WorldWideScience

Sample records for brookhaven high flux

  1. The High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory`s High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) was built because of the need of the scientist to always want `more`. In the mid-50`s the Brookhaven Graphite reactor was churning away producing a number of new results when the current generation of scientists, led by Donald Hughes, realized the need for a high flux reactor and started down the political, scientific and engineering path that led to the BFBR. The effort was joined by a number of engineers and scientists among them, Chemick, Hastings, Kouts, and Hendrie, who came up with the novel design of the HFBR. The two innovative features that have been incorporated in nearly all other research reactors built since are: (i) an under moderated core arrangement which enables the thermal flux to peak outside the core region where beam tubes can be placed, and (ii) beam tubes that are tangential to the core which decrease the fast neutron background without affecting the thermal beam intensity. Construction began in the fall of 1961 and four years later, at a cost of $12 Million, criticality was achieved on Halloween Night, 1965. Thus began 30 years of scientific accomplishments.

  2. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  3. Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harpeneau, Evan M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2011-06-24

    On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions.

  4. Brookhaven highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  5. Brookhaven leak reactor to close

    CERN Multimedia

    MacIlwain, C

    1999-01-01

    The DOE has announced that the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven is to close for good. Though the news was not unexpected researchers were angry the decision had been taken before the review to assess the impact of reopening the reactor had been concluded (1 page).

  6. High field magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, A; Muratore, J; Parker, B; Sampson, W; Wanderer, P J; Willen, E

    2000-01-01

    The magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focussed on superconducting magnets for particle accelerators. The effort includes magnet production at the laboratory and in industry, magnet R&D, and test facilities for magnets and superconductors. Nearly 2000 magnets-dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles and correctors for the arc and insertion regions-were produced for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which is being commissioned. Currently, production of helical dipoles for the polarized proton program at RHIC, insertion region dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and an insertion magnet system for the Hadron-Elektron-Ring- Analage (HERA) collider at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) is underway. The R&D effort is exploring dipoles with fields above 10 T for use in post-LHC colliders. Brittle superconductors-Nb/sub 3/Sn or HTS-are being used for these magnets. The superconductor test facility measures short-sample currents and other characteristics of sample...

  7. Initial experiments with the Nevis Cyclotron, the Brookhaven Cosmotron, the Brookhaven AGS and their effects on high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The first experiment at the Nevis Cyclotron by Bernardini, Booth and Lindenbaum demonstrated that nuclear stars are produced by a nucleon-nucleon cascade within the nucleon. This solved a long standing problem in Cosmic rays and made it clear that where they overlap cosmic ray investigation would not be competitive with accelerator investigations. The initial experiments at the Brookhaven Cosmotron by Lindenbaum and Yuan demonstrated that low energy pion nucleon scattering and pion production were unexpectedly mostly due to excitation of the isotopic spin = angular momentum = 3/2 isobaric state of the nucleon. This contradicted the Fermi statistical theory and led to the Isobar model proposed by the author and a collaborator. The initial experiments at the AGS by the author and collaborators demonstrated that the Pomeronchuck Theorem would not come true till at least several hundred GeV. These scattering experiments led to the development of the ''On-line Computer Technique'' by the author and collaborators which is now the almost universal technique in high energy physics. The first accomplishment which flowed from this technique led to contradiction of the Regge pole theory as a dynamical asymptotic theory, by the author and collaborators. The first critical experimental proof of the forward dispersion relation in strong interactions was accomplished by the author and collaborators. They were then used as a crystal ball to predict that ''Asymptopia''---the theoretically promised land where all asymptotic theorems come true---would not be reached till at least 25,000 BeV and probably not before 1,000,000 BeV. 26 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Reliable operation of the Brookhaven EBIS for highly charged ion production for RHIC and NSRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beebe, E., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Alessi, J., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Binello, S., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Kanesue, T., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; McCafferty, D., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Morris, J., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Okamura, M., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Pikin, A., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Ritter, J., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Schoepfer, R., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-01-09

    An Electron Beam Ion Source for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC EBIS) was commissioned at Brookhaven in September 2010 and since then it routinely supplies ions for RHIC and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) as the main source of highly charged ions from Helium to Uranium. Using three external primary ion sources for 1+ injection into the EBIS and an electrostatic injection beam line, ion species at the EBIS exit can be switched in 0.2 s. A total of 16 different ion species have been produced to date. The length and the capacity of the ion trap have been increased by 20% by extending the trap by two more drift tubes, compared with the original design. The fraction of Au{sup 32+} in the EBIS Au spectrum is approximately 12% for 70-80% electron beam neutralization and 8 pulses operation in a 5 Hertz train and 4-5 s super cycle. For single pulse per super cycle operation and 25% electron beam neutralization, the EBIS achieves the theoretical Au{sup 32+} fractional output of 18%. Long term stability has been very good with availability of the beam from RHIC EBIS during 2012 and 2014 RHIC runs approximately 99.8%.

  9. Brookhaven Highlights, January 1982-March 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuper, J.B.H.; Rustad, M.C. (eds.)

    1983-01-01

    Research at Brookhaven National Laboratory is summarized. Major headings are high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science, support activities and administration. (GHT)

  10. Brookhaven highlights, fiscal year 1985, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory are briefly discussed. These include work at the National Synchrotron Light Source, the High Flux Beam Reactor, and the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Areas of research include heavy ion reactions, neutrino oscillations, low-level waste, nuclear data, medicine, biology, chemistry, parallel computing, optics. Also provided are general and administrative news, a financial report. (LEW)

  11. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  12. The RaDIATE High-Energy Proton Materials Irradiation Experiment at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammigan, Kavin; et al.

    2017-05-01

    The RaDIATE collaboration (Radiation Damage In Accelerator Target Environments) was founded in 2012 to bring together the high-energy accelerator target and nuclear materials communities to address the challenging issue of radiation damage effects in beam-intercepting materials. Success of current and future high intensity accelerator target facilities requires a fundamental understanding of these effects including measurement of materials property data. Toward this goal, the RaDIATE collaboration organized and carried out a materials irradiation run at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer facility (BLIP). The experiment utilized a 181 MeV proton beam to irradiate several capsules, each containing many candidate material samples for various accelerator components. Materials included various grades/alloys of beryllium, graphite, silicon, iridium, titanium, TZM, CuCrZr, and aluminum. Attainable peak damage from an 8-week irradiation run ranges from 0.03 DPA (Be) to 7 DPA (Ir). Helium production is expected to range from 5 appm/DPA (Ir) to 3,000 appm/DPA (Be). The motivation, experimental parameters, as well as the post-irradiation examination plans of this experiment are described.

  13. Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Brookhaven Linac Isoptope Producer (BLIP)—positioned at the forefront of research into radioisotopes used in cancer treatment and diagnosis—produces commercially...

  14. Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Data Analysis for U.S. Veterans Making Glass Invisible: A Nanoscience-Based Disappearing Act Our Mission We ... our diverse portfolio of licensable technologies. | More Outlook Web Access Brookhaven National Lab PO Box 5000 Upton, ...

  15. High-flux solar photon processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorents, D C; Narang, S; Huestis, D C; Mooney, J L; Mill, T; Song, H K; Ventura, S [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1992-06-01

    This study was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of identifying high-flux photoprocesses that would lead to beneficial national and commercial applications. The specific focus on high-flux photoprocesses is based on the recent development by NREL of solar concentrator technology capable of delivering record flux levels. We examined photolytic and photocatalytic chemical processes as well as photothermal processes in the search for processes where concentrated solar flux would offer a unique advantage. 37 refs.

  16. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HFIR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a light-water cooled and moderated reactor that is the United States’ highest flux reactor-based neutron source. HFIR...

  17. Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCray, S.B.

    1989-10-24

    Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

  18. RADIATION DOSIMETRY OF THE PRESSURE VESSEL INTERNALS OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLDEN,N.E.; RECINIELLO,R.N.; HU,J.P.; RORER,D.C.

    2002-08-18

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the transition plate, and the control rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex{trademark} polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal ''peanut'' ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rate, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive Microshield code were used to model the gamma transport and dose buildup.

  19. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety). (GHT)

  20. Radiological environmental monitoring report for Brookhaven National Laboratory 1967--1970

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, C.B.; Hull, A.P.

    1998-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was established in 1947 on the former Army Camp Upton site located in central Long Island, New York. From the very beginning, BNL has monitored the environment on and around the Laboratory site to assess the effects of its operations on the environment. This document summarizes the environmental data collected for the years 1967, 1968, 1969, and 1970. Thus, it fills a gap in the series of BNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1962. The data in this document reflect measurements for those four years of concentrations and/or amounts of airborne radioactivity, radioactivity in streams and ground water, and external radiation levels in the vicinity of BNL. Also included are estimates, made at that time, of BNL`s contribution to radioactivity in the environment. Among the major scientific facilities operated at BNL are the High Flux Beam Reactor, Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, and the 60-inch Cyclotron.

  1. Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

    2013-04-01

    Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000ÀC showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

  2. High heat flux single phase heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Javier A.; Izenson, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained to date in a program to develop a high heat flux, single-phase heat exchanger for spacecraft thermal management. The intended application is a net generation interface heat exchanger to couple the crew module water thermal bus to the two-phase ammonia main thermal bus in the Space Station Freedom. The large size of the interface heat exchanger is dictated by the relatively poor water-side heat transfer characteristics. The objective of this program is to develop a single-phase heat transfer approach which can achieve heat fluxes and heat transfer coefficients comparable to those of the evaporation ammonia side. A new heat exchanger concept has been developed to meet these objecties. The main feature of this heat exchanger is that it can achieve very high heat fluxes with a pressure drop one to two orders of magnitude lower than those of previous microchannel or jet impingement high heat flux heat exchangers. This paper describes proof-of-concept experiments performed in air and water and presents analytical model of the heat exchanger.

  3. High flux expansion divertor studies in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Bell, R E; Gates, D A; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Maqueda, R; Menard, J E; Mueller, D; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L

    2009-06-29

    Projections for high-performance H-mode scenarios in spherical torus (ST)-based devices assume low electron collisionality for increased efficiency of the neutral beam current drive. At lower collisionality (lower density), the mitigation techniques based on induced divertor volumetric power and momentum losses may not be capable of reducing heat and material erosion to acceptable levels in a compact ST divertor. Divertor geometry can also be used to reduce high peak heat and particle fluxes by flaring a scrape-off layer (SOL) flux tube at the divertor plate, and by optimizing the angle at which the flux tube intersects the divertor plate, or reduce heat flow to the divertor by increasing the length of the flux tube. The recently proposed advanced divertor concepts [1, 2] take advantage of these geometry effects. In a high triangularity ST plasma configuration, the magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point (SP) is inherently high, leading to a reduction of heat and particle fluxes and a facilitated access to the outer SP detachment, as has been demonstrated recently in NSTX [3]. The natural synergy of the highly-shaped high-performance ST plasmas with beneficial divertor properties motivated a further systematic study of the high flux expansion divertor. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a mid-sized device with the aspect ratio A = 1.3-1.5 [4]. In NSTX, the graphite tile divertor has an open horizontal plate geometry. The divertor magnetic configuration geometry was systematically changed in an experiment by either (1) changing the distance between the lower divertor X-point and the divertor plate (X-point height h{sub X}), or by (2) keeping the X-point height constant and increasing the outer SP radius. An initial analysis of the former experiment is presented below. Since in the divertor the poloidal field B{sub {theta}} strength is proportional to h{sub X}, the X-point height variation changed the divertor plasma wetted area due to

  4. High flux diffractometers on reactor neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewat, Alan W.

    2006-11-01

    Continuous neutron sources such as reactors can deliver a very high time-averaged flux to the sample using a relatively wide band of wavelengths, while still retaining good resolution. For example, the D20 diffractometer at ILL Grenoble, the world's highest flux neutron powder machine, can collect complete patterns at 100 ms intervals, and this has been important for the real time study of explosive SHS reactions. New very large 2D detectors, such as those recently installed on D2B and D19 at ILL, are up to an order of magnitude larger than previous designs, and will provide unmatched speed of data collection from very small samples, opening up new scientific perspectives for powder and single crystal diffraction. We will discuss future reactor based diffractometers designed for rapid data collection from small samples in special environments.

  5. Theoretical models of flux pinning and flux motion in high-{Tc} superconducting oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, D.O.

    1991-12-31

    Various issues involved in the development of phenomenological models of flux pinning and motion in high-{Tc} oxides are discussed. A simplified model is presented for the critical current density and is used to examine the question of whether flux flow results from an instability due to plasticity of the flux-line array or from pin breaking.

  6. The RaDIATE High-Energy Proton Materials Irradiation Experiment at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Ammigan, Kavin; Amroussia, Aida; Avilov, Mikhail; Boehlert, Carl; Calviani, Marco; Casella, Andrew; Densham, Chris; Fornasiere, Elvis; Hurh, Patrick; Ishida, Taku; KUKSENKO Viacheslav; Lee, Yongjoong; Makimura, Shunsuke; Mausner, Leonard; Medvedev, Dmitri

    2017-01-01

    The RaDIATE collaboration (Radiation Damage In Accelerator Target Environments) was founded in 2012 to bring together the high-energy accelerator target and nuclear materials communities to address the challenging issue of radiation damage effects in beam-intercepting materials. Success of current and future high intensity accelerator target facilities requires a fundamental understanding of these effects including measurement of materials property data. Toward this goal, the RaDIATE collabor...

  7. Biological Effects of Particles with Very High Energy Deposition on Mammalian Cells Utilizing the Brookhaven Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Janapriya; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wang, Minli

    2013-01-01

    High LET radiation from GCR (Galactic Cosmic Rays) consisting mainly of high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei and secondary protons and neutrons, and secondaries from protons in SPE (Solar Particle Event) pose a major health risk to astronauts due to induction of DNA damage and oxidative stress. Experiments with high energy particles mimicking the space environment for estimation of radiation risk are being performed at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL. Experiments with low energy particles comparing to high energy particles of similar LET are of interest for investigation of the role of track structure on biological effects. For this purpose, we report results utilizing the Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator at BNL. The primary objective of our studies is to elucidate the influence of high vs low energy deposition on track structure, delta ray contribution and resulting biological responses. These low energy ions are of special relevance as these energies may occur following absorption through the spacecraft and shielding materials in human tissues and nuclear fragments produced in tissues by high energy protons and neutrons. This study will help to verify the efficiency of these low energy particles and better understand how various cell types respond to them.

  8. High-flux cellulose acetate membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeddeker, K.W.; Finken, H.; Wenzlaff, A.

    1981-01-01

    Three routes to increase the permeate flux of asymmetric cellulose diacetate membranes of the Loeb-Sourirajan type are investigated: increasing the hydrophilicity of the membranes; increasing their compaction stability; employing a swelling agent which allows for higher solvent-to-polymer ratio in the casting solution. The effect of casting solution composition on flux and rejection of formamide-modified cellulose acetate membranes is shown in Figure 1, illustrating the general capability of this membrane type as function of solvent concentration. Membranes of casting solution composition cellulose diacetate/acetone/formamide 23/52/25 (solvent-to-polymer ratio 2.26) were used as reference membranes in this work.

  9. High-flux cellulose acetate membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeddeker, K.W.; Finken, H.; Wenzlaff, A.

    1981-01-01

    Three routes to increase the permeate flux of asymmetric cellulose diacetate membranes of the Loeb-Sourirajan type were investigated: increasing the hydrophilicity of the membranes; increasing their compaction stability, and employing a swelling agent which allows for higher solvent-to-polymer ratio in the casting solution. The effect of casting solution composition on flux and rejection of formamide-modified cellulose acetate membrane is included, illustrating the general capability of this membrane type as function of solvent concentration. Membranes of casting solution composition cellulose diacetate/acetone/formamide 23/52/25 were used as reference membranes in the work. 6 figures. (DP)

  10. Periods of High Intensity Solar Proton Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xapsos, Michael A.; Stauffer, Craig A.; Jordan, Thomas M.; Adams, James H.; Dietrich, William F.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis is presented for times during a space mission that specified solar proton flux levels are exceeded. This includes both total time and continuous time periods during missions. Results for the solar maximum and solar minimum phases of the solar cycle are presented and compared for a broad range of proton energies and shielding levels. This type of approach is more amenable to reliability analysis for spacecraft systems and instrumentation than standard statistical models.

  11. Baseline high heat flux and plasma facing materials for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Y.; Schmid, K.; Balden, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Loewenhoff, Th.; Ito, A.; Hasegawa, A.; Hardie, C.; Porton, M.; Gilbert, M.

    2017-09-01

    In fusion reactors, surfaces of plasma facing components (PFCs) are exposed to high heat and particle flux. Tungsten and Copper alloys are primary candidates for plasma facing materials (PFMs) and coolant tube materials, respectively, mainly due to high thermal conductivity and, in the case of tungsten, its high melting point. In this paper, recent understandings and future issues on responses of tungsten and Cu alloys to fusion environments (high particle flux (including T and He), high heat flux, and high neutron doses) are reviewed. This review paper includes; Tritium retention in tungsten (K. Schmid and M. Balden), Impact of stationary and transient heat loads on tungsten (J.W. Coenen and Th. Loewenhoff), Helium effects on surface morphology of tungsten (Y. Ueda and A. Ito), Neutron radiation effects in tungsten (A. Hasegawa), and Copper and copper alloys development for high heat flux components (C. Hardie, M. Porton, and M. Gilbert).

  12. Brookhaven highlights, October 1978-September 1979. [October 1978 to September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    These highlights present an overview of the major research and development achievements at Brookhaven National Laboratory from October 1978 to September 1979. Specific areas covered include: accelerator and high energy physics programs; high energy physics research; the AGS and improvements to the AGS; neutral beam development; heavy ion fusion; superconducting power cables; ISABELLE storage rings; the BNL Tandem accelerator; heavy ion experiments at the Tandem; the High Flux Beam Reactor; medium energy physics; nuclear theory; atomic and applied physics; solid state physics; neutron scattering studies; x-ray scattering studies; solid state theory; defects and disorder in solids; surface physics; the National Synchrotron Light Source ; Chemistry Department; Biology Department; Medical Department; energy sciences; environmental sciences; energy technology programs; National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems; advanced reactor systems; nuclear safety; National Nuclear Data Center; nuclear materials safeguards; Applied Mathematics Department; and support activities. (GHT)

  13. Dynamic resistance of a high-Tc superconducting flux pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhenan; Hamilton, K.; Amemiya, Naoyuki; Badcock, R. A.; Bumby, C. W.

    2014-09-01

    Superconducting flux pumps enable large currents to be injected into a superconducting circuit, without the requirement for thermally conducting current leads which bridge between the cryogenic environment and room temperature. In this work, we have built and studied a mechanically rotating flux pump which employs a coated conductor high-Tc superconducting (HTS) stator. This flux pump has been used to excite an HTS double pancake coil at 77 K. Operation of the flux pump causes the current within the superconducting circuit to increase over time, before saturating at a limiting value. Interestingly, the superconducting flux pump is found to possess an effective internal resistance, Reff, which varies linearly with frequency, and is two orders of magnitude larger than the measured series resistance of the soldered contacts within the circuit. This internal resistance sets a limit for the maximum achievable output current from the flux pump, which is independent of the operating frequency. We attribute this effect to dynamic resistance within the superconducting stator wire which is caused by the interaction between the DC transport current and the imposed alternating magnetic field. We provide an analytical expression describing the output characteristics of our rotating flux pump in the high frequency limit, and demonstrate that it describes the time-dependent behavior of our experimental circuit. Dynamic resistance is highlighted as a generic issue that must be considered when optimizing the design of an HTS flux pump.

  14. Brookhaven highlights. [Fiscal year 1992, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  15. Thermal problems on high flux beam lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Robert T.

    1984-05-01

    Wiggler and undulator magnets can provide very intense photon flux densities to beam line components. This paper addresses some thermal/materials consequences due to such impingement. The LBL/Exxon/SSRL hybrid-wiggler beam line VI [1] now nearing operation will be able to provide up to ˜ 7 kW of total photon power at planned SPEAR operating conditions. The first masks are located at 6.5 m from the source and may receive a peak power density (transverse to the beam) exceeding 20 kW/cm 2. Significantly, this heat transfer rate exceeds that radiated from the sun's surface (7 kW/cm 2) and is comparable to that if welding torches. Clearly, cooling and configuration are of critical importance. Configurations for the first mask, the movable mask and the pivot mask on this beam line are presented together with considerations of thermal stress fatigue and of heat transfer by conduction to water-cooling circuits. Some preliminary information on the heating of crystals and mirrors is also presented. For the future, many additional intense wiggler/undulator beam lines are contemplated at several storage rings. The design of these beamlines would be enhanced by faster and more accurate computational techniques. LBL is developing a computer code which will be capable of giving photon power densities onto impinged surfaces for a wide range of source and beam line parameters. These include electron beam energy, current, emittance and orbit deviations; wiggler/undulator length, period and magnetic field; photon energy and angular distribution; reflection/absorption at intermediate impinged surfaces; defining apertures and focusing by mirrors. Three-dimensional computer programs for temperature, stress and strain have been available for some years, but "user friendly" versions are being sought. Other items to pursue are also suggested.

  16. Scientists at Brookhaven contribute to the development of a better electron accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Scientists working at Brookhaven have developed a compact linear accelerator called STELLA (Staged Electron Laser Acceleration). Highly efficient, it may help electron accelerators become practical tools for applications in industry and medicine, such as radiation therapy (1 page)

  17. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT PLAN.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NAIDU,J.R.

    2002-10-22

    The purpose of the Wildlife Management Plan (WMP) is to promote stewardship of the natural resources found at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and to integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission.

  18. OVERALL CONTROL SYSTEM FOR HIGH FLUX PILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newson, H.W.; Durham, N.C.; Wigner, E.P.; Princeton, N.J.; Epler, E.P.

    1961-05-23

    A control system is given for a high fiux reactor incorporating an anti- scram control feature whereby a neutron absorbing control rod acts as a fine adjustment while a neutron absorbing shim rod, actuated upon a command received from reactor period and level signals, has substantially greater effect on the neutron level and is moved prior to scram conditions to alter the reactor activity before a scram condition is created. Thus the probability that a scram will have to be initiated is substantially decreased.

  19. ATLAS Overview Week at Brookhaven

    CERN Multimedia

    Pilcher, J

    Over 200 ATLAS participants gathered at Brookhaven National Laboratory during the first week of June for our annual overview week. Some system communities arrived early and held meetings on Saturday and Sunday, and the detector interface group (DIG) and Technical Coordination also took advantage of the time to discuss issues of interest for all detector systems. Sunday was also marked by a workshop on the possibilities for heavy ion physics with ATLAS. Beginning on Monday, and for the rest of the week, sessions were held in common in the well equipped Berkner Hall auditorium complex. Laptop computers became the norm for presentations and a wireless network kept laptop owners well connected. Most lunches and dinners were held on the lawn outside Berkner Hall. The weather was very cooperative and it was an extremely pleasant setting. This picture shows most of the participants from a view on the roof of Berkner Hall. Technical Coordination and Integration issues started the reports on Monday and became a...

  20. Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

    2011-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one

  1. Rapid single flux quantum logic in high temperature superconductor technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shunmugavel, K.

    2006-01-01

    A Josephson junction is the basic element of rapid single flux quantum logic (RSFQ) circuits. A high operating speed and low power consumption are the main advantages of RSFQ logic over semiconductor electronic circuits. To realize complex RSFQ circuits in HTS technology one needs a reproducible

  2. Plasma–Surface Interactions Under High Heat and Particle Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory De Temmerman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasma-surface interactions expected in the divertor of a future fusion reactor are characterized by extreme heat and particle fluxes interacting with the plasma-facing surfaces. Powerful linear plasma generators are used to reproduce the expected plasma conditions and allow plasma-surface interactions studies under those very harsh conditions. While the ion energies on the divertor surfaces of a fusion device are comparable to those used in various plasma-assited deposition and etching techniques, the ion (and energy fluxes are up to four orders of magnitude higher. This large upscale in particle flux maintains the surface under highly non-equilibrium conditions and bring new effects to light, some of which will be described in this paper.

  3. Very high flux research reactors based on particle fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, J.R.; Takahashi, H.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach to high flux research reactors is described, the VHFR (Very High Flux Reactor). The VHFR fuel region(s) are packed beds of HTGR-type fuel particles through which coolant (e.g., D/sub 2/O) flows directly. The small particle diameter (typically on the order of 500 microns) results in very large surface areas for heat transfer (approx. 100 cm/sup 2//cm/sup 3/ of bed), high power densities (approx. 10 megawatts per liter), and minimal ..delta..T between fuel and coolant (approx. 10 K) VHFR designs are presented which achieve steady-state fluxes of approx. 2x10/sup 16/ n/cm/sup 2/sec. Deuterium/beryllium combinations give the highest flux levels. Critical mass is low, approx. 2 kg /sup 235/U for 20% enriched fuel. Refueling can be carried out continuously on-line, or in a batch process with a short daily shutdown. Fission product inventory is very low, approx. 100 to 300 grams, depending on design.

  4. Flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    Med udgangspunkt i kompleksistetsforskning og studiet af selvorganiserende systemer beskriver lb Ravn den fysiske og biologiske evolution og menneskets udvikling. Han fortolker begreber som kultur, sprog, frihed, værdier, mening, smerte og det ondes problem i lyset af en procesbaseret ontologi...... kanalisering af den flux eller energi, der strømmer igennem os og giver sig til kende i vore daglige aktiviteter. Skal vores tanker, handlinger, arbejde, samvær og politiske liv organiseres efter stramme og faste regelsæt, uden slinger i valsen? Eller skal de tværtimod forløbe ganske uhindret af regler og bånd...

  5. BVOC ecosystem flux measurements at a high latitude wetland site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Holst

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present summertime concentrations and fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs measured at a sub-arctic wetland in northern Sweden using a disjunct eddy-covariance (DEC technique based on a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS. The vegetation at the site was dominated by Sphagnum, Carex and extit{Eriophorum} spp. The measurements reported here cover a period of 50 days (1 August to 19 September 2006, approximately one half of the growing season at the site, and allowed to investigate the effect of day-to-day variation in weather as well as of vegetation senescence on daily BVOC fluxes, and on their temperature and light responses. The sensitivity drift of the DEC system was assessed by comparing H3O+-ion cluster formed with water molecules (H3O+(H2O at m37 with water vapour concentration measurements made using an adjacent humidity sensor, and the applicability of the DEC method was analysed by a comparison of sensible heat fluxes for high frequency and DEC data obtained from the sonic anemometer. These analyses showed no significant PTR-MS sensor drift over a period of several weeks and only a small flux-loss due to high-frequency spectrum omissions. This loss was within the range expected from other studies and the theoretical considerations.

    Standardised (20 °C and 1000 μmol m−2 s−1 PAR summer isoprene emission rates found in this study of 329 μg C m−2 (ground area h−1 were comparable with findings from more southern boreal forests, and fen-like ecosystems. On a diel scale, measured fluxes indicated a stronger temperature dependence than emissions from temperate or (subtropical ecosystems. For the first time, to our knowledge, we report ecosystem methanol fluxes from a sub-arctic ecosystem. Maximum daytime emission fluxes were around 270 μg m−2 h−1

  6. Geothermal materials development at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukacka, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    As part of the DOE/OGT response to recommendations and priorities established by industrial review of their overall R&D program, the Geothermal Materials Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focusing on topics that can reduce O&M costs and increase competitiveness in foreign and domestic markets. Corrosion and scale control, well completion materials, and lost circulation control have high priorities. The first two topics are included in FY 1997 BNL activities, but work on lost circulation materials is constrained by budgetary limitations. The R&D, most of which is performed as cost-shared efforts with U.S. geothermal firms, is rapidly moving into field testing phases. FY 1996 and 1997 accomplishments in the development of lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant cements for well completions; corrosion resistant, thermally conductive polymer matrix composites for heat exchange applications; and metallic, polymer and ceramic-based corrosion protective coatings are given in this paper. In addition, plans for work that commenced in March 1997 on thermally conductive cementitious grouting materials for use with geothermal heat pumps (GHP), are discussed.

  7. DMSP observations of high latitude Poynting flux during magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheryl Y.; Huang, Yanshi; Su, Yi-Jiun; Hairston, Marc R.; Sotirelis, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that energy can enter the high-latitude regions of the Ionosphere-Thermosphere (IT) system on open field lines. To assess the extent of high-latitude energy input, we have carried out a study of Poynting flux measured by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites during magnetic storms. We report sporadic intense Poynting fluxes measured by four DMSP satellites at polar latitudes during two moderate magnetic storms which occurred in August and September 2011. Comparisons with a widely used empirical model for energy input to the IT system show that the model does not adequately capture electromagnetic (EM) energy at very high latitudes during storms. We have extended this study to include more than 30 storm events and find that intense EM energy is frequently detected poleward of 75° magnetic latitude.

  8. The Use of Predictive Modeling in the Characterization and Remediation of the High Flux Beam Reactor Tritium Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, W.; Hauptmann, M.; Sullivan, T.

    2008-12-01

    Discovery of tritium in the groundwater near the Brookhaven National Laboratory High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) in January 1997 initiated an intense effort to locate its source, determine its extent, and implement remediation methods to mitigate its consequences. The tritium plume that resulted from the slow, long-term seepage of contaminated water from the HFBR spent fuel pool was the subject of much attention by the media, State and Federal regulators, and the public in 1997. Tremendous amounts of resources were dedicated to characterizing the plume in great detail and to mitigating its consequences. An important element of the remediation activities and in communicating the status of these efforts to stakeholders involved the modeling of the plume, particularly its future path and extent of travel. This paper describes the effectiveness of the models that were employed and the assumptions made in predicting the plume migration over time at an active research laboratory site. The prediction that was made by the model for the selected remediation alternative is compared with the actual groundwater monitoring data obtained over 10 years to assess the performance of the model. This paper also describes how the outputs from the groundwater models were used to effectively convey information about the remediation efforts to environmental regulators and the local community.

  9. Characterisation of Redlen high-flux CdZnTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, B.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Seller, P.; Schneider, A.; Iniewski, K.

    2017-12-01

    CdZnTe is a promising material for the current generation of free electron laser light sources and future laser-driven γ-ray sources which require detectors capable of high flux imaging at X-ray and γ-ray energies (> 10 keV) . However, at high fluxes CdZnTe has been shown to polarise due to hole trapping, leading to poor performance. Novel Redlen CdZnTe material with improved hole transport properties has been designed for high flux applications. Small pixel CdZnTe detectors were fabricated by Redlen Technologies and flip-chip bonded to PIXIE ASICs. An XIA Digital Gamma Finder PIXIE-16 system was used to digitise each of the nine analogue signals with a timing resolution of 10 ns. Pulse shape analysis was used to extract the rise times and amplitude of signals. These were measured as a function of applied bias voltage and used to calculate the mobility (μ) and mobility-lifetime (μτ) of electrons and holes in the material for three identical detectors. The measured values of the transport properties of electrons in the high-flux-capable material was lower than previously reported for Redlen CdZnTe material (μeτe ~ 1 × 10‑3 cm2V‑1 and μe ~ 1000 cm2V‑1s‑1) while the hole transport properties were found to have improved (μhτh ~ 3 × 10‑4 cm2V‑1 and μh ~ 100 cm2V‑1s‑1).

  10. Planning thermal radiation experiments at high flux. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knasel, M.; Houghton, A.J.; Sievers, R.H.; Gordon, B.A.; McDonnell, M.D.

    1981-10-27

    This report covers analyses; experimentation; equipment design and fabrication; instrumentation design, selection, fabrication, and tests; and recording-equipment selection in preparation for high-thermal-flux experiments on soil surfaces. The reported effort is preparatory to a continuing program to obtain empirical data and examine parametric relationships on the response of different surfaces and the formation of an overlying thermal and dust layer resulting from the thermal pulse of a nuclear weapon.

  11. Dr. Praveen Chaudhari named director of Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Brookhaven Science Associates announced today the selection of Dr. Praveen Chaudhari as Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. Dr. Chaudhari, who will begin his new duties on April 1, joins Brookhaven Lab after 36 years of distinguished service at IBM as a scientist and senior manager of research" (1 page).

  12. High Flux Metallic Membranes for Hydrogen Recovery and Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buxbaum, Robert

    2010-06-30

    We made and tested over 250 new alloys for use as lower cost, higher flux hydrogen extraction membrane materials. Most of these were intermetallic, or contained significant intermetallic content, particularly based on B2 alloy compositions with at least one refractory component; B2 intermetallics resemble BCC alloys, in structure, but the atoms have relatively fixed positions, with one atom at the corners of the cube, the other at the centers. The target materals we were looking for would contain little or no expensive elements, no strongly toxic or radioactive elements, would have high flux to hydrogen, while being fabricable, brazable, and relatively immune to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion in operation. The best combination of properties of the membrane materials we developed was, in my opinion, a Pd-coated membrane consisting of V -9 atomic % Pd. This material was relatively cheap, had 5 times the flux of Pd under the same pressure differential, was reasonably easy to fabricate and braze, and not bad in terms of embrittlement. Based on all these factors we project, about 1/3 the cost of Pd, on an area basis for a membrane designed to last 20 years, or 1/15 the cost on a flux basis. Alternatives to this membrane replaced significant fractions of the Pd with Ni and or Co. The cost for these membranes was lower, but so was the flux. We produced successful brazed products from the membrane materials, and made them into flat sheets. We tested, unsuccessfully, several means of fabricating thematerials into tubes, and eventually built a membrane reactor using a new, flat-plate design: a disc and doughnut arrangement, a design that seems well- suited to clean hydrogen production from coal. The membranes and reactor were tested successfully at Western Research. A larger equipment company (Chart Industries) produced similar results using a different flat-plate reactor design. Cost projections of the membrane are shown to be attractive.

  13. O+ and H+ ion heat fluxes at high altitudes and high latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Barghouthi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Higher order moments, e.g., perpendicular and parallel heat fluxes, are related to non-Maxwellian plasma distributions. Such distributions are common when the plasma environment is not collision dominated. In the polar wind and auroral regions, the ion outflow is collisionless at altitudes above about 1.2 RE geocentric. In these regions wave–particle interaction is the primary acceleration mechanism of outflowing ionospheric origin ions. We present the altitude profiles of actual and "thermalized" heat fluxes for major ion species in the collisionless region by using the Barghouthi model. By comparing the actual and "thermalized" heat fluxes, we can see whether the heat flux corresponds to a small perturbation of an approximately bi-Maxwellian distribution (actual heat flux is small compared to "thermalized" heat flux, or whether it represents a significant deviation (actual heat flux equal or larger than "thermalized" heat flux. The model takes into account ion heating due to wave–particle interactions as well as the effects of gravity, ambipolar electric field, and divergence of geomagnetic field lines. In the discussion of the ion heat fluxes, we find that (1 the role of the ions located in the energetic tail of the ion velocity distribution function is very significant and has to be taken into consideration when modeling the ion heat flux at high altitudes and high latitudes; (2 at times the parallel and perpendicular heat fluxes have different signs at the same altitude. This indicates that the parallel and perpendicular parts of the ion energy are being transported in opposite directions. This behavior is the result of many competing processes; (3 we identify altitude regions where the actual heat flux is small as compared to the "thermalized" heat flux. In such regions we expect transport equation solutions based on perturbations of bi-Maxwellian distributions to be applicable. This is true for large altitude intervals for protons

  14. Dialyzer Reuse and Outcomes of High Flux Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Roumelioti, Maria-Eleni; Sattar, Abdus; Kellum, John A; Weissfeld, Lisa; Unruh, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The bulk of randomized trial evidence for the expanding use of High Flux (HF) hemodialysis worldwide comes from two randomized controlled trials, one of which (HEMODIALYSIS, HEMO) allowed, while the other (Membrane Outcomes Permeability, MPO) excluded, the reuse of membranes. It is not known whether dialyzer reuse has a differential impact on outcomes with HF vs low flyx (LF) dialyzers. Proportional Hazards Models and Joint Models for longitudinal measures and survival outcomes were used in HEMO to analyze the relationship between β2-microglobulin (β2M) concentration, flux, and reuse. Meta-analysis and regression techniques were used to synthesize the evidence for HF dialysis from HEMO and MPO. In HEMO, minimally reused (dialysis and the reuse process on dialyzers may suggest novel biomarkers for uremic toxicity and may accelerate membrane technology innovations that will improve patient outcomes.

  15. Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evan Harpeneau

    2011-06-24

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

  16. Proceedings of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Brookhaven National Laboratory workshop on neutron scattering instrumentation at high-flux reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBee, M.R. (ed.); Axe, J.D.; Hayter, J.B.

    1990-07-01

    For the first three decades following World War II, the US, which pioneered the field of neutron scattering research, enjoyed uncontested leadership in the field. By the mid-1970's, other countries, most notably through the West European consortium at Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France, had begun funding neutron scattering on a scale unmatched in this country. By the early 1980's, observers charged with defining US scientific priorities began to stress the need for upgrading and expansion of US research reactor facilities. The conceptual design of the ANS facility is now well under way, and line-item funding for more advanced design is being sought for FY 1992. This should lead to a construction request in FY 1994 and start-up in FY 1999, assuming an optimal funding profile. While it may be too early to finalize designs for instruments whose construction is nearly a decade removed, it is imperative that we begin to develop the necessary concepts to ensure state-of-the-art instrumentation for the ANS. It is in this context that this Instrumentation Workshop was planned. The workshop touched upon many ideas that must be considered for the ANS, and as anticipated, several of the discussions and findings were relevant to the planning of the HFBR Upgrade. In addition, this report recognizes numerous opportunities for further breakthroughs on neutron instrumentation in areas such as improved detection schemes (including better tailored scintillation materials and image plates, and increased speed in both detection and data handling), in-beam monitors, transmission white beam polarizers, multilayers and supermirrors, and more. Each individual report has been cataloged separately.

  17. Dialyzer Reuse and Outcomes of High Flux Dialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Roumelioti, Maria-Eleni; Sattar, Abdus; Kellum, John A.; Weissfeld, Lisa; Unruh, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The bulk of randomized trial evidence for the expanding use of High Flux (HF) hemodialysis worldwide comes from two randomized controlled trials, one of which (HEMODIALYSIS, HEMO) allowed, while the other (Membrane Outcomes Permeability, MPO) excluded, the reuse of membranes. It is not known whether dialyzer reuse has a differential impact on outcomes with HF vs low flyx (LF) dialyzers. Methods Proportional Hazards Models and Joint Models for longitudinal measures and survival outcomes were used in HEMO to analyze the relationship between β2-microglobulin (β2M) concentration, flux, and reuse. Meta-analysis and regression techniques were used to synthesize the evidence for HF dialysis from HEMO and MPO. Findings In HEMO, minimally reused (reused LF ones for all cause, cardiovascular, cardiac and infectious mortality respectively. These relationships reversed for extensively reused membranes (p for interaction between reuse and flux reuse and flux of 0.10 and 0.08 respectively). Reduction of β2M explained only 1/3 of the effect of minimally reused HF dialyzers on all cause mortality, while non-β2M related factors explained the apparent attenuation of the benefit with more extensively reused dialyzers. Meta-regression of HEMO and MPO estimated an adjusted HR of 0.63 (95% CI: 0.51–0.78) for non-reused HF dialyzers compared with non-reused LF membranes. Conclusions This secondary analysis and synthesis of two large hemodialysis trials supports the widespread use of HF dialyzers in clinical hemodialysis over the last decade. A mechanistic understanding of the effects of HF dialysis and the reuse process on dialyzers may suggest novel biomarkers for uremic toxicity and may accelerate membrane technology innovations that will improve patient outcomes. PMID:26057383

  18. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) carries out basic and applied research in the following fields: high-energy nuclear and solid state physics; fundamental material and structure properties and the interactions of matter; nuclear medicine, biomedical and environmental sciences; and selected energy technologies. In conducting these research activities, it is Laboratory policy to protect the health and safety of employees and the public, and to minimize the impact of BNL operations on the environment. This document is the BNL environmental report for the calendar year 1990 for the safety and Environmental Protection division and corners topics on effluents, surveillance, regulations, assessments, and compliance.

  19. High-heat-flux sensor calibration using calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestrín, J.; Estrada, C. A.; Rodríguez-Alonso, M.; Pérez-Rábago, C.; Langley, L. W.; Barnes, A.

    2004-08-01

    This paper demonstrates a calorimetric procedure for calibrating high-heat-flux sensors. The results are in agreement with calibrations obtained using black-body radiation. However, the proposed method has the potential of being more accurate than traditional approaches. This new procedure calibrates sensors to measure correctly under conditions of concentrated solar radiation. At present, the thermal balance calibration technique in the laboratory is limited to solar irradiances of approximately 100 kW m-2. The next step is to demonstrate this methodology to higher irradiances under non-laboratory conditions in the CIEMAT solar furnace at Plataforma Solar de Almería.

  20. High-flux solar photon processes: Opportunities for applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinfeld, J.I.; Coy, S.L.; Herzog, H.; Shorter, J.A.; Schlamp, M.; Tester, J.W.; Peters, W.A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1992-06-01

    The overall goal of this study was to identify new high-flux solar photon (HFSP) processes that show promise of being feasible and in the national interest. Electric power generation and hazardous waste destruction were excluded from this study at sponsor request. Our overall conclusion is that there is promise for new applications of concentrated solar photons, especially in certain aspects of materials processing and premium materials synthesis. Evaluation of the full potential of these and other possible applications, including opportunities for commercialization, requires further research and testing. 100 refs.

  1. RETRACTED ARTICLE: Effect of magnetic relaxation on flux jump in high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.-F.; He, T.-H.

    2010-10-01

    The effect of magnetic relaxation on flux jump is studied in high temperature superconducting slab. The magnetothermal diffusion equations based on the Kim model are presented in this paper to estimate the effect of magnetic relaxation on flux jump inside the slab in the flux dynamics process. Numerical results obtained show that the flux-jump phenomenon could be suppressed by the magnetic relaxation and the dependence of the number of flux jumps on the relaxation time are obvious.

  2. Advanced Tethersonde for High-Speed Flux Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Flux measurements of trace gases and other quantities, such as latent heat, are of great importance in scientific field research. One typical flux measurement setup...

  3. Searching for the H dibaryon at Brookhaven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, A.J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This paper reviews the status of current experiments at Brookhaven, searching for the six-quark H dibaryon postulated by R. Jaffe in 1977. Two experiments, E813 and E888, have recently completed running and two new experiments, E836 and E885, are approved to run. The data recorded so far is under analysis and should have good sensitivity to both short-lived and long-lived Hs.

  4. The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, M.

    1991-12-18

    The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary.

  5. Dialyzer Reuse and Outcomes of High Flux Dialysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Argyropoulos

    Full Text Available The bulk of randomized trial evidence for the expanding use of High Flux (HF hemodialysis worldwide comes from two randomized controlled trials, one of which (HEMODIALYSIS, HEMO allowed, while the other (Membrane Outcomes Permeability, MPO excluded, the reuse of membranes. It is not known whether dialyzer reuse has a differential impact on outcomes with HF vs low flyx (LF dialyzers.Proportional Hazards Models and Joint Models for longitudinal measures and survival outcomes were used in HEMO to analyze the relationship between β2-microglobulin (β2M concentration, flux, and reuse. Meta-analysis and regression techniques were used to synthesize the evidence for HF dialysis from HEMO and MPO.In HEMO, minimally reused (< 6 times HF dialyzers were associated with a hazard ratio (HR of 0.67 (95% confidence interval, 95%CI: 0.48-0.92, p = 0.015, 0.64 (95%CI: 0.44 - 0.95, p = 0.03, 0.61 (95%CI: 0.41 - 0.90, p = 0.012, 0.53 (95%CI: 0.28 - 1.02, p = 0.057 relative to minimally reused LF ones for all cause, cardiovascular, cardiac and infectious mortality respectively. These relationships reversed for extensively reused membranes (p for interaction between reuse and flux < 0.001, p = 0.005 for death from all cause and cardiovascular causes, while similar trends were noted for cardiac and infectious mortality (p of interaction between reuse and flux of 0.10 and 0.08 respectively. Reduction of β2M explained only 1/3 of the effect of minimally reused HF dialyzers on all cause mortality, while non-β2M related factors explained the apparent attenuation of the benefit with more extensively reused dialyzers. Meta-regression of HEMO and MPO estimated an adjusted HR of 0.63 (95% CI: 0.51-0.78 for non-reused HF dialyzers compared with non-reused LF membranes.This secondary analysis and synthesis of two large hemodialysis trials supports the widespread use of HF dialyzers in clinical hemodialysis over the last decade. A mechanistic understanding of the effects of

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous hydrogenated carbon under high hydrogen fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, E. D.; von Toussaint, U.; Kleyn, A. W.; W. J. Goedheer,

    2009-01-01

    We study the flux dependence of the carbon erosion yield and the hydrogen enrichment of the surface in the high flux regime at 10(28) ions per m(2) s and higher by using molecular dynamics (MD). We simulate an amorphous hydrogenated carbon sample exposed to high flux hydrogen bombardment with a

  7. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A. [eds.

    1995-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory.

  8. High Flux Commercial Illumination Solution with Intelligent Controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camil Ghiu

    2012-04-30

    This report summarizes the work performed at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-EE0003241 for developing a high efficiency LED-based luminaire. A novel light engine module (two versions: standard and super), power supply and luminaire mechanical parts were designed and tested. At steady-state, the luminaire luminous flux is 3156 lumens (lm), luminous efficacy 97.4 LPW and CRI (Ra) 88 at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3507K. When the luminaire is fitted with the super version of the light engine the efficacy reaches 130 LPW. In addition, the luminaire is provided with an intelligent control network capable of additional energy savings. The technology developed during the course of this project has been incorporated into a family of products. Recently, the first product in the family has been launched.

  9. Brookhaven highlights, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Highlights from all the department are illustrated. The main topics are on accelerator development and applications. (LSP)

  10. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  11. A conceptual high flux reactor design with scope for use in ADS ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 68; Issue 2. A conceptual high flux reactor design with scope for use in ADS applications. Usha Pal V Jagannathan ... A 100 MWt reactor design has been conceived to support flux level of the order of 1015 n/cm2/s in selected flux trap zones. The physics design ...

  12. DistributedFBA.jl: high-level, high-performance flux balance analysis in Julia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heirendt, Laurent; Thiele, Ines; Fleming, Ronan M T

    2017-05-01

    Flux balance analysis and its variants are widely used methods for predicting steady-state reaction rates in biochemical reaction networks. The exploration of high dimensional networks with such methods is currently hampered by software performance limitations. DistributedFBA.jl is a high-level, high-performance, open-source implementation of flux balance analysis in Julia. It is tailored to solve multiple flux balance analyses on a subset or all the reactions of large and huge-scale networks, on any number of threads or nodes. The code is freely available on github.com/opencobra/COBRA.jl. The documentation can be found at opencobra.github.io/COBRA.jl. ronan.mt.fleming@gmail.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  13. DistributedFBA.jl: High-level, high-performance flux balance analysis in Julia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heirendt, Laurent; Thiele, Ines; Fleming, Ronan M T

    2017-01-16

    Flux balance analysis, and its variants, are widely used methods for predicting steady-state reaction rates in biochemical reaction networks. The exploration of high dimensional networks with such methods is currently hampered by software performance limitations. DistributedFBA.jl is a high-level, high-performance, open-source implementation of flux balance analysis in Julia. It is tailored to solve multiple flux balance analyses on a subset or all the reactions of large and huge-scale networks, on any number of threads or nodes. The code is freely available on github.com/opencobra/COBRA.jl. The documentation can be found at opencobra.github.io/COBRA.jl. ronan.mt.fleming@gmail.com. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. A Compact, High-Flux Cold Atom Beam Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, James R.; Kohel, James M.; Thompson, Robert J.; Aveline, David C.; Yu, Nan; Schlippert, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The performance of cold atom experiments relying on three-dimensional magneto-optical trap techniques can be greatly enhanced by employing a highflux cold atom beam to obtain high atom loading rates while maintaining low background pressures in the UHV MOT (ultra-high vacuum magneto-optical trap) regions. Several techniques exist for generating slow beams of cold atoms. However, one of the technically simplest approaches is a two-dimensional (2D) MOT. Such an atom source typically employs at least two orthogonal trapping beams, plus an additional longitudinal "push" beam to yield maximum atomic flux. A 2D atom source was created with angled trapping collimators that not only traps atoms in two orthogonal directions, but also provides a longitudinal pushing component that eliminates the need for an additional push beam. This development reduces the overall package size, which in turn, makes the 2D trap simpler, and requires less total optical power. The atom source is more compact than a previously published effort, and has greater than an order of magnitude improved loading performance.

  15. High-pressure, flux-conserving tokamak equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dory, R.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1976-08-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) tokamak equilibria are found with values of ..beta.. up to 20 percent and prescribed MHD safety factor values (e.g., q(axis) = 1 and q(edge) = 4.8) for tokamaks with aspect ratio A = 4 and D-shaped cross section. If such equilibria could be attained experimentally, they would be very attractive for decreasing the projected costs of tokamak power reactors substantially. In the flux-conserving tokamak (FCT) model, where rapid heating is applied to an already relatively hot plasma, these high ..beta.. equilibria are achievable. We study the quasi-static evolution of FCT equilibria as ..beta.. increases. An operating window is found in the pressure profile width w/sub p/: for high ..beta.. the values of w/sub p/ must lie between 0.40 and 0.55 of the plasma minor width. Within this window, plasma current and poloidal ..beta.. increase monotonically with ..beta... For fixed plasma boundary, significant poloidal surface currents are induced, but these can be eliminated by small increases in the plasma minor radius, the pressure profile width, and the vacuum toroidal field.

  16. Radiance limits of ceramic phosphors under high excitation fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenef, Alan; Kelso, John; Zheng, Yi; Tchoul, Maxim

    2013-09-01

    Ceramic phosphors, excited by high radiance pump sources, offer considerable potential for high radiance conversion. Interestingly, thermodynamic arguments suggest that the radiance of the luminescent spot can even exceed that of the incoming light source. In practice, however, thermal quenching and (non-thermal) optical saturation limit the maximum attainable radiance of the luminescent source. We present experimental data for Ce:YAG and Ce:GdYAG ceramics in which these limits have been investigated. High excitation fluxes are achieved using laser pumping. Optical pumping intensities exceeding 100W/mm2 have been shown to produce only modest efficiency depreciation at low overall pump powers because of the short Ce3+ lifetime, although additional limitations exist. When pump powers are higher, heat-transfer bottlenecks within the ceramic and heat-sink interfaces limit maximum pump intensities. We find that surface temperatures of these laser-pumped ceramics can reach well over 150°C, causing thermal-quenching losses. We also find that in some cases, the loss of quantum efficiency with increasing temperature can cause a thermal run-away effect, resulting in a rapid loss in converted light, possibly over-heating the sample or surrounding structures. While one can still obtain radiances on the order of many W/mm2/sr, temperature quenching effects ultimately limit converted light radiance. Finally, we use the diffusion-approximation radiation transport models and rate equation models to simulate some of these nonlinear optical pumping and heating effects in high-scattering ceramics.

  17. High Flux Isotope Reactor system RELAP5 input model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.

    1993-01-01

    A thermal-hydraulic computational model of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been developed using the RELAP5 program. The purpose of the model is to provide a state-of-the art thermal-hydraulic simulation tool for analyzing selected hypothetical accident scenarios for a revised HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The model includes (1) a detailed representation of the reactor core and other vessel components, (2) three heat exchanger/pump cells, (3) pressurizing pumps and letdown valves, and (4) secondary coolant system (with less detail than the primary system). Data from HFIR operation, component tests, tests in facility mockups and the HFIR, HFIR specific experiments, and other pertinent experiments performed independent of HFIR were used to construct the model and validate it to the extent permitted by the data. The detailed version of the model has been used to simulate loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs), while the abbreviated version has been developed for the operational transients that allow use of a less detailed nodalization. Analysis of station blackout with core long-term decay heat removal via natural convection has been performed using the core and vessel portions of the detailed model.

  18. High-Flux Carbon Molecular Sieve Membranes for Gas Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Hannes; Voss, Hartwig; Kaltenborn, Nadine; Kämnitz, Susanne; Wollbrink, Alexander; Feldhoff, Armin; Caro, Jürgen; Roitsch, Stefan; Voigt, Ingolf

    2017-06-26

    Carbon membranes have great potential for highly selective and cost-efficient gas separation. Carbon is chemically stable and it is relative cheap. The controlled carbonization of a polymer coating on a porous ceramic support provides a 3D carbon material with molecular sieving permeation performance. The carbonization of the polymer blend gives turbostratic carbon domains of randomly stacked together sp2 hybridized carbon sheets as well as sp3 hybridized amorphous carbon. In the evaluation of the carbon molecular sieve membrane, hydrogen could be separated from propane with a selectivity of 10 000 with a hydrogen permeance of 5 m3 (STP)/(m2 hbar). Furthermore, by a post-synthesis oxidative treatment, the permeation fluxes are increased by widening the pores, and the molecular sieve carbon membrane is transformed from a molecular sieve carbon into a selective surface flow carbon membrane with adsorption controlled performance and becomes selective for carbon dioxide. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Fabrication of control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sease, J.D.

    1998-03-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a research-type nuclear reactor that was designed and built in the early 1960s and has been in continuous operation since its initial criticality in 1965. Under current plans, the HFIR is expected to continue in operation until 2035. This report updates ORNL/TM-9365, Fabrication Procedure for HFIR Control Plates, which was mainly prepared in the early 1970's but was not issued until 1984, and reflects process changes, lessons learned in the latest control rod fabrication campaign, and suggested process improvements to be considered in future campaigns. Most of the personnel involved with the initial development of the processes and in part campaigns have retired or will retire soon. Because their unlikely availability in future campaigns, emphasis has been placed on providing some explanation of why the processes were selected and some discussions about the importance of controlling critical process parameters. Contained in this report is a description of the function of control rods in the reactor, the brief history of the development of control rod fabrication processes, and a description of procedures used in the fabrication of control rods. A listing of the controlled documents and procedures used in the last fabrication campaigns is referenced in Appendix A.

  20. Surface morphology and deuterium retention in tungsten exposed to high flux D plasma at high temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jia, Y. Z.; De Temmerman, G.; Luo, G. N.; Xu, H.Y.; Li, C.; Fu, B. Q.; Liu, W.

    2015-01-01

    Surface modifications and deuterium retention induced in tungsten by high fluxes (1024 m−2 s−1) low energy (38 eV) deuterium ions were studied as a function of surface temperature. Blister formation was studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction, while deuterium

  1. Critical Heat Flux Phenomena at HighPressure & Low Mass Fluxes: NEUP Final Report Part I: Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Wu, Qiao [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2015-04-30

    This report is a preliminary document presenting an overview of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) phenomenon, the High Pressure Critical Heat Flux facility (HPCHF), preliminary CHF data acquired, and the future direction of the research. The HPCHF facility has been designed and built to study CHF at high pressure and low mass flux ranges in a rod bundle prototypical of conceptual Small Modular Reactor (SMR) designs. The rod bundle is comprised of four electrically heated rods in a 2x2 square rod bundle with a prototypic chopped-cosine axial power profile and equipped with thermocouples at various axial and circumferential positions embedded in each rod for CHF detection. Experimental test parameters for CHF detection range from pressures of ~80 – 160 bar, mass fluxes of ~400 – 1500 kg/m2s, and inlet water subcooling from ~30 – 70°C. The preliminary data base established will be further extended in the future along with comparisons to existing CHF correlations, models, etc. whose application ranges may be applicable to the conditions of SMRs.

  2. Level 1 Tornado PRA for the High Flux Beam Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozoki, G.E.; Conrad, C.S.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes a risk analysis primarily directed at providing an estimate for the frequency of tornado induced damage to the core of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and thus it constitutes a Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) covering tornado induced accident sequences. The basic methodology of the risk analysis was to develop a ``tornado specific`` plant logic model that integrates the internal random hardware failures with failures caused externally by the tornado strike and includes operator errors worsened by the tornado modified environment. The tornado hazard frequency, as well as earlier prepared structural and equipment fragility data, were used as input data to the model. To keep modeling/calculational complexity as simple as reasonable a ``bounding`` type, slightly conservative, approach was applied. By a thorough screening process a single dominant initiating event was selected as a representative initiator, defined as: ``Tornado Induced Loss of Offsite Power.`` The frequency of this initiator was determined to be 6.37E-5/year. The safety response of the HFBR facility resulted in a total Conditional Core Damage Probability of .621. Thus, the point estimate of the HFBR`s Tornado Induced Core Damage Frequency (CDF) was found to be: (CDF){sub Tornado} = 3.96E-5/year. This value represents only 7.8% of the internal CDF and thus is considered to be a small contribution to the overall facility risk expressed in terms of total Core Damage Frequency. In addition to providing the estimate of (CDF){sub Tornado}, the report documents, the relative importance of various tornado induced system, component, and operator failures that contribute most to (CDF){sub Tornado}.

  3. Forced bulk boiling at high heat fluxes; Erzwungenes Blasensieden bei hohen Waermestromdichten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knipping, Tobias; Humpfer, Frank; Arnemann, Michael [Hochschule Karlsruhe - Technik und Wirtschaft (HsKA) (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Maschinenbau und Mechatronik fuer Kaelte-, Klima- und Umwelttechnik (IKKU)

    2013-05-15

    The influence of very high heat flux densities (10{sup 5} to 10{sup 7} W/m{sup 2}) on the boiling behavior of R404A is investigated. By using a new evaporator design it is possible to change the evaporating effects even at these high heat flux densities to bulk boiling. This paper focuses on the experimental analysis of the new evaporator by varying the parameters geometry, mass flux, subcooling and fluid velocity. The results show that fluid velocity, mass flux and geometry have a high influence on the transferred heat-flow, while the subcooling of the liquid phase only has a small effect. (orig.)

  4. Flux flow in high-Tc Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filatrella, G.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1993-01-01

    experimentally. The spatial inhomogeneities considered are on the scale of the Josephson penetration depth (mum). It is demonstrated that the topic is of interest for the construction of amplifiers. Thus when fluxons are generated the resulting flux flow regime proves to be much more sensitive than the uniform...

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, G.L.; Paquette, D.E.; Naidu, J.R.; Lee, R.J.; Briggs, S.L.K.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1996. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and non-radiological emissions and effluents to the environment.

  6. Dissolution flowsheet for high flux isotope reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-27

    As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) processing campaign, H-Canyon is planning to begin dissolving High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel in late FY17 or early FY18. Each HFIR fuel core contains inner and outer fuel elements which were fabricated from uranium oxide (U3O8) dispersed in a continuous Al phase using traditional powder metallurgy techniques. Fuels fabricated in this manner, like other SNF’s processed in H-Canyon, dissolve by the same general mechanisms with similar gas generation rates and the production of H2. The HFIR fuel cores will be dissolved and the recovered U will be down-blended into low-enriched U. HFIR fuel was previously processed in H-Canyon using a unique insert in both the 6.1D and 6.4D dissolvers. Multiple cores will be charged to the same dissolver solution maximizing the concentration of dissolved Al. The objective of this study was to identify flowsheet conditions through literature review and laboratory experimentation to safely and efficiently dissolve the HFIR fuel in H-Canyon. Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to evaluate the dissolution of HFIR fuel using both Al 1100 and Al 6061 T6 alloy coupons. The Al 1100 alloy was considered a representative surrogate which provided an upper bound on the generation of flammable (i.e., H2) gas during the dissolution process. The dissolution of the Al 6061 T6 alloy proceeded at a slower rate than the Al 1100 alloy and was used to verify that the target Al concentration in solution could be achieved for the selected Hg concentration. Mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy were used to provide continuous monitoring of the concentration of H2 and other permanent gases in the dissolution offgas allowing the development of H2 generation rate profiles. The H2 generation rates were subsequently used to evaluate if a full HFIR core could be dissolved in an H-Canyon dissolver without exceeding 60% of the

  7. Deuterium retention in graphite exposed to high flux plasma at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusinov, A., E-mail: rusinov.aleksandr@gmail.com [Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Trifonov, N.; Gasparyan, Yu. [Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Khripunov, B., E-mail: boris@nfi.kiae.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Academic Kurchatov sq., 1, 123098 Moscow (Russian Federation); Mayer, M.; Roth, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmanstr.2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pisarev, A. [Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-10-01

    Deuterium trapping in graphite under high flux plasma exposure at high temperatures was studied. A target of MPG-8 fine grain graphite was exposed to plasma beam in LENTA device at zero potential. The average ion flux was of about 10{sup 21} D/m{sup 2} s with a maximum in the center. The temperature was 1473 K in the center and 873 K outside the beam spot. After irradiation, the target was sectioned along and across the surface and studied by SEM, NRA, and TDS. Deuterium profiles measured by NRA showed a peak close to the surface and long tails in the bulk. TDS of samples taken for the front and back sides of the target were very similar. It is suggested, that D retention at the plasma irradiation is mainly controlled by trapping from the gas phase, locally created in the graphite pores by plasma ions injection and subsequent flow of gas to the back side through internal porosity.

  8. Time Exceedances for High Intensity Solar Proton Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xapsos, Michael A.; Stauffer, Craig A.; Jordan, Thomas M.; Adam, James H., Jr.; Dietrich, William F.

    2011-01-01

    A model is presented for times during a space mission that specified solar proton flux levels are exceeded. This includes both total time and continuous time periods during missions. Results for the solar maximum and solar minimum phases of the solar cycle are presented and compared for a broad range of proton energies and shielding levels. This type of approach is more amenable to reliability analysis for spacecraft systems and instrumentation than standard statistical models.

  9. A High Heat Flux Facility Design for Testing of Advanced Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Stability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maas, E; Irvine, S; Bates, R; Auyeung, T

    2004-01-01

    .... Of the existing thermal stability test rigs, none have the ability to accurately simulate the high heat flux conditions that will exist in the cooling channels of these new high-pressure hydrocarbon engines...

  10. Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) for high heat flux thrust chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Christopher M.

