciences, and 30.2%from Surgical Medical Sciences. Among the respondents, the percentage of specialists, assistant professors, associate professors and professors were 20.7%, 8.2%, 13.7%, and 57.3%, respectively. Independent of specialty field and aff iliation, the respondents concluded that the conduction and thesis writing contributed to their scientific career in spite of the common problems they encountered regarding adequate time for preparation. Furthermore, they concluded that thesis writing had a positive eff ect in the

  3. Changing trend of viral hepatitis -- 'A twenty one year report from Pakistan medical research council research centre, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the frequency and pattern of Hepatitis B and C over the past twenty one years, in a liver research unit of Karachi. Retrospective analysis of the records of PMRC, Research Centre, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from 1987 to 2007 were reviewed. A special flow sheet was made where information of all patients with viral liver disease was entered. Patients having complete information of viral markers were included in the analysis. Cases with HBsAg, Anti HBc IgM positive and raised ALT were considered as acute Hepatitis B. HBs Ag/ Anti HBc IgG positive were considered as chronic Hepatitis B. Delta antibody positive with or without HBsAg were considered as Delta Hepatitis. Anti HCV positive and raised ALT more than ten times for less than 6 months were considered as acute Hepatitis C, whereas Anti HCV and HCV-RNA positive with or without raised ALT for more than six months were considered as chronic Hepatitis C. Anti HEV IgM and Anti HAV IgM positive were considered as acute Hepatitis E and A respectively. A total of 5193 cases fulfilling all criteria of viral hepatitis were seen in the past 21 years. Of the total 3247 (62.5 %) were males and 1946 (37.5 %) females giving a male to female ratio of 1.7:1 Hepatitis C was the most common infection seen in 2896 cases (55.8 %), followed by Hepatitis B in 1691 cases (32.6 %). Seventy five percent cases of Hepatitis B were males and 25 % females while 55% Hepatitis C cases were males and 45 % females. Hepatitis B was seen a decade earlier in different age groups than hepatitis C. Overall, out of the total 5193 cases, 2294 (44.2%) were of chronic hepatitis, 1430 (27.5%) cirrhosis, 1083 (20.8%) carriers and 346 (6.7%) had acute hepatitis (hepatitis B; 214 (61.8%), hepatitis C; 21 (6.0%). While hepatitis B and hepatitis C both were present in 3 (1.3%). Hepatitis E was 70 (20.2%) hepatitis A 12 (3.5%) and all markers were negative in 26 (7.5%) cases). Forty cases (0.8%) were of Hepatocellular carcinoma

  4. WE-A-16A-01: International Medical Physics Symposium: Increasing Access to Medical Physics Education/Training and Research Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortfeld, T [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ngoma, T [Ocean Road Cancer Institute, Dar Es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of); Odedina, F [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Morgan, S [IAEA PACT, Vienna (Austria); Wu, R [University of Arizona Cancer Center, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Sajo, E [University Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Ngwa, W [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    In response to a world in which cancer is a growing global health challenge, there is now a greater need for US Medical Physicists and other Radiation Oncology professionals across institutions to work together and be more globally engaged in the fight against cancer. There are currently many opportunities for Medical Physicists to contribute to alleviating this pressing need, especially in helping enhance access to Medical Physics Education/training and Research Excellence across international boundaries, particularly for low and middle-income countries (LMIC), which suffer from a drastic shortage of accessible knowledge and quality training programs in radiotherapy. Many Medical Physicists are not aware of the range of opportunities that even with small effort could have a high impact. Faculty at the two CAMPEP-accredited Medical Physics Programs in New England: the University of Massachusetts Lowell and Harvard Medical School have developed a growing alliance to increase Access to Medical Physics Education/training and Research Excellence (AMPERE), and facilitate greater active involvement of U.S. Medical Physicists in helping the global fight against cancer and cancer disparities. In this symposium, AMPERE Alliance members and partners from Europe and Africa will present and discuss the growing global cancer challenge, the dearth of knowledge, research, and other barriers to providing life-saving radiotherapy in LMIC, mechanisms for meeting these challenges, the different opportunities for participation by Medical Physicists, including students and residents, and how participation can be facilitated to increase AMPERE for global health. Learning Objectives: To learn about the growing global cancer challenge, areas of greatest need and limitations to accessing knowledge and quality radiotherapy training programs, especially in LMIC; To learn about the range of opportunities for Medical Physicists, including students and residents, to work together in global