    -section components has become critical, but at the same time the service conditions have put our best alloy systems to their limits. As a result, implementation of cooling holes and thermal barrier coatings are new advances in hot-section technologies now looked at for modifications to reach higher temperature applications. Current thermal barrier coatings used in today's turbine applications is known as 8%yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and there are no coatings for current thrust chambers. Current research is looking at the applicability of 8%yttria-stabilized hafnia (YSH) for turbine applications and the implementation of 8%YSZ onto thrust chambers. This study intends to determine if the use of thermal barrier coatings are applicable for high heat flux thrust chambers using industrial YSZ will be advantageous for improvements in efficiency, thrust and longer service life by allowing the thrust chambers to be used more than once.

  11. A conceptual high flux reactor design with scope for use in ADS ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A 100 MWt reactor design has been conceived to support flux level of the order of 1015 n/cm2/s in selected flux trap zones. The physics design considers high enriched metallic alloy fuel in the form of annular plates placed in a D2O moderator tank in a hexagonal lattice arrangement. By choosing a tight lattice pitch ...

  12. Development of a silicone ablator for high-heat-flux and high-shear-rate condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R. A.; Ramseyer, J. A.; Huntress, A.

    1972-01-01

    A silicone material was developed which gives suitable ablative protection in the high heat flux, high shear environments encountered in severe reentry applications, such as nose cones for ballistic vehicles and protection of leading edges or other critical areas of a vehicle. In addition, the ease of handling, low application cost, and room temperature cure make such a silicon material suitable nozzles for the large rockets necessary for vehicle launching. The development of this product is traced from the selection of suitable polymers through the choice of fillers and the finalization of filler loadings.

  13. Increased intensity performance of the Brookhaven AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raka, E.; Ahrens, L.; Frey, W.; Gill, E.; Glenn, J.W.; Sanders, R.; Weng, W.

    1985-05-01

    With the advent of H/sup -/ injection into the Brookhaven AGS, circulating beams of up to 3 x 10/sup 13/ protons at 200 MeV have been obtained. Rf capture of 2.2 x 10/sup 13/ and acceleration of 1.73 x 10/sup 13/ up to the transition energy (approx. = 8 GeV) and 1.64 x 10/sup 13/ to full energy (approx. = 29 GeV) has been achieved. This represents a 50% increase over the best performance obtained with H/sup +/ injection. The increase in circulation beam current is obtained without filling the horizontal aperture. This allows the rf capture process to utilize a larger longitudinal phase space area (approx. = 1 eV sec/bunch vs less than or equal to 0.6 eV sec with H/sup +/ operation). The resulting reduction in relative longitudinal density partially offsets the increase in space charge effects at higher currents. In order to make the capture process independent of injected beam current, a dynamic beam loading compensation loop was installed on the AGS rf system. This is the only addition to the synchrotron itself that was required to reach the new intensity records. A discussion of injection, the rf capture process, and space charge effects is presented. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Dissolution Flowsheet for High Flux Isotope Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Karay, N. S [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-27

    As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) processing campaign, H-Canyon is planning to begin dissolving High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel in late FY17 or early FY18. Each HFIR fuel core contains inner and outer fuel elements which were fabricated from uranium oxide (U3O8) dispersed in a continuous Al phase using traditional powder metallurgy techniques. Fuels fabricated in this manner, like other SNF’s processed in H-Canyon, dissolve by the same general mechanisms with similar gas generation rates and the production of H2. The HFIR fuel cores will be dissolved and the recovered U will be down-blended into low-enriched U. HFIR fuel was previously processed in H-Canyon using a unique insert in both the 6.1D and 6.4D dissolvers. Multiple cores will be charged to the same dissolver solution maximizing the concentration of dissolved Al. The objective of this study was to identify flowsheet conditions through literature review and laboratory experimentation to safely and efficiently dissolve the HFIR fuel in H-Canyon. Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to evaluate the dissolution of HFIR fuel using both Al 1100 and Al 6061 T6 alloy coupons. The Al 1100 alloy was considered a representative surrogate which provided an upper bound on the generation of flammable (i.e., H2) gas during the dissolution process. The dissolution of the Al 6061 T6 alloy proceeded at a slower rate than the Al 1100 alloy, and was used to verify that the target Al concentration in solution could be achieved for the selected Hg concentration. Mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy were used to provide continuous monitoring of the concentration of H2 and other permanent gases in the dissolution offgas, allowing the development of H2 generation rate profiles. The H2 generation rates were subsequently used to evaluate if a full HFIR core could be dissolved in an H-Canyon dissolver without exceeding 60% of the

  15. High-Flux, High-Temperature Thermal Vacuum Qualification Testing of a Solar Receiver Aperture Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Mason, Lee S.; Strumpf, Hal J.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the International Space Station (ISS) Phase 1 program, NASA Lewis Research Center (LERC) and the Russian Space Agency (RSA) teamed together to design, build and flight test the world's first orbital Solar Dynamic Power System (SDPS) on the Russian space station Mir. The Solar Dynamic Flight Demonstration (SDFD) program was to operate a nominal 2 kWe SDPS on Mir for a period up to 1-year starting in late 1997. Unfortunately, the SDFD mission was demanifested from the ISS phase 1 shuttle program in early 1996. However, substantial flight hardware and prototypical flight hardware was built including a heat receiver and aperture shield. The aperture shield comprises the front face of the cylindrical cavity heat receiver and is located at the focal plane of the solar concentrator. It is constructed of a stainless steel plate with a 1-m outside diameter, a 0.24-m inside diameter and covered with high-temperature, refractory metal Multi-Foil Insulation (MFI). The aperture shield must minimize heat loss from the receiver cavity, provide a stiff, high strength structure to accommodate shuttle launch loads and protect receiver structures from highly concentrated solar fluxes during concentrator off-pointing events. To satisfy Mir operational safety protocols, the aperture shield was required to accommodate direct impingement of the intensely concentrated solar image for a 1-hour period. To verify thermal-structural durability under the anticipated high-flux, high-temperature loading, an aperture shield test article was constructed and underwent a series of two tests in a large thermal vacuum chamber configured with a reflective, point-focus solar concentrator and a solar simulator. The test article was positioned near the focal plane and exposed to concentrated solar flux for a period of 1-hour. In the first test, a near equilibrium temperature of 1862 K was attained in the center of the shield hot spot. In the second test, with increased incident flux, a near

  16. Modelling deuterium release from tungsten after high flux high temperature deuterium plasma exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigorev, Petr, E-mail: grigorievpit@gmail.com [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, Mol, 2400 (Belgium); Ghent University, Applied Physics EA17 FUSION-DC, St. Pietersnieuwstraat, 41 B4, B-9000, Gent (Belgium); Department of Experimental Nuclear Physics K-89, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnologies, and Telecommunications, Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Matveev, Dmitry [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425, Jülich (Germany); Bakaeva, Anastasiia [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, Mol, 2400 (Belgium); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University (Belgium); Terentyev, Dmitry [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, Mol, 2400 (Belgium); Zhurkin, Evgeny E. [Department of Experimental Nuclear Physics K-89, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnologies, and Telecommunications, Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Van Oost, Guido [Ghent University, Applied Physics EA17 FUSION-DC, St. Pietersnieuwstraat, 41 B4, B-9000, Gent (Belgium); Noterdaeme, Jean-Marie [Ghent University, Applied Physics EA17 FUSION-DC, St. Pietersnieuwstraat, 41 B4, B-9000, Gent (Belgium); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten is a primary candidate for plasma facing materials for future fusion devices. An important safety concern in the design of plasma facing components is the retention of hydrogen isotopes. Available experimental data is vast and scattered, and a consistent physical model of retention of hydrogen isotopes in tungsten is still missing. In this work we propose a model of non-equilibrium hydrogen isotopes trapping under fusion relevant plasma exposure conditions. The model is coupled to a diffusion-trapping simulation tool and is used to interpret recent experiments involving high plasma flux exposures. From the computational analysis performed, it is concluded that high flux high temperature exposures (T = 1000 K, flux = 10{sup 24} D/m{sup 2}/s and fluence of 10{sup 26} D/m{sup 2}) result in generation of sub-surface damage and bulk diffusion, so that the retention is driven by both sub-surface plasma-induced defects (bubbles) and trapping at natural defects. On the basis of the non-equilibrium trapping model we have estimated the amount of H stored in the sub-surface region to be ∼10{sup −5} at{sup −1}, while the bulk retention is about 4 × 10{sup −7} at{sup −1}, calculated by assuming the sub-surface layer thickness of about 10 μm and adjusting the trap concentration to comply with the experimental results for the integral retention.

  17. High frequency study of nutrient fluxes variability in a small river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zongo, S. B.; Schmitt, F. G.

    2012-04-01

    We consider here high frequency nutrient fluxes recorded during two one month duration campaigns in 2010 and 2011 in the Wimereux river (North of France). During these campaigns, the river flow is recorded every 10 minutes, simultaneously with NO3, NH4, PO4 and COT data. High frequency fluxes are computed. We first compare these high frequency estimations with low frequency (1 measurement every month) estimations in order to quantify the error in the latter. We also consider the pdf of the ratio of high frequency fluxes ("true" values) to low frequency estimation. We finally consider the scaling properties of the fluctuations of the nutrient data, flow data, and of the fluxes. This study was supported by a grant from Agence de l'Eau Artois Picardie.

  18. Origin of the High-energy Neutrino Flux at IceCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carceller, J. M.; Illana, J. I.; Masip, M.; Meloni, D.

    2018-01-01

    We discuss the spectrum of the different components in the astrophysical neutrino flux reaching the Earth, and the possible contribution of each component to the high-energy IceCube data. We show that the diffuse flux from cosmic ray (CR) interactions with gas in our galaxy implies just two events among the 54-event sample. We argue that the neutrino flux from CR interactions in the intergalactic (intracluster) space depends critically on the transport parameter δ describing the energy dependence in the diffusion coefficient of galactic CRs. Our analysis motivates a {E}-2.1 neutrino spectrum with a drop at PeV energies that fits the data well, including the non-observation of the Glashow resonance at 6.3 PeV. We also show that a CR flux described by an unbroken power law may produce a neutrino flux with interesting spectral features (bumps and breaks) related to changes in the CR composition.

  19. Apparatus for high flux photocatalytic pollution control using a rotating fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali; Muradov, Nazim Z.; Martin, Eric

    2003-06-24

    An apparatus based on optimizing photoprocess energetics by decoupling of the process energy efficiency from the DRE for target contaminants. The technique is applicable to both low- and high-flux photoreactor design and scale-up. An apparatus for high-flux photocatalytic pollution control is based on the implementation of multifunctional metal oxide aerogels and other media in conjunction with a novel rotating fluidized particle bed reactor.

  20. COMPARISON OF COOLING SCHEMES FOR HIGH HEAT FLUX COMPONENTS COOLING IN FUSION REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phani Kumar Domalapally

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Some components of the fusion reactor receives high heat fluxes either during the startup and shutdown or during the operation of the machine. This paper analyzes different ways of enhancing heat transfer using helium and water for cooling of these high heat flux components and then conclusions are drawn to decide the best choice of coolant, for usage in near and long term applications.

  1. Plasma resonance and flux dynamics in layered high-Tc superconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sakai, S.

    2000-01-01

    Flux dynamics of layered high Tc superconductors are considered with special emphasis on the small oscillation modes. In particular we find the dispersion relation for the plasma modes and discuss the spectra to be observed in microwave experiments.......Flux dynamics of layered high Tc superconductors are considered with special emphasis on the small oscillation modes. In particular we find the dispersion relation for the plasma modes and discuss the spectra to be observed in microwave experiments....

  2. Low flux submerged membrane bioreactor treating high strength leachate from a solid waste transfer station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Bui Xuan; Dan, Nguyen Phuoc; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan

    2013-08-01

    A submerged membrane bioreactor was employed to treat high strength leachate generating from a solid waste transfer station. The reactor was operated at low fluxes of 1.2; 2.4; 3.8 and 5.1 LMH. The organic loading rate (OLR) ranged from 2 to 10 kg COD/m(3)day. Results show that 97% removal efficiency of COD at flux of 2.4 LMH. The highest removal of ammonia nitrogen and total nitrogen was 92.0 ± 1.5% and 88.0 ± 2.0% respectively at flux of 3.8 LMH. Fouling rates were observed to be 0.075; 0.121; 3.186 and 6.374 kPa/day for the fluxes of 1.2; 2.4; 3.8 and 5.1 LMH, respectively. Membrane fouled very slowly at low flux operation. The sustainable flux was identified to be less than 2.4 LMH for treating high strength leachate. It reveals less fouling was able to achieve for high strength wastewater by reducing the membrane flux. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. High-frequency measurements of aeolian saltation flux: Field-based methodology and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Raleigh L.; Kok, Jasper F.; Hugenholtz, Chris H.; Barchyn, Thomas E.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Ellis, Jean T.

    2018-02-01

    Aeolian transport of sand and dust is driven by turbulent winds that fluctuate over a broad range of temporal and spatial scales. However, commonly used aeolian transport models do not explicitly account for such fluctuations, likely contributing to substantial discrepancies between models and measurements. Underlying this problem is the absence of accurate sand flux measurements at the short time scales at which wind speed fluctuates. Here, we draw on extensive field measurements of aeolian saltation to develop a methodology for generating high-frequency (up to 25 Hz) time series of total (vertically-integrated) saltation flux, namely by calibrating high-frequency (HF) particle counts to low-frequency (LF) flux measurements. The methodology follows four steps: (1) fit exponential curves to vertical profiles of saltation flux from LF saltation traps, (2) determine empirical calibration factors through comparison of LF exponential fits to HF number counts over concurrent time intervals, (3) apply these calibration factors to subsamples of the saltation count time series to obtain HF height-specific saltation fluxes, and (4) aggregate the calibrated HF height-specific saltation fluxes into estimates of total saltation fluxes. When coupled to high-frequency measurements of wind velocity, this methodology offers new opportunities for understanding how aeolian saltation dynamics respond to variability in driving winds over time scales from tens of milliseconds to days.

  4. Dual-stage trapped-flux magnet cryostat for measurements at high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Zahirul; Das, Ritesh K.; Weinstein, Roy

    2015-04-14

    A method and a dual-stage trapped-flux magnet cryostat apparatus are provided for implementing enhanced measurements at high magnetic fields. The dual-stage trapped-flux magnet cryostat system includes a trapped-flux magnet (TFM). A sample, for example, a single crystal, is adjustably positioned proximate to the surface of the TFM, using a translation stage such that the distance between the sample and the surface is selectively adjusted. A cryostat is provided with a first separate thermal stage provided for cooling the TFM and with a second separate thermal stage provided for cooling sample.

  5. Simultaneous in situ CO2 soil flux and isotopic analysis in a high CO2 flux environment at Mammoth Mountain, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogue, R. R.; Oze, C.; Horton, T. W.; Defliese, W.

    2016-12-01

    Areas proximal to Mammoth Mountain, CA, have been emitting anomalously high CO2 for nearly three decades. High CO2 flux rates in these areas have resulted in tree kills and are potentially attributed to a large shallow CO2 reservoir fed by the breakdown of metasedimentary rocks and/or degassing from a mid-crustal magma body. Previous studies have focused largely on providing estimates of total CO2 efflux and the origin of CO2 release in the area. However, the nature and complexity of the interface between high CO2 flux and adjacent ecosystem have not been explored. Here we assess the spatial and temporal transition of the high CO2 flux zone and tree kill area into the adjacent forest ecosystem. In June and July 2016 extensive in situ diffuse soil CO2 flux and 13CO2 isotope measurements were conducted with a coupled West Systems/LICOR and Picarro. Additionally, gas samples were collected for Δ47 clumped isotope analyses. Compared to previous studies, areas of high CO2 flux have progressed northeast into a forest ecosystem, with some of the highest flux areas less than 20 meters from live trees. 13CO2 values primarily mirror areas of high CO2 flux with 13CO2 magmatic signatures; however, magmatic 13CO2 values are present in low CO2 flux and heavily forested areas. Δ47 values are depleted relative to equilibrium at ambient air and soil temperatures, indicating a high-temperature source. Young trees were also observed growing in areas that were part of the initial tree kill, providing tangible evidence of the impact of the movement of the high CO2 flux areas.

  6. HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES FLUX ORIGIN IN THE CLOUDS, DARK LIGHTNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov, V.V.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Problem of high-energy particles flux origin in clouds is discussed. Conditions in which dark lightning preceding the ordinary one and creating additional ionization, fluxes of fast electrons with MeV energy prior to the earthquake detected among lightning initiating ball-lightning, glow, sprites are considered. All above phenomena appear to be of general nature founded on quantum entanglement of hydrogen bonds protons in water clasters inside clouds.

  7. Behavior of TPC`s in a high particle flux environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etkin, A.; Eiseman, S.E.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Lindenbaum, S.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Zhao, K.H.; Zhu, Y. [City College of New York, New York (United States); Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Ahmad, S.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Chiou, C.N.; Clement, J.M.; Mutchler, G.S.; Roberts, J.B. [Bonner Nuclear Lab., Houston, TX (United States)

    1991-12-31

    TPC`s (Time Projection Chamber) used in E-810 at the TAGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) were exposed to fluxes equivalent to more than 10 minimum ionizing particles per second to find if such high fluxes cause gain changes or distortions of the electric field. Initial results of these and other tests are presented and the consequences for the RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) TPC-based experiments are discussed.

  8. In vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, R.; Yasumura, Seiichi; Dilmanian, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    Seven important body elements, C, N, Ca, P, K, Na, and Cl, can be measured with great precision and accuracy in the in vivo neutron activation facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The facilities include the delayed-gamma neutron activation, the prompt-gamma neutron activation, and the inelastic neutron scattering systems. In conjunction with measurements of total body water by the tritiated-water dilution method several body compartments can be defined from the contents of these elements, also with high precision. In particular, body fat mass is derived from total body carbon together with total body calcium and nitrogen; body protein mass is derived from total body nitrogen; extracellular fluid volume is derived from total body sodium and chlorine; lean body mass and body cell mass are derived from total body potassium; and, skeletal mass is derived from total body calcium. Thus, we suggest that neutron activation analysis may be valuable for calibrating some of the instruments routinely used in clinical studies of body composition. The instruments that would benefit from absolute calibration against neutron activation analysis are bioelectric impedance analysis, infrared interactance, transmission ultrasound, and dual energy x-ray/photon absorptiometry.

  9. HOM identification by bead pulling in the Brookhaven ERL cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, H; Jain, Puneet; Johnson, Elliott C; Xu, Wencan

    2014-01-01

    Exploratory measurements of the Brookhaven Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) cavity at superconducting temperature produced a long list of high order modes (HOMs). The niobium 5-cell cavity is terminated at each end with HOM ferrite dampers that successfully reduce the Q-factors to levels required to avoid beam break up (BBU) instabilities. However, a number of un-damped resonances with Q≥106 were found at 4 K and their mode identification forms the focus of this paper. The approach taken here consists of bead pulling on a copper (Cu) replica of the ERL cavity with dampers involving various network analyzer measurements. Several different S21 transmission measurements are used, including those taken from the fundamental input coupler to the pick-up probe across the cavity, others between beam-position monitor probes in the beam tubes, and also between probes placed into the cells. The bead pull technique suitable for HOM identification with a metallic needle or dielectric bead is detailed. This paper presents the...

  10. Non-isothermal Crystallization Kinetics of Mold Fluxes for Casting High-Aluminum Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lejun; Li, Huan; Wang, Wanlin; Wu, Zhaoyang; Yu, Jie; Xie, Senlin

    2017-12-01

    This paper investigates the crystallization behavior of CaO-SiO2- and CaO-Al2O3-based mold fluxes for casting high-aluminum steels using single hot thermocouple technology, developed kinetic models, and scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the crystallization ability of the typical CaO-SiO2-based Flux A (CaO/SiO2 0.62, Al2O3 2 mass pct) is weaker than that of CaO-Al2O3-based Flux B (CaO/SiO2 4.11, Al2O3 31.9 mass pct) because of its higher initial crystallization temperature. The crystallization kinetics of Flux A was "surface nucleation and growth, interface reaction control" in the overall non-isothermal crystallization process, whereas that of Flux B was "constant nucleation rate, 1-dimensional growth, diffusion control, in the primary crystallization stage, and then transformed into constant nucleation rate, 3-dimensional growth, interface reaction control in the secondary crystallization stage." The energy dispersive spectroscopy results for Flux B suggested that the variations in the crystallization kinetics for Flux B are due to different crystals precipitating in the primary (BaCa2Al8O15) and secondary (CaAl2O4) crystallization periods during the non-isothermal crystallization process.

  11. Non-isothermal Crystallization Kinetics of Mold Fluxes for Casting High-Aluminum Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lejun; Li, Huan; Wang, Wanlin; Wu, Zhaoyang; Yu, Jie; Xie, Senlin

    2017-10-01

    This paper investigates the crystallization behavior of CaO-SiO2- and CaO-Al2O3-based mold fluxes for casting high-aluminum steels using single hot thermocouple technology, developed kinetic models, and scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the crystallization ability of the typical CaO-SiO2-based Flux A (CaO/SiO2 0.62, Al2O3 2 mass pct) is weaker than that of CaO-Al2O3-based Flux B (CaO/SiO2 4.11, Al2O3 31.9 mass pct) because of its higher initial crystallization temperature. The crystallization kinetics of Flux A was "surface nucleation and growth, interface reaction control" in the overall non-isothermal crystallization process, whereas that of Flux B was "constant nucleation rate, 1-dimensional growth, diffusion control, in the primary crystallization stage, and then transformed into constant nucleation rate, 3-dimensional growth, interface reaction control in the secondary crystallization stage." The energy dispersive spectroscopy results for Flux B suggested that the variations in the crystallization kinetics for Flux B are due to different crystals precipitating in the primary (BaCa2Al8O15) and secondary (CaAl2O4) crystallization periods during the non-isothermal crystallization process.

  12. High energy astrophysical neutrino flux and modified dispersion relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alba, J. L. Bazo; Bustamante, M.; Gago, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by the interest in searches for violation of CPT invariance, we study its possible effects in the flavour ratios of high-energy neutrinos coming from cosmic accelerators. In particular, we focus on the effect of an energy independent new physics contribution to the neutrino flavour osci...

  13. Development and applications of very high flux microfiltration membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, S.; van Rijn, C.J.M.; Nijdam, W.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    1998-01-01

    Inorganic microfiltration membranes with a pore size down to 0.1 µm have been made using laser interference lithography and silicon micro machining technology. The membranes have an extremely small flow resistance due to a thickness smaller than the pore size, a high porosity and a very narrow pore

  14. Growth of a dry spot under a vapor bubble at high heat flux and high pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolayev, Vadim; Lagier, G -L; Hegseth, J

    2016-01-01

    We report a 2D modeling of the thermal diffusion-controlled growth of a vapor bubble attached to a heating surface during saturated boiling. The heat conduction problem is solved in a liquid that surrounds a bubble with a free boundary and in a semi-infinite solid heater by the boundary element method. At high system pressure the bubble is assumed to grow slowly, its shape being defined by the surface tension and the vapor recoil force, a force coming from the liquid evaporating into the bubble. It is shown that at some typical time the dry spot under the bubble begins to grow rapidly under the action of the vapor recoil. Such a bubble can eventually spread into a vapor film that can separate the liquid from the heater thus triggering the boiling crisis (critical heat flux).

  15. A new frontier in CO2 flux measurements using a highly portable DIAL laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiβer, Manuel; Granieri, Domenico; Burton, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic CO2 emissions play a key role in the geological carbon cycle, and monitoring of volcanic CO2 fluxes helps to forecast eruptions. The quantification of CO2 fluxes is challenging due to rapid dilution of magmatic CO2 in CO2-rich ambient air and the diffuse nature of many emissions, leading to large uncertainties in the global magmatic CO2 flux inventory. Here, we report measurements using a new DIAL laser remote sensing system for volcanic CO2 (CO2DIAL). Two sites in the volcanic zone of Campi Flegrei (Italy) were scanned, yielding CO2 path-amount profiles used to compute fluxes. Our results reveal a relatively high CO2 flux from Campi Flegrei, consistent with an increasing trend. Unlike previous methods, the CO2DIAL is able to measure integrated CO2 path-amounts at distances up to 2000 m using virtually any solid surface as a reflector, whilst also being highly portable. This opens a new frontier in quantification of geological and anthropogenic CO2 fluxes. PMID:27652775

  16. Methods to assess high-resolution subsurface gas concentrations and gas fluxes in wetland ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, Bo; Kühl, Michael; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2013-01-01

    The need for measurements of soil gas concentrations and surface fluxes of greenhouse gases at high temporal and spatial resolution in wetland ecosystem has lead to the introduction of several new analytical techniques and methods. In addition to the automated flux chamber methodology for high......-resolution estimates of greenhouse gas fluxes across the soil-atmosphere interface, these high-resolution methods include microsensors for quantification of spatiotemporal concentration dynamics in O2 and N2O at micrometer scales, fiber-optic optodes for long-term continuous point measurements of O2 concentrations...... and peat soils are highly heterogeneous, containing a mosaic of dynamic macropore systems created by both macrofauna and flora leading to distinct spatial and temporal variations in gas concentration on a scale of millimeters and minutes. Applications of these new methodologies allow measurements...

  17. High Flux, Fouling Resistant Membranes for RO Pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-31

    powder , and 20 mg/l Orchid Pro plant food containing humic and fulvic organics (Chapman 2011). The recipe contains key components that were identified as...algea and bacteria. Finally, particulates and microorganisms contribute to fouling, especially by forming a cake layer. In this simulated seawater...higher. High shear rates can significantly decrease cake fouling as the tangential flow removes particulates from the surface more effectively

  18. High geothermal heat flux measured below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Andrew T; Mankoff, Kenneth D; Tulaczyk, Slawek M; Tyler, Scott W; Foley, Neil

    2015-07-01

    The geothermal heat flux is a critical thermal boundary condition that influences the melting, flow, and mass balance of ice sheets, but measurements of this parameter are difficult to make in ice-covered regions. We report the first direct measurement of geothermal heat flux into the base of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), below Subglacial Lake Whillans, determined from the thermal gradient and the thermal conductivity of sediment under the lake. The heat flux at this site is 285 ± 80 mW/m(2), significantly higher than the continental and regional averages estimated for this site using regional geophysical and glaciological models. Independent temperature measurements in the ice indicate an upward heat flux through the WAIS of 105 ± 13 mW/m(2). The difference between these heat flux values could contribute to basal melting and/or be advected from Subglacial Lake Whillans by flowing water. The high geothermal heat flux may help to explain why ice streams and subglacial lakes are so abundant and dynamic in this region.

  19. The Influence of Non-Uniform High Heat Flux on Thermal Stress of Thermoelectric Power Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingzhen Ming

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A thermoelectric generator (TEG device which uses solar energy as heat source would achieve higher efficiency if there is a higher temperature difference between the hot-cold ends. However, higher temperature or higher heat flux being imposed upon the hot end will cause strong thermal stress, which will have a negative influence on the life cycle of the thermoelectric module. Meanwhile, in order to get high heat flux, a Fresnel lens is required to concentrate solar energy, which will cause non-uniformity of heat flux on the hot end of the TEG and further influence the thermal stress of the device. This phenomenon is very common in solar TEG devices but seldom research work has been reported. In this paper, numerical analysis on the heat transfer and thermal stress performance of a TEG module has been performed considering the variation on the power of the heat flux being imposed upon the hot-end; the influence of non-uniform high heat flux on thermal stress has also been analyzed. It is found that non-uniformity of high heat flux being imposed upon the hot end has a significant effect on the thermal stress of TEG and life expectation of the device. Taking the uniformity of 100% as standard, when the heating uniformity is 70%, 50%, 30%, and 10%, respectively, the maximum thermal stress of TEG module increased by 3%, 6%, 12%, and 22% respectively. If we increase the heat flux on the hot end, the influence of non-uniformity on the thermal stress will be more remarkable.

  20. High-flux/high-temperature solar thermal conversion: technology development and advanced applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar Thermal Power Plants have generated in the last 10 years a dynamic market for renewable energy industry and a pro-active networking within R&D community worldwide. By end 2015, there are about 5 GW installed in the world, most of them still concentrated in only two countries, Spain and the US, though a rapid process of globalization is taking place in the last few years and now ambitious market deployment is starting in countries like South Africa, Chile, Saudi Arabia, India, United Arab Emirates or Morocco. Prices for electricity produced by today's plants fill the range from 12 to 16 c€/kWh and they are capital intensive with investments above 4000 €/kW, depending on the number of hours of thermal storage. The urgent need to speed up the learning curve, by moving forward to LCOE below 10 c€/kWh and the promotion of sun-to-fuel applications, is driving the R&D programmes. Both, industry and R&D community are accelerating the transformation by approaching high-flux/high-temperature technologies and promoting the integration with high-efficiency conversion systems.

  1. Global anthropogenic heat flux database with high spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y.; Varquez, A. C. G.; Kanda, M.

    2017-02-01

    This study developed a top-down method for estimating global anthropogenic heat emission (AHE), with a high spatial resolution of 30 arc-seconds and temporal resolution of 1 h. Annual average AHE was derived from human metabolic heating and primary energy consumption, which was further divided into three components based on consumer sector. The first and second components were heat loss and heat emissions from industrial sectors equally distributed throughout the country and populated areas, respectively. The third component comprised the sum of emissions from commercial, residential, and transportation sectors (CRT). Bulk AHE from the CRT was proportionally distributed using a global population dataset, with a radiance-calibrated nighttime lights adjustment. An empirical function to estimate monthly fluctuations of AHE based on gridded monthly temperatures was derived from various Japanese and American city measurements. Finally, an AHE database with a global coverage was constructed for the year 2013. Comparisons between our proposed AHE and other existing datasets revealed that the problem of overestimation of AHE intensity in previous top-down models was mitigated by the separation of energy consumption sectors; furthermore, the problem of AHE underestimation at central urban areas was solved by the nighttime lights adjustment. A strong agreement in the monthly profiles of AHE between our database and other bottom-up datasets further proved the validity of the current methodology. Investigations of AHE for the 29 largest urban agglomerations globally highlighted that the share of heat emissions from CRT sectors to the total AHE at the city level was 40-95%; whereas that of metabolic heating varied with the city's level of development by a range of 2-60%. A negative correlation between gross domestic product (GDP) and the share of metabolic heating to a city's total AHE was found. Globally, peak AHE values were found to occur between December and February, while

  2. Final report of the HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) irradiation facilities improvement project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, B.H.; Thoms, K.R.; West, C.D.

    1987-09-01

    The High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has outstanding neutronics characteristics for materials irradiation, but some relatively minor aspects of its mechanical design severely limited its usefulness for that purpose. In particular, though the flux trap region in the center of the annular fuel elements has a very high neutron flux, it had no provision for instrumentation access to irradiation capsules. The irradiation positions in the beryllium reflector outside the fuel elements also have a high flux; however, although instrumented, they were too small and too few to replace the facilities of a materials testing reactor. To address these drawbacks, the HFIR Irradiation Facilities Improvement Project consisted of modifications to the reactor vessel cover, internal structures, and reflector. Two instrumented facilities were provided in the flux trap region, and the number of materials irradiation positions in the removable beryllium (RB) was increased from four to eight, each with almost twice the available experimental space of the previous ones. The instrumented target facilities were completed in August 1986, and the RB facilities were completed in June 1987.

  3. Brookhaven Lab and Argonne Lab scientists invent a plasma valve

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have received U.S. patent number 6,528,948 for a device that shuts off airflow into a vacuum about one million times faster than mechanical valves or shutters that are currently in use (1 page).

  4. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY: THREE SELECTED TOPICS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT,J.W.DENG,Y.GLIMM,J.SAMULYAK,R.

    2003-09-15

    We present an overview of computational science at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), with selections from three areas: fluids, nanoscience, and biology. The work at BNL in each of these areas is itself very broad, and we select a few topics for presentation within each of them.

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.E.; Schroeder, G.L. [eds.] [and others

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1995. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment. Areas of known contamination are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement established by the Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency and the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. Except for identified areas of soil and groundwater contamination, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with the applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. Also, the data show that the environmental impacts at Brookhaven National Laboratory are minimal and pose no threat to the public nor to the environment. This report meets the requirements of Department of Energy Orders 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

  6. Review of Brookhaven nuclear transparency measurements in (p ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 61; Issue 5. Review of Brookhaven nuclear transparency ... First, we describe the measurements with the newer experiment, E850, which has more complete kinematic definition of quasi-elastic events. E850 covers a larger range of incident momenta, and thus ...

  7. Brookhaven National Laboratory moves to the fast lane

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The U.S. Department of Energy's energy sciences network (ESnet) continues to roll out its next-generation architecture on schedule with the March 14 completion of the Long Island Metropolitan Area Network, connecting Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to the ESnet point of presente (PO) 60 miles away in New York City." (1 page)

  8. High-flux electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators driven by petawatt lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ming; Tesileanu, Ovidiu

    2017-07-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are considered to be one of the most competitive next-generation accelerator candidates. In this paper, we will study the potential high-flux electron beam production of an LWFA driven by petawatt-level laser pulses. In our three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, an optimal set of parameters gives ˜ 40 {nC} of charge with 2 {PW} laser power, thus ˜ 400 {kA} of instantaneous current if we assume the electron beam duration is 100 fs. This high flux and its secondary radiation are widely applicable in nuclear and QED physics, industrial imaging, medical and biological studies.

  9. High speed infrared camera diagnostic for heat flux measurement in NSTX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, J-W; Maingi, R; Mastrovito, D; Roquemore, A L

    2010-02-01

    A new high speed infrared camera has been successfully implemented and produced first set of heat flux measurements on the lower divertor tiles in the NSTX tokamak. High spatial and temporal resolutions, 6.4 mm and 1.6-6.3 kHz, respectively, enable us to investigate detailed structure of heat flux deposition pattern caused by transient events such as edge localized modes. A comparison of the data with a slow infrared camera viewing the same region of interest shows good agreement between the two independent measurements. Data analysis for various plasma conditions is in progress.

  10. GRCop-84: A High Temperature Copper-based Alloy For High Heat Flux Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    While designed for rocket engine main combustion chamber liners, GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) offers potential for high heat flux applications in industrial applications requiring a temperature capability up to approximately 700 C (1292 F). GRCop-84 is a copper-based alloy with excellent elevated temperature strength, good creep resistance, long LCF lives and enhanced oxidation resistance. It also has a lower thermal expansion than copper and many other low alloy copper-based alloys. GRCop-84 can be manufactured into a variety of shapes such as tubing, bar, plate and sheet using standard production techniques and requires no special production techniques. GRCop-84 forms well, so conventional fabrication methods including stamping and bending can be used. GRCop-84 has demonstrated an ability to be friction stir welded, brazed, inertia welded, diffusion bonded and electron beam welded for joining to itself and other materials. Potential applications include plastic injection molds, resistance welding electrodes and holders, permanent metal casting molds, vacuum plasma spray nozzles and high temperature heat exchanger applications.

  11. Proceedings of Brookhaven National Laboratory's fusion/synfuel workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R. (eds.)

    1979-01-01

    The fusion synfuels workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on August 27-29, 1979 examined the current status of candidate synfuel processes and the R and D required to develop the capability for fusion synfuel production. Participants divided into five working groups, covering the following areas: (1) economics and applications; (2) high-temperature electrolysis; (3) thermochemical processes (including hybrid thermo-electrochemical); (4) blanket and materials; and (5) high-efficiency power cycles. Each working group presented a summary of their conclusions and recommendations to all participants during the third day of the Workshop. These summaries are given.

  12. Model-dependent high-energy neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Kumar, Pawan

    2013-03-22

    The IceCube Collaboration recently reported a stringent upper limit on the high energy neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which provides a meaningful constraint on the standard internal shock model. Recent broadband electromagnetic observations of GRBs also challenge the internal shock paradigm for GRBs, and some competing models for γ-ray prompt emission have been proposed. We describe a general scheme for calculating the GRB neutrino flux, and compare the predicted neutrino flux levels for different models. We point out that the current neutrino flux upper limit starts to constrain the standard internal shock model. The dissipative photosphere models are also challenged if the cosmic ray luminosity from GRBs is at least 10 times larger than the γ-ray luminosity. If the neutrino flux upper limit continues to go down in the next few years, then it would suggest the following possibilities: (i) the photon-to-proton luminosity ratio in GRBs is anomalously high for shocks, which may be achieved in some dissipative photosphere models and magnetic dissipation models; or (ii) the GRB emission site is at a larger radius than the internal shock radius, as expected in some magnetic dissipation models such as the internal collision-induced magnetic reconnection and turbulence model.

  13. Autophagic flux is highly active in early mitosis and differentially regulated throughout the cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Wang, Dongmei; Liu, Juanjuan; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Mitosis is a fast process that involves dramatic cellular remodeling and has a high energy demand. Whether autophagy is active or inactive during the early stages of mitosis in a naturally dividing cell is still debated. Here we aimed to use multiple assays to resolve this apparent discrepancy. Although the LC3 puncta number was reduced in mitosis, the four different cell lines we tested all have active autophagic flux in both interphase and mitosis. In addition, the autophagic flux was highly active in nocodazole-induced, double-thymidine synchronization released as well as naturally occurring mitosis in HeLa cells. Multiple autophagy proteins are upregulated in mitosis and the increased Beclin-1 level likely contributes to the active autophagic flux in early mitosis. It is interesting that although the autophagic flux is active throughout the cell cycle, early mitosis and S phase have relatively higher autophagic flux than G1 and late G2 phases, which might be helpful to degrade the damaged organelles and provide energy during S phase and mitosis. PMID:27213594

  14. Analysis of heat transfer under high heat flux nucleate boiling conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.; Dinh, N. [3145 Burlington Laboratories, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Analysis was performed for a heater infrared thermometric imaging temperature data obtained from high heat flux pool boiling and liquid film boiling experiments BETA. With the OpenFOAM solver, heat flux distribution towards the coolant was obtained by solving transient heat conduction of heater substrate given the heater surface temperature data as boundary condition. The so-obtained heat flux data was used to validate them against the state-of-art wall boiling model developed by D. R. Shaver (2015) with the assumption of micro-layer hydrodynamics. Good agreement was found between the model prediction and data for conditions away from the critical heat flux (CHF). However, the data indicate a different heat transfer pattern under CHF, which is not captured by the current model. Experimental data strengthen the notion of burnout caused by the irreversible hot spot due to failure of rewetting. The observation forms a basis for a detailed modeling of micro-layer hydrodynamics under high heat flux.

  15. High flux nanofiltration membranes based on layer-by-layer assembly modified electrospun nanofibrous substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guo-Rong; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Xu, Jian-Mei; Li, Lu; Su, Hui-Chao; Zhao, He-Li; Feng, Hou-Jun

    2018-03-01

    Herein, high flux nanofiltration (NF) membranes were fabricated by combined procedures of electrospinning, layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly, and phase inversion. The membranes displayed three-dual structure constituted polyether sulfone (PES) coating layer, LBL assembly modified electrospun polyester (PET) nanofibrous mats, and non-woven supports. High flux NF membranes thus prepared are characterized by ultrathin phase inversion layer (∼10 μm) while that of conventional membranes are 100-150 μm, implying that very high flux could be expected. Various factors including electrospinning conditions, chitosan (CHI)/alginate (ALG) concentration, PES concentration, exposed time, coagulating temperature, thermal treatment, and sulfonated poly ether ketone (SPEEK) content were systematically investigated. Structures of the membranes were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), mechanical properties test, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and static contact angle measurements. The separation experiments indicated that thus prepared membranes exhibited high flux of as high as ∼75 L m-2 h-1 with Mg SO4 rejection of ∼80%.

  16. High Heat Flux Testing of Tungsten PFCs for the Fusion Reactor Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk-Kwon; Park, Seong Dae; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Tungsten divertor plasma facing components (PFCs) were fabricated by using hot isostatic-pressing (HIP) bonding and vacuum plasma spray method (VPS) for the fusion reactor development. Tungsten mockups were designed for the high heat flux test with the Korean high heat flux test facility - electron beam (KoHLT-EB), which was constructed for the performance qualification of various PFCs. KoHLT-EB was used to qualify the PFCs performances of each fusion research. The high heat load conditions were simulated by using a thermo-hydraulic analysis tool with the ANSYS-CFX code. A high heat flux testing was performed up to the thermal life-time of each mockup with the evaluated conditions in 1 ⁓ 5 MW/m{sup 2}. HIP-bonded testing mockups consisted of 2 mm pure tungsten PFCs and ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) as structural materials, and VPS mockups are comprised with 1 ⁓ 2 mm coated tungsten layer and FMS. These tungsten mockups are the candidate for the blanket and divertor in DEMO or a fusion power reactor. For the thermal fatigue test, two types of tungsten mock-ups were fabricated by using HIP bonding and VPS method for the fusion reactor development. The verification of the cooling performance was tested under the operation condition of ITER and fusion reactor. After the completion of the preliminary mockup test and facility qualification, the high heat flux test facility assess the performance test for two type of plasma facing components.

  17. High diversity of methanotrophic bacteria in geothermal soils affected by high methane fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Walter; Gagliano, Antonina Lisa; Quatrini, Paola; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas 25 times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic/geothermal soils act as source, but also as biological filter for methane release to the atmosphere. For long time, volcanic/geothermal soils has been considered inhospitable for methanotrophic microorganisms, but new extremophile methanotrophs belonging to Verrucomicrobia were identified in three different areas (Pozzuoli, Italy; Hell's Gate, New Zealand; Kamchatka, Russia), explaining anomalous behaviours in methane leakages of several geothermal/volcanic sites. Our aim was to increase the knowledge of the relationship between methane emissions from volcanic/geothermal areas and biological methane oxidation, by investigating a geothermal site of Pantelleria island (Italy). Pantelleria Island hosts a high enthalpy geothermal system characterized by high temperature, high CH4 and very low H2S fluxes. Such characteristics are reflected in potentially great supply of methane for methanotrophs and scarce presence of inhibitors of their activity (H2S and NH3) in the Pantelleria soils. Potential methanotrophic activity within these soils was already evidenced by the CH4/CO2 ratio of the flux measurements which was lower than that of the respective fumarolic manifestations indicating a loss of CH4 during the gas travel towards the earth's surface. In this study laboratory incubation experiments using soils sampled at Favara Grande, the main hydrothermal area of Pantelleria, showed very high methane consumption rates (up to 9500 ng CH4 h-1 g-1). Furthermore, microbiological and culture-independent molecular analyses allowed to detect the presence of methanotrophs affiliated to Gamma- and Alpha-Proteobacteria and to the newly discovered acidothermophilic methanotrophs Verrucomicrobia. Culturable methanotrophic Alpha-proteobacteria of the genus Methylocystis were isolated by

  18. Reduced deuterium retention in self-damaged tungsten exposed to high-flux plasmas at high surface temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Hoen, M.H.J.; Mayer, M.; Kleyn, A.W.; Schut, H.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of surface temperature on deuterium retention in self-damaged tungsten exposed to high-flux deuterium plasmas. The retention saturates at a W4+ fluence of about 3 x 10(17) m(-2) and is strongly reduced for the present high surface temperatures of 800-1200 K as compared

  19. Operating manual for the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Volume I. Description of the facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    This volume contains a comprehensive description of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Facility. Its primary purpose is to supplement the detailed operating procedures, providing the reactor operators with background information on the various HFIR systems. The detailed operating procdures are presented in another report.

  20. Resolving mass flux at high spatial and temporal resolution using GRACE intersatellite measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowlands, D. D.; Luthcke, S. B.; Klosko, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    The GRACE mission is designed to monitor mass flux on the Earth's surface at one month and high spatial resolution through the estimation of monthly gravity fields. Although this approach has been largely successful, information at submonthly time scales can be lost or even aliased through...

  1. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of RP-2 Under High Heat Fluxes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Billingsley, M. C; Lyu, H. Y; Bates, R. W

    2007-01-01

    ... such as RP-2, an advanced grade of ultra-low sulfur rocket kerosene. This paper reports recent experiments and numerical simulations of RP-2 cooled thermal stability tests conducted in the AFRL High Heat Flux Facility located at Edwards AFB, CA...

  2. Plasma pressure and particle loss studies in the Pilot-PSI high flux linear plasma generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jesko, K.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Gunn, J. P.; Vernimmen, J. W. M.; De Temmerman, G.

    2017-01-01

    Plasma detachment in tokamak divertors reduces the particle and power fluxes to the plasma facing components and is essential for successful operation of ITER. The linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI can produce a high density (∼1021 m−3), low temperature (∼1 eV) plasma which is similar to that

  3. Deuterium retention and surface modifications of nanocrystalline tungsten films exposed to high-flux plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Hoen, M.H.J.; Dellasega, D.; Pezzoli, A.; Passoni, M.; Kleyn, A.W.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Deuterium retention studies are presented for nanostructured tungsten films exposed to high-flux deuterium plasmas. Thin tungsten films of similar to 1 mu m thickness were deposited with pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on bulk tungsten. Surface modifications were studied with scanning electron

  4. Deuterium retention and surface modifications of nanocrystalline tungsten films exposed to high-flux plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoen, M. H. J. 't; Dellasega, D.; Pezzoli, A.; Passoni, M.; Kleyn, A. W.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Deuterium retention studies are presented for nanostructured tungsten films exposed to high-flux deuterium plasmas. Thin tungsten films of ∼1 μm thickness were deposited with pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on bulk tungsten. Surface modifications were studied with scanning electron

  5. A combined sensor for simultaneous high resolution 2-D imaging of oxygen and trace metals fluxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahl, Henrik; Warnken, Kent W.; Sochaczewski, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    A new sandwich sensor, consisting of an O-2 planar optode overlain by a thin (90 mu m) DGT layer is presented. This sensor can simultaneously resolve 2-D O-2 dynamics and trace metal fluxes in benthic substrates at a high spatial resolution. The DGT layer accumulates metals on a small particle si...

  6. High heat flux test on the thermocouple embedded ITER neutral beam duct liner mock-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.K., E-mail: ckpark@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H.S., E-mail: hskim@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G.H.; Ahn, H.J. [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.K.; Lee, D.W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Urbani, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067, St. Paul Lez Durance, Cedex (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Twenty thermocouples have been installed on the NB duct liner full scale mock-up. • High heat flux test has been performed. • Four thermocouple fixation schemes had been verified by high heat flux test. • Temperature behavior of the NB duct liner has been successfully simulated. - Abstract: The ITER neutral beam duct liner is located within the tokamak VV port extension and is mounted on the VV port extension flange. The duct liner is made from CuCrZr copper alloy and is actively cooled through deep-drilled channels. A number of thermocouples should be installed on the neutral beam duct liner in order to provide the ability to detect temperature excursions on the surface of the duct liner. Twenty thermocouples have been installed on the neutral beam duct liner full scale mock-up, and a high heat flux test has been performed at the KoHLT-EB test facility, in order to simulate temperature detection in the neutral beam duct liner during ITER operation. For each thermocouple, the fixation method has been verified by high heat flux test with uniform electron beam profile, and the temperature behavior of the neutral beam duct liner has been successfully simulated by Gaussian electron beam profile.

  7. High flux, narrow bandwidth compton light sources via extended laser-electron interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, V P

    2015-01-13

    New configurations of lasers and electron beams efficiently and robustly produce high flux beams of bright, tunable, polarized quasi-monoenergetic x-rays and gamma-rays via laser-Compton scattering. Specifically, the use of long-duration, pulsed lasers and closely-spaced, low-charge and low emittance bunches of electron beams increase the spectral flux of the Compton-scattered x-rays and gamma rays, increase efficiency of the laser-electron interaction and significantly reduce the overall complexity of Compton based light sources.

  8. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  9. Activity of the European high heat flux test facility: FE200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobin-Vastra, I. [AREVA Centre Technique de Framatome, FE200, Porte Magenta BP181, 71200 Le Creusot Cedex (France) and EFDA Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: isabelle.bobinvastra@framatome-anp.com; Escourbiac, F. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)]. E-mail: escourbi@drfc.cad.cea.fr; Merola, M. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: mario.merola@tech.efda.org; Lorenzetto, P. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: lorenzp@tech.efda.org

    2005-11-15

    FE200 is an electron beam (EB) 200 kW test facility resulting since 1991 from partnership between Framatome Technical Centre in Le Creusot (France) and Tore Supra team in CEA Cadarache (France). It is dedicated to high heat flux testing of small and medium-sized plasma facing components. The performed tests are thermal fatigue tests (100,000 since 1992), critical heat fluxes, disruptions, glancing incidence tests on materials such as Cu-Al25 and CuCrZr alloys, carbon fibre composite (CFC) or tungsten (W). The thermal fatigue behaviour of some primary first wall (PFW), hypervapotron and divertor components is described.

  10. The Founding of the Brookhaven National Laboratory - Associated Universities, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    1948-01-15

    At the end of the war it became apparent that the teamwork of government and scientific institutions, which had been so effective in wartime work, must somehow be perpetuated in order to insure the continued progress of nuclear science in peace time. The enormous expense of the tools needed to pursue the next steps in this research -- nuclear reactors and high energy accelerators -- and the shortage of scientifically trained personnel pointed towards the establishment of a cooperative laboratory. Such a laboratory, using government funds, could carry out a comprehensive research program that would benefit the many interested research groups throughout the country. As a result of the wartime programs under the Manhattan District, centers of research in nuclear science were already active at the Radiation Laboratory in Berkeley, California, at Los Alamos in New Mexico, at the Clinton Laboratories in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and at the Argonne Laboratory in Chicago. No analogous nuclear research laboratories, however, had developed in the Northeast, and since so much of the nation's scientific talent and industrial activities are concentrated in the northeastern states, it was proposed that a new laboratory be established near New York City. As a result of this plan, the Brookhaven National Laboratory is now in operation at Upton, Long Island. The work of this Laboratory is performed under a contract between the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and a corporation, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) , formed by representatives of nine of the larger private universities in the northeast: Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, the University of Rochester, and Yale. The purpose of this laboratory is the advancement of knowledge in the fundamentals of nuclear science, the extension of its application to other fields, and the training of young scientists in these new subjects. This

  11. A unique high heat flux facility for testing hypersonic engine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Gladden, Herbert J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the Hot Gas Facility, a unique, reliable, and cost-effective high-heat-flux facility for testing hypersonic engine components developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The Hot Gas Facility is capable of providing heat fluxes ranging from 200 Btu/sq ft per sec on flat surfaces up to 8000 Btu/sq ft per sec at a leading edge stagnation point. The usefulness of the Hot Gas Facility for the NASP community was demonstrated by testing hydrogen-cooled structures over a range of temperatures and pressures. Ranges of the Reynolds numbers, Prandtl numbers, enthalpy, and heat fluxes similar to those expected during hypersonic flights were achieved.

  12. High-flux first-wall design for a small reversed-field pinch reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cort, G. E.; Graham, A. L.; Christensen, K. E.

    To achieve the goal of a commercially economical fusion power reactor, small physical size and high power density should be combined with simplicity (minimized use of high technology systems). The Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) is a magnetic confinement device that promises to meet these requirements with power densities comparable to those in existing fission power plants. To establish feasibility of such an RFP reactor, a practical design for a first wall capable of withstanding high levels of cyclic neutron wall loadings is needed. Associated with the neutron flux in the proposed RFP reactor is a time averaged heat flux of 4.5 MW/sq m with a conservatively estimated transient peak approximately twice the average value. The design for a modular first wall made from a high-strength copper alloy that will meet these requirements of cyclic thermal loading is presented. The heat removal from the wall is by subcooled water flowing in straight tubes at high linear velocities.

  13. High-Flux Hemodialysis and High-Volume Hemodiafiltration Improve Serum Calcification Propensity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke Dekker

    Full Text Available Calciprotein particles (CPPs may play an important role in the calcification process. The calcification propensity of serum (T50 is highly predictive of all-cause mortality in chronic kidney disease patients. Whether T50 is therapeutically improvable, by high-flux hemodialysis (HD or hemodiafiltration (HDF, has not been studied yet.We designed a cross-sectional single center study, and included stable prevalent in-center dialysis patients on HD or HDF. Patients were divided into two groups based on dialysis modality, were on a thrice-weekly schedule, had a dialysis vintage of > 3 months and vascular access providing a blood flow rate > 300 ml/min. Calcification propensity of serum was measured by the time of transformation from primary to secondary CPP (T50 test, by time-resolved nephelometry.We included 64 patients, mean convective volume was 21.7L (SD 3.3L. In the pooled analysis, T50 levels increased in both the HD and HDF group with pre- and post-dialysis (mean (SD of 244(64 - 301(57 and 253(55 - 304(61 min respectively (P = 0.43(HD vs. HDF. The mean increase in T50 was 26.29% for HD and 21.97% for HDF patients (P = 0.61 (HD vs. HDF. The delta values (Δ of calcium, phosphate and serum albumin were equal in both groups. Baseline T50 was negatively correlated with phosphate, and positively correlated with serum magnesium and fetuin-A. The ΔT50 was mostly influenced by Δ phosphate (r = -0.342; P = 0.002 HD and r = -0.396; P<0.001 HDF in both groups.HD and HDF patients present with same baseline T50 calcification propensity values pre-dialysis. Calcification propensity is significantly improved during both HD and HDF sessions without significant differences between both modalities.

  14. Institute for High Heat Flux Removal (IHHFR). Phases I, II, and III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Ronald D. [Prairie View A& M Univ., TX (United States)

    2014-08-31

    The IHHFR focused on interdisciplinary applications as it relates to high heat flux engineering issues and problems which arise due to engineering systems being miniaturized, optimized, or requiring increased high heat flux performance. The work in the IHHFR focused on water as a coolant and includes: (1) the development, design, and construction of the high heat flux flow loop and facility; (2) test section development, design, and fabrication; and, (3) single-side heat flux experiments to produce 2-D boiling curves and 3-D conjugate heat transfer measurements for single-side heated test sections. This work provides data for comparisons with previously developed and new single-side heated correlations and approaches that address the single-side heated effect on heat transfer. In addition, this work includes the addition of single-side heated circular TS and a monoblock test section with a helical wire insert. Finally, the present work includes: (1) data base expansion for the monoblock with a helical wire insert (only for the latter geometry), (2) prediction and verification using finite element, (3) monoblock model and methodology development analyses, and (4) an alternate model development for a hypervapotron and related conjugate heat transfer controlling parameters.

  15. Prototyping phase of the high heat flux scraper element of Wendelstein 7-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscary, J., E-mail: jean.boscary@ipp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); Greuner, H. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); Ehrke, G. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald (Germany); Böswirth, B.; Wang, Z. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); Clark, E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States); Lumsdaine, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Tretter, J. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); McGinnis, D.; Lore, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Ekici, K. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Aim of scraper element: reduction of heat loads on high heat flux divertor ends. • Design: actively water-cooled for 20 MW/m{sup 2} local heat loads. • Technology: CFC NB31 monoblocks bonded by HIP to CuCrZr cooling tube. • Successful high heat flux testing up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}. - Abstract: The water-cooled high heat flux scraper element aims to reduce excessive heat loads on the target element ends of the actively cooled divertor of Wendelstein 7-X. Its purpose is to intercept some of the plasma fluxes both upstream and downstream before they reach the divertor surface. The scraper element has 24 identical plasma facing components (PFCs) divided into 6 modules. One module has 4 PFCs hydraulically connected in series by 2 water boxes. A PFC, 247 mm long and 28 mm wide, has 13 monoblocks made of CFC NB31 bonded by hot isostatic pressing onto a CuCrZr cooling tube equipped with a copper twisted tape. 4 full-scale prototypes of PFCs have been successfully tested in the GLADIS facility up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}. The difference observed between measured and calculated surface temperatures is probably due to the inhomogeneity of CFC properties. The design of the water box prototypes has been detailed to allow the junction between the cooling pipe of the PFCs and the water boxes by internal orbital welding. The prototypes are presently under fabrication.

  16. Anomalous high-frequency wave activity flux preceding anomalous changes in the Northern polar jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Mototaka; Kadota, Minoru; Yamane, Shozo

    2010-05-01

    Anomalous forcing by quasi-geostrophic (QG) waves has been reported as an important forcing factor in the Northern Annular Mode (NAM) in recent literatures. In order to shed a light on the dynamics of the NAM from a different angle, we have examined anomalous behavior of the winter jets in the upper troposphere and stratosphere by focusing our diagnosis on not the anomalous geopotential height (Z) itself, but on the anomalous change in the Z (dZ) between two successive months and preceding transient QG wave activity flux during the cold season. We calculated EOFs of dZ between two successive months at 150hPa for a 46-year period, from 1958 to 2003, using the monthly mean NCEP reanalysis data. We then formed anomaly composites of changes in Z and the zonal velocity (U), as well as the preceding and following wave activity flux, Z, U, and temperature at various heights, for both positive and negative phases of the first EOF. For the wave forcing fields, we adopted the diagnostic system for the three-dimensional QG transient wave activity flux in the zonally-varying three-dimensional mean flow developed by Plumb (1986) with a slight modification in its application to the data. Our choice of the Plumb86 is based on the fact that the winter mean flow in the Northern Hemisphere is characterized by noticeable zonal asymmetry, and has a symbiotic relationship with waves in the extra-tropics. The Plumb86 flux was calculated for high-frequency (period of 2 to 7 days) and low-frequency (period of 10 to 20 days) waves with the ultra-low-frequency (period of 30 days or longer) flow as the reference state for each time frame of the 6 hourly NCEP reanalysis data from 1958 to 2003. By replacing the mean flow with the ultra-low-frequency flow in the application of the Plumb86 formula, the flux fields were calculated as time series at 6 hour intervals. The time series of the wave activity flux was then averaged for each month. The patterns of composited anomalous dZ and dU clearly

  17. Upscaling CH4 Fluxes Using High-Resolution Imagery in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J. Davidson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Arctic tundra ecosystems are a major source of methane (CH4, the variability of which is affected by local environmental and climatic factors, such as water table depth, microtopography, and the spatial heterogeneity of the vegetation communities present. There is a disconnect between the measurement scales for CH4 fluxes, which can be measured with chambers at one-meter resolution and eddy covariance towers at 100–1000 m, whereas model estimates are typically made at the ~100 km scale. Therefore, it is critical to upscale site level measurements to the larger scale for model comparison. As vegetation has a critical role in explaining the variability of CH4 fluxes across the tundra landscape, we tested whether remotely-sensed maps of vegetation could be used to upscale fluxes to larger scales. The objectives of this study are to compare four different methods for mapping and two methods for upscaling plot-level CH4 emissions to the measurements from EC towers. We show that linear discriminant analysis (LDA provides the most accurate representation of the tundra vegetation within the EC tower footprints (classification accuracies of between 65% and 88%. The upscaled CH4 emissions using the areal fraction of the vegetation communities showed a positive correlation (between 0.57 and 0.81 with EC tower measurements, irrespective of the mapping method. The area-weighted footprint model outperformed the simple area-weighted method, achieving a correlation of 0.88 when using the vegetation map produced with the LDA classifier. These results suggest that the high spatial heterogeneity of the tundra vegetation has a strong impact on the flux, and variation indicates the potential impact of environmental or climatic parameters on the fluxes. Nonetheless, assimilating remotely-sensed vegetation maps of tundra in a footprint model was successful in upscaling fluxes across scales.

  18. Signal photon flux generated by high-frequency relic gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xin; Wen, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The power spectrum of primordial tensor perturbations $\\mathcal{P}_t$ increases rapidly in high frequency region if the spectral index $n_t>0$. It is shown that the amplitude of relic gravitational wave $h_t$($5\\times10^9$Hz) varies from $10^{-36}$ to $10^{-25}$ while $n_t$ varies from $-6.25\\times 10^{-3}$ to $0.87$. High frequency gravitational waves detector that is proposed by F.-Y. Li detects gravitational waves through observing the perturbed photon flux that is generated by interaction between the relic gravitational waves and electromagnetic system. It is shown that the perturbative photon flux $N_x^1$($5\\times10^9$Hz) varies from $1.40\\times10^{-4}\\rm s^{-1}$ to $2.85\\times10^{7}\\rm s^{-1}$ while $n_t$ varies from $-6.25\\times 10^{-3}$ to $0.87$. Correspondingly, the ratio of the transverse perturbative photon flux $N_x^1$ to the background photon flux varies from $10^{-28}$ to $10^{-16}$.

  19. Antifouling, high-flux nanofiltration membranes enabled by dual functional polydopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yafei; Su, Yanlei; Zhao, Xueting; He, Xin; Zhang, Runnan; Zhao, Jiaojiao; Fan, Xiaochen; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2014-04-23

    A facile method for fabricating antifouling and high-flux nanofiltration (NF) membranes was developed based on bioinspired polydopamine (PDA). Polyethersulfone (PES) ultrafiltration membrane as the support was first deposited a thin PDA layer and then chemically modified by a new kind of fluorinated polyamine via Michael addition reaction between fluorinated polyamine and quinone groups of PDA. PDA coating significantly reduced the pore sizes of the PES support membrane and endowed the NF membrane with high separation performance (flux about 46.1 L/(m(2) h) under 0.1 MPa, molecular weight cutoff of about 780 Da). The grafted fluorinated polyamine on the PDA layer could form low free energy microdomains to impede the accumulation/coalescence of foulants and lower the adhesion force between foulants and the membrane, rendering the membrane surface with prominent fouling-release property. When foulant solutions (including bovine serum albumin, oil and humic acid) were filtered, the resultant NF membrane exhibited excellent antifouling properties (the minimal value of total flux decline ratio was ∼8.9%, and the flux recovery ratio reached 98.6%). It is also found that the structural stability of the NF membrane could be significantly enhanced due to the covalent bond and other intermolecular interactions between the PDA layer and the PES support.

  20. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY INSTITUTIONAL PLAN FY2003-2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-10

    This document presents the vision for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the next five years, and a roadmap for implementing that vision. Brookhaven is a multidisciplinary science-based laboratory operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), supported primarily by programs sponsored by the DOE's Office of Science. As the third-largest funding agency for science in the U.S., one of the DOE's goals is ''to advance basic research and the instruments of science that are the foundations for DOE's applied missions, a base for U.S. technology innovation, and a source of remarkable insights into our physical and biological world, and the nature of matter and energy'' (DOE Office of Science Strategic Plan, 2000 http://www.osti.gov/portfolio/science.htm). BNL shapes its vision according to this plan.