  5. Initiating undergraduate medical students into communities of research practise: what do supervisors recommend?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riley Simon C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much has been written in the educational literature on the value of communities of practise in enhancing student learning. Here, we take the experience of senior undergraduate medical students involved in short-term research as a member of a team as a paradigm for learning in a community of practise. Based on feedback from experienced supervisors, we offer recommendations for initiating students into the research culture of their team. In so doing, we endeavour to create a bridge between theory and practise through disseminating advice on good supervisory practise, where the supervisor is perceived as an educator responsible for designing the research process to optimize student learning. Methods Using the questionnaire design tool SurveyMonkey and comprehensive lists of contact details of staff who had supervised research projects at the University of Edinburgh during 1995 - 2008, current and previous supervisors were invited to recommend procedures which they had found successful in initiating students into the research culture of a team. Text responses were then coded in the form of derivative recommendations and categorized under general themes and sub-themes. Results Using the chi-square tests of linear trend and association, evidence was found for a positive trend towards more experienced supervisors offering responses (χ2 = 16.833, p 2 = 0.482, p = 0.487, n = 203, respectively. A total of 126 codes were extracted from the text responses of 65 respondents. These codes were simplified to form a complete list of 52 recommendations, which were in turn categorized under seven derivative overarching themes, the most highly represented themes being Connecting the student with others and Cultivating self-efficacy in research competence. Conclusions Through the design of a coding frame for supervisor responses, a wealth of ideas has been captured to make communities of research practise effective mediums for undergraduate

  6. Short-term outcomes of a program developed to inculcate research essentials in undergraduate medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, V; Ramnarayan, K; Abraham, RR; Pallath, V; Kamath, A; Kodidela, S

    2015-01-01

    -institutional collaborations, 14 publications and 15 conference presentations. An area for improvement noted was to have the MSP implemented in the curriculum without increasing students’ overall workload and stress. Conclusion: The study identified strengths and weaknesses of the MSP program. Our model of undergraduate research project may be incorporated in undergraduate medical programs to foster positive attitude and knowledge base about scientific research and to instil research skills among students. PMID:26119435

  7. Short-term outcomes of a program developed to inculcate research essentials in undergraduate medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Devi

    2015-01-01

    -institutional collaborations, 14 publications and 15 conference presentations. An area for improvement noted was to have the MSP implemented in the curriculum without increasing students′ overall workload and stress. Conclusion: The study identified strengths and weaknesses of the MSP program. Our model of undergraduate research project may be incorporated in undergraduate medical programs to foster positive attitude and knowledge base about scientific research and to instil research skills among students.

  8. The conceptual design of waste repository for radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities containing comparatively high radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advisory Committee on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Backend Policy reported the basic approach to the RI and Institute etc. wastes on March 2002. According to it, radioactive waste form medical, industrial and research facilities should be classified by their radioactivity properties and physical and chemical properties, and should be disposed in the appropriate types of repository with that classification. For the radioactive waste containing comparatively high radioactivity generated from reactors, NSC has established the Concentration limit for disposal. NSC is now discussing about the limit for the radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities containing comparatively high radioactivity. Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) preliminary studied about the repository for radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities and discussed about the problems for design on H12. This study was started to consider those problems, and to develop the conceptual design of the repository for radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities. Safety assessment for that repository is also performed. The result of this study showed that radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities of high activity should be disposed in the repository that has higher performance of barrier system comparing with the vault type near surface facility. If the conditions of the natural barrier and the engineering barrier are clearer, optimization of the design will be possible. (author)