  1. High heat flux test of tungsten brazed mock-ups developed for KSTAR divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J.H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K.M., E-mail: kyungmin@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, S.H.; Kim, H.T.; Park, S.H.; Park, H.K.; Ahn, H.J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.K.; Lee, D.W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    The tungsten (W) brazed flat type mock-up which consists of W, OFHC-Cu (oxygen-free high conductive copper) and CuCrZr alloy has been designed for KSTAR divertor in preparation for KSTAR upgrade with 17 MW heating power. For verification of the W brazed mock-up, the high heat flux test is performed at KoHLT-EB (Korea High Heat Load Test Facility-Electron Beam) in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). Three mock-ups are tested for several thousand thermal cycles with absorbed heat flux up to 5 MW/m{sup 2} for 20 s duration. There is no evidence of the failure at the bonding joints of all mock-ups after HHF test. Finite element analysis (FEA) is performed to interpret the result of the test. As a result, it is considered that the local area in the water is in the subcooled boiling regime.

  2. A high-resolution optical measurement system for rapid acquisition of radiation flux density maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Martin; Raeder, Christian; Willsch, Christian; Dibowski, Gerd

    2017-06-01

    To identify the power and flux density of concentrated solar radiation the Institute of Solar Research at the German Aerospace Center (DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft-und Raumfahrt e. V.) has used the camera-based measurement system FATMES (Flux and Temperature Measurement System) since 1995. The disadvantages of low resolution, difficult handling and poor computing power required a revision of the existing measurement system. The measurement system FMAS (Flux Mapping Acquisition system) is equipped with state-of-the-art-hardware, is compatible with computers off-the-shelf and is programmed in LabView. The expenditure of time for an image evaluation is reduced by the factor 60 compared to FATMES. The new measurement system is no longer associated with the facilities Solar Furnace and High Flux Solar Simulator at the DLR in Cologne but is also applicable as a mobile system. The data and the algorithms are transparent throughout the complete process. The measurement accuracy of FMAS is determined to at most ±3 % until now. The error of measurement of FATMES is at least 2 % higher according to the conducted comparison tests.

  3. Influence of high flux hydrogen-plasma exposure on the thermal shock induced crack formation in tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirtz, M.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Rapp, J.; Wright, G. M.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of high flux hydrogen-plasma on the thermal shock behaviour of tungsten was investigated in a combined experiment using the linear plasma device Pilot-PSI and the electron beam facility JUDITH 1. Tungsten targets were exposed to high flux hydrogen plasma, cyclic thermal shock tests and

  4. SPring-8 BL41XU, a high-flux macromolecular crystallography beamline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kazuya; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Okumura, Hideo; Mizuno, Nobuhiro; Baba, Seiki; Hirata, Kunio; Takeuchi, Tomoyuki; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    SPring-8 BL41XU is a high-flux macromolecular crystallography beamline using an in-vacuum undulator as a light source. The X-rays are monochromated by a liquid-nitrogen-cooling Si double-crystal monochromator, and focused by Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror optics. The focused beam size at the sample is 80 µm (H) × 22 µm (V) with a photon flux of 1.1 × 1013 photons s−1. A pinhole aperture is used to collimate the beam in the range 10–50 µm. This high-flux beam with variable size provides opportunities not only for micro-crystallography but also for data collection effectively making use of crystal volume. The beamline also provides high-energy X-rays covering 20.6–35.4 keV which allows ultra-high-resolution data to be obtained and anomalous diffraction using the K-edge of Xe and I. Upgrade of BL41XU for more rapid and accurate data collection is proceeding. Here, details of BL41XU are given and an outline of the upgrade project is documented. PMID:24121338

  5. Quasi-B-mode generated by high-frequency gravitational waves and corresponding perturbative photon fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fangyu, E-mail: cqufangyuli@hotmail.com [Institute of Gravitational Physics, Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wen, Hao [Institute of Gravitational Physics, Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Fang, Zhenyun [Institute of Gravitational Physics, Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wei, Lianfu; Wang, Yiwen; Zhang, Miao [Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Interaction of very low-frequency primordial (relic) gravitational waves (GWs) to cosmic microwave background (CMB) can generate B-mode polarization. Here, for the first time we point out that the electromagnetic (EM) response to high-frequency GWs (HFGWs) would produce quasi-B-mode distribution of the perturbative photon fluxes. We study the duality and high complementarity between such two B-modes, and it is shown that such two effects are from the same physical origin: the tensor perturbation of the GWs and not the density perturbation. Based on this quasi-B-mode in HFGWs and related numerical calculation, it is shown that the distinguishing and observing of HFGWs from the braneworld would be quite possible due to their large amplitude, higher frequency and very different physical behaviors between the perturbative photon fluxes and background photons, and the measurement of relic HFGWs may also be possible though face to enormous challenge.

  6. Qualification, commissioning and in situ monitoring of high heat flux plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escourbiac, F. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)], E-mail: frederic.escourbiac@cea.fr; Durocher, A.; Grosman, A.; Cismondi, F.; Courtois, X.; Farjon, J.L.; Schlosser, J. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Merola, M.; Tivey, R. [ITER Team, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2007-10-15

    Up-to-date development of actively cooled high heat flux (HHF) plasma facing components (PFC) prototypes only allows reduced margins with regards to the ITER thermal requirements. Additionally, perfect quality cannot be ensured along series manufacturing: the presence of flaws which impair the heat transfer capability of the component, in particular at the interface armour/heat sink appears to be statistically unavoidable. In order to ensure a successful series production, a qualification methodology of actively cooled high heat flux plasma facing components is proposed. Secondly, advanced non-destructive techniques developed for HHF PFC commissioning are detailed with definition of acceptance criteria. Finally, innovative diagnostics for in situ monitoring during plasma operations or tokamak shutdowns are investigated in order to prevent immediate damage (safety monitoring); or evaluate component degradation (health monitoring). This work takes into account the relevance to Tore Supra, and is applied to W7X and ITER Divertor HHF PFC.

  7. Nanostructured fuzz growth on tungsten under low-energy and high-flux He irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; You, Yu-Wei; Liu, Lu; Fan, Hongyu; Ni, Weiyuan; Liu, Dongping; Liu, C. S.; Benstetter, Günther; Wang, Younian

    2015-06-01

    We report the formation of wave-like structures and nanostructured fuzzes in the polycrystalline tungsten (W) irradiated with high-flux and low-energy helium (He) ions. From conductive atomic force microscope measurements, we have simultaneously obtained the surface topography and current emission images of the irradiated W materials. Our measurements show that He-enriched and nanostructured strips are formed in W crystal grains when they are exposed to low-energy and high-flux He ions at a temperature of 1400 K. The experimental measurements are confirmed by theoretical calculations, where He atoms in W crystal grains are found to cluster in a close-packed arrangement between {101} planes and form He-enriched strips. The formations of wave-like structures and nanostructured fuzzes on the W surface can be attributed to the surface sputtering and swelling of He-enriched strips, respectively.

  8. Quasi-B-mode generated by high-frequency gravitational waves and corresponding perturbative photon fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Y. Fangyu Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of very low-frequency primordial (relic gravitational waves (GWs to cosmic microwave background (CMB can generate B-mode polarization. Here, for the first time we point out that the electromagnetic (EM response to high-frequency GWs (HFGWs would produce quasi-B-mode distribution of the perturbative photon fluxes. We study the duality and high complementarity between such two B-modes, and it is shown that such two effects are from the same physical origin: the tensor perturbation of the GWs and not the density perturbation. Based on this quasi-B-mode in HFGWs and related numerical calculation, it is shown that the distinguishing and observing of HFGWs from the braneworld would be quite possible due to their large amplitude, higher frequency and very different physical behaviors between the perturbative photon fluxes and background photons, and the measurement of relic HFGWs may also be possible though face to enormous challenge.

  9. Self-castellation of tungsten monoblock under high heat flux loading and impact of material properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Panayotis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the full-tungsten divertor qualification program at ITER Organization, macro-cracks, so called self-castellation were found in a fraction of tungsten monoblocks during cyclic high heat flux loading at 20MW/m2. The number of monoblocks with macro-cracks varied with the tungsten products used as armour material. In order to understand correlation between the macro-crack appearance and W properties, an activity to characterize W monoblock materials was launched at the IO. The outcome highlighted that the higher the recrystallization resistance, the lower the number of cracks detected during high heat flux tests. Thermo-mechanical finite element modelling demonstrated that the maximum surface temperature ranges from 1800 °C to 2200 °C and in this range recrystallization of tungsten occurred. Furthermore, it indicated that loss of strength due to recrystallization is responsible for the development of macro-cracks in the tungsten monoblock.

  10. Improve carbon metabolic flux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae at high temperature by overexpressed TSL1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Yan; Chen, Xiang

    2013-04-01

    This study describes a novel strategy to improve the glycolysis flux of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at high temperature. The TSL1 gene-encoding regulatory subunit of the trehalose synthase complex was overexpressed in S. cerevisiae Z-06, which increased levels of trehalose synthase activity in extracts, enhanced stress tolerance and glucose consuming rate of the yeast cells. As a consequence, the final ethanol concentration of 185.5 g/L was obtained at 38 °C for 36 h (with productivity up to 5.2 g/L/h) in 7-L fermentor, and the ethanol productivity was 92.7 % higher than that of the parent strain. The results presented here provide a novel way to enhance the carbon metabolic flux at high temperature, which will be available for the purposes of producing other primary metabolites of commercial interest using S. cerevisiae as a host.

  11. Can dialysis modality influence quality of life in chronic hemodialysis patients? Low-flux hemodialysis versus high-flux hemodiafiltration: a cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantartzi, Konstantia; Panagoutsos, Stelios; Mourvati, Efthemia; Roumeliotis, Athanasios; Leivaditis, Konstantinos; Devetzis, Vassilios; Passadakis, Ploumis; Vargemezis, Vassilios

    2013-01-01

    Hemodiafiltration with online preparation of the substitution [online high-flux hemodiafiltration (OHDF)] and hemodiafiltration with prepared bags of substitution (HDF) are important, recently widely used renal replacement therapies in patients with end-stage renal disease. However, there is little information on the comparative impacts of these modalities versus conventional low-flux hemodialysis (HD) on the quality of life (QoL) of HD patients. This study investigates the effect of dialysis modality on QoL in chronic HD patients. In this prospective, randomized, cross-over, open label study, 24 patients were enrolled. Their age were 62 ± 13.34 years (mean ± SD), with the duration of dialysis of 31 ± 23.28 months (mean ± SD). Five of the patients were women. QoL was measured by the Short-Form Health Survey with 36 questions (SF-36) and subscale scores were calculated. Each patient received HD, OHDF, and HDF for 3 months, with the dialysis modality subsequently being altered. They completed the questionnaire of QoL at the end of each period. There were statistical significant differences in QoL for the total SF-36 [36.1 (26.7-45.7) and 40.7 (30.2-62.8)], for classic low-flux HD and high-flux hemodiafiltration, for bodily pain [45 (26.9-66.9) and 55 (35.6-87.5)], and for role limitations due to emotional functioning [0 (0-33.3) and 33.3 (0-100)], respectively. The scores did not differ significantly between the two types of hemodiafiltration. Our study indicates that QoL differs significantly among patients receiving low-flux HD and high-flux hemodiafiltration, on total SF-36, bodily pain, and role limitations due to emotional functioning. Convective modalities may offer better QoL than diffusive HD.

  12. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1994.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NAIDU,J.R.; ROYCE,B.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory's operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory. Brookhaven National Laboratory's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment were evaluated. Among the permitted facilities, two instances of pH exceedances were observed at recharge basins, possibly related to rain-water run-off to these recharge basins. Also, the discharge from the Sewage Treatment Plant to the Peconic River exceeded. on ten occasions, one each for fecal coliform and 5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand (avg.) and eight for ammonia nitrogen. The ammonia and Biochemical Oxygen Demand exceedances were attributed to the cold winter and the routine cultivation of the sand filter beds which resulted in the hydraulic overloading of the filter beds and the possible destruction of nitrifying bacteria. The on-set of warm weather and increased aeration of the filter beds via cultivation helped to alleviate this condition. The discharge of fecal coliform may also be linked to this occurrence, in that the increase in fecal coliform coincided with the increased cultivation of the sand filter beds. The environmental monitoring data has identified site-specific contamination of groundwater and soil. These areas are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement. Except for the above, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with

  13. Concepts for using trapped-flux bulk high-temperature superconductor in motors and generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R; Strasik, Michael [Boeing Research and Technology, PO Box 3707, MC 2T-50, Seattle, WA 98124-2207 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We review previous concepts for using bulk high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in motors and generators and discuss methods for using trapped-flux (TF) HTSs in motors and generators that have been recently investigated in our laboratory. We examine the expected performance of a brushless motor/generator that uses TF bulk HTSs to provide magnetomotive force, where the stator windings are used to create the TF. A key feature is the use of dysprosium for the stator and rotor cores.

  14. FOEHN: The critical experiment for the Franco-German High Flux Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharmer, K.; Eckert, H. G. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany)

    1991-01-01

    A critical experiment for the Franco-German High Flux Reactor was carried out in the French reactor EOLE (CEN Cadarache). The purpose of the experiment was to check the calculation methods in a realistic geometry and to measure effects that can only be calculated imprecisely (e.g. beam hole effects). The structure of the experiment and the measurement and calculation methods are described. A detailed comparison between theoretical and experimental results was performed. 30 refs., 105 figs.

  15. Concepts for using trapped-flux bulk high-temperature superconductor in motors and generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.; Strasik, Michael

    2010-12-01

    We review previous concepts for using bulk high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in motors and generators and discuss methods for using trapped-flux (TF) HTSs in motors and generators that have been recently investigated in our laboratory. We examine the expected performance of a brushless motor/generator that uses TF bulk HTSs to provide magnetomotive force, where the stator windings are used to create the TF. A key feature is the use of dysprosium for the stator and rotor cores.

  16. Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

    1980-09-01

    The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort.

  17. Coupling soil Carbon Fluxes, Soil Microbes, and High-Resolution Carbon Profiling in Permafrost Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.; Stegen, J.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Tfaily, M. M.; Huang, M.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial communities play a central role in the functioning of natural ecosystems by heavily influencing biogeochemical cycles. Understanding how shifts in the environment are tied to shifts in biogeochemical rates via changes in microbial communities is particularly relevant in high latitude terrestrial systems underlain by permafrost due to vast carbon stocks currently stored within thawing permafrost. There is limited understanding, however, of the interplay among soil-atmosphere CO2 fluxes, microbial communities, and SOM chemical composition. To address this knowledge gap, we leverage the distinct spatial transitions in permafrost-affected soils at the Caribou Poker Creek Research Watershed, a 104 km2 boreal watershed ~50 km north of Fairbanks, AK. We integrate a variety of data to gain new knowledge of the factors that govern observed patterns in the rates of soil CO2 fluxes associated with permafrost to non-permafrost transition zones. We show that nonlinearities in fluxes are influenced by depth to permafrost, tree stand structure, and soil C composition. Further, using 16S sequencing methods we explore microbial community assembly processes and their connection to CO2 flux across spatial scales, and suggest a path to more mechanistically link microbes to large-scale biogeochemical cycles. Lastly, we use the Community Land Model (CLM) to compare Earth System Model predictions of soil C cycling with empirical measurements. Deviations between CLM predictions and field observations of CO2 flux and soil C stocks will provide insight for how the model may be improved through inclusion of additional biotic (e.g., microbial community composition) and abiotic (e.g., organic carbon composition) features, which will be critical to improve the predictive power of climate models in permafrost-affected regions.

  18. On the Relationship Between High Speed Solar Wind Streams and Radiation Belt Electron Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yihua

    2011-01-01

    Both past and recent research results indicate that solar wind speed has a close connection to radiation belt electron fluxes [e.g., Paulikas and Blake, 1979; Reeves et aI., 2011]: a higher solar wind speed is often associated with a higher level of radiation electron fluxes. But the relationship can be very complex [Reeves et aI., 2011]. The study presented here provides further corroboration of this viewpoint by emphasizing the importance of a global perspective and time history. We find that all the events during years 2010 and 2011 where the >0.8 MeV integral electron flux exceeds 10(exp 5) particles/sq cm/sr/s (pfu) at GEO orbit are associated with the high speed streams (HSS) following the onset of the Stream Interaction Region (SIR), with most of them belonging to the long-lasting Corotating Interaction Region (CIR). Our preliminary results indicate that during HSS events, a maximum speed of 700 km/s and above is a sufficient but not necessary condition for the > 0.8 MeV electron flux to reach 10(exp 5) pfu. But in the exception cases of HSS events where the electron flux level exceeds the 10(exp 5) pfu value but the maximum solar wind speed is less than 700 km/s, a prior impact can be noted either from a CME or a transient SIR within 3-4 days before the arrival of the HSS - stressing the importance of time history. Through superposed epoch analysis and studies providing comparisons with the CME events and the HSS events where the flux level fails to reach the 10(exp 5) pfu, we will present the quantitative assessment of behaviors and relationships of various quantities, such as the time it takes to reach the flux threshold value from the stream interface and its dependence on different physical parameters (e.g., duration of the HSS event, its maximum or average of the solar wind speed, IMF Bz, Kp). The ultimate goal is to apply what is derived to space weather forecasting.

  19. Advanced Multiphysics Thermal-Hydraulics Models for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Engineering design studies to determine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from using highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This work is part of an effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Conversion Program. HFIR is a very high flux pressurized light-water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type research reactor. HFIR s current missions are to support neutron scattering experiments, isotope production, and materials irradiation, including neutron activation analysis. Advanced three-dimensional multiphysics models of HFIR fuel were developed in COMSOL software for safety basis (worst case) operating conditions. Several types of physics including multilayer heat conduction, conjugate heat transfer, turbulent flows (RANS model) and structural mechanics were combined and solved for HFIR s inner and outer fuel elements. Alternate design features of the new LEU fuel were evaluated using these multiphysics models. This work led to a new, preliminary reference LEU design that combines a permanent absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, a burnable absorber in the inner element side plates, and a relocated and reshaped (but still radially contoured) fuel zone. Preliminary results of estimated thermal safety margins are presented. Fuel design studies and model enhancement continue.

  20. A regional high-resolution carbon flux inversion of North America for 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Schuh

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Resolving the discrepancies between NEE estimates based upon (1 ground studies and (2 atmospheric inversion results, demands increasingly sophisticated techniques. In this paper we present a high-resolution inversion based upon a regional meteorology model (RAMS and an underlying biosphere (SiB3 model, both running on an identical 40 km grid over most of North America. Current operational systems like CarbonTracker as well as many previous global inversions including the Transcom suite of inversions have utilized inversion regions formed by collapsing biome-similar grid cells into larger aggregated regions. An extreme example of this might be where corrections to NEE imposed on forested regions on the east coast of the United States might be the same as that imposed on forests on the west coast of the United States while, in reality, there likely exist subtle differences in the two areas, both natural and anthropogenic. Our current inversion framework utilizes a combination of previously employed inversion techniques while allowing carbon flux corrections to be biome independent. Temporally and spatially high-resolution results utilizing biome-independent corrections provide insight into carbon dynamics in North America. In particular, we analyze hourly CO2 mixing ratio data from a sparse network of eight towers in North America for 2004. A prior estimate of carbon fluxes due to Gross Primary Productivity (GPP and Ecosystem Respiration (ER is constructed from the SiB3 biosphere model on a 40 km grid. A combination of transport from the RAMS and the Parameterized Chemical Transport Model (PCTM models is used to forge a connection between upwind biosphere fluxes and downwind observed CO2 mixing ratio data. A Kalman filter procedure is used to estimate weekly corrections to biosphere fluxes based upon observed CO2. RMSE-weighted annual NEE estimates, over an ensemble of potential inversion parameter sets, show a

  1. A regional high-resolution carbon flux inversion of North America for 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, A. E.; Denning, A. S.; Corbin, K. D.; Baker, I. T.; Uliasz, M.; Parazoo, N.; Andrews, A. E.; Worthy, D. E. J.

    2010-05-01

    Resolving the discrepancies between NEE estimates based upon (1) ground studies and (2) atmospheric inversion results, demands increasingly sophisticated techniques. In this paper we present a high-resolution inversion based upon a regional meteorology model (RAMS) and an underlying biosphere (SiB3) model, both running on an identical 40 km grid over most of North America. Current operational systems like CarbonTracker as well as many previous global inversions including the Transcom suite of inversions have utilized inversion regions formed by collapsing biome-similar grid cells into larger aggregated regions. An extreme example of this might be where corrections to NEE imposed on forested regions on the east coast of the United States might be the same as that imposed on forests on the west coast of the United States while, in reality, there likely exist subtle differences in the two areas, both natural and anthropogenic. Our current inversion framework utilizes a combination of previously employed inversion techniques while allowing carbon flux corrections to be biome independent. Temporally and spatially high-resolution results utilizing biome-independent corrections provide insight into carbon dynamics in North America. In particular, we analyze hourly CO2 mixing ratio data from a sparse network of eight towers in North America for 2004. A prior estimate of carbon fluxes due to Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER) is constructed from the SiB3 biosphere model on a 40 km grid. A combination of transport from the RAMS and the Parameterized Chemical Transport Model (PCTM) models is used to forge a connection between upwind biosphere fluxes and downwind observed CO2 mixing ratio data. A Kalman filter procedure is used to estimate weekly corrections to biosphere fluxes based upon observed CO2. RMSE-weighted annual NEE estimates, over an ensemble of potential inversion parameter sets, show a mean estimate 0.57 Pg/yr sink in North America

  2. Explanation for the low flux of high-energy astrophysical muon neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakvasa, Sandip; Joshipura, Anjan; Mohanty, Subhendra

    2013-04-26

    There has been some concern about the unexpected paucity of cosmic high-energy muon neutrinos in detectors probing the energy region beyond 1 PeV. As a possible solution we consider the possibility that some exotic neutrino property is responsible for reducing the muon neutrino flux at high energies from distant sources; specifically, we consider (i) neutrino decay and (ii) neutrinos being pseudo-Dirac-particles. This would provide a mechanism for the reduction of high-energy muon events in the IceCube detector, for example.

  3. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-12-31

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory`s activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  4. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-01-01

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory's activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  5. Eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia by high temperature chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sintermann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A system for fast ammonia (NH3 measurements with chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS based on a commercial Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS is presented. It uses electron transfer reaction as ionisation pathway and features a drift tube of polyetheretherketone (PEEK and silica-coated steel. Heating the instrumental inlet and the drift tube to 180 °C enabled an effective time resolution of ~1 s and made it possible to apply the instrument for eddy covariance (EC measurements. EC fluxes of NH3 were measured over two agricultural fields in Oensingen, Switzerland, following fertilisations with cattle slurry. Air was aspirated close to a sonic anemometer at a flow of 100 STP L min−1 and was directed through a 23 m long 1/2" PFA tube heated to 150 °C to an air-conditioned trailer where the gas was sub-sampled from the large bypass stream. This setup minimised damping of fast NH3 concentration changes between the sampling point and the actual measurement. High-frequency attenuation loss of the NH3 fluxes of 20 to 40% was quantified and corrected for using an empirical ogive method. The instrumental NH3 background signal showed a minor interference with H2O which was characterised in the laboratory. The resulting correction of the NH3 flux after slurry spreading was less than 1‰. The flux detection limit of the EC system was about 5 ng m−2 s−1 while the accuracy of individual flux measurements was estimated 16% for the high-flux regime during these experiments. The NH3 emissions after broad spreading of the slurry showed an initial maximum of 150 μg m−2 s−1 with a fast decline in the following hours.

  6. Hypersonic engine component experiments in high heat flux, supersonic flow environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1993-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Even though progress has been made in the computational understanding of fluid dynamics and the physics/chemistry of high speed flight, there is also a need for experimental facilities capable of providing a high heat flux environment for testing component concepts and verifying/calibrating these analyses. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to fulfill this need. This 'Hot Gas Facility' is capable of providing heat fluxes up to 450 w/sq cm on flat surfaces and up to 5,000 w/sq cm at the leading edge stagnation point of a strut in a supersonic flow stream. Gas temperatures up to 3050 K can also be attained. Two recent experimental programs conducted in this facility are discussed. The objective of the first experiment is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Macrophotographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight. The objective of the second experiment is to assess the capability of cooling a porous surface exposed to a high temperature, high velocity flow environment and to provide a heat transfer data base for a design procedure. Experimental results from transpiration cooled surfaces in a supersonic flow environment are presented.

  7. Advantages and Limits of 4H-SIC Detectors for High- and Low-Flux Radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciuto, A.; Torrisi, L.; Cannavò, A.; Mazzillo, M.; Calcagno, L.

    2017-11-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) detectors based on Schottky diodes were used to monitor low and high fluxes of photons and ions. An appropriate choice of the epilayer thickness and geometry of the surface Schottky contact allows the tailoring and optimizing the detector efficiency. SiC detectors with a continuous front electrode were employed to monitor alpha particles in a low-flux regime emitted by a radioactive source with high energy (>5.0 MeV) or generated in an ion implanter with sub-MeV energy. An energy resolution value of 0.5% was measured in the high energy range, while, at energy below 1.0 MeV, the resolution becomes 10%; these values are close to those measured with a traditional silicon detector. The same SiC devices were used in a high-flux regime to monitor high-energy ions, x-rays and electrons of the plasma generated by a high-intensity (1016 W/cm2) pulsed laser. Furthermore, SiC devices with an interdigit Schottky front electrode were proposed and studied to overcome the limits of the such SiC detectors in the detection of low-energy (˜1.0 keV) ions and photons of the plasmas generated by a low-intensity (1010 W/cm2) pulsed laser. SiC detectors are expected to be a powerful tool for the monitoring of radioactive sources and ion beams produced by accelerators, for a complete characterization of radiations emitted from laser-generated plasmas at high and low temperatures, and for dosimetry in a radioprotection field.

  8. Optical design of a high radiative flux solar furnace for Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riveros-Rosas, D.; Perez-Rabago, C.A.; Arancibia-Bulnes, C.A.; Jaramillo, O.A.; Estrada, C.A. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Av. Xochicalco s/n, A.P. 34, Temixco, 62580 Morelos (Mexico); Herrera-Vazquez, J.; Vazquez-Montiel, S.; Granados-Agustin, F. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, A.P. 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Sanchez-Gonzalez, M. [Centro Nacional de Energias Renovables, Calle Somera 7-9, 28026 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    In the present work, the optical design of a new high radiative flux solar furnace is described. Several optical configurations for the concentrator of the system have been considered. Ray tracing simulations were carried out in order to determine the concentrated radiative flux distributions in the focal zone of the system, for comparing the different proposals. The best configuration was chosen in terms of maximum peak concentration, but also in terms of economical and other practical considerations. It consists of an arrangement of 409 first surface spherical facets with hexagonal shape, mounted on a spherical frame. The individual orientation of the facets is corrected in order to compensate for aberrations. The design considers an intercepted power of 30 kW and a target peak concentration above 10,000 suns. The effect of optical errors was also considered in the simulations. (author)

  9. High-flux water desalination with interfacial salt sieving effect in nanoporous carbon composite membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Qiang; Fan, Zhongli; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Zhang, Xixiang; Lai, Zhiping; Sheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Nanoporous carbon composite membranes, comprising a layer of porous carbon fiber structures with an average channel width of 30-60 nm grown on a porous ceramic substrate, are found to exhibit robust desalination effect with high freshwater flux. In three different membrane processes of vacuum membrane distillation, reverse osmosis and forward osmosis, the carbon composite membrane showed 100% salt rejection with 3.5 to 20 times higher freshwater flux compared to existing polymeric membranes. Thermal accounting experiments found that at least 80% of the freshwater pass through the carbon composite membrane with no phase change. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a unique salt rejection mechanism. When seawater is interfaced with either vapor or the surface of carbon, one to three interfacial atomic layers contain no salt ions. Below the liquid entry pressure, the salt solution is stopped at the openings to the porous channels and forms a meniscus, while the surface layer of freshwater can feed the surface...

  10. Examination of high heat flux components for the ITER divertor after thermal fatigue testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missirlian, M., E-mail: marc.missirlian@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Escourbiac, F., E-mail: frederic.escourbiac@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Schmidt, A., E-mail: a.schmidt@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Juelich, IFE-2 (Germany); Riccardi, B., E-mail: Bruno.Riccardi@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion For Energy, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Bobin-Vastra, I., E-mail: isabelle.bobinvastra@areva.com [AREVA-NP, 71200 Le Creusot (France)

    2011-10-01

    An extensive development programme has been carried out in the EU on high heat flux components within the ITER project. In this framework, a full-scale vertical target (VTFS) prototype was manufactured with all the main features of the corresponding ITER divertor design. The fatigue cycling campaign on CFC and W armoured regions, proved the capability of such a component to meet the ITER requirements in terms of heat flux performances for the vertical target. This paper discusses metallographic observations performed on both CFC and W part after this intensive thermal fatigue testing campaign for a better understanding of thermally induced mechanical stress within the component, especially close to the armour-heat sink interface.

  11. High-accuracy determination of the neutron flux at n{sub T}OF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Tagliente, G.; Variale, V. [Sezione di Bari, INFN, Bari (Italy); Guerrero, C.; Andriamonje, S.; Boccone, V.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Cerutti, F.; Chin, M.; Ferrari, A.; Kadi, Y.; Losito, R.; Versaci, R.; Vlachoudis, V. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Tsinganis, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Athens (Greece); Tarrio, D.; Duran, I.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Paradela, C. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago (Spain); Altstadt, S.; Goebel, K.; Langer, C.; Reifarth, R.; Schmidt, S.; Weigand, M. [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Andrzejewski, J.; Marganiec, J.; Perkowski, J. [Uniwersytet Lodzki, Lodz (Poland); Audouin, L.; Leong, L.S.; Tassan-Got, L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/IN2P3 - IPN, Orsay (France); Becares, V.; Cano-Ott, D.; Garcia, A.R.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Kroll, J.; Valenta, S. [Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Belloni, F.; Fraval, K.; Gunsing, F.; Lampoudis, C.; Papaevangelou, T. [Commissariata l' Energie Atomique (CEA) Saclay - Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Berthoumieux, E.; Chiaveri, E. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Commissariata l' Energie Atomique (CEA) Saclay - Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Billowes, J.; Ware, T.; Wright, T. [University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Bosnar, D.; Zugec, P. [University of Zagreb, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Zagreb (Croatia); Calvino, F.; Cortes, G.; Gomez-Hornillos, M.B.; Riego, A. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Carrapico, C.; Goncalves, I.F.; Sarmento, R.; Vaz, P. [Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Cortes-Giraldo, M.A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J.M.; Sabate-Gilarte, M. [Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla (Spain); Diakaki, M.; Karadimos, D.; Kokkoris, M.; Vlastou, R. [National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Athens (Greece); Domingo-Pardo, C.; Giubrone, G.; Tain, J.L. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Dressler, R.; Kivel, N.; Schumann, D.; Steinegger, P. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Dzysiuk, N.; Mastinu, P.F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Rome (Italy); Eleftheriadis, C.; Manousos, A. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece); Ganesan, S.; Gurusamy, P.; Saxena, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai (IN); Griesmayer, E.; Jericha, E.; Leeb, H. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Atominstitut, Wien (AT); Hernandez-Prieto, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (ES); Jenkins, D.G.; Vermeulen, M.J. [University of York, Heslington, York (GB); Kaeppeler, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus Nord, Karlsruhe (DE); Koehler, P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge (US); Lederer, C. [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (DE); University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (AT); Massimi, C.; Mingrone, F.; Vannini, G. [Universita di Bologna (IT); INFN, Sezione di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica, Bologna (IT); Mengoni, A.; Ventura, A. [Agenzia nazionale per le nuove tecnologie, l' energia e lo sviluppo economico sostenibile (ENEA), Bologna (IT); Milazzo, P.M. [Sezione di Trieste, INFN, Trieste (IT); Mirea, M. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH, Bucharest - Magurele (RO); Mondalaers, W.; Plompen, A.; Schillebeeckx, P. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, European Commission JRC, Geel (BE); Pavlik, A.; Wallner, A. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (AT); Rauscher, T. [University of Basel, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Basel (CH); Roman, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH, Bucharest - Magurele (RO); Rubbia, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso dell' INFN, Assergi (AQ) (IT); Weiss, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (DE)

    2013-12-15

    The neutron flux of the n{sub T}OF facility at CERN was measured, after installation of the new spallation target, with four different systems based on three neutron-converting reactions, which represent accepted cross sections standards in different energy regions. A careful comparison and combination of the different measurements allowed us to reach an unprecedented accuracy on the energy dependence of the neutron flux in the very wide range (thermal to 1 GeV) that characterizes the n{sub T}OF neutron beam. This is a pre-requisite for the high accuracy of cross section measurements at n{sub T}OF. An unexpected anomaly in the neutron-induced fission cross section of {sup 235}U is observed in the energy region between 10 and 30keV, hinting at a possible overestimation of this important cross section, well above currently assigned uncertainties. (orig.)

  12. High-accuracy determination of the neutron flux at n_TOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, M.; Guerrero, C.; Tsinganis, A.; Tarrío, D.; Altstadt, S.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Dressler, R.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Göbel, K.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Gurusamy, P.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Kivel, N.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martınez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondalaers, W.; Papaevangelou, T.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sabate-Gilarte, M.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Steinegger, P.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2013-12-01

    The neutron flux of the n_TOF facility at CERN was measured, after installation of the new spallation target, with four different systems based on three neutron-converting reactions, which represent accepted cross sections standards in different energy regions. A careful comparison and combination of the different measurements allowed us to reach an unprecedented accuracy on the energy dependence of the neutron flux in the very wide range (thermal to 1 GeV) that characterizes the n_TOF neutron beam. This is a pre-requisite for the high accuracy of cross section measurements at n_TOF. An unexpected anomaly in the neutron-induced fission cross section of 235U is observed in the energy region between 10 and 30keV, hinting at a possible overestimation of this important cross section, well above currently assigned uncertainties.

  13. Development of a Scale Model for High Flux Isotope Reactor Cycle 400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Dan [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    The development of a comprehensive SCALE computational model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is documented and discussed in this report. The SCALE model has equivalent features and functionality as the reference MCNP model for Cycle 400 that has been used extensively for HFIR safety analyses and for HFIR experiment design and analyses. Numerical comparisons of the SCALE and MCNP models for the multiplication constant, power density distribution in the fuel, and neutron fluxes at several locations in HFIR indicate excellent agreement between the results predicted with the two models. The SCALE HFIR model is presented in sufficient detail to provide the users of the model with a tool that can be easily customized for various safety analysis or experiment design requirements.

  14. Preliminary investigation of changes in x-ray multilayer optics subjected to high radiation flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hockaday, M.P.; Blake, R.L.; Grosso, J.S.; Selph, M.M.; Klein, M.M.; Matuska, W. Jr.; Palmer, M.A.; Liefeld, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of metal multilayers was exposed to high x-ray flux using Sandia National Laboratories' PROTO II machine in the gas puff mode. Fluxes incident on the multilayers above 700 MW/cm/sup 2/ in total radiation, in nominal 20 ns pulses, were realized. The neon hydrogen- and helium-like resonance lines were used to probe the x-ray reflectivity properties of the multilayers as they underwent change of state during the heating pulse. A fluorescer-fiber optic-streak camera system was used to monitor the changes in x-ray reflectivity as a function of time and irradiance. Preliminary results are presented for a W/C multilayer. Work in progress to model the experiment is discussed. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Magnetic microstructure and flux dynamics of high-T/sub c/ superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ourmazd, A.; Rentschler, J.A.; Skocpol, W.J.; Johnson D.W. Jr.

    1987-12-01

    We present high-resolution Bitter patterns which reveal the magnetic microstructure of the high-T/sub c/ superconductor Ba/sub 2/YCu/sub 3/O/sub 7/, allowing the direct observation of vortices, and their response to magnetic-field changes. By forming patterns in the presence of a time-varying magnetic field, or a transport current, we also study the dynamics of flux motion. Our results reveal a hierarchy of pinning sites and a remarkable anisotropy in the characteristics of neighboring twins, and allow the mapping of superconducting regions in the presence of circulating and transport currents.

  16. Dispersive nature of high mach number collisionless plasma shocks: Poynting flux of oblique whistler waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundkvist, David; Krasnoselskikh, V; Bale, S D; Schwartz, S J; Soucek, J; Mozer, F

    2012-01-13

    Whistler wave trains are observed in the foot region of high Mach number quasiperpendicular shocks. The waves are oblique with respect to the ambient magnetic field as well as the shock normal. The Poynting flux of the waves is directed upstream in the shock normal frame starting from the ramp of the shock. This suggests that the waves are an integral part of the shock structure with the dispersive shock as the source of the waves. These observations lead to the conclusion that the shock ramp structure of supercritical high Mach number shocks is formed as a balance of dispersion and nonlinearity.

  17. A Transverse Flux High-Temperature Superconducting Generator Topology for Large Direct Drive Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keysan, Ozan; Mueller, Markus A.

    The cost and mass of an offshore wind turbine power-train can be reduced by using high-temperature superconducting generators, but for a successful commercial design the superconducting generator should be as reliable as its alternatives. In this paper, we present a novel transverse flux superconducting generator topology which is suitable for low-speed, high-torque applications. The generator is designed with a stationary superconducting field winding and a variable reluctance claw pole motor for simplified mechanical structure and maximum reliability. 3D FEA simulation results of a 70 kW prototype is presented.

  18. High luminous flux from single crystal phosphor-converted laser-based white lighting system

    KAUST Repository

    Cantore, Michael

    2015-12-14

    The efficiency droop of light emitting diodes (LEDs) with increasing current density limits the amount of light emitted per wafer area. Since low current densities are required for high efficiency operation, many LED die are needed for high power white light illumination systems. In contrast, the carrier density of laser diodes (LDs) clamps at threshold, so the efficiency of LDs does not droop above threshold and high efficiencies can be achieved at very high current densities. The use of a high power blue GaN-based LD coupled with a single crystal Ce-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce) sample was investigated for white light illumination applications. Under CW operation, a single phosphor-converted LD (pc-LD) die produced a peak luminous efficacy of 86.7 lm/W at 1.4 A and 4.24 V and a peak luminous flux of 1100 lm at 3.0 A and 4.85 V with a luminous efficacy of 75.6 lm/W. Simulations of a pc-LD confirm that the single crystal YAG:Ce sample did not experience thermal quenching at peak LD operating efficiency. These results show that a single pc-LD die is capable of emitting enough luminous flux for use in a high power white light illumination system.

  19. High heat flux testing of mock-ups for a full tungsten ITER divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavila, P., E-mail: pierre.gavila@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Riccardi, B. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Constans, S.; Jouvelot, J.L.; Vastra, I. Bobin [AREVA NP, Centre Technique, Fusion, 71200, Le Creusot (France); Missirlian, M.; Richou, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2011-10-15

    In order to evaluate the option to start the ITER operation with a full tungsten (W) divertor, the EU-DA launched an extensive R and D program. It consisted in its initial phase in the high heat flux (HHF) testing of W mock-ups and medium scale prototypes up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} in the AREVA FE 200 facility (F). Critical heat flux (CHF) experiments were carried out on the items which survived the above thermal fatigue testing. After 1000 cycles at 10 MW/m{sup 2}, the full W Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) mock-ups successfully sustained either 1000 cycles at 15 MW/m{sup 2} or 500 cycles at 20 MW/m{sup 2}. However, some significant surface melting, as well as the complete melting of a few monoblocks, occurred during the HHF thermal fatigue testing program representative of the present ITER requirements for the strike point region, namely 1000 cycles at 10 MW/m{sup 2} followed by 1000 cycles at 20 MW/m{sup 2}. The results of the CHF experiments were also rather encouraging, since the tested items sustained heat fluxes in the range of 30 MW/m{sup 2} in steady-state conditions.

  20. SIRHEX—A new experimental facility for high heat flux testing of plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunze, André, E-mail: andre.kunze@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (Germany); Ghidersa, Bradut-Eugen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (Germany); Bonelli, Flavia [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento Energia (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Commercial infrared heaters have been qualified for future First Wall experiments. • In first tests surface heat flux densities up to 470 kW/m were achieved. • The homogeneity of the heat distribution stayed within ±5% of the nominal value. • With the heaters a typical ITER pulse can be reproduced. • An adequate testing strategy will be required to improve heater lifetime. - Abstract: SIRHEX (“Surface Infrared Radiation Heating Experiment”) is a small-scale experimental facility at KIT, which has been built for testing and qualifying high heat flux radiation heaters for blanket specific conditions using an instrumented water cooled target. This paper describes the SIRHEX facility and the experimental set-up for the heater tests. The results of a series of tests focused on reproducing homogeneous surface heat flux densities up to 500 kW/m{sup 2} will be presented and the impact of the heater performance on the design of the First Wall test rig will be discussed.

  1. An experimental study of critical heat flux of flow boiling in minichannels at high reduced pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, A. V.; Dedov, A. V.; Varava, A. N.; Komov, A. T.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents an experimental setup and experimental data for critical heat flux. The hydraulic loop of the experimental setup allows it to maintain stable flow parameters at the inlet of the test section at pressures up to 2.7 MPa and temperatures up to 200 °C. Experiments of hydrodynamics and heat transfer were performed for R113 and RC318 in two vertical channels with diameters of 1.36 and 0.95 mm and lengths of 200 and 100 mm, respectively. The inlet pressure-to-critical pressure ratio (reduced pressure) was pr = p/pcr = 0.15 ÷ 0.9, the mass flux ranges were between 700 and 4800 kg/(m2s), and inlet temperature varied from 30 to 180 °C. The primary regimes were obtained for conditions that varied from highly subcooled flows to saturated flows. For each regime with fixed parameters, the maximum possible heating power value was applied, with the maximum limited by the maximum output of the power supply, the onset of dryout, or wall temperatures exceeding 350 °C. The influence of flow conditions (i.e., mass flow rate, pressure, inlet temperature, and the channel diameter) on the critical heat flux is presented.

  2. Brookhaven highlights, July 1976-September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    Some of the most significant research accomplishments during this 27-month period are presented. Although some data are given, this report is primarily descriptive in outlook; detailed information on completed work should be sought from the references cited herein or from the usual sources of physics research information. The report is organized as follows: High-energy Physics (general introduction, physics research, accelerators, ISABELLE); Nuclear and Solid State Physics, and Chemistry; Life Sciences (biology, medicine); Applied Energy Science (energy and the environment, reactor systems and safety, National Nuclear Data Center, nuclear materials safeguards); Support Activities (applied mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, safety and environmental protection); and General and Administrative. 117 figures, 16 tables, 315 references. (RWR)

  3. One-dimensional Simulation of Heat Structure Melting and Evaporation Under High Heat Flux Condition Using MARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Woo; Lee, Jeong-Hun; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu; Park, Goon-Cherl [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Im, Kihak [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In order to establish the successful application for high heat flux condition, it is necessary to analyze material damage including possible phase change such as melting and evaporation due to high heat flux. In addition, in terms of coolant, water which is widely used for coolant has serious concern in that critical heat flux (CHF) occurrence can degrade the cooling capability and aggravate the integrity of cooling components. However, MARS code cannot simulate the melting and evaporation of materials under high heat flux or heat generation condition by itself due to the absence of those models. In the present study, therefore, one dimensional heat conduction calculation module for heat structure melting and evaporation was developed and coupled with MARS to overcome the limitation of material phase change simulation capability in MARS code. As clarifying the high heat flux problem, plasma facing component of Korean demonstration fusion reactor, K-DEMO, was selected. The one-dimensional simulation of melting and evaporation of high heat flux component was performed using MARS and newly developed phase change simulation module. The target component and high heat flux condition were referred to geometry of plasma facing component in Korean fusion demonstration plant and fusion reactor's plasma disruption event. In order to simulate melting and evaporation, effective heat capacity method and evaporation model were applied to phase change simulation module. The simulation results showed several phenomena such as melting, evaporation and CHF occurrence in coolant channel.

  4. Far scrape-off layer particle and heat fluxes in high density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, H. W.; Bernert, M.; Carralero, D.

    2014-01-01

    The far scrape-off layer transport is studied in ASDEX Upgrade H-mode discharges with high divertor neutral density N0,div, high power across the separatrix Psep and nitrogen seeding to control the divertor temperature. Such conditions are expected for ITER but usually not investigated in terms...... of turbulent SOL transport. At high N0,div and Psep the H-mode discharges enter a regime of high cross-field particle and power transport in the SOL which is accompanied by a significant change of the turbulence characteristic analogous to the transition from conductive to convective transport in L......-mode. Parallel particle and power flux densities of several 1023 m−2 s−1 and 10 MW m−2 have been detected about ∼40 to 45 mm outside the separatrix mapped to the outer mid-plane. The particle flux fall-off length reached up to 45 mm. This paper presents for the first time an empirical condition to enter the high...

  5. Evaluation of High Temperature Composites Thermal Properties under Different Heat Flux Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Bahramian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal protection of structures in vehicles, at instantaneous high thermal shocks, would be more effective and economically feasible among other thermal protection methods using the passive heat shields especially charring the ablative composites. The most important limitations reported are lack of compiled knowledge on designing heat shield with optimal thickness under real conditions and high surface erosion rate and low mechanical strength of char layer of a composite created by ablation process. In this paper SiAlON ceramic composites, reinforced with short carbon fiber, are identified as high performance heat shields for challenging these limitations. Ablation rate and effective thermal diffusivity at different external heat fluxes are determined and calculated using oxyacetylene flame test and modeling of temperature distributions in ablation process for evaluation of thermal protection performance and effective thermal diffusivity of this composite, as a thermal protection system. The results of this work have indicated that the carbon fiber reinforced SiAlON ceramic composite can be considered as a high ablation heat shield. Under the same condition of ablation test, SiAlON ceramic composites reinforced by carbon fiber show higher ablation performance relative to other commercial carbon fiber reinforced composite heat shields. At 8500 and 5000 kWm-2 external heat flux the ablation rates of this composite are 0.075 and 0.026 mms-1, respectively. Also, at 2500 kWm-2 external heat flux and test duration time of less than 25 s, this composite displays an adequate thermal shock protection with maximum flexural strength loss of about 23.4 %.

  6. 1995 Annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) conduct of epidemiologic surveillance provides an early warning system for health problems among workers. This program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report summarizes epidemiologic surveillance data collected from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at BNL and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out.

  7. Brookhaven National Laboratory site report for calendar year 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R.

    1989-06-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is managed by Associated Universities Inc. (AUI). AUI was formed in 1946 by a group of nine universities whose purpose was to create and manage a laboratory in the Northeast in order to advance scientific research in areas of interest to universities, industry, and government. On January 31, 1947, the contract for BNL was approved by the Manhattan District of the Army Corps of Engineers and BNL was established on the former Camp Upton army camp. 54 refs., 21 figs., 78 tabs.

  8. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A.; Miltenberger, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    This publication presents the results of BNL`s environmental monitoring and compliance effort and provides an assessment of the impact of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) operations on the environment. This document is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Section of the Safety and Envirorunental Protection Division. Within this Section, the Environmental Monitoring Group (EMG) sample the environment, interpreted the results, performed the impact analysis of the emissions from BNL, and compiled the information presented here. In this effort, other groups of the Section: Compliance; Analytical; Ground Water; and Quality played a key role in addressing the regulatory aspects and the analysis and documentation of the data, respectively.

  9. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A.; Miltenberger, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    This publication presents the results of BNL's environmental monitoring and compliance effort and provides an assessment of the impact of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) operations on the environment. This document is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Section of the Safety and Envirorunental Protection Division. Within this Section, the Environmental Monitoring Group (EMG) sample the environment, interpreted the results, performed the impact analysis of the emissions from BNL, and compiled the information presented here. In this effort, other groups of the Section: Compliance; Analytical; Ground Water; and Quality played a key role in addressing the regulatory aspects and the analysis and documentation of the data, respectively.

  10. [Treatment of acute lithium intoxication with high-flux haemodialysis membranes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Fernández, E J; Regidor, D; Peces, C; Sánchez, R; Montero, A; Selgas, R

    2006-01-01

    Lithium carbonate is commonly prescribed for the treatment of bipolar (manic-depressive) disorders. However, because of its narrow therapeutic index an excessive elevation of serum lithium concentration, either during chronic maintenance therapy or after an acute overdose, can result in serious toxicity. In addition to supportive care, the established treatment of severe lithium toxicity is haemodialysis. Conventional haemodialysis can reduce serum lithium rapidly, but post-dialysis rebound elevations with recurrent toxicity have been documented in old publications. High-flux membranes should be capable of removing more lithium per hour of haemodialysis, but published values are not available. We report here three patients with acute lithium intoxication who were treated successfully with bicarbonate and high-flux haemodialysis membranes. Our patients presented with a severe degree of intoxication, based on the amount of drug ingested, the initial serum lithium level, the severity of neurologic symptoms and systemic manifestations. Two patients developed acute renal failure probably as a result of volume depletion since it was rapidly reversible by haemodialysis and infusion therapy. In addition, consecutive haemodialysis sessions and improvement of renal function allowed a rapid decrease in serum lithium levels without haemodynamic instability or rebound elevations in lithium concentration. The effectiveness of the procedure in these cases can be attributed to the use of bicarbonate dialysate and high-efficiency dialysers. This is the first report describing the effect of high-efficiency dialysers on lithium pharmacokinetic. Using this technique the elimination rate of lithium was found to be greater than previously reported with haemodialysis.

  11. Modeling and Depletion Simulations for a High Flux Isotope Reactor Cycle with a Representative Experiment Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Betzler, Ben [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Hirtz, Gregory John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Sunny, Eva [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document a high-fidelity VESTA/MCNP High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core model that features a new, representative experiment loading. This model, which represents the current, high-enriched uranium fuel core, will serve as a reference for low-enriched uranium conversion studies, safety-basis calculations, and other research activities. A new experiment loading model was developed to better represent current, typical experiment loadings, in comparison to the experiment loading included in the model for Cycle 400 (operated in 2004). The new experiment loading model for the flux trap target region includes full length 252Cf production targets, 75Se production capsules, 63Ni production capsules, a 188W production capsule, and various materials irradiation targets. Fully loaded 238Pu production targets are modeled in eleven vertical experiment facilities located in the beryllium reflector. Other changes compared to the Cycle 400 model are the high-fidelity modeling of the fuel element side plates and the material composition of the control elements. Results obtained from the depletion simulations with the new model are presented, with a focus on time-dependent isotopic composition of irradiated fuel and single cycle isotope production metrics.

  12. Engineering and erection of a 300kW high-flux solar simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieghardt, Kai; Laaber, Dmitrij; Hilger, Patrick; Dohmen, Volkmar; Funken, Karl-Heinz; Hoffschmidt, Bernhard

    2017-06-01

    German Aerospace Center (DLR) is currently constructing a new high-flux solar simulator synlight which shall be commissioned in late 2016. The new facility will provide three separately operated experimental spaces with expected radiant powers of about 300kW / 240kW / 240kW respectively. synlight was presented to the public for the first time at SolarPACES 2015 [1]. Its engineering and erection is running according to plan. The current presentation reports about the engineering and the ongoing erection of the novel facility, and gives an outlook on its new level of possibilities for solar testing and qualification.

  13. Giant flux creep through the surface barriers and the irreversibility line in high-{Tc} superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlachkov, L. [Bar-Ilan Univ., Ramat-Gan (Israel); Geshkenbein, V.B. [Landau Inst. for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel)]|[Theoretische Physik, ETH-Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland); Koshelev, A.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[ISSP, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Larkin, A.I. [Landau Inst. for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Vinokur, V.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic flux relaxation over the surface barrier in high temperature superconductors are investigated Vortex dynamics controlled by the penetration both of pancake vortices and vortex lines are discussed. The penetration field H{sub p} for pancakes decay is exponentially with temperature. The size of the magnetization loop is determined by the decay of H{sub p} during the process of relaxation, but its shape remains unchanged. The irreversibility line associated with the pancake penetration is given by H{sub irr} {proportional_to} exp(- 2T/T{sub o}), and may lie both above and below the melting line.

  14. Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Analysis (TXRF) using the high flux SAXS camera

    CERN Document Server

    Wobrauschek, P; Pepponi, G; Bergmann, A; Glatter, O

    2002-01-01

    Combining the high photon flux from a rotating anode X-ray tube with an X-ray optical component to focus and monochromatize the X-ray beam is the most promising instrumentation for best detection limits in the modern XRF laboratory. This is realized by using the design of a high flux SAXS camera in combination with a 4 kW high brilliant rotating Cu anode X-ray tube with a graded elliptically bent multilayer and including a new designed module for excitation in total reflection geometry within the beam path. The system can be evacuated thus reducing absorption and scattering of air and removing the argon peak in the spectra. Another novelty is the use of a Peltier cooled drift detector with an energy resolution of 148 eV at 5.9 keV and 5 mm sup 2 area. For Co detection limits of about 300 fg determined by a single element standard have been achieved. Testing a real sample NIST 1643d led to detection limits in the range of 300 ng/l for the medium Z.

  15. A Petawatt-Laser-Driven, High-Flux Neutron Source for Fusion Micro-Materials Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, B. G.; Perkins, L. J.; Ditmire, T.; Rosen, M. D.; Perry, M. D.; Key, M. H.; Diaz de La Rubia, T.; Wolfer, W. G.

    1998-11-01

    We are examining the application of petawatt lasers to create beam-target fusion neutrons via ponderomotive-driven, electrostatic coupling. This offers a low cost, high-flux, “micro” 14MeV neutron source for testing tensile strengths of small ( ~100μm) fibers of C, Al_2O_3, SiC, etc., to ~100dpa. Such fibers can form porous fabric tubes for flowing coolant/breeders ( Flibe, LiPb, LiO_2-sand) in a various applications (direct-drive ICF, spheromaks, etc.). Under very short, intense laser heating of a thin tritium-frost layer, ejection of hot (multi-MeV) tail electrons driven by the ponderomotive pressure of the laser field competes with thermal electron heat conduction. Hot ions are ejected from the tritium layer by the resulting potential and move into a deuterium-ice substrate, pre-heated by the hot electrons. Beam-target fusion neutrons are produced at high efficiency (i.e., Q ~0.01-0.1 relative to Q ~0.001 for conventional solid, cold targets), while small target dimensions yield high neutron fluxes. Formal treatment of laser-induced electrostatic potentials is required to accurately model electron/ion transport.

  16. Association of Beta-2 Microglobulin with Inflammation and Dislipidemia in High-Flux Membrane Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topçiu-Shufta, Valdete; Miftari, Ramë; Haxhibeqiri, Valdete; Haxhibeqiri, Shpend

    2016-10-01

    Higher than expected cardiovascular mortality in hemodialysis patients, has been attributed to dyslipidemia as well as inflammation. Beta2-Microglobulin (β2M) is an independent predictor of outcome for hemodialysis patients and a representative substance of middle molecules. In 40 patients in high-flux membrane hemodialysis, we found negative correlation of β2M with high density lipoprotein (r=-0.73, p<0.001) and albumin (r= -0.53, p<0.001) and positive correlation with triglycerides (r=0.69, p<0.001), parathyroid hormone (r=0.58, p < 0.05) and phosphorus (r= 0.53, p<0.001). There was no correlation of β2M with C- reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). During the follow-up period of three years, 6 out of 40 patients have died from cardiovascular events. In high-flux membrane hemodialysis patients, we observed a significant relationship of β2M with dyslipidemia and mineral bone disorders, but there was no correlation with inflammation.

  17. Prognostic effect of high-flux hemodialysis in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the prognostic effects of high-flux hemodialysis (HFHD and low-flux hemodialysis (LFHD in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Both an electronic and a manual search were performed based on our rigorous inclusion and exclusion criteria to retrieve high-quality, relevant clinical studies from various scientific literature databases. Comprehensive meta-analysis 2.0 (CMA 2.0 was used for the quantitative analysis. We initially retrieved 227 studies from the database search. Following a multi-step screening process, eight high-quality studies were selected for our meta-analysis. These eight studies included 4967 patients with CKD (2416 patients in the HFHD group, 2551 patients in the LFHD group. The results of our meta-analysis showed that the all-cause death rate in the HFHD group was significantly lower than that in the LFHD group (OR=0.704, 95%CI=0.533-0.929, P=0.013. Additionally, the cardiovascular death rate in the HFHD group was significantly lower than that in the LFHD group (OR=0.731, 95%CI=0.616-0.866, P<0.001. The results of this meta-analysis clearly showed that HFHD decreases all-cause death and cardiovascular death rates in patients with CKD and that HFHD can therefore be implemented as one of the first therapy choices for CKD.

  18. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coatings During Interrupted High-Heat-Flux Laser Testing using Luminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation showed progress made in extending luminescence-base delamination monitoring to TBCs exposed to high heat fluxes, which is an environment that much better simulates actual turbine engine conditions. This was done by performing upconversion luminescence imaging during interruptions in laser testing, where a high-power CO2 laser was employed to create the desired heat flux. Upconverison luminescence refers to luminescence where the emission is at a higher energy (shorter wavelength) than the excitation. Since there will be negligible background emission at higher energies than the excitation, this methods produces superb contrast. Delamination contrast is produced because both the excitation and emission wavelengths are reflected at delamination cracks so that substantially higher luminescence intensity is observed in regions containing delamination cracks. Erbium was selected as the dopant for luminescence specifically because it exhibits upconversion luminescence. The high power CO2 10.6 micron wavelength laser facility at NASA GRC was used to produce the heat flux in combination with forced air backside cooling. Testing was performed at a lower (95 W/sq cm) and higher (125 W/sq cm) heat flux as well as furnace cycling at 1163C for comparison. The lower heat flux showed the same general behavior as furnace cycling, a gradual, "spotty" increase in luminescence associated with debond progression; however, a significant difference was a pronounced incubation period followed by acceleration delamination progression. These results indicate that extrapolating behavior from furnace cycling measurements will grossly overestimate remaining life under high heat flux conditions. The higher heat flux results were not only accelerated, but much different in character. Extreme bond coat rumpling occurred, and delamination propagation extended over much larger areas before precipitating macroscopic TBC failure. This indicates that under the higher heat flux (and

  19. 75 FR 43611 - U S Rail Corporation-Construction and Operation Exemption-Brookhaven Rail Terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board U S Rail Corporation--Construction and Operation Exemption-- Brookhaven Rail Terminal On August 7, 2008, U S Rail Corporation (U S Rail), an existing class III short line...) of new rail line at a 28-acre site (the Brookhaven Rail Terminal or BRT) located in the Town of...

  20. Brookhaven National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY2001--FY2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.

    2000-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory in the Department of Energy National Laboratory system and plays a lead role in the DOE Science and Technology mission. The Laboratory also contributes to the DOE missions in Energy Resources, Environmental Quality, and National Security. Brookhaven strives for excellence in its science research and in facility operations and manages its activities with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. The Laboratory's programs are aligned continuously with the goals and objectives of the DOE through an Integrated Planning Process. This Institutional Plan summarizes the portfolio of research and capabilities that will assure success in the Laboratory's mission in the future. It also sets forth BNL strategies for our programs and for management of the Laboratory. The Department of Energy national laboratory system provides extensive capabilities in both world class research expertise and unique facilities that cannot exist without federal support. Through these national resources, which are available to researchers from industry, universities, other government agencies and other nations, the Department advances the energy, environmental, economic and national security well being of the US, provides for the international advancement of science, and educates future scientists and engineers.

  1. Calibration of high-heat-flux sensors in a solar furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestrín, J.; Rodríguez-Alonso, M.; Rodríguez, J.; Cañadas, I.; Barbero, F. J.; Langley, L. W.; Barnes, A.

    2006-12-01

    The most common sensors used for the measurement of high solar irradiance are the Gardon gauges, which are usually calibrated using a black body at a certain temperature as the radiant source. This calibration procedure is assumed to produce a systematic error when solar irradiance measurements are taken using these sensors. This paper demonstrates a calorimetric method for calibrating these high-heat-flux gauges in a solar furnace. This procedure has enabled these sensors to be calibrated under concentrated solar radiation at higher irradiances under non-laboratory conditions in the CIEMAT solar furnace at the Plataforma Solar de Almería. Working at higher irradiances has allowed the uncertainty in the calibration constant of these sensors to be reduced. This work experimentally confirms the predicted systematic errors committed when measuring high solar irradiances using Gardon sensors calibrated with a black body.

  2. Comparison of the impact of high-flux dialysis on mortality in hemodialysis patients with and without residual renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Wook; Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, Young Ok; Jin, Dong Chan; Song, Ho Chul; Choi, Euy Jin; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kim, Yon-Su; Kang, Shin-Wook; Kim, Nam-Ho; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2014-01-01

    The effect of flux membranes on mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients is controversial. Residual renal function (RRF) has shown to not only be as a predictor of mortality but also a contributor to β2-microglobulin clearance in HD patients. Our study aimed to determine the interaction of residual renal function with dialyzer membrane flux on mortality in HD patients. HD Patients were included from the Clinical Research Center registry for End Stage Renal Disease, a prospective observational cohort study in Korea. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to study the association between use of high-flux dialysis membranes and all-cause mortality with RRF and without RRF. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. This study included 893 patients with 24 h-residual urine volume ≥100 ml (569 and 324 dialyzed using low-flux and high-flux dialysis membranes, respectively) and 913 patients with 24 h-residual urine volume dialysis membranes, respectively). After a median follow-up period of 31 months, mortality was not significantly different between the high and low-flux groups in patients with 24 h-residual urine volume ≥100 ml (HR 0.86, 95% CI, 0.38-1.95, P = 0.723). In patients with 24 h-residual urine volume dialysis membrane was associated with decreased mortality compared to HD using low-flux dialysis membrane in multivariate analysis (HR 0.40, 95% CI, 0.21-0.78, P = 0.007). Our data showed that HD using high-flux dialysis membranes had a survival benefit in patients with 24 h-residual urine volume dialysis rather than low-flux dialysis might be considered in HD patients without RRF.

  3. Assessment of the W7-X high heat flux divertor with thermo-mechanical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Xinyuan [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Jinzhai Road 96, 230026 Hefei,Anhui (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shushanhu Road 350, 230031 Hefei, Anhui (China); Peng, Xuebing, E-mail: pengxb@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shushanhu Road 350, 230031 Hefei, Anhui (China); Fellinger, Joris [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Boscary, Jean [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bykov, Victor [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Wang, Zhongwei [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shushanhu Road 350, 230031 Hefei, Anhui (China); Ye, Minyou; Song, Yuntao [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Jinzhai Road 96, 230026 Hefei,Anhui (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shushanhu Road 350, 230031 Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Thermo-mechanical analysis of HHF divertor module, TM2H. • Temperature of all parts is acceptable for long pulse operation. • Stress in different parts is mainly caused by different load. • Radial displacement need to be improved based on FE calculations. - Abstract: The Wendelstein 7-X is an experimental device designed with a stellarator magnetic confinement for stationary plasma operation (up to 30 min). At the first stage, it is scheduled to start with an inertially cooled test divertor unit and a shorter plasma pulse operation up to 10 s. After the completion of this stage, a water-cooled high heat flux (HHF) divertor will be installed for the steady-state operation phase. The divertor consists of individual target modules, which are sets of target elements armored with CFC tiles supported by a stainless steel structure and fed in parallel with manifolds. Detailed thermo-mechanical analysis of the target modules using the finite element method has been performed to validate and/or improve the elected design of the HHF divertor under operation. Different operating conditions have been studied and the effect of the variation of the convective heat flux pattern with localized heating loads as high as 10 MW/m{sup 2} onto the target elements has been computed. The analysis of the thermal response, stress distribution and deformation allowed a better understanding of the behavior of the divertor modules under operation and confirmed the suitability of the design.

  4. Aberration-Coreected Electron Microscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu,Y.; Wall, J.

    2008-04-01

    The last decade witnessed the rapid development and implementation of aberration correction in electron optics, realizing a more-than-70-year-old dream of aberration-free electron microscopy with a spatial resolution below one angstrom [1-9]. With sophisticated aberration correctors, modern electron microscopes now can reveal local structural information unavailable with neutrons and x-rays, such as the local arrangement of atoms, order/disorder, electronic inhomogeneity, bonding states, spin configuration, quantum confinement, and symmetry breaking [10-17]. Aberration correction through multipole-based correctors, as well as the associated improved stability in accelerating voltage, lens supplies, and goniometers in electron microscopes now enables medium-voltage (200-300kV) microscopes to achieve image resolution at or below 0.1nm. Aberration correction not only improves the instrument's spatial resolution but, equally importantly, allows larger objective lens pole-piece gaps to be employed thus realizing the potential of the instrument as a nanoscale property-measurement tool. That is, while retaining high spatial resolution, we can use various sample stages to observe the materials response under various temperature, electric- and magnetic- fields, and atmospheric environments. Such capabilities afford tremendous opportunities to tackle challenging science and technology issues in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology. The research goal of the electron microscopy group at the Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science and the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, as well as the Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is to elucidate the microscopic origin of the physical- and chemical-behavior of materials, and the role of individual, or groups of atoms, especially in their native functional environments. We plan to accomplish this by developing and implementing various quantitative

  5. Fluxes of nitrates between snow surfaces and the atmosphere in the European high Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Beine

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of atmospheric and snow mixing ratios of nitrates and nitrites and their fluxes above the snow surface were made during two intensive campaigns during spring time 2001 at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard as part of the EU project  "`The NItrogen Cycle and Effects on the oxidation of atmospheric trace species at high latitudes' (NICE. At this coastal site close to the unseasonably unfrozen fjord, of the measured nitrogen species, only HNO3 showed a significant flux on to the snow surface; a mean deposition of -8.7 nmol h-1 m-2 was observed in late April / early May 2001. These fluxes may be due to the reaction of HNO3 with sea salt, and especially NaCl, or may be simply uptake of HNO3 by ice, which is alkaline because of the sea salt in our marine environment. During snowfall periods dry deposition of HNO3 may contribute up to 10% of the N budget in the snow; however, the main source for N is wet deposition in falling snow. The surface snow at Ny-Ålesund showed very complex stratigraphy; the NO3- mixing ratio in snow varied between 65 and 520 ng g-1, the total NO3- content of the snowpack was on the order of 2700 ng cm-2. In comparison the atmospheric boundary layer column showed a NO3- content of only 8 ng cm-2. The limited exchange, however, between the snow and the atmosphere was attributed to low mobility of NO3- in the observed snow. Contrary to other Arctic sites (i.e. Alert, Nunavut or Summit, Greenland deposition of sea salt and crustal aerosols in this marine environment made the surface snow alkaline; snow NO3- was associated with heavier cations and was not readily available for physical exchange or photochemical reactions.

  6. Confirmatory investigations on the flux effect and associated unstable matrix damage in RPV materials exposed to high neutron fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaouadi, R., E-mail: rachid.chaouadi@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Gérard, R. [Tractebel Engineering, Avenue Ariane 7, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-06-15

    This paper provides additional experimental data on the neutron flux effect on RPV hardening and embrittlement and on the so-called unstable matrix damage that was suggested to occur at high flux. Six materials taken from the first irradiation surveillance capsules of Belgian PWRs with a fluence not exceeding about 1.5 × 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} were further irradiated in the BR2 high flux reactor to additional fluences ranging between about 1 and 1.5 × 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} at 290 °C. Eight additional RPV materials were selected to investigate the flux effect on irradiation hardening. No statistically-significant difference in irradiation hardening for low and high flux could be evidenced from the null hypothesis test applied with the general linear model. This is confirmed by additional experiments where fourteen irradiated specimens of various RPV materials consisting of low to high Cu and Ni contents were annealed at 350 °C for 5 h to eventually reveal some recovery of the unstable matrix damage. The results did not show any recovery upon heat treatment, which indicates that unstable matrix defects did not appear in these materials during irradiation at high flux.

  7. High-frequency analysis of the complex linkage between soil CO(2) fluxes, photosynthesis and environmental variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jonathan G; Phillips, Claire L; Schmidt, Andres; Irvine, James; Law, Beverly E

    2012-01-01

    High-frequency soil CO(2) flux data are valuable for providing new insights into the processes of soil CO(2) production. A record of hourly soil CO(2) fluxes from a semi-arid ponderosa pine stand was spatially and temporally deconstructed in attempts to determine if variation could be explained by logical drivers using (i) CO(2) production depths, (ii) relationships and lags between fluxes and soil temperatures, or (iii) the role of canopy assimilation in soil CO(2) flux variation. Relationships between temperature and soil fluxes were difficult to establish at the hourly scale because diel cycles of soil fluxes varied seasonally, with the peak of flux rates occurring later in the day as soil water content decreased. Using a simple heat transport/gas diffusion model to estimate the time and depth of CO(2) flux production, we determined that the variation in diel soil CO(2) flux patterns could not be explained by changes in diffusion rates or production from deeper soil profiles. We tested for the effect of gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) by minimizing soil flux covariance with temperature and moisture using only data from discrete bins of environmental conditions (±1 °C soil temperature at multiple depths, precipitation-free periods and stable soil moisture). Gross ecosystem productivity was identified as a possible driver of variability at the hourly scale during the growing season, with multiple lags between ~5, 15 and 23 days. Additionally, the chamber-specific lags between GEP and soil CO(2) fluxes appeared to relate to combined path length for carbon flow (top of tree to chamber center). In this sparse and heterogeneous forested system, the potential link between CO(2) assimilation and soil CO(2) flux may be quite variable both temporally and spatially. For model applications, it is important to note that soil CO(2) fluxes are influenced by many biophysical factors, which may confound or obscure relationships with logical environmental drivers and act at

  8. High heat flux testing of EU tungsten monoblock mock-ups for the ITER divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavila, P., E-mail: pierre.gavila@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Riccardi, B. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Pintsuk, G. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Ritz, G. [AREVA NP, Centre Technique France, 71205 Le Creusot (France); Kuznetsov, V. [JCS “Efremov Institute”, Doroga na Metallostroy 3, Metallostroy, Saint-Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation); Durocher, A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • All the tested items sustained the ITER Full W divertor qualification program requirements. This confirms that the technology for the manufacturing of the first set of the ITER Divertor is available in Europe. • The surface roughening and local melting of the W surface under high heat flux was proven to be significantly reduced for an armour thickness lower or equal to 6 mm. • However, this campaign highlighted some specific areas of improvement to be implemented ideally before the upcoming ITER Divertor IVT serial production. • The issue of the self-castellation of the W monoblocks, which typically appears after a few tenths of cycles at 20 MW/m{sup 2}, is critical because it generates some uncontrolled defects at the amour to heat sink joints. Besides, they create a gap which exposure is almost perpendicular to the magnetic field lines and which might lead to local W melting in the strike point region. • This campaign also evidenced that the minimum IO requirements on the CuCrZr ductility could be revised to avoid the occurrence of rather early fatigue failures. Although the W material characterization program has been set up by the IO, the strategy on the CuCrZr still needs to be defined. - Abstract: With the aim to assess the option to start the ITER operation with a full tungsten divertor, an R&D program was launched in order to evaluate the performances of tungsten (W) armoured plasma facing components (PFCs) under high heat flux. The F4E program consisted in the manufacturing and high heat flux (HHF) testing of W monoblock mock-ups and medium scale prototypes up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}. During the test campaign, 26 W mock-ups and two medium scale prototypes manufactured by Plansee SE (Austria) and by Ansaldo Nucleare (Italy) have been tested at the FE200 (AREVA, Le Creusot, France) and ITER Divertor Test Facility (IDTF) (Efremov Institute Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation) electron beam test facilities. The high heat flux (HHF) testing

  9. A Novel and Inexpensive Method for Measuring Volcanic Plume Water Fluxes at High Temporal Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom D. Pering

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Water vapour (H2O is the dominant species in volcanic gas plumes. Therefore, measurements of H2O fluxes could provide valuable constraints on subsurface degassing and magmatic processes. However, due to the large and variable concentration of this species in the background atmosphere, little attention has been devoted to monitoring the emission rates of this species from volcanoes. Instead, the focus has been placed on remote measurements of SO2, which is present in far lower abundances in plumes, and therefore provides poorer single flux proxies for overall degassing conditions. Here, we present a new technique for the measurement of H2O emissions at degassing volcanoes at high temporal resolution (≈1 Hz, via remote sensing with low cost digital cameras. This approach is analogous to the use of dual band ultraviolet (UV cameras for measurements of volcanic SO2 release, but is focused on near infrared absorption by H2O. We report on the field deployment of these devices on La Fossa crater, Vulcano Island, and the North East Crater of Mt. Etna, during which in-plume calibration was performed using a humidity sensor, resulting in estimated mean H2O fluxes of ≈15 kg·s−1 and ≈34 kg·s−1, respectively, in accordance with previously reported literature values. By combining the Etna data with parallel UV camera and Multi-GAS observations, we also derived, for the first time, a combined record of 1 Hz gas fluxes for the three most abundant volcanic gas species: H2O, CO2, and SO2. Spectral analysis of the Etna data revealed oscillations in the passive emissions of all three species, with periods spanning ≈40–175 s, and a strong degree of correlation between the periodicity manifested in the SO2 and H2O data, potentially related to the similar exsolution depths of these two gases. In contrast, there was a poorer linkage between oscillations in these species and those of CO2, possibly due to the deeper exsolution of carbon dioxide, giving

  10. Carbon dioxide in northern high latitude oceans: Anthropogenic increase and air-sea flux variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, Abdirahman M.

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this thesis is to further our knowledge of carbon dioxide in the northern high latitude oceans (northern North Atlantic, Barents Sea, and Arctic Ocean) by studying the anthropogenic change in the oceanic CO2, the inter-annual variability of the air-sea CO2 flux, and the relationship between this variability and changes in other oceanic processes. An introductory chapter and four papers are presented. Descriptions of the seawater carbonate system parameters, air-sea exchange of CO2, and related processes are given in the introduction chapter. The anthropogenic increase in partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in the surface water of the Barents Sea is evaluated in paper I. The effect of alternations of the Barents Sea climate between cold and warm modes on the annual cycles of seawater fugacity and air-sea flux of CO2 is investigated in paper II. Oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 associated with the seasonal formation of sea ice in Storfjorden and the implication for the entire Arctic Ocean is studied in paper III. An assessment of the variations of the air-sea flux of CO2 in the northern North Atlantic for 20 winters (1981-2001) is carried out in paper IV. PCO2 in the surface water of the Barents Sea is shown to have increased parallel with the atmospheric pCO2 between 1967 and 2000-2001 (paper I). This was determined by comparing seawater pCO2 from 1967 with that from 2000-2001. The former was estimated from surface seawater temperature (SST) while the latter was computed from data of total dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity. A procedure which accounts for the natural variability was applied and the difference between seawater pC02 of 1967 and that of 2000-2001 is attributed to the uptake of excess CO2. In the Atlantic sector of the Barents Sea, the surface seawater fugacity of CO2 (fCO s''w) is shown to be lower than the atmospheric fCO2 throughout the year, implying that the area is an annual sink of atmospheric CO2 (paper II). Additionally

  11. Influence of hadronic interaction models on characteristics of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, A. D.; Kochanov, A. A.; Sinegovskaya, T. S.; Sinegovsky, S. I.

    2017-12-01

    The high-energy conventional atmospheric neutrino fluxes are calculated with the hadronic interaction models: Kimel & Mokhov, QGSJET II-03(04), SIBYL 2.1(2.3), EPOS LHC. The influence of hadron-nuclear interactions on the neutrino flux ratios, v/\\bar{v},({v}μ +{\\bar{v}}μ )/({v}e+{\\bar{v}}e), is studied. A comparison of calculations obtained with use of two different approaches, {\\mathscr{Z}}(E,h) -functions method and the Matrix Cascade Equations (MCEQ), demonstrates close agreement in whole but some of partial contrubutions. The comparison of calculated muon neutrino spectra with the latest experimental data justifies reliability of performed computation which describes correctly the atmospheric neutrino production. The calculation made with the model EPOS LHC, combined with Hillas & Gaisser parametrization of the cosmic ray spectrum, is in close agreement with the best fit of IceCube for energy spetrum of atmospheric muon neutrinos in the energy range 1–500 TeV.

  12. Constraints on the flux of Ultra-High Energy neutrinos from WSRT observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholten, O; Bacelar, J; Braun, R; de Bruyn, A G; Falcke, H; Singh, K; Stappers, B; Strom, R G; al Yahyaoui, R

    2010-04-02

    Context. Ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos and cosmic rays initiate particle cascades underneath the Moon's surface. These cascades have a negative charge excess and radiate Cherenkov radio emission in a process known as the Askaryan effect. The optimal frequency window for observation of these pulses with radio telescopes on the Earth is around 150 MHz. Aims. By observing the Moon with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope array we are able to set a new limit on the UHEneutrino flux. Methods. The PuMa II backend is used to monitor the Moon in 4 frequency bands between 113 and 175 MHz with a sampling frequency of 40 MHz. The narrow band radio interference is digitally filtered out and the dispersive effect of the Earth?s ionosphere is compensated for. A trigger system is implemented to search for short pulses. By inserting simulated pulses in the raw data, the detection efficiency for pulses of various strength is calculated. Results. With 47.6 hours of observation time, we are able to set a limit on the UHE neutrino flux. This new limit is an order of magnitude lower than existing limits. In the near future, the digital radio array LOFAR will be used to achieve an even lower limit.

  13. The impact of high-flux dialysis on mortality rates in incident and prevalent hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Wook; Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, Young Ok; Jin, Dong Chan; Song, Ho Chul; Choi, Euy Jin; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kim, Yon-Su; Kang, Shin-Wook; Kim, Nam-Ho; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2014-11-01

    The effect of high-flux (HF) dialysis on mortality rates could vary with the duration of dialysis. We evaluated the effects of HF dialysis on mortality rates in incident and prevalent hemodialysis (HD) patients. Incident and prevalent HD patients were selected from the Clinical Research Center registry for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a Korean prospective observational cohort study. Incident HD patients were defined as newly diagnosed ESRD patients initiating HD. Prevalent HD patients were defined as patients who had been receiving HD for > 3 months. The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality. This study included 1,165 incident and 1,641 prevalent HD patients. Following a median 24 months of follow-up, the mortality rates of the HF and low-flux (LF) groups did not significantly differ in the incident patients (hazard ratio [HR], 1.046; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.592 to 1.847; p = 0.878). In the prevalent patients, HF dialysis was associated with decreased mortality compared with LF dialysis (HR, 0.606; 95% CI, 0.416 to 0.885; p = 0.009). HF dialysis was associated with a decreased mortality rate in prevalent HD patients, but not in incident HD patients.

  14. High geothermal heat flux in close proximity to the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysgaard, Søren; Bendtsen, Jørgen; Mortensen, John; Sejr, Mikael K

    2018-01-22

    The Greenland ice sheet (GIS) is losing mass at an increasing rate due to surface melt and flow acceleration in outlet glaciers. Currently, there is a large disagreement between observed and simulated ice flow, which may arise from inaccurate parameterization of basal motion, subglacial hydrology or geothermal heat sources. Recently it was suggested that there may be a hidden heat source beneath GIS caused by a higher than expected geothermal heat flux (GHF) from the Earth's interior. Here we present the first direct measurements of GHF from beneath a deep fjord basin in Northeast Greenland. Temperature and salinity time series (2005-2015) in the deep stagnant basin water are used to quantify a GHF of 93 ± 21 mW m-2 which confirm previous indirect estimated values below GIS. A compilation of heat flux recordings from Greenland show the existence of geothermal heat sources beneath GIS and could explain high glacial ice speed areas such as the Northeast Greenland ice stream.

  15. Reliable MOSFET operation using two-phase microfluidics in the presence of high heat flux transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govind Singh, Shiv; Agrawal, Amit; Duttagupta, Siddhartha P.

    2011-10-01

    Randomly generated heat flux transients affect the reliability of advanced integrated circuits and can induce severe nonlinearity in the device response, resulting in the degradation of a gate dielectric in metal oxide field effect transistors (MOSFETs). The effect of high heat flux transients on MOSFET operation and mitigation, using single-phase and two-phase on-chip microfluidics, is reported in this paper. A prototype comprising monolithically integrated MOSFETs, resistance temperature detector (RTD) arrays, simulated transient source (microheaters) and microfluidic networks was developed. The application of a 10 s transient (153 W cm-2) led to the degradation of subthreshold swing (S) from 120 to 240 mV/decade. However, in the presence of water flow, effective mitigation of S (up to 75%) is observed. The rate of mitigation is higher at lower flow rates because of the higher heat-transfer efficiency for two-phase flow. Thus, an appropriate selection of flow parameters can lead to optimized cooling. Additionally, we propose a strategy to localize the transient heat sources based on the temperature profiles generated using an on-chip, distributed RTD sensor array. The proposed methodology can be applied in practical integrated circuits for localization and characterization of heat sources leading to modifications in the circuit design or process integration steps.

  16. High Upward Fluxes of Formic Acid from a Boreal Forest Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Lopez-Hilifiker, Felipe D.; Taipale, Ditte; Millet, Dylan B.; D'Ambro, Emma L.; Rantala, Pekka; Mammarella, Ivan; Zhou, Putian; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Lee, Ben H.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Eddy covariance fluxes of formic acid, HCOOH, were measured over a boreal forest canopy in spring/summer 2014. The HCOOH fluxes were bidirectional but mostly upward during daytime, in contrast to studies elsewhere that reported mostly downward fluxes. Downward flux episodes were explained well by modeled dry deposition rates. The sum of net observed flux and modeled dry deposition yields an upward gross flux of HCOOH, which could not be quantitatively explained by literature estimates of direct vegetative soil emissions nor by efficient chemical production from other volatile organic compounds, suggesting missing or greatly underestimated HCOOH sources in the boreal ecosystem. We implemented a vegetative HCOOH source into the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to match our derived gross flux and evaluated the updated model against airborne and spaceborne observations. Model biases in the boundary layer were substantially reduced based on this revised treatment, but biases in the free troposphere remain unexplained.

  17. High-energy neutrino fluxes from AGN populations inferred from X-ray surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Idunn B.; Wu, Kinwah; On, Alvina Y. L.; Saxton, Curtis J.

    2015-08-01

    High-energy neutrinos and photons are complementary messengers, probing violent astrophysical processes and structural evolution of the Universe. X-ray and neutrino observations jointly constrain conditions in active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets: their baryonic and leptonic contents, and particle production efficiency. Testing two standard neutrino production models for local source Cen A (Koers & Tinyakov and Becker & Biermann), we calculate the high-energy neutrino spectra of single AGN sources and derive the flux of high-energy neutrinos expected for the current epoch. Assuming that accretion determines both X-rays and particle creation, our parametric scaling relations predict neutrino yield in various AGN classes. We derive redshift-dependent number densities of each class, from Chandra and Swift/BAT X-ray luminosity functions (Silverman et al. and Ajello et al.). We integrate the neutrino spectrum expected from the cumulative history of AGN (correcting for cosmological and source effects, e.g. jet orientation and beaming). Both emission scenarios yield neutrino fluxes well above limits set by IceCube (by ˜4-106 × at 1 PeV, depending on the assumed jet models for neutrino production). This implies that: (i) Cen A might not be a typical neutrino source as commonly assumed; (ii) both neutrino production models overestimate the efficiency; (iii) neutrino luminosity scales with accretion power differently among AGN classes and hence does not follow X-ray luminosity universally; (iv) some AGN are neutrino-quiet (e.g. below a power threshold for neutrino production); (v) neutrino and X-ray emission have different duty cycles (e.g. jets alternate between baryonic and leptonic flows); or (vi) some combination of the above.

  18. Numerical simulation in a subcooled water flow boiling for one-sided high heat flux in reactor divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, P., E-mail: pinliu@aust.edu.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan 232001 (China); Peng, X.B., E-mail: pengxb@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Song, Y.T. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Fang, X.D. [Institute of Air Conditioning and Refrigeration, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Huang, S.H. [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Mao, X. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The Eulerian multiphase models coupled with Non-equilibrium Boiling model can effectively simulate the subcooled water flow boiling. • ONB and FDB appear earlier and earlier with the increase of heat fluxes. • The void fraction increases gradually along the flow direction. • The inner CuCrZr tube deteriorates earlier than the outer tungsten layer and the middle OFHC copper layer. - Abstract: In order to remove high heat fluxes for plasma facing components in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) divertor, a numerical simulation of subcooled water flow boiling heat transfer in a vertically upward smooth tube was conducted in this paper on the condition of one-sided high heat fluxes. The Eulerian multiphase model coupled with Non-equilibrium Boiling model was adopted in numerical simulation of the subcooled boiling two-phase flow. The heat transfer regions, thermodynamic vapor quality (x{sub th}), void fraction and temperatures of three components on the condition of the different heat fluxes were analyzed. Numerical results indicate that the onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) and fully developed boiling (FDB) appear earlier and earlier with increasing heat flux. With the increase of heat fluxes, the inner CuCrZr tube will deteriorate earlier than the outer tungsten layer and the middle oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper layer. These results provide a valuable reference for the thermal-hydraulic design of a water-cooled W/Cu divertor.

  19. Deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory. With the exception of radium, there are no regulations or guidelines to establish cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soils at BNL. BNL must derive radionuclide soil cleanup guidelines for a number of Operable Units (OUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs). These guidelines are required by DOE under a proposed regulation for radiation protection of public health and the environment as well as to satisfy the requirements of CERCLA. The objective of this report is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL. Implementation of the approach is briefly discussed.

  20. Summary of failure analysis activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowgill, M.G.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Franz, E.M.

    1996-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has for many years conducted examinations related to the failures of nuclear materials and components. These examinations included the confirmation of root cause analyses, the determination of the causes of failure, identification of the species that accelerate corrosion, and comparison of the results of nondestructive examinations with those obtained by destructive examination. The results of those examinations, which had previously appeared in various formats (formal and informal reports, journal articles, etc.), have been collected together and summarized in the present report. The report is divided into sections according to the general subject matter (for example, corrosion, fatigue, etc.). Each section presents summaries of the information contained in specific reports and publications, all of which are fully identified as to title, authors, report number or journal reference, date of publication, and FIN number under which the work was performed.

  1. High-latitude poynting flux from combined Iridium and SuperDARN data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Waters

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Field-aligned currents convey stress between the magnetosphere and ionosphere, and the associated low altitude magnetic and electric fields reflect the flow of electromagnetic energy to the polar ionosphere. We introduce a new technique to measure the global distribution of high latitude Poynting flux, S||, by combining electric field estimates from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN with magnetic perturbations derived using magnetometer data from the Iridium satellite constellation. Spherical harmonic methods are used to merge the data sets and calculate S|| for any magnetic local time (MLT from the pole to 60° magnetic latitude (MLAT. The effective spatial resolutions are 2° MLAT, 2h MLT, and the time resolution is about one hour due to the telemetry rate of the Iridium magnetometer data. The technique allows for the assessment of high-latitude net S|| and its spatial distribution on one hour time scales with two key advantages: (1 it yields the net S|| including the contribution of neutral winds; and (2 the results are obtained without recourse to estimates of ionosphere conductivity. We present two examples, 23 November 1999, 14:00-15:00 UT, and 11 March 2000, 16:00-17:00 UT, to test the accuracy of the technique and to illustrate the distributions of S|| that it gives. Comparisons with in-situ S|| estimates from DMSP satellites show agreement to a few mW/m2 and in the locations of S|| enhancements to within the technique's resolution. The total electromagnetic energy flux was 50GW for these events. At auroral latitudes, S|| tends to maximize in the morning and afternoon in regions less than 5° in MLAT by two hours in MLT having S||=10 to 20mW/m2 and total power up to 10GW. The power poleward of the Region 1 currents is about one

  2. High-latitude poynting flux from combined Iridium and SuperDARN data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Waters

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Field-aligned currents convey stress between the magnetosphere and ionosphere, and the associated low altitude magnetic and electric fields reflect the flow of electromagnetic energy to the polar ionosphere. We introduce a new technique to measure the global distribution of high latitude Poynting flux, S||, by combining electric field estimates from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN with magnetic perturbations derived using magnetometer data from the Iridium satellite constellation. Spherical harmonic methods are used to merge the data sets and calculate S|| for any magnetic local time (MLT from the pole to 60° magnetic latitude (MLAT. The effective spatial resolutions are 2° MLAT, 2h MLT, and the time resolution is about one hour due to the telemetry rate of the Iridium magnetometer data. The technique allows for the assessment of high-latitude net S|| and its spatial distribution on one hour time scales with two key advantages: (1 it yields the net S|| including the contribution of neutral winds; and (2 the results are obtained without recourse to estimates of ionosphere conductivity. We present two examples, 23 November 1999, 14:00-15:00 UT, and 11 March 2000, 16:00-17:00 UT, to test the accuracy of the technique and to illustrate the distributions of S|| that it gives. Comparisons with in-situ S|| estimates from DMSP satellites show agreement to a few mW/m2 and in the locations of S|| enhancements to within the technique's resolution. The total electromagnetic energy flux was 50GW for these events. At auroral latitudes, S|| tends to maximize in the morning and afternoon in regions less than 5° in MLAT by two hours in MLT having S||=10 to 20mW/m2 and total power up to 10GW. The power poleward of the Region 1 currents is about one-third of the total power, indicating significant energy flux over the polar cap.

  3. High-latitude electromagnetic and particle energy flux during an event with sustained strongly northward IMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Korth

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a case study of a prolonged interval of strongly northward orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field on 16 July 2000, 16:00-19:00 UT to characterize the energy exchange between the magnetosphere and ionosphere for conditions associated with minimum solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. With reconnection occurring tailward of the cusp under northward IMF conditions, the reconnection dynamo should be separated from the viscous dynamo, presumably driven by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH instability. Thus, these conditions are also ideal for evaluating the contribution of a viscous interaction to the coupling process. We derive the two-dimensional distribution of the Poynting vector radial component in the northern sunlit polar ionosphere from magnetic field observations by the constellation of Iridium satellites together with drift meter and magnetometer observations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP F13 and F15 satellites. The electromagnetic energy flux is then compared with the particle energy flux obtained from auroral images taken by the far-ultraviolet (FUV instrument on the Imager for Magnetopause to Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE spacecraft. The electromagnetic energy input to the ionosphere of 51 GW calculated from the Iridium/DMSP observations is eight times larger than the 6 GW due to particle precipitation all poleward of 78° MLAT. This result indicates that the energy transport is significant, particularly as it is concentrated in a small region near the magnetic pole, even under conditions traditionally considered to be quiet and is dominated by the electromagnetic flux. We estimate the contributions of the high and mid-latitude dynamos to both the Birkeland currents and electric potentials finding that high-latitude reconnection accounts for 0.8 MA and 45kV while we attribute <0.2MA and ~5kV to an interaction at lower latitudes having the sense of a viscous interaction. Given that these

  4. Searches for high frequency variations in the 8-B neutrino flux at the Sudbury neutrino observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rielage, Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seibert, Stanley R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stonehill, L C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wouters, J M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aharmim, B [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Ahmed, S N [QUEEN' S UNIV; Anthony, A E [UNIV OF TEXAS; Barros, N [PORTUGAL; Beier, E W [UNIV OF PA; Bellerive, A [CARLETON UNIV; Belttran, B [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Bergevin, M [LBNL; Biller, S D [UNIV OF OXFORD; Boudjemline, K [CARLETON UNIV; Burritt, T H [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Cai, B [QUEEN' S UNIV; Chan, Y D [LBNL; Chauhan, D [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Chen, M [QUEEN' S UNIV; Cleveland, B T [UNIV OF OXFORD; Cox - Mobrand, G A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Dai, X [QUEEN' S UNIV; Deng, H [UNIV OF PA; Detwiler, J [LBNL; Dimarco, M [QUEEN' S UNIV; Doe, P J [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Drouin, P - L [CARLTON UNIV; Duba, C A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Duncan, F A [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Dunford, M [UNIV OF PA; Earle, E D [QUEEN' S UNIV; Evans, H C [QUEEN' S UNIV; Ewan, G T [QUEEN' S UNIV; Farine, J [LAURENTTIAN UNIV; Fergani, H [UNIV OF OXFORD; Fleurot, F [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Ford, R J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Formaggilo, J A [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Gagnon, N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Goon, J Tm [LOUISIANA STATE UNIV; Guillian, E [QUEEN' S UNIV; Habib, S [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Hahn, R L [BNL; Hallin, A L [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Hallman, E D [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Harvey, P J [QUEEN' S UNIV; Hazama, R [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Heintzelman, W J [UNIV OF PA; Heise, J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Helmer, R L [TRIUMF; Howard, C [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Howe, M A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Huang, M [UNIV OF TEXAS; Jamieson, B [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Jelley, N A [UNIV OF OXFORD; Keeter, K J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Klein, J R [UNIV OF TEXAS; Kos, M [QUEEN' S UNIV; Kraus, C [QUEEN' S UNIV; Krauss, C B [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Kutter, T [LOUISIANA STATE UNIV; Kyba, C C M [UNIV OF PA; Law, J [UNIV OF GUELPH; Lawson, I T [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Lesko, K T [LBNL; Leslie, J R [QUEEN' S UNIV; Loach, J C [UNIV OF OXFORD; Maclellan, R [QUEEN' S UNIV; Majerus, S [UNIV OF OXFORD; Mak, H B [QUEEN' S UNIV; Maneira, J [PORTUGAL; Martin, R [QUEEN' S UNIV; Mccauley, N [UNIV OF PA; Mc Donald, A B [QUEEN' S UNIV; Mcgee, S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Miffin, C [CARLETON UNIV; Miller, M L [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Monreal, B [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Monroe, J [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH; Morissette, B [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Nickel, B G [UNIV OF GUELPH; Noble, A J [QUEEN' S UNIV; O' Keeffe, H M [UNIV OF OXFORD; Oblath, N S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Orebi Gann, G D [UNIV OF OXFORD; Oser, S M [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Ott, R A [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Peeters, S J M [UNIV OF OXFORD; Poon, A W P [LBNL; Prior, G [LBNL; Reitzner, S D [UNIV OF GUELPH; Robertson, B C [QUEEN' S UNIV; Robertson, R G H [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Rollin, E [CARLETON UNIV; Schwendener, M H [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Secrest, J A [UNIV OF PA; Seibert, S R [UNIV OF TEXAS; Simard, O [CARLETON UNIV; Sinclair, D [CARLETON UNIV; Sinclair, L [CARLETON UNIV; Skensved, P [QUEEN' S UNIV; Sonley, T J [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Tesic, G [CARLETON UNIV; Tolich, N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Tsui, T [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Tunnell, C D [UNIV OF TEXAS; Van Berg, R [UNIV OF PA; Van Devender, B A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Virtue, C J [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Wall, B L [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Waller, D [CARLETON UNIV; Wan Chan Tseung, H [UNIV OF OXFORD; West, N [UNIV OF OXFORD; Wilkerson, J F [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Wilson, J R [UNIV OF OXFORD; Wright, A [QUEEN' S UNIV; Yeh, M [BNL; Zhang, F [CARLETON UNIV; Zuber, K [UNIV OF OXFORD

    2009-01-01

    We have peformed three searches for high-frequency signals in the solar neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), motivated by the possibility that solar g-mode oscillations could affect the production or propagation of solar {sup 8}B neutrinos. The first search looked for any significant peak in the frequency range l/day to 144/day, with a sensitivity to sinusoidal signals with amplitudes of 12% or greater. The second search focused on regions in which g-mode signals have been claimed by experiments aboard the SoHO satellite, and was sensitive to signals with amplitudes of 10% or greater. The third search looked for extra power across the entire frequency band. No statistically significant signal was detected in any of the three searches.

  5. Spectral resolution and high-flux capability tradeoffs in CdTe detectors for clinical CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Scott S; Rajbhandary, Paurakh L; Pelc, Norbert J

    2018-02-08

    Photon counting detectors using CdTe or CZT substrates are promising candidates for future CT systems but suffer from a number of non-idealities, including charge sharing and pulse pileup. By increasing the pixel size of the detector, the system can improve charge sharing characteristics at the expense of increasing pileup. The purpose of this work is to describe these considerations in the optimization of the detector pixel pitch. The transport of x-rays through the CdTe substrate was simulated in a Monte Carlo fashion using GEANT4. Deposited energy was converted into charges distributed as a Gaussian function with size dependent on interaction depth to capture spreading from diffusion and Coulomb repulsion. The charges were then collected in a pixelated fashion. Pulse pileup was incorporated separately with Monte Carlo simulation. The Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB) of the measurement variance was numerically estimated for the basis material projections. Noise in these estimates was propagated into CT images. We simulated pixel pitches of 250, 350, and 450 microns and compared the results to a photon counting detector with pileup but otherwise ideal energy response and an ideal dual-energy system (80/140 kVp with tin filtration). The modeled CdTe thickness was 2 mm, the incident spectrum was 140 kVp and 500 mA, and the effective dead time was 67 ns. Charge summing circuitry was not modeled. We restricted our simulations to objects of uniform thickness and did not consider the potential advantage of smaller pixels at high spatial frequencies. At very high x-ray flux, pulse pileup dominates and small pixel sizes perform best. At low flux or for thick objects, charge sharing dominates and large pixel sizes perform best. At low flux and depending on the beam hardness, the CRLB of variance in basis material projections tasks can be 32%-55% higher with a 250 micron pixel pitch compared to a 450 micron pixel pitch. However, both are about four times worse in variance

  6. Optical characteristics of recrystallized tungsten mirrors exposed to low-energy, high flux D plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, A.I. [National Technical University ' Kharkiv Polytechnical Institute' , 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine); Alimov, V.Kh., E-mail: vkahome@mail.ru [Tritium Technology Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Galuza, A.A. [Institute of Electrophysics and Radiation Technologies, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine); Isobe, K. [Tritium Technology Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Konovalov, V.G.; Ryzhkov, I.V. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Scientific Center ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' , 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Savchenko, A.A.; Slatin, K.A. [National Technical University ' Kharkiv Polytechnical Institute' , 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine); Voitsenya, V.S. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Scientific Center ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' , 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Yamanishi, T. [Tritium Technology Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2011-06-01

    The surface topography and optical properties of recrystallized tungsten exposed to a low-energy (38 eV/D), high flux (10{sup 22} D/m{sup 2s}) deuterium plasma with an ion fluence of 10{sup 26} D/m{sup 2} at various temperatures was investigated. It was found that the surface morphology weakly depends on the exposure temperature in the range 320-695 K with the exception of the narrow temperature region around 535 K, where large changes to all optical characteristics occurs. After plasma exposure at this temperature, the surface topography of the W sample is characterized by active blistering as has already been indicated in previous publications. The reflectance found in direct measurements at normal incidence drops in the wavelength interval 220-650 nm, whereas the estimations of reflectance using the ellipsometry data demonstrate some increase.

  7. Glass-fiber-based neutron detectors for high- and low-flux environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Mary; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Craig, Richard A.; Geelhood, Bruce D.; Knopf, Michael A.; Miley, Harry S.; Perkins, Richard W.; Reeder, Paul L.; Sunberg, Debra S.; Warner, Ray A.; Wogman, Ned A.

    1995-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has fabricated cerium-activated lithium silicate scintillating fibers via a hot-downdraw process. These fibers typically have a operational transmission length (e(superscript -1) length) of greater than 2 meters. This permits the fabrication of devices which were not possible to consider. Scintillating fibers permit conformable devices, large-area devices, and extremely small devices; in addition, as the thermal-neutron sensitive elements in a fast neutron detection system, scintillating fibers can be dispersed within moderator, improving neutron economy, over that possible with commercially available (superscript 3)He or BF(subscript 3) proportional counters. These fibers can be used for national-security applications, in medical applications, in the nuclear-power industry, and for personnel protection at experimental facilities. Data are presented for devices based on single fibers and devices made up of ribbons containing many fibers under high-and low-flux conditions.

  8. Timing discriminator based on single-flux-quantum circuit toward high time-resolved photon detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Shigeyuki; Miki, Shigehito; Yabuno, Masahiro; Yamashita, Taro; Terai, Hirotaka

    2017-12-01

    We propose a new time discriminating method based on a single-flux quantum (SFQ) circuit to realize a high time-resolved single-photon detection scheme that uses a superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SSPD). The timing discriminator consists of an SFQ comparator and an interface circuit for converting the output signals of an SSPD into SFQ pulses. Prior to connecting with the SSPD, we evaluated the timing jitters of the SFQ timing discriminator itself by applying external electrical pulses. The timing jitters of the SFQ timing discriminator were found to be dominated by the timing jitters in the interface circuit. However, it was estimated to be below 10 ps even with an input pulse amplitude of 20 μA, which is close to the typical output amplitude of the SSPD.

  9. The performance of RPCs with bakelite electrodes of resistivity under high radiation fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Cwiok, M; Górski, M; Królikowski, J

    2000-01-01

    Three medium-size Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) with bakelite electrodes having resistivity of 5*10/sup 8/, 5*10/sup 9/ and 3*10 /sup 10/ Omega cm were tested in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN in 1997, 1998 and 1999. The 2 mm gap modules working in an Inverted Double Gap configuration filled with gas mixtures containing freon C/sub 2/H/sub 2/F/sub 4/ and operated in avalanche mode exhibit wide efficiency plateau, good time resolution and small time walk due to rate variation even at intensities as high as 1 kHz/cm/sup 2//gap of a continuous radiation flux. (8 refs).

  10. Thermal Conductivity and Elastic Modulus Evolution of Thermal Barrier Coatings under High Heat Flux Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Laser high heat flux test approaches have been established to obtain critical properties of ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under near-realistic temperature and thermal gradients that may he encountered in advanced engine systems. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of a thin ceramic coating were continuously monitored in real time at various test temperatures. A significant thermal conductivity increase was observed during the laser simulated engine heat flux tests. For a 0.25 mm thick ZrO2-8%Y2O3 coating system, the overall thermal conductivity increased from the initial value of 1.0 W/m-K to 1. 15 W/m-K, 1. 19 W/m-K and 1.5 W/m-K after 30 hour testing at surface temperatures of 990C, 1100C, and 1320C. respectively. Hardness and modulus gradients across a 1.5 mm thick TBC system were also determined as a function of laser testing time using the laser sintering/creep and micro-indentation techniques. The coating Knoop hardness values increased from the initial hardness value of 4 GPa to 5 GPa near the ceramic/bond coat interface, and to 7.5 GPa at the ceramic coating surface after 120 hour testing. The ceramic surface modulus increased from an initial value of about 70 GPa to a final value of 125 GPa. The increase in thermal conductivity and the evolution of significant hardness and modulus gradients in the TBC systems are attributed to sintering-induced micro-porosity gradients under the laser-imposed high thermal gradient conditions. The test techniques provide a viable means for obtaining coating data for use in design, development, stress modeling, and life prediction for various thermal barrier coating applications.

  11. Development of advanced high heat flux and plasma-facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Rieth, M.; Aktaa, J.; Chikada, T.; Hoffmann, A.; Hoffmann, J.; Houben, A.; Kurishita, H.; Jin, X.; Li, M.; Litnovsky, A.; Matsuo, S.; von Müller, A.; Nikolic, V.; Palacios, T.; Pippan, R.; Qu, D.; Reiser, J.; Riesch, J.; Shikama, T.; Stieglitz, R.; Weber, T.; Wurster, S.; You, J.-H.; Zhou, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Plasma-facing materials and components in a fusion reactor are the interface between the plasma and the material part. The operational conditions in this environment are probably the most challenging parameters for any material: high power loads and large particle and neutron fluxes are simultaneously impinging at their surfaces. To realize fusion in a tokamak or stellarator reactor, given the proven geometries and technological solutions, requires an improvement of the thermo-mechanical capabilities of currently available materials. In its first part this article describes the requirements and needs for new, advanced materials for the plasma-facing components. Starting points are capabilities and limitations of tungsten-based alloys and structurally stabilized materials. Furthermore, material requirements from the fusion-specific loading scenarios of a divertor in a water-cooled configuration are described, defining directions for the material development. Finally, safety requirements for a fusion reactor with its specific accident scenarios and their potential environmental impact lead to the definition of inherently passive materials, avoiding release of radioactive material through intrinsic material properties. The second part of this article demonstrates current material development lines answering the fusion-specific requirements for high heat flux materials. New composite materials, in particular fiber-reinforced and laminated structures, as well as mechanically alloyed tungsten materials, allow the extension of the thermo-mechanical operation space towards regions of extreme steady-state and transient loads. Self-passivating tungsten alloys, demonstrating favorable tungsten-like plasma-wall interaction behavior under normal operation conditions, are an intrinsic solution to otherwise catastrophic consequences of loss-of-coolant and air ingress events in a fusion reactor. Permeation barrier layers avoid the escape of tritium into structural and cooling

  12. Calculation of conventional and prompt lepton fluxes at very high energy

    CERN Document Server

    Fedynitch, Anatoli; Gaisser, Thomas K; Riehn, Felix; Stanev, Todor

    2015-01-01

    An efficient method for calculating inclusive conventional and prompt atmospheric leptons fluxes is presented. The coupled cascade equations are solved numerically by formulating them as matrix equation. The presented approach is very flexible and allows the use of different hadronic interaction models, realistic parametrizations of the primary cosmic-ray flux and the Earth's atmosphere, and a detailed treatment of particle interactions and decays. The power of the developed method is illustrated by calculating lepton flux predictions for a number of different scenarios.

  13. Simulation of high-energy radiation belt electron fluxes using NARMAX-VERB coupled codes

    OpenAIRE

    I. P. Pakhotin; A. Y. Drozdov; Yuri Shprits; R. J. Boynton; D. A. Subbotin; M. A. Balikhin

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a fusion of data-driven and physics-driven methodologies of energetic electron flux forecasting in the outer radiation belt. Data-driven NARMAX (Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Averages with eXogenous inputs) model predictions for geosynchronous orbit fluxes have been used as an outer boundary condition to drive the physics-based Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, to simulate energetic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt environment. The coupled system ...

  14. GRCop-84: A High-Temperature Copper Alloy for High-Heat-Flux Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) is a new high-temperature copper-based alloy. It possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance and low-cycle fatigue up to 700 C (1292 F) along with low thermal expansion and good conductivity. GRCop-84 can be processed and joined by a variety of methods such as extrusion, rolling, bending, stamping, brazing, friction stir welding, and electron beam welding. Considerable mechanical property data has been generated for as-produced material and following simulated braze cycles. The data shows that the alloy is extremely stable during thermal exposures. This paper reviews the major GRCop-84 mechanical and thermophysical properties and compares them to literature values for a variety of other high-temperature copper-based alloys.

  15. Augmentation of Critical Heat Flux of High Velocity Liquid Jet Flow utilizing Flat-Narrow Rectangular Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Hisashi; Koizumi, Yasuo; Ohtake, Hiroyasu

    Sub-cooled flow boiling heat transfer experiments were performed for narrow-flat flow passages of 2 mm wide and 0.2 mm high. A heat transfer surface of 2 mm × 2 mm was placed at the just downstream of the flow channel outlet. A fast wall plane-jet was formed on the heat transfer surface and space for vapor generated on the heat transfer surface to leave freely form the plane jet was provided The experiments covered the flow rate from 5 m⁄s through 20 m⁄s and the inlet sub-cooling from 30 K through 70 K. Critical heat fluxes were greatly augmented about twice compared with those in the previous experiments where the heat transfer surface was located at the outlet end of the same flow channel as that in the present experiments. This has indicated that the present idea of the flow system is effective to enhance the critical heat flux. When the flow velocity was slower than 10 m⁄s, a large secondary bubble that was formed as a result of coalescence of many primary bubbles on the heat transfer surface covered the heat transfer surface. The large-coalesced bubble triggered the occurrence of the critical heat flux. When the flow velocity became faster than 10 m⁄s, the heat transfer surface was covered with many tiny-primary bubbles even at the critical heat flux condition. The critical heat fluxes in the present experiments were much larger than predictions of correlations. The triggering mechanism of the critical heat flux condition was proposed based on the observation mentioned above. It has two parts; for low flow velocity and for high flow velocity. The boundary is 10 m⁄s. In both cases, disappearance of a liquid film under the bubble due to evaporation is related to the appearance of the critical heat flux condition. The predicted critical heat fluxes were larger than that measured, however, qualitatively agreed well.

  16. A dynamic aerodynamic resistance approach to calculate high resolution sensible heat fluxes in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Ben; Grimmond, Sue; Kent, Christoph; Gabey, Andrew; Ward, Helen; Sun, Ting; Morrison, William

    2017-04-01

    Remotely sensed data from satellites have potential to enable high-resolution, automated calculation of urban surface energy balance terms and inform decisions about urban adaptations to environmental change. However, aerodynamic resistance methods to estimate sensible heat flux (QH) in cities using satellite-derived observations of surface temperature are difficult in part due to spatial and temporal variability of the thermal aerodynamic resistance term (rah). In this work, we extend an empirical function to estimate rah using observational data from several cities with a broad range of surface vegetation land cover properties. We then use this function to calculate spatially and temporally variable rah in London based on high-resolution (100 m) land cover datasets and in situ meteorological observations. In order to calculate high-resolution QH based on satellite-observed land surface temperatures, we also develop and employ novel methods to i) apply source area-weighted averaging of surface and meteorological variables across the study spatial domain, ii) calculate spatially variable, high-resolution meteorological variables (wind speed, friction velocity, and Obukhov length), iii) incorporate spatially interpolated urban air temperatures from a distributed sensor network, and iv) apply a modified Monte Carlo approach to assess uncertainties with our results, methods, and input variables. Modeled QH using the aerodynamic resistance method is then compared to in situ observations in central London from a unique network of scintillometers and eddy-covariance measurements.

  17. Hypersonic Engine Leading Edge Experiments in a High Heat Flux, Supersonic Flow Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Three aerothermal load related concerns are the boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow, articulating panel seals in high temperature environments, and strut (or cowl) leading edges with shock-on-shock interactions. A multidisciplinary approach is required to address these technical concerns. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to experimentally evaluate the heat transfer and structural response of the strut (or cowl) leading edge. A recent experimental program conducted in this facility is discussed and related to cooling technology capability. The specific objective of the experiment discussed is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Heat transfer analyses of a similar leading edge concept cooled with gaseous hydrogen is included to demonstrate the complexity of the problem resulting from plastic deformation of the structures. Macro-photographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight.

  18. Design and performance of vacuum system for high heat flux test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy Kidambi, Rajamannar; Mokaria, Prakash; Khirwadkar, Samir; Belsare, Sunil; Khan, M. S.; Patel, Tushar; Krishnan, Deepu S.

    2017-04-01

    High heat flux test facility (HHFTF) at IPR is used for testing thermal performance of plasma facing materials or components. It consists of various subsystems like vacuum system, high power electron beam system, diagnostic and calibration system, data acquisition and control system and high pressure high temperature water circulation system. Vacuum system consists of large D-shaped chamber, target handling system, pumping systems and support structure. The net volume of vacuum chamber is 5 m3 was maintained at the base pressure of the order of 10-6 mbar for operation of electron gun with minimum beam diameter which is achieved with turbo-molecular pump (TMP) and cryo pump. A variable conductance gate valve is used for maintaining required vacuum in the chamber. Initial pumping of the chamber was carried out by using suitable rotary and root pumps. PXI and PLC based faster real time data acquisition and control system is implemented for performing the various operations like remote operation, online vacuum data measurements, display and status indication of all vacuum equipments. This paper describes in detail the design and implementation of various vacuum system for HHFTF.

  19. High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halfon, S. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

    2013-04-19

    A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

  20. Micromegas a high-granularity position-sensitive gaseous detector for high particle-flux environments

    CERN Document Server

    Giomataris, Ioanis; Robert, J P; Charpak, Georges

    1996-01-01

    We describe a novel structure for a gaseous detector that is under development at Saclay. It consists of a two-stage parallel-plate avalanche chamber of small amplification gap (100 microm) combined with a conversion-drift space. It allows a fast removal of positive ionsproduced during the avalanche development. Fast signals (3/4 1 ns) are obtained duirng the collection of the electron avalanche on the anode microstrip plane. The induced positive ion signal has a rise time of 100 ns. The fast evacuation of positive ions combined with the high granularity of the detector provide a high rate capability. Gas gains of up to $10^5$ have been achieved.

  1. Soluble transferrin receptor as a marker of erythropoiesis in patients undergoing high-flux hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Yin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is a common complication in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients receiving hemodialysis. The effect of high-flux dialysis (HFD on anemia remains unclear. This prospective study aimed to evaluate the effect of HFD on anemia, and the potential of soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR as a marker of iron status and erythropoiesis in CKD patients on hemodialysis. Forty patients, who switched from conventional low-flux dialysis to HFD for 12 months, were enrolled in this study. The levels of sTfR, hemoglobin (Hb, iron, and nutritional markers, as well as the dose of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO and use of chalybeate were determined at 0, 2, 6, and 12 months after starting HFD. HFD significantly increased the hemoglobin level and reduced sTfR level in CKD patients (p < 0.05. In addition, significant decreasing linear trends were observed for rhEPO dosage and chalybeate use (p < 0.05. The level of sTfR was positively correlated with the percentage of reticulocytes (RET%, rhEPO dose, and chalybeate use, while it was negatively correlated with Hb levels and total iron-binding capacity results (all p < 0.05. A univariate generalized estimating equation (GEE model showed that the Hb level, RET%, rhEPO dose, and chalybeate use were the variables associated with sTfR levels. A multivariate GEE model showed that the time points when hemodialysis was performed were the variables associated significantly with sTfR levels. Overall, our findings suggest that HFD can effectively improve renal anemia in hemodialysis patients, and sTfR could be used as a marker of erythropoiesis in HFD patients.

  2. Modelling of growing season methane fluxes in a high-Arctic wet tundra ecosystem 1997–2010 using in situ and high-resolution satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torbern Tagesson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 fluxes 1997–2010 were studied by combining remotely sensed normalised difference water index (NDWI with in situ CH4 fluxes from Rylekærene, a high-Arctic wet tundra ecosystem in the Zackenberg valley, north-eastern Greenland. In situ CH4 fluxes were measured using the closed-chamber technique. Regression models between in situ CH4 fluxes and environmental variables [soil temperature (Tsoil, water table depth (WtD and active layer (AL thickness] were established for different temporal and spatial scales. The relationship between in situ WtD and remotely sensed NDWI was also studied. The regression models were combined and evaluated against in situ CH4 fluxes. The models including NDWI as the input data performed on average slightly better [root mean square error (RMSE =1.56] than the models without NDWI (RMSE=1.67, and they were better in reproducing CH4 flux variability. The CH4 flux model that performed the best included exponential relationships against temporal variation in Tsoil and AL, an exponential relationship against spatial variation in WtD and a linear relationship between WtD and remotely sensed NDWI (RMSE=1.50. There were no trends in modelled CH4 flux budgets between 1997 and 2010. Hence, during this period there were no trends in the soil temperature at 10 cm depth and NDWI.

  3. A high-resolution dataset of water fluxes and states for Germany accounting for parametric uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Matthias; Kumar, Rohini; Cuntz, Matthias; Samaniego, Luis

    2017-03-01

    Long-term, high-resolution data about hydrologic fluxes and states are needed for many hydrological applications. Because continuous large-scale observations of such variables are not feasible, hydrologic or land surface models are applied to derive them. This study aims to analyze and provide a consistent high-resolution dataset of land surface variables over Germany, accounting for uncertainties caused by equifinal model parameters. The mesoscale Hydrological Model (mHM) is employed to derive an ensemble (100 members) of evapotranspiration, groundwater recharge, soil moisture, and runoff generated at high spatial and temporal resolutions (4 km and daily, respectively) for the period 1951-2010. The model is cross-evaluated against the observed daily streamflow in 222 basins, which are not used for model calibration. The mean (standard deviation) of the ensemble median Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency estimated for these basins is 0.68 (0.09) for daily streamflow simulations. The modeled evapotranspiration and soil moisture reasonably represent the observations from eddy covariance stations. Our analysis indicates the lowest parametric uncertainty for evapotranspiration, and the largest is observed for groundwater recharge. The uncertainty of the hydrologic variables varies over the course of a year, with the exception of evapotranspiration, which remains almost constant. This study emphasizes the role of accounting for the parametric uncertainty in model-derived hydrological datasets.

  4. Development of an intracellular glycolytic flux sensor for high throughput applications in E.coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehning, Christina Eva

    The aim of this PhD project was to construct, test and apply an intracellular, growth-­‐ independent and direct measureable glycolytic flux biosensor in E. coli. Studying the metabolic flux of bacterial cells is of growing interest as it is of fundamental importance to bacterial physiology as wel...

  5. Magnetic properties of high-T(sub c) superconductors: Rigid levitation, flux pinning, thermal depinning, and fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    The levitation of high-T(sub c) superconductors is quite conspicuous: Above magnets of low symmetry a disk of these ceramics floats motionless, without vibration or rotation; it has a continuous range of stable positions and orientations as if it were stuck in sand. Some specimens may even be suspended above or below the same magnet. This fascinating stability, inherent to no other type of levitation, is caused by the pinning of magnetic flux lines by inhomogeneities inside these extreme type-2 superconductors. The talk deals with pinning of magnetic flux in these materials, with flux flow, flux creep, thermally activated depinning, and the thermal fluctuation of the vortex positions in the flux line lattice (often called flux lattice melting). Also discussed are the fluctuations of the (nearly periodic) magnetic field inside these superconductors which are caused by random pinning sites and by the finite temperature. These fluctuations broaden the van-Hove singularities observed in the density of the magnetic field by nuclear magnetic resonance and by muon spin rotation.

  6. A three-dimensional inverse problem in estimating the internal heat flux of housing for high speed motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Cheng-Hung; Lo, Hung-Chi [Department of Systems and Naval Mechatronic Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 701, (Taiwan)

    2006-10-15

    The time-dependent heat flux generated in rotor and stator for the high speed electric motor is determined in this three-dimensional inverse heat conduction problem. The inverse algorithm utilizing the Steepest Descent Method (SDM) and a general purpose commercial code CFX4.4 is applied successfully in the present study in accordance with the simulated measured temperature distributions on some proper exterior surfaces. No cooling systems can be designed before the heat fluxes are estimated and identified. Two different functional forms for heat fluxes with different temperature measurement errors are used in the numerical experiments to illustrate the validity of the inverse algorithm. Results of the numerical simulation show that due to the structure of the cooling passages for motor housing, the estimated heat flux lying under the cooling passages is not accurate. However, when the concept of effective heat flux is applied, a reliable time-dependent heat flux can be obtained by using the present inverse algorithm. (author)

  7. Generation of high-photon flux-coherent soft x-ray radiation with few-cycle pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmler, Stefan; Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Krebs, Manuel; Hage, Arvid; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    We present a tabletop source of coherent soft x-ray radiation with high-photon flux. Two-cycle pulses delivered by a fiber-laser-pumped optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier operating at 180 kHz repetition rate are upconverted via high harmonic generation in neon to photon energies beyond 200 eV. A maximum photon flux of 1.3·10(8) photons/s is achieved within a 1% bandwidth at 125 eV photon energy. This corresponds to a conversion efficiency of ~10(-9), which can be reached due to a gas jet simultaneously providing a high target density and phase matching. Further scaling potential toward higher photon flux as well as higher photon energies are discussed.

  8. Carbon flux from plants to soil microbes is highly sensitive to nitrogen addition and biochar amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, C.; Solaiman, Z. M.; Kilburn, M. R.; Clode, P. L.; Fuchslueger, L.; Koranda, M.; Murphy, D. V.

    2012-04-01

    material, microbial biomass and dissolved organic matter by IRMS, 13C and 15N in plant roots cells and intraradical mycorrhizal hyphae by NanoSims). Our results show that (1) C assimilated by plants was delivered within 4 hours to the soil microbial community both via roots and the mycorrhizal network (2) N addition during the labeling period strongly and rapidly increased the 13C flux of recently assimilated carbohydrates to the soil microbial biomass (3) the effect of N addition was not as rapid but was of the same magnitude when N was delivered to the plant exclusively by mycorrhizal hyphae as compared to taken up by roots (4) soils which had been amended with biochar (which were characterized by an increased abundance of mycorrhizal fungi) also showed a significant increase of C flux from plants to the soil. We conclude that plant belowground C allocation is highly sensitive to alterations of microbial community structure and nutritional status in the soil. Moreover, our results indicate that plants respond rapidly (within hours) to changing soil N availability by altering the rate of C transported belowground. Our results emphasise the ecological significance of plant-belowground interactions for ecosystem C cycling.

  9. Infrared LED Enhanced Spectroscopic CdZnTe Detector Working under High Fluxes of X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekárek, Jakub; Dědič, Václav; Franc, Jan; Belas, Eduard; Rejhon, Martin; Moravec, Pavel; Touš, Jan; Voltr, Josef

    2016-09-27

    This paper describes an application of infrared light-induced de-polarization applied on a polarized CdZnTe detector working under high radiation fluxes. We newly demonstrate the influence of a high flux of X-rays and simultaneous 1200-nm LED illumination on the spectroscopic properties of a CdZnTe detector. CdZnTe detectors operating under high radiation fluxes usually suffer from the polarization effect, which occurs due to a screening of the internal electric field by a positive space charge caused by photogenerated holes trapped at a deep level. Polarization results in the degradation of detector charge collection efficiency. We studied the spectroscopic behavior of CdZnTe under various X-ray fluxes ranging between 5 × 10 5 and 8 × 10 6 photons per mm 2 per second. It was observed that polarization occurs at an X-ray flux higher than 3 × 10 6 mm - 2 ·s - 1 . Using simultaneous illumination of the detector by a de-polarizing LED at 1200 nm, it was possible to recover X-ray spectra originally deformed by the polarization effect.

  10. Infrared LED Enhanced Spectroscopic CdZnTe Detector Working under High Fluxes of X-rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Pekárek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an application of infrared light-induced de-polarization applied on a polarized CdZnTe detector working under high radiation fluxes. We newly demonstrate the influence of a high flux of X-rays and simultaneous 1200-nm LED illumination on the spectroscopic properties of a CdZnTe detector. CdZnTe detectors operating under high radiation fluxes usually suffer from the polarization effect, which occurs due to a screening of the internal electric field by a positive space charge caused by photogenerated holes trapped at a deep level. Polarization results in the degradation of detector charge collection efficiency. We studied the spectroscopic behavior of CdZnTe under various X-ray fluxes ranging between 5 × 10 5 and 8 × 10 6 photons per mm 2 per second. It was observed that polarization occurs at an X-ray flux higher than 3 × 10 6 mm − 2 ·s − 1 . Using simultaneous illumination of the detector by a de-polarizing LED at 1200 nm, it was possible to recover X-ray spectra originally deformed by the polarization effect.

  11. Use of high-radiant flux, high-resolution DMD light engines in industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Alexandra; Ram, Surinder

    2014-03-01

    The field of application of industrial projectors is growing day by day. New Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) - based applications like 3D printing, 3D scanning, Printed Circuit Board (PCB) board printing and others are getting more and more sophisticated. The technical demands for the projection system are rising as new and more stringent requirements appear. The specification for industrial projection systems differ substantially from the ones of business and home beamers. Beamers are designed to please the human eye. Bright colors and image enhancement are far more important than uniformity of the illumination or image distortion. The human eye, followed by the processing of the brain can live with quite high intensity variations on the screen and image distortion. On the other hand, a projector designed for use in a specialized field has to be tailored regarding its unique requirements in order to make no quality compromises. For instance, when the image is projected onto a light sensitive resin, a good uniformity of the illumination is crucial for good material hardening (curing) results. The demands on the hardware and software are often very challenging. In the following we will review some parameters that have to be considered carefully for the design of industrial projectors in order to get the optimum result without compromises.