  9. Consumer-Involved Participatory Research to Address General Medical Health and Wellness in a Community Mental Health Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Sharat P; Pancake, Laura S; Dandino, Elizabeth S; Wells, Kenneth B

    2015-12-01

    Barriers to sustainably implementing general medical interventions in community mental health (CMH) settings include role uncertainty, consumer engagement, workforce limitations, and sustainable reimbursement. To address these barriers, this project used a community-partnered participatory research framework to create a stakeholder-based general medical and wellness intervention in a large CMH organization, with consumers involved in all decision-making processes. Consumers faced practical barriers to participating in organizational decision making, but their narratives were critical in establishing priorities and ensuring sustainability. Addressing baseline knowledge and readiness of stakeholders and functional challenges to consumer involvement can aid stakeholder-based approaches to implementing general medical interventions in CMH settings. PMID:26174950

  10. Global medical education partnerships to expand specialty expertise: a case report on building neurology clinical and research capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Kaddumukasa, Mark; Katabira, Elly; Salata, Robert A.; Costa, Marco A.; Ddumba, Edward; Furlan, Anthony; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Kamya, Moses R.; Kayima, James; Longenecker, Chris T.; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Mondo, Charles; Moore, Shirley; Pundik, Svetlana; Sewankambo, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurological disorders are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan African, but resources for their management are scarce. Collaborations between training institutions in developed and resource-limited countries can be a successful model for supporting specialty medical education and increasing clinical and research capacity. Case report This report describes a US National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) to enhance ...

  11. The Evolution of Legislation in the Field of Medically Assisted Reproduction and Embryo Stem Cell Research in European Union Members

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Paolo Busardò; Matteo Gulino; Simona Napoletano; Simona Zaami; Paola Frati

    2014-01-01

    Medically Assisted Reproduction (MAR), involving in vitro fertilisation (IVF), and research on embryos have created expectation to many people affected by infertility; at the same time it has generated a surplus of laws and ethical and social debates. Undoubtedly, MAR represents a rather new medical field and constant developments in medicine and new opportunities continue to defy the attempt to respond to those questions. In this paper, the authors reviewed the current legislation in the 28 ...

  12. Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision: Translating Research into the Rapid Expansion of Services in Kenya, 2008–2011

    OpenAIRE

    Mwandi, Zebedee; Murphy, Anne; Reed, Jason; Chesang, Kipruto; Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel; Agot, Kawango; Llewellyn, Emma; Kirui, Charles; Serrem, Kennedy; Abuya, Isaac; Loolpapit, Mores; Mbayaki, Regina; Kiriro, Ndungu; Cherutich, Peter; Muraguri, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Since the World Health Organization and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS recommended implementation of medical male circumcision (MC) as part of HIV prevention in areas with low MC and high HIV prevalence rates in 2007, the government of Kenya has developed a strategy to circumcise 80% of uncircumcised men within five years. To facilitate the quick translation of research to practice, a national MC task force was formed in 2007, a medical MC policy was implemented in early 2008,...

  13. A STUDY ON AWARENESS ABOUT HIV/AIDS AMO NG FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS OF BANGALORE MEDICAL COLLEGE AND RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaraj

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: HIV/AIDS epidemic is one of the challenges in public health in India. Young people are more vulnerable for getting in contact with the disease. Medical students during their tenure of student life can play a pivotal role in knowledge transmission about th e disease to the general public. This study was conducted at Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute to find out the awareness of HIV/AIDS among first year medical students. METHODOLOGY: A Cross sectional study was done among 250 MBBS students of Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute during the academic year of 2012 - 2013 . The information was collected from them within 2 - 3 weeks of admission to the course using pre - tested semi structured questionnaire. RESULTS: The mean age of the study population was 18 ( + 1 years. Males comprised 64% and females comprised 36% of respondents. 29% of them were from rural background and 67% from Urban. 97% of the participants know that HIV causative agent is virus. 49% of them said it is contagious , 42% of them said non - contagious and 8.9% say they don’t know. They had adequate knowledge about modes of transmission of HIV/AIDS was through blood transfusion , unsterilized instrument , and mother to child transmission. But regarding sexual transmission among tw o HIV infected person , 40% of them said it is safe . 92% of them felt HIV can be prevented by taking proper precautions. 94% of them got the information from mass media especially from TV. 55% of them received formal sex education in Schools and Colleges. CONCLUSION: Young medical students can be used as a resource persons for educating the youth at the community level.