  12. Assembly and Delivery of Rabbit Capsules for Irradiation of Silicon Carbide Cladding Tube Specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Takaaki [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Neutron irradiation of silicon carbide (SiC)-based fuel cladding under a high radial heat flux presents a critical challenge for SiC cladding concepts in light water reactors (LWRs). Fission heating in the fuel provides a high heat flux through the cladding, which, combined with the degraded thermal conductivity of SiC under irradiation, results in a large temperature gradient through the thickness of the cladding. The strong temperature dependence of swelling in SiC creates a complex stress profile in SiCbased cladding tubes as a result of differential swelling. The Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) Program within the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is supporting research efforts to improve the scientific understanding of the effects of irradiation on SiC cladding tubes. Ultimately, the results of this project will provide experimental validation of multi-physics models for SiC-based fuel cladding during LWR operation. The first objective of this project is to irradiate tube specimens using a previously developed design that allows for irradiation testing of miniature SiC tube specimens subjected to a high radial heat flux. The previous “rabbit” capsule design uses the gamma heating in the core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to drive a high heat flux through the cladding tube specimens. A compressible aluminum foil allows for a constant thermal contact conductance between the cladding tubes and the rabbit housing despite swelling of the SiC tubes. To allow separation of the effects of irradiation from those due to differential swelling under a high heat flux, a new design was developed under the NSUF program. This design allows for irradiation of similar SiC cladding tube specimens without a high radial heat flux. This report briefly describes the irradiation experiment design concepts, summarizes the irradiation test matrix, and reports on the successful delivery of six rabbit capsules to the HFIR. Rabbits of both low and high

  13. Proto-2, an ALICE detector prototype, part of the STAR experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Proto-2, an LAICE detector prototype, overcame its prototype status to become a real part of the SDTAR, epxeriment at the US Brookhaven National Laboratory. After more than two years across the ocean, it has just arrived back at CERN.

  14. Local structure of cobalt nanoparticles synthesized by high heat flux plasma process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orpe, P. B.; Paris, E.; Balasubramanian, C.; Joseph, B.; Mukherjee, S.; Di Gioacchino, D.; Marcelli, A.; Saini, N. L.

    2017-08-01

    We have used high heat flux plasma synthesis process to grow Co those for the morphology, stoichiometry and the local structure as a function of plasma current. We find that the nanoparticles produced by the thermal plasma method have different shapes and size distribution with the plasma current being a key parameter in controlling the formation of composition, morphology and crystalline structure. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements at Co K-edge have revealed formation of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles with the composition mainly depending on the arc current. While low plasma current appears to produce nanoparticles solely of CoO with a small amount of Co metal, the high plasma current tends to produce nanoparticles of CoO and Co3O4 oxides with increased amount of Co metal. The results are consistent with the morphological and structural analysis, showing nanoparticles of different shapes and size depending on the arc current.

  15. High Heat Flux Interactions and Tritium Removal from Plasma Facing Components by a Scanning Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.H. Skinner; C.A. Gentile; A. Hassanein

    2002-01-28

    A new technique for studying high heat flux interactions with plasma facing components is presented. The beam from a continuous wave 300 W neodymium laser was focused to 80 W/mm2 and scanned at high speed over the surface of carbon tiles. These tiles were previously used in the TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] inner limiter and have a surface layer of amorphous hydrogenated carbon that was codeposited during plasma operations. Laser scanning released up to 84% of the codeposited tritium. The temperature rise of the codeposit on the tiles was significantly higher than that of the manufactured material. In one experiment, the codeposit surface temperature rose to 1,770 C while for the same conditions, the manufactured surface increased to only 1,080 C. The peak temperature did not follow the usual square-root dependence on heat pulse duration. Durations of order 100 ms resulted in brittle destruction and material loss from the surface, while a duration of approximately 10 ms showed minimal change. A digital microscope imaged the codeposit before, during, and after the interaction with the laser and revealed hot spots on a 100-micron scale. These results will be compared to analytic modeling and are relevant to the response of plasma facing components to disruptions and vertical displacement events (VDEs) in next-step magnetic fusion devices.

  16. Internal filtration, filtration fraction, and blood flow resistance in high- and low-flux dialyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneditz, Daniel; Zierler, Edda; Vanholder, Raymond; Eloot, Sunny

    2014-01-01

    It was the aim to examine the fluid flow in blood and dialysate compartments of highly permeable hollow fiber dialyzers where internal filtration contributes to solute removal but where excessive filtration bears a risk of cell activation and damage. Flow characteristics of high- (HF) and low-flux (LF) dialyzers were studied in lab-bench experiments using whole bovine blood. Measurements obtained under different operating conditions and under zero net ultrafiltration were compared to theoretical calculations obtained from a mathematical model. Experimental resistances in the blood compartment were within ±2% of those calculated from the model when dialysate was used as a test fluid. With whole blood, the experimental resistances in the blood compartment were only 81.8 ± 2.8% and 83.7 ± 4.3% of those calculated for the LF and HF dialyzer, respectively. Surprisingly, measured blood flow resistance slightly but significantly decreased with increasing flow rate (p filtration fraction, while overall internal filtration increased. The increase in internal filtration when increasing blood flow is associated with a beneficial reduction in internal filtration fraction. Concerns of increased hemoconcentration when increasing blood flow therefore appear to be unwarranted.

  17. Discrete Wavelet Transform Method for High Flux n-γ Discrimination With Liquid Scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harleen; Mehra, Rohit

    2017-07-01

    A Novel method based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT) for n-γ discrimination in high radiation flux is presented. We investigated the behavior of higher order wavelets from different families such as the Daubechies family, symlets, and coiflet type wavelets for pulse shape discrimination. A DWT-based average pulse analysis of neutron and γ-ray pulses suggests less sensitivity of db2, db3, sym4, and coif1 wavelets over the widely used Haar wavelet and the charge comparison method for the pile-up events. The DWT method with proposed wavelets is applied to a mixed radiation field at an energy threshold of 500 keVee obtained from an americium-beryllium source exposed to BC501 liquid scintillator which was coupled to a 12-b digital oscilloscope with sampling rate of 2.5 GSamples/s. The proposed wavelets require a short processing gate and are more suitable when applied to high count rate measurement with large fraction of pile-up events in the data set. Furthermore, these wavelets are very stable toward the variation in the width of processing gate in DWT. This feature is very helpful in the optimization of processing gate for the real-time applications.

  18. WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION

    2003-09-01

    This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve) is based on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) fire management planning procedures and was developed in cooperation with the Department of Energy (DOE) by Brookhaven Science Associates. As the Upton Reserve is contained within the BNL 5,265-acre site, it is logical that the plan applies to both the Upton Reserve and BNL. The Department of the Interior policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas managed by FWS that can sustain fire must have an FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures and specifies values to be protected or enhanced. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, ''prescribed'' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL/Upton Reserve Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered and threatened species and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL and the Upton Reserve. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of FWS, BNL, and the Upton Reserve. This Fire Management Plan is a modified version of the Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex Fire plan (updated in 2000), which contains all FWS fire plan requirements and is presented in the format specified by the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. FWS shall be, through an Interagency Agreement dated November 2000 (Appendix C), responsible for coordinating and

  19. Ultra-selective high-flux membranes from directly synthesized zeolite nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Mi Young; Kim, Donghun; Kumar, Prashant; Lee, Pyung Soo; Rangnekar, Neel; Bai, Peng; Shete, Meera; Elyassi, Bahman; Lee, Han Seung; Narasimharao, Katabathini; Basahel, Sulaiman Nasir; Al-Thabaiti, Shaeel; Xu, Wenqian; Cho, Hong Je; Fetisov, Evgenii O.; Thyagarajan, Raghuram; Dejaco, Robert F.; Fan, Wei; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Siepmann, J. Ilja; Tsapatsis, Michael

    2017-03-01

    A zeolite with structure type MFI is an aluminosilicate or silicate material that has a three-dimensionally connected pore network, which enables molecular recognition in the size range 0.5-0.6 nm. These micropore dimensions are relevant for many valuable chemical intermediates, and therefore MFI-type zeolites are widely used in the chemical industry as selective catalysts or adsorbents. As with all zeolites, strategies to tailor them for specific applications include controlling their crystal size and shape. Nanometre-thick MFI crystals (nanosheets) have been introduced in pillared and self-pillared (intergrown) architectures, offering improved mass-transfer characteristics for certain adsorption and catalysis applications. Moreover, single (non-intergrown and non-layered) nanosheets have been used to prepare thin membranes that could be used to improve the energy efficiency of separation processes. However, until now, single MFI nanosheets have been prepared using a multi-step approach based on the exfoliation of layered MFI, followed by centrifugation to remove non-exfoliated particles. This top-down method is time-consuming, costly and low-yield and it produces fragmented nanosheets with submicrometre lateral dimensions. Alternatively, direct (bottom-up) synthesis could produce high-aspect-ratio zeolite nanosheets, with improved yield and at lower cost. Here we use a nanocrystal-seeded growth method triggered by a single rotational intergrowth to synthesize high-aspect-ratio MFI nanosheets with a thickness of 5 nanometres (2.5 unit cells). These high-aspect-ratio nanosheets allow the fabrication of thin and defect-free coatings that effectively cover porous substrates. These coatings can be intergrown to produce high-flux and ultra-selective MFI membranes that compare favourably with other MFI membranes prepared from existing MFI materials (such as exfoliated nanosheets or nanocrystals).

  20. High rates of energy expenditure and water flux in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, D.E.; Kofahl, N.; Fellers, G.D.; Gates, N.B.; Houser, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    We measured water flux and energy expenditure in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea by using the doubly labeled water method. Previous laboratory investigations have suggested weak urinary concentrating ability, high rates of water flux, and low basal metabolic rates in this species. However, free-ranging measurements from hygric mammals are rare, and it is not known how these features interact in the environment. Rates of water flux (210 ?? 32 mL d-1) and field metabolic rates (1,488 ?? 486 kJ d-1) were 159% and 265%, respectively, of values predicted by allometric equations for similar-sized herbivores. Mountain beavers can likely meet their water needs through metabolic water production and preformed water in food and thus remain in water balance without access to free water. Arginine-vasopressin levels were strongly correlated with rates of water flux and plasma urea : creatinine ratios, suggesting an important role for this hormone in regulating urinary water loss in mountain beavers. High field metabolic rates may result from cool burrow temperatures that are well below lower critical temperatures measured in previous laboratory studies and suggest that thermoregulation costs may strongly influence field energetics and water flux in semifossorial mammals. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  1. Performance of smooth and micro-fin tubes in high mass flux region of R-134a during evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsa-ngam, Jittraporn; Nualboonrueng, Thipjak; Wongwises, Somchai

    . The two-phase heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop during evaporation of pure R-134a in smooth and micro-fin tubes are experimentally investigated. Different from most previous studies, the present experiments have been performed at high mass flux conditions. The test section is a 2.5 m long counterflow horizontal double tube heat exchanger with refrigerant flow inside the tube while hot water flows in the annulas. The inner tubes are made from smooth or micro-fin horizontal copper tubing of 9.52 mm outer diameter. The test runs are done at average saturated evaporating temperatures ranging between 10 and 20 °C. The mass fluxes are between 400 and 800 kg/m2s. The experimental results of both smooth and micro-fin tubes show that the average heat transfer coefficient tends to increase with an increase of average quality, mass flux, and evaporating temperature. The pressure drop increases with an increase of average quality and mass flux, but tends to slightly decrease with a rise of evaporating temperature. The average heat transfer coefficient of the 9.52 mm OD micro-fin tube is 50% to 100% higher than that of the 9.52 mm OD smooth tube while the pressure drop is 10% to 60% higher. New correlations for the evaporation heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop in high mass flux region of R-134a are proposed for practical use.

  2. Diurnal cycle of methane flux from a lake, with high emissions during nighttime caused by convection in the water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgrajsek, E.; Sahlee, E.; Rutgersson, A.

    2012-12-01

    Many studies have stressed the importance of lakes as major contributors of methane to the atmosphere (e.g. Bastviken et al 2011). However there is still a lack of continuous long time flux measurements over lakes as well as poor understanding of the magnitude of methane fluxes through ebullition and vegetation pathways. In this study the Eddy covariance method has been used for measuring methane fluxes from a lake in central Sweden. At several occasions during the long time measuring campaign (autumn 2010-autumn 2012), a diurnal cycle of methane, with high fluxes during night and low during day, has been captured. Some of the high flux events during nighttime were comparable in magnitude to what previously only been measured from vegetation regions in lakes at these latitudes (e.g. Kankaala et al 2004) and from tropical reservoirs (e.g. Bastviken 2009). During these occasions the difference between air and water temperature (ΔT=Ta-Tw) also displayed an diurnal cycle, with ΔT being positive during day and negative during night with the corresponding change in the sensible heat flux i.e. negative during daytime and positive during nighttime. The high nighttime methane fluxes could be explained with this difference in air and water temperature, which will cool the water surface during night, creating convective mixing in the lake, while during daytime the water will be stably stratified. Temperature measurements made at different vertical levels in the lake water confirm this water stratification. The nighttime convective mixing may act to disturb the bottom water, triggering methane ebullition events and bringing methane rich water up to the surface, which can be emitted to the atmosphere. With this study we want to emphasis the necessity of introducing also complex physical processes when estimating air-water exchange fluxes and also measure methane fluxes not only at few occasions during daytime but also during night and for longer measuring periods. References

  3. Surface Catalysis and Oxidation on Stagnation Point Heat Flux Measurements in High Enthalpy Arc Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Driver, David M.; Terrazas-Salinas

    2013-01-01

    Heat flux sensors are routinely used in arc jet facilities to determine heat transfer rates from plasma plume. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of surface composition changes on these heat flux sensors. Surface compositions can change due to oxidation and material deposition from the arc jet. Systematic surface analyses of the sensors were conducted before and after exposure to plasma. Currently copper is commonly used as surface material. Other surface materials were studied including nickel, constantan gold, platinum and silicon dioxide. The surfaces were exposed to plasma between 0.3 seconds and 3 seconds. Surface changes due to oxidation as well as copper deposition from the arc jets were observed. Results from changes in measured heat flux as a function of surface catalycity is given, along with a first assessment of enthalpy for these measurements. The use of cupric oxide is recommended for future heat flux measurements, due to its consistent surface composition arc jets.

  4. Simulation of high-energy radiation belt electron fluxes using NARMAX-VERB coupled codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhotin, I P; Drozdov, A Y; Shprits, Y Y; Boynton, R J; Subbotin, D A; Balikhin, M A

    2014-10-01

    This study presents a fusion of data-driven and physics-driven methodologies of energetic electron flux forecasting in the outer radiation belt. Data-driven NARMAX (Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Averages with eXogenous inputs) model predictions for geosynchronous orbit fluxes have been used as an outer boundary condition to drive the physics-based Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, to simulate energetic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt environment. The coupled system has been tested for three extended time periods totalling several weeks of observations. The time periods involved periods of quiet, moderate, and strong geomagnetic activity and captured a range of dynamics typical of the radiation belts. The model has successfully simulated energetic electron fluxes for various magnetospheric conditions. Physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the discrepancies between the model results and observations are discussed.

  5. Industrialization of nanocrystalline Fe–Si–B–P–Cu alloys for high magnetic flux density cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takenaka, Kana, E-mail: k-takenaka@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Research and Development Center for Ultra High Efficiency Nano-crystalline Soft Magnetic Materials, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Setyawan, Albertus D.; Sharma, Parmanand; Nishiyama, Nobuyuki [Research and Development Center for Ultra High Efficiency Nano-crystalline Soft Magnetic Materials, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Makino, Akihiro [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2016-03-01

    Nanocrystalline Fe–Si–B–P–Cu alloys exhibit high saturation magnetic flux density (B{sub s}) and extremely low magnetic core loss (W), simultaneously. Low amorphous-forming ability of these alloys hinders their application potential in power transformers and motors. Here we report a solution to this problem. Minor addition of C is found to be effective in increasing the amorphous-forming ability of Fe–Si–B–P–Cu alloys. It allows fabrication of 120 mm wide ribbons (which was limited to less than 40 mm) without noticeable degradation in magnetic properties. The nanocrystalline (Fe{sub 85.7}Si{sub 0.5}B{sub 9.5}P{sub 3.5}Cu{sub 0.8}){sub 99}C{sub 1} ribbons exhibit low coercivity (H{sub c})~4.5 A/m, high B{sub s}~1.83 T and low W~0.27 W/kg (@ 1.5 T and 50 Hz). Success in fabrication of long (60–100 m) and wide (~120 mm) ribbons, which are made up of low cost elements is promising for mass production of energy efficient high power transformers and motors - Highlights: • Minor addition of C in FeSiBPCu alloy increases amorphous-forming ability. • The FeSiBPCuC alloy exhibits B{sub s} close to Si-steel and Core loss lower than it. • Excellent soft magnetic properties were obtained for 120 mm wide ribbons. • Nanocrystalline FeSiBPCuC alloy can be produced at industrial scale with low cost. • The alloy is suitable for making low energy loss power transformers and motors.

  6. Investigating the suitability of GaAs:Cr material for high flux X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, M. C.; Bell, S. J.; Duarte, D. D.; French, M. J.; Hart, M.; Schneider, A.; Seller, P.; Wilson, M. D.; Kachkanov, V.; Lozinskaya, A. D.; Novikov, V. A.; Tolbanov, O. P.; Tyazhev, A.; Zarubin, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    Semi-insulating wafers of GaAs material with a thickness of 500μm have been compensated with chromium by Tomsk State University. Initial measurements have shown the material to have high resistivity (3 × 109Ωcm) and tests with pixel detectors on a 250 μm pitch produced uniform spectroscopic performance across an 80 × 80 pixel array. At present, there is a lack of detectors that are capable of operating at high X-ray fluxes (> 108 photons s-1 mm-2) in the energy range 5-50 keV. Under these conditions, the poor stopping power of silicon, as well as issues with radiation hardness, severely degrade the performance of traditional detectors. While high-Z materials such as CdTe and CdZnTe may have much greater stopping power, the formation of space charge within these detectors degrades detector performance. Initial measurements made with GaAs:Cr detectors suggest that many of its material properties make it suitable for these challenging conditions. In this paper the radiation hardness of the GaAs:Cr material has been measured on the B16 beam line at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron. Small pixel detectors were bonded to the STFC Hexitec ASIC and were irradiated with 3 × 108 photons s-1 mm-2 monochromatic 12 keV X-rays up to a maximum dose of 0.6 MGy. Measurements of the spectroscopic performance before and after irradiation have been used to assess the extent of the radiation damage.

  7. Toward an estimation of daily european CO{sub 2} fluxes at high spatial resolution by inversion of atmospheric transport; Vers une estimation des flux de CO{sub 2} journaliers europeens a haute resolution par inversion du transport atmospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carouge, C

    2006-04-15

    distance between pixels, climate and vegetation distribution over Europe. To study the potential of this method, we used synthetic data generated from forward simulations of LMDZt (driven by flux fields generated from the biosphere model ORCHIDEE). We have found that the current network is not dense enough to constrain fluxes at model resolution. However, fluxes that are aggregated spatially over a region of 850 x 850 km in the Western Europe and temporally over 8-10 days compare very well with the ORCHIDEE fluxes. Preliminary inversion results using real data indicate that synoptic variations of estimated fluxes are in phase with the variations of the ORCHIDEE biosphere model flux and the variations observed in atmospheric concentrations. However, the quality of the flux estimates are highly dependant on transport model errors and in particular, on the quality of modelling small scale transport. Moreover, fossil fuel emissions are prescribed in this inverse model and the quality of their distribution is shown to be crucial. Data selection also has a large impact on estimated fluxes. The use of the daytime only data to calculate daily averaged concentrations greatly improves the estimated fluxes by reducing bias inferred from model transport errors. (author)

  8. High-flux cold rubidium atomic beam for strongly-coupled cavity QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Basudev [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Kolkata (India); University of Maryland, MD (United States); Scholten, Michael [University of Maryland, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    This paper presents a setup capable of producing a high-flux continuous beam of cold rubidium atoms for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments in the region of strong coupling. A 2D{sup +} magneto-optical trap (MOT), loaded with rubidium getters in a dry-film-coated vapor cell, fed a secondary moving-molasses MOT (MM-MOT) at a rate greater than 2 x 10{sup 10} atoms/s. The MM-MOT provided a continuous beam with a tunable velocity. This beam was then directed through the waist of a cavity with a length of 280 μm, resulting in a vacuum Rabi splitting of more than ±10 MHz. The presence of a sufficient number of atoms in the cavity mode also enabled splitting in the polarization perpendicular to the input. The cavity was in the strong coupling region, with an atom-photon dipole coupling coefficient g of 7 MHz, a cavity mode decay rate κ of 3 MHz, and a spontaneous emission decay rate γ of 6 MHz.

  9. High-flux solar furnace processing of crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuo, Y. S.; Pitts, J. R.; Menna, P.; Landry, M. D.; Gee, J. M.; Ciszek, T. F.

    1997-02-01

    We studied the processing of crystalline-silicon solar cells using a 10-kW, high-flux solar furnace (HFSF). Major findings of this study include: (1) hydrogenated amorphous silicon films deposited on glass substrates can be converted to microcrystalline silicon by solid-phase crystallization in 5 seconds or less in the HFSF; (2) the presence of concentrated sunlight enhances the diffusion of phosphorus into silicon from a spin-on dopant source; (3) the combination of a porous-silicon surface layer and photo-enhanced impurity diffusion is very effective in gettering impurities from a metallurgical-grade silicon wafer or thin-layer silicon deposited using liquid-phase epitaxy; (4) a 14.1%-efficient crystalline-silicon solar cell with an area of 4.6 cm2 was fabricated using the HFSF for simultaneous diffusion of front n+-p and back p-p+ junctions; and (5) we have shown that the HFSF can be used to texture crystalline-silicon surfaces and to anneal metal contacts printed on a silicon solar cell.

  10. The HB-2D Polarized Neutron Development Beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Lowell; Hamilton, WA; Zhao, JK; Robertson, JL

    2016-09-01

    The Polarized Neutron Development beamline, recently commissioned at the HB-2D position on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides a tool for development and testing of polarizers, polarized neutron devices, and prototyping of polarized neutron techniques. With available monochromators including pyrolytic graphite and polarizing enriched Fe-57 (Si), the instrument has operated at 4.25 and 2.6 Å wavelengths, using crystal, supermirror, or He-3 polarizers and analyzers in various configurations. The Neutron Optics and Development Team has used the beamline for testing of He-3 polarizers for use at other HFIR and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) instruments, as well as a variety of flipper devices. Recently, we have acquired new supermirror polarizers which have improved the instrument performance. The team and collaborators also have continuing demonstration experiments of spin-echo focusing techniques, and plans to conduct polarized diffraction measurements. The beamline is also used to support a growing use of polarization techniques at present and future instruments at SNS and HFIR.

  11. Plasma pressure and particle loss studies in the Pilot-PSI high flux linear plasma generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ješko

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasma detachment in tokamak divertors reduces the particle and power fluxes to the plasma facing components and is essential for successful operation of ITER. The linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI can produce a high density (∼1021 m−3, low temperature (∼1eV plasma which is similar to that expected at the ITER divertor strike-points during the partially detached regime [1]. Given the simple geometry of the device, Pilot-PSI allows to diagnose the plasma beam at multiple axial positions. In this study, the incoherent Thomson scattering (TS diagnostic [2] is exploited to measure the radial plasma Te and ne profiles at two locations of the hydrogen plasma beam: near the plasma source (upstream and 2cm from the target plate. At the target, the TS measurements are supported by an embedded Langmuir probe. These measurements prove the existence of parallel plasma pressure loss as well as particle loss, confirming that physical processes believed to cause detachment in tokamak divertors also hold in Pilot-PSI (ion-neutral friction, volume recombination. It is found that the fractional reduction of the plasma pressure varies between ∼4 and ∼5000, depending strongly on the pressure of the background neutrals. The importance of individual loss channels is discussed.

  12. Results of high heat flux qualification tests of W monoblock components for WEST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Lipa, M.; Missirlian, M.; Richou, M.

    2017-12-01

    One goal of the WEST project (W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) is the manufacturing, quality assessment and operation of ITER-like actively water-cooled divertor plasma facing components made of tungsten. Six W monoblock plasma facing units (PFUs) from different suppliers have been successfully evaluated in the high heat flux test facility GLADIS at IPP. Each PFU is equipped with 35 W monoblocks of an ITER-like geometry. However, the W blocks are made of different tungsten grades and the suppliers applied different bonding techniques between tungsten and the inserted Cu-alloy cooling tubes. The intention of the HHF test campaign was to assess the manufacturing quality of the PFUs on the basis of a statistical analysis of the surface temperature evolution of the individual W monoblocks during thermal loading with 100 cycles at 10 MW m-2. These tests confirm the non-destructive examinations performed by the manufacturer and CEA prior to the installation of the WEST platform, and no defects of the components were detected.

  13. Irradiation of structural materials in contact with lead bismuth eutectic in the high flux reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magielsen, A.J., E-mail: magielsen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Jong, M.; Bakker, T.; Luzginova, N.V.; Mutnuru, R.K.; Ketema, D.J.; Fedorov, A.V. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-08-31

    In the framework of the materials domain DEMETRA in the European Transmutation research and development project EUROTRANS, irradiation experiment IBIS has been performed in the High Flux Reactor in Petten. The objective was to investigate the synergystic effects of irradiation and lead bismuth eutectic exposure on the mechanical properties of structural materials and welds. In this experiment ferritic martensitic 9 Cr steel, austenitic 316L stainless steel and their welds have been irradiated for 250 Full Power Days up to a dose level of 2 dpa. Irradiation temperatures have been kept constant at 300 deg. C and 500 deg. C. During the post-irradiation test phase, tensile tests performed on the specimens irradiated at 300 deg. C have shown that the irradiation hardening of ferritic martensitic 9 Cr steel at 1.3 dpa is 254 MPa, which is in line with the irradiation hardening obtained for ferritic martensitic Eurofer97 steel investigated in the fusion program. This result indicates that no LBE interaction at this irradiation temperature is present. A visual inspection is performed on the specimens irradiated in contact with LBE at 500 deg. C and have shown blackening on the surface of the specimens and remains of LBE that makes a special cleaning procedure necessary before post-irradiation mechanical testing.

  14. Leaf day respiration: low CO2 flux but high significance for metabolism and carbon balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcherkez, Guillaume; Gauthier, Paul; Buckley, Thomas N; Busch, Florian A; Barbour, Margaret M; Bruhn, Dan; Heskel, Mary A; Gong, Xiao Ying; Crous, Kristine Y; Griffin, Kevin; Way, Danielle; Turnbull, Matthew; Adams, Mark A; Atkin, Owen K; Farquhar, Graham D; Cornic, Gabriel

    2017-12-01

    Contents 986 I. 987 II. 987 III. 988 IV. 991 V. 992 VI. 995 VII. 997 VIII. 998 References 998 SUMMARY: It has been 75 yr since leaf respiratory metabolism in the light (day respiration) was identified as a low-flux metabolic pathway that accompanies photosynthesis. In principle, it provides carbon backbones for nitrogen assimilation and evolves CO2 and thus impacts on plant carbon and nitrogen balances. However, for a long time, uncertainties have remained as to whether techniques used to measure day respiratory efflux were valid and whether day respiration responded to environmental gaseous conditions. In the past few years, significant advances have been made using carbon isotopes, 'omics' analyses and surveys of respiration rates in mesocosms or ecosystems. There is substantial evidence that day respiration should be viewed as a highly dynamic metabolic pathway that interacts with photosynthesis and photorespiration and responds to atmospheric CO2 mole fraction. The view of leaf day respiration as a constant and/or negligible parameter of net carbon exchange is now outdated and it should now be regarded as a central actor of plant carbon-use efficiency. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Koyanagi, Takaaki [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Cetiner, Nesrin [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel [ORNL

    2014-09-01

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  16. Effects of diffuse radiation on carbon and water fluxes of a high latitude temperate deciduous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Ibrom, Andreas; Pilegaard, Kim; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Garcia, Monica

    2017-04-01

    Ecosystem carbon and water fluxes are controlled by the interplay of biophysical factors such as solar radiation, temperature and soil moisture. In high latitudes, cloudy days are prevalent with a low amount of solar radiation and a higher proportion of diffuse radiation. For instance, in Denmark 90% of all days are non-clear (fraction of direct radiation temperate deciduous forest using long term eddy covariance observations. Eddy covariance records (Gross Primary Productivity: GPP; Evapotranspiration: ET) from 2002 to 2012, field data, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and sap flow data during the period of 2009-2011 at Sorø, a Danish beech forest flux site, were used for analysis. A Cloudiness Index (CI), which is based on actual and potential shortwave incoming radiation and can indicate the proportion of diffuse radiation, was used. First, multiple regression based path analysis was applied to daily and monthly observations to partition direct and indirect effects from CI to GPP and ET. Results indicate diffuse radiation increases the light use efficiency (LUE) with CI being as important as other constraints, e.g. air temperature (Tair), vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR), on regulating LUE. An increase of the CI value of 0.1 can increase maximum LUE by about 0.286 gC•MJ-1. Following PAR and LAI, CI has the third largest effects on GPP. For ET, path analysis showed the impact of CI is limited. Further, the CI constraint was added to two physiologically based models for estimating GPP (LUE, Potter et al., 1993) and ET (Priestley-Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory, PT-JPL, Fisher et al., 2008) at the daily time scale to assess model improvement. When considering the effect of diffuse radiation by including the CI constraint, the RMSE of the simulated GPP decreases from 2.12 to 1.42 gC•day-1. The performance of PT-JPL improves slightly with RMSE

  17. Constant Flux of Spatial Niche Partitioning through High-Resolution Sampling of Magnetotactic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kuang; Gilder, Stuart A; Orsi, William D; Zhao, Xiangyu; Petersen, Nikolai

    2017-10-15

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) swim along magnetic field lines in water. They are found in aquatic habitats throughout the world, yet knowledge of their spatial and temporal distribution remains limited. To help remedy this, we took MTB-bearing sediment from a natural pond, mixed the thoroughly homogenized sediment into two replicate aquaria, and then counted three dominant MTB morphotypes (coccus, spirillum, and rod-shaped MTB cells) at a high spatiotemporal sampling resolution: 36 discrete points in replicate aquaria were sampled every ∼30 days over 198 days. Population centers of the MTB coccus and MTB spirillum morphotypes moved in continual flux, yet they consistently inhabited separate locations, displaying significant anticorrelation. Rod-shaped MTB were initially concentrated toward the northern end of the aquaria, but at the end of the experiment, they were most densely populated toward the south. The finding that the total number of MTB cells increased over time during the experiment argues that population reorganization arose from relative changes in cell division and death and not from migration. The maximum net growth rates were 10, 3, and 1 doublings day -1 and average net growth rates were 0.24, 0.11, and 0.02 doublings day -1 for MTB cocci, MTB spirilla, and rod-shaped MTB, respectively; minimum growth rates for all three morphotypes were -0.03 doublings day -1 Our results suggest that MTB cocci and MTB spirilla occupy distinctly different niches: their horizontal positioning in sediment is anticorrelated and under constant flux. IMPORTANCE Little is known about the horizontal distribution of magnetotactic bacteria in sediment or how the distribution changes over time. We therefore measured three dominant magnetotactic bacterium morphotypes at 36 places in two replicate aquaria each month for 7 months. We found that the spatial positioning of population centers changed over time and that the two most abundant morphotypes (MTB cocci and MTB spirilla

  18. Brookhaven National Laboratory 2008 Site Environment Report Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2009-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the full report.

  19. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) conducted April 6 through 17, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with BNL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at BNL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the BNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the BNL Survey. 80 refs., 24 figs., 48 tabs.

  20. CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVIS, M.

    2005-04-01

    The Cultural Resource Management Plan (CRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides an organized guide that describes or references all facets and interrelationships of cultural resources at BNL. This document specifically follows, where applicable, the format of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management Plans, DOE G 450.1-3 (9-22-04[m1]). Management strategies included within this CRMP are designed to adequately identify the cultural resources that BNL and DOE consider significant and to acknowledge associated management actions. A principal objective of the CRMP is to reduce the need for additional regulatory documents and to serve as the basis for a formal agreement between the DOE and the New York State Historic Preservation Officer (NYSHPO). The BNL CRMP is designed to be a ''living document.'' Each section includes identified gaps in the management plan, with proposed goals and actions for addressing each gap. The plan will be periodically revised to incorporate new documentation.

  1. Tiger Team assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York, between March 26 and April 27, 1990. The BNL is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the Associated Universities, Inc., (AUI) for DOE. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at the Laboratory. The scope of the assessment included a review of management systems and operating procedures and records; observations of facility operations; and interviews at the facilities. Subteams in four areas performed the review: ES H, Occupational Safety and Health, and Management and Organization. The assessment was comprehensive, covering all areas of ES H activities and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; and internal BNL requirements was assessed. In addition, the assessment included an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractor, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), management, organization, and administration of the ES H programs at BNL.

  2. Tiger Team assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York, between March 26 and April 27, 1990. The BNL is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the Associated Universities, Inc., (AUI) for DOE. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at the laboratory. The scope of the assessment included a review of management systems and operating procedures and records; observations of facility operations; and interviews at the facilities. Subteams in four areas performed the review: ES H, Occupational Safety and Health, and Management and Organization. The assessment was comprehensive, covering all areas of ES H activities and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; and internal BNL requirements was assessed. In addition, the assessment included an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractor, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), management, organization, and administration of the ES H programs at BNL. This volume contains appendices.

  3. US-Japan workshop Q-181 on high heat flux components and plasma-surface interactions for next devices: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, R.T. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yamashina, T. [ed.] [Hokkadio Univ. (Japan)

    1994-04-01

    This report contain viewgraphs of papers from the following sessions: plasma facing components issues for future machines; recent PMI results from several tokamaks; high heat flux technology; plasma facing components design and applications; plasma facing component materials and irradiation damage; boundary layer plasma; plasma disruptions; conditioning and tritium; and erosion/redeposition.

  4. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coating During Interrupted High-Heat Flux Laser Testing Using Upconversion Luminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Upconversion luminescence imaging of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been shown to successfully monitor TBC delamination progression during interrupted furnace cycling. However, furnace cycling does not adequately model engine conditions where TBC-coated components are subjected to significant heat fluxes that produce through-thickness temperature gradients that may alter both the rate and path of delamination progression. Therefore, new measurements are presented based on luminescence imaging of TBC-coated specimens subjected to interrupted high-heat-flux laser cycling exposures that much better simulate the thermal gradients present in engine conditions. The TBCs tested were deposited by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and were composed of 7wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) with an integrated delamination sensing layer composed of 7YSZ co-doped with erbium and ytterbium (7YSZ:Er,Yb). The high-heat-flux exposures that produce the desired through-thickness thermal gradients were performed using a high power CO2 laser operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns. Upconversion luminescence images revealed the debond progression produced by the cyclic high-heat-flux exposures and these results were compared to that observed for furnace cycling.

  5. Job/task analysis for I C (Instrumentation and Controls) instrument technicians at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duke, L.L.

    1989-09-01

    To comply with Department of Energy Order 5480.XX (Draft), a job/task analysis was initiated by the Maintenance Management Department at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The analysis was applicable to instrument technicians working at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This document presents the procedures and results of that analysis. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Depth profiling of the modification induced by high-flux deuterium plasma in tungsten and tungsten–tantalum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zayachuk, Y.; Manhard, A.; Hoen, M. H. J. 't; Jacob, W.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Van Oost, G.

    2014-01-01

    The present work reports the results of an experimental study of the depth distribution and fluence dependence of deuterium plasma-induced material modification of tungsten and tungsten–tantalum alloys. Plasma-induced damage was created by exposure to high-flux deuterium plasma in the plasma

  7. Turbulent fluxes of momentum and heat over land in the High-Arctic summer: the influence of observation techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sjöblom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Different observation techniques for atmospheric turbulent fluxes of momentum and sensible heat were tested in a High-Arctic valley in Svalbard during two consecutive summers (June–August in 2010 and 2011. The gradient method (GM and the bulk method (BM have been compared to the more direct eddy covariance method (ECM in order to evaluate if relatively robust and cheap instrumentation with low power consumption can be used as a means to increase the number of observations, especially at remote locations where instruments need to be left unattended for extended periods. Such campaigns increase knowledge about the snow-free surface exchange processes, an area which is relatively little investigated compared to snow-covered ground. The GM agreed closely to the ECM, especially for momentum flux where the two methods agree within 5%. For sensible heat flux, the GM produces, on average, approximately 40% lower values for unstable stratification and 67% lower for stable stratification. However, this corresponds to only 20 and 12 W m−2, respectively. The BM, however, shows a greater scatter and larger differences for both parameters. In addition to testing these methods, radiation properties were measured and the surface albedo was found to increase through the summer, from approximately 0.1 to 0.2. The surface energy budget shows that the sensible heat flux is usually directed upwards for the whole summer, while the latent heat flux is upwards in June, but becomes downward in July and August.

  8. Influence Of Bedrock Geology On Elemental Fluxes In Two Forested Catchments Affected By High Acidic Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krám, P.; Hruška, J.

    1994-02-01

    Water samples have been collected from two forested catchments in the Slavkovsky les Mountains of western Bohemia, in the Czech Republic. The objective of the study was to compare and contrast elemental fluxes in two catchments with similar conditions of climate, topography, vegetation over and acidic atmospheric deposition, but very different bedrock geology. The Lysina catchment is underlain by slow-weathering leucocratic granite. Soils are podzolized brown earths and peaty gleys with small pools of exchangeable basic cations. Both soils and drainage water at Lysina are acidified by atmospheric deposition. Surface runoff was found to be dominated by sulphate and dissolved silica, accompanied by high concentrations of H+ (volume weighted pH = 3.87). Stream water also displayed extremely high concentrations of total aluminum (volume-weighted mean 66 μmol.l-1). Inorganic monomeric aluminum was the predominant aluminum fraction present, which contained mainly aquo-Al (Al3+ and fluoride complexes. The Pluhuv Bor catchment is characterized by ultramafic serpentinite and, in contrast to Lysina, soil and drainage waters have higher concentration of basic cations. Streamwater chemistry was dominated by magnesium, sulphate and silica. Stream-water at the site was not acidic (volume weighted pH = 7.25). The ratio of output/input of sulphate was similar at both catchments (1.16 for granite site and 1.07 for the serpentinite site). This pattern may be indicative of the conservative behaviour of sulphate in very different soil and bedrock environments under elevated loadings of acidic deposition.

  9. Modeling and Simulations for the High Flux Isotope Reactor Cycle 400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); Chandler, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); Ade, Brian J [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); Sunny, Eva E [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); Betzler, Benjamin R [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); Pinkston, Daniel [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    2015-03-01

    A concerted effort over the past few years has been focused on enhancing the core model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), as part of a comprehensive study for HFIR conversion from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. At this time, the core model used to perform analyses in support of HFIR operation is an MCNP model for the beginning of Cycle 400, which was documented in detail in a 2005 technical report. A HFIR core depletion model that is based on current state-of-the-art methods and nuclear data was needed to serve as reference for the design of an LEU fuel for HFIR. The recent enhancements in modeling and simulations for HFIR that are discussed in the present report include: (1) revision of the 2005 MCNP model for the beginning of Cycle 400 to improve the modeling data and assumptions as necessary based on appropriate primary reference sources HFIR drawings and reports; (2) improvement of the fuel region model, including an explicit representation for the involute fuel plate geometry that is characteristic to HFIR fuel; and (3) revision of the Monte Carlo-based depletion model for HFIR in use since 2009 but never documented in detail, with the development of a new depletion model for the HFIR explicit fuel plate representation. The new HFIR models for Cycle 400 are used to determine various metrics of relevance to reactor performance and safety assessments. The calculated metrics are compared, where possible, with measurement data from preconstruction critical experiments at HFIR, data included in the current HFIR safety analysis report, and/or data from previous calculations performed with different methods or codes. The results of the analyses show that the models presented in this report provide a robust and reliable basis for HFIR analyses.

  10. Particulate generation during disruption simulation on the SIRENS high heat flux facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, John Phillip

    2000-12-01

    Successful implementation of advanced electrical power generation technology into the global marketplace requires at least two fundamental ideals: cost effectiveness and the guarantee of public safety. One general area of concern for fusion devices is the production of particulate, often referred to as dust or aerosol, from material exposed to high energy density fusion plasma. This dust may be radiologically activated and/or chemically toxic, and, if released to the environment, could become a hazard to the public. The goal of this investigation was to provide insight into the production and transport of particulate generated during the event of extreme heat loads to surfaces directly exposed to high energy density plasma. A step towards achieving this goal was an experiment campaign carried out with the S&barbelow;urface I&barbelow;nteṞaction E&barbelow;xperiment at Ṉorth Carolina S&barbelow;tate (SIRENS), a facility used for high heat flux experiments. These experiments involved exposing various materials, including copper, stainless steel 316, tungsten, aluminum, graphite (carbon), and mixtures of carbon and metals, to the high energy density plasma of the SIRENS source section. Comparison of simulation results with experiment observations provides an understanding of the physical mechanisms forming the particulate and indicates if mechanisms other than those in the model were present in the experiment. Key results from this comparison were: the predicted amount of mass mobilized from the source section was generally much lower than that measured, the calculated and measured particle count median diameters were similar at various locations in the expansion chamber, and the measured standard deviations were larger than those predicted by the model. These results implicate that other mechanisms (e.g., mobilization of melted material) in addition to ablation were responsible for mass removal in the source section, a large number of the measured particles were

  11. Analysis of Voyager Observed High-Energy Electron Fluxes in the Heliosheath Using MHD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washimi, Haruichi; Webber, W. R.; Zank, Gary P.; Hu, Qiang; Florinski, Vladimir; Adams, James; Kubo, Yuki

    2011-01-01

    The Voyager spacecraft (V1 and V2) observed electrons of 6-14 MeV in the heliosheath which showed several incidences of flux variation relative to a background of gradually increasing flux with distance from the Sun. The increasing flux of background electrons is thought to result from inward radial diffusion. We compare the temporal electron flux variation with dynamical phenomena in the heliosheath that are obtained from our MHD simulations. Because our simulation is based on V2 observed plasma data before V2 crossed the termination shock, this analysis is effective up to late 2008, i.e., about a year after the V2-crossing, during which disturbances, driven prior to the crossing time, survived in the heliosheath. Several electron flux variations correspond to times directly associated with interplanetary shock events. One noteworthy example corresponds to various times associated with the March 2006 interplanetary shock, these being the collision with the termination shock, the passage past the V1 spacecraft, and the collision with the region near the heliopause, as identified by W.R. Webber et al. for proton/helium of 7-200 MeV. Our simulations indicate that all other electron flux variations, except one, correspond well to the times when a shock-driven magneto-sonic pulse and its reflection in the heliosheath either passed across V1/V2, or collided with the termination shock or with the plasma sheet near the heliopause. This result suggests that variation in the electron flux should be due to either direct or indirect effects of magnetosonic pulses in the heliosheath driven by interplanetary shocks

  12. Effect of high flux hemodialysis on plasma toxin molecule contents and body’s microinflammatory state in patients with uremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Nan We

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of high flux hemodialysis on plasma toxin molecule contents and body’s microinflammatory state in patients with uremia. Methods: A total of 96 cases of patients with uremia receiving inpatient dialysis in our hospital from June 2011 to March 2015 were selected as research subjects and randomly divided into observation group and control group, each group with 48 cases. Control group received low flux hemodialysis (LF-HD, observation group received high flux hemodialysis (HF-HD, and then levels of plasma renal function-related toxins, oxidative stress-related toxins, leptin, intact parathyroid hormone and asymmetric dimethylarginine as well as levels of microinflammatory state-related factors of two groups were compared. Results: Plasma BUN, Scr, UA and β2-MG levels of observation group after dialysis were significantly lower than those of control group; plasma MDA and Cor levels of observation group after dialysis were lower than those of control group, and levels of GSH and SOD were higher than those of control group; plasma Leptin, iPTH and ADMA levels of observation group after 1 time and 5 times of dialysis were significantly lower than those of control group; plasma hs-CRP, IL-6, TNF-α and ASAA levels of observation group after dialysis were significantly lower than those of control group. Conclusion: High flux hemodialysis for patients with uremia can effectively eliminate related toxins in the body and reduce systemic microinflammatory state, and it has active clinical significance.

  13. Methane fluxes in the high northern latitudes for 2005-2013 estimated using a Bayesian atmospheric inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Rona L.; Sasakawa, Motoki; Machida, Toshinobu; Aalto, Tuula; Worthy, Doug; Lavric, Jost V.; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    We present methane (CH4) flux estimates for 2005 to 2013 from a Bayesian inversion focusing on the high northern latitudes (north of 50° N). Our inversion is based on atmospheric transport modelled by the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART and CH4 observations from 17 in situ and five discrete flask-sampling sites distributed over northern North America and Eurasia. CH4 fluxes are determined at monthly temporal resolution and on a variable grid with maximum resolution of 1° × 1°. Our inversion finds a CH4 source from the high northern latitudes of 82 to 84 Tg yr-1, constituting ˜ 15 % of the global total, compared to 64 to 68 Tg yr-1 (˜ 12 %) in the prior estimates. For northern North America, we estimate a mean source of 16.6 to 17.9 Tg yr-1, which is dominated by fluxes in the Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) and western Canada, specifically the province of Alberta. Our estimate for the HBL, of 2.7 to 3.4 Tg yr-1, is close to the prior estimate (which includes wetland fluxes from the land surface model, LPX-Bern) and to other independent inversion estimates. However, our estimate for Alberta, of 5.0 to 5.8 Tg yr-1, is significantly higher than the prior (which also includes anthropogenic sources from the EDGAR-4.2FT2010 inventory). Since the fluxes from this region persist throughout the winter, this may signify that the anthropogenic emissions are underestimated. For northern Eurasia, we find a mean source of 52.2 to 55.5 Tg yr-1, with a strong contribution from fluxes in the Western Siberian Lowlands (WSL) for which we estimate a source of 19.3 to 19.9 Tg yr-1. Over the 9-year inversion period, we find significant year-to-year variations in the fluxes, which in North America, and specifically in the HBL, appear to be driven at least in part by soil temperature, while in the WSL, the variability is more dependent on soil moisture. Moreover, we find significant positive trends in the CH4 fluxes in North America of 0.38 to 0.57 Tg yr-2, and northern

  14. Irradiation of Wrought FeCrAl Tubes in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linton, Kory D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign within the Nuclear Technology Research and Development program of the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is seeking to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactors. Alumina-forming ferritic alloys (e.g., FeCrAl) are one of the leading candidate materials for fuel cladding to replace traditional zirconium alloys because of the superior oxidation resistance of FeCrAl. However, there are still some unresolved questions regarding irradiation effects on the microstructure and mechanical properties of FeCrAl at end-of-life dose levels. In particular, there are concerns related to irradiation-induced embrittlement of FeCrAl alloys due to secondary phase formation. To address this issue, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a new experimental design to irradiate shortened cladding tube specimens with representative 17×17 array pressurized water reactor diameter and thickness in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) under relevant temperatures (300–350°C). Post-irradiation examination will include studies of dimensional change, microstructural changes, and mechanical performance. This report briefly summarizes the capsule design concept and the irradiation test matrix for six rabbit capsules. Each rabbit contains two FeCrAl alloy tube specimens. The specimens include Generation I and Generation II FeCrAl alloys with varying processing conditions, Cr concentrations, and minor alloying elements. The rabbits were successfully assembled, welded, evaluated, and delivered to the HFIR along with a complete quality assurance fabrication package. Pictures of the rabbit assembly process and detailed dimensional inspection of select specimens are included in this report. The rabbits were inserted into HFIR starting in cycle 472 (May 2017).

  15. Simulating High Flux Isotope Reactor Core Thermal-Hydraulics via Interdimensional Model Coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travis, Adam R [ORNL

    2014-05-01

    A coupled interdimensional model is presented for the simulation of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the High Flux Isotope Reactor core at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model consists of two domains a solid involute fuel plate and the surrounding liquid coolant channel. The fuel plate is modeled explicitly in three-dimensions. The coolant channel is approximated as a twodimensional slice oriented perpendicular to the fuel plate s surface. The two dimensionally-inconsistent domains are linked to one another via interdimensional model coupling mechanisms. The coupled model is presented as a simplified alternative to a fully explicit, fully three-dimensional model. Involute geometries were constructed in SolidWorks. Derivations of the involute construction equations are presented. Geometries were then imported into COMSOL Multiphysics for simulation and modeling. Both models are described in detail so as to highlight their respective attributes in the 3D model, the pursuit of an accurate, reliable, and complete solution; in the coupled model, the intent to simplify the modeling domain as much as possible without affecting significant alterations to the solution. The coupled model was created with the goal of permitting larger portions of the reactor core to be modeled at once without a significant sacrifice to solution integrity. As such, particular care is given to validating incorporated model simplifications. To the greatest extent possible, the decrease in solution time as well as computational cost are quantified versus the effects such gains have on the solution quality. A variant of the coupled model which sufficiently balances these three solution characteristics is presented alongside the more comprehensive 3D model for comparison and validation.

  16. Design of Phosphor Thermometry System for Transient High Heat Flux Surface Thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Frankel, Jay I [ORNL; Beshears, David L [EMCO

    2012-01-01

    basis for resolving such problems, it is intended for near-term application using the UTK s high-heat flux laser facility which is presently under development

  17. A Level 1+ Probabilistic Safety Assessment of the High Flux Australian Reactor. Vol 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Industry, Science and Tourism selected PLG, an EQE International Company, to systematically and independently evaluate the safety of the High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR), located at Lucas Heights, New South Wales. PLG performed a comprehensive probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) to quantify the risks posed by operation of HIFAR . The PSA identified possible accident scenarios, estimated their likelihood of occurrence, and assigned each scenario to a consequence category; i.e., end state. The accident scenarios developed included the possible release of radioactive material from irradiated nuclear fuel and of tritium releases from reactor coolant. The study team developed a recommended set of safety criteria against which the results of the PSA may be judged. HIFAR was found to exceed one of the two primary safety objectives and two of the five secondary safety objectives. Reactor coolant leaks, earthquakes, and coolant pump trips were the accident initiators that contributed most to scenarios that could result in fuel overheating. Scenarios initiated by earthquakes were the reason the frequency criterion for the one primary safety objective was exceeded. Overall, the plant safety status has been shown to be generally good with no evidence of major safety-related problems from its operation. One design deficiency associated with the emergency core cooling system was identified that should be corrected as soon as possible. Additionally, several analytical issues have been identified that should be investigated further. The results from these additional investigations should be used to determine whether additional plant and procedural changes are required, or if further evaluations of postulated severe accidents are warranted. Supporting information can be found in Appendix A for the seismic analysis and in the Appendix B for selected other external events refs., 139 tabs., 85 figs. Prepared for Department of Industry, Science and Tourism

  18. Overview of the NASA Glenn Flux Reconstruction Based High-Order Unstructured Grid Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Seth C.; DeBonis, James R.; Huynh, H. T.

    2016-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics code based on the flux reconstruction (FR) method is currently being developed at NASA Glenn Research Center to ultimately provide a large- eddy simulation capability that is both accurate and efficient for complex aeropropulsion flows. The FR approach offers a simple and efficient method that is easy to implement and accurate to an arbitrary order on common grid cell geometries. The governing compressible Navier-Stokes equations are discretized in time using various explicit Runge-Kutta schemes, with the default being the 3-stage/3rd-order strong stability preserving scheme. The code is written in modern Fortran (i.e., Fortran 2008) and parallelization is attained through MPI for execution on distributed-memory high-performance computing systems. An h- refinement study of the isentropic Euler vortex problem is able to empirically demonstrate the capability of the FR method to achieve super-accuracy for inviscid flows. Additionally, the code is applied to the Taylor-Green vortex problem, performing numerous implicit large-eddy simulations across a range of grid resolutions and solution orders. The solution found by a pseudo-spectral code is commonly used as a reference solution to this problem, and the FR code is able to reproduce this solution using approximately the same grid resolution. Finally, an examination of the code's performance demonstrates good parallel scaling, as well as an implementation of the FR method with a computational cost/degree- of-freedom/time-step that is essentially independent of the solution order of accuracy for structured geometries.

  19. Numerical prediction of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer coefficient under high heat fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezo Milada L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics approach to prediction of the heat transfer coefficient for nucleate pool boiling under high heat fluxes. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the atmospheric saturated pool boiling are performed. Mathematical modelling of pool boiling requires a treatment of vapor-liquid two-phase mixture on the macro level, as well as on the micro level, such as bubble growth and departure from the heating surface. Two-phase flow is modelled by the two-fluid model, which consists of the mass, momentum and energy conservation equations for each phase. Interface transfer processes are calculated by the closure laws. Micro level phenomena on the heating surface are modelled with the bubble nucleation site density, the bubble resistance time on the heating wall and with the certain level of randomness in the location of bubble nucleation sites. The developed model was used to determine the heat transfer coefficient and results of numerical simulations are compared with available experimental results and several empirical correlations. A considerable scattering of the predictions of the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient by experimental correlations is observed, while the numerically predicted values are within the range of results calculated by well-known Kutateladze, Mostinski, Kruzhilin and Rohsenow correlations. The presented numerical modeling approach is original regarding both the application of the two-fluid two-phase model for the determination of heat transfer coefficient in pool boiling and the defined boundary conditions at the heated wall surface. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 174014

  20. Low temperature magnetron sputter deposition of polycrystalline silicon thin films using high flux ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbi, Jennifer E.; Abelson, John R.

    2007-03-01

    We demonstrate that the microstructure of polycrystalline silicon thin films depends strongly on the flux of low energy ions that bombard the growth surface during magnetron sputter deposition. The deposition system is equipped with external electromagnetic coils which, through the unbalanced magnetron effect, provide direct control of the ion flux independent of the ion energy. We report the influence of low energy (thin films onto amorphous substrates. We use spectroscopic ellipsometry, Raman scattering, x-ray diffraction, and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy to analyze the film microstructure. We demonstrate that increasing the flux ratio of Ar+ ions to silicon neutrals (J+/J0) during growth by an order of magnitude (from 3 to 30) enables the direct nucleation of polycrystalline Si on glass and SiO2 coated Si at temperatures below 400°C. We discuss possible mechanisms for this enhancement of crystalline microstructure, including the roles of enhanced adatom mobility and the formation of shallow, mobile defects.

  1. BESTIA (Brookhaven Experimental Supra-Terawatt Infrared at ATF) laser: A status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.; Babzien, Marcus; Pogorelsky, Igor V.

    2017-03-01

    Development of a next-generation CO2 laser aiming at 100 TW peak power at a wavelength of 10 µm ts underway at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A new laser facility is being deployed as part of the ATF-II upgrade. New high-pressure power amplifiers are being fabricated and assembled, while R&D continues with ATF's present 2 TW CO2 laser system. Our plan for increasing the peak laser power envisions several discrete steps in the upgrade. First will be demonstration of a 10 TW capability utilizing chirped pulse amplification, with an extended power amplifier chain filled with high-pressure isotopic gas. Further development aimed at a demonstration of 25 TW operation will require the addition of a nonlinear compressor system to shrink the pulse width below the nominal gain-bandwidth limit. These upgrades will then enable a longer-term R&D effort to achieve the 100 TW goal. Over the last two years, significant R&D effort has been focused on the development of chirped-pulse amplification, the study of the behavior of optical materials under the action of high-peak-power mid-IR pulses, and the optimization of the beam quality, which is required for nonlinear pulse compression. The results of this R&D have been implemented into the ongoing operation of the ATF's CO2 laser and have already benefited our users in their experimental programs.

  2. Fabrication of high flux and antifouling mixed matrix fumarate-alumoxane/PAN membranes via electrospinning for application in membrane bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Golshan; Zinadini, Sirus; Rajabi, Laleh; Dadari, Soheil

    2018-01-01

    The nanofibrous Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) membranes embedded with fumarate-alumoxane (Fum-A) nanoparticles were prepared via electrospinning technique as high flux and antifouling membranes for membrane bioreactor (MBR) applications. The effect of Fum-A nanoparticles on membrane morphology, surface hydrophilicity, pure water flux, effluent turbidity and the antifouling property was investigated. Fum-A is a carboxylate-alumoxane nanoparticle covered by extra hydroxyl and carboxylate groups on its surface. By embedding Fum-A nanoparticles into the spinning solution, the surface hydrophilicity and pure water flux of the resulted membranes were improved. The smooth surface of fibers at the low amount of nanoparticles and the agglomeration of nanoparticles at their high concentration were shown in SEM images of the membranes surface. The energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the prepared Fum-A/PAN membrane confirmed the presence of carboxylate and hydroxyl functional groups of Fum-A nanoparticles on the surface of the Fum-A nanoparticles containing membrane. The results obtained from the filtration of activated sludge suspension revealed that by addition of a low amount of Fum-A nanoparticles, the irreversible fouling was significantly decreased due to the higher hydrophilicity. The Fum-A/PAN membranes showed superior permeate flux and antifouling properties compared to bare electrospun PAN membrane. Finally, 2 wt.% Fum-A/PAN membrane exhibited the highest FRR of 96% and the lowest irreversible fouling of 4% with excellent durability of antifouling property during twenty repeated activated sludge filtrations.

  3. High-accuracy determination of the neutron flux in the new experimental area nTOF-EAR2 at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabate-Gilarte, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Universidad de Sevilla, Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Sevilla (Spain); Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N.; Damone, L.; Belloni, F.; Mastromarco, M.; Tagliente, G.; Variale, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Gunsing, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Diakaki, M.; Papaevangelou, T.; Dupont, E. [Universite Paris-Saclay, CEA Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Zugec, P.; Bosnar, D. [University of Zagreb, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Zagreb (Croatia); Vlachoudis, V.; Aberle, O.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Cardella, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Ferrari, A.; Kadi, Y.; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Montesano, S.; Rubbia, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Chen, Y.H.; Audouin, L.; Tassan-Got, L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/IN2P3 - IPN, Orsay (France); Stamatopoulos, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Tsinganis, A.; Vlastou, R. [National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Athens (Greece); Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Cortes-Giraldo, M.A.; Guerrero, C.; Quesada, J.M. [Universidad de Sevilla, Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Sevilla (Spain); Villacorta, A. [University of Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain); Cosentino, L.; Finocchiaro, P.; Piscopo, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Musumarra, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Universita di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica, Catania (Italy); Andrzejewski, J.; Gawlik, A.; Marganiec, J.; Perkowski, J. [University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Becares, V.; Balibrea, J.; Cano-Ott, D.; Garcia, A.R.; Gonzalez, E.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Bacak, M.; Weiss, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Technische Universitaet Wien, Wien (Austria); Baccomi, R.; Milazzo, P.M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Barros, S.; Ferreira, P.; Goncalves, I.F.; Vaz, P. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Valenta, S. [Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Beinrucker, C.; Goebel, K.; Heftrich, T.; Reifarth, R.; Schmidt, S.; Weigand, M.; Wolf, C. [Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Billowes, J.; Frost, R.J.W.; Ryan, J.A.; Smith, A.G.; Warren, S.; Wright, T. [University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Caamano, M.; Deo, K.; Duran, I.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Paradela, C.; Robles, M.S. [University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Calvino, F.; Casanovas, A.; Riego-Perez, A. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Castelluccio, D.M.; Lo Meo, S. [Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie (ENEA), Bologna (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Cortes, G.; Mengoni, A. [Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie (ENEA), Bologna (Italy); Domingo-Pardo, C.; Tain, J.L. [Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Dressler, R.; Heinitz, S.; Kivel, N.; Maugeri, E.A.; Schumann, D. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villingen (Switzerland); Furman, V.; Sedyshev, P. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Gheorghe, I.; Glodariu, T.; Mirea, M.; Oprea, A. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele (Romania); Goverdovski, A.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk (Russian Federation); Griesmayer, E.; Jericha, E.; Kavrigin, P.; Leeb, H. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Wien (Austria); Harada, H.; Kimura, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai-mura (Japan); Hernandez-Prieto, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (ES); Heyse, J.; Schillebeeckx, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Geel (BE); Jenkins, D.G. [University of York, York (GB); Kaeppeler, F. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (DE); Katabuchi, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (JP); Lederer, C.; Lonsdale, S.J.; Woods, P.J. [University of Edinburgh, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (GB); Licata, M.; Massimi, C.; Vannini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (IT); Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (IT); Mastinu, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Legnaro, Legnaro (IT); Matteucci, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (IT); Universita di Trieste, Dipartimento di Astronomia, Trieste (IT); Mingrone, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (IT); Nolte, R. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (DE); Palomo-Pinto, F.R. [Universidad de Sevilla, Dept. Ingenieria Electronica, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros, Sevilla (ES); Patronis, N. [University of Ioannina, Ioannina (GR); Pavlik, A. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (AT); Porras, J.I. [University of Granada, Granada (ES); Praena, J. [Universidad de Sevilla, Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Sevilla (ES); University of Granada, Granada (ES); Rajeev, K.; Rout, P.C.; Saxena, A.; Suryanarayana, S.V. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai (IN); Rauscher, T. [University of Hertfordshire, Centre for Astrophysics Research, Hatfield (GB); University of Basel, Department of Physics, Basel (CH); Tarifeno-Saldivia, A. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (ES); Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (ES); Ventura, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (IT); Wallner, A. [Australian National University, Canberra (AU)

    2017-10-15

    A new high flux experimental area has recently become operational at the nTOF facility at CERN. This new measuring station, nTOF-EAR2, is placed at the end of a vertical beam line at a distance of approximately 20 m from the spallation target. The characterization of the neutron beam, in terms of flux, spatial profile and resolution function, is of crucial importance for the feasibility study and data analysis of all measurements to be performed in the new area. In this paper, the measurement of the neutron flux, performed with different solid-state and gaseous detection systems, and using three neutron-converting reactions considered standard in different energy regions is reported. The results of the various measurements have been combined, yielding an evaluated neutron energy distribution in a wide energy range, from 2 meV to 100 MeV, with an accuracy ranging from 2%, at low energy, to 6% in the high-energy region. In addition, an absolute normalization of the nTOF-EAR2 neutron flux has been obtained by means of an activation measurement performed with {sup 197}Au foils in the beam. (orig.)