  14. Comparison research on stakeholders analysis of disposition of medical dispute between China and abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We learn about the methods, process, effects of each stakeholder and the principles of the disposition of medical dispute home and abroad through stakeholder analysis. Methods: We investigate the methods, process and the principles of the disposition of medical dispute home and abroad by literature retrieval, key informant interview and depth interview. Results: The stakeholders of medical disputes mainly include patients and families, medical staff and hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, governments, laws, non-government organizations and media. They play different roles in medical disputes and have different effects. Over all, patients and families, medical staff and hospitals have the greatest effect and then laws, media, government, non-government organizations and pharmaceutical companies. Conclusion: Different stakeholders affect the disposition of medical disputes differently. It is crucial to establish harmonious relationship between patients and doctors and to build harmonious society by untangling the responsibility between all the stakeholders and dispose medical disputes quickly and effectively.

  15. Clinicalcodes: an online clinical codes repository to improve the validity and reproducibility of research using electronic medical records

    OpenAIRE

    Springate, DA; Kontopantelis, E; Ashcroft, DM; Olier, I.; Parisi, R; Chamapiwa, E; Reeves, D

    2014-01-01

    Lists of clinical codes are the foundation for research undertaken using electronic medical records (EMRs). If clinical code lists are not available, reviewers are unable to determine the validity of research, full study replication is impossible, researchers are unable to make effective comparisons between studies, and the construction of new code lists is subject to much duplication of effort. Despite this, the publication of clinical codes is rarely if ever a requirement for obtaining gran...

  16. Study of co-authorship network of papers in the Journal of Research in Medical Sciences using social network analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Firoozeh Zare-Farashbandi; Ehsan Geraei; Saba Siamaki

    2014-01-01

    Background: Co-authorship is one of the most tangible forms of research collaboration. A co-authorship network is a social network in which the authors through participation in one or more publication through an indirect path have linked to each other. The present research using the social network analysis studied co-authorship network of 681 articles published in Journal of Research in Medical Sciences (JRMS) during 2008-2012. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out with the sciento...

  17. A tracking system for laboratory mice to support medical researchers in behavioral analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrì, S; Mainetti, L; Patrono, L; Pieretti, S; Secco, A; Sergi, I

    2015-08-01

    The behavioral analysis of laboratory mice plays a key role in several medical and scientific research areas, such as biology, toxicology, pharmacology, and so on. Important information on mice behavior and their reaction to a particular stimulus is deduced from a careful analysis of their movements. Moreover, behavioral analysis of genetically modified mice allows obtaining important information about particular genes, phenotypes or drug effects. The techniques commonly adopted to support such analysis have many limitations, which make the related systems particularly ineffective. Currently, the engineering community is working to explore innovative identification and sensing technologies to develop new tracking systems able to guarantee benefits to animals' behavior analysis. This work presents a tracking solution based on passive Radio Frequency Identification Technology (RFID) in Ultra High Frequency (UHF) band. Much emphasis is given to the software component of the system, based on a Web-oriented solution, able to process the raw tracking data coming from a hardware system, and offer 2D and 3D tracking information as well as reports and dashboards about mice behavior. The system has been widely tested using laboratory mice and compared with an automated video-tracking software (i.e., EthoVision). The obtained results have demonstrated the effectiveness and reliability of the proposed solution, which is able to correctly detect the events occurring in the animals' cage, and to offer a complete and user-friendly tool to support researchers in behavioral analysis of laboratory mice. PMID:26737401