  4. High-accuracy determination of the neutron flux in the new experimental area n_TOF-EAR2 at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N.; Gunsing, F.; Žugec, P.; Vlachoudis, V.; Chen, Y. H.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Villacorta, A.; Guerrero, C.; Damone, L.; Audouin, L.; Berthoumieux, E.; Cosentino, L.; Diakaki, M.; Finocchiaro, P.; Musumarra, A.; Papaevangelou, T.; Piscopo, M.; Tassan-Got, L.; Aberle, O.; Andrzejewski, J.; Bécares, V.; Bacak, M.; Baccomi, R.; Balibrea, J.; Barros, S.; Bečvář, F.; Beinrucker, C.; Belloni, F.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cardella, R.; Casanovas, A.; Castelluccio, D. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortés, G.; Deo, K.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Dupont, E.; Durán, I.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Frost, R. J. W.; Furman, V.; Göbel, K.; García, A. R.; Gawlik, A.; Gheorghe, I.; Glodariu, T.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Harada, H.; Heftrich, T.; Heinitz, S.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Katabuchi, T.; Kavrigin, P.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Licata, M.; Lo Meo, S.; Lonsdale, S. J.; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Matteucci, F.; Maugeri, E. A.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Montesano, S.; Nolte, R.; Oprea, A.; Palomo-Pinto, F. R.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Porras, J. I.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rajeev, K.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Robles, M. S.; Rout, P. C.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Smith, A. G.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weigand, M.; Wolf, C.; Woods, P. J.; Weiss, C.; Wright, T.

    2017-10-01

    A new high flux experimental area has recently become operational at the n_TOF facility at CERN. This new measuring station, n_TOF-EAR2, is placed at the end of a vertical beam line at a distance of approximately 20m from the spallation target. The characterization of the neutron beam, in terms of flux, spatial profile and resolution function, is of crucial importance for the feasibility study and data analysis of all measurements to be performed in the new area. In this paper, the measurement of the neutron flux, performed with different solid-state and gaseous detection systems, and using three neutron-converting reactions considered standard in different energy regions is reported. The results of the various measurements have been combined, yielding an evaluated neutron energy distribution in a wide energy range, from 2meV to 100MeV, with an accuracy ranging from 2%, at low energy, to 6% in the high-energy region. In addition, an absolute normalization of the n_TOF-EAR2 neutron flux has been obtained by means of an activation measurement performed with 197Au foils in the beam.

  5. High geothermal heat flux in close proximity to the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rysgaard, Soren; Bendtsen, Jorgen; Mortensen, John

    2018-01-01

    or geothermal heat sources. Recently it was suggested that there may be a hidden heat source beneath GIS caused by a higher than expected geothermal heat flux (GHF) from the Earth's interior. Here we present the first direct measurements of GHF from beneath a deep fjord basin in Northeast Greenland. Temperature...... and salinity time series (2005-2015) in the deep stagnant basin water are used to quantify a GHF of 93 +/- 21 mW m(-2) which confirm previous indirect estimated values below GIS. A compilation of heat flux recordings from Greenland show the existence of geothermal heat sources beneath GIS and could explain...

  6. NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN,T.ET AL.

    2003-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is located near the geographic center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated on 5,265 acres of land composed of Pine Barrens habitat with a central area developed for Laboratory work. In the mid-1990s BNL began developing a wildlife management program. This program was guided by the Wildlife Management Plan (WMP), which was reviewed and approved by various state and federal agencies in September 1999. The WMP primarily addressed concerns with the protection of New York State threatened, endangered, or species of concern, as well as deer populations, invasive species management, and the revegetation of the area surrounding the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The WMP provided a strong and sound basis for wildlife management and established a basis for forward motion and the development of this document, the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP), which will guide the natural resource management program for BNL. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B respectively), lists of actions in tabular format (Appendix C), and regulatory drivers for the Natural Resource Program (Appendix D). The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and incorporation of community involvement, where applicable.

  7. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A. [eds.

    1994-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at BNL and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1993. To evaluate the effect of BNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, ground water and vegetation were made at the BNL site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory. Brookhaven National Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment were evaluated. Among the permitted facilities, two instances, of pH exceedances were observed at recharge basins, possible related to rain-water run-off to these recharge basins. Also, the discharge from the Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) to the Peconic River exceeded on five occasions, three for residual chlorine and one each for iron and ammonia nitrogen. The chlorine exceedances were related to a malfunctioning hypochlorite dosing pump and ceased when the pump was repaired. While the iron and ammonia-nitrogen could be the result of disturbances to the sand filter beds during maintenance. The environmental monitoring data has identified site-specific contamination of ground water and soil. These areas are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FS) under the Inter Agency Agreement (IAG). Except for the above, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment, and that the environmental impacts at BNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public or to the environment. This report meets the requirements of DOE Orders 5484. 1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

  8. The Brookhaven National Laboratory electron beam ion source for RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, J G; Barton, D; Beebe, E; Bellavia, S; Gould, O; Kponou, A; Lambiase, R; Lockey, R; McNerney, A; Mapes, M; Marneris, Y; Okamura, M; Phillips, D; Pikin, A I; Raparia, D; Ritter, J; Snydstrup, L; Theisen, C; Wilinski, M

    2010-02-01

    As part of a new heavy ion preinjector that will supply beams for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory, construction of a new electron beam ion source (EBIS) is now being completed. This source, based on the successful prototype Brookhaven National Laboratory Test EBIS, is designed to produce milliampere level currents of all ion species, with q/m=(1/6)-(1/2). Among the major components of this source are a 5 T, 2-m-long, 204 mm diameter warm bore superconducting solenoid, an electron gun designed to operate at a nominal current of 10 A, and an electron collector designed to dissipate approximately 300 kW of peak power. Careful attention has been paid to the design of the vacuum system, since a pressure of 10(-10) Torr is required in the trap region. The source includes several differential pumping stages, the trap can be baked to 400 C, and there are non-evaporable getter strips in the trap region. Power supplies include a 15 A, 15 kV electron collector power supply, and fast switchable power supplies for most of the 16 electrodes used for varying the trap potential distribution for ion injection, confinement, and extraction. The EBIS source and all EBIS power supplies sit on an isolated platform, which is pulsed up to a maximum of 100 kV during ion extraction. The EBIS is now fully assembled, and operation will be beginning following final vacuum and power supply tests. Details of the EBIS components are presented.

  9. P2 asymmetry of Au's M-band flux and its smoothing effect due to high-Z ablator dopants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available X-ray drive asymmetry is one of the main seeds of low-mode implosion asymmetry that blocks further improvement of the nuclear performance of “high-foot” experiments on the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004]. More particularly, the P2 asymmetry of Au's M-band flux can also severely influence the implosion performance of ignition capsules [Li et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 072705 (2016]. Here we study the smoothing effect of mid- and/or high-Z dopants in ablator on Au's M-band flux asymmetries, by modeling and comparing the implosion processes of a Ge-doped ignition capsule and a Si-doped one driven by X-ray sources with P2 M-band flux asymmetry. As the results, (1 mid- or high-Z dopants absorb hard X-rays (M-band flux and re-emit isotropically, which helps to smooth the asymmetric M-band flux arriving at the ablation front, therefore reducing the P2 asymmetries of the imploding shell and hot spot; (2 the smoothing effect of Ge-dopant is more remarkable than Si-dopant because its opacity in Au's M-band is higher than the latter's; and (3 placing the doped layer at a larger radius in ablator is more efficient. Applying this effect may not be a main measure to reduce the low-mode implosion asymmetry, but might be of significance in some critical situations such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF experiments very near the performance cliffs of asymmetric X-ray drives.

  10. UH-FLUX: Compact, Energy Efficient Superconducting Asymmetric Energy Recovery LINAC for Ultra-high Fluxes of X-ray and THz Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konoplev, Ivan [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). JAI, Dept. of Physics; Ainsworth, Robert [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Burt, Graeme [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Cockcroft Inst.; Seryi, Andrei [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). JAI, Dept. of Physics

    2016-06-01

    The conventional ERLs have limited peak beam current because increasing the beam charge and repetition rate leads to appearance of the beam break-up instabilities. At this stage the highest current, from the SRF ERL, is around 300 mA. A single-turn (the beam will be transported through the accelerating section, interaction point and deceleration section of the AERL only once) Asymmetric Energy Recovery LINAC (AERL) is proposed. The RF cells in different sections of the cavity are tuned in such a way that only operating mode is uniform inside all of the cells. The AERL will drive the electron beams with typical energies of 10 - 30 MeV and peak currents above 1 A, enabling the generation of high flux UV/X-rays and high power coherent THz radiation. We aim to build a copper prototype of the RF cavity for a compact AERL to study its EM properties. The final goal is to build AERL based on the superconducting RF cavity. Preliminary design for AERL's cavity has been developed and will be presented. The results of numerical and analytical models and the next steps toward the AERL operation will also be discussed.

  11. High flux and antifouling filtration membrane based on non-woven fabric with chitosan coating for membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chanchan; Yang, Fenglin; Meng, Fangang; Zhang, Hanmin; Xue, Yuan; Fu, Gang

    2010-07-01

    To prepare a high flux and antifouling filtration membrane used for submerged membrane bioreactors, non-woven fabric (NWF) was modified by coating chitosan (CS) on both internal and outer surface. Chemical structural and morphological changes were characterized. The changes of surface free energy were monitored by dynamic contact angle, which showed an increase after modification. The CS/NWF composite membranes were found to be with high flux, high effluent quality and excellent antifouling property. The results of fouling resistance distribution indicated that irreversible fouling resistance was decreased by coating CS. Especially, there were fewer gel layers existing on the outer surface. The adsorption of EPS on the NWF membrane internal surface decreased after being coated with CS. Modification improved filtration performance, and made fouling less troublesome and membrane regeneration efficient. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fuel Grading Study on a Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    An engineering design study that would enable the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models used to search for a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion study, and the recent results obtained with these models during FY 2009, are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating high-enriched uranium fuel core. These studies indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations.

  13. Magnetic-flux dynamics of high-Tc superconductors in weak magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Il’ichev, E. V.; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde

    1994-01-01

    , and a radio frequency-superconducting quantum interference device (RF-SQUID) along a common axis. For epitaxial thin films the Meissner effect was established. For a ceramic sample it was found that field changes of order 10(-2) Oe affect the flux distribution inside the sample. The observations can explain...

  14. High sensitivity double relaxation oscillation superconducting quantum interference devices with large transfer from flux to voltage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelerhof, D.J.; Kawai, J.; Uehara, G.; Kado, H. [Electrotechnical Laboratory, 1-1-4 Umezono, Tsukuba 303 (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    Double relaxation oscillation superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) (DROSs) based on Nb/AlO{sub {ital x}} tunnel junctions have been fabricated and characterized. The estimated relaxation frequencies range from 400 MHz up to 14 GHz. Transfer coefficients from flux to voltage of 2 up to 7 mV/{phi}{sub 0} have been obtained. Both the intrinsic flux noise and the performance in a flux-locked loop with direct-voltage readout have been determined. Special attention is paid to the effect of damping resistors on the sensitivity of DROSs. The intrinsic sensitivity improves with increasing relaxation frequency, leveling off to a value of 13{ital h} at relaxation frequencies above 2--3 GHz for SQUID inductances of about 30 pH. This sensitivity is very close to the theoretical maximum sensitivity of 6{ital h} of a comparable standard type dc SQUID. In a flux-locked loop based on direct-voltage readout, a noise level of 0.55 {mu}{phi}{sub 0}/{radical}Hz corresponding to an energy sensitivity of 34{ital h} has been obtained for a DROS with a SQUID inductance of 29 pH. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  15. Deuterium retention in tungsten and tungsten-tantalum alloys exposed to high-flux deuterium plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zayachuk, Y.; Hoen, M. H. J. 't; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Uytdenhouwen, I.; Van Oost, G.

    2012-01-01

    A direct comparison of deuterium retention in samples of tungsten and two grades of tungsten-tantalum alloys-W-1% Ta and W-5% Ta, exposed to deuterium plasmas (ion flux similar to 10(24) m(-2) s(-1), ion energy at the biased target similar to 50 eV) at the plasma generator Pilot-PSI was performed

  16. Microwave testing of high-Tc based direct current to a single flux quantum converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplunenko, V. K.; Fischer, Gerd Michael; Ivanov, Z. G.

    1994-01-01

    Design, simulation, and experimental investigations of a direct current to a single flux quantum converter loaded with a Josephson transmission line and driven by an external 70 GHz microwave oscillator are reported. The test circuit includes nine YBaCuO Josephson junctions aligned on the grain...

  17. High Flux Microchannel Receiver Development with Adap-tive Flow Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drost, Kevin [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2015-08-15

    This project is focused on the demonstration of a microchannel-based solar receiver (MSR). The MSR concept consists of using a modular arrangement of arrayed microchannels to heat a working fluid in a concentrating solar receiver, allowing a much higher solar flux on the receiver and consequently a significant reduction in thermal losses, size, and cost.

  18. Performance of a Cross-Flow Humidifier with a High Flux Water Vapor Transport Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Wang, X.; Johnson, W. B.; Berg, F.; Kadylak, D.

    2015-09-30

    Water vapor transport (WVT) flux across a composite membrane that consists of a very thin perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer layer sandwiched between two expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) microporous layers is investigated. Static and dynamic tests are conducted to measure WVT flux for different composite structures; a transport model shows that the underlying individual resistances for water diffusion in the gas phase and microporous and ionomer layers and for interfacial kinetics of water uptake at the ionomer surface are equally important under different conditions. A finite-difference model is formulated to determine water transport in a full-scale (2-m2 active membrane area) planar cross-flow humidifier module assembled using pleats of the optimized composite membrane. In agreement with the experimental data, the modeled WVT flux in the module increases at higher inlet relative humidity (RH) of the wet stream and at lower pressures, but the mass transfer effectiveness is higher at higher pressures. The model indicates that the WVT flux is highest under conditions that maintain the wet stream at close to 100% RH while preventing the dry stream from becoming saturated. The overall water transport is determined by the gradient in RH of the wet and dry streams but is also affected by vapor diffusion in the gas layer and the microporous layer.

  19. Phosphoglycerate Mutase Is a Highly Efficient Enzyme without Flux Control in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Christian; Petranovic, D.; Købmann, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase (PGM), which catalyzes the conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate to 2-phosphoglycerate, was examined in Lactococcus lactis with respect to its function, kinetics and glycolytic flux control. A library of strains with PGM activities ranging between 15-465% ...

  20. Spontaneous synthesis of carbon nanowalls, nanotubes and nanotips using high flux density plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrov, K.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Arnas, C.; Marot, L.; Mathys, D.; Liu, F.; L.K. Xu,; X.B. Li,; A.V. Shalpegin,; De Temmerman, G.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the formation of various carbon nanostructures using extreme plasma fluxes up to four orders of magnitude larger than in conventional plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition processing. Carbon nanowalls, multi-wall nanotubes, spherical nanoparticles and nanotips are among the

  1. The generation and detection of high flux atomic oxygen for physical vapor deposition thin film growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingle, N.J.C.; Hammond, R.H.; Beasley, M.R.; Blank, David H.A.

    1999-01-01

    The growth of many epitaxial thin-film oxides is significantly enhanced with the use of an oxidizing agent such as atomic oxygen, ozone, or NO2. We developed a flow-through microwave plasma source to generate large atomic oxygen fluxes while maintaining vacuum pressures of less that 1×10¿4 Torr.

  2. Surface morphology and deuterium retention of tungsten after low- and high-flux deuterium plasma exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Hoen, M.H.J.; Balden, M.; Manhard, A.; Mayer, M.; Elgeti, S.; Kleyn, A.W.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    The surface morphology and deuterium retention were investigated of polycrystalline tungsten targets that were exposed to deuterium plasmas at widely varying conditions. By changing only one parameter at a time, the isolated effects of flux, time and pre-damaging on surface modifications and

  3. Radiant heat transfer network in the simulated protective clothing ; System under high heat flux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fukazawa, T.; Hartog, E.A. den; Daanen, H.A.M.; Penders-van Elk, N.; Tochihara, Y.; Havenith, G.

    2005-01-01

    A radiant network model was developed for design of the protective clothing system against solar and infrared radiative heat flux. A one-dimensional model was employed in the present study, because the aim of this study was to obtain precise temperature distribution through the system with use of a

  4. High heat flux testing of ITER ICH&CD antenna beryllium faraday screen bars mock-ups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtois, X., E-mail: xavier.courtois@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Meunier, L. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Kuznetsov, V. [Efremov Institute, FSUE NIIEFA, St. Petersburg, 196641 (Russian Federation); Beaumont, B.; Lamalle, P. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Conchon, D. [ATMOSTAT Co, F-94815 Villejuif (France); Languille, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • ITER ICH&CD antenna beryllium faraday screen bars mock-ups were manufactured. • The mock-ups are submitted to high heat loads to test their heat exhaust capabilities. • The mock-ups withstand without damage the design limit load. • Lifetime is gradually reduced when the heat load is augmented beyond the design limit. • Thermal and mechanical behavior are reproducible, and coherent with the calculation. - Abstract: The Faraday Screen (FS) is the plasma facing component of ITER ion cyclotron heating antennas shielding. The requirement for the high heat exhaust, and the limitation of the temperatures to minimize strain and thus offer sufficient resistance to fatigue, imply the need for high conductivity materials and a high cooling flow rate. The FS bars are constructed by a hipping process involving beryllium tiles, a pure copper layer, a copper chrome zirconium alloy for the cooling channel and a stainless steel backing strip. Two FS bars small scale mock-ups were manufactured and tested under high heat flux. They endured 15,000 heating cycles without degradation under nominal heat flux, and revealed growing flaws when the heat flux was progressively augmented beyond. In this case, the ultrasonic test confirms a strong delamination of the Be tiles.

  5. Methods and applications in high flux neutron imaging; Methoden und Anwendungen fuer bildgebende Verfahren mit hohen Neutronenfluessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballhausen, H.

    2007-02-07

    This treatise develops new methods for high flux neutron radiography and high flux neutron tomography and describes some of their applications in actual experiments. Instead of single images, time series can be acquired with short exposure times due to the available high intensity. To best use the increased amount of information, new estimators are proposed, which extract accurate results from the recorded ensembles, even if the individual piece of data is very noisy and in addition severely affected by systematic errors such as an influence of gamma background radiation. The spatial resolution of neutron radiographies, usually limited by beam divergence and inherent resolution of the scintillator, can be significantly increased by scanning the sample with a pinhole-micro-collimator. This technique circumvents any limitations in present detector design and, due to the available high intensity, could be successfully tested. Imaging with scattered neutrons as opposed to conventional total attenuation based imaging determines separately the absorption and scattering cross sections within the sample. For the first time even coherent angle dependent scattering could be visualized space-resolved. New applications of high flux neutron imaging are presented, such as materials engineering experiments on innovative metal joints, time-resolved tomography on multilayer stacks of fuel cells under operation, and others. A new implementation of an algorithm for the algebraic reconstruction of tomography data executes even in case of missing information, such as limited angle tomography, and returns quantitative reconstructions. The setup of the world-leading high flux radiography and tomography facility at the Institut Laue-Langevin is presented. A comprehensive appendix covers the physical and technical foundations of neutron imaging. (orig.)

  6. Higher-order-mode absorbers for energy recovery linac cryomodules at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hahn

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Several future accelerator projects at Brookhaven for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC are based on energy recovery linacs (ERLs with high-charge high-current electron beams. Their stable operation mandates effective higher-order-mode (HOM damping. The development of HOM dampers for these projects is pursued actively at this laboratory. Strong HOM damping was experimentally demonstrated both at room and at superconducting (SC temperatures in a prototype research and development (R&D five-cell niobium superconducting rf (SRF cavity with ferrite dampers. Two room-temperature mock-up five-cell copper cavities were used to study various damper configurations with emphasis on capacitive antenna dampers. An innovative type of ferrite damper over a ceramic break for an R&D SRF electron gun also was developed. For future SRF linacs longer cryomodules comprised of multiple superconducting cavities with reasonably short intercavity transitions are planned. In such a configuration, the dampers, located closer to the cavities, will be at cryogenic temperatures; this will impose additional constraints and complications. This paper presents the results of simulations and measurements of several damper configurations.

  7. Microgravity experiments on boiling and applications: research activity of advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Koichi; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2004-11-01

    Research and development on advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices has been carried out as the Project of Fundamental Technology Development for Energy Conservation, promoted by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan (NEDO). Based on the microgravity experiments on boiling heat transfer, the following useful results have obtained for the cooling of electronic devices. In subcooled flow boiling in a small channel, heat flux increases considerably more than the ordinary critical heat flux with microbubble emission in transition boiling, and dry out of the heating surface is disturbed. Successful enhancement of heat transfer is achieved by a capillary effect from grooved surface dual subchannels on the liquid supply. The critical heat flux increases 30-40 percent more than for ordinary subchannels. A self-wetting mechanism has been proposed, following investigation of bubble behavior in pool boiling of binary mixtures under microgravity. Ideas and a new concept have been proposed for the design of future cooling system in power electronics.

  8. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  9. 3D GCM modelling of thermospheric nitric oxide during the 2003 Halloween Storm using high resolution solar flux data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbin, A.; Aylward, A.

    Radiative emission by excited nitric oxide NO is an important cooling mechanism in the lower thermosphere Numerical modelling of thermospheric temperatures must therefore include a realistic representation of NO densities At low latitudes the abundance of this key constituent is thought to be is directly related to the flux of solar soft X-ray radiation while at high latitudes NO is affected by the flux of precipitating electrons In the present study the coupled middle atmosphere and thermosphere CMAT general circulation model has been used to simulate the 11-day period from 23rd October to 3rd November 2003 During this time the Earth was subject to highly variable solar irradiance and extremely high levels of geomagnetic activity The 3D model used incorporates a complex ion and neutral chemical scheme including a detailed self consistent calculation of NO production and transport High-resolution solar flux data taken from the SOLAR2000 irradiance model is incorporated along with variable auroral energy inputs Predictions of the global distribution of nitric oxide in the lower thermosphere are presented along with thermospheric temperatures for the storm period

  10. Thermal Safety Analyses for the Production of Plutonium-238 at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurt, Christopher J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Freels, James D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hobbs, Randy W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jain, Prashant K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Maldonado, G. Ivan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-01

    There has been a considerable effort over the previous few years to demonstrate and optimize the production of plutonium-238 (238Pu) at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This effort has involved resources from multiple divisions and facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate the fabrication, irradiation, and chemical processing of targets containing neptunium-237 (237Np) dioxide (NpO2)/aluminum (Al) cermet pellets. A critical preliminary step to irradiation at the HFIR is to demonstrate the safety of the target under irradiation via documented experiment safety analyses. The steady-state thermal safety analyses of the target are simulated in a finite element model with the COMSOL Multiphysics code that determines, among other crucial parameters, the limiting maximum temperature in the target. Safety analysis efforts for this model discussed in the present report include: (1) initial modeling of single and reduced-length pellet capsules in order to generate an experimental knowledge base that incorporate initial non-linear contact heat transfer and fission gas equations, (2) modeling efforts for prototypical designs of partially loaded and fully loaded targets using limited available knowledge of fabrication and irradiation characteristics, and (3) the most recent and comprehensive modeling effort of a fully coupled thermo-mechanical approach over the entire fully loaded target domain incorporating burn-up dependent irradiation behavior and measured target and pellet properties, hereafter referred to as the production model. These models are used to conservatively determine several important steady-state parameters including target stresses and temperatures, the limiting condition of which is the maximum temperature with respect to the melting point. The single pellet model results provide a basis for the safety of the irradiations, followed by parametric analyses in the initial prototypical designs

  11. Methane and nitrous oxide fluxes from four tundra ecotopes in Ny-Ålesund of the High Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingqing; Zhu, Renbin; Wang, Qing; Xu, Hua

    2014-07-01

    During the summers of 2008 and 2009, net methane (CH₄) and nitrous oxide (N₂O) fluxes were investigated from 4 tundra ecotopes: normal lowland tundra (LT), bird sanctuary tundra (BT), the tundra in an abandoned coal mine (CT) and the tundra in scientific bases (ST) in Ny-Ålesund of the High Arctic. Tundra soils in CT (184.5 ± 40.0 μg CH4/(m²·hr)) and ST (367.6 ± 92.3μg CH4/(m²·hr)) showed high CH4 emissions due to the effects of human activities, whereas high CH4 uptake or low emission occurred in the soils of LT and BT. The lowland tundra soils (mean, -4.4-4.3μg N₂O/(m²·hr)) were weak N₂O sources and even sinks. Bird activity increased N₂O emissions from BT with the mean flux of 7.9μgN2O/(m(2)·hr). The mean N₂O fluxes from CT (45.4 ± 10.2 μg N₂O/(m²·hr)) and ST (78.8 ± 18.5μg N₂O/(m²·hr)) were one order of magnitude higher than those from LT and BT, indicating that human activities significantly increased N₂O emissions from tundra soils. Soil total carbon and water regime were important factors affecting CH₄ fluxes from tundra soils. The N₂O fluxes showed a significant positive correlation with ammonia nitrogen (NH₄(+)-N) contents (r=0.66, ptundra soils. The CH4 and N₂O fluxes did not correspond to the temperature variations of soil at 0-15 cm depths. Overall our results implied that human activities might have greater effects on soil CH₄ and N₂O emissions than current climate warming in Ny-Ålesund, High Arctic. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Estimating spatially distributed turbulent heat fluxes from high-resolution thermal imagery acquired with a UAV system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Claire; Thiem, Christina Elisabeth; Wizemann, Hans-Dieter; Bernhardt, Matthias; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-05-19

    In this study, high-resolution thermal imagery acquired with a small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is used to map evapotranspiration (ET) at a grassland site in Luxembourg. The land surface temperature (LST) information from the thermal imagery is the key input to a one-source and two-source energy balance model. While the one-source model treats the surface as a single uniform layer, the two-source model partitions the surface temperature and fluxes into soil and vegetation components. It thus explicitly accounts for the different contributions of both components to surface temperature as well as turbulent flux exchange with the atmosphere. Contrary to the two-source model, the one-source model requires an empirical adjustment parameter in order to account for the effect of the two components. Turbulent heat flux estimates of both modelling approaches are compared to eddy covariance (EC) measurements using the high-resolution input imagery UAVs provide. In this comparison, the effect of different methods for energy balance closure of the EC data on the agreement between modelled and measured fluxes is also analysed. Additionally, the sensitivity of the one-source model to the derivation of the empirical adjustment parameter is tested. Due to the very dry and hot conditions during the experiment, pronounced thermal patterns developed over the grassland site. These patterns result in spatially variable turbulent heat fluxes. The model comparison indicates that both models are able to derive ET estimates that compare well with EC measurements under these conditions. However, the two-source model, with a more complex treatment of the energy and surface temperature partitioning between the soil and vegetation, outperformed the simpler one-source model in estimating sensible and latent heat fluxes. This is consistent with findings from prior studies. For the one-source model, a time-variant expression of the adjustment parameter (to account for the difference between

  13. [Effect of seasonal high temperature and drought on carbon flux of bamboo forest ecosystem in subtropical region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-feng; Jiang, Hong; Niu, Xiao-dong; Zhang, Jin-meng; Liu, Yu-li; Fang, Cheng-yuan

    2016-02-01

    The carbon flux of subtropical bamboo forest ecosystem was continuously measured using eddy covariance technique in Anji County of Zhejiang Province, China. The monthly net ecosystem productivity (NEP), ecosystem respiration (Re) and gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) data from 2011 to 2013 were selected to analyze the impacts of seasonal high temperature and drought on the carbon flux of bamboo forest ecosystem. The results showed that there were big differences among annual NEP of bamboo forest from 2011 to 2013. Because of the asynchronization of precipitation and heat, the seasonal high temperature and drought in July and August of 2013 caused significant decline in NEP by 59.9% and 80.0% when compared with the same months in 2011. Correlation analysis of the NEP, Re, GEP and environmental factors suggested that the atmosphere temperatures were significantly correlated with Re and GEP in 2011 and 2013 (Pecosystem in Anji, from July to August in 2013.

  14. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design with Two-Dimensional Grading for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

    2011-05-01

    An engineering design study of the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models developed during fiscal year 2010 to search for an LEU fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion and the results obtained with these models are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating HEU fuel core. The results obtained indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations under the assumption that the operating power for the reactor fueled with LEU can be increased from the current value of 85 MW to 100 MW.

  15. Insignificant enhancement of export flux in the highly productive subtropical front, east of New Zealand: a high resolution study of particle export fluxes based on 234Th: 238U disequilibria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Hall

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the export fluxes of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC in the Subtropical Frontal zone (STF of the SW Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean. The site is characterized by enhanced primary productivity, which has been suggested to be stimulated through so-called natural iron fertilization processes where iron-depleted subantarctic water (SAW mixes with mesotrophic, iron-replete subtropical water (STW. We adopted the small-volume 234Th method to achieve the highest possible spatial sampling resolution in austral late autumn-early winter, May–June, 2008. Inventories of chlorophyll-a, particulate 234Th and POC observed in the upper 100 m were all elevated in the mid-salinity water type (34.5 34.8 salinity waters which were of STW origin with low macronutrients. However, Steady-State 234Th fluxes were similar across the salinity gradient being, 25 ± 0.78 ((1.5 ± 0.047 × 103 in the mid-salinity, and 29 ± 0.53 ((1.8 ± 0.032 × 103 and 22 ± 1.1 Bq m−2 d−1 ((1.3 ± 0.066 × 103 dpm m−2 d–1 in the high and low salinity waters respectively. Bottle POC/Th ratios at the depth of 100 m were used to convert 234Th fluxes into POC export fluxes. The derived POC flux did not appear to be enhanced in mid-salinity waters where the primary productivity was inferred to be the highest at the time of sampling, with a flux of 11 ± 0.45 mmol C m−2 d−1, compared to 14 ± 0.39 mmol C m−2 d−1 in high salinity waters and 8.5 ± 0.66 mmol C m−2 d−1 in low salinity waters. This study thus implied that natural iron fertilization does not necessarily lead to an enhancement of POC export in STF regions.

  16. Effectiveness of hemodialysis with high-flux polysulfone membrane in the treatment of life-threatening methanol intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Alvarez, Rafael

    2002-02-01

    Methanol poisoning may result in metabolic acidosis, blindness and death. In this report, we describe a case of life-threatening methanol intoxication in a 44-year-old man who was treated successfully with supportive care, ethanol infusion, folic acid and early hemodialysis with a high-flux polysulfone dialyzer. We conclude that hemodialysis as implemented in this case is a safe and effective approach to the management of methanol poisoning. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Fluxes of CO2 and CH4 in high latitude wetlands: measuring, modelling and predicting response to climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Panikov, Nicolai S.

    1999-01-01

    This review covers selected aspects of recent international efforts to measure and model greenhouse gas emission from northern wetlands, to identify the environmental factors that control gas emission, and to investigate wetlands’responses (particularly with respect to gas emission) to global change. Both bottom-up and top-to-bottom approaches, based respectively on local observations plus inventory of gas fluxes and inverse modelling of global circulation, agree on the size of the high latit...

  18. Cu-Cr-Nb-Zr Alloy for Rocket Engines and Other High-Heat- Flux Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Rocket-engine main combustion chamber liners are used to contain the burning of fuel and oxidizer and provide a stream of high-velocity gas for propulsion. The liners in engines such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine are regeneratively cooled by flowing fuel, e.g., cryogenic hydrogen, through cooling channels in the back side of the liner. The heat gained by the liner from the flame and compression of the gas in the throat section is transferred to the fuel by the liner. As a result, the liner must either have a very high thermal conductivity or a very high operating temperature. In addition to the large heat flux (>10 MW/sq m), the liners experience a very large thermal gradient, typically more than 500 C over 1 mm. The gradient produces thermally induced stresses and strains that cause low cycle fatigue (LCF). Typically, a liner will experience a strain differential in excess of 1% between the cooling channel and the hot wall. Each time the engine is fired, the liner undergoes an LCF cycle. The number of cycles can be as few as one for an expendable booster engine, to as many as several thousand for a reusable launch vehicle or reaction control system. Finally, the liners undergo creep and a form of mechanical degradation called thermal ratcheting that results in the bowing out of the cooling channel into the combustion chamber, and eventual failure of the liner. GRCop-84, a Cu-Cr-Nb alloy, is generally recognized as the best liner material available at the time of this reporting. The alloy consists of 14% Cr2Nb precipitates in a pure copper matrix. Through experimental work, it has been established that the Zr will not participate in the formation of Laves phase precipitates with Cr and Nb, but will instead react with Cu to form the desired Cu-Zr compounds. It is believed that significant improvements in the mechanical properties of GRCop-84 will be realized by adding Zr. The innovation is a Cu-Cr-Nb-Zr alloy covering the composition range of 0.8 to 8.1 weight

  19. RHIC and quark matter: proposal for a relativistic heavy ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-08-01

    This document describes the Brookhaven National Laboratory Proposal for the construction of a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The construction of this facility represents the natural continuation of the laboratory's role as a center for nuclear and high-energy physics research and extends and uses the existing AGS, Tandem Van de Graaff and CBA facilities at BNL in a very cost effective manner. The Administration and Congress have approved a project which will provide a link between the Tandem Van de Graaf and the AGS. Completion of this project in 1986 will provide fixed target capabilities at the AGS for heavy ions of about 14 GeV/amu with masses up to approx. 30 (sulfur). The addition of an AGS booster would extend the mass range to the heaviest ions (A approx. 200, e.g., gold); its construction could start in 1986 and be completed in three years. These two new AGS experimental facilities can be combined with the proposed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to extend the energy range to 100 x 100 GeV/amu for the heaviest ions. BNL proposes to start construction of RHIC in FY 86 with completion in FY 90 at a total cost of 134 M$.

  20. A flux-scaling scenario for high-scale moduli stabilization in string theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Font, Anamaría [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, LMU, Theresienstr. 37, 80333 München (Germany); Fuchs, Michael [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Herschmann, Daniela, E-mail: herschma@mpp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Plauschinn, Erik [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “Galileo Galilei”, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Sekiguchi, Yuta; Wolf, Florian [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, LMU, Theresienstr. 37, 80333 München (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Tree-level moduli stabilization via geometric and non-geometric fluxes in type IIB orientifolds on Calabi–Yau manifolds is investigated. The focus is on stable non-supersymmetric minima, where all moduli are fixed except for some massless axions. The scenario includes the purely axionic orientifold-odd moduli. A set of vacua allowing for parametric control over the moduli vacuum expectation values and their masses is presented, featuring a specific scaling with the fluxes. Uplift mechanisms and supersymmetry breaking soft masses on MSSM-like D7-branes are discussed as well. This scenario provides a complete effective framework for realizing the idea of F-term axion monodromy inflation in string theory. It is argued that, with all masses close to the Planck and GUT scales, one is confronted with working at the threshold of controlling all mass hierarchies.

  1. A flux-scaling scenario for high-scale moduli stabilization in string theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Blumenhagen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tree-level moduli stabilization via geometric and non-geometric fluxes in type IIB orientifolds on Calabi–Yau manifolds is investigated. The focus is on stable non-supersymmetric minima, where all moduli are fixed except for some massless axions. The scenario includes the purely axionic orientifold-odd moduli. A set of vacua allowing for parametric control over the moduli vacuum expectation values and their masses is presented, featuring a specific scaling with the fluxes. Uplift mechanisms and supersymmetry breaking soft masses on MSSM-like D7-branes are discussed as well. This scenario provides a complete effective framework for realizing the idea of F-term axion monodromy inflation in string theory. It is argued that, with all masses close to the Planck and GUT scales, one is confronted with working at the threshold of controlling all mass hierarchies.

  2. Seasonal and Lunar Month Periods Observed in Natural Neutron Flux at High Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenkin, Yuri; Alekseenko, Victor; Cai, Zeyu; Cao, Zhen; Cattaneo, Claudio; Cui, Shuwang; Giroletti, Elio; Gromushkin, Dmitry; Guo, Cong; Guo, Xuewen; He, Huihai; Liu, Ye; Ma, Xinhua; Shchegolev, Oleg; Vallania, Piero; Vigorito, Carlo; Zhao, Jing

    2017-07-01

    Air radon concentration measurement is useful for research on geophysical effects, but it is strongly sensitive to site geology and many geophysical and microclimatic processes such as wind, ventilation, air humidity and so on inducing very big fluctuations on the concentration of radon in air. On the contrary, monitoring the radon concentration in soil by measuring the thermal neutron flux reduces environmental effects. In this paper, we report some experimental results on the natural thermal neutron flux as well as on the concentration of air radon and its variations at 4300 m asl. These results were obtained with unshielded thermal neutron scintillation detectors (en-detectors) and radon monitors located inside the ARGO-YBJ experimental hall. The correlation of these variations with the lunar month and 1-year period is undoubtedly confirmed. A method for earthquake prediction provided by a global net of en-detectors is currently under study.

  3. Aluminium surface morphology behaviour under high-flux helium ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girka, O.; Bizyukov, O.; Bogatyrenko, S.; Bizyukov, I.

    2017-08-01

    Samples of aluminium with purity 99.99% wt are irradiated with helium ion beam under ITER-like conditions using FALCON ion source. Aluminium is used as the surrogate material for plasma-material interaction studies. Typical parameters during steady-state exposure are the following: helium ion flux is 2-4 × 1022 m-2 s-1, heat flux is above 1 MW m-2, average ion energy is of 2 keV, and the ion fluence is well above 1027 m-2. Investigation of the surface morphology with SEM shows the formation of the cone-like structures, which develop with fluence increasing. Surface features suddenly disappear at the fluence of 1.06 × 1027 m-2 and then start to grow again. Further fluence increase with step-by-step surface diagnostics shows periodical character of the surface structures growth and degradation.

  4. Seasonal and Lunar month periods observed in natural neutron flux at high altitude

    CERN Document Server

    Stenkin, Yuri; Cai, Zeyu; Cao, Zhen; Cattaneo, Claudio; Cui, Shuwang; Giroletti, Elio; Gromushkin, Dmitry; Guo, Xuewen; Guo, Cong; He, Huihai; Liu, Ye; Ma, Xinhua; Shchegolev, Oleg; Vallania, Piero; Vigorito, Carlo; Zhao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Air radon concentration measurement is useful for research on geophysical effects, but it is strongly sensitive to site geology and many geophysical and microclimatic processes such as wind, ventilation, air humidity and so on that induce very big fluctuations on the concentration of radon in air. On the contrary, monitoring the radon concentration in soil by measuring the thermal neutron flux reduces environmental effects. In this paper we report some experimental results on the natural thermal neutron flux as well as the concentration of air radon and its variations at 4300 m a.s.l. These results were obtained with unshielded thermal neutron scintillation detectors (en-detectors) and radon monitors located inside the ARGO-YBJ experimental hall. The correlation of these variations with the lunar month and 1-year period is undoubtedly confirmed. A method for earthquakes prediction provided by a global net of the en-detectors is currently under study.

  5. An exploding foil shockwave technique for magnetic flux compression and high voltage pulse generation

    CERN Document Server

    Goh, S E

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes a novel electromagnetic shockwave technique for use in compressing magnetic flux and to serve as the basis for a new approach to producing fast-rising voltage pulses with amplitudes of several hundred kV. The shockwave is produced by an exploding foil driven electric gun that accelerates a Mylar flyer to impact with a sample of aluminium powder. Both Japanese and Russian researchers have previously published experimental results for shockwave magnetic flux compression using an explosive driver. The present research considers replacing the explosive energy of this driver by the electrostatic energy stored in a capacitor bank, thereby enabling experiments to be performed in a laboratory environment. Differences in performance that arise from the use of explosive and electrical driver are examined. A conventional electric gun system in planar geometry is developed to study the insulator-to-metallic transition in shock-compressed aluminium powder. This provides data on the conducting shock f...

  6. The zero-flux DC current transformer a high precision bipolar wide- band measuring device

    CERN Document Server

    Appelo, H C

    1977-01-01

    A current-carrying conductor is surrounded by a pair of ring cores. A sense winding on one core provides flux rate feedback to a power amplifier which drives the ampere-turn compensating current through a common compensating winding. The other core serves as a second- harmonic modulator to establish zero-flux operation and thus to ensure a perfect, temperature-independent current balance. A specially- developed burden resistor converts the compensating current into a voltage signal, which is amplified to give an 10 V output signal at the nominal value of the current to be measured. A substantial number of devices, ranging from 50 to 25000 Amperes is now operational in the beam transfer and extraction power supplies to the CERN SPS. (4 refs).

  7. A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkovitz, Carmen; Bernholc, Nicole; Cohen, Anita; Eng, Susan; Enriquez-Leder, Rosario; Franz, Barbara; Gorden, Patricia; Hanson, Louise; Lamble, Geraldine; Martin, Harriet; Mastrangelo, Iris; McLane, Victoria; Villela, Maria-Alicia; Vivirito, Katherine; Woodhead, Avril

    1991-01-01

    This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

  8. A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Careers in action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

  9. Natural Resource Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    green, T.

    2011-08-15

    This comprehensive Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was built on the successful foundation of the Wildlife Management Plan for BNL, which it replaces. This update to the 2003 plan continues to build on successes and efforts to better understand the ecosystems and natural resources found on the BNL site. The plan establishes the basis for managing the varied natural resources located on the 5,265 acre BNL site, setting goals and actions to achieve those goals. The planning of this document is based on the knowledge and expertise gained over the past 10 years by the Natural Resources management staff at BNL in concert with local natural resource agencies including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Long Island Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission, The Nature Conservancy, and others. The development of this plan is an attempt at sound ecological management that not only benefits BNL's ecosystems but also benefits the greater Pine Barrens habitats in which BNL is situated. This plan applies equally to the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve). Any difference in management between the larger BNL area and the Upton Reserve are noted in the text. The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to sustainably integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, sustainability, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and the incorporation of community involvement, where applicable. The NRMP is periodically reviewed and updated, typically every five years. This review and update was delayed to develop documents associated with a new third party facility, the Long Island Solar Farm. This two hundred acre facility will result in

  10. Wildland Fire Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green,T.

    2009-10-23

    This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) updates the 2003 plan incorporating changes necessary to comply with DOE Order 450.1 and DOE P 450.4, Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy and Program Review; Wildland and Prescribed Fire Management Policy and implementation Procedures Reference Guide. This current plan incorporates changes since the original draft of the FMP that result from new policies on the national level. This update also removes references and dependence on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and Department of the Interior, fully transitioning Wildland Fire Management responsibilities to BNL. The Department of Energy policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas, managed by the DOE and/or its various contractors, that can sustain fire must have a FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures associated with wild fire, operational, and prescribed fires. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, 'prescribed' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered, threatened, and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of the DOE and BNL. This Fire Management Plan is presented in a format that coverers all aspects specified by DOE guidance documents which are based on the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. This FMP is to be used and implemented for the

  11. Rigid levitation, flux pinning, thermal depinning and fluctuation in high-Tc superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    Here, the author shows that the strong velocity-independent frictional force on a levitating superconductor and on any type-II superconductor moving in a homogeneous magnetic field is caused by pinning and depinning of the magnetic flux lines in its interior. Levitation may thus be used to investigate the pinning properties of a superconductor, and friction in a superconductor bearing may be minimized by choosing appropriate materials and geometries.

  12. Boiling Heat-Transfer Processes and Their Application in the Cooling of High Heat Flux Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    presented previously in Eq. (8). Bjorge , et al. (Ref. 170) and Stephan and Auracher (Ref. 171) later presented variations of the superposition approach...ofHeat Transfer, Vol. 90, May 1968, pp. 239-247. 170. Bjorge , R. W., Hall, G. R., and Rohsenow, W. M. "Correlation of Forced Convection Boiling Heat... Communications on Heat Mass Transfer, Vol. 18, No.5, September-October 1991, pp. 659-667. 383. Boyd, R. D., Sr. "Critical Heat Flux and Heat Transfer

  13. Thin, High-Flux, Self-Standing, Graphene Oxide Membranes for Efficient Hydrogen Separation from Gas Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouša, Daniel; Friess, Karel; Pilnáček, Kryštof; Vopička, Ondřej; Lanč, Marek; Fónod, Kristián; Pumera, Martin; Sedmidubský, David; Luxa, Jan; Sofer, Zdeněk

    2017-08-22

    The preparation and gas-separation performance of self-standing, high-flux, graphene oxide (GO) membranes is reported. Defect-free, 15-20 μm thick, mechanically stable, unsupported GO membranes exhibited outstanding gas-separation performance towards H2 /CO2 that far exceeded the corresponding 2008 Robeson upper bound. Remarkable separation efficiency of GO membranes for H2 and bulky C3 or C4 hydrocarbons was achieved with high flux and good selectivity at the same time. On the contrary, N2 and CH4 molecules, with larger kinetic diameter and simultaneously lower molecular weight, relative to that of CO2 , remained far from the corresponding H2 /N2 or H2 /CH4 upper bounds. Pore size distribution analysis revealed that the most abundant pores in GO material were those with an effective pore diameter of 4 nm; therefore, gas transport is not exclusively governed by size sieving and/or Knudsen diffusion, but in the case of CO2 was supplemented by specific interactions through 1) hydrogen bonding with carboxyl or hydroxyl functional groups and 2) the quadrupole moment. The self-standing GO membranes presented herein demonstrate a promising route towards the large-scale fabrication of high-flux, hydrogen-selective gas membranes intended for the separation of H2 /CO2 or H2 /alkanes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. High flux and antifouling properties of negatively charged membrane for dyeing wastewater treatment by membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Eui-Jong; Tabatabai, S Assiyeh Alizadeh; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-10-15

    This study investigated the applicability of membrane distillation (MD) to treat dyeing wastewater discharged by the textile industry. Four different dyes containing methylene blue (MB), crystal violet (CV), acid red 18 (AR18), and acid yellow 36 (AY36) were tested. Two types of hydrophobic membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were used. The membranes were characterized by testing against each dye (foulant-foulant) and the membrane-dye (membrane-foulant) interfacial interactions and their mechanisms were identified. The MD membranes possessed negative charges, which facilitated the treatment of acid and azo dyes of the same charge and showed higher fluxes. In addition, PTFE membrane reduced the wettability with higher hydrophobicity of the membrane surface. The PTFE membrane evidenced especially its resistant to dye absorption, as its strong negative charge and chemical structure caused a flake-like (loose) dye-dye structure to form on the membrane surface rather than in the membrane pores. This also enabled the recovery of flux and membrane properties by water flushing (WF), thereby direct-contact MD with PTFE membrane treating 100 mg/L of dye mixtures showed stable flux and superior color removal during five days operation. Thus, MD shows a potential for stable long-term operation in conjunction with a simple membrane cleaning process, and its suitability in dyeing wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of similarity of HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) with separate effects test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Slovik, G.C.

    1990-11-01

    A Separate Effects Test (SET) facility was constructed in 1963 to demonstrate the feasibility of the HFBR design and to determine the core power limits for a safe flow reversal event. The objective of the task reported here is to review the capability of the test to scale the dominant phenomena in the HFBR during a flow reversal event and the applicability of the range of the power level obtained from the test to the HFBR. The conclusion of this report was that the flow during the flow reversal event will not be similar in the two facilities. The causes of the dissimilarity are the differences in the core inlet friction, bypass path friction, the absence of the check valve in the test, and the materials used to represent the fuel plates. The impact of these differences is that the HFBR will undergo flow reversal sooner than the test and will have a higher flow rate in the final Natural Circulation Period. The shorter duration of the flow reversal event will allow less time for the plate to heat up and the larger flow in the Natural Circulation Period will lead to higher critical heat flux limits in the HFBR than in the test. Based on these observations, it was concluded that the HFBR can undergo flow reversal safely for heat fluxes up to 46,700 (BTU/hr ft{sup 2}), the heat flux limit obtained from the 1963 test.

  16. High flux and antifouling properties of negatively charged membrane for dyeing wastewater treatment by membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin

    2016-07-25

    This study investigated the applicability of membrane distillation (MD) to treat dyeing wastewater discharged by the textile industry. Four different dyes containing methylene blue (MB), crystal violet (CV), acid red 18 (AR), and acid yellow 36 (AY) were tested. Two types of hydrophobic membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were used. The membranes were characterized by testing against each dye (foulant-foulant) and the membrane–dye (membrane-foulant) interfacial interactions and their mechanisms were identified. The MD membranes possessed negative charges, which facilitated the treatment of acid and azo dyes of the same charge and showed higher fluxes. In addition, PTFE membrane reduced the wettability with higher hydrophobicity of the membrane surface. The PTFE membrane evidenced especially its resistant to dye absorption, as its strong negative charge and chemical structure caused a flake-like (loose) dye–dye structure to form on the membrane surface rather than in the membrane pores. This also enabled the recovery of flux and membrane properties by water flushing (WF), thereby direct-contact MD with PTFE membrane treating 100 mg/L of dye mixtures showed stable flux and superior color removal during five days operation. Thus, MD shows a potential for stable long-term operation in conjunction with a simple membrane cleaning process, and its suitability in dyeing wastewater treatment.

  17. High heat flux testing of mm thick tungsten coatings on carbon-fiber composites for the JT-60SA tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, M.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Elgeti, S.; Maier, H.; Neu, R.; Nakano, T.; Kuroki, N.; Noumi, K.; Takabatake, T.; Yoshida, N.

    2017-12-01

    High heat flux tests have been performed on 0.4 mm thick W coatings produced by vacuum plasma spraying on carbon-fiber composites (CFCs) for the future actively cooled W-coated CFC divertor target in JT-60SA. The surface temperature of the W coating increased up to 2000 °C at 15 MW m‑2 for 5 s. No severe morphological changes, for example, melting, cracking and delamination were observed although recrystallization and grain growth were found in the W coating. Cyclic loading at 15 MW m‑2 for 3 s with 50 cycles and additional 50 cycles with longer pulse length of 4 s produced again no severe morphological changes. Heat transfer analysis of the W-coated CFC sample during the high heat flux test showed that thermal resistance between W coatings and CFCs was negligibly low. This analysis also showed that the surface temperature of the 1 mm thick W coating on the actively cooled CFC monoblock divertor target in JT-60SA will be higher than the recrystallization temperature, 1200 °C, at the steady state heat flux of 15 MW m‑2. Therefore, a reduction of armor thickness of the future actively cooled W-coated CFC monoblock divertor target in JT-60SA could be necessary to decrease the surface temperature to less than the recrystallization temperature.

  18. Prediction of Flow and Temperature Distributions in a High Flux Research Reactor Using the Porous Media Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanfang Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High thermal neutron fluxes are needed in some research reactors and for irradiation tests of materials. A High Flux Research Reactor (HFRR with an inverse flux trap-converter target structure is being developed by the Reactor Engineering Analysis Lab (REAL at Tsinghua University. This paper studies the safety of the HFRR core by full core flow and temperature calculations using the porous media approach. The thermal nonequilibrium model is used in the porous media energy equation to calculate coolant and fuel assembly temperatures separately. The calculation results show that the coolant temperature keeps increasing along the flow direction, while the fuel temperature increases first and decreases afterwards. As long as the inlet coolant mass flow rate is greater than 450 kg/s, the peak cladding temperatures in the fuel assemblies are lower than the local saturation temperatures and no boiling exists. The flow distribution in the core is homogeneous with a small flow rate variation less than 5% for different assemblies. A large recirculation zone is observed in the outlet region. Moreover, the porous media model is compared with the exact model and found to be much more efficient than a detailed simulation of all the core components.

  19. Realization of high heat flux tungsten monoblock type target with graded interlayer for application to DEMO divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richou, M.; Gallay, F.; Böswirth, B.; Chu, I.; Lenci, M.; Loewenhoff, Th; Quet, A.; Greuner, H.; Kermouche, G.; Meillot, E.; Pintsuk, G.; Visca, E.; You, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    The divertor is the key in-vessel plasma-facing component being in charge of power exhaust and removal of impurity particles. In DEMO, divertor targets must survive an environment of high heat fluxes (˜up to 20 MW m-2 during slow transients) and neutron irradiation. One advanced concept for components in monoblock configuration concerns the insertion of a compositionally graded layer between tungsten and CuCrZr instead of the soft copper interlayer. As a first step, a thin graded layer (˜25 μm) was developed. As a second step, a thicker graded layer (˜500 μm), which is actually being developed, will also be inserted to study the compliant role of a macroscopic graded layer. This paper reports the results of cyclic high heat flux loading tests up to 20 MW m-2 and to heat flux higher than 25 MW m-2 that mock-ups equipped with thin graded layer survived without visible damage. First feedback on manufacturing steps is also presented. Moreover, the first results obtained on the development of the thick graded layer and its integration in a monoblock configuration are shown.

  20. Thermal behavior and temperature measurements of melting beryllium plasma-facing components exposed to high heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, E., E-mail: eric.gauthier@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Pocheau, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Kovari, M.; Barnard, J.M.; Crowley, B.; Godwin, J.; Lane, C. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    The emissivity of metallic materials is low and varies with temperature and wavelength inducing errors on surface temperature measurements. High heat flux experiments on beryllium were carried out to investigate the thermal behavior of bulk Be tiles. Thermal modeling aiming at determining the surface and bulk temperatures have been performed using ANSYS®. A Be tile was exposed to heat flux with power density ranging between 1 and 7 MW/m{sup 2}. Surface temperatures were measured using an infrared camera in the 3–5 μm range and two-color pyrometers, one at short wavelengths (1.5–1.7 μm) and one at mid IR range wavelengths (2–4 μm) range. Both the IR camera and two-color pyrometers do not provide accurate temperature measurements on melted Be due to changes in the emissivities and emissivity ratio induced by surface modifications.

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of online hemodiafiltration versus high-flux hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramponi F

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Ramponi,1,2 Claudio Ronco,1,3 Giacomo Mason,1 Enrico Rettore,4 Daniele Marcelli,5,6 Francesca Martino,1,3 Mauro Neri,1,7 Alejandro Martin-Malo,8 Bernard Canaud,5,9 Francesco Locatelli10 1International Renal Research Institute (IRRIV, San Bortolo Hospital, Vicenza, 2Department of Economics and Management, University of Padova, Padova, 3Department of Nephrology, San Bortolo Hospital, Vicenza, 4Department of Sociology and Social Research, University of Trento, FBK-IRVAPP & IZA, Trento, Italy; 5Europe, Middle East, Africa and Latin America Medical Board, Fresenius Medical Care,, Bad Homburg, Germany; 6Danube University, Krems, Austria; 7Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Vicenza, Italy; 8Nephrology Unit, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Córdoba, Spain; 9School of Medicine, Montpellier University, Montpellier, France; 10Department of Nephrology, Manzoni Hospital, Lecco, Italy Background: Clinical studies suggest that hemodiafiltration (HDF may lead to better clinical outcomes than high-flux hemodialysis (HF-HD, but concerns have been raised about the cost-effectiveness of HDF versus HF-HD. Aim of this study was to investigate whether clinical benefits, in terms of longer survival and better health-related quality of life, are worth the possibly higher costs of HDF compared to HF-HD.Methods: The analysis comprised a simulation based on the combined results of previous published studies, with the following steps: 1 estimation of the survival function of HF-HD patients from a clinical trial and of HDF patients using the risk reduction estimated in a meta-analysis; 2 simulation of the survival of the same sample of patients as if allocated to HF-HD or HDF using three-state Markov models; and 3 application of state-specific health-related quality of life coefficients and differential costs derived from the literature. Several Monte Carlo simulations were performed, including simulations for patients with different

  2. Abundant carbon substrates drive extremely high sulfate reduction rates and methane fluxes in Prairie Pothole Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Paula; Hoyt, David W.; Bansal, Sheel; Mills, Christopher T.; Tfaily, Malak; Tangen, Brian; Finocchiaro, Raymond; Johnston, Michael D.; McAdams, Brandon C.; Solensky, Matthew J.; Smith, Garrett J.; Chin, Yu-Ping; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Inland waters are increasingly recognized as critical sites of methane emissions to the atmosphere, but the biogeochemical reactions driving such fluxes are less well understood. The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America is one of the largest wetland complexes in the world, containing millions of small, shallow wetlands. The sediment pore waters of PPR wetlands contain some of the highest concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and sulfur species ever recorded in terrestrial aquatic environments. Using a suite of geochemical and microbiological analyses, we measured the impact of sedimentary carbon and sulfur transformations in these wetlands on methane fluxes to the atmosphere. This research represents the first study of coupled geochemistry and microbiology within the PPR and demonstrates how the conversion of abundant labile DOC pools into methane results in some of the highest fluxes of this greenhouse gas to the atmosphere ever reported. Abundant DOC and sulfate additionally supported some of the highest sulfate reduction rates ever measured in terrestrial aquatic environments, which we infer to account for a large fraction of carbon mineralization in this system. Methane accumulations in zones of active sulfate reduction may be due to either the transport of free methane gas from deeper locations or the co-occurrence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. If both respiratory processes are concurrent, any competitive inhibition of methanogenesis by sulfate-reducing bacteria may be lessened by the presence of large labile DOC pools that yield noncompetitive substrates such as methanol. Our results reveal some of the underlying mechanisms that make PPR wetlands biogeochemical hotspots, which ultimately leads to their critical, but poorly recognized role in regional greenhouse gas emissions.

  3. Abundant carbon substrates drive extremely high sulfate reduction rates and methane fluxes in Prairie Pothole Wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalcin Martins, Paula [Microbiology Department, The Ohio State University, Columbus OH 43210 USA; Hoyt, David W. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Richland WA 99350 USA; Bansal, Sheel [United States Geological Survey - Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center, Jamestown ND 58401 USA; Mills, Christopher T. [United States Geological Survey, Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center, Building 20, Denver Federal Center Denver CO 80225 USA; Tfaily, Malak [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Richland WA 99350 USA; Tangen, Brian A. [United States Geological Survey - Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center, Jamestown ND 58401 USA; Finocchiaro, Raymond G. [United States Geological Survey - Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center, Jamestown ND 58401 USA; Johnston, Michael D. [School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus OH 43210 USA; McAdams, Brandon C. [School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus OH 43210 USA; Solensky, Matthew J. [United States Geological Survey - Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center, Jamestown ND 58401 USA; Smith, Garrett J. [Microbiology Department, The Ohio State University, Columbus OH 43210 USA; Chin, Yu-Ping [School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus OH 43210 USA; Wilkins, Michael J. [Microbiology Department, The Ohio State University, Columbus OH 43210 USA; School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus OH 43210 USA

    2017-02-23

    Inland waters are increasingly recognized as critical sites of methane emissions to the atmosphere, but the biogeochemical reactions driving such fluxes are less well understood. The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America is one of the largest wetland complexes in the world, containing millions of small, shallow wetlands. The sediment pore waters of PPR wetlands contain some of the highest concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and sulfur species ever recorded in terrestrial aquatic environments. Using a suite of geochemical and microbiological analyses we measured the impact of sedimentary carbon and sulfur transformations in these wetlands on methane fluxes to the atmosphere. This research represents the first study of coupled geochemistry and microbiology within the PPR, and demonstrates how the conversion of abundant labile DOC pools into methane results in some of the highest fluxes of this greenhouse gas to the atmosphere ever reported. Abundant DOC and sulfate additionally supported some of the highest sulfate reduction rates ever measured in terrestrial aquatic environments, which we infer to account for a large fraction of carbon mineralization in this system. Methane accumulations in zones of active sulfate reduction may be due to either the transport of free methane gas from deeper locations, or the co-occurrence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. If both respiratory processes are concurrent, any competitive inhibition of methanogenesis by sulfate-reducing bacteria may be lessened by the presence of large labile DOC pools that yield non-competitive substrates such as methanol. Our results reveal some of the underlying mechanisms that make PPR wetlands biogeochemical hotspots, which ultimately leads to their critical, but poorly recognized role in regional greenhouse gas emissions.

  4. Design and Characterization of a High Resolution Microfluidic Heat Flux Sensor with Thermal Modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sun-Kyu Lee; Sung-Cheon Cho; Jung-Kyun Kim; Sung-Ki Nam

    2010-01-01

    A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-compatible process was used in the design and fabrication of a suspended membrane microfluidic heat flux sensor with a thermopile for the purpose of measuring the heat flow rate. The combination of a thirty-junction gold and nickel thermoelectric sensor with an ultralow noise preamplifier, a low pass filter, and a lock-in amplifier can yield a resolution 20 nW with a sensitivity of 461 V/W. The thermal modulation method is used to eliminate low-freque...

  5. Study of the flux effect nature for VVER-1000 RPV welds with high nickel content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleshova, E. A.; Gurovich, B. A.; Lavrukhina, Z. V.; Maltsev, D. A.; Fedotova, S. V.; Frolov, A. S.; Zhuchkov, G. M.

    2017-01-01

    This work extends the research of the basic regularities of segregation processes in the grain boundaries (GB) of VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The paper considers the influence of irradiation with different fast neutron fluxes on the structure, yield strength and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (TK) changes as well as on changes of the share of brittle intergranular fracture and development of segregation processes in the VVER-1000 RPV weld metal (WM). The obtained experimental results allow to separate the contribution of the hardening and non-hardening mechanisms to mechanical properties degradation of material irradiated at the operating temperature. It is shown that the difference in TK shift in WM irradiated to the same fluence with different fast neutron fluxes is mainly due to the difference in the GB accumulation kinetics of impurities and only to a small extent due to the material hardening. Phosphorus bulk diffusion coefficients were evaluated for the temperature exposure, accelerated irradiation and irradiation within surveillance specimens (SS) using a kinetic model of phosphorus GB accumulation in low-alloyed low-carbon steels under the influence of operational factors. The correlation between the GB segregation level of phosphorus and nickel, and the TK shift - in WM SS was obtained experimentally and indicates the non-hardening mechanism contribution to the total radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steels throughout its extended lifetime.

  6. Design and Characterization of a High Resolution Microfluidic Heat Flux Sensor with Thermal Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Kyu Lee

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-compatible process was used in the design and fabrication of a suspended membrane microfluidic heat flux sensor with a thermopile for the purpose of measuring the heat flow rate. The combination of a thirty-junction gold and nickel thermoelectric sensor with an ultralow noise preamplifier, a low pass filter, and a lock-in amplifier can yield a resolution 20 nW with a sensitivity of 461 V/W. The thermal modulation method is used to eliminate low-frequency noise from the sensor output, and various amounts of fluidic heat were applied to the sensor to investigate its suitability for microfluidic applications. For sensor design and analysis of signal output, a method of modeling and simulating electro-thermal behavior in a microfluidic heat flux sensor with an integrated electronic circuit is presented and validated. The electro-thermal domain model was constructed by using system dynamics, particularly the bond graph. The electro-thermal domain system model in which the thermal and the electrical domains are coupled expresses the heat generation of samples and converts thermal input to electrical output. The proposed electro-thermal domain system model is in good agreement with the measured output voltage response in both the transient and the steady state.

  7. Design and characterization of a high resolution microfluidic heat flux sensor with thermal modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sung-Ki; Kim, Jung-Kyun; Cho, Sung-Cheon; Lee, Sun-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-compatible process was used in the design and fabrication of a suspended membrane microfluidic heat flux sensor with a thermopile for the purpose of measuring the heat flow rate. The combination of a thirty-junction gold and nickel thermoelectric sensor with an ultralow noise preamplifier, a low pass filter, and a lock-in amplifier can yield a resolution 20 nW with a sensitivity of 461 V/W. The thermal modulation method is used to eliminate low-frequency noise from the sensor output, and various amounts of fluidic heat were applied to the sensor to investigate its suitability for microfluidic applications. For sensor design and analysis of signal output, a method of modeling and simulating electro-thermal behavior in a microfluidic heat flux sensor with an integrated electronic circuit is presented and validated. The electro-thermal domain model was constructed by using system dynamics, particularly the bond graph. The electro-thermal domain system model in which the thermal and the electrical domains are coupled expresses the heat generation of samples and converts thermal input to electrical output. The proposed electro-thermal domain system model is in good agreement with the measured output voltage response in both the transient and the steady state.

  8. Measuring the parameters of a high flux plasma in Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeen, C.; Biewer, T. M.; Cantrell, C. L.; Klemm, J. C.; Musick, R. A.; Nunley, G.; Salazar Sanchez, J. S.; Sawyer, D. J.; Ray, H.; Shaw, G.; Showers, M.

    2016-10-01

    The Prototype Material Plasma Exposure Experiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear, magnetically confined plasma production device, utilizing a helicon antenna. The plasma column interacts with a material target at the end of the device, creating plasma-material interaction conditions that are relevant to the conditions that are expected in future fusion reactors. Moreover, helicon antenna plasma sources have been proposed as propulsion devices for spacecraft. It has been observed that in some circumstances the Proto-MPEX plasma exerts sufficient force on the target plate to cause the target to recoil. A ballistic probe has been designed to measure the force and heat flux profile of the plasma. The probe response has been calibrated, using scales, thermocouples, and fast camera imaging. The ballistic probe has been inserted into Proto-MPEX plasmas and the heat flux profile of the plasma has been measured. Also the maximum force that is exerted on the probe has been estimated. This work was supported by the US. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725, and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities ARC program.

  9. Comparison of Source Partitioning Methods for CO2 and H2O Fluxes Based on High Frequency Eddy Covariance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterhalfen, Anne; Moene, Arnold; Schmidt, Marius; Ney, Patrizia; Graf, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Source partitioning of eddy covariance (EC) measurements of CO2 into respiration and photosynthesis is routinely used for a better understanding of the exchange of greenhouse gases, especially between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The most frequently used methods are usually based either on relations of fluxes to environmental drivers or on chamber measurements. However, they often depend strongly on assumptions or invasive measurements and do usually not offer partitioning estimates for latent heat fluxes into evaporation and transpiration. SCANLON and SAHU (2008) and SCANLON and KUSTAS (2010) proposed an promising method to estimate the contributions of transpiration and evaporation using measured high frequency time series of CO2 and H2O fluxes - no extra instrumentation necessary. This method (SK10 in the following) is based on the spatial separation and relative strength of sources and sinks of CO2 and water vapor among the sub-canopy and canopy. Assuming that air from those sources and sinks is not yet perfectly mixed before reaching EC sensors, partitioning is estimated based on the separate application of the flux-variance similarity theory to the stomatal and non-stomatal components of the regarded fluxes, as well as on additional assumptions on stomatal water use efficiency (WUE). The CO2 partitioning method after THOMAS et al. (2008) (TH08 in the following) also follows the argument that the dissimilarities of sources and sinks in and below a canopy affect the relation between H2O and CO2 fluctuations. Instead of involving assumptions on WUE, TH08 directly screens their scattergram for signals of joint respiration and evaporation events and applies a conditional sampling methodology. In spite of their different main targets (H2O vs. CO2), both methods can yield partitioning estimates on both fluxes. We therefore compare various sub-methods of SK10 and TH08 including own modifications (e.g., cluster analysis) to each other, to established

  10. Combining Eddy Covariance Fluxes, High-Precision Trace Gas Measurements, Chemical Transport Modeling, and Inverse Modeling to Estimate Regional CO2 Fluxes in the Southern Great Plains, USA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, A. I.; Fischer, M. L.; Biraud, S. C.; Torn, M. S.; Berry, J. A.; Andrews, A. E.; Peters, W.; Zahorowski, W.; Chambers, S. Z.; Tans, P. P.

    2008-01-01

    We use the radon tracer method to estimate monthly average net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of carbon dioxide in the Southern Great Plains of the USA for the year 2007. These estimates are compared with optimized flux estimates of NEE from NOAA CarbonTracker, sampled with a Lagrangian particle

  11. High temporal resolution ecosystem CH4, CO2 and H2O flux data measured with a novel chamber technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Riis Christiansen, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    Soil-atmosphere exchange of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is commonly measured with closed static chambers (Pihlatie et al., 2013) with off-site gas chromatographic (GC) analysis for CH4 and N2O. Static chambers are widely used to observe in detail the effect of experimental manipulations, like climate change experiments, on GHG exchange (e.g. Carter et al., 2012). However, the low sensitivity of GC systems necessitates long measurement times and manual sampling, which increases the disturbance of the exchange of GHGs and leads to potential underestimation of fluxes (Christiansen et al., 2011; Creelman et al., 2013). The recent emergence of field proof infrared lasers using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) have increased frequency and precision of concentration measurements and enabled better estimates of GHG fluxes (Christiansen et al., 2015) due to shorter chamber enclosure times. This minimizes the negative impact of the chamber enclosure on the soil-atmosphere gas exchange rate. Secondly, an integral aspect of understanding GHG exchange in terrestrial ecosystem is to achieve high temporal coverage. This is needed to capture the often dynamic behavior where fluxes can change rapidly over the course of days or even a few hours in response to e.g. rain events. Consequently, low temporal coverage in measurements of GHG exchange have in many past investigations led to highly uncertain annual budgets which severely limits our understanding of the ecosystem processes interacting with the climate system through GHG exchange. Real-time field measurements at high temporal resolution are needed to obtain a much more detailed understanding of the processes governing ecosystem CH4 exchange as well as for better predicting the effects of climate and environmental changes. We combined a state-of-the-art field applicable CH4 sensor (Los Gatos UGGA) with a newly developed ecosystem-level automatic chamber controlled by a LI-COR 8100/8150 system. The chamber is capable of

  12. 75 FR 55631 - U. S. Rail Corporation-Construction and Operation Exemption-Brookhaven Rail Terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... Surface Transportation Board U. S. Rail Corporation--Construction and Operation Exemption-- Brookhaven Rail Terminal AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Notice of Board Action. SUMMARY: Subject to... approval requirements of 49 U.S.C. 10901 for U. S. Rail Corporation (U. S. Rail) to construct and operate a...

  13. Brookhaven Lab physicist William Willis wins the 2003 W.K.H. Panofsky prize

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    William Willis, a senior physicist Brookhaven National Laboratory, has won the American Physical Society's 2003 W.K.H. Panofsky Prize in Experimental Particle Physics. He received the prize, which consists of $5,000 and a certificate citing his contributions to physics, at the APS meeting in Philadelphia on April 6 (1 page).

  14. T.D. LEE: RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AND THE RIKEN BROOKHAVEN CENTER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCLERRAN,L.; SAMIOS, N.

    2006-11-24

    This paper presents the history of Professor T. D. Lee's seminal work on the theory of relativistic heavy ion collisions, and the founding and development of the Riken Brookhaven Center. A number of anecdotes are given about Prof. Lee, and his strong positive effect on his colleagues, particularly young physicists.

  15. The Path to High Q-Factors in Superconducting Accelerating Cavities: Flux Expulsion and Surface Resistance Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    causing temperature rising. The physics behind the magnetic flux expulsion is also analyzed, showing that during a fast cooldown the magnetic field structures, called vortices, tend to move in the same direction of the thermal gradient, from the Meissner state region to the mixed state region, minimizing the Gibbs free energy. On the other hand, during a slow cool down, not only the vortices movement is limited by the absence of thermal gradients, but, also, at the end of the superconducting transition, the magnetic field concentrates along randomly distributed normal-conducting region from which it cannot be expelled anymore. The systematic study of the surface resistance components performed for the different surface treatments, reveals that the BCS surface resistance and the trapped flux surface resistance have opposite trends as a function of the surface impurity content, defined by the mean free path. At medium field value, the BCS surface resistance is minimized for nitrogen-doped cavities and significantly larger for standard niobium cavities. On the other hand, Nitrogen-doped cavities show larger dissipation due to trapped flux. This is consequence of the bell-shaped trend of the trapped flux sensitivity as a function of the mean free path. Such experimental findings allow also a better understanding of the RF dissipation due to trapped flux. The best compromise between all the surface resistance components, taking into account the possibility of trapping some external magnetic field, is given by light nitrogen-doping treatments. However, the beneficial effects of the nitrogen-doping is completely lost when large amount of magnetic field is trapped during the cooldown, underlying the importance of both cooldown and magnetic field shielding optimization in high quality factors cryomodules.

  16. High-Flux Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework Membranes for Propylene/Propane Separation by Postsynthetic Linker Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moon Joo; Kwon, Hyuk Taek; Jeong, Hae-Kwon

    2018-01-02

    While zeolitic imidazolate framework, ZIF-8, membranes show impressive propylene/propane separation, their throughput needs to be greatly improved for practical applications. A method is described that drastically reduces the effective thickness of ZIF-8 membranes, thereby substantially improving their propylene permeance (that is, flux). The new strategy is based on a controlled single-crystal to single-crystal linker exchange of 2-methylimidazole in ZIF-8 membrane grains with 2-imidazolecarboxaldehyde (ZIF-90 linker), thereby enlarging the effective aperture size of ZIF-8. The linker-exchanged ZIF-8 membranes showed a drastic increase in propylene permeance by about four times, with a negligible loss in propylene/propane separation factor when compared to as-prepared membranes. The linker-exchange effect depends on the membrane synthesis method. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Directional gravity wave momentum fluxes in the stratosphere derived from high-resolution AIRS temperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, M.; Hoffmann, L.; Preusse, P.

    2017-01-01

    In order to reduce uncertainties in modeling the stratospheric circulation, global observations of gravity wave momentum flux (GWMF) vectors are required for comparison with distributions of resolved and parametrized GWMF in global models. For the first time, we derive GWMF vectors globally from data of a nadir-viewing satellite instrument: we apply a 3-D method to an Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) temperature data set that was optimized for gravity wave (GW) analysis. For January 2009, the resulting distributions of GW amplitudes and of net GWMF highlight the importance of GWs in the polar vortex and the summertime subtropics. Net GWMF is preferentially directed opposite to the background wind, and, interestingly, it is dominated by large-amplitude GWs of relatively long horizontal wavelength. For convective GW sources, these large horizontal scales are in contradiction with traditional thoughts. However, the observational filter effect needs to be kept in mind when interpreting the results.

  18. Hybrid Heat Pipes for Lunar and Martian Surface and High Heat Flux Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababneh, Mohammed T.; Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Alvarez-Hernandez, Angel R.

    2016-01-01

    Novel hybrid wick heat pipes are developed to operate against gravity on planetary surfaces, operate in space carrying power over long distances and act as thermosyphons on the planetary surface for Lunar and Martian landers and rovers. These hybrid heat pipes will be capable of operating at the higher heat flux requirements expected in NASA's future spacecraft and on the next generation of polar rovers and equatorial landers. In addition, the sintered evaporator wicks mitigate the start-up problems in vertical gravity aided heat pipes because of large number of nucleation sites in wicks which will allow easy boiling initiation. ACT, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and NASA Johnson Space Center, are working together on the Advanced Passive Thermal experiment (APTx) to test and validate the operation of a hybrid wick VCHP with warm reservoir and HiK"TM" plates in microgravity environment on the ISS.

  19. A Nadir-adjusted Airborne Multi Spectral Imaging System (NAMSIS) for high-resolution remote sensing of carbon fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z.; Scott, S.; Rahman, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing is widely used in vegetation monitoring, water stress detection and carbon cycle modeling. However, image pixels from high temporal resolution satellite sensors (such as MODIS) have coarse spatial resolution, much larger than the canopies they are supposed to characterize. An alternative solution for on-demand high spatial resolution remote sensing is sensors onboard low-flying aircrafts. Airborne remote sensing has been traditionally used in crop management studies. In this presentation we demonstrate the application of a relatively low-cost airborne sensor system with customized spectral band combinations for studying forest carbon fluxes. Our team has developed an Inertia Measurement Unit (IMU) controlled automated system to detach aircraft movements (pitch and roll) and engine vibration from the six-band programmable imager, in order to maintain the sensor at nadir view at all times during the flight. Flight lines are configured by a GPS-controleld system to simulate MODIS pixels. A feature-based algorithm is used to automatically generate a mosaic of individual images along the flight lines. This algorithm eliminates the need to mosiac and georeference images manually. An empirical line method is used to calculate reflectance from the raw data. Images from this airborne system produce reflectance values that are comparable with MODIS reflectance product. These high spatial resolution (~0.5 m) images deliver detailed information about tree species and phenological conditions within each MODIS pixel, and thus permit a high resolution spatio-temporal assessment of forest carbon fluxes.

  20. Flux-P: Automating Metabolic Flux Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta E. Ebert

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative knowledge of intracellular fluxes in metabolic networks is invaluable for inferring metabolic system behavior and the design principles of biological systems. However, intracellular reaction rates can not often be calculated directly but have to be estimated; for instance, via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, a model-based interpretation of stable carbon isotope patterns in intermediates of metabolism. Existing software such as FiatFlux, OpenFLUX or 13CFLUX supports experts in this complex analysis, but requires several steps that have to be carried out manually, hence restricting the use of this software for data interpretation to a rather small number of experiments. In this paper, we present Flux-P as an approach to automate and standardize 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, using the Bio-jETI workflow framework. Exemplarily based on the FiatFlux software, it demonstrates how services can be created that carry out the different analysis steps autonomously and how these can subsequently be assembled into software workflows that perform automated, high-throughput intracellular flux analysis of high quality and reproducibility. Besides significant acceleration and standardization of the data analysis, the agile workflow-based realization supports flexible changes of the analysis workflows on the user level, making it easy to perform custom analyses.

  1. Results and analysis of high heat flux tests on a full-scale vertical target prototype of ITER divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missirlian, M. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance, Cedex (France)]. E-mail: missir@drfc.cad.cea.fr; Escourbiac, F. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance, Cedex (France); Merola, M. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Garching (Germany); Bobin-Vastra, I. [FRAMATOME, Le Creusot (France); Schlosser, J. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance, Cedex (France); Durocher, A. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance, Cedex (France)

    2005-11-15

    After an extensive R and D development program, a full-scale divertor target prototype, manufactured with all the main features of the corresponding ITER divertor, was intensively tested in the high heat flux FE200 facility. The prototype consists of four units having a full monoblock geometry. The lower part (CFC armour) and the upper part (W armour) of each monoblock were joined to the solution annealed, quenched and cold worked CuCrZr tube by HIP technique. This paper summarises and analyses the main test results obtained on this prototype.

  2. Testing of actively cooled mock-ups in several high heat flux facilities-An International Round Robin Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM Association, B-NM, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: m.roedig@fz-juelich.de; Bobin-Vastra, I. [AREVA Centre Technique de Framatome, Porte Magenta, BP181, 71205 Le Creusot Cedex (France); Cox, S. [JET, UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Escourbiac, F. [CEA-DRFC, Cadarache, 13115 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Gervash, A. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation); Kapoustina, A. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM Association, B-NM, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kuehnlein, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM Association, B-NM, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kuznetsov, V. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation); Merola, M. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Nygren, R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1129 (United States); Youchison, D.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1129 (United States)

    2005-11-15

    Several electron beam and ion beam facilities are involved in high heat flux testing of plasma-facing components for next step fusion devices. Up to a certain degree, these machines are comparable, but differences concern, e.g. beam generation, beam sweeping, calibration techniques and diagnostics. In order to get an information if tests in the different facilities are really comparable, a set of actively cooled CFC monoblocks has been heated in four electron beam and one ion beam facility at comparable power densities. The temperature response during these loadings has been registered and used as a criteria for assessment.

  3. High-Resolution Vector Magnetograms of the Sun's Poles from Hinode: Flux Distributions and Global Coronal Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    The Sun's polar fields play a leading role in structuring the large-scale solar atmosphere and in determining the interplanetary magnetic field. They are also believed to supply the seed field for the subsequent solar activity cycle. However, present-day synoptic observations do not have sufficient spatial resolution or sensitivity to diagnose accurately the high-latitude magnetic vector field. The high spatial resolution and sensitivity of the full-Stokes observations from the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope Spectro-Polarimeter, observing the poles long-term, allows us to build up a detailed picture of the Cycle 24 polar field reversal, including the changing latitude distribution of the high-latitude flux, and to study the effect on global coronal field models. The Hinode observations provide detailed information on the dominant facular-scale magnetic structure of the polar fields, and their field inclination and flux distribution. Hybrid synoptic magnetograms are constructed from Hinode polar measurements and full-disk magnetograms from the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) Vector Spectro-Magnetograph (VSM), and coronal potential field models are calculated. Loss of effective spatial resolution at the highest latitudes presents complications. Possible improvements to synoptic polar data are discussed.

  4. Continuous, high-flux and efficient oil/water separation assisted by an integrated system with opposite wettability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Long, Yifei; Xu, Changcheng; Tian, Haifeng; Wu, Yanxia; Zha, Fei

    2018-03-01

    To resolve the drawbacks that single-mesh involved for oil/water separation, such as batch processing mode, only one phase was purified and the quick decrease in flux et al., herein, a two-way separation T-tube device was designed by integrating a pair of meshes with opposite wettability, i.e., underwater superoleophobic and superhydrophobic/superoleophilic properties. Such integrated system can continuously separate both oil and water phase from the oil/water mixtures simultaneously through one-step procedure with high flux (above 3.675 L m-2 s-1) and high separation efficiency larger than 99.8% regardless of the heavy oil or light oil involved in the mixture. Moreover, the as-prepared two meshes still maintained high separation efficiency larger than above 98.9% even after 50 cycle-usages. It worthy mentioned that this two-way separation mode essentially solves the oil liquid accumulation problem that is the single separation membrane needs to tolerate a large hydrostatic pressure caused by the accumulated liquid. We deeply believe this two-way separation system would provide a new strategy for realizing practical applications in oil spill clean-up via a continuous mode.

  5. The impact of the driving frequency on the output flux of high-power InGaAlP-LEDs during high-current pulsed operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Benjamin; Morgott, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Direct red light-emitting diodes based on InGaAlP comprise a strong temperature sensitivity regarding their output flux. In étendue-limited applications, like digital projectors, these LEDs are usually driven at current densities exceeding 3 A/mm2 in pulsed mode. The losses inside the semiconductor lead to a large amount of heat, which has to be removed most efficiently by a heatsink to keep the junction temperature as low as possible and therefore to obtain the maximum output flux. One important performance parameter is the thermal resistance Rth of the LED, which has been improved during the last few years, e.g. by the development of new high-power chips and packages. In our present approach, we investigated the influence of the driving frequency - which is closely related to the thermal impedance Zth - on the luminous and the radiant flux of red LEDs. A simulation model based on the electro-thermal analogies was implemented in SPICE and the optical and electrical characteristics of one LED type (OSRAM OSTAR Projection Power LE A P1W) were measured under application-related driving conditions while varying the parameters frequency, duty cycle, forward current, and heatsink temperature. The experimental results show clearly that the luminous and the radiant flux go up when the driving frequency is increased while the other parameters are maintained. Moreover, it can be noticed that the degree of this effect depends on the other parameters. The largest impact can be observed at the lowest tested duty cycle (30 %) and the highest tested current density (4 A/mm2) and heatsink temperature (80 °C). At this operating point, the luminous and the radiant flux increase by 20 % and 14 % respectively when raising the frequency from 240 Hz to 1920 Hz.

  6. AC-flux penetration into high-temperature superconductors with hall effects 3; Koon chodendotai ni okeru koryu jiba shinnyu to horu koka 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mawatari, Y. [Electotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1999-11-10

    On the basis of equation of motion of line of magnetic flux considering Hall effect, linear alternating current response of line of magnetic flux for minute alternating magnetic field parallelly applied to dc magnetic field has been analyzed theoretically. It has been reported that as the result, in the super clean condition, it is a base of the high frequency as GHz, and that effective mass, resonance phenomena, excitation of standing wave, elliptic motion of line of magnetic flux of line of magnetic flux, etc. can generate various and new phenomena. This time, alternating magnetic field dc magnetic field it theoretically rotational magnetic field line of magnetic flux spiral motion helicon resonance it. (NEDO)

  7. Solubility of manganotantalite, zircon and hafnon in highly fluxed peralkaline to peraluminous pegmatitic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lichtervelde, Marieke; Holtz, Francois; Hanchar, John M.

    2010-07-01

    The behavior of tantalum and zirconium in pegmatitic systems has been investigated through the determination of Ta and Zr solubilities at manganotantalite and zircon saturation from dissolution and crystallization experiments in hydrous, Li-, F-, P- and B-bearing pegmatitic melts. The pegmatitic melts are synthetic and enriched in flux elements: 0.7-1.3 wt% Li2O, 2-5.5 wt% F, 2.8-4 wt% P2O5 and 0-2.8 wt% B2O3, and their aluminum saturation index ranges from peralkaline to peraluminous (ASILi = Al/[Na + K + Li] = 0.8 to 1.3) with various K/Na ratios. Dissolution and crystallization experiments were conducted at temperatures varying between 700 and 1,150°C, at 200 MPa and nearly water-saturated conditions. For dissolution experiments, pure synthetic, end member manganotantalite and zircon were used in order to avoid problems with slow solid-state kinetics, but additional experiments using natural manganotantalite and zircon of relatively pure composition (i.e., close to end member composition) displayed similar solubility results. Zircon and manganotantalite solubilities considerably increase from peraluminous to peralkaline compositions, and are more sensitive to changes in temperature or ASI of the melt than to flux content. A model relating the enthalpy of dissolution of manganotantalite to the ASILi of the melt is proposed: ∆ H diss (kJ/mol) = 304 × ASILi - 176 in the peralkaline field, and ∆ H diss (kJ/mol) = -111 × ASILi + 245 in the peraluminous field. The solubility data reveal a small but detectable competitivity between Zr and Ta in the melt, i.e., lower amounts of Zr are incorporated in a Ta-bearing melt compared to a Ta-free melt under the same conditions. A similar behavior is observed for Hf and Ta. The competitivity between Zr (or Hf) and Ta increases from peraluminous to peralkaline compositions, and suggests that Ta is preferentially bonded to non-bridging oxygens (NBOs) with Al as first-neighbors, whereas Zr is preferentially bonded to NBOs

  8. Options for a high heat flux enabled helium cooled first wall for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbeiter, Frederik, E-mail: f.arbe@kit.edu; Chen, Yuming; Ghidersa, Bradut-Eugen; Klein, Christine; Neuberger, Heiko; Ruck, Sebastian; Schlindwein, Georg; Schwab, Florian; Weth, Axel von der

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Design challenges for helium cooled first wall reviewed and otimization approaches explored. • Application of enhanced heat transfer surfaces to the First Wall cooling channels. • Demonstrated a design point for 1 MW/m{sup 2} with temperatures <550 °C and acceptable stresses. • Feasibility of several manufacturing processes for ribbed surfaces is shown. - Abstract: Helium is considered as coolant in the plasma facing first wall of several blanket concepts for DEMO fusion reactors, due to the favorable properties of flexible temperature range, chemical inertness, no activation, comparatively low effort to remove tritium from the gas and no chemical corrosion. Existing blanket designs have shown the ability to use helium cooled first walls with heat flux densities of 0.5 MW/m{sup 2}. Average steady state heat loads coming from the plasma for current EU DEMO concepts are expected in the range of 0.3 MW/m{sup 2}. The definition of peak values is still ongoing and depends on the chosen first wall shape, magnetic configuration and assumptions on the fraction of radiated power and power fall off lengths in the scrape off layer of the plasma. Peak steady state values could reach and excess 1 MW/m{sup 2}. Higher short-term transient loads are expected. Design optimization approaches including heat transfer enhancement, local heat transfer tuning and shape optimization of the channel cross section are discussed. Design points to enable a helium cooled first wall capable to sustain heat flux densities of 1 MW/m{sup 2} at an average shell temperature lower than 500 °C are developed based on experimentally validated heat transfer coefficients of structured channel surfaces. The required pumping power is in the range of 3–5% of the collected thermal power. The FEM stress analyses show code-acceptable stress intensities. Several manufacturing methods enabling the application of the suggested heat transfer enhanced first wall channels are explored. An

  9. AC-flux penetration into high-Tc superconductors with hall effects 2; Koon chodendotai ni okeru koryu jiba shinnyu to horu koka 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mawatari, Y. [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1999-06-07

    It has been confirmed that high temperature superconductor can become the superclean condition in which mean free path is abnormally long in the scattering time of the quasiparticle in the nucleus of line of magnetic flux. Though in this condition, the Hall effect concerning magnetic flux motion remarkably appears, we have not studied it until now on pinning and AC characteristic which together considered Hall effect of line of magnetic flux. For this, we analyzed linear alternating current response of line of magnetic flux for minute alternating magnetic field on the basis of equation of motion of line of magnetic flux considering Hall effect theoretically, and line of magnetic flux had effective mass in the superclean condition, and it was reported that resonance phenomenas were generated in the last time. This time, we carried out magnetic flux motion, alternating magnetic field invasion and more and more detailed analysis on the alternating current permeability, and we examined new possibility of the phenomenon such as elliptic motion of line of magnetic flux and excitation of standing wave. (NEDO)

  10. TWENTY-YEAR PLANNING STUDY FOR THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER FACILITY AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LUDLAM,T.ET AL.

    2003-12-31

    At the request of DOE's Office of Nuclear Physics (ONP), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has created this planning document to assemble and summarize a planning exercise that addresses the core scientific thrust of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) for the next twenty years and the facilities operation plan that will support this program. The planning work was carried out by BNL in close collaboration with the RHIC user community and within budgetary guidelines for the next five years supplied by the ONP. The resulting plans were reviewed by the BNL High Energy and Nuclear Physics Program Advisory Committee (PAC) at a special RHIC planning meeting held in December 2003. Planning input from each of the four RHIC experimental collaborations was absolutely central to the preparation of this overall Laboratory plan. Each collaboration supplied two key documents, a five-year ''Beam Use Proposal'' and a ten-year ''Decadal Plan''. These plans are posted on the BNL website http://www.bnl.gov/henp/, along with other planning documents germane to this paper, such as the complete written reports from the August and December 2003 PAC meetings that considered the five-year and decadal planning documents of the four RHIC collaborations and offered advice and commentary on these plans. Only in these collaboration documents can the full physics impact of the RHIC program be seen and the full scope of the efforts put into this planning process be appreciated. For this reason, the maximum value of the present planning paper can only be realized by making frequent reference to the collaboration documents.

  11. High heat flux engineering for the upgraded neutral beam injection systems of MAST-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhalla, F., E-mail: Fahim.dhalla@ccfe.ac.uk; Mistry, S.; Turner, I.; Barrett, T.R.; Day, I.; McAdams, R.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A new Residual Ion Dump (RID) and bend magnet system for the upgraded NBI systems have been designed for the 5 s MAST-U pulse requirements. • Design scoping was performed using numerical ion-tracing analysis software (MAGNET and OPERA codes). • A more powerful bending magnet will separate the residual ions into full, half and third energy components. • Three separate CuCrZr dumps spread the power loading resulting in acceptable power footprints. • FE thermo-mechanical analyses using ANSYS to validate the designs against the ITER SDC-IC code. • New bend magnet coils, yoke and CuCrZr water-cooled plates are in the procurement phase. - Abstract: For the initial phase of MAST-U operation the two existing neutral beam injection systems will be used, but must be substantially upgraded to fulfil expected operational requirements. The major elements are the design, manufacture and installation of a bespoke bending magnet and Residual Ion Dump (RID) system. The MAST-design full energy dump is being replaced with new actively-cooled full, half and third energy dumps, designed to receive 2.4 MW of ion power deflected by an iron-cored electromagnet. The main design challenge is limited space available in the vacuum vessel, requiring ion-deflection calculations to ensure acceptable heat flux distribution on the dump panels. This paper presents engineering and physics analysis of the upgraded MAST beamlines and reports the current status of manufacture.

  12. Decoupled cantilever arms for highly versatile and sensitive temperature and heat flux measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Brian R; Tong, Jonathan K; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Chen, Gang

    2012-10-01

    Microfabricated cantilever beams have been used in microelectromechanical systems for a variety of sensor and actuator applications. Bimorph cantilevers accurately measure temperature change and heat flux with resolutions several orders of magnitude higher than those of conventional sensors such as thermocouples, semiconductor diodes, as well as resistance and infrared thermometers. The use of traditional cantilevers, however, entails a series of important measurement limitations, because their interactions with the sample and surroundings often create parasitic deflection forces and the typical metal layer degrades the thermal sensitivity of the cantilever. The paper introduces a design to address these issues by decoupling the sample and detector section of the cantilever, along with a thermomechanical model, the fabrication, system integration, and characterization. The custom-designed bi-arm cantilever is over one order of magnitude more sensitive than current commercial cantilevers due to the significantly reduced thermal conductance of the cantilever sample arm. The rigid and immobile sample section offers measurement versatility ranging from photothermal absorption, near-field thermal radiation down to contact, conduction, and material thermal characterization measurements in nearly identical configurations.

  13. High Heat Flux Test Simulation of Tungsten Macro-brush Mock-ups for the KSTAR Divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J. H.; Kim, K. M.; Kim, H. T.; Kim, H. K.; Bang, E. N.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. H.; Yang, H. L.; Oh, Y. K. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The divertor has been an important part of PFC because of its intrinsic function achieving effective particle control to keep high quality plasma with enough shaping flexibility. The divertor will be exposed to heat loads during operation of KSTAR-like plasma fusion device. Therefore, it is important to withstand high heat loads. In this paper, the hydraulic thermo-mechanical analysis was performed by ANSYS WORKBENCH 15.0 in order to predict the fatigue lifetime of the mock-ups for the high heat flux (HHF) test under the KSTAR base mode operating conditions. Under KSTAR base mode operating conditions, the finite element analysis was performed to predict the fatigue lifetime of the mock-ups for the HHF test. The results of analyses showed that the mock-up's temperatures were within the recommended operational range, and its fatigue lifetime was about 1,513 cycles.

  14. Hybrid matrices of ZnO nanofibers with silicone for high water flux photocatalytic degradation of dairy effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanjwal, Muzafar A., E-mail: kanjwalmuzafar@gmail.com [Nano-Bio Science Research Group, DTU-Food Technical University of Denmark, Soltofts Plads, B 227, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Dept. of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Hail, Hail 81451 (Saudi Arabia); Shawabkeh, Ali Qublan [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Hail, Hail 81451 (Saudi Arabia); Alm, Martin; Thomsen, Peter [BioModics ApS, Gregersensvej 7, DK-2630 Taastrup (Denmark); Barakat, Nasser A.M. [Department of Textile Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Chronakis, Ioannis S., E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk [Nano-Bio Science Research Group, DTU-Food Technical University of Denmark, Soltofts Plads, B 227, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2016-09-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanofibers were produced by electrospinning technique and surface coated on silicone elastomer substrate (diameter: 10.0 mm; thickness: 2.0 mm) by a dipcoating method. The obtained hybrid nanoporous matrices were investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformation infrared techniques (FTIR). These characterizations reveal that the surface morphology of electrospun nanofibers remained intact by the dipcoating technique. The produced hybrid matrices showed high water flux of 9407 L/m{sup 2}h, 38% removal rate of dairy effluent (DE) and 2298 ml/g h rate of hydrogen production. - Highlights: • Hybrid ZnO silicon nanoporous matrices are introduced. • The water flux is high 9407 L/m{sup 2}h for ZnO silicon nanoporous matrices. • The ZnO silicon nanoporous matrices showed good photocatalytic properties. • The ZnO nanoporous matrices showed 2298 ml/g h rate of hydrogen production.

  15. Acute high-caffeine exposure increases autophagic flux and reduces protein synthesis in C2C12 skeletal myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, M A; Downs, R M; Webb, G W; Crocker, C L; Kinsey, S T; Baumgarner, Bradley L

    2017-04-01

    Caffeine is a highly catabolic dietary stimulant. High caffeine concentrations (1-10 mM) have previously been shown to inhibit protein synthesis and increase protein degradation in various mammalian cell lines. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of short-term caffeine exposure on cell signaling pathways that regulate protein metabolism in mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Fully differentiated C2C12 skeletal myotubes either received vehicle (DMSO) or 5 mM caffeine for 6 h. Our analysis revealed that caffeine promoted a 40% increase in autolysosome formation and a 25% increase in autophagic flux. In contrast, caffeine treatment did not significantly increase the expression of the skeletal muscle specific ubiquitin ligases MAFbx and MuRF1 or 20S proteasome activity. Caffeine treatment significantly reduced mTORC1 signaling, total protein synthesis and myotube diameter in a CaMKKβ/AMPK-dependent manner. Further, caffeine promoted a CaMKII-dependent increase in myostatin mRNA expression that did not significantly contribute to the caffeine-dependent reduction in protein synthesis. Our results indicate that short-term caffeine exposure significantly reduced skeletal myotube diameter by increasing autophagic flux and promoting a CaMKKβ/AMPK-dependent reduction in protein synthesis.

  16. Reduced-Order Biogeochemical Flux Model for High-Resolution Multi-Scale Biophysical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine; Hamlington, Peter; Pinardi, Nadia; Zavatarelli, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Biogeochemical tracers and their interactions with upper ocean physical processes such as submesoscale circulations and small-scale turbulence are critical for understanding the role of the ocean in the global carbon cycle. These interactions can cause small-scale spatial and temporal heterogeneity in tracer distributions that can, in turn, greatly affect carbon exchange rates between the atmosphere and interior ocean. For this reason, it is important to take into account small-scale biophysical interactions when modeling the global carbon cycle. However, explicitly resolving these interactions in an earth system model (ESM) is currently infeasible due to the enormous associated computational cost. As a result, understanding and subsequently parameterizing how these small-scale heterogeneous distributions develop and how they relate to larger resolved scales is critical for obtaining improved predictions of carbon exchange rates in ESMs. In order to address this need, we have developed the reduced-order, 17 state variable Biogeochemical Flux Model (BFM-17) that follows the chemical functional group approach, which allows for non-Redfield stoichiometric ratios and the exchange of matter through units of carbon, nitrate, and phosphate. This model captures the behavior of open-ocean biogeochemical systems without substantially increasing computational cost, thus allowing the model to be combined with computationally-intensive, fully three-dimensional, non-hydrostatic large eddy simulations (LES). In this talk, we couple BFM-17 with the Princeton Ocean Model and show good agreement between predicted monthly-averaged results and Bermuda testbed area field data (including the Bermuda-Atlantic Time-series Study and Bermuda Testbed Mooring). Through these tests, we demonstrate the capability of BFM-17 to accurately model open-ocean biochemistry. Additionally, we discuss the use of BFM-17 within a multi-scale LES framework and outline how this will further our understanding

  17. DCS - A High Flux Beamline for Time Resolved Dynamic Compression Science – Design Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capatina, D.; D' Amico, Kevin L.; Nudell, J.; Collins, J.; Schmidt, Oliver

    2016-07-27

    The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) beamline, a national user facility for time resolved dynamic compression science supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has recently completed construction and is being commissioned at Sector 35 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The beamline consists of a First Optics Enclosure (FOE) and four experimental enclosures. A Kirkpatrick–Baez focusing mirror system with 2.2 mrad incident angles in the FOE delivers pink beam to the experimental stations. A refocusing Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror system is situated in each of the two most downstream enclosures. Experiments can be conducted in either white, monochromatic, pink or monochromatic-reflected beam mode in any of the experimental stations by changing the position of two interlocked components in the FOE. The beamline Radiation Safety System (RSS) components have been designed to handle the continuous beam provided by two in-line revolver undulators with periods of 27 and 30 mm, at closed gap, 150 mA beam current, and passing through a power limiting aperture of 1.5 x 1.0 mm2. A novel pink beam end station stop [1] is used to stop the continuous and focused pink beam which can achieve a peak heat flux of 105 kW/mm2. A new millisecond shutter design [2] is used to deliver a quick pulse of beam to the sample, synchronized with the dynamic event, the microsecond shutter, and the storage ring clock.

  18. DCS - A high flux beamline for time resolved dynamic compression science – Design highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capatina, D., E-mail: capatina@aps.anl.gov; D’Amico, K., E-mail: kdamico@aps.anl.gov; Nudell, J., E-mail: jnudell@aps.anl.gov; Collins, J., E-mail: collins@aps.anl.gov; Schmidt, O., E-mail: oschmidt@aps.anl.gov [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) beamline, a national user facility for time resolved dynamic compression science supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has recently completed construction and is being commissioned at Sector 35 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The beamline consists of a First Optics Enclosure (FOE) and four experimental enclosures. A Kirkpatrick–Baez focusing mirror system with 2.2 mrad incident angles in the FOE delivers pink beam to the experimental stations. A refocusing Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror system is situated in each of the two most downstream enclosures. Experiments can be conducted in either white, monochromatic, pink or monochromatic-reflected beam mode in any of the experimental stations by changing the position of two interlocked components in the FOE. The beamline Radiation Safety System (RSS) components have been designed to handle the continuous beam provided by two in-line revolver undulators with periods of 27 and 30 mm, at closed gap, 150 mA beam current, and passing through a power limiting aperture of 1.5 x 1.0 mm{sup 2}. A novel pink beam end station stop [1] is used to stop the continuous and focused pink beam which can achieve a peak heat flux of 105 kW/mm{sup 2}. A new millisecond shutter design [2] is used to deliver a quick pulse of beam to the sample, synchronized with the dynamic event, the microsecond shutter, and the storage ring clock.

  19. Energy-related perturbations of the northeast coastal zone: five years (1974-1979) of oceanographic research at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J.J.

    1980-03-01

    Since inception of oceanographic research at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1974, over 75 cruises and 150 papers and reports have been completed. In comparison of shelf ecosystems at high, mid, and low latitudes, an understanding of the natural variability of US coastal waters has been derived. Annual carbon and nitrogen budgets suggest that the energy flow is diverted to a pelagic food web in summer-fall and a demersal food web in winter-spring within the Mid-Atlantic Bight. The impact of energy-related perturbations can now be assessed within the context of natural oscillation of the coastal food web.

  20. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual report for FY 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, David [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    This report documents progress made during FY 2009 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Studies are reported of the application of a silicon coating to surrogates for spheres of uranium-molybdenum alloy. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. A description of the progress in developing a finite element thermal hydraulics model of the LEU core is provided.

  1. Shigella reroutes host cell central metabolism to obtain high-flux nutrient supply for vigorous intracellular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentner, David; Martano, Giuseppe; Callon, Morgane; Chiquet, Petra; Brodmann, Maj; Burton, Olga; Wahlander, Asa; Nanni, Paolo; Delmotte, Nathanaël; Grossmann, Jonas; Limenitakis, Julien; Schlapbach, Ralph; Kiefer, Patrick; Vorholt, Julia A; Hiller, Sebastian; Bumann, Dirk

    2014-07-08

    Shigella flexneri proliferate in infected human epithelial cells at exceptionally high rates. This vigorous growth has important consequences for rapid progression to life-threatening bloody diarrhea, but the underlying metabolic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we used metabolomics, proteomics, and genetic experiments to determine host and Shigella metabolism during infection in a cell culture model. The data suggest that infected host cells maintain largely normal fluxes through glycolytic pathways, but the entire output of these pathways is captured by Shigella, most likely in the form of pyruvate. This striking strategy provides Shigella with an abundant favorable energy source, while preserving host cell ATP generation, energy charge maintenance, and survival, despite ongoing vigorous exploitation. Shigella uses a simple three-step pathway to metabolize pyruvate at high rates with acetate as an excreted waste product. The crucial role of this pathway for Shigella intracellular growth suggests targets for antimicrobial chemotherapy of this devastating disease.

  2. [Effectiveness of pre-emptive hemodialysis with high-flux membranes for the treatment of life-threatening alcohol poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Fernández, R; Peces, C; González, E; Olivas, E; Renjel, F; Jiménez, M; Costero, O; Montero, A; Selgas, R

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol intoxication (methanol, ethanol and ethylene glycol) may result in metabolic acidosis with increased anion gap, increased serum osmolal gap, and neurologic abnormalities ranging from drunkenness to coma, and death. The mortality and morbidity rates remain very high despite intensive care therapy. The toxicity of methanol and ethylene glycol is clearly correlated to the degree of metabolic acidosis. The established treatment of severe methanol and ethylene glycol intoxication is ethanol administration and hemodialysis (HD). By inhibiting the main metabolic pathway of methanol and ethylene glycol (alcohol dehydrogenase), ethanol prevents the formation of major toxic metabolites (formic acid, glycolic acid and oxalic acid). Conventional HD can reduce serum methanol, ethanol and ethylene glycol and its metabolites rapidly, but high-flux membranes should be capable of removing more toxic per hour of HD. In this report, we describe 14 cases of life-threatening alcohol intoxication (11 methanol, 1 ethanol, and 2 ethylene glycol) who were treated successfully with supportive care, ethanol infusion (methanol and ethylene glycol), and early HD with a high-flux dialyser. The median pH was 7.04 +/- 0.06 (range 6.60-7.33), median bicarbonate 9.9 +/- 1.9 mmol/l (range 1.4-25), and median base deficit 18.4 +/- 2.6 mmol/l (range 2-33). The median anion gap was 29.1 +/- 2.3 mmol/l (range 16-45) and the median osmolal gap was 119 +/- 47 mOsm/l (range 16-402). On admission there was an excellent linear correlation between the serum toxic alcohol concentrations and the osmolal gaps (R2 = 0.98, p = 0.0006). In all cases early HD corrected metabolic acidosis and osmolal abnormalities. The mortality was 7 % (1 from 14). We conclude that pre-emptive HD should be performed in severe intoxications to remove both the parent compound and its metabolites. The HD prescription should include a large surface area dialyser with high-flux membrane, a blood flow rate in excess of 250 ml

  3. Numerical investigation of fluid flow and heat transfer under high heat flux using rectangular micro-channels

    KAUST Repository

    Mansoor, Mohammad M.

    2012-02-01

    A 3D-conjugate numerical investigation was conducted to predict heat transfer characteristics in a rectangular cross-sectional micro-channel employing simultaneously developing single-phase flows. The numerical code was validated by comparison with previous experimental and numerical results for the same micro-channel dimensions and classical correlations based on conventional sized channels. High heat fluxes up to 130W/cm 2 were applied to investigate micro-channel thermal characteristics. The entire computational domain was discretized using a 120×160×100 grid for the micro-channel with an aspect ratio of (α=4.56) and examined for Reynolds numbers in the laminar range (Re 500-2000) using FLUENT. De-ionized water served as the cooling fluid while the micro-channel substrate used was made of copper. Validation results were found to be in good agreement with previous experimental and numerical data [1] with an average deviation of less than 4.2%. As the applied heat flux increased, an increase in heat transfer coefficient values was observed. Also, the Reynolds number required for transition from single-phase fluid to two-phase was found to increase. A correlation is proposed for the results of average Nusselt numbers for the heat transfer characteristics in micro-channels with simultaneously developing, single-phase flows. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. High-Fat Diet-Induced Lysosomal Dysfunction and Impaired Autophagic Flux Contribute to Lipotoxicity in the Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takeshi; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kimura, Tomonori; Namba, Tomoko; Matsuda, Jun; Minami, Satoshi; Kaimori, Jun-Ya; Matsui, Isao; Matsusaka, Taiji; Niimura, Fumio; Yanagita, Motoko; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2017-05-01

    Excessive fat intake contributes to the progression of metabolic diseases via cellular injury and inflammation, a process termed lipotoxicity. Here, we investigated the role of lysosomal dysfunction and impaired autophagic flux in the pathogenesis of lipotoxicity in the kidney. In mice, a high-fat diet (HFD) resulted in an accumulation of phospholipids in enlarged lysosomes within kidney proximal tubular cells (PTCs). In isolated PTCs treated with palmitic acid, autophagic degradation activity progressively stagnated in association with impaired lysosomal acidification and excessive lipid accumulation. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that the accumulated lipids originated from cellular membranes. In mice with induced PTC-specific ablation of autophagy, PTCs of HFD-mice exhibited greater accumulation of ubiquitin-positive protein aggregates normally removed by autophagy than did PTCs of mice fed a normal diet. Furthermore, HFD-mice had no capacity to augment autophagic activity upon another pathologic stress. Autophagy ablation also exaggerated HFD-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammasome activation. Moreover, renal ischemia-reperfusion induced greater injury in HFD-mice than in mice fed a normal diet, and ablation of autophagy further exacerbated this effect. Finally, we detected similarly enhanced phospholipid accumulation in enlarged lysosomes and impaired autophagic flux in the kidneys of obese patients compared with nonobese patients. These findings provide key insights regarding the pathophysiology of lipotoxicity in the kidney and clues to a novel treatment for obesity-related kidney diseases. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  5. Results and analysis of high heat flux tests on a full scale vertical target prototype of ITER divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missirlian, M.; Escourbiac, F.; Schlosser, J.; Durocher, A. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Merola, M. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Garching (Germany); Bobin-Vastra, I. [Framatome, 71 - Le Creusot (France)

    2004-07-01

    After an extensive development program, a Full-Scale Divertor Target prototype (VTFS) manufactured with all the main features of the corresponding ITER divertor, was intensively tested in the high heat flux FE200 facility. The prototype consists of four units having a full mono-block geometry. The lower part (CFC armour) and the upper part (W armour) of each mono-block were joined to the solution annealed, quenched and cold worked CuCrZr tube by HIP technique. The CFC mono-block was successfully tested up to 1000 cycles at 23 MW/m{sup 2} without any indication of failure. This value is well beyond the ITER design target of 300 cycles at 20 MW/m{sup 2}. The W mono-block endured {approx}600 cycles at 10 MW/m{sup 2}. This value of flux is one order of magnitude higher than the ITER design target for the upper part of the vertical target. Fatigue damage is observed when pursuing the cycling up to 15 MW/m{sup 2}. A first stress analysis seems to predict these factual results. However, macro-graphic examinations should bring a better damage valuation. Meanwhile, the fatigue testing will continue on the W healthy part of the VTFS prototype with castellation located on the heated surface (reducing the stresses close to the W-Cu interface). (authors)

  6. High Flux FRC Facility for the Stability, Confinement and ITER Divertor Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Alan L. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Aerospace and Energetics Research Program. Redmond Plasma Physics Lab.; Milroy, Richard D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Aerospace and Energetics Research Program. Redmond Plasma Physics Lab.

    2014-01-31

    The TCS (Translation, Confinement, & Sustainment) program was begun on 7 August, 1996 to renew basic studies of the Field Reversed Configuration (FRC). The program made use of the old LSX (Large s Experiment) device, which was constructed at STI during the period from 1986 to 1990, but only operated for one year due to a DOE decision at the time to focus exclusively on the tokamak configuration. LSX was transferred to the University of Washington in 1992 and modified (LSX/mod) to perform Tokamak Refueling by Accelerated Plasmoids (TRAP) experiments. The TRAP program was funded from 7 August, 1992 until 6 August, 1996, but was utilized for an additional year while TCS was being constructed. During the first TCS funding period TCS was completed and initial experiments were begun. A large multi-megawatt RF power supply was built by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for use with a Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF) system, and LANL has been a continuing participant in our experimental program. A smaller prototype facility, called the Star Thrust Experiment (STX) was also built and operated in this period, partly with NASA funding, before TCS came on-line. A final report for this construction period was submitted in September 2000. A first renewal period (2.5 years) provided operating funds for the period between July 7, 2000 and January 6, 2003. A great deal of progress was made in understanding the use of RMF to both form and sustain FRCs during this period. The principal result of the experimental program was the formation of quasi steady-state (as long as RMF power was available) FRCs with densities in the 1-3x1019 m-3 range. However, the plasma temperature (Te or Ti) was limited to sub-25 eV, except transiently during start-up, by the rapid accumulation of impurities. This is not surprising since TCS was only designed to demonstrate RMF flux build-up and was not provided with either fueling capabilities or modern vacuum

  7. Quantitative evaluation of high-energy O- ion particle flux in a DC magnetron sputter plasma with an indium-tin-oxide target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Taku; Bae, Hansin; Setaka, Kenta; Ogawa, Hayato; Fukuoka, Yushi; Suzuki, Haruka; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2017-11-01

    O- ion flux from the indium tin oxide (ITO) sputter target under Ar ion bombardment is quantitatively evaluated using a calorimetry method. Using a mass spectrometer with an energy analyzer, O- energy distribution is measured with spatial dependence. Directional high-energy O- ion ejected from the target surface is observed. Using a calorimetry method, localized heat flux originated from high-energy O- ion is measured. From absolute evaluation of the heat flux from O- ion, O- particle flux in order of 1018 m-2 s-1 is evaluated at a distance of 10 cm from the target. Production yield of O- ion on the ITO target by one Ar+ ion impingement at a kinetic energy of 244 eV is estimated to be 3.3  ×  10-3 as the minimum value.

  8. Collective Thomson scattering system for determination of ion properties in a high flux plasma beam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meiden, H. J.; Vernimmen, J. W. M.; Bystrov, K.; Jesko, K.; Kantor, M. Y.; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, T. W.

    2016-01-01

    A collective Thomson scattering system has been developed for measuring ion temperature, plasma velocity and impurity concentration in the high density magnetized Magnum-PSI plasma beam, allowing for measurements at low temperature (<5 eV) and high electron density >4 × 1020 m−3, while

  9. High-Energy Neutrino Flux Studied in the ANTARES Deep-Sea Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löhner, Herbert; Steadman, SG; Stephans, GSF; Taylor, FE

    2012-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos from cosmic origin appear to be ideal probes for long-distance astronomy and may provide insight into cosmic particle acceleration mechanisms. The ANTARES deep-sea neutrino telescope, fully operational since May 2008, aims at the detection of upgoing muon tracks caused by high

  10. Nitrogen mineralization and nitrification in a mixed-conifer forest in southern California: controlling factors, fluxes, and nitrogen fertilization response at a high and low nitrogen deposition site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark E. Fenn; Mark A. Poth; Joseph D. Terry; Timothy J. Blubaugh

    2005-01-01

    Net fluxes of nitrogen (N) mineralization and nitrification were measured in situ on a monthly basis for 3 years at a high (HN) and low (LN) N deposition site in the San Bernardino Mountains, California. Mean N mineralization fluxes in the forest floor and top 10 cm of mineral soil were 19.0 and 59.8 kg N·ha–1·year–1 at LN...

  11. First magnet constructed for the LHC by Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    CERN has taken delivery of the first US-built contribution to the LHC. The 25-tonne interaction-region dipole magnet, which will guide the LHC´s two counter-rotating beams of protons into collision, was built at the US Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is the first of 20 that the laboratory will ultimately provide and took nine months for more than 100 scientists, engineers and technicians to construct. Brookhaven´s Superconducting Magnet Division is now building the remaining 19 magnets, which will be shipped to CERN later this year. They are provided for the LHC under the terms of a 1998 agreement between CERN and the US Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  12. Deuteron flux production in a small high-voltage high-current diode with pulsed magnetic insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikanov, A. E.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Isaev, A. A.; Kozlovskii, K. I.; Shatokhin, V. L.

    2017-06-01

    The results of new studies on the production of accelerated deuteron fluxes in a small ion diode with pulsed magnetic insulation of electrons have been presented. A plasma anode of the diode has been formed under the action of a 1.06 μm laser radiation with a pulse duration of 10 ns, a pulse energy of up to 1 J, and a power density on the target of 5 × 1015 W m-2. An accelerating voltage of up to 300 kV has been created using an Arkad'ev-Marx pulsed voltage generator with a stored energy of 50 J and a repetition rate of 1 Hz. A magnetic field of higher than 0.6 T for insulating electrons has been formed by a current pulse of the first cascade of the generator in a spiral line before a conical cascade. Stable deuteron acceleration to 300 keV with a current of up to 1.5 kA and a pulse duration of 0.3 μs has been achieved.

  13. Finite Volume Scheme for Double Convection-Diffusion Exchange of Solutes in Bicarbonate High-Flux Hollow-Fiber Dialyzer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodwo Annan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of a high-flux dialyzer in terms of buffering and toxic solute removal largely depends on the ability to use convection-diffusion mechanism inside the membrane. A two-dimensional transient convection-diffusion model coupled with acid-base correction term was developed. A finite volume technique was used to discretize the model and to numerically simulate it using MATLAB software tool. We observed that small solute concentration gradients peaked and were large enough to activate solute diffusion process in the membrane. While CO2 concentration gradients diminished from their maxima and shifted toward the end of the membrane, concentration gradients peaked at the same position. Also, CO2 concentration decreased rapidly within the first 47 minutes while optimal concentration was achieved within 30 minutes of the therapy. Abnormally high diffusion fluxes were observed near the blood-membrane interface that increased diffusion driving force and enhanced the overall diffusive process. While convective flux dominated total flux during the dialysis session, there was a continuous interference between convection and diffusion fluxes that call for the need to seek minimal interference between these two mechanisms. This is critical for the effective design and operation of high-flux dialyzers.

  14. Hybrid Cooling Loop Technology for Robust High Heat Flux Cooling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. proposes to develop a hybrid cooling loop technology for space thermal control. The proposed technology combines the high heat...

  15. ) Mold Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Myung-Duk; Shi, Cheng-Bin; Cho, Jung-Wook; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2014-10-01

    The effects of basicity (CaO/SiO2), B2O3, and Li2O addition on the crystallization behaviors of lime-silica-based mold fluxes have been investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and single hot thermocouple technique. It was found that the crystallization temperature of cuspidine increased with increasing the basicity of mold fluxes. The crystallization of wollastonite was suppressed with increasing the mold flux basicity due to the enhancement of cuspidine crystallization. The addition of B2O3 suppresses the crystallization of mold flux. The crystallization temperature of mold flux decreases with Li2O addition. The size of cuspidine increases, while the number of cuspidine decreases with increasing mold flux basicity. The morphology of cuspidine in mold fluxes with lower basicity is largely dendritic. The dendritic cuspidine in mold fluxes is composed of many fine cuspidine crystals. On the contrary, in mold fluxes with higher basicity, the cuspidine crystals are larger in size with mainly faceted morphology. The crystalline phase evolution was also calculated using a thermodynamic database, and compared with the experimental results determined by DSC and XRD. The results of thermodynamic calculation of crystalline phase formation are in accordance with the results determined by DSC and XRD.

  16. Qualitative risk evaluation of environmental restoration programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, S.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report documents the evaluation of risks associated with environmental restoration activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory using two tools supplied by DOE to provide a consistent set of risk estimates across the DOE complex: Risk Data Sheets (RDS) and Relative Risk Ranking. The tools are described, the process taken characterized, results provided and discussed. The two approaches are compared and recommendations provided for continuing improvement of the process.

  17. Brookhaven experience with handling and shipping of, and cask design for, reactor spent-fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, Francis A.

    1965-12-01

    The general problems in the area are presented. Solutions to the specific problems at Brookhaven are discussed in relation to the general problem. Presentation covers (a) fuel removal tools and equipment, and canal storage facilities; (b) methods of shipment; (c) brief review of the AEC and ICC regulatory requirements; and (d) optimized design of the shipping container. Specific solutions used by BNL over a six -year period are described. The need for complete and early analysis of the specific problem is indicated.

  18. The first picosecond terawatt CO{sub 2} laser at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Babzien, M. [and others

    1998-02-01

    The first terawatt picosecond CO{sub 2} laser will be brought to operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility in 1998. System consists of a single-mode TEA oscillator, picosecond semiconductor optical switch, multi-atmosphere. The authors report on design, simulation, and performance tests of the 10 atm final amplifier that allows for direct multi-joule energy extraction in a picosecond laser pulse.

  19. Strong interactions of hyperons. [Summaries of research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemethy, P.; Hungerbuehler, V.; Majka, R.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of the strong interaction results obtained with the Yale--FNAL--BNL hyperon beam at the Brookhaven AGS is presented. Differential cross sections are reported for hyperon-proton elastic scattering with samples of 6200 ..sigma../sup -/p events and 67 ..xi../sup -/p events. Also a report is made on a search for hyperon resonances in inelastic scattering. Finally, the prospects for new results on hyperon interactions are reviewed.

  20. Brookhaven highlights. Report on research, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Belford, M.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. [eds.

    1993-12-31

    This report highlights the research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory during the period dating from October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. There are contributions to the report from different programs and departments within the laboratory. These include technology transfer, RHIC, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, physics, biology, national synchrotron light source, applied science, medical science, advanced technology, chemistry, reactor physics, safety and environmental protection, instrumentation, and computing and communications.

  1. 2003 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-02

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Brookhaven National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  2. Use of EPICS and Python technology for the development of a computational toolkit for high heat flux testing of plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugandhi, Ritesh, E-mail: ritesh@ipr.res.in; Swamy, Rajamannar, E-mail: rajamannar@ipr.res.in; Khirwadkar, Samir, E-mail: sameer@ipr.res.in

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • An integrated approach to software development for computational processing and experimental control. • Use of open source, cross platform, robust and advanced tools for computational code development. • Prediction of optimized process parameters for critical heat flux model. • Virtual experimentation for high heat flux testing of plasma facing components. - Abstract: The high heat flux testing and characterization of the divertor and first wall components are a challenging engineering problem of a tokamak. These components are subject to steady state and transient heat load of high magnitude. Therefore, the accurate prediction and control of the cooling parameters is crucial to prevent burnout. The prediction of the cooling parameters is based on the numerical solution of the critical heat flux (CHF) model. In a test facility for high heat flux testing of plasma facing components (PFC), the integration of computations and experimental control is an essential requirement. Experimental physics and industrial control system (EPICS) provides powerful tools for steering controls, data simulation, hardware interfacing and wider usability. Python provides an open source alternative for numerical computations and scripting. We have integrated these two open source technologies to develop a graphical software for a typical high heat flux experiment. The implementation uses EPICS based tools namely IOC (I/O controller) server, control system studio (CSS) and Python based tools namely Numpy, Scipy, Matplotlib and NOSE. EPICS and Python are integrated using PyEpics library. This toolkit is currently under operation at high heat flux test facility at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) and is also useful for the experimental labs working in the similar research areas. The paper reports the software architectural design, implementation tools and rationale for their selection, test and validation.

  3. Progress on the realization of a new GEM based neutron diagnostic concept for high flux neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croci, G.; Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Milano, Italy and INFN, Sez. di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Rebai, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy and INFN, Sez. di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Cazzaniga, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Palma, M. Dalla; Pasqualotto, R.; Tollin, M. [Consorzio RFX - Associazione Euratom-Enea sulla Fusione, Padova (Italy); Grosso, G.; Muraro, A. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Milano (Italy); Murtas, F.; Claps, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy)

    2014-08-21

    Fusion reactors will need high flux neutron detectors to diagnose the deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium. A candidate detection technique is the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM). New GEM based detectors are being developed for application to a neutral deuterium beam test facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission due to interaction of the deuterium beam with the deuterons implanted in the beam dump surface. This is done by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses nGEM detectors, i.e. GEM detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. After the realization and test of several small area prototypes, a full size prototype has been realized and tested with laboratory sources. Test on neutron beams are foreseen for the next months.

  4. Characteristic and magnetic field analysis of a high temperature superconductor axial-flux coreless induction maglev motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qin; Yu, Fan; Jin, Fang; Shuo, Li; Guoguo, Li; Gang, Lv

    2012-04-01

    A new high temperature superconductor axial-flux coreless maglev motor (HTS AFIM) is proposed, of which the primary windings are made of HTS tapes and the secondary is a non-magnetic conductor. The main works of this paper are the magnetic-field computation and characteristics analysis of HTS AFIM. For the first one, the reduction of magnetic fields near outer and inner radius of the HTS AFIM is solved by introducing the sub-loop electro-magnetic model along the radial position. For the second one, the AC losses of HTS coils are calculated. The relationships between the device's characteristics and device parameters are presented, and the results indicate that under certain frequency and current levitation device can output enough lift force. The conclusions are verified by finite element calculations.

  5. Characteristic and magnetic field analysis of a high temperature superconductor axial-flux coreless induction maglev motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qin; Yu, Fan; Jin, Fang; Shuo, Li; Guoguo, Li; Gang, Lv

    2012-04-01

    A new high temperature superconductor axial-flux coreless maglev motor (HTS AFIM) is proposed, of which the primary windings are made of HTS tapes and the secondary is a non-magnetic conductor. The main works of this paper are the magnetic-field computation and characteristics analysis of HTS AFIM. For the first one, the reduction of magnetic fields near outer and inner radius of the HTS AFIM is solved by introducing the sub-loop electro-magnetic model along the radial position. For the second one, the AC losses of HTS coils are calculated. The relationships between the device's characteristics and device parameters are presented, and the results indicate that under certain frequency and current levitation device can output enough lift force. The conclusions are verified by finite element calculations.

  6. Design and characterization of a 64 channels ASIC front-end electronics for high-flux particle beam detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fausti, F.; Mazza, G.; Attili, A.; Mazinani, M. Fadavi; Giordanengo, S.; Lavagno, M.; Manganaro, L.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Vignati, A.; Cirio, R.