  18. Research design and statistical methods in Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences (PJMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Sohail; Shah, Syed Wadood Ali; Rafiq, M.; Khan, Ajmal

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This article compares the study design and statistical methods used in 2005, 2010 and 2015 of Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences (PJMS). Methods: Only original articles of PJMS were considered for the analysis. The articles were carefully reviewed for statistical methods and designs, and then recorded accordingly. The frequency of each statistical method and research design was estimated and compared with previous years. Results: A total of 429 articles were evaluated (n=74 in 2005, n=179 in 2010, n=176 in 2015) in which 171 (40%) were cross-sectional and 116 (27%) were prospective study designs. A verity of statistical methods were found in the analysis. The most frequent methods include: descriptive statistics (n=315, 73.4%), chi-square/Fisher’s exact tests (n=205, 47.8%) and student t-test (n=186, 43.4%). There was a significant increase in the use of statistical methods over time period: t-test, chi-square/Fisher’s exact test, logistic regression, epidemiological statistics, and non-parametric tests. Conclusion: This study shows that a diverse variety of statistical methods have been used in the research articles of PJMS and frequency improved from 2005 to 2015. However, descriptive statistics was the most frequent method of statistical analysis in the published articles while cross-sectional study design was common study design. PMID:27022365

  19. Advancing science diplomacy: Indonesia and the US Naval Medical Research Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Frank L

    2014-12-01

    Science diplomacy supposedly builds international cooperation through scientific and technical exchange. In practice, however, there are important but often overlooked instances where it might create conflict instead--as with accusations of espionage surrounding the US Naval Medical Research Unit 2 (NAMRU-2) in Indonesia. Did American science diplomacy backfire in Indonesia and, if so, why? Most literature fails to anticipate this possibility, let alone explain it, since science diplomacy is rarely subject to critical analysis. Rather than shun politics or, similarly, simply blame the demise of NAMRU-2 on the military or avian influenza, I consider both the successes and failures of this research unit in the context of Indonesia's transition to democracy and America's legacy from the Cold War. Based on this history, I propose that the effects of science diplomacy depend on strategic communication and exchange, as well as elite influence and material incentives. Therefore, by challenging the conventional wisdom about science diplomacy, NAMRU-2 can help advance the theory and practice of this potentially useful tool of statecraft. PMID:25608440

  20. The principles of medical ethics and medical research Os princípios da ética médica e da pesquisa médica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Harris

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I discuss the application of the principles of medical ethics and of medical research to the case of children and others whose consent to treatment and to research is problematic. Public health depends substantially on the possibility of ongoing research into all conditions which affect the health of the people. Constraints on this research are therefore a public health issue. Moreover and more importantly the possibility of predictive testing and indeed of screening for health-relevant conditions is an important public health tool, and limitations on the use of this tool are of great significance to public health medicine. Having considered the particular problems created by research and predictive testing on children for late-onset conditions I go on to discuss research on those whose consent is problematic more generally. I conclude with radical recommendations for the reform of The Declaration of Helsinki and of the International Ethics Guidelines for Biomedical Research Involving Human Subjects, prepared by the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS.Nesse artigo, discuto a aplicação dos princípios de ética médica e da pesquisa médica ao caso de crianças e outros cujo consentimento a tratamento e pesquisa é problemático. A saúde pública depende substancialmente da possibilidade da continuidade de pesquisas dirigidas a todas as condições que afetam a saúde da população. Restrições nessas pesquisas são, portanto, uma questão de saúde pública. Além disso, e mais importante, testagens preditivas e, especialmente, screening para condições relevantes (para à saúde constituem-se em valiosos instrumentos de saúde pública. Limitações no uso desses instrumentos são da maior significância à medicina ligada à saúde pública. Levando em consideração os problemas particulares criados pela pesquisa e testagem preditiva para crianças no que se refere a condições que se