    2017-09-01

    A new wide-input range 64-channels current-to-frequency converter ASIC has been developed and characterized for applications in beam monitoring of therapeutic particle beams. This chip, named TERA09, has been designed to extend the input current range, compared to the previous versions of the chip, for dealing with high-flux pulsed beams. A particular care was devoted in achieving a good conversion linearity over a wide bipolar input current range. Using a charge quantum of 200 fC, a linearity within ±2% for an input current range between 3 nA and 12 μA is obtained for individual channels, with a gain spread among the channels of about 3%. By connecting all the 64 channels of the chip to a common input, the current range can be increased 64 times preserving a linearity within ±3% in the range between and 20 μA and 750 μA.

  7. Paleo response of the Northeast Greenland ice stream to changes in ice geometry and anomalously high geothermal flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muresan, Ioana S.; Khan, Shfaqat A.; Aschwanden, Andy; Rogozhina, Irina; MacGregor, Joseph A.; Fahnestock, Mark A.; Kjær, Kurt H.; Bjørk, Anders A.; Kjeldsen, Kristian K.

    2017-04-01

    The Northeast Greenland ice stream (NEGIS) extends more than 600 km into the interior of the Greenland Ice Sheet, and the observed recent increase in surface melting and dynamic thinning have raised questions about its future stability. Most numerical modelling studies have focused on understanding ice dynamics and processes occurring at the terminus, and a higher-dimension modelling characterization of the ice stream, especially 100-600 km upstream glacier, is still missing. Using the Parallel Ice Sheet Model we investigate the sensitivity of the NEGIS ice flow to past changes in ice geometry, anomalously high geothermal flux and subglacial hydrology routing. We use two subglacial hydrology models. In the first model, the water in the subglacial layer is not conserved and it is only stored locally in a layer of subglacial till up to 2 m. In the second model, the water is conserved in the map-plane and the excess water is transported downstream glacier horizontally. On millennial time scales (here 120 ka), the basal topography influences the spatial pattern of the ice flow by changing the longitudinal stress gradients in the ice, while the thermal boundary conditions at the base of the ice sheet influence the ice flow through changes in basal melt rates and subsequent basal sliding. Field observations interpreted together with numerical simulations suggest that a combination of anomalously high geothermal flux and subglacial hydrology routing, bed topography and time-evolved ice geometry could explain the observed speed and shape of the NEGIS. The model performance is assessed against observed ice flow velocities, surface elevation change from satellite and airborne laser and radar altimetry, and reconstructed terminus retreat.

  8. Experimental design and analysis for irradiation of SiC/SiC composite tubes under a prototypic high heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Christian M.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; McDuffee, Joel L.; Deck, Christian P.; Katoh, Yutai; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to design an irradiation vehicle for testing silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composite cladding materials under conditions representative of a light water reactor in order to validate thermo-mechanical models of stress states in these materials due to irradiation swelling and differential thermal expansion. The design allows for a constant tube outer surface temperature in the range of 300-350 °C under a representative high heat flux (∼0.66 MW/m2) during one cycle of irradiation in an un-instrumented ;rabbit; capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. An engineered aluminum foil was developed to absorb the expansion of the cladding tubes, due to irradiation swelling, without changing the thermal resistance of the gap between the cladding and irradiation capsule. Finite-element analyses of the capsule were performed, and the models used to calculate thermal contact resistance were validated by out-of-pile testing and post-irradiation examination of the foils and passive SiC thermometry. Six irradiated cladding tubes (both monoliths and composites) were irradiated and subsequently disassembled in a hot cell. The calculated temperatures of passive SiC thermometry inside the capsules showed good agreement with temperatures measured post-irradiation, with two calculated temperatures falling within 10 °C of experimental measurements. The success of this design could lead to new opportunities for irradiation applications with materials that suffer from irradiation swelling, creep, or other dimensional changes that can affect the specimen temperature during irradiation.

  9. Sub-surface microstructure of single and polycrystalline tungsten after high flux plasma exposure studied by TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinko, A., E-mail: adubinko@sckcen.be [Institute for Nuclear Material Sciences, SCK-CEN, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Terentyev, D. [Institute for Nuclear Material Sciences, SCK-CEN, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Bakaeva, A. [Institute for Nuclear Material Sciences, SCK-CEN, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Hernández-Mayoral, M. [Division of Materials, CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); De Temmerman, G. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Buzi, L. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst. Energie & Klimaforsch Plasmaphys, D-52425 Julich (Germany); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Unterberg, B. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst. Energie & Klimaforsch Plasmaphys, D-52425 Julich (Germany)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • Plasma exposure induces dislocation-dominated microstructure as indicated by TEM. • Plasma exposure increases surface dislocation density by an order of magnitude in the polycrystalline tungsten. • Intensive dislocation-grain boundary interaction observed in polycrystalline tungsten. • Dislocation loops are observed in both polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten. - Abstract: We have performed high flux plasma exposure of tungsten and subsequent microstructural characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The aim was to reveal the nanometric features in the sub-surface region as well as to compare the microstructural evolution in tungsten single crystal and ITER-relevant specification. In both types of samples, TEM examination revealed the formation of a dense dislocation network and dislocation tangles. The estimated dislocation density in the sub-surface region was of the order of 10{sup 14} m{sup −2} and it gradually decreased with a depth position of the examined sample. Besides individual dislocation lines, networks and tangles, the interstitial dislocation loops have been observed in all examined samples only after the exposure. Contrary to that, examination of the pristine single crystal W and backside of the plasma-exposed samples did not reveal the presence of dislocation loops and tangles. This clearly proves that high flux plasma exposure induces severe plastic deformation in the sub-surface region irrespective of the presence of initial dislocations and sub-grains, and the formation of dislocation tangles, networks and interstitial loops is a co-product of thermal stress and intensive plasma particles uptake.

  10. Reorganization of graphite surfaces into carbon micro- and nanoparticles under high flux hydrogen plasma bombardment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrov, K.; van der Vegt, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Arnas, C.; Marot, L.

    2013-01-01

    Fine-grain graphite samples were exposed to high density low temperature (n(e) similar to 10(20)m(-3), T-e similar to 1 eV) hydrogen plasmas in the Pilot-PSI linear plasma generator. Redeposition of eroded carbon is so strong that no external precursor gas injection is necessary for deposits to form

  11. Operational characteristics of the high flux plasma generator Magnum-PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, H. J. N.; Abrams, T.; van den Berg, M. A.; Brons, S.; van Eden, G. G.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Morgan, T. W.; van de Pol, M.J.; Scholten, J.; Smeets, P. H. M.; De Temmerman, G.; de Vries, P. C.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In Magnum-PSI (MAgnetized plasma Generator and \\{NUMerical\\} modeling for Plasma Surface Interactions), the high density, low temperature plasma of a wall stabilized dc cascaded arc is confined to a magnetized plasma beam by a quasi-steady state axial magnetic field up to 1.3 T. It

  12. Herschel-PACS high-precision FIR fluxes of NEAs and MBAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, T.; Kiss, C.; Ali-Lagoa, V.

    2017-09-01

    We present unique and high-precision Herschel-PACS photometer far-IR observations of near-Earth and main-belt asteroids. These measurements are used for radiometric studies of unprecedented accuracy, resulting in sizes, albedos, thermal inertias, emissivities, and surface roughness for six important NEAs and more than 20 large MBAs.

  13. Environmental and physical controls on northern high latitude methane fluxes across permafrost zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Olefeldt; M.R. Turetsky; P.M. Crill; A.D. McGuire

    2013-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emissions from the northern high-latitude region represent potentially significant biogeochemical feedbacks to the climate system. We compiled a database of growing-season CH4 emissions from terrestrial ecosystems located across permafrost zones, including 303 sites described in 65 studies. Data on...

  14. Performance of high temperature heat flux plates and soil moisture probes during controlled surface fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. J. Massman; J. M. Frank; S. M. Massman; W. D. Shepperd

    2003-01-01

    Natural and prescribed fires play an important role in managing and maintaining most ecosystems in the western United States. The high soil temperatures associated with fire influence forests and their ability to regenerate after a fire by altering soil properties and soil chemistry and by killing microbes, plant roots, and seeds. Because prescribed fire is frequently...

  15. The high-flux effect on deuterium retention in TiC and TaC doped tungsten at high temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zibrov, M.; Bystrov, K.; Mayer, M.; Morgan, T. W.; Kurishita, H.

    2017-01-01

    Samples made of tungsten (W) doped either with titanium carbide (W-1.1TiC) or tantalum carbide (W-3.3TaC) were exposed to a low-energy (40 eV/D), high-flux (1.8–5 × 1023 D/m2s) deuterium (D) plasma at temperatures of about800 K, 1050 K, and 1250 K to a fluence of about1 × 1027 D/m2. The deuterium

  16. The Structure and The Crystallization Behaviour of The CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-Based Mold Flux for High-Al Steels Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinxing; Wen, Guanghua; Huang, Ting; Tang, Ping

    The reaction between [Al] and SiO2 sharply converted the original CaO-SiO2-based flux into CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-based flux during the continuous casting of high-Al steels, promoting the crystallization and deteriorating the mold lubrication. Therefore, study on the structure and crystallization behavior of CaO-SiO2-based and CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-based flux is important to solve this problem. The structure and crystallization behavior were investigated by Raman spectra and the single hot thermocouple technique. The results show that the [AlO4]5- entered the silicate network (CaO-SiO2-based) and the melt converted into the aluminosilicates structure (CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-based), the formation of Al-O-Al linkages and Si-O-Al linkages increased the instability of network structure. From the time temperature transformation diagrams, the strong crystallization tendency and the variety of crystals are mainly the properties of slag film in the CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-based flux. Hence, the improvement of the structural stability and suppression the crystallization tendency of the CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-based flux are key to design a high-Al steel mold flux.

  17. Flux Creep Investigation in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+d High-Temperature Superconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Blanca

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The flux creep process in a c-axis Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+d thin film was investigated at different temperatures and applied fields using the Kim-Anderson (KA approach. The peaked behavior shown in the magnetoresistance profile was attributed to the competing mechanisms of flux motion and sample-intrinsic transition near Tc.Within the temperature range where the competition occurs, U increases with temperature and consequently a decrease in the superconducting volume corresponds to a decrease in the flux creep. Moreover, the flux creep potential barrier varies with applied current I at all temperatures consistent with the KA model.

  18. Direct depth distribution measurement of deuterium in bulk tungsten exposed to high-flux plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Taylor

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding tritium retention and permeation in plasma-facing components is critical for fusion safety and fuel cycle control. Glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GD-OES is shown to be an effective tool to reveal the depth profile of deuterium in tungsten. Results confirm the detection of deuterium. A ∼46 μm depth profile revealed that the deuterium content decreased precipitously in the first 7 μm, and detectable amounts were observed to depths in excess of 20 μm. The large probing depth of GD-OES (up to 100s of μm enables studies not previously accessible to the more conventional techniques for investigating deuterium retention. Of particular applicability is the use of GD-OES to measure the depth profile for experiments where high deuterium concentration in the bulk material is expected: deuterium retention in neutron irradiated materials, and ultra-high deuterium fluences in burning plasma environment.

  19. Staged Z-pinch for the production of high-flux neutrons and net energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessel, Frank J.; Rahman, Hafiz Ur; Rostoker, Norman; Ney, Paul

    2017-12-05

    A fusible target is embedded in a high Z liner, ohmically heated and then shock wave heated by implosion of an enveloping high Z liner. The target is adiabatically heated by compression, fusibly ignited and charged-particle heated as it is being ignited. A shock front forms as the liner implodes which shock front detaches from the more slowly moving liner, collides with the outer surface of the target, accelerates inward, rapidly heating the target, adiabatically compressing the target and liner and amplifying the current to converge the liner mass toward a central axis thereby compressing the target to a fusion condition when it begins to ignite and produce charged particles. The charged particles are trapped in a large magnetic field surrounding the target. The energy of the charged particles is deposited into the target to further heat the target to produce an energy gain.

  20. Snowpack fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide from high Arctic tundra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirk, Norbert; Tamstorf, Mikkel P; Lund, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the land-atmosphere exchange of the greenhouse gases methane (CH4) andcarbon dioxide (CO2) in high Arctic tundra ecosystems are particularly difficult in the cold season, resultingin large uncertainty on flux magnitudes and their controlling factors during this long, frozen period...... butdetected a pulse in the 13C-CH4stable isotopic signature of the soil’s CH4source during snowmelt, whichsuggests the release of a CH4reservoir that was strongly affected by methanotrophic microorganisms. In thepolygonal tundra of Adventdalen, the snowpack featured several ice layers, which suppressed...... togeomorphological soil cracks. Collectively, these findings suggest important ties between growing seasonand cold season greenhouse gas emissions from high Arctic tundra....

  1. Room temperature creep-fatigue response of selected copper alloys for high heat flux applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, M.; Singh, B.N.; Stubbins, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Two copper alloys, dispersion-strengthened CuAl25 and precipitation-hardened CuCrZr, were examined under fatigue and fatigue with hold time loading conditions. Tests were carried out at room temperature and hold times were imposed at maximum tensile and maximum compressive strains. It was found...... that hold times could be damaging even at room temperature, well below temperatures typically associated with creep. Hold times resulted in shorter fatigue lives in the high cycle fatigue, long life regime (i.e., at low strain amplitudes) than those of materials tested under the same conditions without hold...... times. The influence of hold times on fatigue life in the low cycle fatigue, short life regime (i.e., at high strain amplitudes) was minimal. When hold time effects were observed, fatigue lives were reduced with hold times as short as two seconds. Appreciable stress relaxation was observed during...

  2. LAD Early Career Prize Talk:Laboratory astrophysics experiments investigating the effects of high energy fluxes on Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth relevant to young supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. Paul; Park, Hye Sook; Huntington, Channing; Miles, Aaron R.; Remington, Bruce A.; Plewa, Tomek; Trantham, Matt; Shvarts, Dov; Raman, Kumar; MacLaren, Steven; Wan, Wesley; Doss, Forrest; Kline, John; Flippos, Kirk; Malamud, Guy; Handy, Timothy; Prisbey, Shon; Grosskopf, Michael; Krauland, Christine; Klein, Sallee; Harding, Eric; Wallace, Russell; Marion, Donna; Kalantar, Dan

    2017-06-01

    Energy-transport effects can alter the structure that develops as a supernova evolves into a supernova remnant. The Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability is thought to produce structure at the interface between the stellar ejecta and the circumstellar matter (CSM), based on simple models and hydrodynamic simulations. When a blast wave emerges from an exploding star, it drives a forward shock into the CSM and a reverse shock forms in the expanding stellar ejecta, creating a young supernova remnant (SNR). As mass accumulates in the shocked layers, the interface between these two shocks decelerates, becoming unstable to the RT instability. Simulations predict that RT produces structures at this interface, having a range of spatial scales. When the CSM is dense enough, as in the case of SN 1993J, the hot shocked matter can produce significant radiative fluxes that affect the emission from the SNR. Here we report experimental results from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to explore how large energy fluxes, which are present in supernovae such as SN 1993J, might affect this structure. The experiment used NIF to create a RT unstable interface subject to a high energy flux by the emergence of a blast wave into lower-density matter, in analogy to the SNR. We also preformed and with a low energy flux to compare the affect of the energy flux on the instability growth. We found that the RT growth was reduced in the experiments with a high energy flux. In analyzing the comparison with SN 1993J, we discovered that the energy fluxes produced by heat conduction appear to be larger than the radiative energy fluxes, and large enough to have dramatic consequences. No reported astrophysical simulations have included radiation and heat conduction self-consistently in modeling SNRs.

  3. How unequal fluxes of high energy astrophysical neutrinos and antineutrinos can fake new physics

    OpenAIRE

    Nunokawa, Hiroshi; Panes, Boris; Funchal, Renata Zukanovich

    2016-01-01

    Flavor ratios of very high energy astrophysical neutrinos, which can be studied at the Earth by a neutrino telescope such as IceCube, can serve to diagnose their production mechanism at the astrophysical source. The flavor ratios for neutrinos and antineutrinos can be quite different as we do not know how they are produced in the astrophysical environment. Due to this uncertainty the neutrino and antineutrino flavor ratios at the Earth also could be quite different. Nonetheless, it is general...

  4. A regional high-resolution carbon flux inversion of North America for 2004

    OpenAIRE

    Schuh, A. E.; A. S. Denning; Corbin, K. D.; Baker, I. T.; M. Uliasz; N. Parazoo; A. E. Andrews; D. E. J. Worthy

    2010-01-01

    Resolving the discrepancies between NEE estimates based upon (1) ground studies and (2) atmospheric inversion results, demands increasingly sophisticated techniques. In this paper we present a high-resolution inversion based upon a regional meteorology model (RAMS) and an underlying biosphere (SiB3) model, both running on an identical 40 km grid over most of North America. Current operational systems like CarbonTracker as well as many previous glob...

  5. The high-flux effect on deuterium retention in TiC and TaC doped tungsten at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibrov, Mikhail; Bystrov, Kirill; Mayer, Matej; Morgan, Thomas W.; Kurishita, Hiroaki

    2017-10-01

    Samples made of tungsten (W) doped either with titanium carbide (W-1.1TiC) or tantalum carbide (W-3.3TaC) were exposed to a low-energy (40 eV/D), high-flux (1.8-5 × 1023 D/m2s) deuterium (D) plasma at temperatures of about800 K, 1050 K, and 1250 K to a fluence of about1 × 1027 D/m2. The deuterium (D) inventory in the samples was examined by nuclear reaction analysis and thermal desorption spectroscopy. At 800 K the D bulk concentrations and total D inventories in W-1.1TiC and W-3.3TaC were more than one order of magnitude higher compared to that in pure polycrystalline W. At 1050 K and 1250 K the D concentrations in all types of samples were very low (≤10-5 at. fr.); however the D inventories in W-1.1TiC were significantly higher compared to those in W-3.3TaC and pure W. It is suggested that D trapping inside the carbide precipitates and at their boundaries is essential at high temperatures and high incident fluxes, especially in W-1.1TiC.

  6. Carbon stocks and fluxes in the high latitudes: using site-level data to evaluate Earth system models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadburn, Sarah E.; Krinner, Gerhard; Porada, Philipp; Bartsch, Annett; Beer, Christian; Belelli Marchesini, Luca; Boike, Julia; Ekici, Altug; Elberling, Bo; Friborg, Thomas; Hugelius, Gustaf; Johansson, Margareta; Kuhry, Peter; Kutzbach, Lars; Langer, Moritz; Lund, Magnus; Parmentier, Frans-Jan W.; Peng, Shushi; Van Huissteden, Ko; Wang, Tao; Westermann, Sebastian; Zhu, Dan; Burke, Eleanor J.

    2017-11-01

    It is important that climate models can accurately simulate the terrestrial carbon cycle in the Arctic due to the large and potentially labile carbon stocks found in permafrost-affected environments, which can lead to a positive climate feedback, along with the possibility of future carbon sinks from northward expansion of vegetation under climate warming. Here we evaluate the simulation of tundra carbon stocks and fluxes in three land surface schemes that each form part of major Earth system models (JSBACH, Germany; JULES, UK; ORCHIDEE, France). We use a site-level approach in which comprehensive, high-frequency datasets allow us to disentangle the importance of different processes. The models have improved physical permafrost processes and there is a reasonable correspondence between the simulated and measured physical variables, including soil temperature, soil moisture and snow. We show that if the models simulate the correct leaf area index (LAI), the standard C3 photosynthesis schemes produce the correct order of magnitude of carbon fluxes. Therefore, simulating the correct LAI is one of the first priorities. LAI depends quite strongly on climatic variables alone, as we see by the fact that the dynamic vegetation model can simulate most of the differences in LAI between sites, based almost entirely on climate inputs. However, we also identify an influence from nutrient limitation as the LAI becomes too large at some of the more nutrient-limited sites. We conclude that including moss as well as vascular plants is of primary importance to the carbon budget, as moss contributes a large fraction to the seasonal CO2 flux in nutrient-limited conditions. Moss photosynthetic activity can be strongly influenced by the moisture content of moss, and the carbon uptake can be significantly different from vascular plants with a similar LAI. The soil carbon stocks depend strongly on the rate of input of carbon from the vegetation to the soil, and our analysis suggests that

  7. Impact of the High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU to LEU Fuel Conversion on Cold Source Nuclear Heat Generation Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration, staff members at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducting studies to determine whether the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. As part of these ongoing studies, an assessment of the impact that the HEU to LEU fuel conversion has on the nuclear heat generation rates in regions of the HFIR cold source system and its moderator vessel was performed and is documented in this report. Silicon production rates in the cold source aluminum regions and few-group neutron fluxes in the cold source moderator were also estimated. Neutronics calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo N-Particle code to determine the nuclear heat generation rates in regions of the HFIR cold source and its vessel for the HEU core operating at a full reactor power (FP) of 85 MW(t) and the reference LEU core operating at an FP of 100 MW(t). Calculations were performed with beginning-of-cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) conditions to bound typical irradiation conditions. Average specific BOC heat generation rates of 12.76 and 12.92 W/g, respectively, were calculated for the hemispherical region of the cold source liquid hydrogen (LH2) for the HEU and LEU cores, and EOC heat generation rates of 13.25 and 12.86 W/g, respectively, were calculated for the HEU and LEU cores. Thus, the greatest heat generation rates were calculated for the EOC HEU core, and it is concluded that the conversion from HEU to LEU fuel and the resulting increase of FP from 85 MW to 100 MW will not impact the ability of the heat removal equipment to remove the heat deposited in the cold source system. Silicon production rates in the cold source aluminum regions are estimated to be about 12.0% greater at BOC and 2.7% greater at EOC for the LEU core in comparison to the HEU core. Silicon is aluminum s major transmutation product and

  8. A large Streamer Chamber muon tracking detector in a high-flux fixed-target application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D.; Adeva, B.; Arik, E.; Arvidson, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballintijn, M.K.; Bardin, G.; Baum, G.; Berglund, P.; Betev, L.; Bird, I.G.; Birsa, R.; Bjoerkholm, P.; Bonner, B.E.; Botton, N. de; Boutemeur, M.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Bueltmann, S.; Burtin, E.; Cavata, C.; Crabb, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Cuhadar, T.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dantzig, R. van; Derro, B.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Dulya, C.; Dyring, A.; Eichblatt, S.; Faivre, J.C.; Fasching, D.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandez, C.; Forthmann, S.; Frois, B.; Gallas, A.; Garabatos, C.; Garzon, J.A.; Gaussiran, T.; Gilly, H.; Giorgi, M.; Goeler, E. von; Goertz, S.; Golutvin, I.A.; Gomez-Tato, A.; Gracia, G.; Groot, N. de; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Guelmez, E.; Haft, K.; Harrach, D. von; Hasegawa, T.; Hautle, P.; Hayashi, N.; Heusch, C.A.; Horikawa, N.; Hughes, V.W.; Igo, G.; Ishimoto, S.; Iwata, T.; Kabuss, E.M.; Kageya, T.; Karev, A.; Kessler, H.J.; Ketel, T.J.; Kiryluk, J.; Kiryushin, Iu.; Kishi, A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klostermann, L.; Kraemer, D.; Kroeger, W.; Kurek, K.; Kyynaeraeinen, J.; Lamanna, M.; Landgraf, U.; Lau, K.; Layda, T.; Le Goff, J.M.; Lehar, F.; Lesquen, A. de; Lichtenstadt, J.; Lindqvist, T.; Litmaath, M.; Lowe, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Marie, F.; Martin, A.; Martino, J.; Matsuda, T.; Mayes, B.; McCarthy, J.S.; Medved, K.; Meyer, W.; Middelkoop, G. van; Miller, D.; Miyachi, Y.; Mori, K.; Moromisato, J.; Nassalski, J.; Naumann, L.; Niinikoski, T.O.; Oberski, J.E.J.; Ogawa, A.; Ozben, C.; Parks, D.P.; Pereira, H.; Penzo, A.; Perrot-Kunne, F.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piegaia, R.; Pinsky, L. E-mail: pinky@uh.edu; Platchkov, S.; Plo, M.; Pose, D.; Postma, H.; Pretz, J.; Pussieux, T.; Pyrlik, J.; Raaedel, G.; Reyhancan, I.; Reicherz, G.; Rijllart, A.; Roberts, J.B.; Rock, S.; Rodriguez, M.; Rondio, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Rosado, A.; Roscherr, B.; Sabo, I.; Saborido, J.; Sandacz, A.; Sanders, D.; Savin, I.; Schiavon, P.; Schiller, A.; Schueler, K.P.; Segel, R.; Seitz, R.; Semertzidis, Y. [and others

    1999-10-11

    Arrays of limited streamer tubes of the Iarocci type were deployed in our experiment at CERN as part of a forward muon detector system with provisions for the beam to pass through the center of each panel in the array. A total of 16 4 mx4 m panels were assembled with inductive readout strips on both sides of each panel. An active feedback system was deployed to regulate the high voltage to the streamer tubes to insure a constant efficiency for minimum ionizing particles. The arrays were operated in this environment for over five years of data taking. Streamer tube track-reconstruction efficiencies and tube replacement rates are reported. (author)

  9. High-fat feeding inhibits exercise-induced increase in mitochondrial respiratory flux in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbro, Mette; Boushel, Robert Christopher; Hansen, Christina Neigaard

    2011-01-01

    ) and intramyocellular triacylglycerol content did not change with the intervention in either group. Indexes of mitochondrial density were similar across the groups and intervention. Mitochondrial respiratory rates, measured in permeabilized muscle fibers, showed a 31 ± 11 and 26 ± 9% exercise-induced increase (P ... and in exercise-induced mitochondrial substrate oxidation rates, with the effects being present hours after the exercise. The effect of HFD is present even without effects on insulin sensitivity and intramyocellular lipid accumulation. An isocaloric high-fat diet does not cause insulin resistance....

  10. How unequal fluxes of high energy astrophysical neutrinos and antineutrinos can fake new physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunokawa, Hiroshi [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, C.P. 38071, 22452-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Panes, Boris; Funchal, Renata Zukanovich [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, C.P. 66.318, 05315-970 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-10-21

    Flavor ratios of very high energy astrophysical neutrinos, which can be studied at the Earth by a neutrino telescope such as IceCube, can serve to diagnose their production mechanism at the astrophysical source. The flavor ratios for neutrinos and antineutrinos can be quite different as we do not know how they are produced in the astrophysical environment. Due to this uncertainty the neutrino and antineutrino flavor ratios at the Earth also could be quite different. Nonetheless, it is generally assumed that flavor ratios for neutrinos and antineutrinos are the same at the Earth, in fitting the high energy astrophysical neutrino data. This is a reasonable assumption for the limited statistics for the data we currently have. However, in the future the fit must be performed allowing for a possible discrepancy in these two fractions in order to be able to disentangle different production mechanisms at the source from new physics in the neutrino sector. To reinforce this issue, in this work we show that a wrong assumption about the distribution of neutrino flavor ratios at the Earth may indeed lead to misleading interpretations of IceCube results.

  11. Characterization and damaging law of CFC for high heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevet, G., E-mail: gaelle.chevet@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Martin, E., E-mail: martin@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Boscary, J., E-mail: jean.boscary@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Camus, G., E-mail: camus@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Herb, V., E-mail: herb@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Schlosser, J., E-mail: jacques.schlosser@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Escourbiac, F., E-mail: frederic.escourbiac@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Missirlian, M., E-mail: marc.missirlian@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2011-10-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (CFC) Sepcarb N11 has been used in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak (Cadarache, France) as armour material for the plasma facing components. For the fabrication of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) divertor (Greifswald, Germany), the NB31 material was chosen. For the fabrication of the ITER divertor, two potential CFC candidates are the NB31 and NB41 materials. In the case of Tore Supra, defects such as microcracks or debonding were found at the interface between CFC tile and copper heat sink. A mechanical characterization of the behaviour of N11 and NB31 was undertaken, allowing the identification of a damage model and finite element calculations both for flat tiles (TS and W7-X) and monoblock (ITER) armours. The mechanical responses of these CFC materials were found almost linear under on-axis tensile tests but highly nonlinear under shear tests or off-axis tensile tests. As a consequence, damage develops within the high shear-stress zones.

  12. Can we distinguish autotrophic respiration from heterotrophic respiration in a field site using high temporal resolution CO2 flux measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, Beatrice; Berger, Sina; Praetzel, Leandra; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The processes behind C-cycling in peatlands are important to understand for assessing the vulnerability of peatlands as carbon sinks under changing climate conditions. Especially boreal peatlands are likely to underlie strong alterations in the future. It is expected that C-pools that are directly influenced by vegetation and water table fluctuations can be easily destabilized. The CO2 efflux through respiration underlies autotrophic and heterotrophic processes that show different feedbacks on changing environmental conditions. In order to understand the respiration fluxes better for more accurate modelling and prognoses, the determination of the relative importance of different respiration sources is necessary. Earlier studies used e.g. exfoliation experiments, incubation experiments or modelling approaches to estimate the different respiration sources for the total ecosystem respiration (Reco). To further the understanding in this topic, I want to distinguish autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration using high temporal resolution measurements. The study site was selected along a hydrological gradient in a peatland in southern Ontario (Canada) and measurements were conducted from May to September 2015 once per month. Environmental controls (water table, soil temperature and soil moisture) that effect the respiration sources were recorded. In my study I used a Li-COR 6400XT and a Los Gatos greenhouse gas analyzer (GGA). Reco was determined by chamber flux measurements with the GGA, while simultaneously CO2 respiration measurements on different vegetation compartments like roots, leaves and mosses were conducted using the Li-COR 6400XT. The difference between Reco and autotrophic respiration equals heterotrophic respiration. After the measurements, the vegetation plots were harvested and separated for all compartments (leaves, roots, mosses, soil organic matter), dried and weighed. The weighted respiration rates from all vegetation compartments sum up to

  13. Fine-scale community structure analysis of ANME in Nyegga sediments with high and low methane flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eRoalkvam

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To obtain knowledge on how regional variations in methane seepage rates influence the stratification, abundance and diversity of anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME we analyzed the vertical microbial stratification in a gravity core from a methane micro-seeping area at Nyegga by using 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene tagged amplicons and quantitative PCR. The results were compared with previously obtained data from the more active G11 pockmark, characterized by higher methane flux. A downcore stratification and high relative abundance of ANME was observed in both cores, with transition from an ANME-2a/b dominated community in low-sulfide and low-methane horizons to ANME-1 dominance in horizons near the sulfate methane transition zone (SMTZ. The stratification was over a wider spatial region and at greater depth in the core with lower methane flux, and the total 16S rRNA copy numbers were two orders of magnitude lower than in the sediments at G11 pockmark. A fine-scale view into the ANME communities at each location was achieved through OTU clustering of ANME-affiliated sequences. The majority of ANME-1 sequences from both sampling sites clustered within one OTU, while ANME-2a/b sequences were represented in unique OTUs. We suggest that free living ANME-1 is the most abundant taxon in Nyegga cold seeps, and also the main consumer of methane. The specific ANME-2a/b ecotypes could reflect adaptations to the geochemical composition at each location, with different affinities to methane. Given that the ANME-2a/b population could be sustained in less active seepage areas, this subgroup could be potential seed populations in newly developed methane-enriched environments.

  14. Striving Toward Energy Sustainability: How Plants Will Play a Role in Our Future (453rd Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrieri, Richard A. (Ph.D., Medical Department)

    2009-10-28

    Edible biomass includes sugars from sugar cane or sugar beets, starches from corn kernels or other grains, and vegetable oils. The fibrous, woody and generally inedible portions of plants contain cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, three key cell-wall components that make up roughly 70 percent of total plant biomass. At present, starch can readily be degraded from corn grain into glucose sugar, which is then fermented into ethanol, and an acre of corn can yield roughly 400 gallons of ethanol. In tapping into the food supply to solve the energy crisis, however, corn and other crops have become more expensive as food. One solution lies in breaking down other structural tissues of plants, including the stalks and leaves of corn, grasses and trees. However, the complex carbohydrates in cellulose-containing biomass are more difficult to break down and convert to ethanol. So researchers are trying to engineer plants having optimal sugars for maximizing fuel yield. This is a challenge because only a handful of enzymes associated with the more than 1,000 genes responsible for cell-wall synthesis have had their roles in controlling plant metabolism defined. As Richard Ferrieri, Ph.D., a leader of a biofuel research initiative within the Medical Department, will discuss during the 453rd Brookhaven Lecture, he and his colleagues use short-lived radioisotopes, positron emission tomography and biomarkers that they have developed to perform non-invasive, real time imaging of whole plants. He will explain how the resulting metabolic flux analysis gives insight into engineering plant metabolism further.

  15. Snowpack fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide from high Arctic tundra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirk, Norbert; Tamstorf, Mikkel P.; Lund, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    the expectedgas emissions to the atmosphere, and conversely lead to snowpack gas accumulations of up to 86 ppm CH4and 3800 ppm CO2by late winter. CH4to C O2ratios indicated distinctly different source characteristicsin the rampart of ice-wedge polygons compared to elsewhere on the measured transect, possibly due......Measurements of the land-atmosphere exchange of the greenhouse gases methane (CH4) andcarbon dioxide (CO2) in high Arctic tundra ecosystems are particularly difficult in the cold season, resultingin large uncertainty on flux magnitudes and their controlling factors during this long, frozen period...... to 2 orders of magnitude lower than growing season fluxes. Perennially, CH4fluxes resembledthe same spatial pattern, which was largely attributed to differences in soil wetness controlling substrateaccumulation and microbial activity. We found no significant gas sinks or sources inside the snowpack...

  16. Fatigue behavior of copper and selected copper alloys for high heat flux applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leedy, K.D.; Stubbins, J.F.; Singh, B.N.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-04-01

    The room temperature fatigue behavior of standard and subsize specimens was examined for five copper alloys: OFHC Cu, two CuNiBe alloys, a CuCrZr alloy, and a Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy. Fatigue tests were run in strain control to failure. In addition to establishing failure lives, the stress amplitudes were monitored as a function of numbers of accrued cycles. The results indicate that the alloys with high initial yield strengths provide the best fatigue response over the range of failure lives examined in the present study: N{sub f} = 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 6}. In fact, the fatigue performance of the best alloys is dominated by the elastic portion of the strain range, as would be expected from the correlation of performance with yield properties. The alumina strengthened alloy and the two CuNiBe alloys show the best overall performance of the group examined here.

  17. Brightness of Solar Magnetic Elements As a Function of Magnetic Flux at High Spatial Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahil, F.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the relationship between the photospheric magnetic field of small-scale magnetic elements in the quiet-Sun (QS) at disk center and the brightness at 214, 300, 313, 388, 397, and 525.02 nm. To this end, we analyzed spectropolarimetric and imaging time series acquired simultaneously by the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment magnetograph and the SuFI filter imager on board the balloon-borne observatory {{S}}{{UNRISE}} during its first science flight in 2009, with high spatial and temporal resolution. We find a clear dependence of the contrast in the near ultraviolet and the visible on the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field, B LOS, which is best described by a logarithmic model. This function effectively represents the relationship between the Ca ii H-line emission and B LOS and works better than the power-law fit adopted by previous studies. This, along with the high contrast reached at these wavelengths, will help with determining the contribution of small-scale elements in the QS to the irradiance changes for wavelengths below 388 nm. At all wavelengths, including the continuum at 525.40 nm, the intensity contrast does not decrease with increasing B LOS. This result also strongly supports the fact that {{S}}{{UNRISE}} has resolved small strong magnetic field elements in the internetwork, resulting in constant contrasts for large magnetic fields in our continuum contrast at 525.40 nm versus the B LOS scatterplot, unlike the turnover obtained in previous observational studies. This turnover is due to the intermixing of the bright magnetic features with the dark intergranular lanes surrounding them.

  18. Development of new CdZnTe detectors for room-temperature high-flux radiation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbene, Leonardo; Gerardi, Gaetano; Raso, Giuseppe; Principato, Fabio; Zambelli, Nicola; Benassi, Giacomo; Bettelli, Manuele; Zappettini, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Recently, CdZnTe (CZT) detectors have been widely proposed and developed for room-temperature X-ray spectroscopy even at high fluxes, and great efforts have been made on both the device and the crystal growth technologies. In this work, the performance of new travelling-heater-method (THM)-grown CZT detectors, recently developed at IMEM-CNR Parma, Italy, is presented. Thick planar detectors (3 mm thick) with gold electroless contacts were realised, with a planar cathode covering the detector surface (4.1 mm × 4.1 mm) and a central anode (2 mm × 2 mm) surrounded by a guard-ring electrode. The detectors, characterized by low leakage currents at room temperature (4.7 nA cm(-2) at 1000 V cm(-1)), allow good room-temperature operation even at high bias voltages (>7000 V cm(-1)). At low rates (200 counts s(-1)), the detectors exhibit an energy resolution around 4% FWHM at 59.5 keV ((241)Am source) up to 2200 V, by using commercial front-end electronics (A250F/NF charge-sensitive preamplifier, Amptek, USA; nominal equivalent noise charge of 100 electrons RMS). At high rates (1 Mcounts s(-1)), the detectors, coupled to a custom-designed digital pulse processing electronics developed at DiFC of University of Palermo (Italy), show low spectroscopic degradations: energy resolution values of 8% and 9.7% FWHM at 59.5 keV ((241)Am source) were measured, with throughputs of 0.4% and 60% at 1 Mcounts s(-1), respectively. An energy resolution of 7.7% FWHM at 122.1 keV ((57)Co source) with a throughput of 50% was obtained at 550 kcounts s(-1) (energy resolution of 3.2% at low rate). These activities are in the framework of an Italian research project on the development of energy-resolved photon-counting systems for high-flux energy-resolved X-ray imaging.

  19. KüFA safety testing of HTR fuel pebbles irradiated in the High Flux Reactor in Petten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, O., E-mail: oliver.seeger@rwth-aachen.de [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laurie, M., E-mail: mathias.laurie@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Abjani, A. El; Ejton, J.; Boudaud, D.; Freis, D.; Carbol, P.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Fütterer, M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Energy and Transport (IET), Nuclear Reactor Integrity Assessment and Knowledge Management Unit, PO Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Allelein, H.-J. [Lehrstuhl für Reaktorsicherheit und -technik an der RWTH Aachen, Kackertstraße 9, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    The Cold Finger Apparatus (KühlFinger-Apparatur—KüFA) in operation at JRC-ITU is designed to experimentally scrutinize the effects of Depressurization LOss of Forced Circulation (D-LOFC) accident scenarios on irradiated High Temperature Reactor (HTR) fuel pebbles. Up to 1600 °C, the reference maximum temperature for these accidents, high-quality German HTR fuel pebbles have already demonstrated a small fission product release. This paper discusses and compares the releases obtained from KüFA-testing the pebbles HFR-K5/3 and HFR-EU1/3, which were both irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten. We present the time-dependent fractional release of the volatile fission product {sup 137}Cs as well as the fission gas {sup 85}Kr for both pebbles. For HFR-EU1/3 the isotopes {sup 134}Cs and {sup 154}Eu as well as the shorter-lived {sup 110m}Ag have also been measured. A detailed description of the experimental setup and its accuracy is given. The data for the recently tested pebbles is discussed in the context of previous results.

  20. A persistent high-energy flux from the heart of the Milky Way: Integral's view of the Galactic center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belanger, G.; Goldwurm, A.; Renaud, M.

    2006-01-01

    Highly sensitive imaging observations of the Galactic center ( GC) at high energies with an angular resolution of order 100 is a very recent development in the field of high-energy astrophysics. The IBIS/ISGRI imager on the INTEGRAL observatory detected for the first time a hard X-ray source, IGR......-rays to the overall spectrum from this region. There is also evidence for hard emission from a region located between the central black hole and the radio arc near l similar to 0.degrees 1 along the Galactic plane and known to contain giant molecular clouds....... sigma upper limit on the flux at the electron-positron annihilation energy of 511 keV from the direction of Sgr A* is set at 1.9 x 10(-4) photons cm(-2) s(-1). Very recently, the HESS collaboration presented the detection of a source of similar to TeV gamma-rays also located within an arcminute of Sgr A...

  1. A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 × 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Toumi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric model (GELCA, comprising a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 × 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e. a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution, which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and high-resolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to

  2. Effect of pretreatment and membrane orientation on fluxes for concentration of whey with high foulants by using NH3/CO2in forward osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seker, M; Buyuksari, E; Topcu, S; Babaoglu, D S; Celebi, D; Keskinler, B; Aydiner, C

    2017-11-01

    Usage of forward osmosis membrane in FO mode, in which active and support layers of the membrane were in contact with the feed and the draw solutions respectively, provided higher initial water flux (12L/m 2 h) than the usage of membrane in PRO mode (6L/m 2 h) having opposite orientation but fluxes approached to each other after 4h during concentration of whey with NH 3 /CO 2 as draw salt. High organic and inorganic foulants of whey was considered as reason for observed result in addition to lower solute resistivity. Initial water flux (8,5L/m 2 h) was lower when pre-treatment was applied before forward osmosis process but final flux (4L/m 2 h) was equal flux of non pre-treatment. Reduction of solute resistivity or absence of hydraulic pressure can be reasons for lower initial flux. Detection of organic carbon but absence of lactose in draw solution showed passage of molecules being different than lactose into draw solution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Observing Planets and Small Bodies in Sputtered High Energy Atom (SHEA) Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milillo, A.; Orsini, S.; Hsieh, K. C.; Baragiola, R.; Fama, M.; Johnson, R.; Mura, A.; Plainaki, Ch.; Sarantos, M.; Cassidy, T. A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of the surfaces of bodies unprotected by either strong magnetic fields or thick atmospheres in the Solar System is caused by various processes, induced by photons, energetic ions and micrometeoroids. Among these processes, the continuous bombardment of the solar wind or energetic magnetospheric ions onto the bodies may significantly affect their surfaces, with implications for their evolution. Ion precipitation produces neutral atom releases into the exosphere through ion sputtering, with velocity distribution extending well above the particle escape limits. We refer to this component of the surface ejecta as sputtered high-energy atoms (SHEA). The use of ion sputtering emission for studying the interaction of exposed bodies (EB) with ion environments is described here. Remote sensing in SHEA in the vicinity of EB can provide mapping of the bodies exposed to ion sputtering action with temporal and mass resolution. This paper speculates on the possibility of performing remote sensing of exposed bodies using SHEA The evolution of the surfaces of bodies unprotected by either strong magnetic fields or thick atmospheres in the Solar System is caused by various processes, induced by photons, energetic ions and micrometeoroids. Among these processes, the continuous bombardment of the solar wind or energetic magnetospheric ions onto the bodies may significantly affect their surfaces, with implications for their evolution. Ion precipitation produces neutral atom releases into the exosphere through ion sputtering, with velocity distribution extending well above the particle escape limits. We refer to this component of the surface ejecta as sputtered high-energy atoms (SHEA). The use of ion sputtering emission for studying the interaction of exposed bodies (EB) with ion environments is described here. Remote sensing in SHEA in the vicinity of EB can provide mapping of the bodies exposed to ion sputtering action with temporal and mass resolution. This paper

  4. Organic carbon fluxes in fjords across a high-to-mid latitudinal gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, X.; Bianchi, T. S.; Jaeger, J. M.; Savage, C.; Smith, R. W.

    2016-12-01

    Over geological timescales, the net burial of biospheric OC (OCbio) and oxidation of petrogenic OC (OCpetro) are important processes influencing atmospheric CO2 levels. Coastal sediments are major depo-centers that account for as much as 90% of Holocene OC burial in the global ocean. Fjords, as a major component of coastal systems, are deep, glacially-carved estuaries located in high latitudes and are key in connecting rivers and the ocean. These systems have recently been identified as sites of enhanced organic carbon burial with surface area-normalized OC burial rates at least five times greater than other marine systems. Recent studies proposed that fjords also have an impact on atmospheric CO2 levels over glacial-interglacial time. Understanding sediment processes, sources and respective burial of different types of OC are necessary to better constrain OC burial in fjords, particularly fjords across glaciated versus non-glaciated systems across latitudinal gradients. Here, we use surface sediment samples from multiple fjords to quantify the sources and burial of OC and conduct a latitudinal comparison across a suite of fjords. A multi-proxy approach (stable isotopes, radiocarbon, lignin-phenols and lipids) allow for separation of marine and terrestrial OCbio, and OCpetro in surface sediments. Our results for SE Alaska show that surface sediments in northern fjords (north of Icy Strait) with headwater glaciers are dominated by OCpetro, in contrast to marine and terrestrially-derived fresh OC in non-glaciated southern fjords. These findings make SE Alaska potentially the largest sink of OCpetro in North America and a hotspot in burying marine OC (OCbio-mari). In contrast, sedimentary OC in fjords along Fiordland, New Zealand is dominated by vascular plants sources, with increasing OCbio-mari inputs along the inner-to-outer fjord transects. Interestingly, there is minimal OCpetro contribution to fjords in this region. We conclude that there may be a general

  5. Direct determination of highly size-resolved turbulent particle fluxes with the disjunct eddy covariance method and a 12 – stage electrical low pressure impactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schmidt

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available During summer 2007, turbulent vertical particle mass and number fluxes were measured for a period of 98 days near the city centre of Münster in north-west Germany. For this purpose, a valve controlled disjunct eddy covariance system was mounted at 65 m a.g.l. on a military radio tower. The concentration values for 11 size bins with aerodynamic diameters (D50 from 0.03 to 10 μm were measured with an electrical low pressure impactor. After comparison with other fluxes obtained from 10 Hz measurements with the classical eddy covariance method, the loss of information concerning high frequent parts of the flux could be stated as negligible. The results offer an extended insight in the turbulent atmospheric exchange of aerosol particles by highly size-resolved particle fluxes covering 11 size bins and show that the city of Münster acts as a relevant source for aerosol particles.

    Significant differences occur between the fluxes of the various particle size classes. While the total particle number flux shows a pattern which is strictly correlated to the diurnal course of the turbulence regime and the traffic intensity, the total mass flux exhibits a single minimum in the evening hours when coarse particles start to deposit.

    As a result, a mean mass deposition of about 10 mg m−2 per day was found above the urban test site, covering the aerosol size range from 40 nm to 2.0 μm. By contrast, the half-hourly total number fluxes accumulated over the lower ELPI stages range from −4.29×107 to +1.44×108 particles m−2 s−1 and are clearly dominated by the sub-micron particle fraction of the impactor stages with diameters between 40 nm and 320 nm. The averaged number fluxes of particles with diameters between 2.0 and 6.4 μm show lower turbulent dynamics during daytime and partially remarkably high negative fluxes with mean deposition velocities of 2×10−3 m

  6. Direct determination of highly size-resolved turbulent particle fluxes with the disjunct eddy covariance method and a 12 - stage electrical low pressure impactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; Klemm, O.

    2008-12-01

    During summer 2007, turbulent vertical particle mass and number fluxes were measured for a period of 98 days near the city centre of Münster in north-west Germany. For this purpose, a valve controlled disjunct eddy covariance system was mounted at 65 m a.g.l. on a military radio tower. The concentration values for 11 size bins with aerodynamic diameters (D50) from 0.03 to 10 μm were measured with an electrical low pressure impactor. After comparison with other fluxes obtained from 10 Hz measurements with the classical eddy covariance method, the loss of information concerning high frequent parts of the flux could be stated as negligible. The results offer an extended insight in the turbulent atmospheric exchange of aerosol particles by highly size-resolved particle fluxes covering 11 size bins and show that the city of Münster acts as a relevant source for aerosol particles. Significant differences occur between the fluxes of the various particle size classes. While the total particle number flux shows a pattern which is strictly correlated to the diurnal course of the turbulence regime and the traffic intensity, the total mass flux exhibits a single minimum in the evening hours when coarse particles start to deposit. As a result, a mean mass deposition of about 10 mg m-2 per day was found above the urban test site, covering the aerosol size range from 40 nm to 2.0 μm. By contrast, the half-hourly total number fluxes accumulated over the lower ELPI stages range from -4.29×107 to +1.44×108 particles m-2 s-1 and are clearly dominated by the sub-micron particle fraction of the impactor stages with diameters between 40 nm and 320 nm. The averaged number fluxes of particles with diameters between 2.0 and 6.4 μm show lower turbulent dynamics during daytime and partially remarkably high negative fluxes with mean deposition velocities of 2×10-3 m s-1 that appear temporary during noontime and in the evening hours.

  7. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENT FOR DRINKING WATER SUPPLY WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BENNETT,D.B.; PAQUETTE,D.E.; KLAUS,K.; DORSCH,W.R.

    2000-12-18

    The BNL water supply system meets all water quality standards and has sufficient pumping and storage capacity to meet current and anticipated future operational demands. Because BNL's water supply is drawn from the shallow Upper Glacial aquifer, BNL's source water is susceptible to contamination. The quality of the water supply is being protected through (1) a comprehensive program of engineered and operational controls of existing aquifer contamination and potential sources of new contamination, (2) groundwater monitoring, and (3) potable water treatment. The BNL Source Water Assessment found that the source water for BNL's Western Well Field (comprised of Supply Wells 4, 6, and 7) has relatively few threats of contamination and identified potential sources are already being carefully managed. The source water for BNL's Eastern Well Field (comprised of Supply Wells 10, 11, and 12) has a moderate number of threats to water quality, primarily from several existing volatile organic compound and tritium plumes. The g-2 Tritium Plume and portions of the Operable Unit III VOC plume fall within the delineated source water area for the Eastern Well Field. In addition, portions of the much slower migrating strontium-90 plumes associated with the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, Waste Concentration Facility and Building 650 lie within the Eastern source water area. However, the rate of travel in the aquifer for strontium-90 is about one-twentieth of that for tritium and volatile organic compounds. The Laboratory has been carefully monitoring plume migration, and has made adjustments to water supply operations. Although a number of BNL's water supply wells were impacted by VOC contamination in the late 1980s, recent routine analysis of water samples from BNL's supply wells indicate that no drinking water standards have been reached or exceeded. The high quality of the water supply strongly indicates that the operational and engineered

  8. Brookhaven highlights: a two year report, July 1974--June 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Brief summaries are given of research activities in the areas of high energy physics, basic and applied energy science, and life sciences. Support activities and administrative data are also briefly reviewed.

  9. High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurney, Kevin R.; Mendoza, Daniel L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Fischer, Marc L.; Miller, Chris C.; Geethakumar, Sarath; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-03-19

    Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of {approx}100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach.

  10. Aeronet Solar Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SolRad-Net (Solar Radiation Network) is an established network of ground-based sensors providing high-frequency solar flux measurements in quasi-realtime to the...

  11. Thermal modelling of various thermal barrier coatings in a high heat flux rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Traditional Air Plasma Sprayed (APS) ZrO2-Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC's) and Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed (LPPS) ZrO2-Y2O3/Ni-Cr-Al-Y cermet coatings were tested in a H2/O2 rocked engine. The traditional ZrO2-Y2O3 (TBC's) showed considerable metal temperature reductions during testing in the hydrogen-rich environment. A thermal model was developed to predict the thermal response of the tubes with the various coatings. Good agreement was observed between predicted temperatures and measured temperatures at the inner wall of the tube and in the metal near the coating/metal interface. The thermal model was also used to examine the effect of the differences in the reported values of the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 ceramic coatings, the effect of 100 micron (0.004 in.) thick metallic bond coat, the effect of tangential heat transfer around the tube, and the effect or radiation from the surface of the ceramic coating. It was shown that for the short duration testing in the rocket engine, the most important of these considerations was the effect of the uncertainty in the thermal conductivity of temperatures (greater than 100 C) predicted in the tube. The thermal model was also used to predict the thermal response of the coated rod in order to quantify the difference in the metal temperatures between the two substrate geometries and to explain the previously-observed increased life of coatings on rods over that on tubes. A thermal model was also developed to predict heat transfer to the leading edge of High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) blades during start-up of the space shuttle main engines. The ability of various TBC's to reduce metal temperatures during the two thermal excursions occurring on start-up was predicted. Temperature reductions of 150 to 470 C were predicted for 165 micron (0.0065 in.) coatings for the greater of the two thermal excursions.

  12. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    An engineering plant analyzer has been developed at BNL for realistically and accurately simulating transients and severe abnormal events in BWR power plants. Simulations are being carried out routinely with high fidelity, high simulation speed, at low cost and with unsurpassed user convenience. The BNL Plant Analyzer is the only operating facility which (a) simulates more than two orders-of-magnitude faster than the CDC-7600 mainframe computer, (b) is accessible and fully operational in on-line interactive mode, remotely from anywhere in the US, from Europe or the Far East (Korea), via widely available IBM-PC compatible personal computers, standard modems and telephone lines, (c) simulates both slow and rapid transients seven times faster than real-time in direct access, and four times faster in remote access modes, (d) achieves high simulation speed without compromising fidelity, and (e) is available to remote access users at the low cost of $160 per hour.

  13. Simulation of Field Dependence of Critical Current Densities of Bulk High Tc Superconducting Materials regarding Thermally Activated Flux Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh, M.; Naik, S. Pavan Kumar; Koblischka, M. R.

    2017-07-01

    In the upcoming generation, bulk high temperature superconductors (HTS) will play a crucial and a promising role in numerous industrial applications ranging from Maglev trains to magnetic resonance imaging, etc. Especially, the bulk HTS as permanent magnets are suitable due to the fact that they can trap magnetic fields being several orders of magnitude higher than those of the best hard ferromagnets. The bulk HTS LREBa2Cu3O7-δ (LREBCO or LRE-123, LRE: Y, Gd, etc.,) materials could obtain very powerful compact superconducting super-magnets, which can be operated at the cheaper liquid nitrogen temperature or below due to higher critical temperatures (i.e., ∼90 K). As a result, the new advanced technology can be utilized in a more attractive manner for a variety of technological and medical applications which have the capacity to revolutionize the field. An understanding of the magnetic field dependence of the critical current density (J c(H)) is important to develop better adapted materials. To achieve this goal, a variety of Jc (H) behaviours of bulk LREBCO samples were modelled regarding thermally activated flux motion. In essence, the Jc (H) curves follows a certain criterion where an exponential model is applied. However, to fit the complete Jc (H) curve of the LRE-123 samples an unique model is necessary to explain the behavior at low and high fields. The modelling of the various superconducting materials could be understood in terms of the pinning mechanisms.

  14. MAGIC upper limits to the VHE gamma-ray flux of 3C 454.3 in high emission state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderhub, H.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Baixeras, C.; Balestra, S.; Barrio, J. A.; Bartko, H.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Becker, J. K.; Bednarek, W.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Bock, R. K.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Bretz, T.; Britvitch, I.; Camara, M.; Carmona, E.; Commichau, S.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Costado, M. T.; Covino, S.; Curtef, V.; Dazzi, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Cea Del Pozo, E.; de Los Reyes, R.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, M.; de Sabata, F.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Dominguez, A.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Errando, M.; Ferenc, D.; Fernández, E.; Firpo, R.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Galante, N.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Goebel, F.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Herrero, A.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hsu, C. C.; Huber, S.; Jogler, T.; Kranich, D.; La Barbera, A.; Laille, A.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Meyer, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moldón, J.; Moles, M.; Moralejo, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Ninkovic, J.; Otte, N.; Oya, I.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Pasanen, M.; Pascoli, D.; Pauss, F.; Pegna, R. G.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Prada, F.; Prandini, E.; Puchades, N.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rissi, M.; Robert, A.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Sanchez-Conde, M.; Sartori, P.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shore, S. N.; Sidro, N.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamerra, A.; Stark, L. S.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tluczykont, M.; Torres, D. F.; Turini, N.; Vankov, H.; Venturini, A.; Vitale, V.; Wagner, R. M.; Wittek, W.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; Zapatero, J.; Vercellone, S.; Donnarumma, I.; D'Ammando, F.; Tavani, M.

    2009-04-01

    Aims: We report upper limits to the very high energy flux (E>100 GeV) of the flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 454.3 (z=0.859) derived by the Cherenkov telescope MAGIC during the high states of July/August and November/December 2007. We compare the upper limits derived in both time slots with the available quasi-simultaneous MeV-GeV data from the AGILE γ-ray satellite and interpret the observational results in the context of leptonic emission models. Methods: The source was observed with the MAGIC telescope during the active phases of July-August 2007 and November-December 2007 and the data were analyzed with the MAGIC standard analysis tools. For the periods around the ends of July and November, characterized by the most complete multifrequency coverage, we constructed the spectral energy distributions using our data together with nearly simultaneous multifrequency (optical, UV, X-ray and GeV) data. Results: Only upper limits can be derived from the MAGIC data. The upper limits, once corrected for the expected absorption by the extragalactic background light, together with nearly simultaneous multifrequency data, allow us to constrain the spectral energy distribution of 3C 454.3. The data are consistent with the model expectations based on inverse Compton scattering of the ambient photons from the broad line region by relativistic electrons, which robustly predicts a sharp cut-off above 20-30 GeV.

  15. Pressure enhancement associated with meridional flow in high-speed solar wind: possible evidence for an interplanetary magnetic flux rope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-Y. Tu

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available A sizable total-pressure (magnetic pressure plus kinetic pressure enhancement was found within the high-speed wind stream observed by Helios 2 in 1976 near 0.3 AU. The proton density and temperature and the magnetic magnitude simultaneously increased for about 6 h. This pressure rise was associated with a comparatively large southward flow velocity component (with Vz ≈ –100 km · s–1 and magnetic-field rotation. The pressure enhancement was associated with unusual features in the electron distribution function. It shows a wide angular distribution of electron counting rates in the low-energy (57.8 eV channel, while previous to the enhancement it exhibits a wide angular distribution of electron count rate in the high-energy (112, 221 and 309 eV channels, perhaps indicating the mirroring of electrons in the converging field lines of the background magnetic field. These fluid and kinetic phenomena may be explained as resulting from an interplanetary magnetic flux rope which is not fully convected by the flow but moves against the background wind towards the Sun.

  16. Results of high heat flux tests of tungsten divertor targets under plasma heat loads expected in ITER and tokamaks (review)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budaev, V. P., E-mail: budaev@mail.ru [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    Heat loads on the tungsten divertor targets in the ITER and the tokamak power reactors reach ~10MW m{sup −2} in the steady state of DT discharges, increasing to ~0.6–3.5 GW m{sup −2} under disruptions and ELMs. The results of high heat flux tests (HHFTs) of tungsten under such transient plasma heat loads are reviewed in the paper. The main attention is paid to description of the surface microstructure, recrystallization, and the morphology of the cracks on the target. Effects of melting, cracking of tungsten, drop erosion of the surface, and formation of corrugated and porous layers are observed. Production of submicron-sized tungsten dust and the effects of the inhomogeneous surface of tungsten on the plasma–wall interaction are discussed. In conclusion, the necessity of further HHFTs and investigations of the durability of tungsten under high pulsed plasma loads on the ITER divertor plates, including disruptions and ELMs, is stressed.

  17. Electron heat flux instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Lazar, M.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-02-01

    The heat flux instability is an electromagnetic mode excited by a relative drift between the protons and two-component core-halo electrons. The most prominent application may be in association with the solar wind where drifting electron velocity distributions are observed. The heat flux instability is somewhat analogous to the electrostatic Buneman or ion-acoustic instability driven by the net drift between the protons and bulk electrons, except that the heat flux instability operates in magnetized plasmas and possesses transverse electromagnetic polarization. The heat flux instability is also distinct from the electrostatic counterpart in that it requires two electron species with relative drifts with each other. In the literature, the heat flux instability is often called the 'whistler' heat flux instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. This paper elucidates all of these fundamental plasma physical properties associated with the heat flux instability starting from a simple model, and gradually building up more complexity towards a solar wind-like distribution functions. It is found that the essential properties of the instability are already present in the cold counter-streaming electron model, and that the instability is absent if the protons are ignored. These instability characteristics are highly reminiscent of the electron firehose instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy, propagating in parallel direction with respect to the ambient magnetic field, except that the free energy source for the heat flux instability resides in the effective parallel pressure provided by the counter-streaming electrons.

  18. Methane Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Methane (CH4) flux is the net rate of methane exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS LandCarbon project...

  19. Experimental results and a self-consistent model of evaporation and high heat flux extraction by evaporating flow in a micro-grooved blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monazami, Reza; Saadat, Mehdi; Zhu, Jianzhong; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2015-11-01

    The problem of evaporation from a vertical micro-grooved blade heated from above is investigated. The required superheat to handle the incoming flux is calculated using the results of the study by Monazami and Haj-Hariri (2012). The relation between the applied heat flux, dry-out length and the maximum equilibrium temperature for several geometries and working fluids are studied. Furthermore, a computational study of the evaporating meniscus is conducted to evaluate the evaporation rates and dissipated heat flux at the liquid-vapor interface. The computational study accounts for the flow and heat transfer in both liquid and vapor phases. The results of this study indicate that the micro-grooved structure can dissipate heat fluxes as high as 10MW/m2 for superheats as low as 5 degrees Kelvin. Experiments are conducted to verify the computational and analytical results. The findings of this work are applicable to the design of thermal management systems for high heat flux applications. Partially supported by the MAXNET Energy Partnership (Max Planck Institute and UVA).

  20. Building Magnets at Brookhaven National Laboratory: A Condensed Account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willen, Erich

    2017-09-01

    The development of superconducting wire and cable in the late twentieth century enabled high-field magnets and thus much higher beam-collision energies in accelerators. These higher collision energies have allowed experimentalists to probe further into the structure of matter at the most fundamental, subatomic level. The behavior of the early universe, where these high energies prevailed, and its evolution over time are the realm their experiments seek to investigate. The subject has aroused the curiosity of the public as well as scientists and has facilitated the support needed to build and operate such expensive machines and experiments. The path forward has not been easy, however. Success in most projects has been mixed with failure, progress with ineptitude. The building of high energy accelerators is mostly a story of capable people doing their best to develop new and unusual technology toward some defined goal, facing both success and failure along the way. It is also a story of administrative imperatives that had unpredictable effects on a project's success, depending mostly on the people in the administrative roles and the decisions that they made.